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Sample records for waste regulatory structure

  1. Improvements to the DOE low-level waste regulatory structure and process under recommendation 94-2 - progress to date

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regnier, E.

    1995-01-01

    Among the concerns expressed by the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) in its Recommendation 94-2 was the lack of a clearly defined and effective internal Department of Energy (DOE) regulatory oversight and enforcement process for ensuring that low-level radioactive waste management health, safety, and environmental requirements are met. Therefore, part of the response to the DNFSB concern is a task to clarify and strengthen the low-level waste management regulatory structure. This task is being conducted in two steps. First, consistent with the requirements of the current DOE waste management order and within the framework of the current organizational structure, interim clarification of a review process and the associated organizational responsibilities has been issued. Second, in coordination with the revision of the waste management order and consistent with the organizational responsibilities resulting from the strategic alignment of DOE, a rigorous, more independent regulatory oversight structure will be developed

  2. Improvements to the DOE low-level waste regulatory structure and process under recommendation 94-2 - progress to date

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regnier, E.

    1995-12-31

    Among the concerns expressed by the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) in its Recommendation 94-2 was the lack of a clearly defined and effective internal Department of Energy (DOE) regulatory oversight and enforcement process for ensuring that low-level radioactive waste management health, safety, and environmental requirements are met. Therefore, part of the response to the DNFSB concern is a task to clarify and strengthen the low-level waste management regulatory structure. This task is being conducted in two steps. First, consistent with the requirements of the current DOE waste management order and within the framework of the current organizational structure, interim clarification of a review process and the associated organizational responsibilities has been issued. Second, in coordination with the revision of the waste management order and consistent with the organizational responsibilities resulting from the strategic alignment of DOE, a rigorous, more independent regulatory oversight structure will be developed.

  3. Structural radioactive waste from 'retubing/refurbishment' of Embalse nuclear power plant. Regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Daniela E.; Lee Gonzales, Horacio M.; Medici, Marcela A.; Piumetti, Elsa H.

    2009-01-01

    Unlike the building of a new nuclear reactor, the 'retubing / refurbishment' of nuclear reactors that have been in operation for many years, involves the replacement of components in a radioactive environment. This requires a carefully planned radiation protection program to ensure protection of workers, the public and the environment as well as a radioactive waste management program for those radioactive waste generated during the process, which go beyond those generated during the normal operation and maintenance of the plant. Nucleoelectrica Argentina Sociedad Anonima (NA-SA) is scheduled to conduct the Life Extension Process of Embalse Nuclear Power Plant (CNE) which essentially consist of 'retubing / refurbishment' of the installation. The Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) will then have an important activity related to the above process. In particular, this paper will describe some points of interest related to the generation and management of radioactive waste during the 'retubing / refurbishment' of the CNE, from the regulatory point of view. (author)

  4. Regulatory aspects of mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, R.R.; Orlando, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    Mixed waste is waste that satisfies the definition of low-level radioactive waste in the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA) and contains hazardous waste that is either: (1) listed as a hazardous waste in 40 CFR 261, Subpart D; or (2) causes the waste to exhibit any of the characteristics identified in 40 CFR 261, Subpart C. Low-level radioactive waste is defined in the LLRWPAA as radioactive material that is not high level waste, spent nuclear fuel, or byproduct material, as defined in Section 11e(2) of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, and is classified as low-level waste by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This paper discusses dual regulatory (NRC and Environmental Protection Agency) responsibility, overview of joint NRC/EPA guidance, workshops, national mixed waste survey, and principal mixed waste uncertainties

  5. Radioactive waste below regulatory concern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuder, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published two notices in the Federal Register concerning radioactive waste below regulatory concern. The first, a Commission Policy Statement and Implementation Plan published August 29, 1986, concerns petition to exempt specific radioactive waste streams from the regulations. The second, an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking published Decemger 2, 1986, addresses the concept of generic rulemaking by the NRC on radioactive wastes that are below regulatory concern. Radioactive waste determined to be below regulatory concern would not be subject to regulatory control and would not need to go to a licensed low-level radioactive waste disposal site. The Policy Statement and Implementation Plan describe (1) the information a petitioner should file in support of a petition to exempt a specific waste stream, (2) the decision criteria the Commission intends to use for judging the petition, and (3) the internal administrative procedures to use be followed in order to permit the Commission to act upon the petition in an expedited manner

  6. Radioactive waste management regulatory framework in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barcenas, M.; Mejia, M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the current regulatory framework concerning the radioactive waste management in Mexico. It is intended to show regulatory historical antecedents, the legal responsibilities assigned to institutions involved in the radioactive waste management, the sources of radioactive waste, and the development and preparation of national standards for fulfilling the legal framework for low level radioactive waste. It is at present the most important matter to be resolved. (author)

  7. The regulatory function in radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, A.; Pescatore, C.

    2008-01-01

    Allan Duncan, expert to NEA and former Chief Inspector for Pollution (United Kingdom), elaborated on the regulatory function in the domain of radioactive waste management. The preparation of a document and a brochure on the subject has been one of the main tasks of the Regulators' Forum since its creation in 2001. He stressed that management of NORM waste was generally subject to different standards than similar radioactive waste from a nuclear source, for no obvious reason than that of public perception. He also pointed out the large number of 'regulatory bodies' involved in the regulation of radioactive waste management facilities and particularly geological disposal facilities, and their links to the Government. He gave the example of the United Kingdom. He stressed the fact that, since there will not be continuous control, licensing of geological disposal is an act of trust in the regulatory system. A. Duncan gave the position of two Commissions in England on deep geological disposal. The UK Sustainable Development Commission says, 'it is impossible to guarantee safety over long-term disposal of (nuclear) waste' which implies that nuclear fission power should be shut down; CoRWM, the Committee on Radioactive Waste Management, recommends instead geological disposal for existing wastes as a broadly acceptable solution. As a concluding remark A. Duncan focused the attention on the general question of what current society needs to do in order to meet its obligations to future generations with respect to disposal of long-lived wastes. (authors)

  8. DOE regulatory reform initiative vitrified mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, S.J.; Holtzscheiter, E.W.

    1997-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is charged with responsibly managing the largest volume of mixed waste in the United States. This responsibility includes managing waste in compliance with all applicable Federal and State laws and regulations, and in a cost-effective, environmentally responsible manner. Managing certain treated mixed wastes in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage and disposal units (specifically those mixed wastes that pose low risks from the hazardous component) is unlikely to provide additional protection to human health and the environment beyond that afforded by managing these wastes in storage and disposal units subject to requirements for radiological control. In October, 1995, the DOE submitted a regulatory reform proposal to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) relating to vitrified mixed waste forms. The technical proposal supports a regulatory strategy that would allow vitrified mixed waste forms treated through a permit or other environmental compliance mechanism to be granted an exemption from RCRA hazardous waste regulation, after treatment, based upon the inherent destruction and immobilization capabilities of vitrification technology. The vitrified waste form will meet, or exceed the performance criteria of the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass that has been accepted as an international standard for immobilizing radioactive waste components and the LDR treatment standards for inorganics and metals for controlling hazardous constituents. The proposal further provides that vitrified mixed waste would be responsibly managed under the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) while reducing overall costs. Full regulatory authority by the EPA or a State would be maintained until an acceptable vitrified mixed waste form, protective of human health and the environment, is produced

  9. A waste package strategy for regulatory compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, D.; Cloninger, M.O.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the strategy given in the Site Characterization Plan for demonstrating compliance with the post closure performance objectives for the waste package and the Engineered Barrier System contained in the Code of Federal Regulations. The strategy consists of the development of a conservative waste package design that will meet the regulatory requirements with sufficient margin for uncertainty using a multi-barrier approach that takes advantage of the unsaturated nature of the Yucca Mountain site. 7 refs., 1 fig

  10. Legal and Regulatory Frameworks for Decommissioning and Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leech, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Safe and efficient decommissioning and waste management requires clear structures for allocating responsibility and funding. Organisation of decommissioning and waste management activities and the regulatory environment within which those activities are undertaken should also allow the supply chain to prosper and, wherever possible, reduce barriers to international availability of resources and waste facilities. Radioactive waste treatment and disposal in particular raises both legal and political challenges to effective international co-operation, yet options for decommissioning and waste management are maximised where international barriers can be minimised. Added to this, international nuclear liabilities issues must be managed so as to avoid unnecessary deterrents to international mobility of capability within the decommissioning market. Contractual terms and insurance arrangements for international shipments of nuclear waste and materials will also need to take into account imminent changes to liabilities conventions, ensuring compliance and management of compliance costs (of both insurance and management time). This paper explores legal and commercial structures intended to support effective decommissioning and waste management and examines regulatory and commercial factors affecting the ability of facility operators to utilise internationally available capability. It focusses on: - strategic approaches developed in the UK to address decommissioning and waste management liabilities associated with the UK's first and second generation civil nuclear sites and comparison of those approaches with other jurisdictions with significant decommissioning liabilities; - liability and compliance risks associated with navigating international nuclear liabilities regimes in context of both mobility of decommissioning capability and international waste shipment; and - regulatory issues affecting international availability of waste treatment facilities, including

  11. Regulatory framework for the management of radioactive wastes in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amato, E.; Siraky, G.; Petraitis, E.; Novo, R.

    2000-01-01

    The legal and regulatory framework within which the radioactive waste management is carried out in Argentina are exposed. The activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) in relation to facility inspections, safety assessments and collaboration with international agencies in the matter are also presented. Further, the regulatory criteria applied to waste management are reported. (author)

  12. Regulatory barriers to hazardous waste technology innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuusinen, T.L.; Siegel, M.R.

    1991-02-01

    The primary federal regulatory programs that influence the development of new technology for hazardous waste are the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA, also commonly known as Superfund). Two important aspects of RCRA that can create barriers to hazardous waste technology innovation are technology-based waste pre-treatment standards and a cumbersome permitting program. By choosing a technology-based approach to the RCRA land disposal restrictions program, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has simultaneously created tremendous demand for the technologies specified in its regulations, while at the same time significantly reduced incentives for technology innovation that might have otherwise existed. Also, the RCRA hazardous waste permitting process can take years and cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. The natural tendency of permit writers to be cautious of unproven (i.e., innovative) technology also can create a barrier to deployment of new technologies. EPA has created several permitting innovations, however, to attempt to mitigate this latter barrier. Understanding the constraints of these permitting innovations can be important to the success of hazardous waste technology development programs. 3 refs

  13. In situ vitrification of mixed wastes: Progress and regulatory status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindle, C.H.; Barich, J.J. III

    1991-08-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) technology targets mixed wastes in in situ near-surface environments. Federal laws governing toxic substances (TSCA), hazardous waste (RCRA), and abandoned sites (Superfund) create the need for remediation technology and define the required performance characteristics. The need for ISV depends, in part, on the extent of regulation and how well ISV's demonstrated performance characteristics match up with regulatory criteria. The regulatory requirements are easier to identify and meet in short-duration site- and situation-specific applications of the technology than they are simpler in long-term, generalized applications. ISV's ability to treat both inorganics and organics in a single process supports applications for mixed, hazardous, and radioactive sites of moderate depth (20 ft). The durability of the ISV waste form is a major advantage of the technology when demonstrating permanence of a waste management strategy. Achieving depth and vapor containment assurance are issues being addressed as the ISV process is refined for new applications having different processing concerns. Refinements include moveable electrodes and sheet steel as the material for the containment structure. 16 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  14. Regulatory criteria for final disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petraitis, E.; Ciallella, N.; Siraky, G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes briefly the legislative and regulatory framework in which the final disposal of radioactive wastes is carried out in Argentina. It also presents the criteria developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) to assess the long-term safety of final disposal systems for high level radioactive wastes. (author)

  15. Regulatory Support of Treatment of Savannah River Site Purex Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, L.T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the support given by federal and state regulatory agencies to Savannah River Site (SRS) during the treatment of an organic liquid mixed waste from the Plutonium Extraction (Purex) process. The support from these agencies allowed (SRS) to overcome several technical and regulatory barriers and treat the Purex waste such that it met LDR treatment standards. (authors)

  16. 40 CFR 92.6 - Regulatory structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regulatory structure. 92.6 Section 92... Regulations for Locomotives and Locomotive Engines § 92.6 Regulatory structure. This section provides an overview of the regulatory structure of this part. (a) The regulations of this part 92 are intended to...

  17. 40 CFR 94.6 - Regulatory structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regulatory structure. 94.6 Section 94... for Compression-Ignition Marine Engines § 94.6 Regulatory structure. This section provides an overview of the regulatory structure of this part. (a) The regulations of this Part 94 are intended to control...

  18. Advancing towards commonsense regulation of mixed waste: Regulatory update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, C.L.

    1996-01-01

    The author previously presented the basis for regulating mixed waste according to the primary hazard (either chemical or radiological) in order to avoid the inefficient practice of open-quotes dual regulationclose quotes of mixed waste. In addition to covering the technical basis, recommendations were made on how to capitalize upon a window of opportunity for implementation of a open-quotes primary hazards approachclose quotes. Some of those recommendations have been pursued and the resulting advances on the regulatory front are exciting. This paper chronicles those pursuits, presents in capsule form the massive amount of data assembled, and summarizes the changing regulatory framework. The data supports the premise that disposal of stabilized mixed waste in a low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility is protective of human health and the environment. Based on that premise, proposed regulatory changes, if finalized, will eliminate much of the open-quotes dual regulationclose quotes of mixed waste

  19. Regulatory criteria for the disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagstaff, K.P.

    1986-09-01

    Radiological protection criteria have been proposed by the Atomic Energy Control Board for judging the potential long-term impacts of radioactive waste disposal options in which the wastes are contained and isolated from the human environment. This paper reviews the proposed criteria and the regulatory guidelines for their application in performance assessments, taking note of the public comments received to-date

  20. The waste isolation pilot plant regulatory compliance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mewhinney, J.A.; Kehrman, R.F.

    1996-01-01

    The passage of the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act of 1992 (LWA) marked a turning point for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) program. It established a Congressional mandate to open the WIPP in as short a time as possible, thereby initiating the process of addressing this nation's transuranic (TRU) waste problem. The DOE responded to the LWA by shifting the priority at the WIPP from scientific investigations to regulatory compliance and the completion of prerequisites for the initiation of operations. Regulatory compliance activities have taken four main focuses: (1) preparing regulatory submittals; (2) aggressive schedules; (3) regulator interface; and (4) public interactions

  1. Regulatory control, nuclear safety regulation and waste management in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.

    2000-01-01

    This article presents the challenges that faces the spanish regulatory authority. The deregulation of electricity industry imposes severe changes in nuclear power economics and forces nuclear power to compete with other sources of electricity. A pressure is perceived for regulatory effectiveness primarily since the cost of regulation is a component of the cost of the product. This effectiveness gain in regulatory control will be reached through systematic strategic analysis, formulation and implementation. The regulatory aspects of plant life extension and of waste management are examined

  2. Exemption from regulatory control of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The guide specifies the principles and criteria for the exemption of the low-level radioactive wastes for disposal, reuse or recycle. The basic radiation protection criteria are consistent with those given in the IAEA Safety Series No. 89. The guide allows two options for exemption: unrestricted or restricted. Unrestricted exemption is possible if the waste meets fairly strict activity levels. In case of restricted exemption, the receiver and further treatment of disposal of waste must be adequately specified and the compliance with radiation protection criteria must be analyzed. Some guidance on the methods for monitoring the activity in waste is also given. (5 refs.)

  3. 5 CFR 880.102 - Regulatory structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Regulatory structure. 880.102 Section 880.102 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS... Regulatory structure. (a) This part contains the following subparts: (1) Subpart A contains general...

  4. 5 CFR 847.102 - Regulatory structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Regulatory structure. 847.102 Section 847.102 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS... INSTRUMENTALITIES General Provisions § 847.102 Regulatory structure. (a)(1) Subpart A of this part contains...

  5. WIPP Waste Characterization: Implementing Regulatory Requirements in the Real World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper Wayman, J.D.; Goldstein, J.D.

    1999-01-01

    It is imperative to ensure compliance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP) with applicable statutory and regulatory requirements. In particular, compliance with the waste characterization requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and its implementing regulation found at 40 CFR Parts 262,264 and 265 for hazardous and mixed wastes, as well as those of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, the Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1970, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, and the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, as amended, and their implementing regulations found at 40 CFR Parts 191 and 194 for non-mixed radioactive wastes, are often difficult to ensure at the operational level. For example, where a regulation may limit a waste to a certain concentration, this concentration may be difficult to measure. For example, does the definition of transuranic waste (TRU) as 100 nCi/grain of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste mean that the radioassay of a waste must show a reading of 100 plus the sampling and measurement error for the waste to be a TRU waste? Although the use of acceptable knowledge to characterize waste is authorized by statute, regulation and DOE Orders, its implementation is similarly beset with difficulty. When is a document or documents sufficient to constitute acceptable knowledge? What standard can be used to determine if knowledge is acceptable for waste characterization purposes? The inherent conflict between waste characterization regulatory requirements and their implementation in the real world, and the resolution of this conflict, will be discussed

  6. Regulatory requirements for groundwater monitoring networks at hazardous waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, J.F.

    1989-10-01

    In the absence of an explicit national mandate to protect groundwater quality, operators of active and inactive hazardous waste sites must use a number of statutes and regulations as guidance for detecting, correcting, and preventing groundwater contamination. The objective of this paper is to provide a framework of the technical and regulatory considerations that are important to the development of groundwater monitoring programs at hazardous waste sites. The technical site-specific needs and regulatory considerations, including existing groundwater standards and classifications, will be presented. 14 refs., 2 tabs

  7. Regulatory safety aspects of nuclear waste management operations in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundararajan, A.R.

    2000-01-01

    The Department of Atomic Energy in India as part of its programme to harness the nuclear energy for generation of nuclear power has been operating a whole range of nuclear fuel cycle facilities including waste management plants for more than four decades. The waste management plants include three high level waste immobilisation plants, one in operation, one under commissioning and one more under construction. Atomic Energy Regulatory Board is mandated to review and authorise from the safety angle the siting, the design, the construction and the operation of the waste management plants. The regulatory procedures, which involve multi-tier review adopted for ensuring the safety of these facilities, are described in this paper. (author)

  8. Regulatory aspects on underground disposal of radioactive waste in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, A.

    1978-01-01

    The underground disposal of radioactive waste in Sweden is primarily governed by the Atomic Energy Act, the Radiation Protection Act, and to some extent by the Nuclear Liability Act. The regulatory authorities in question are the Nuclear Power Inspectorate, and the Radiation protection Institute. Application for a licence relating to waste management facilities are examined by the Inspectorate which presents its recommendations to the Government for decision. The Inspectorate is also called upon to impose conditions for the operation of the installation. The choice of site for the proposed nuclear waste facility is subject to the approval of the local authorities concerned. (NEA) [fr

  9. Legislative and regulatory framework of radioactive waste management in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutoiu, D.

    2000-01-01

    The paper intent is to present an update on the Romanian legislative and regulatory framework in the area of radioactive waste management. Based on the experiences gained by the National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control in the past years, the recent legislative initiatives related to the coherent radwaste management policy at the national level are presented. (author)

  10. Coastal structures, waste materials and fishery enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, K.J.; Jensen, A.C.; Lockwood, A.P.M.; Lockwood, S.J. [University of Southampton, Southampton (United Kingdom). Dept. of Oceanography

    1994-09-01

    Current UK practice relating to the disposal of material at sea is reviewed. The use of stabilization technology relating to bulk waste materials, coal ash, oil ash and incinerator ash is discussed. The extension of this technology to inert minestone waste and tailings, contaminated dredged sediments and phosphogypsum is explored. Uses of stabilized wastes are considered in the areas of habitat restoration, coastal defense and fishery enhancement. It is suggested that rehabilitation of marine dump sites receiving loose waste such as pulverized fuel ash (PFA) could be enhanced by the continued dumping of the material but in a stabilized block form, so creating new habitat diversity. Global warming predictions include sea level rise and increased storm frequency. This is of particular concern along the southern and eastern coasts of the UK. The emphasis of coastal defense is changing from hard seawalls to soft options which include offshore barriers to reduce wave energy reaching the coast. Stabilized waste materials could be included in these and other marine constructions with possible economic benefit. Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF), the regulatory authority in England and Wales for marine disposal/construction, policy regarding marine structures and fishery enhancement is outlined. A case is made for the inclusion of fishery enhancement features in future coastal structures. Examples of the productivity of man-made structures are given. Slight modification of planned structures and inclusion of suitable habitat niches could allow for the cultivation of kelp, molluscs, crustacea and fish.

  11. Incorporating regulatory considerations into waste treatment technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, M.R.; Powell, J.A.; Williams, T.A.; Kuusinen, T.L.; Lesperance, A.M.

    1991-02-01

    It is generally recognized that the development of new and innovative waste treatment technologies can significantly benefit the US Department of Energy's (DOE) environmental restoration and waste management program. DOE has established a research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT ampersand E) program, managed by its Office of Technology Development, to encourage and direct the development of new waste treatment and management technologies. The treatment, storage, and disposal of hazardous and radioactive waste is heavily regulated both at the federal and state levels. In order to achieve the goals of applying the best new technologies in the fastest and most cost-effective manner possible, it is essential that regulatory factors be considered early and often during the development process. This paper presents a number of regulatory issues that are relevant to any program intended to encourage the development of new waste treatment and management technologies. It will also address how the use of these basic regulatory considerations can help ensure that technologies that are developed are acceptable to regulators and can therefore be deployed in the field. 2 refs

  12. Regulatory research for waste disposal - Objectives and international approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanner, Hans; Fischer-Appelt, Klaus; Pescatore, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    The question of active involvement of nuclear regulatory and supervisory bodies in research and development (R and D) projects has become a topic of increasing interest in recent years. The way in which research is included in regulatory activities varies from country to country, ranging from countries with no regulatory R and D activities to countries with extensive activities which are often carried out by independent research organisations acting on behalf of the regulatory body. The present report outlines (part 1) the potential merits of R and D work carried out by the regulator, and summarizes (part 2) the results of a questionnaire that was circulated among the members of the Regulators' Forum of NEA's Radioactive Waste Management Committee in 2009. Part 3 presents the conclusions of discussions within the RWMC-RF. The detailed answers to the questionnaire are also provided

  13. Regulatory aspects of underground disposal of radioactive waste in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luethi, H.R.

    1978-01-01

    The management of radioactive waste has become an important problem in Switzerland, and work has now begun on technical investigations and the preparation of a regulatory framework for deep-underground disposal. The law currently in force is the Federal Law on the Peaceful Use of Atomic Energyy and Radiation Protection, under which two licences are required, one for construction and one for operation. An amendment to this Law is envisaged whereby the licensing system will be modified, in particular by requiring an additional licence which will be granted by the Federal Government, with the consent of Parliament, if the safe disposal of waste can be guaranteed. The producers of radioactive waste are primarily responsible for the management thereof, but the National Co-operative Society for the Storage of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA) has the task of planning, constructing and operating repositories. The licensing authority in Switzerland is the Federal department of Communications and Energy. (NEA) [fr

  14. The waste isolation pilot plant: A new regulatory environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frei, M.W.; Schneider, S.P.; Saris, E.C.; Austin, P.W.

    1993-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is ready to embark on a multiyear test program, using radioactive waste, at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The WIPP is a deep geologic repository, constructed in ancient salt beds in southeastern New Mexico. It was authorized by Congress in 1979 as a research and development facility to demonstrate safe disposal of the nation's defense transuranic (TRU) waste. Nonradioactive testing in the repository has been under way for several years. The DOE is now ready to begin underground experiments at WIPP with small amounts of TRU waste. Radioactive waste testing in an actual repository environment will reduce uncertainties associated with predictions of long-term repository performance. However, the authority for DOE to begin this new phase of the test program no longer resides within the department. The WIPP is now subject to a new level of regulatory oversight by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other federal agencies, as set forth by Public Law 102-579, the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, signed by the President on October 30, 1992. This paper discusses the act's new regulatory requirements for WIPP

  15. Structural classification of endogenous regulatory oligopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamyatnin, A A

    1991-07-01

    Based on the criteria of 50% identity in the amino acid sequence, a new method for grouping endogenous regulatory oligopeptides into structural families is presented. Data from the EROP-Moscow data bank on 579 oligopeptides fitting a preset spectrum of functional activities revealed 73 structural oligopeptide groups, 36 of which were called families.

  16. Managing the high level waste nuclear regulatory commission licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskin, K.P.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the process for obtaining Nuclear Regulatory Commission permits for the high level waste storage facility is basically the same process commercial nuclear power plants followed to obtain construction permits and operating licenses for their facilities. Therefore, the experience from licensing commercial reactors can be applied to the high level waste facility. Proper management of the licensing process will be the key to the successful project. The management of the licensing process was categorized into four areas as follows: responsibility, organization, communication and documentation. Drawing on experience from nuclear power plant licensing and basic management principles, the management requirement for successfully accomplishing the project goals are discussed

  17. Investigations of potential below regulatory concern (de minimus) wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruhlke, J.M.; Galpin, F.L.

    1983-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) includes a wide variety of waste types. Many organizations are contemplating the merits of declaring certain LLW as de minimus. The concept of de minimus has considerable support, as evidenced by the comments on NRC's rulemaking for 10 CFR Part 61, Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste. Practical and philosophical considerations lend weight to the further investigation of the de minimus concept for LLW. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognizes the interest and efforts in the concept of de minimus. Because the term de minimus may imply a lack of concern for the risks of disposal, we use the term Below Regulatory Concern (BRC). EPA has developed technical information, cost data, and a methodology for selecting promising candidate waste streams. The NRC's breakdown of LLW, as provided in the supporting documentation for 10 CFR Part 51, serves as a starting point for evaluating individual waste streams. Waste streams may then be ranked on the basis of individual dose, population health impact, and cost/benefit. A set of waste streams consistently ranks near the top in all categories and deserves further analysis. This screening is the initial step in an overall effort to develop a basis for determining the appropriateness and form of generic BRC criteria. 14 references, 8 tables

  18. Regulatory Framework for Salt Waste Disposal and Tank Closure at the Savannah River Site - 13663

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Steve; Dickert, Ginger [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The end of the Cold War has left a legacy of approximately 37 million gallons of radioactive waste in the aging waste tanks at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). A robust program is in place to remove waste from these tanks, treat the waste to separate into a relatively small volume of high-level waste and a large volume of low-level waste, and to actively dispose of the low-level waste on-site and close the waste tanks and associated ancillary structures. To support performance-based, risk-informed decision making and to ensure compliance with all regulatory requirements, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its current and past contractors have worked closely with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to develop and implement a framework for on-site low-level waste disposal and closure of the SRS waste tanks. The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, provides DOE the authority to manage defense-related radioactive waste. DOE Order 435.1 and its associated manual and guidance documents detail this radioactive waste management process. The DOE also has a requirement to consult with the NRC in determining that waste that formerly was classified as high-level waste can be safely managed as either low-level waste or transuranic waste. Once DOE makes a determination, NRC then has a responsibility to monitor DOE's actions in coordination with SCDHEC to ensure compliance with the Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 61 (10CFR61), Subpart C performance objectives. The management of hazardous waste substances or components at SRS is regulated by SCDHEC and the EPA. The foundation for the interactions between DOE, SCDHEC and EPA is the SRS Federal Facility Agreement (FFA). Managing this array of requirements and successfully interacting with regulators, consultants and stakeholders is a challenging task but

  19. Regulatory document R-104, Regulatory objectives, requirements and guidelines for the disposal of radioactive wastes - long-term aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose and scope of this document is to present the regulatory basis for judging the long-term acceptability of radioactive waste disposal options. The basic objectives of radioactive waste disposal are given as are the regulatory requirements to be satisfied. (NEA)

  20. Regulatory framework for radioactive waste disposal in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogaru, Daniela

    2005-01-01

    Full text: To fulfill the obligations assumed by Romania by joining to the international convention and treaty as well as for implementing the European Commission legislative framework a lot of regulations was already issued or are under the development. The National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control as regulatory authority in nuclear field in Romania considered the process of developing regulations in order to detail the requirements for safe management of radioactive waste. (authors)

  1. Regulatory framework for radioactive waste disposal in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogaru, D.M.

    2005-01-01

    To fulfill the obligations assumed by Romania by joining to the international convention and treaty as well as for implementing the European Commission legislative framework a lot of regulations was already issued or are under the development. The National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control as regulatory authority in nuclear field in Romania considered the process of developing regulations in order to detail the requirements for safe management of radioactive waste. (authors)

  2. Regulatory, administrative and financial problems raised by radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyners, P.

    1980-03-01

    This paper analyses the salient aspects of the non-technical problems involved in radioactive waste disposal: the division of operational, regulatory and administrative responsibilities, the usefulness of providing a form of institutional control of the waste disposed of, and the question of the length of time for such mechanisms, both of which are closely linked to the preceding point. A description follows of the R and D financing mechanisms in the field and of the surveillance systems to be set up. Finally, mention is made of the legal and practical difficulties encountered in the application of the third party liability and insurance regime to long-term waste management and the international dimension of all these questions. (NEA) [fr

  3. Regulatory aspects of the radioactive waste management in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siraky, Graciela

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes briefly the legislative and regulatory framework in which the radioactive waste management is carried out in Argentina. The activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) and the applied approaches in relation to inspection of facilities, safety assessments of associated systems and collaboration in the matter with international agencies are also exposed. The 'National Law of the Nuclear Activity' (No. 24804), in force since April 1997, assigns to NRA the following functions: to regulate and to inspect nuclear activities regarding radiological and nuclear safety, physical protection of nuclear materials, in order to verify that such materials are used exclusively with peaceful purposes and also, to advise the National Executive Power in matters of its competence. For the fulfilment of these functions the Law grants to NRA the necessary legal competence to develop, to establish and to apply a regulatory system to all nuclear activities carried out in Argentina. The activity of NRA is carried out in the framework of a regulatory system whose fundamental aspect in the approach adopted to establish the requirements of safety, which is know as 'of performance'. This system has a group of rules known as 'AR Standards' (AR: abbreviation of Regulatory Authority) that, among other requirements, establish that the construction, operation and decommissioning of a nuclear installation can not start without the corresponding construction, operation or decommissioning license. In that sense, besides having the legal competence in the topic, NRA has developed its necessary technical competence to evaluate, with own criteria, all radiological and nuclear safety aspects involved in the grant of licenses and to guarantee an appropriate level of control in the facilities. In relation to the radioactive waste management, NRA has developed some basic criteria. These criteria underline the requirements put to the 'Responsible Entity' that generates or manages

  4. Structure and drafting of safeguards regulatory documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, R.J.; Bennett, C.A.; Edelhertz, H.; Wood, M.T.; Brown, R.J.; Roberts, F.P.

    1977-09-01

    This study develops hypothesis about the relation between the structure and drafting of safeguards regulatory documents and the ability of document users to understand and implement them in a way that reflects the intent and requirements of the NRC. Four decisions are needed to improve communication: (1) Should improvement of safeguards regulatory documents as communication instruments be an explicit NRC program. (2) What specific methods of communication should be the focus of improvement efforts. (3) What actions to improve communications are feasible and desirable. (4) How should the NRC divide its available effort and resources among desirable actions in order to provide the most effective communication through regulatory documents. This volume contains: introduction, conceptual bases, legal requirements, targets, choice of documents, preparation of documents, readability, and further study of recommended changes in structure and drafting

  5. Scientific, institutional, regulatory, political, and public acceptance of the waste isolation pilot plant transuranic waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, L.G.

    2000-01-01

    The recent successful certification and opening of a first-of-a-kind, deep geological repository for safe disposal of long-lived, transuranic radioactive waste (TRUW) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, New Mexico, United States of America (USA), embody both long-standing local and wide-spread, gradually achieved, scientific, institutional, regulatory, political, and public acceptance. The related historical background and development are outlined and the main contributors to the successful siting, certification, and acceptance of the WIPP TRUW repository, which may also serve as a model to success for other radioactive waste disposal programs, are described. (author)

  6. 77 FR 40817 - Low-Level Radioactive Waste Regulatory Management Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ...-2011-0012] RIN-3150-AI92 Low-Level Radioactive Waste Regulatory Management Issues AGENCY: Nuclear... regulatory time of compliance for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility, allowing licensees the... system, and revising the NRC's licensing requirements for land disposal of radioactive waste. DATES: The...

  7. An approach to regulatory compliance with radioactive mixed waste regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, G.G.; Mihalovich, G.S.; Provencher, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    On May 7, 1990, radioactive mixed waste (RMW) at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) became subject to the State Of New York hazardous waste regulations. The facility was required to be in full compliance by June 6, 1990. Achievement of this goal was difficult because of the short implementation time frame. Compliance with the hazardous waste regulations also presented some potential conflicts between the hazardous waste requirements and other regulatory requirements specifically applicable to nuclear facilities. The potential conflicts involved construction, operation, and control measures. However, the facility had been working extensively with EPA Region 2 and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) on the application of the hazardous waste regulations to the facility. During these preliminary contacts, WVDP identified three issues that related to the potential conflicts: 1. Equivalency of Design and Equipment, 2. Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR), and 3. The Principle of As Low As Reasonable Achievable (ALARA) Radiation Exposure. The equivalency of nuclear facility design and equipment to the hazardous waste requirements is based in part on the increased construction criteria for nuclear facilities, the use of remote radiological monitoring for leak detection, and testing of system components that are not accessible to personnel due to high levels of radiation. This paper discusses in detail: 1. The implementation and results of the WVDP's interaction with its regulators, 2. How the regulators were helped to understand the different situations and conditions of nuclear and chemical facilities, and 3. How, by working together, the result was not only mutually advantageous to the NWDP and the agencies, but it also assured that the health and safety of workers, the public, and the environment were protected

  8. System engineering in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing process: Program architecture process and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romine, D.T.

    1989-01-01

    In October 1987, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses at Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, Texas. The overall mission of the center is to provide a sustained level of high-quality research and technical assistance in support of NRC regulatory responsibilities under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA). A key part of that mission is to assist the NRC in the development of the program architecture - the systems approach to regulatory analysis for the NRC high-level waste repository licensing process - and the development and implementation of the computer-based Program Architecture Support System (PASS). This paper describes the concept of program architecture, summarizes the process and basic structure of the PASS relational data base, and describes the applications of the system

  9. Waste package for Yucca Mountain repository: Strategy for regulatory compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloninger, M.; Short, D.; Stahl, D.

    1989-02-01

    This document summarizes the strategy given in the Site Characterization Plan (1) for demonstrating compliance with the post closure performance objectives for the waste package and the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) contained in the Code of Federal Regulations. The strategy consists of the development of a conservative waste package design that will meet the regulatory requirements with sufficient margin for uncertainty using a multi-barrier approach that takes advantage of the unsaturated nature of the Yucca Mountain site. This strategy involves an iterative process designed to achieve compliance with the requirements for substantially complete containment and EBS release. The strategy will be implemented in such a manner that sufficient evidence will be provided for presentation to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) so that it may make a finding that there is ''reasonable assurance'' that these performance requirements will indeed be met. In implementing the strategy, DOE recognizes four fundamental goals: (1) protect public health and safety; (2) minimize financial and other resource commitments; (3) comply with applicable laws and regulations; and (4) maintain an aggressive schedule. The strategy is intended to be a reasonable balance of these competing goals. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  10. Regulation of Federal radioactive waste activities. Report to Congress on extending the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's licensing or regulatory authority to Federal radioactive waste storage and disposal activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    The report contains two recommendations for extending the Commission's regulatory authority: (1) NRC licensing authority should be extended to cover all new DOE facilities for disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste and nondefense low-level waste. (2) A pilot program, focused on a few specific DOE waste management activities, should be established to test the feasibility of extending NRC regulatory authority on a consultative basis to DOE waste management activities not now covered by NRC's licensing authority or its extension as recommended in Recommendation 1

  11. Low level waste disposal regulatory issues in the US - 59311

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, David; Kalinowski, Thomas; Edwards, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The United States led the international efforts to define disposal requirements for low level radioactive wastes with the publication of US Regulations governing the disposal of such wastes. The requirements were based on a system of waste classification based on the concentrations of certain radionuclides considered problematic for the protection of future generations from radiation exposure. The regulation, itself, was based on a process for the development of new disposal sites defined by the US congress to provide an equitable distribution of burden to various regions of the US. This process has met with little success in the almost 30 years since its initiation leaving only an incomplete patchwork of disposal options which are primarily dependant on the same options that existed before the act and regulations were initiated. There is currently a new focus on the basis for some of the regulatory requirements derived from advances in the understanding of dose impacts from certain radionuclides, improvements in performance assessment methodologies, the increased use of engineered barriers, the reality of current disposal economies, along with the failure of the act to conform to expectations. This paper will provide an update on the discussion taking place with a focus on the technical considerations. (authors)

  12. First update to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's regulatory strategy for the high-level waste repository program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.L.; Linehan, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has updated its initial regulatory strategy for the High-Level Waste Repository Licensing Program. The update describes changes to the initial strategy and summarizes progress and future activities. This paper summarizes the first update of the regulatory strategy. In general the overall strategy of identifying and reducing uncertainties is unchanged. Identifying regulatory and institutional uncertainties is essentially complete, and therefore, the current and future emphasis is on reducing those regulatory and institutional uncertainties identified to date. The NRC staff has improved the methods of reducing regulatory uncertainties by (1) enhancing the technical basis preparation process for potential rulemakings and guidance and (2) designing a new guidance document, called a staff position, for clarifying regulatory uncertainties. For guiding the US DOE's reduction of technical uncertainties, the NRC staff will give more emphasis to prelicense application reviews and less emphasis on preparing staff technical positions

  13. WWER nuclear waste management regulatory experience in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varjoranta, Tero

    2000-01-01

    About 30% of all electricity produced in Finland is generated by nuclear power. Four reactors, with a total capacity of 2 656 MW e (net), are currently in operation. At Loviisa, there are two 488 MW e WWER units (recently upgraded 440-units) and at Olkiluoto two 840 MW e BWR units. At the Loviisa plant conditioning, storage and final disposal of low-and intermediate-level wastes from reactor operation will take place at the NPP sites. Intermediate level ion exchange resins and evaporation concentrates are currently stored in tanks. However, a license application for constructing a solidification plant based on cementation is currently under STUKs regulatory review. The construction of the final repository for I/LLW at the Loviisa site was started in 1993 and the Government granted the operating license in 1998. The nuclear legislation requires disposal of spent fuel into the Finnish bedrock. (Authors)

  14. Team structure and regulatory focus: the impact of regulatory fit on team dynamic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimotakis, Nikolaos; Davison, Robert B; Hollenbeck, John R

    2012-03-01

    We report a within-teams experiment testing the effects of fit between team structure and regulatory task demands on task performance and satisfaction through average team member positive affect and helping behaviors. We used a completely crossed repeated-observations design in which 21 teams enacted 2 tasks with different regulatory focus characteristics (prevention and promotion) in 2 organizational structures (functional and divisional), resulting in 84 observations. Results suggested that salient regulatory demands inherent in the task interacted with structure to determine objective and subjective team-level outcomes, such that functional structures were best suited to (i.e., had best fit with) tasks with a prevention regulatory focus and divisional structures were best suited to tasks with a promotion regulatory focus. This contingency finding integrates regulatory focus and structural contingency theories, and extends them to the team level with implications for models of performance, satisfaction, and team dynamics.

  15. Regulatory framework, strategy and radioactive waste management in Zambia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banda, S.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Zambia is involved in the peaceful application in Nuclear Science and Technology which cover the agriculture, human health, industry, research and education sectors. In the execution of the projects various radioactive sources and radioisotopes are used. The data from the Radiation Protection Board show that there are 136 organizations and 971 Radiation workers benefit from the regulatory control and personnel Dosimetry service that is provided by the Board. The radiation user institutions are broken down as follows: medical (106), industrial (18), research (10) and (2) in teaching. The radioactive waste generated and spent sources are managed, in several ways depending on the type . In addition to radioactive waste generated by various application there are new developments concerning the management of spent sources mainly brought into control by the detection of illicit trade or trafficking activities by the Police, Drug Enforcement Commission, and the vigilant people of the community. The challenge for Zambia is to set-up a Radioactive Waste Management Facility preferably under the National Institute for Scientific and Industrial Research (NISIR). The RPB should legally designate NISIR for this function and assist to have the Government provide support that is required to have an operation and effective facility. One Radioactive Waste Interim Storage Shed at Kalulushi. This shed was put up by a copper mining conglomerate which now has been privatized. It is hoped that this facility can be licensed by Radiation Protection Board to be run by private enterprise for storage of prescribed spent radioactive sources and materials. This shed should be technically competent persons and should have good equipment for the purpose. The application in industry (NDT, mining, radiation sterilization, pipeline and construction, human health (nuclear medicine, radioimmunoassay and radiotherapy practices) and agriculture (use of P-32) required that a National Strategy

  16. Final Regulatory Determination for Special Wastes From Mineral Processing (Mining Waste Exclusion) - Federal Register Notice, June 13, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    This action presents the Agency's final regulatory determination required by section 3001(b)(3)(C) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) for 20 special wastes from the processing of ores and minerals.

  17. Regulatory control of solid low level radioactive waste disposal in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newstead, S.; Schwemlein, P.

    1998-01-01

    The following topics are described: (i) regulatory authorities; (ii) inspection; (iii) waste categories; (iv) disposal routes for low level waste; (v) inspection of disposal routes; (vi) waste quality checking; (vii) reporting and application of results; and (viii) European Network activities. (P.A.)

  18. Immobilization of defense high-level waste: an assessment of technological strategies and potential regulatory goals. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-06-01

    An investigation was made of the high-level radioactive waste immobilization technology programs in the U.S. and Europe, and of the associated regulatory programs and waste management perspectives in the countries studied. Purpose was to assess the ability of those programs to satisfy DOE waste management needs and U.S. regulatory requirements. This volume includes: introduction, immobilization strategies in the context of waste isolation program needs, high-level waste management as an integrated system, regulatory goals, engineered-barrier characteristics, barrier technology, high-level waste disposal programs, analysis of HLW immobilization technology in the context of policy and regulatory requirements, and waste immobilization program option

  19. Slovak Nuclear Regulatory Body Position in the Transport of Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homola, J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes safety requirements for transport of radioactive waste in Slovakia and the role of regulatory body in the transport licensing and assessment processes. Importance of radioactive waste shipments have been increased since 1999 by starting of NPP A-1 decommissioning and operation of near surface disposal facility. Also some information from history of shipment as well as future activities are given. Legal basis for radioactive waste transport is resulting from IAEA recommendations in this area. Different types of transport equipment were approved by regulatory body for both liquid and solid waste and transportation permits were issued to their shipment. Regulatory body attention during evaluation of transport safety is focused mainly on ability of individual packages to withstand different transport conditions and on safety analyses performed for transport equipment for liquid waste with high frequency of shipments. During past three years no event was occurred in connection with radioactive waste transport in Slovakia

  20. Policy, regulatory and international spects of the disposal of low - and intermediate radioactive waste and other hazardous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivier, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper focuses on the management of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste. It recalls briefly the technical background and the main features of the regulatory systems adopted by most countries for their radioactive wastes, the respective role of technical and institutional measures contributing to safety, and the influence of international cooperation. A very preliminary attempt is made to draw a parallel with the situation existing for other hazardous wastes, underlying in particular those aspects which seem important in the discussion of management and regulatory policies

  1. Waste management strategy for nuclear fusion power systems from a regulatory perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckman, R.A.

    1977-12-06

    A waste management strategy for future nuclear fusion power systems is developed using existing regulatory methodology. The first step is the development of a reference fuel cycle. Next, the waste streams from such a facility are identified. Then a waste management system is defined to safely handle and dispose of these wastes. The future regulator must identify the decisions necessary to establish waste management performance criteria. The data base and methodologies necessary to make these decisions must then be developed. Safe management of nuclear fusion wastes is not only a technological challenge, but encompasses significant social, political, and ethical questions as well.

  2. Waste management strategy for nuclear fusion power systems from a regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckman, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    A waste management strategy for future nuclear fusion power systems is developed using existing regulatory methodology. The first step is the development of a reference fuel cycle. Next, the waste streams from such a facility are identified. Then a waste management system is defined to safely handle and dispose of these wastes. The future regulator must identify the decisions necessary to establish waste management performance criteria. The data base and methodologies necessary to make these decisions must then be developed. Safe management of nuclear fusion wastes is not only a technological challenge, but encompasses significant social, political, and ethical questions as well

  3. Regulatory mechanisms for underground waste disposal in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    Environmental Pollution Control in Nigeria, National Guidelines on Waste Disposal through Underground ... dead, domestic waste and, excrement in this manner. The soil and geological formations that are the waste ... waste water daily is presently seeking partnerships with the ... role in ground water quality protection from.

  4. Role of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority in the final disposal of radioactive wastes in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petraitis, E.J.; Siraky, G.; Novo, R.G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes briefly the legislative and regulatory framework in which the final disposal of radioactive wastes is carried out in Argentina. The activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) and the applied approaches in relation to inspection of facilities, safety assessments of associated systems and collaboration in the matter with international agencies are also exposed. (author) [es

  5. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's role in the management of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernero, R.M.; Kalman, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) role in the management of radioactive waste. It provides an overview of the NRC's programs for the management of High-Level and Low-Level radioctive wastes and uranium mill tailings. (author) 7 refs

  6. Current issues and regulatory infrastructure aspects on radioactive waste management in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieru, G.

    2002-01-01

    The nuclear facilities that exist throughout Romania perform a broad range of missions from research to nuclear materials production to radioactive waste management, and to deactivation and decommissioning. As a consequence, there is a broad array of external regulations and internal requirements that potentially applies to a facility or activity. Therefore, the management of radioactive waste occurs within a larger context of managing hazards, both radiological and industrial, at these facilities. At the same time, concern for upgrading existing facilities used for radioactive waste management, as called for in Article 12, fits into a larger framework of safety management. The primary objective of the Romanian Nuclear Regulatory Body-CNCAN on legislation and regulatory infrastructure for the safety of radioactive waste management is to protect human health and the environment now and in the future. It is unanimously recognized that a well developed regulated system for the management and disposal of radioactive waste is a prerequisite for both public and market acceptance of nuclear energy. It is to underline that the continuing internationalization of the nuclear industry following terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001 stresses the need for national legislation and regulatory infrastructure to be based on internationally endorsed principles and safety standards. The paper presents some aspects of the Romanian experience on the national legislative and regulatory system related to the followings aspects of the safety aspects of radioactive waste management: definition of responsibilities; nuclear and radiation safety requirements; siting and licensing procedures; regulatory functions; international co-operation and coherence on strategies and criteria in the area of safety of radioactive waste management. Finally, prescriptive and goal oriented national as well international regimes in the field of the safety of radioactive waste management are briefly commented

  7. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Process for Risk-Informing the Nuclear Waste Arena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leslie, B. W.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is increasing the use of risk insights and information in its regulation of nuclear materials and waste. The objective of this risk-informed regulatory effort is to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the agency, while maintaining or increasing its focus on safety. The agency's Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards (NMSS) proposed a five-step process to carry out a framework for increasing the use of risk information and insights in its regulation of nuclear materials and waste. The office is carrying out the five-step process to risk-inform the nuclear materials and waste arenas. NMSS's actions included forming a Risk Task Group and the use of case studies to test and complete screening criteria for identifying candidate regulatory applications amenable for risk-informing. Other actions included involving stakeholders through enhanced public participation, developing safety goals for materials and waste regulatory applications, and establishing a risk training program for staff. Through the case studies, NRC staff found the draft screening criteria to be effective in deciding regulatory areas that may be amenable to an increased use of risk insights. NRC staff also found that risk information may have the potential to reduce regulatory burden and improve staff's efficiency in making decisions, while maintaining safety. Finally, staff found that it would be possible to develop safety goals for the nuclear materials and waste arenas

  8. Waste management from reprocessing: a stringent regulatory requirements for high quality conditioned residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordier, J. C.; Greneche, D.; Devezeaux, J. G.; Dalcorso, J.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear waste production and management in France is governed by safety requirements imposed to all operators. French nuclear safety relies on two basic principles: · Responsibility of the nuclear operator, which expands to waste generated, · Safety basic objectives issued by national Safety Authority. For a long time the regulatory framework for waste production and management has been satisfactorily applied and has benefited to each actor of the process. LLW/MLW and HLW nuclear waste are currently conditioned in safe matrices or packages either likely to be disposed in surface repositories or designed with the intention to be disposed underground according to their radioactive content. France is looking into the case of VLLW and has already carried out a design for future disposal, the design being in the pipe. Other types of waste (i. e. radium bearing waste, graphite, and tritium content waste) are also considered in the whole framework of French waste management. (author)

  9. Regulatory objectives, requirements and guidelines for the disposal of radioactive wastes - long-term aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    It is the purpose of this document to present the regulatory basis for judging the long-term acceptability of radioactive waste disposal options, assuming that the operational aspects of waste emplacement and facility closure satisfy the existing regulatory framework of requirements. Basic objectives of radioactive waste disposal are given, as are the regulatory requirements which must be satisfied in order to achieve these objectives. In addition, guidelines are given on the application of the radiological requirements to assist proponents in the preparation of submissions to the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). The primary focus of the requirements is on radiation protection, although environmental protection and institutional controls are also addressed in a more general way since these factors stem directly from the overall objectives for radioactive waste disposal

  10. Regulatory requirements important to Hanford single-shell tank waste management decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, J.F.; Woodruff, M.G.

    1989-06-01

    This report provides an initial analysis of the regulations that may be pertinent to SST management activities (e.g., characterization, disposal, retrieval, processing, etc.) and the interrelationships among those regulations. Waste disposal decisions regarding SST waste must consider the regulatory requirements against which technical solutions will be evaluated. Regulatory requirements can also be used as guidelines for management and disposal of waste in a manner that protects human health and safety and the environment. Also, in cases where waste management regulations do not specifically address a waste form, such as radioactive mixed waste, the SST waste may come under the purview of a number of regulations related to radioactive waste management, hazardous waste management, and water and air quality protection. This report provides a comprehensive review of the environmental pollution control and radioactive waste management statutes and regulations that are relevant to SST waste characterization and management. Also, other statutes and regulations that contain technical standards that may be used in the absence of directly applicable regulations are analyzed. 8 refs., 4 figs

  11. Structure and drafting of safeguards regulatory documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, R.J.; Bennett, C.A.; Edelhertz, H.; Wood, M.T.; Brown, R.J.; Roberts, F.P.

    1977-09-01

    Improving communication of NRU's requirements is the subject of this study. This summary is organized in terms of four decisions on whether safeguards regulatory documents as communication instruments should be an explicit NRC program, what communication methods should be focused on, what actions are feasible and desirable, and how should the NRC divide its effort and resources among desirable actions

  12. Regional Power Integration : Structural and Regulatory Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2011-01-01

    The Central America Regional Electricity Market (MER) trades electricity and transmission capacity among six Central American countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama. The market differs from other electricity markets worldwide because it has its own regulatory body and system operator. Economic integration of the Central American countries has followed...

  13. Interim report to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission on radioactive waste classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, W.C.; Cohen, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory assisted the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in the development of a radioactive waste classification system that will satisfy technical, environmental, and societal concerns. This is an interim report to the NRC on work accomplished to date. It describes a proposed waste-classification system that is based on the final disposition of waste material. The system consists of three classes of radioactive waste. The classification of any radioactive waste will depend primarily on its hazard potential. Other characteristics such as longevity (half-size) will be considered also. The levels of hazard that differentiate the three classes of radioactive waste will be determined by ongoing work. This report describes other work to be completed before a suitable radioactive waste-classificaion system is established

  14. The exemption of regulatory control for the management of low level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, M.T.; Carboneras, P.

    1993-01-01

    A high number of wastes produced in different fields of science and technology, as well as nuclear power plants, contain a significant volume of byproducts contaminated with radioisotopes, having a very low radioactive level. This kind of wastes might be managed as ordinary wastes by conventional methods or even reused. In order to carry out this procedure, a new regulation exempting these products from the regulatory control normatives would be necessary. This paper analyzes the big advantages of introducing these exemptions (costs recycling, radioactive wastes minimization) and how they follow the recommendations of ICRP, IAEA, EC and NRC

  15. The scientific and regulatory basis for the geological disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, D.

    1995-01-01

    The disposal of radioactive waste is a central issue in the future of nuclear power and poses considerable technical, political and social issues. This book addresses these topics in an integrated fashion using performance assessment of the disposal concept as a unifying theme. Subjects addressed include: regulatory criteria; waste types, sources and characteristics; man-made or ''engineered'' barriers; the selection and evaluation of geological disposal media; the use of underground research laboratories; the movement of radionuclides in the biosphere; repository performance assessment tools approaches; addressing uncertainty and spatial variability; assessing information from natural systems; and looking at radioactive waste in relation to other wastes. (Author)

  16. Data Science and Political Economy: Application to Financial Regulatory Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharyn O'Halloran

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of computational data science techniques in natural language processing and machine learning algorithms to analyze large and complex textual information opens new avenues for studying the interaction between economics and politics. We apply these techniques to analyze the design of financial regulatory structure in the United States since 1950. The analysis focuses on the delegation of discretionary authority to regulatory agencies in promulgating, implementing, and enforcing financial sector laws and overseeing compliance with them. Combining traditional studies with the new machine learning approaches enables us to go beyond the limitations of both methods and offer a more precise interpretation of the determinants of financial regulatory structure.

  17. Treatment of Radioactive Contaminated Soil and Concrete Wastes Using the Regulatory Clearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Il Sik; Ryu, W. S.; Kim, T. K.; Shon, J. S.; Ahn, S. J.; Lee, Y. H.; Bae, S. M.; Hong, D. S.; Ji, Y. Y.; Lee, B. C

    2008-11-15

    In the radioactive waste storage facilities at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) in Daejoen, there are thousands drums of radioactive contaminated soil and concrete wastes. The soil and concrete wastes were generated in 1988 during the decommissioning process of the research reactor and the attached radioactive waste treatment facility which were located in Seoul. The wastes were transported to Daejeon and have been stored since then. At the generation time, the radioactive contamination of the wastes was very low, and the radionuclides in the wastes was Co-60 and Cs-137. As the wastes have been stored for more than 20 years, the radioactivity concentration of the wastes has been decayed to become very extremely low. The wastes are needed to be treated because they take up large spaces at the storage facility. Also by treating the wastes, final disposal cost can be saved. So, the regulatory clearance was considered as a treatment method for the soil and concrete wastes with extremely low radioactivity concentration.

  18. Legal and regulatory issues regarding classification and disposal of wastes from actinide partitioning and transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    Partitioning and transmutation of actinide radioelements in spent nuclear fuel from civilian power reactors is potentially attractive because the resulting wastes might be acceptable for disposal using systems which are considerably less costly than a deep geologic repository. At present, there are no legal or regulatory prohibitions to seeking alternatives to a geologic repository for disposal of such wastes. However, additional laws and regulations would be needed, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has been reluctant to alter the current framework for radioactive waste management, in which geologic repositories or near-surface facilities are the only disposal options established in law and regulations unless a compelling need for alternatives with intermediate waste-isolation capabilities is demonstrated. There are also important technical considerations which are not encouraging with regard to the development of intermediate disposal systems for wastes from partitioning and transmutation of actinides in civilian spent fuel. First, the wastes may contain sufficient concentrations of fission products. Second, defense reprocessing wastes may contain sufficient concentrations of fission products and long-lived actinides. Thus, in developing the legal and regulatory framework for alternative disposal systems, there is a need to establish maximum concentrations of fission products and long-lived actinides that would be acceptable for intermediate disposal. 19 refs

  19. A regulatory perspective on design and performance requirements for engineered systems in high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernero, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    For engineered systems, this paper gives an overview of some of the current activities at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), with the intent of elucidating how the regulatory process works in the management of high-level waste (HLW). Throughout the waste management cycle, starting with packaging and transportation, and continuing to final closure of a repository, these activities are directed at taking advantage of the prelicensing consultation period, a period in which the NRC, DOE and others can interact in ways that will reduce regulatory, technical and institutional uncertainties, and open the path to development and construction of a deep geologic repository for permanent disposal of HLW. Needed interactions in the HLW program are highlighted. Examples of HLW regulatory activities are given in discussions of a multipurpose-cask concept and of current NRC work on the meaning of the term substantially complete containment

  20. Legislative and Regulatory Timeline for Fossil Fuel Combustion Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    This timeline walks through the history of fossil fuel combustion waste regulation since 1976 and includes information such as regulations, proposals, notices, amendments, reports and meetings and site visits conducted.

  1. Regulatory basis for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, Bryan A.; Crawford, M.B.; Galson, D.A.; Marietta, Melvin G.

    2000-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is the first operational repository designed for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste from the defense programs of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is responsible for certifications and regulation of the WIPP facility for the radioactive components of the waste. The EPA has promulgated general radioactive waste disposal standards at 40 CFR Part 191. and WIPP-specific criteria to implement and interpret the generic disposal standards at 40 CFR Part 194. In October 1996. the DOE submitted its Compliance Certification Application (CCA) to the EPA to demonstrate compliance with the disposal standards at Subparts B and C of 40 CFR Part 191. This paper summarizes the development of the overall legal framework for radioactive waste disposal at the WIPP, the parallel development of the WIPP performance assessment (PA), and how the EPA disposal standards and implementing criteria formed the basis for the CCA WIPP PA. The CCA resulted in a certification in May 1998 by the EPA of the WIPP'S compliance with the EPA's disposal standard, thus enabling the WIPP to begin radioactive waste disposal

  2. Technical, environmental and regulatory aspects of waste management and their reflection in the IAEA programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, D.K.

    1982-01-01

    Within the IAEA training course on waste management this paper is intended to overview technological, radiological, encironmental, regulatory and institutional aspects of importance in establishing a waste management policy for nuclear power programmes; the objectives and results of IAEA activities in this field; and some current issues from a national and international perspective with special consideration on the needs of countries embarking on nuclear power. (orig./RW)

  3. Regulatory aspects of underground radioactive waste disposal in Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    In Belgium, the underground disposal of radioactive waste is subject to two sets of regulations. The licensing system for the construction and operation of a mine includes, notably, consultation with the local authorities involved. Nuclear installations are governed by a Regulation of 28 February 1963 and, in particular, waste management facilities require a licence from either the provincial authorities or the Crown, as appropriate. Applications must be accompanied by detailed plans, and a licence will be granted only if all safety and other regulations have been complied with. Inspections are provided for to ensure continued compliance. Under a law of 5 August 1978, the Government is enabled to take a preponderant part in the management of radioactive waste and to undertake, alone, its storage. (NEA) [fr

  4. General and regulatory aspects of nuclear waste disposal in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaeisaenen, Seppo.

    1978-01-01

    The Minister of Trade and Industry has recently appointed a committee to review the legislation in the nuclear energy field. The mandate of the committee includes the formulation of a law on nuclear waste management, which problem is also the subject of a current research and development programme. Licensing and control measures for nuclear installations already exist and these do include general safety measures relating to the management of nuclear waste. There are three types of licence - construction licence (including site approval), operating licence and fuel licence - given by the Ministry of Trade and Industry after consultation with various bodies, notably, the Institute of Radiation Protection. Conditions may be imposed on granting a licence, and periodic inspections are carried out during the operation of the installation. This licensing procedure, modified when necessary, could be applied to waste disposal facilities. (NEA) [fr

  5. Nuclear Regulatory Commission low-level radioactive waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    It is believed that the priorities of NRC work in low-level waste management as described in this action plan are consistent with the needs of the overall national waste management program. Present licensing procedures and criteria are adequate for the short term, and priority attention is being given to the longer term, when the quantities of waste to be managed will be greater and licensing demand will increase. The plan makes use of expertise within NRC to achieve early results and is coordinated with other Federal agencies having related responsibilities. Since NRC decisions will affect industry, other governmental jurisdictions, private interest groups, and the public at large, procedures were developed to involve them in planning the program

  6. 30 CFR 817.84 - Coal mine waste: Impounding structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Impounding structures. 817.84... ACTIVITIES § 817.84 Coal mine waste: Impounding structures. New and existing impounding structures constructed of coal mine waste or intended to impound coal mine waste shall meet the requirements of § 817.81...

  7. International principles for exemption from regulatory control and their application to waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsley, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the main features of the international consensus on principles for exempting radiation sources and practices from regulatory control reached at a meeting in Vienna in March 1988. Some remaining problems, both of a philosophical and technical nature especially related to the application of the principles to radioactive waste disposal, are discussed

  8. Legislation and regulatory infrastructure for the safety of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegberg, L.

    2000-01-01

    The essential generic characteristics of a national legislative and regulatory system for the safety of radioactive waste management are defined and discussed. The Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management as well as other relevant international legal instruments and guidelines are discussed. Special emphasis is given to the following characteristics of a national legislative and regulatory system: (i) definition of responsibilities, (ii) financing of future costs, (iii) nuclear and radiation safety requirements, (iv) siting and licensing procedures, (v) regulatory functions, and (vi) international co-operation. It is concluded that there exists an internationally endorsed basis for establishing effective national legislation and regulatory infrastructures for the safety of radioactive waste management. It is underlined that the continuing internationalization of the nuclear industry stresses the need for national legislation and regulatory infrastructure to be based on such internationally endorsed principles and standards. It is pointed out that regulators are accountable to the public and have to gain public trust by being active in the public arena, demonstrating their competence and integrity. Finally, prescriptive and goal-oriented international safety regimes are briefly discussed in the light of experience so far gained with the Convention on Nuclear Safety. (author)

  9. Regulatory supervision of sites for spent fuel and radioactive waste storage in the Russian northwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandala, N K; Sneve, M K; Smith, G M; Kiselev, M F; Kochetkov, O A; Savkin, M N; Simakov, A V; Novikova, N Ya; Titov, A V; Romanov, V V; Seregin, V A; Filonova, A V; Semenova, M P

    2008-12-01

    In the 1960s two technical bases for the Northern Fleet were created in the Russian northwest at Andreeva Bay in the Kola Peninsula and Gremikha village on the coast of the Barents Sea. They maintained nuclear submarines, receiving and storing radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. No further waste was received after 1985, and the technical bases have since been re-categorised as temporary storage sites. The handling of these materials to put them into a safe condition is especially hazardous because of their degraded state. This paper describes regulatory activities which have been carried out to support the supervision of radiological protection during recovery of waste and spent fuel, and to support regulatory decisions on overall site remediation. The work described includes: an assessment of the radiation situation on-site; the development of necessary additional regulatory rules and standards for radiation protection assurance for workers and the public during remediation; and the completion of an initial threat assessment to identify regulatory priorities. Detailed consideration of measures for the control of radiation exposure of workers and radiation exposure of the public during and after operations and emergency preparedness and response are complete and provided in sister papers. The continuing requirements for regulatory activities relevant to the development and implementation of on-going and future remediation activities are also outlined. The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority supports the work, as part of the Norwegian Government's plan of action to promote improvements in radiation protection and nuclear safety in northwest Russia.

  10. Regulatory supervision of sites for spent fuel and radioactive waste storage in the Russian Northwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shandala, N K; Kochetkov, O A; Savkin, M N; Simakov, A V; Novikova, N Ya; Titov, A V; Seregin, V A; Filonova, A V; Semenova, M P [Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sneve, M K [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oslo (Norway); Smith, G M [GMS Abingdon Ltd (United Kingdom); Kiselev, M F; Romanov, V V [Federal Medical-Biological Agency, Moscow (Russian Federation)], E-mail: shandala@srcibph.ru

    2008-12-15

    In the 1960s two technical bases for the Northern Fleet were created in the Russian northwest at Andreeva Bay in the Kola Peninsula and Gremikha village on the coast of the Barents Sea. They maintained nuclear submarines, receiving and storing radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. No further waste was received after 1985, and the technical bases have since been re-categorised as temporary storage sites. The handling of these materials to put them into a safe condition is especially hazardous because of their degraded state. This paper describes regulatory activities which have been carried out to support the supervision of radiological protection during recovery of waste and spent fuel, and to support regulatory decisions on overall site remediation. The work described includes: an assessment of the radiation situation on-site; the development of necessary additional regulatory rules and standards for radiation protection assurance for workers and the public during remediation; and the completion of an initial threat assessment to identify regulatory priorities. Detailed consideration of measures for the control of radiation exposure of workers and radiation exposure of the public during and after operations and emergency preparedness and response are complete and provided in sister papers. The continuing requirements for regulatory activities relevant to the development and implementation of on-going and future remediation activities are also outlined. The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority supports the work, as part of the Norwegian Government's plan of action to promote improvements in radiation protection and nuclear safety in northwest Russia.

  11. Regulatory aspects of underground disposal of radioactive waste - Danish notes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    In Denmark, provisions regulating nuclear installations (their licensing, and the disposal of radioactive waste amongst other matters) are contained in an Act of 12 May 1976. This act, however, will only come into force if Denmark decides to implement a nuclear power programme. Under the provisions of this Act, the Minister of the Environment is the licensing authority. He receives recommendations from various bodies, including the Inspectorate of Nuclear Installations, and may impose any conditions thought necessary. Three permits are required - site approval, construction permit, and operation permit - and applications must be accompanied by documentation relevant to environmental and nuclear safety and health aspects. Operation of a nuclear installation may be suspended in cases of urgency. As yet, no detailed safety regulations or guidelines on the disposal of nuclear waste have been issued, but a working party, established by the Environmental Protection Agency, is currently studying the problem. (NEA) [fr

  12. Waste management regulatory compliance issues related to D ampersand D activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitch, J.P.; Arnold, S.E.; Burwinkle, T.; Daugherty, D.

    1994-01-01

    The waste management activities at ORNL related to the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of radioactively contaminated buildings are divided into four categories: Operational facilities, inactive or surplus facilities, future facilities planning, and D ampersand D activities. This paper only discusses regulatory issues related to inactive or surplus facilities. Additionally, rather than attempting to address all resulting waste streams and related regulations, this paper highlights only a few of the ORNL waste streams that present key regulatory issues

  13. Industry petition for rulemaking on the disposal of below-regulatory-concern wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipton, T.E.

    1989-01-01

    The Nuclear Management and Resources Council, Inc., in conjunction with the Edison Electric Institute, plans to submit a petition for rulemaking entitled Petition for Rulemaking Regarding Disposal of Below Regulatory Concern Wastes from commercial Nuclear Power Plants to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This petition for rulemaking, which is being filed pursuant to 10CFR2.802 and 10CFR2, Appendix B of the Code of Federal Regulations, requests the NRC to promulgate a rule authorizing the treatment and disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) determined to be below regulatory concern (BRC) in other than licensed LLW disposal facilities. The proposed rule will apply only to LLW generated at commercial nuclear power plants. The petition is based on detailed scientific and technical data derived through an extensive research program conducted by the Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. It addresses the 14 decision criteria that the NRC will employ in judging whether to grant the petition. The petition also provides an environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact and regulatory analysis. The purpose of the environmental assessment is to discuss alternatives, consequences, and impacts analyzed to support the recommendation of the proposed rule. The regulatory analysis addresses the need for and consequences of the proposed regulatory action as it relates to the protection of public health and safety

  14. Recommended regulatory program plan for low-level radioactive waste management in Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The National Program for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management was instituted by the US Department of Energy to assist the states in carrying out this new federal policy. Based on the premise that the safe disposal of low-level waste is technologically feasible and that states have the necessary degree of authority to set management policy, the National Program is helping them to develop a responsive, comprehensive regulatory program. The State of Maryland is actively engaged with the National Program in its efforts to form a comprehensive management program. The purpose of this plan is to review existing statutory and regulatory program responsibilities and provide a recommended management scheme for low-level radioactive waste

  15. Alternative approaches to pollution control and waste management: Regulatory and economic instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to present an overview of the most common strategies and policy instruments (that is, regulatory and economic) used in developed and developing countries to achieve pollution control and waste management objectives. Although this topic has been at the center of theoretical controversy both within and outside the World Bank, the paper is not intended to contribute to this debate. Rather, its purpose is to explore how regulatory and economic instruments are used to control air and water pollution, protect ground water, and manage solid and hazardous wastes. The paper is directed to policy makers at the national, state, and local levels of government, as well as to other parties responsible for pollution control and waste management programs

  16. Overview of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Low-Level Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, W.P.; Bell, M.J.; Dragonette, K.S.; Adam, J.

    1979-01-01

    Environmental impacts from Table S-3 of 10 CFR Part 51 are included in individual environmental impact statements for LWR's. In response to a U.S. Court of Appeals finding of inadequate documentation to support Table S-3, ''Environmental Survey of Reprocessing and Waste Management Portions of the LWR Fuel Cycle'' (NUREG-0116) and ''Public Comments and Task Force Responses Regarding Environmental Survey of the Reprocessing and Waste Portions of the LWR Fuel Cycle'' (NUREG-0216) were published. As a result of these in-house studies, an interim rule revising Table S-3 has been published. These documents include discussions of shallow land burial of low-level waste, past experiences and sensitivity calculations estimating potential dose commitments from the groundwater migration of the wastes. An NRC task force report (NUREG-0217) examining the Federal and Agreement State programs for regulating commercial low-level waste disposal recommends increasing the federal role in low-level waste disposal. The need to investigate alternatives to shallow land burial is identified. The NRC is developing a radioactive waste management program which includes a plan for the implementation of the task force recommendations, the development of environmental impacts for low-level waste disposal, development of standards and criteria, and the establishment of a regulatory framework and licensing procedures for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste

  17. Status on the regulatory aspects in NORM/TENORM activities and waste in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Hasmadi

    2005-01-01

    In Malaysia, waste associated with TENORM are generated mostly in the tin mining and smelting, processing of minerals, and oil and gas industry. As one of a major tin producer in the world and the country current activities in oil production, the amount of waste generated in this kind of activities is quite substantial. Currently the government of Malaysia did not provide any provision in the law specifically for the exclusion of TENORM waste, however, the government did imposed the criteria for exclusion of this waste by adopting the guideline limit established by the IAEA safety series 26, which is very vital for the regulatory body i.e. Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB) to overcome the problems in managing some of waste related to TENORM industries. As one example, this guideline has been applied to one of the mineral processing industries in the country on decommissioning and disposing of their waste. Furthermore, due to economic reason and price of tin and its by-product is not viable and profitable so much, making this industry not significant in business and trade industries, several practices have been exempted from the regulatory control under the Atomic Energy Licensing Act, 1984. (author)

  18. Regulatory aspects of underground disposal of radioactive waste in Denmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmersen, P.

    1980-01-01

    The introduction of nuclear power in Denmark is a matter to be decided by the Government and the Parliament. Disposal of radioactive waste from the nuclear fuel cycle has become a decesive part of the issue. The licensing of future nuclear facilities, facilities for storage and disposal of radioactive waste originating from the nuclear fuel cycle, will be regulated by Act of May 12, 1976 ''on the safety and environmental conditions applicable to nuclear installations''. The 1976-act will not come into force until the Danish Parliament passes an implementing act, following a positive decision on a nuclear power programme for Denmark. The Minister for the Environment will be responsible for the administration of the 1976-Act. The Agency of Environmental Protection and the National Health Service deal with the nuclear safety and health aspects of applications and submit recommendations on these matters to the Minister. According to the law the Minister for the Environment can issue a site approval, only if the application has been approved by a parliamentary resolution following a proposal from the Minister. Before such a proposal is made the regional and municipal authorities concerned shall submit statements and the Minister for the Environment must consult the Minister for Commerce. Before the granting of construction and operation permits the Minister shall consult the relevant parliamentary Committee. (author)

  19. Regulatory issues related to long-term storage and disposal of radioactive wastes in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, A.; Romanenko, O.; Tazhibayeva, I.; Zhunussova, T.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Reported material is a result of activity accomplished in the framework of cooperation program between Kazakhstan and Norway within 2009-2012. This work was divided into three distinctive parts, as follows: 1. Analysis of existing threats associated with radioactive wastes in the Republic of Kazakhstan. The objective of this part of the work was to reveal the most important threats in the sphere of radioactive waste management in the Republic of Kazakhstan, which require an increased regulatory attention. Threat assessment needed to identify: main radiological threats both for people who work with radioactive wastes and for population living near the radioactive waste storage places now and in the long term which require an increased regulatory attention; problems that need urgent and detailed analysis; and main problems in the realization of regulatory process in Kazakhstan including weakness in the regulatory and legal framework. Threat assessment analysis showed that in order to reduce the level of threats it was necessary to begin developing a national policy and strategy for radioactive waste management which need to be approved by the Government, to develop proposals for Radioactive Wastes new classification, including identification of relevant categories of Radioactive Wastes, as well as criteria for their disposal in accordance with IAEA recommendations and experience from other countries. 2. Development of new classification system for radioactive wastes in Kazakhstan. Following the results of threat assessment performed within the first stage, the objective of the second part of work was to develop a proposal to adopt a new Radioactive Wastes classification in Kazakhstan in accordance with the IAEA recommendations, including implementation of new categories, taking into account international experience and current situation in Kazakhstan. The result of this stage of work was a proposal for a new Radioactive Wastes classification and

  20. Structural and regulatory functions of keratins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magin, Thomas M.; Vijayaraj, Preethi; Leube, Rudolf E.

    2007-01-01

    The diversity of epithelial functions is reflected by the expression of distinct keratin pairs that are responsible to protect epithelial cells against mechanical stress and to act as signaling platforms. The keratin cytoskeleton integrates these functions by forming a supracellular scaffold that connects at desmosomal cell-cell adhesions. Multiple human diseases and murine knockouts in which the integrity of this system is destroyed testify to its importance as a mechanical stabilizer in certain epithelia. Yet, surprisingly little is known about the precise mechanisms responsible for assembly and disease pathology. In addition to these structural aspects of keratin function, experimental evidence accumulating in recent years has led to a much more complex view of the keratin cytoskeleton. Distinct keratins emerge as highly dynamic scaffolds in different settings and contribute to cell size determination, translation control, proliferation, cell type-specific organelle transport, malignant transformation and various stress responses. All of these properties are controlled by highly complex patterns of phosphorylation and molecular associations

  1. Regulatory authority of the Rocky Mountain states for low-level radioactive waste packaging and transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitman, M.; Tate, P.

    1983-07-01

    The newly-formed Rocky Mountain Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact is an interstate agreement for the management of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). Eligible members of the compact are Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. Each state must ratify the compact within its legislature for the compact to become effective in that state and to make that state a full-fledged member of the compact. By so adopting the compact, each state agrees to the terms and conditions specified therein. Among those terms and conditions are provisions requiring each member state to adopt and enforce procedures requiring low-level waste shipments originating within its borders and destined for a regional facility to conform to packaging and transportation requirements and regulations. These procedures are to include periodic inspections of packaging and shipping practices, periodic inspections of waste containers while in the custody of carriers and appropriate enforcement actions for violations. To carry out this responsibility, each state must have an adequate statutory and regulatory inspection and enforcement authority to ensure the safe transportation of low-level radioactive waste. Three states in the compact region, Arizona, Utah and Wyoming, have incorporated the Department of Transportation regulations in their entirety, and have no published rules and regulations of their own. The other states in the compact, Colorado, Nevada and New Mexico all have separate rules and regulations that incorporate the DOT regulations. A brief description of the regulatory requirements of each state is presented

  2. Situation on regulatory aspects of underground disposal of radioactivity wastes in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murano, T.; Asano, T.; Matsubara, N.

    1978-01-01

    At present, in Japan, there exists no law specifically regulating the underground disposal of radioactive wastes although various regulations deal with disposal safety measures in a general way. For the moment, apart from the need to gain public acceptance of such disposal, the problem is essentially one of technical feasibility, and a geological study is currently being undertaken by the Science and Technology Agency. This same Agency is also looking at the problem of a long-term waste management system, but it is the Nuclear Safety Commission, created in 1978, which will be primarily responsible for all regulatory aspects of safety. (NEA) [fr

  3. Hazardous waste management system--Environmental Protection Agency. Notice of regulatory reform actions; request for comments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-13

    In response to Executive Order 12291 and the President's Task Force on Regulatory Relief, the Environmental Protection Agency is reviewing and reassessing the hazardous waste regulations developed under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). A variety of activities are underway that will simplify procedures and reduce paperwork, modify existing regulations to make them more workable and cost effective, and control new wastes and new processes. The purpose of this notice is to inform the public of these activities and invite comments on the general approaches being taken.

  4. Legislative and regulatory framework on the safety of radioactive waste management in Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastchiev, G.

    2000-01-01

    There are six nuclear power units in operation in Bulgaria. Over 2000 sites use sources of ionizing radiation. NPP radioactive waste is stored on-site and the institutional waste was disposed of at the Novi han repository until 1994. Bulgaria signed the Joint Convention in 1998 and is to ratify it until the end of 1999. A plan on preparation of the country for the obligations following the forthcoming ratification was developed and has been implemented. A National Strategy on SNF and RAW was developed, as well as a Comprehensive Legislative Programme in this field. Emphasis is put on the strengthening the regulatory body, improvement of the supervision and control activities. (author)

  5. Closure Strategy for a Waste Disposal Facility with Multiple Waste Types and Regulatory Drivers at the Nevada Test Site - 8422

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D Wieland; V Yucel; L Desotell; G Shott; J Wrapp

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) plans to close the waste and classified material storage cells in the southeast quadrant of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS), informally known as the '92-Acre Area', by 2011. The 25 shallow trenches and pits and the 13 Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) borings contain various waste streams including low-level waste (LLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), transuranic (TRU), mixed transuranic (MTRU), and high specific activity LLW. The cells are managed under several regulatory and permit programs by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). Although the specific closure requirements for each cell vary, 37 closely spaced cells will be closed under a single integrated monolayer evapotranspirative (ET) final cover. One cell will be closed under a separate cover concurrently. The site setting and climate constrain transport pathways and are factors in the technical approach to closure and performance assessment. Successful implementation of the integrated closure plan requires excellent communication and coordination between NNSA/NSO and the regulators

  6. Genomic analysis of the hierarchical structure of regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haiyuan; Gerstein, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A fundamental question in biology is how the cell uses transcription factors (TFs) to coordinate the expression of thousands of genes in response to various stimuli. The relationships between TFs and their target genes can be modeled in terms of directed regulatory networks. These relationships, in turn, can be readily compared with commonplace “chain-of-command” structures in social networks, which have characteristic hierarchical layouts. Here, we develop algorithms for identifying generalized hierarchies (allowing for various loop structures) and use these approaches to illuminate extensive pyramid-shaped hierarchical structures existing in the regulatory networks of representative prokaryotes (Escherichia coli) and eukaryotes (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), with most TFs at the bottom levels and only a few master TFs on top. These masters are situated near the center of the protein–protein interaction network, a different type of network from the regulatory one, and they receive most of the input for the whole regulatory hierarchy through protein interactions. Moreover, they have maximal influence over other genes, in terms of affecting expression-level changes. Surprisingly, however, TFs at the bottom of the regulatory hierarchy are more essential to the viability of the cell. Finally, one might think master TFs achieve their wide influence through directly regulating many targets, but TFs with most direct targets are in the middle of the hierarchy. We find, in fact, that these midlevel TFs are “control bottlenecks” in the hierarchy, and this great degree of control for “middle managers” has parallels in efficient social structures in various corporate and governmental settings. PMID:17003135

  7. TANK FARM CLOSURE - A NEW TWIST ON REGULATORY STRATEGIES FOR CLOSURE OF WASTE TANK RESIDUALS FOLLOWING NUREG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LEHMAN LL

    2008-01-01

    Waste from a number of single-shell tanks (SST) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site has been retrieved by CH2M HILL Hanford Group to fulfill the requirements of the 'Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO) [1]. Laboratory analyses of the Hanford tank residual wastes have provided concentration data which will be used to determine waste classification and disposal options for tank residuals. The closure of tank farm facilities remains one of the most challenging activities faced by the DOE. This is due in part to the complicated regulatory structures that have developed. These regulatory structures are different at each of the DOE sites, making it difficult to apply lessons learned from one site to the next. During the past two years with the passage of the Section 3116 of the 'Ronald Reagan Defense Authorization Act of 2005' (NDAA) [2] some standardization has emerged for Savannah River Site and the Idaho National Laboratory tank residuals. Recently, with the issuance of 'NRC Staff Guidance for Activities Related to US. Department of Energy Waste Determinations' (NUREG-1854) [3] more explicit options may be considered for Hanford tank residuals than are presently available under DOE Orders. NUREG-1854, issued in August 2007, contains several key pieces of information that if utilized by the DOE in the tank closure process, could simplify waste classification and streamline the NRC review process by providing information to the NRC in their preferred format. Other provisions of this NUREG allow different methods to be applied in determining when waste retrieval is complete by incorporating actual project costs and health risks into the calculation of 'technically and economically practical'. Additionally, the NUREG requires a strong understanding of the uncertainties of the analyses, which given the desire of some NRC/DOE staff may increase the likelihood of using probabilistic approaches to uncertainty analysis. The purpose

  8. Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Dangerous Waste Sampling and Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MULKEY, C.H.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes sampling and analytical requirements needed to meet state and federal regulations for dangerous waste (DW). The River Protection Project (RPP) is assigned to the task of storage and interim treatment of hazardous waste. Any final treatment or disposal operations, as well as requirements under the land disposal restrictions (LDRs), fall in the jurisdiction of another Hanford organization and are not part of this scope. The requirements for this Data Quality Objective (DQO) Process were developed using the RPP Data Quality Objective Procedure (Banning 1996), which is based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Guidance for the Data Quality Objectives Process (EPA 1994). Hereafter, this document is referred to as the DW DQO. Federal and state laws and regulations pertaining to waste contain requirements that are dependent upon the composition of the waste stream. These regulatory drivers require that pertinent information be obtained. For many requirements, documented process knowledge of a waste composition can be used instead of analytical data to characterize or designate a waste. When process knowledge alone is used to characterize a waste, it is a best management practice to validate the information with analytical measurements

  9. Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Dangerous Waste Sampling and Analysis; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MULKEY, C.H.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes sampling and analytical requirements needed to meet state and federal regulations for dangerous waste (DW). The River Protection Project (RPP) is assigned to the task of storage and interim treatment of hazardous waste. Any final treatment or disposal operations, as well as requirements under the land disposal restrictions (LDRs), fall in the jurisdiction of another Hanford organization and are not part of this scope. The requirements for this Data Quality Objective (DQO) Process were developed using the RPP Data Quality Objective Procedure (Banning 1996), which is based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Guidance for the Data Quality Objectives Process (EPA 1994). Hereafter, this document is referred to as the DW DQO. Federal and state laws and regulations pertaining to waste contain requirements that are dependent upon the composition of the waste stream. These regulatory drivers require that pertinent information be obtained. For many requirements, documented process knowledge of a waste composition can be used instead of analytical data to characterize or designate a waste. When process knowledge alone is used to characterize a waste, it is a best management practice to validate the information with analytical measurements

  10. Regulatory aspects and activities in the field of radioactive waste management in Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastchiev, G.

    2001-01-01

    Bulgaria uses nuclear power for electricity generation and for a variety of nuclear applications in industry, research and medicine. Six WWER type Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) went into operation at Kozloduy between 1974 and 1991. Until 1988 spent fuel was transported back to the former Soviet Union, but since then has been stored on site. Operational low level waste is stored on site, but since 1993 a volume reduction strategy using supercompaction has been employed, which has reduced stored waste volumes by a factor of four. Institutional radioactive wastes are disposed at the Novi Han near surface repository, located 35 km from Sofia. It was commissioned in 1964 and is now about half full. Siting studies have begun for a new near surface repository that would accept both institutional and NPP waste. A legislative and regulatory framework, as well as organizational and institutional arrangements, are in place. A national strategy that includes provisions for compiling a national inventory of spent fuel and radioactive waste and provisions for funding spent fuel and radioactive waste management, has been developed. The paper elaborates on the current situation regarding radioactive waste management in Bulgaria. (author)

  11. National legislative and regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This section treats of the following activities sorted by country: 1 - Belarus: International cooperation, Organisation and structure, Licensing and regulatory infrastructure, Nuclear safety and radiological protection; 2 - France: Nuclear safety and radiological protection, Radioactive waste management, Environmental protection, Liability and compensation, International co-operation; 3 - Hungary: General legislation, Radioactive waste management, Nuclear security; 4 - Ireland: Nuclear safety and radiological protection (including emergency planning); 5 - Lithuania: Licensing and regulatory infrastructure; 6 - Moldova: Nuclear safety and radiological protection; 7 - Portugal: Radioactive waste management, Nuclear safety and radiological protection; 8 - Slovak Republic: Radioactive waste management, Liability and compensation; 9 - Spain: Radioactive waste management; 10 - Ukraine: Radioactive waste management; 11 - United Kingdom: Organisation and structure

  12. Regulatory strategies for high-level radioactive waste management in nine countries: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    This report provides information on the regulatory strategies being developed or implemented in nine countries for the management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The study was performed by International Energy Associates Limited on behalf of Pacific Northwest Laboratories and the US Department of Energy. IEAL obtained information for this report from the regulatory authorities in each country, who also later reviewed drafts of the respective country sections of the report. The nine countries surveyed were Belgium, Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, France, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States. These countries were selected for study because they are among the largest producers of nuclear energy in the world today and have aggressive programs for spent fuel management and waste disposal

  13. Development of regulatory procedures for the disposal of solid radioactive waste in deep, continental formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    For the disposal of radioactive waste, and in particular, of the high-level and alpha-bearing waste from the nuclear fuel cycle, the most favoured solution in most countries is disposal in deep, continental geological formations. Commitment to this disposal method involves a number of issues related to the various stages of the disposal programme which must be addressed through some reasoned decision-making process. Most countries are opting for regulating such a programme through licensing actions by a body whose purpose is to review, certify and ensure the safety of all the stages of the disposal programme. This regulatory body may either be one single national authority or a system of authorities designated by the government. The key to such regulation is the set of procedures, determined in advance, for the actions of the implementing organization, the review by the regulatory body and the involvement of other parties. This document concerns itself with the procedures which could logically be followed in reaching a set of rational decisions by the regulatory body. Care in the preparation and application of such procedures is an important element in the acceptability of the concept, the site and the other aspects of the disposal programme. The intention of this document is to give guidance as to what issues should be addressed in the licensing review, what decision points are important, and what guidance should be given to the applicant by the regulatory body in the course of the licensing actions. The procedures are keyed to be designed according to the logical steps involved in the development and operation of the repository. However, the document does not pretend to give guidance regarding the optimal interactions between the implementing organization and the regulatory body. This document is oriented to the disposal of solid radioactive waste in deep, continental geological formations using mining techniques

  14. The structure of the Dutch waste sector and impediments for waste reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, P.; Wolsink, M.

    1997-01-01

    The way in which organizations collect, treat and dispose of waste in The Netherlands frustrates the achievement of waste reduction goals. The possibility that directed modification of the structure of the waste sector may contribute to stimulating consumers (i.e. all waste producers using services

  15. The role of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in the management of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, H.L. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    In general, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for reviewing and making licensing decisions to ensure that the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) high-level waste repository is designed, constructed, and operated without unreasonable risk to public health and safety. In implementing this responsibility, however, the commission's guidance to the staff is that, in the absence of unresolved safety concerns, the NRC regulatory program will not delay the executive branch's program as set forth in the DOE project decision schedule. The NRC role for the next several years will be to develop its licensing framework and to consult with DOE on its plans. An essential ingredient in the success of both NRC's and DOE's respective missions is the need for free and open exchange of information, which will assure us that the concerns of all parties are addressed. With regard to low-level radioactive waste, the states have the lead responsibility for disposal. The NRC also provides assistance to the states and compacts on such items as regulatory programs, site characterization, and mixed waste disposal. Another of the NRC's roles is in the management of uranium mill tailings. Currently, most of the NRC's attention is focused on ensuring adequate long-term stabilization of tailings

  16. Regulatory issues and assumptions associated with barriers in the vadose zone surrounding buried waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siskind, B.; Heiser, J.

    1993-02-01

    One of the options for control of contaminant migration from buried waste sites is the construction of a subsurface barrier that consists of a wall of low permeability material. The barrier material should be compatible with soil and waste conditions specific to the site and have as low an effective diffusivity as is reasonably achievable to minimize or inhibit transport of moisture and contaminants. This report addresses the regulatory issues associated with the use of non-traditional organic polymer barriers as well as the use of soil-bentonite or cement-bentonite mixtures for such barriers, considering barriers constructed from these latter materials to be a regulatory baseline. The regulatory issues fall into two categories. The first category consists of issues associated with the acceptability of such barriers to the EPA as a method for achieving site or performanceimprovement. The second category encompasses those regulatory issues concerning health, safety and the environment which must be addressed regarding barrier installation and performance, especially if non-traditional materials are to be used

  17. Inter-generational Decision Making for Radioactive Waste Disposal, Policy and Science: Regulatory Protection Forever?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regnier, E.P.; Wallo, A.

    2006-01-01

    Assumptions about this generation's duty to future generations underlie decisions on regulatory requirements for disposal of radioactive waste. Regulatory provisions related to time of compliance, dose criteria, and institutional controls, for example, continue to be topics of discussion as regulations are revised or compared. Subjective and difficult ethical issues are either explicit or implicit in these discussions. The information and criteria used must be relevant and help make good decisions that, ideally, increase the overall welfare of future generations. To what extent can or should science usefully inform such decision-making? Both the National Academies of Science and the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) have reported on this topic, albeit from different viewpoints. This paper explains and expands upon the rationale used for setting compliance time periods such as the Department of Energy's requirement for a 1,000 year time of compliance with dose limits for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. It evaluates radioactive waste disposal against principles of equity recommended by NAPA. Radioactive waste disposal standards require evaluation of impacts much farther into the future than has been common for other endeavors with very long term effects. While performance assessment analyses provide much useful information, their inherent uncertainties over long time periods preclude the projection of reality. Thus, the usefulness of extremely long projections in supporting good decisions that promote the welfare of future generations is limited. Such decisions are fundamentally a question of resource allocation, equity, and fairness. (authors)

  18. Implementation of the waste management transfer act. Requirements from a regulatory point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Dehn, Christian

    2017-01-01

    In future in Germany, the state will be responsible for financing and handling the interim and final storage of radioactive waste from nuclear power plants. With regard to interim storage, this objective is achieved with the provisions of the Waste Management Transfer Act. Regulatory implementation is based on these regulations. BGZ Gesellschaft fuer Zwischenlager mbH is responsible for interim storage on behalf of the Federal Government. Simultaneously with the transfer of interim storage facilities to BGZ a legal transfer of approval is carried out. Insofar as there is a technical, organisational or personnel conjunction with the nuclear power plant operation, which continues to exist beyond this deadline and is relevant for regulatory purposes, a regulation is made via a service contract with the BGZ. This ensures compliance with the licensing regulations. Irradiated fuel assemblies and the waste from reprocessing can be handed over to BGZ from 1 January 2019 onwards and waste with negligible heat generation can be disposed of as of the determination of their proper packaging.

  19. Limited BRC rulemaking: Regulatory approach and experience in Texas for short-lived radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBurney, Ruth E.; Pollard, Christine G.

    1992-01-01

    In 1987, the Texas Department of Health (TDH) implemented a rule to allow, under certain conditions, wastes containing limited concentrations of short- lived radionuclides (less than 300-day half-life) to be disposed of in Type I sanitary landfills. The rule was based on a technical analysis that demonstrated the degree of safety for approximately 340 m of radioactive waste generated annually in Texas and identified major restrictions and conditions for disposal. TDH's Bureau of Radiation Control staff have been able to maintain an account of licensees utilizing the rule during the past years. Several research and industrial facilities in the state have saved significantly on waste disposal expenses. Public concerns and economic impacts for licensees as well as other regulatory aspects and experiences with the rule are discussed. (author)

  20. Applicability of federal and state hazardous waste regulatory programs to waste chemical weapons and chemical warfare agents.; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haffenden, R.; Kimmell, T.

    2002-01-01

    This report reviews federal and state hazardous waste regulatory programs that govern the management of chemical weapons or chemical warfare agents. It addresses state programs in the eight states with chemical weapon storage facilities managed by the U.S. Army: Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Oregon, and Utah. It also includes discussions on 32 additional states or jurisdictions with known or suspected chemical weapons or chemical warfare agent presence (e.g., disposal sites containing chemical agent identification sets): Alaska, Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Virginia, Washington, Washington, D.C., and Wyoming. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste programs are reviewed to determine whether chemical weapons or chemical warfare agents are listed hazardous wastes or otherwise defined or identified as hazardous wastes. Because the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) military munitions rule specifically addresses the management of chemical munitions, this report also indicates whether a state has adopted the rule and whether the resulting state regulations have been authorized by EPA. Many states have adopted parts or all of the EPA munitions rule but have not yet received authorization from EPA to implement the rule. In these cases, the states may enforce the adopted munitions rule provisions under state law, but these provisions are not federally enforceable

  1. The structure of the Dutch waste sector and impediments for waste reduction

    OpenAIRE

    de Jong, P.; Wolsink, M.

    1997-01-01

    The way in which organizations collect, treat and dispose of waste in The Netherlands frustrates the achievement of waste reduction goals. The possibility that directed modification of the structure of the waste sector may contribute to stimulating consumers (i.e. all waste producers using services from collectors) to limit the generation of waste at the source by means of source reduction, re-use and recycling, is the subject of research of which the first results are presented here. This ar...

  2. Future directions for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's low-level waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starmer, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act envisioned that all states would be able to dispose of commercial low-level waste generated within their borders by 1986, either individually or through interstate compacts. Based on the current status of state and compact efforts, it is clear that no new disposal sites will be available by 1986 or for some period thereafter. In the short-term, there is uncertainty that the existing disposal sites will remain open after January 1, 1986, or if restrictions will apply after that time. If restrictions occur, storage, treatment or even curtailed generation may result for individual waste producers. Other uncertainties clouding implementation of the Policy Act include the final configuration of regional compacts - in the northeast in particular - clear assignment of responsibility for disposal of classes of waste, the method of disposal - shallow land burial or alternatives - that will be employed for low-level waste, and regulation of mixed wastes, wastes which have both radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous constituents. The NRC strategy for low-level waste management aims to resolve or reduce these uncertainties, and to encourage transition to a stable, national system based on timely state action. NRC will continue development of regulatory and technical guidance for disposal site licensing and build on its capabilities to address specific areas of state concern, such as alternatives to shallow land burial, and site characterization and modeling. NRC also plans to expand state and compact outreach efforts to help ensure that our technical work is properly focused. The authors will also be directly assisting those states and compacts on technical matters they confront in actual disposal site development and licensing

  3. Proceedings of the tenth annual DOE low-level waste management conference: Session 1: Institutional and regulatory issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This document contains eleven papers on various aspects of low-level radioactive waste regulation. Topics include: EPA environmental standards; international exemption principles; the concept of below regulatory concern; envirocare activities in Utah; mixed waste; FUSRAP and the Superfund; and a review of various incentive programs. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base

  4. Structural imprints in vivo decode RNA regulatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitale, Robert C; Flynn, Ryan A; Zhang, Qiangfeng Cliff; Crisalli, Pete; Lee, Byron; Jung, Jong-Wha; Kuchelmeister, Hannes Y; Batista, Pedro J; Torre, Eduardo A; Kool, Eric T; Chang, Howard Y

    2015-03-26

    Visualizing the physical basis for molecular behaviour inside living cells is a great challenge for biology. RNAs are central to biological regulation, and the ability of RNA to adopt specific structures intimately controls every step of the gene expression program. However, our understanding of physiological RNA structures is limited; current in vivo RNA structure profiles include only two of the four nucleotides that make up RNA. Here we present a novel biochemical approach, in vivo click selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation and profiling experiment (icSHAPE), which enables the first global view, to our knowledge, of RNA secondary structures in living cells for all four bases. icSHAPE of the mouse embryonic stem cell transcriptome versus purified RNA folded in vitro shows that the structural dynamics of RNA in the cellular environment distinguish different classes of RNAs and regulatory elements. Structural signatures at translational start sites and ribosome pause sites are conserved from in vitro conditions, suggesting that these RNA elements are programmed by sequence. In contrast, focal structural rearrangements in vivo reveal precise interfaces of RNA with RNA-binding proteins or RNA-modification sites that are consistent with atomic-resolution structural data. Such dynamic structural footprints enable accurate prediction of RNA-protein interactions and N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) modification genome wide. These results open the door for structural genomics of RNA in living cells and reveal key physiological structures controlling gene expression.

  5. Trichomes: different regulatory networks lead to convergent structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna, Laura; Martin, Cathie

    2006-06-01

    Sometimes, proteins, biological structures or even organisms have similar functions and appearances but have evolved through widely divergent pathways. There is experimental evidence to suggest that different developmental pathways have converged to produce similar outgrowths of the aerial plant epidermis, referred to as trichomes. The emerging picture suggests that trichomes in Arabidopsis thaliana and, perhaps, in cotton develop through a transcriptional regulatory network that differs from those regulating trichome formation in Antirrhinum and Solanaceous species. Several lines of evidence suggest that the duplication of a gene controlling anthocyanin production and subsequent divergence might be the major force driving trichome formation in Arabidopsis, whereas the multicellular trichomes of Antirrhinum and Solanaceous species appear to have a different regulatory origin.

  6. Operational and regulatory impacts of regional management on transportation of commercial low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirley, C.G.; Wilmot, E.L.; Shepherd, E.W.

    1981-09-01

    The 96th Congress of the United States, as part of the Low-level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-573), instructed the Secretary of the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a report on the current US low-level waste management situation and the conditions and requirements for management on a regional basis. The Transportation Technology Center has compared the transportation requirement and regional management scenarios for commercial low-level radioactive waste in support of the DOE response to this instruction. Using 1979 low-level waste volumes shipped to commercial burial grounds and six management regions postulated by DOE, transportation requirements were estimated and compared for the two management scenarios in terms of cumulative shipping distance and transportation cost. Effects of these results on the demand for transportation services and equipment and on population risks were considered. Finally, current regulatory issues and the potential effects of regional management on regulation of low-level waste transportation were reviewed

  7. EPA's criteria development for radioactive waste that is Below Regulatory Concern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, W.F.; Gruhlke, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The EPA's program for developing environmental standards for land disposal of low-level radioactive wastes, including a criterion for determining wastes with sufficiently low levels of radioactivity to be considered Below Regulatory Concern (BRC) has completed its risk assessment and cost-effectiveness analyses. The analyses for the BRC criterion included evaluation of general population health risks, maximum annual exposures to critical population groups, and costs of risk reduction. These risk assessments include analyses of 18 surrogate radioactive waste streams, representing both fuel cycle and non-fuel cycle facilities. Less restrictive disposal alternatives typical of those used for municipal garbage disposal, such as sanitary landfills, and situated in diverse demographic settings were used in the analyses. A number of waste types which contribute only small doses or fractions of a health effect over 10,000 years from unregulated disposal were identified. Disposal of such wastes without consideration of their very low radioactivity content results in significant cost savings. 3 references, 1 figure, 4 tables

  8. Groundwater contamination from waste management sites: The interaction between risk-based engineering design and regulatory policy: 1. Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massmann, Joel; Freeze, R. Allan

    1987-02-01

    This paper puts in place a risk-cost-benefit analysis for waste management facilities that explicitly recognizes the adversarial relationship that exists in a regulated market economy between the owner/operator of a waste management facility and the government regulatory agency under whose terms the facility must be licensed. The risk-cost-benefit analysis is set up from the perspective of the owner/operator. It can be used directly by the owner/operator to assess alternative design strategies. It can also be used by the regulatory agency to assess alternative regulatory policy, but only in an indirect manner, by examining the response of an owner/operator to the stimuli of various policies. The objective function is couched in terms of a discounted stream of benefits, costs, and risks over an engineering time horizon. Benefits are in the form of revenues for services provided; costs are those of construction and operation of the facility. Risk is defined as the cost associated with the probability of failure, with failure defined as the occurrence of a groundwater contamination event that violates the licensing requirements established for the facility. Failure requires a breach of the containment structure and contaminant migration through the hydrogeological environment to a compliance surface. The probability of failure can be estimated on the basis of reliability theory for the breach of containment and with a Monte-Carlo finite-element simulation for the advective contaminant transport. In the hydrogeological environment the hydraulic conductivity values are defined stochastically. The probability of failure is reduced by the presence of a monitoring network operated by the owner/operator and located between the source and the regulatory compliance surface. The level of reduction in the probability of failure depends on the probability of detection of the monitoring network, which can be calculated from the stochastic contaminant transport simulations. While

  9. Waste convention regulatory impact on planning safety assessment for LILW disposal in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valcic, I.; Subasic, D.; Lokner, V.

    2000-01-01

    Preparations for establishment of a LILW repository in Croatia have reached a point where a preliminary safety assessment for the prospective facility is being planned. The planning is not based upon the national regulatory framework, which does not require such an assessment at this early stage, but upon the interagency BSS and the IAEA RADWASS programme recommendations because the national regulations are being revised with express purpose to conform to the most recent international standards and good practices. The Waste Convention, which Croatia has ratified in the meantime, supports this approach in principle, but does not appear to have more tangible regulatory relevance for the safety assessment planning. Its actual requirements regarding safety analyses for a repository fall short of the specific assessment concepts practiced in this decade, and could have well been met by the old Croatian regulations from the mid-eighties. (author)

  10. Reversibility of Decisions and Retrievability of Radioactive Waste: An Overview of Regulatory Positions and Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz-Lopez, Carmen; Pescatore, Claudio

    2015-02-01

    The Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC) of the NEA has been at the forefront worldwide in examining the topic of Reversibility and Retrievability (R and R). As early as 2001, an NEA survey-based report entitled 'Reversibility and Retrievability in Geological Disposal of Radioactive Waste' provided an overview of R and R by an ad-hoc group of experts from 11 NEA Member countries. The 2001 report (NEA 2001) observed that national safety regulations dealt mainly with operational safety and design targets for long-term (post-closure) safety and relatively little consideration was given to retrievability/reversibility or its implications. Yet, policy frames saw benefits from retrievability. In 2007, the RWMC launched the NEA R and R project with participation from 15 countries and two international organisations. The project included, amongst its members, representatives of six organisations involved in regulation, five regulatory authorities of five countries and one technical support organisation to the safety authorities. The project aimed to improve awareness amongst the RWMC constituency of the breadth of issues and positions regarding the concepts of R and R with the goal of providing a neutral overview of relevant issues and viewpoints in OECD countries. Hence substantial attention was given to R and R regulatory issues mainly in the context of decision making for repository development. The report (NEA 2011) points out regulatory issues, including safety criteria and licensing considerations. The present document presents an overview of findings, positions, boundary conditions and issues based on the results of the R and R project of 2007-2011 (stepwise decision making and reversibility, regulatory authorisations and R and R, decision making for retrieval) and of the Reims conference of December 2010 (terminology and definitions, legal and policy context, motivations for R and R, practical aspects, stakeholders confidence aspects)

  11. Overall review strategy for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's High-Level Waste Repository Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.L.

    1994-11-01

    The Overall Review Strategy gives general guidance to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff for conducting it's license application and pre-license application reviews. These reviews are in support of the Commission's construction authorization decision for a geologic repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Objectives and strategies are defined that focus the staff's reviews on determining compliance with requirements of 10 CFR Part 60. These strategies define how the staff prioritizes its reviews on those key technical uncertainties considered to be most important to repository performance. Strategies also give guidance for developing, in an integrated way, the License Application Review Plan together with supporting performance assessments, analyses, and research

  12. Support in the development of Regulatory Procedures for licensing Lepse Waste Management Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    This report describes a project intended to assist Gosatomnadzor of Russia develop a set of documents defining the regulatory requirements for information to be submitted to Gosatomnadzor in support of any application for a licence relating to the removal of spent nuclear fuel from the depot ship Lepse. The project resulted in the development of three regulatory documents covering the documentation required in support of a licence application, the requirements for quality assurance arrangements and the safety analysis report. The working method adopted involved staged development of draft material and review at workshops involving a wide variety of relevant Russian and western organizations. The input and output of the workshops was fully documented to provide an audit trail for the document development and the rationale for what has been included and what is excluded and why. The availability of the regulatory documents in English should significantly assist in the use of the documents by western partners in the actual industrial project. Important experience and information was exchanged among participants in the project. The developing understanding is an important element in providing confidence, from a western perspective, that appropriate regulatory supervision can be applied to industrial projects supported by organizations such as the European Commission and national agencies. The same working methods could be used in the next phase of Lepse regulatory support, i.e., support in development of the procedures for the regulatory review of licence applications, and, subsequently, support in the application of the regulatory inspection process to ensure licence conditions are being complied with. Similarly, these working methods could be used in providing regulatory support for nuclear and radiation safety related to other industrial projects involving radioactive waste management. The participants in this sub-project described in this report were Norwegian

  13. Regulatory dilemmas of a trans-solutional problem: Spatial and temporal isolation of radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnsrud, J.H. [State College, PA (United States). Sierra Club National Nuclear Waste Task Force

    1999-04-01

    This paper explores the `trans-solutional` nature of nuclear waste control - that it is in essence beyond human solution. To protect present and future human health, radioactive wastes require effective isolation from the biosphere for the full hazardous life of the wastes. Waste sequestration is essential to protect human beings, other forms of life in the bio-system, and the environment from adverse mutational impacts of exposures to ionizing radiation experienced in excess of those received from naturally-occurring background sources. The linear hypothesis of dose-response describes the relationship of radiation exposures to health at least with respect to cancer induction and hereditary genetic effects. The issue of risks of low-level radiation effects remains in controversy, with pressures exerted on regulators to ignore or minimize those impacts. However, recent research indicates that chronic low-dose exposures via inhalation and ingestion pathways may also give rise to non-fatal non-cancer deleterious health effects. Fatal cancers, now the primary measure of radiation injury in setting standards, may be less significant to a population in the long run than more subtle low-level impacts affecting genetic material. The latter, hard to identify or measure, may reduce developmental and reproductive capability. Given the hazardous longevity of high-level wastes, it is imperative that both protective standards and waste regulation be framed within an ethic of species responsibility. In our half century we have generated vast amounts of long-lived waste, with more promised in the coming millennium. The regulatory obligation is to isolate all nuclear wastes to best prevent any releases to the biosphere now but also to assure future generations an equal opportunity when our `disposal` methods inevitably fail over future time, to be able to retrieve and continue to isolate the wastes that we have caused to be produced. lt follows that the standards must not calculate

  14. Regulatory dilemmas of a trans-solutional problem: Spatial and temporal isolation of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsrud, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    This paper explores the 'trans-solutional' nature of nuclear waste control - that it is in essence beyond human solution. To protect present and future human health, radioactive wastes require effective isolation from the biosphere for the full hazardous life of the wastes. Waste sequestration is essential to protect human beings, other forms of life in the bio-system, and the environment from adverse mutational impacts of exposures to ionizing radiation experienced in excess of those received from naturally-occurring background sources. The linear hypothesis of dose-response describes the relationship of radiation exposures to health at least with respect to cancer induction and hereditary genetic effects. The issue of risks of low-level radiation effects remains in controversy, with pressures exerted on regulators to ignore or minimize those impacts. However, recent research indicates that chronic low-dose exposures via inhalation and ingestion pathways may also give rise to non-fatal non-cancer deleterious health effects. Fatal cancers, now the primary measure of radiation injury in setting standards, may be less significant to a population in the long run than more subtle low-level impacts affecting genetic material. The latter, hard to identify or measure, may reduce developmental and reproductive capability. Given the hazardous longevity of high-level wastes, it is imperative that both protective standards and waste regulation be framed within an ethic of species responsibility. In our half century we have generated vast amounts of long-lived waste, with more promised in the coming millennium. The regulatory obligation is to isolate all nuclear wastes to best prevent any releases to the biosphere now but also to assure future generations an equal opportunity when our 'disposal' methods inevitably fail over future time, to be able to retrieve and continue to isolate the wastes that we have caused to be produced. lt follows that the standards must not calculate

  15. Below Regulatory Conern Owners Group: Radiologic impact of accidents and unexpected events from disposal of BRC waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waite, D.A.; Dolan, M.M.; Rish, W.R.; Rossi, A.J.; McCourt, J.E.

    1989-07-01

    This report determines the radiological impact of accidents and unexpected events in the disposal of Below Regulatory Concern (BRC) waste. The accident analysis considers the transportation, incineration, and disposal of BRC waste as municipal solid waste. The potential greatest radiological impact for each type of accident is identified through the use of event trees. These accident events are described in terms of the generic waste property(ies) (e.g., flammability, dispersibility, leachability, and solubility) that cause the greatest radiological impact. 7 refs., 32 figs., 12 tabs

  16. Radioactive waste disposal process geological structure for the waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtois, G.; Jaouen, C.

    1983-01-01

    The process described here consists to carry out the two phases of storage operation (intermediate and definitive) of radioactive wastes (especially the vitrified ones) in a geological dispositif (horizontal shafts) at an adequate deepness but suitable for a natural convection ventilation with fresh air from the land surface and moved only with the calorific heat released by the burried radioactive wastes when the radioactive decay has reached the adequate level, the shafts are totally and definitely occluded [fr

  17. Regulatory effects of cotranscriptional RNA structure formation and transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng-Rui; Hu, Chun-Gen; Zhang, Jin-Zhi

    2016-09-01

    RNAs, which play significant roles in many fundamental biological processes of life, fold into sophisticated and precise structures. RNA folding is a dynamic and intricate process, which conformation transition of coding and noncoding RNAs form the primary elements of genetic regulation. The cellular environment contains various intrinsic and extrinsic factors that potentially affect RNA folding in vivo, and experimental and theoretical evidence increasingly indicates that the highly flexible features of the RNA structure are affected by these factors, which include the flanking sequence context, physiochemical conditions, cis RNA-RNA interactions, and RNA interactions with other molecules. Furthermore, distinct RNA structures have been identified that govern almost all steps of biological processes in cells, including transcriptional activation and termination, transcriptional mutagenesis, 5'-capping, splicing, 3'-polyadenylation, mRNA export and localization, and translation. Here, we briefly summarize the dynamic and complex features of RNA folding along with a wide variety of intrinsic and extrinsic factors that affect RNA folding. We then provide several examples to elaborate RNA structure-mediated regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Finally, we illustrate the regulatory roles of RNA structure and discuss advances pertaining to RNA structure in plants. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:562-574. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1350 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Criteria for waste-related risks to be below regulatory concern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trubatch, S.L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes and analyzes the criteria recently established by the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit for determining that a risk is de minimis, i.e., below regulatory concern (BRC), for the purpose of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, 42 USC 2011 et seq. The court established these BRC criteria incidentally during its review of intervenors' challenge to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) issuance of an operating license for the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant. In the course of that licensing proceeding, the NRC had determined that its regulations did not require it to consider the complicating effects of earthquakes on emergency planning. Although the legal standard and its quantitation arose in the context of emergency planning, these criteria are equally applicable to waste-related risks cognizable under the Atomic Energy Act. These criteria imply that the NRC, when licensing a waste repository, need not consider the risk of a catastrophic accident having a frequency of occurrence of less than one chance in one hundred thousand per year

  19. Regulatory controls on the hydrogeological characterization of a mixed waste disposal site, Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruebelmann, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    Following the detection of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in the groundwater beneath the SDA in the summer of 1987, hydrogeological characterization of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The waste site, the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA), is the subject of a RCRA Corrective Action Program. Regulatory requirements for the Corrective Action Program dictate a phased approach to evaluation of the SDA. In the first phase of the program, the SDA is the subject of a RCRA Facility Investigation (RIF), which will obtain information to fully characterize the physical properties of the site, determine the nature and extent of contamination, and identify pathways for migration of contaminants. If the need for corrective measures is identified during the RIF, a Corrective Measures Study (CMS) will be performed as second phase. Information generated during the RIF will be used to aid in the selection and implementation of appropriate corrective measures to correct the release. Following the CMS, the final phase is the implementation of the selected corrective measures. 4 refs., 1 fig

  20. Regulatory issues and assumptions associated with polymers for subsurface barriers surrounding buried waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiser, J.; Siskind, B.

    1993-01-01

    One of the options for control of contaminant migration from buried waste sites is the construction of a subsurface barrier that consists of a wall of low permeability material. Subsurface barriers will improve remediation performance by removing pathways for contaminant transport due to groundwater movement, meteorological water infiltration, vapor- and gas-phase transport, transpiration, etc. Subsurface barriers may be used to open-quotes directclose quotes contaminant movement to collection sumps/lysimeters in cases of unexpected remediation failures or transport mechanisms, to contain leakage from underground storage tanks, and to restrict in-situ soil cleanup operation and chemicals. Brookhaven National Laboratory is currently investigating advanced polymer materials for subsurface barriers. This report addresses the regulatory aspects of using of non-traditional polymer materials as well as soil-bentonite or cement-bentonite mixtures for such barriers. The regulatory issues fall into two categories. The first category consists of issues associated with the acceptability of subsurface barriers to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a method for achieving waste site performance improvement. The second category encompasses those regulatory issues concerning health, safety and the environment which must be addressed regarding barrier installation and performance, especially if non-traditional materials are to be used. Since many of EPA's concerns regarding subsurface barriers focus on the chemicals used during installation of these barriers the authors discuss the results of a search of the Federal Register and the Code of Federal Regulations for references in Titles 29 and 40 pertaining to key chemicals likely to be utilized in installing non-traditional barrier materials. The use of polymeric materials in the construction industry has been accomplished with full compliance with the applicable health, safety, and environmental regulations

  1. National legislative and regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This section gathers the following national legislative and regulatory activities sorted by country: Bulgaria: General legislation; Czech Republic: General legislation; France: General legislation, Regulatory infrastructure and activity; Germany: General legislation; India: Liability and compensation, Organisation and structure; Ireland: Radiation protection, General legislation; Korea (Republic of): Organisation and structure; Lithuania: Regulatory infrastructure and activity, Radioactive waste management, Radiation protection, international cooperation, Nuclear safety; Poland: General legislation; Romania: Environmental protection; Russian Federation: Radioactive waste management; Slovenia: Nuclear safety; Spain: Liability and compensation, Nuclear security; Sweden: Nuclear safety; Turkey: Radiation protection, Regulatory infrastructure and activity, Nuclear safety, Liability and compensation; United States: General legislation

  2. Extra-regulatory impact tests and analyses of the structural evaluation test unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwigsen, J.S.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    The structural evaluation test unit is roughly equivalent to a 1/3 scale model of a high level waste rail cask. The test unit was designed to just meet the requirements of NRC Regulatory Guide 7.6 when subjected to a 9 m (30 ft) free drop resulting in an impact velocity of 13.4 m/s (30 mph) onto an unyielding target in the end-on orientation. The test unit was then subjected to impacts with higher velocities to determine the amount of built-in conservatism in this design approach. Test impacts of 13.4, 20.1 and 26.8 m/s (30, 45, and 60 mph) were performed. This paper will describe the design, testing, and comparison of measured strains and deformations to the equivalent analytical predictions

  3. Status report on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations for land disposal of low-level radioactive wastes and geologic repository disposal of high-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browning, R.E.; Bell, M.J.; Dragonette, K.S.; Johnson, T.C.; Roles, G.W.; Lohaus, P.H.; Regnier, E.P.

    1984-01-01

    On 27 December 1982, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) amended its regulations to provide specific requirements for licensing the land disposal of low-level radioactive wastes. The regulations establish performance objectives for land disposal of waste; technical requirements for the siting, design, operations, and closure activities for a near-surface disposal facility; technical requirements concerning waste form and classification that waste generators must meet for the land disposal of waste; institutional requirements; financial assurance requirements; and administrative and procedural requirements for licensing a disposal facility. Waste generators must comply with the waste form and classification provisions of the new rule, on 27 December 1983, one year later. During this implementation period, licensees must develop programmes to ensure compliance with the new waste form and classification provisions. The NRC is also promulgating regulations specifying the technical criteria for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in geological repositories. The proposed rule was published for public comment in July 1981. Public comments have been received and considered by the Commission staff. The Commission will soon approve and publish a revised final rule. While the final rule being considered by the Commission is fundamentally the same as the proposed rule, provisions have been added to permit flexibility in the application of numerical criteria, some detailed design requirements have been deleted, and other changes have been made in response to comments. The rule is consistent with the recently enacted Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. (author)

  4. Regulatory Anatomy: How "Safety Logics" Structure European Transplant Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeyer, Klaus

    2015-07-01

    This article proposes the term "safety logics" to understand attempts within the European Union (EU) to harmonize member state legislation to ensure a safe and stable supply of human biological material for transplants and transfusions. With safety logics, I refer to assemblages of discourses, legal documents, technological devices, organizational structures, and work practices aimed at minimizing risk. I use this term to reorient the analytical attention with respect to safety regulation. Instead of evaluating whether safety is achieved, the point is to explore the types of "safety" produced through these logics as well as to consider the sometimes unintended consequences of such safety work. In fact, the EU rules have been giving rise to complaints from practitioners finding the directives problematic and inadequate. In this article, I explore the problems practitioners face and why they arise. In short, I expose the regulatory anatomy of the policy landscape.

  5. Historical perspective, economic analysis, and regulatory analysis of the impacts of waste partitioning-transmutation on the disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Croff, A.G.; Kocher, D.C.

    1990-10-01

    Partitioning-transmutation, sometimes called actinide burning, is an alternative approach to high-level radioactive waste management. It consists of removing long-lived radionuclides from wastes and destroying those radionuclides, thus reducing the long-term hazards of radioactive waste. It was studied in detail in the 1970's. New developments in technology and other factors are resulting in a reexamination of this waste management option. This report consists of three papers which summarize the historical work, update the analysis of the costs of waste disposal, and describe current regulatory requirements which might be impacted by P-T. The papers provide a starting point for future research on P-T. 152 refs., 2 figs., 19 tabs

  6. Memory functions reveal structural properties of gene regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Carrasco, Ruben

    2018-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) control cellular function and decision making during tissue development and homeostasis. Mathematical tools based on dynamical systems theory are often used to model these networks, but the size and complexity of these models mean that their behaviour is not always intuitive and the underlying mechanisms can be difficult to decipher. For this reason, methods that simplify and aid exploration of complex networks are necessary. To this end we develop a broadly applicable form of the Zwanzig-Mori projection. By first converting a thermodynamic state ensemble model of gene regulation into mass action reactions we derive a general method that produces a set of time evolution equations for a subset of components of a network. The influence of the rest of the network, the bulk, is captured by memory functions that describe how the subnetwork reacts to its own past state via components in the bulk. These memory functions provide probes of near-steady state dynamics, revealing information not easily accessible otherwise. We illustrate the method on a simple cross-repressive transcriptional motif to show that memory functions not only simplify the analysis of the subnetwork but also have a natural interpretation. We then apply the approach to a GRN from the vertebrate neural tube, a well characterised developmental transcriptional network composed of four interacting transcription factors. The memory functions reveal the function of specific links within the neural tube network and identify features of the regulatory structure that specifically increase the robustness of the network to initial conditions. Taken together, the study provides evidence that Zwanzig-Mori projections offer powerful and effective tools for simplifying and exploring the behaviour of GRNs. PMID:29470492

  7. The regulatory framework for storage and disposal of radioactive waste in the member states of the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burholt, G.D.; Martin, A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to collate information and to summarise the present situation with regard to the regulatory framework for the storage and disposal of radioactive waste in each of the member countries of the European Community together with several important countries outside the Community. (author)

  8. High-level waste program management: A ratepayers' and regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, E.G.

    1986-01-01

    The nation's electric utility regulators have joined the effort to enhance the federal project to dispose of high-level nuclear waste. Because all financial support comes from ratepayers, the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC), through the mechanism of a subcommittee, seeks to investigate and monitor the federal program to provide to the Congress and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) the NARUC's unique expertise. Its views to enhance program management and improve cost control are its central contribution. While conveying no lack of confidence in the federal management, the NARUC is imparting its relevant experience derived from review of nuclear power plant construction and cost control. Recommendations are made for more cost-effective program direction and views on its management are given. Financial control, public input and cost responsibilities for disposal of defense and commercial wastes are separately identified. Needs for the DOE's heightened insight into and development of the monitored retrievable storage proposal to the Congress are described. Finally, with a warning that there exists a limit to ratepayer funding of this effort, the request is made for Congressional cost-control hearings and for expanded dialogue between the Department of Engery and financially responsible parties

  9. Development of joint regulatory guidance on the management of higher activity radioactive wastes on nuclear licensed sites - 16095

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacon, Mick; Ilett, Doug; Whittall, Andy

    2009-01-01

    In 2006 the UK Government's response (1) to recommendations by its Committee on Radioactive Waste Management (CoRWM) established, in England and Wales, that geological disposal, supported by safe and secure interim storage, is the preferred route for the long-term management of higher-activity radioactive waste (i.e. that which is not suitable for near-surface disposal). It also gave the responsibility for delivering the programme for a deep geological repository to the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA). The Scottish Government has a policy of long term, near site, near surface safe and secure interim storage. To support the open and transparent approach promised by Government, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), the Environment Agency and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) are developing joint guidance on the management of higher-activity radioactive waste to explain regulatory objectives in securing safe and secure interim storage and the associated management of radioactive wastes. The guidance comes in two parts: - Guidance on the regulatory process; - Technical guidance modules. The guidance promotes a cradle to grave approach to radioactive waste management and by aligning the regulatory interests of environmental and safety regulators it delivers one of the Government's 'Better Regulation' objectives. This paper describes the process by which the joint guidance was produced with particular emphasis on stakeholder engagement. It describes the key features of the guidance, including the concept of the radioactive waste management case (RWMC). Finally the problems encountered with dissemination and implementation are discussed together with measures taken by the regulators to improve these aspects. (1) : UK Government and the devolved administrations, 'Response to the Report and Recommendations from the Committee on Radioactive Waste Management (CoRWM)', (PB 12303) October 2006. www.defra.gov.uk/environment/radioactivity/waste

  10. Glass-ceramics with multibarrier structure obtained from industrial waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berzina, L.; Cimdins, R.; Rozenstrauha, I. [Riga Tech. Univ. (Latvia). Fac. of Chem. Technol.; Bossert, J. [Technisches Inst.: Materialwissenschaft, Friedrich-Schiller-Univ., Jena (Germany); Kravtchenko, I. [Inst. for Problems of Material Science, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1997-12-31

    Recycling problem for various kind of waste is solved by processing the waste to ecological depositable products with multibarrier structure. In order to form a multibarrier structure the ecologically incompatible substances may be diluted and chemically bound until their recycling products gain a structure like natural mineral or glass (I. barrier). After that, remineralized materials are converted into a new product by melting or powder technology using an ecological compatible type of waste as a matrix phase (II. barrier). Waste which are treated this way could be applied to produce ceramic building materials and goods such as floor tiles, stone pavement and casting products. Industrial waste from the metallurgical factory in Latvia ``Liepajas metalurgs`` are metallurgical slag, filter dust, etching waste and sewage used in technologies. The main constituents of chemical compositions of these waste are: Fe, Ca, Si, Mg, Al, Mn etc. In some types of waste a small amount of ecologically risky elements such as Cr, Ni, Zr, Sn and Pb can occur. The combination of metallurgical waste with peat ashes from Riga thermal power station, oil shale ashes or glass waste under controlled sintering procedure gives bulk materials with surface or/and bulkcrystallization. The structure of glass-ceramics built this way may prevent the migration of ecologically risky elements into environment due to corrosion or friction. Physical-chemical properties and thermal behaviour (DTA, dilatometry, melting) of waste define the range of sintering for production of glass-ceramics (powder technology) and decorative glass-ceramic materials (melting and powder technology). (orig.) 5 refs.

  11. Hazardous E-waste and its impact on soil structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharini, K.; Cynthia, J. Bernadette; Kamalambikai, B.; Sudar Celestina, J. P. Arul; Muthu, D.

    2017-07-01

    E-waste disposal has been a significant issue over the past few decades with the development of technology and the plethora of electronic products produced. The inclusive term E-Waste encapsulates various forms of electrical and electronical equipment which provides no value to the current owners and it is one among the fastest growing waste streams. E-Waste is a complex, non-biodegradable waste which is generally dumped in mountain like heaps. These wastes are said to have a large quantities of lead, cadmium, arsenic etc.it is mandatory to dispose such scrupulously since they have the ability to affect the soil and water parameters. Solid waste management is a blooming field which strives to reduce the accumulation of used electronic gadgets. Rainwater gets infiltrated through the e-waste landfill and it leaches through the soil which in turn reaches the groundwater directly thereby affecting the water intended for drinking and domestic purposes. This study focuses on the consequences of toxic waste by comparing the difference in properties of the soil structure prior to and after the e-waste landfill at various concentrations.

  12. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Role and Activities Related to U.S. Department of Energy Incidental Waste Determinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, A.H.; Esh, D.W.; Ridge, A.C.

    2006-01-01

    Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA) requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to consult with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for certain non-high level waste (HLW) determinations. Under the NDAA, NRC performs consultative technical reviews of DOE's waste determinations and monitors DOE's disposal actions for such waste, but the NRC does not have regulatory authority over DOE's waste disposal activities. The NDAA provides the criteria that must be met to determine that waste is not HLW. The criteria require that the waste does not need to be disposed of in a geologic repository, that highly radioactive radionuclides be removed to the maximum extent practical, and that the performance objectives of 10 CFR 61, Subpart C, be met. The performance objectives contain criteria for protection of the public, protection of inadvertent intruders, protection of workers, and stability of the disposal site after closure. This paper describes NRC's approach to implementing its responsibilities under the NDAA, as well as similar activities being performed for sites not covered by the NDAA. (authors)

  13. Sources, classification, and disposal of radioactive wastes: History and legal and regulatory requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: (1) early definitions of different types (classes) of radioactive waste developed prior to definitions in laws and regulations; (2) sources of different classes of radioactive waste; (3) current laws and regulations addressing classification of radioactive wastes; and requirements for disposal of different waste classes. Relationship between waste classification and requirements for permanent disposal is emphasized; (4) federal and state responsibilities for radioactive wastes; and (5) distinctions between radioactive wastes produced in civilian and defense sectors

  14. Regulation of Federal radioactive waste activities. Summary of report to Congress on extending the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's licensing or regulatory authority to Federal radioactive waste storage and disposal activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.D.

    1979-09-01

    The NRC Authorization Bill for FY 1979 directed NRC to conduct a study of extending the Commission's licensing or regulatory authority to include categories of existing and future Federal radioactive waste storage and disposal activities not presently subject to such authority. The report includes a complete listing and inventory of all radioactive waste storage and disposal activities now being conducted or planned by Federal agencies. The NRC study has attempted to present a general comparison of the relative hazards associated with defense-generated and commercial wastes. Options for extending Commission authority were developed and analyzed. The implications of NEPA were analyzed in the context of these options. The national security implications of extending NRC's regulatory authority over DOE programs are examined and evaluated. Costs and benefits are identified and assessed. The Commission's recommendations, based on the study, are to extend licensing authority over new DOE disposal activities involving transuranic wastes and non-defense low-level waste and to initiate a pilot program to test the feasibility of NRC playing a consultative role in the evaluation of existing DOE activities

  15. Estimates of radionuclide release from glass waste forms in a tuff repository and the effects on regulatory compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aines, R.D.

    1986-04-01

    This paper discusses preliminary estimates of the release of radionuclides from waste packages containing glass-based waste forms under the expected conditions at Yucca Mountain. These estimates can be used to evaluate the contribution of waste package performance toward meeting repository regulatory restrictions on radionuclide release. Glass waste will be held in double stainless steel canisters. After failure of the container sometime after the 300 to 1000 year containment period, the open headspace in these cans will provide the only area where standing water can accumulate and react with the glass. A maximum release rate of 0.177 g/m 2 x year or 1.3 grams per year was obtained. Normalized loss of 1.3 grams per year corresponds to 0.08 parts in 100,000 per year of the 1660 kg reference weight of DWPF glass

  16. Effectiveness of Regulatory Structure in the Power Sector of Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Afia Malik

    2007-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to study the regulatory environment in the electricity sector of Pakistan. NEPRA, a regulatory authority was formed in 1997 to protect consumer interests in the area of electricity provision, and to ensure an efficient and competitive environment for the electricity generators and distributors, but it has so far not been able to achieve anything. The power sector (dominated by WAPDA and KESC) is still affected by institutional and organisational weaknesses, with ineff...

  17. Regulatory body contribution to the development of an integrated radioactive waste management system in the Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konecny, L.; Burclova, J.

    2002-01-01

    The nuclear energy is a very important part of electricity production in the Slovak Republic. Slovakia currently operates 6 nuclear units in two sites and their share on total power production is about 55%. Original soviet design of NPPs operated in Slovakia was based on storage strategy of non-treated solid waste and evaporated liquid waste until decommissioning of the plant. A new approach to the waste management at the end of the 1980s resulted in a strategy to install technologies able to transform in principle all radioactive waste into a form suitable for disposal. The technological part of radioactive waste management was supported in the late 1990s by respective legislation namely by a new act on peaceful use of nuclear energy and by regulation on radioactive waste and spent fuel management. Thus the basis for an integrated radioactive waste management system was created and technical short and long term solutions for the management of all kinds of radioactive waste were prepared. A comprehensive combination of individual components such as legal framework, regulation, overall organization, technology etc. in a single functional system is required for an effective and safe waste management system. Although the waste management system in the Slovak Republic is influenced by historical, socio-political, economic and other factors, a strong regulatory body is one of the key elements of an integrated approach to a generic national system for management of all types of wastes. UJD SR which was appointed as the central state authority for nuclear safety supervision took great effort in its legislative, licensing, assessment and inspection activities with the aim to support this integrated approach. (author)

  18. Classification and disposal of radioactive wastes: History and legal and regulatory requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    This document discusses the laws and regulations in the United States addressing classification of radioactive wastes and the requirements for disposal of different waste classes. This review emphasizes the relationship between waste classification and the requirements for permanent disposal

  19. Retrievability of high-level nuclear waste from geologic repositories - Regulatory and rock mechanics/design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanious, N.S.; Nataraja, M.S.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1987-01-01

    Retrievability of nuclear waste from high-level geologic repositories is one of the performance objectives identified in 10CFR60 (Code of Federal Regulations, 1985). 10CFR60.111 states that the geologic repository operations area shall be designed to preserve the option of waste retrieval. In designing the repository operations area, rock mechanics considerations play a major role especially in evaluating the feasibility of retrieval operations. This paper discusses generic considerations affecting retrievability as they relate to repository design, construction, and operation, with emphasis on regulatory and rock mechanics aspects

  20. Regulatory supervision of industrial waste containing very low activities of man-made radionuclides at SevRAO facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneve, Malgorzata K.; Kochetkov, Oleg; Monastyrskaya, Svetlana; Barchukov, Valerie; Romanov, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Large amounts of waste and materials with very low activity level are generated during operation and especially during decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Selection of the optimum economic and ecologically safe management option of such material is complicated by its specific features: very low level radiation exposure to individuals but rather large initial amounts of waste. On the one hand, it is a poor use of limited resources to em place such low activity waste into expensive facilities for radioactive waste storage and disposal if the radiological impact would be very small even for a much less expensive option; on the other hand, there is some apprehension regarding safety both about its disposal to landfills for conventional (non-radioactive) waste disposal, and about its limited or unlimited re-use or re-cycling. To regulate such waste management, a special waste category is introduced - very low level waste (VLLW). This category includes waste containing radionuclides with specific activity levels, which are higher than clearance levels, but do not need high containment and isolation. This paper discusses experience of regulatory development for VLLW control during remediation of radiation hazardous facilities in northwest Russia. The work has promoted identification of some challenges, whose solution has affected the waste management strategy at the sites. One of the main problems resolved was the selection of criteria according to which waste is allocated to the VLLW category. These is turn were partly determined by the radiological criteria chosen for protection of the public during this waste disposal. Elaboration of safe VLLW management strategy depends upon a source of waste generation and of its radiological composition. The VLLW management strategy at an operating enterprise, e.g. a nuclear power plant is rather different from the strategy implemented at the plant under decommissioning, or at storage facilities for the legacy waste

  1. Structural optimization of reinforced concrete container for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, M.

    1984-01-01

    A structural optimization study of reinforced concrete container for transportation and disposal of the low level radioactive waste generated in Brazilian nuclear power plants. The code requires the structural integrity of these containers when subjected to fall from specified height, avoiding environmental contamination. The structural optimization allows material and transportation cost reduction by container wall thickness reduction. The structural analysis is performed by tridimensional mathematical model using finite element method. (Author) [pt

  2. Simulating the structure of gypsum composites using pulverized basalt waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buryanov Аleksandr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the possibility of simulating the structure of gypsum composite modified with basalt dust waste to make materials and products based on it. Structural simulating of the topological space in gypsum modified composite by optimizing its grain-size composition highly improves its physical and mechanical properties. Strength and density tests have confirmed the results of the simulation. The properties of modified gypsum materials are improved by obtaining of denser particle packing in the presence of hemihydrate of finely dispersed basalt and plasticizer particles in the system, and by engaging basalt waste in the structuring process of modified gypsum stone.

  3. Fee structures for low-level radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, A.A.; Baird, R.D.; Rogers, V.C.

    1988-01-01

    Some compacts and states require that the fee system at their new low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility be based on the volume and radioactive hazard of the wastes. The fee structure discussed in this paper includes many potential fee elements that could be used to recover the costs of disposal and at the same time influence the volume and nature of waste that arrives at the disposal facility. It includes a base fee which accounts for some of the underlying administrative costs of disposal, and a broad range of charges related to certain parameters of the waste, such as volume, radioactivity, etc. It also includes credits, such as credits for waste with short-lived radionuclides or superior waste forms. The fee structure presented should contain elements of interest to all states and compacts. While no single disposal facility is likely to incorporate all of the elements discussed here in its fee structure, the paper presents a fairly exhaustive list of factors worth considering

  4. Project of an information integrated system to provide support to the regulatory control of the radioactive waste inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christovao, Marilia Tavares

    2005-05-01

    Sources and radioactive waste deriving from industry activities, medical practice and other areas are collected, received, and stored as waste on Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) Institutes, that also generate, treat and store their own radioactive waste. The object of this project is to present an Integrated Information System named SICORR, having as guidelines, the referred processes to the radioactive waste regulatory control, under the responsibility of the Radioactive Waste Division (DIREJ), the General Coordination of Licensing and Control (CGLC), the Directorate of Safety and Radiation Protection (DRS) and the CNEN. The main objective of the work was reached, once the project SICORR modeling considers the radioactive waste control inventory, enclosing the treatment and integration of the radioactive waste and the radionuclides data and processes; the installations that produce, use, transport or store radiation sources data; and, CNEN Institutes responsible for the radioactive waste management data. The SICORR functions or essential modules involve the data treatment, integration, standardization and consistency between the processes. The SICORR specification and the analysis results are registered in documents, Software Specification Proposal (PESw) and Software Requirements Specification (ERSw), and are presented in text, in diagrams and user interfaces. Use cases have been used in the SICORR context diagram. The user interfaces for each use case have been detailed, defining the graphical layout, the relationships description with other interfaces, the interface details properties and the commands and the product entrances and exits. For objects radioactive waste and radionuclides, states diagrams have been drawn. The activities diagram represents the business model process. The class diagram represents the static objects and relationships that exist between them, under the specification point of view. The class diagram have been determined

  5. Regulatory aspect of nuclear application and radioactive waste management in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad Ridwan

    2002-01-01

    Experience over more than 56 years in the field of nuclear application has shown that such technology is generally safely used. Nevertheless, there have been instances, when safety systems have been circumvented and serious radiological accident have occurred, and have resulted with fatal consequences. During the last 56 years, such radiological accidents, in total, caused 101 person dead, and it is very interesting to note that this figure is more than double the dead caused by nuclear accident as the result of nuclear fuel failure, such as in nuclear power plant, in submarine or in enrichment plant, which has only 47 fatalities. The article 8 of the convention on nuclear safety, stipulates inter alia that the contracting party shall established a regulatory body separated from the promotional or the executing organization of nuclear energy. Indonesia is not operating any nuclear power. At present, it is only operating three research reactors, and some laboratories connected with this reactor, such as one nuclear fuel fabrication plant for research reactors, one experimental fuel fabrication plant for nuclear power, one isotope production facility, radiometalurgy laboratory and some other research facilities. However, in anticipation of the expansion of nuclear programme in Indonesia, and looking into the various accident in the nuclear application, the Indonesian Government has, since April 10, 1997, enacted the new act, Act No. 10/1997 on Nuclear Energy. The new Act addresses several key requirements for the successful conduct of Indonesia nuclear programme, including the establishment of both the Executing Body responsible for nuclear research and development, mining and processing nuclear fuels and materials, production of radio-isotopes and management of radioactive wastes and the independent Nuclear Energy Control Board, which has the power to regulate, to license and to inspect all facets of any activity utilizing nuclear energy. It also sets out the basic

  6. Structure modification of natural zeolite for waste removal application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widayatno, W. B.

    2018-03-01

    Tremendous industrialization in the last century has led to the generation of huge amount of waste. One of the recent hot research topics is utilizing any advance materials and methods for waste removal. Natural zeolite as an inexpensive porous material with a high abundance holds a key for efficient waste removal owing to its high surface area. However, the microporous structure of natural zeolite hinders the adsorption of waste with a bigger molecular size. In addition, the recovery of natural zeolite after waste adsorption into its pores should also be considered for continuous utilization of this material. In this study, the porosity of natural zeolite from Tasikmalaya, Indonesia, was hydrothermally-modified in a Teflon-lined autoclave filled with certain pore directing agent such as distilled water, KOH, and NH4OH to obtain hierarchical pore structure. After proper drying process, the as-treated natural zeolite is impregnated with iron cation and heat-treated at specified temperature to get Fe-embedded zeolite structure. XRD observation is carried out to ensure the formation of magnetic phase within the zeolite pores. The analysis results show the formation of maghemite phase (γ-Fe2O3) within the zeolite pore structure.

  7. Problems of solidificated radioactive wastes burial into deep geological structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kedrovskij, O.L.; Leonov, E.A.; Romadin, N.M.; Shishcits, I.Yu.

    1981-01-01

    Perspectives are noted of the radioactive wastes burial into deep geopogical structures. For these purposes it has been proposed to investigate severap types of rocks, which do not have intensive gas-generation when beeng heated; salt deposits and clays. Basing on the results of calculations it has been shown that the dimentions of zones of substantial deformations in the case of the high-level radioactive wastes burial to not exceed several hundreds of meters. Conclusion is made that in the case of choosing the proper geotogicat structure for burial and ir the case of inclusion in the structure of the burial site a zone of sanitary alienation, it is possible to isolate wastes safely for all the period of preservation. Preliminary demands have been formulated to geological structures and underground burial sites. As main tasks for optimizatiop of burial sited are considered: determination of necessary types, number and reliability of barriers which ensure isolation of wastes; to make prognoses of the stressed and deformed state of a geological massif on the influence of thermal field; investigation in changes of chemical and physical properties of rocks under heat, radiative and chemical influence; estimation of possible diffusion of radioactivity in a mountin massif; development of a rational mining-thechnological schemes of the burual of wastes of different types. A row of tasks in the farmeworks of this probtem are sotved successfutty. Some resutts are given of the theoretical investigations in determination of zones of distructions of rocks because of heat-load [ru

  8. Concrete with onyx waste aggregate as aesthetically valued structural concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyowati E., W.; Soehardjono, A.; Wisnumurti

    2017-09-01

    The utillization of Tulungagung onyx stone waste as an aggregate of concrete mixture will improve the economic value of the concrete due to the brighter color and high aesthetic level of the products. We conducted the research of 75 samples as a test objects to measure the compression stress, splits tensile stress, flexural tensile stress, elasticity modulus, porosity modulus and also studied 15 test objects to identify the concrete micro structures using XRD test, EDAX test and SEM test. The test objects were made from mix designed concrete, having ratio cement : fine aggregate : coarse aggregate ratio = 1 : 1.5 : 2.1, and W/C ratio = 0.4. The 28 days examination results showed that the micro structure of Tulungagung onyx waste concrete is similar with normal concrete. Moreover, the mechanical test results proved that Tulungagung onyx waste concretes also have a qualified level of strength to be used as a structural concrete with higher aesthetic level.

  9. Structure of an RNA dimer of a regulatory element from human thymidylate synthase mRNA

    OpenAIRE

    Dibrov, Sergey; McLean, Jaime; Hermann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    An oligonucleotide representing a regulatory element of human thymidylate synthase mRNA has been crystallized as a dimer. The structure of the asymmetric dimer has been determined at 1.97 Å resolution.

  10. Immobilization of hazardous and radioactive waste into glass structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.

    1997-01-01

    As a result of more than three decades of international research, glass has emerged as the material of choice for immobilization of a wide range of potentially hazardous radioactive and non-radioactive materials. The ability of glass structures to incorporate and then immobilize many different elements into durable, high integrity, waste glass products is a direct function of the unique random network structure of the glassy state. Every major country involved with long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) has either selected or is considering glass as the matrix of choice for immobilizing and ultimately, disposing of the potentially hazardous, high-level radioactive material. There are many reasons why glass is preferred. Among the most important considerations are the ability of glass structures to accommodate and immobilize the many different types of radionuclides present in HLW, and to produce a product that not only has excellent technical properties, but also possesses good processing features. Good processability allows the glass to be fabricated with relative ease even under difficult remote-handling conditions necessary for vitrification of highly radioactive material. The single most important property of the waste glass produced is its ability to retain hazardous species within the glass structure and this is reflected by its excellent chemical durability and corrosion resistance to a wide range of environmental conditions. In addition to immobilization of HLW glass matrices are also being considered for isolation of many other types of hazardous materials, both radioactive as well as nonradioactive. This includes vitrification of various actinides resulting from clean-up operations and the legacy of the cold war, as well as possible immobilization of weapons grade plutonium resulting from disarmament activities. Other types of wastes being considered for immobilization into glasses include transuranic wastes, mixed wastes, contaminated

  11. Ceramic ware waste as coarse aggregate for structural concrete production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-González, Julia; Rodríguez-Robles, Desirée; Juan-Valdés, Andrés; Morán-Del Pozo, Julia M; Guerra-Romero, M Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    The manufacture of any kind of product inevitably entails the production of waste. The quantity of waste generated by the ceramic industry, a very important sector in Spain, is between 5% and 8% of the final output and it is therefore necessary to find an effective waste recovery method. The aim of the study reported in the present article was to seek a sustainable means of managing waste from the ceramic industry through the incorporation of this type of waste in the total replacement of conventional aggregate (gravel) used in structural concrete. Having verified that the recycled ceramic aggregates met all the technical requirements imposed by current Spanish legislation, established in the Code on Structural Concrete (EHE-08), then it is prepared a control concrete mix and the recycled concrete mix using 100% recycled ceramic aggregate instead of coarse natural aggregate. The concretes obtained were subjected to the appropriate tests in order to conduct a comparison of their mechanical properties. The results show that the concretes made using ceramic sanitary ware aggregate possessed the same mechanical properties as those made with conventional aggregate. It is therefore possible to conclude that the reuse of recycled ceramic aggregate to produce recycled concrete is a feasible alternative for the sustainable management of this waste.

  12. Analysis of regulatory structure for a potential fusion reactor industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-03-01

    The report is divided into eight sections. The preface describes the authors of the report, the methodology used in its preparation, and some basic legal terms. The summary describes the principal features of the proposed regulatory system and also includes two flow charts comparing our model with present NRC practices and a summary table briefly outlining the reasoning behind our recommendations. The main body of the report is divided into six sections. This part of the report discusses the existing federal and state programs for regulating electric energy, describes NRC operations and the criticisms of that agency, discusses the features of our proposed regulatory model, recommends certain steps for implementing the proposed model, and states the conclusions of the report.

  13. De Minimis waste impacts analysis methodology. IMPACTS - BRC user's guide and methodology for radioactive wastes below regulatory concern. Draft report for comment. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forstom, J.M.; Goode, D.J.

    1986-07-01

    This report describes the methodology and computer program used by NRC to evaluate radiological impacts associated with petitions to have specific slightly contaminated radioactive waste streams designated as ''below regulatory concern.'' These wastes could be treated and disposed of at facilities which are not licensed for low-level radioactive waste management. The IMPACTS-BRC computer program is implemented on IBM-PC microcomputers using the FORTRAN programming language. Radiological impacts (doses) are estimated for several pathways including direct gamma radiation exposure, worker inhalation and exposure, offsite atmospheric and water releases, and intruder exposures. Annual impacts are calculated for the maximum individual, critical groups, and general population. The treatment and disposal options include onsite incineration, incineration at municipal and hazardous waste facilities, and disposal at sanitary landfills and hazardous waste landfills. Modifications to the program (from Volume 1) are primarily for microcomputer compatibility and to provide information needed to evaluate the petitions. Default environmental and facility parameters are developed representing conservative assumptions about site selection and operational procedures. In particular, the parameters of the groundwater pathway model are modified to represent more conservative assumptions than the original model (Volume 1)

  14. The planning, construction, and operation of a radioactive waste storage facility for an Australian state radiation regulatory authority

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, J.D.; Kleinschmidt, R.; Veevers, P. [Radiation Health, Queensland (Australia)

    1995-12-31

    Radiation regulatory authorities have a responsibility for the management of radioactive waste. This, more often than not, includes the collection and safe storage of radioactive sources in disused radiation devices and devices seized by the regulatory authority following an accident, abandonment or unauthorised use. The public aversion to all things radioactive, regardless of the safety controls, together with the Not In My Back Yard (NIMBY) syndrome combine to make the establishment of a radioactive materials store a near impossible task, despite the fact that such a facility is a fundamental tool for regulatory authorities to provide for the radiation safety of the public. In Queensland the successful completion and operational use of such a storage facility has taken a total of 8 years of concerted effort by the staff of the regulatory authority, the expenditure of over $2 million (AUS) not including regulatory staff costs and the cost of construction of an earlier separate facility. This paper is a summary of the major developments in the planning, construction and eventual operation of the facility including technical and administrative details, together with the lessons learned from the perspective of the overall project.

  15. The global economic and regulatory determinants of household food waste generation: A cross-country analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalak, Ali; Abou-Daher, Chaza; Chaaban, Jad; Abiad, Mohamad G

    2016-02-01

    Food is generally wasted all along the supply chain, with an estimated loss of 35percent generated at the consumer level. Consequently, household food waste constitutes a sizable proportion of the total waste generated throughout the food supply chain. Yet such wastes vary drastically between developed and developing countries. Using data collected from 44 countries with various income levels, this paper investigates the impact of legislation and economic incentives on household food waste generation. The obtained results indicate that well-defined regulations, policies and strategies are more effective than fiscal measures in mitigating household food waste generation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The regulatory environment for drilling and oilfield waste disposal and remediation in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLachlan, L.J.; Stimpson, S.

    1999-01-01

    The legislative basis of regulation of all aspects of oilfield waste, including all oil and gas, oil sands, and oilfield waste management facility operations in Alberta is discussed. The appropriate waste management practices for the upstream petroleum industry and all waste stream associated with the petroleum industry are outlined. Major topics discussed include: (1) the roles and the jurisdictions of the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) and Alberta Environmental Protection (AEP), (2) drilling waste and oilfield waste disposal, EUB guides 50 and 58, (3) wellsite abandonment and reclamation of wellsites, (4) spills and contaminated sites, (5) environmental offences, enforcement, penalties and defences

  17. Management of hospital radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantrana, D.

    1986-01-01

    The general structure of a regulatory scheme for the management of hospital radioactive wastes is presented. The responsabilities of an institution in the radioactive waste management, and storage conditions are defined. The radioactive wastes are classified in physical terms, and the criteria for evaluating the activity of solid wastes are described. The container characteristics and, the types of treatments given to the wastes are specified. (M.C.K.) [pt

  18. Status of the Japan's regulatory policy on radioactive waste management. Cleanup and recycling issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Daiji

    1995-01-01

    Wastes from nuclear facilities are very diversified concerning that have different levels of radioactivity and include different kinds of radioactive materials. Besides some of those waste is not assumed as radioactive waste. The basic policy of the radioactive waste management is taking that diversity into full account for appropriate separate management of different types of radioactive waste and treatment and disposal of each type in a rational manner, including recycling. From the point, the disposal methods are considered or under consideration to that waste, (1) from nuclear reactor facility, (2) from nuclear fuel cycle facility--HLW, waste contaminated TRU nuclides, or contaminated uranium, (3) from RI utilization or research institute, and (4) from decommissioning of nuclear facility. Now in Japan, regulation framework for some kind of LLW from reactor facility, including waste from decommissioning of reactor is established. (J.P.N.)

  19. Salt-occluded zeolite waste forms: Crystal structures and transformability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, J.W. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of salt-occluded zeolite and zeolite/glass composite samples, simulating nuclear waste forms loaded with fission products, have revealed complex structures, with cations assuming the dual roles of charge compensation and occlusion (cluster formation). These clusters roughly fill the 6--8 angstrom diameter pores of the zeolites. Samples are prepared by equilibrating zeolite-A with complex molten Li, K, Cs, Sr, Ba, Y chloride salts, with compositions representative of anticipated waste systems. Samples prepared using zeolite 4A (which contains exclusively sodium cations) as starting material are observed to transform to sodalite, a denser aluminosilicate framework structure, while those prepared using zeolite 5A (sodium and calcium ions) more readily retain the zeolite-A structure. Because the sodalite framework pores are much smaller than those of zeolite-A, clusters are smaller and more rigorously confined, with a correspondingly lower capacity for waste containment. Details of the sodalite structures resulting from transformation of zeolite-A depend upon the precise composition of the original mixture. The enhanced resistance of salt-occluded zeolites prepared from zeolite 5A to sodalite transformation is thought to be related to differences in the complex chloride clusters present in these zeolite mixtures. Data relating processing conditions to resulting zeolite composition and structure can be used in the selection of processing parameters which lead to optimal waste forms

  20. Development of Legal and Regulatory Framework for Radioactive Waste Management Safety in the Russian Federation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryavtsev, E.

    2016-01-01

    Key RW management challenges in Russian Federation: - Full-scale implementation of legislation for radioactive waste management including administrative arrangements; - Transition from RW storage to RW conditioning and final disposal; - Construction of RW disposal facilities for accumulated waste; - Safety of waste management in connection with decommissioning and remediation activity; - Nuclear legacy liability: balanced approach to RW classification and management options in terms of “exceptional” and “retrievable” waste categories

  1. The impact of regulatory compliance behavior on hazardous waste generation in European private healthcare facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Botelho, Anabela

    2013-01-01

    Along with the increased provision of healthcare by private outpatient healthcare facilities within the EU countries, there is also an increase on waste generation from these facilities. A significant fraction of this waste is amongst the most hazardous of all wastes arising in communities, posing significant risks to people and the environment if inappropriately managed. The growing awareness that mismanagement of healthcare waste has serious environmental and public health consequences is r...

  2. Rationale for Selection of Pesticides, Herbicides, and Related Compounds from the Hanford SST/DST Waste Considered for Analysis in Support of the Regulatory DQO (Privatization)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiemers, K.D.; Daling, P.; Meier, K.

    1999-01-04

    Regulated pesticides, herbicides, miticides, and fungicides were evaluated for their potential past and current use at the Hanford Site. The starting list of these compounds is based on regulatory analyte input lists discussed in the Regulatory DQO. Twelve pesticide, herbicide, miticide, and fungicide compounds are identified for analysis in the Hanford SST and DST waste in support of the Regulatory DQO. The compounds considered for additional analyses are non-detected, considered stable in the tank waste matrix, and of higher toxicity/carcinogenicity.

  3. Rationale for Selection of Pesticides, Herbicides, and Related Compounds from the Hanford SST/DST Waste Considered for Analysis in Support of the Regulatory DQO (Privatization)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiemers, K.D.; Daling, P.; Meier, K.

    1999-01-01

    Regulated pesticides, herbicides, miticides, and fungicides were evaluated for their potential past and current use at the Hanford Site. The starting list of these compounds is based on regulatory analyte input lists discussed in the Regulatory DQO. Twelve pesticide, herbicide, miticide, and fungicide compounds are identified for analysis in the Hanford SST and DST waste in support of the Regulatory DQO. The compounds considered for additional analyses are non-detected, considered stable in the tank waste matrix, and of higher toxicity/carcinogenicity

  4. Changing our regulatory structure to accommodate a competitive environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    The efficiency of various regulatory schemes were assessed based on the assumption that certain aspects of transmission and distribution will have to be regulated even after deregulation comes into effect. Price regulation and incentive regulation are the two main forms used to ensure equitable availability of various transmission/wheeling services to distributors, and service quality, wheeling, and prices to be charged by distributors to customers. It was found on balance that only effective market forces spur efficiency, and regulations are only second best. Incentive regulation was not considered to be significantly more efficient than price regulation. The effectiveness of either form will depend upon market conditions and the skill of the regulator

  5. 30 CFR 816.84 - Coal mine waste: Impounding structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... control, the probable maximum precipitation of a 6-hour precipitation event, or greater event as specified.... Runoff from areas above the disposal facility or runoff from surface of the facility that may cause...-hour design precipitation event. (e) Impounding structures constructed of or impounding coal mine waste...

  6. Towards a single European electricity market. A structured approach to regulatory mode decision-making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jong, H.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on the processes through which the rules and regulations that govern European electricity markets - and inherently, their integration process - are established. So far, European policy makers have largely followed a 'trial-and-error' approach to finding an appropriate regulatory mode (process) for dealing effectively with market integration issues. This unstructured approach to regulatory mode selection leads to several problems: - Today's trial-and-error strategy of shifting from one regulatory mode to another is time-consuming. - In the regulatory mode selection process, certain key principles of good governance are insufficiently considered. - European regulatory processes are experienced as vague, intransparent, and illegitimate by 'outside' stakeholders. This study develops a 'structured approach to regulatory mode decision-making' (STARMODE) based on the theory of decision modelling in policy management and a case study exploring three key market integration issues in the field of electricity markets: interconnector investment, congestion management and market transparency. The main objective is to present a systematic and comprehensive framework for analysing and improving regulatory mode decision-making in the context of the European Union, focusing on electricity market integration. The STARMODE approach is generally applicable to (and relevant for) European market integration issues in industries characterized by a natural monopoly and/or an essential service. The approach may also contribute to national regulatory mode decision-making and multi-state decision-making in other continents.

  7. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, G.

    2004-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the performance of Alloy 22

  8. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Gordon

    2004-10-13

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the

  9. Geologic repositories for radioactive waste: the nuclear regulatory commission geologic comments on the environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Justus, P.S.; Trapp, J.S.; Westbrook, K.B.; Lee, R.; Blackford, M.B.; Rice, B.

    1985-01-01

    The NRC staff completed its review of the Environmental Assessments (EAs) issued by the Department of Energy (DOE) in December, 1984, in support of the site selection processes established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA). The EAs contain geologic information on nine sites that DOE has identified as potentially acceptable for the first geologic repository in accordance with the requirements of NWPA. The media for the sites vary from basalt at Hanford, Washington, tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, bedded salt in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas and Paradox Basin, Utah, to salt domes in Mississippi and Louisiana. Despite the diversity in media there are common areas of concern for all sites. These include; structural framework and pattern, rates of tectonic and seismic activity, characterization of subsurface features, and stratigraphic thickness, continuity and homogeneity. Site-specific geologic concerns include: potential volcanic and hydrothermal activity at Yucca Mountain, potential hydrocarbon targets and deep basalt and sub-basalt structure at Hanford, and potential dissolution at all salt sites. The NRC comments were influenced by the performance objectives and siting criteria of 10 CFR Part 60 and the environmental protection criteria in 40 CFR Part 191, the applicable standards proposed by EPA. In its review the NRC identified several areas of geologic concern that it recommended DOE re-examine to determine if alternative or modified conclusions are appropriate

  10. High-level waste canister envelope study: structural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    The structural integrity of waste canisters, fabricated from standard weight Type 304L stainless steel pipe, was analyzed for sizes ranging from 8 to 24 in. diameter and 10 to 16 feet long under normal, abnormal, and improbable life cycle loading conditions. The canisters are assumed to be filled with vitrified high-level nuclear waste, stored temporarily at a fuel reprocessing plant, and then transported for storage in an underground salt bed or other geologic storage. In each of the three impact conditions studies, the resulting impact force is far greater than the elastic limit capacity of the material. Recommendations are made for further study

  11. Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff development of the license application review plan for a high-level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.L.; Holonich, J.J.; Lee, M.P.; Delligatti, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff has recently started a new initiative to develop the License Application Review Plan (LARP) which the staff will use in its reviews of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) license application (LA) for a geologic repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW). This paper describes the staff's approach for developing the LARP, the development schedule and current status, the organization and content of the LARP, and the staff's LA review strategy. Therefore, it gives a preview of the draft LARP which will be made available in late 1993. It also describes how the LARP will be used as guidance to the staff in conducting reviews of regulatory and technical issues important to the licensing of a geologic repository. Finally, the benefits to the NRC staff, DOE, and other parties are discussed

  12. New families of human regulatory RNA structures identified by comparative analysis of vertebrate genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Brian J; Moltke, Ida; Roth, Adam; Washietl, Stefan; Wen, Jiayu; Kellis, Manolis; Breaker, Ronald; Pedersen, Jakob Skou

    2011-11-01

    Regulatory RNA structures are often members of families with multiple paralogous instances across the genome. Family members share functional and structural properties, which allow them to be studied as a whole, facilitating both bioinformatic and experimental characterization. We have developed a comparative method, EvoFam, for genome-wide identification of families of regulatory RNA structures, based on primary sequence and secondary structure similarity. We apply EvoFam to a 41-way genomic vertebrate alignment. Genome-wide, we identify 220 human, high-confidence families outside protein-coding regions comprising 725 individual structures, including 48 families with known structural RNA elements. Known families identified include both noncoding RNAs, e.g., miRNAs and the recently identified MALAT1/MEN β lincRNA family; and cis-regulatory structures, e.g., iron-responsive elements. We also identify tens of new families supported by strong evolutionary evidence and other statistical evidence, such as GO term enrichments. For some of these, detailed analysis has led to the formulation of specific functional hypotheses. Examples include two hypothesized auto-regulatory feedback mechanisms: one involving six long hairpins in the 3'-UTR of MAT2A, a key metabolic gene that produces the primary human methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine; the other involving a tRNA-like structure in the intron of the tRNA maturation gene POP1. We experimentally validate the predicted MAT2A structures. Finally, we identify potential new regulatory networks, including large families of short hairpins enriched in immunity-related genes, e.g., TNF, FOS, and CTLA4, which include known transcript destabilizing elements. Our findings exemplify the diversity of post-transcriptional regulation and provide a resource for further characterization of new regulatory mechanisms and families of noncoding RNAs.

  13. New families of human regulatory RNA structures identified by comparative analysis of vertebrate genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, Brian John; Moltke, Ida; Roth, Adam

    2011-01-01

    a comparative method, EvoFam, for genome-wide identification of families of regulatory RNA structures, based on primary sequence and secondary structure similarity. We apply EvoFam to a 41-way genomic vertebrate alignment. Genome-wide, we identify 220 human, high-confidence families outside protein...

  14. Structural studies of Ca2+-ATPase ligand and regulatory complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drachmann, Nikolaj Düring

    2015-01-01

    , the surrounding membrane itself has a huge influence on SERCA structure and function. Changes in the membrane thickness can alter the activity of the ATPase significantly, and even cause changes in the stoichiometry of ion transport. Structural studies on SERCA in the presence of four different phosphatidyl...... choline lipids with different aliphatic chain length and saturation show three specific lipid binding sites. The four different lipids analysed bind to the same binding sites with varying degrees of disorder. The study contributes to understanding the complex interplay between the surrounding membrane...... to explore the possibilities for an efficient screening of ligand-bound SERCA structures, serial femtosecond crystallography experiments of microcrystals of SERCA1a in the Ca2+ bound state and in a vanadate stabilised E2 state was conducted. A structure obtained at 2.8 Å maximum resolution of the proof...

  15. Regulatory inspection practices for radioactive and non-radioactive waste management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Amitava

    2017-01-01

    Management of nuclear waste plays an important role in the nuclear energy programme of the country. India has adopted the Closed Fuel Cycle option, where the spent nuclear fuel is treated as a material of resource and the nuclear waste is wealth. Closed fuel cycle aims at recovery and recycle of valuable nuclear materials in to reactors as fuel and also separation of useful radio isotopes for the use in health care, agriculture and industry. India has taken a lead role in the waste management activities and has reached a level of maturity over a period of more than forty decades. The nuclear waste management primarily comprises of waste characterization, segregation, conditioning, treatment, immobilization of radionuclides in stable and solid matrices and interim retrievable storage of conditioned solid waste under surveillance. The waste generated in a nuclear facility is in the form of liquid and solid, and it's classification depends on the content of radioactivity. The liquid waste is characterized as Low level (LLW), Intermediate level (ILW) and High Level (HLW). The LLW is relatively large in volume and much lesser radioactive. The LLW is subjected to chemical precipitation using various chemicals based on the radionuclides present, followed by filtration, settling, ion exchange and cement fixation. The conditioning and treatment processes of ILW uses ion exchange, alkali hydrolysis for spent solvent, phase separation and immobilization in cement matrix. The High Level Waste (HLW), generated during spent fuel reprocessing and containing more than 99 percent of the total radioactivity is first subjected to volume reduction/concentration by evaporation and then vitrified in a meIter using borosilicate glass. Presently, Joule Heated Ceramic Meter is used in India for Vitrification process. Vitrified waste products (VWP) are stored for interim period in a multibarrier, air cooled facility under surveillance

  16. A process for ensuring regulatory compliance at the INEL`s buried waste integrated demonstrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, P.G.; Watson, L.R.; Blacker, P.B. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering Lab.

    1993-03-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program is funded by the Department of Energy Office of Technology Development. The mission of this Integrated Demonstration is to identify, evaluate, and demonstrate a suite of innovative technologies for the remediation of radioactive and hazardous waste buried throughout the DOE complex between 1950 and 1970. The program approach to development of a long-range strategy for improving buried waste remediation capabilities is to combine systems analysis with already identified remediation needs for DOE complex buried waste. The systems analysis effort has produced several configuration options (a top-level block diagram of a cradle-to-grave remediation system) capable of remediating the transuranic-contaminated waste pits and trenches at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Technologies for demonstration are selected using three criteria: (a) the ability to satisfy a specific buried waste need, (b) the ability to satisfy functional and operational requirements defined for functional sub-elements in a configuration option, and (c) performance against Comprehensive Environmental Restoration and Compensation Liability Act selection criteria, such as effectiveness, implementability, and cost. Early demonstrations experienced problems with missed requirements, prompting the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program Office to organize a Corrective Action Team to identify the cause and recommend corrective actions. The result of this team effort is the focus of this paper.

  17. Federal legislative and regulatory incentives and disincentives for industrial waste reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordes, R.; Nixon, J.

    1991-10-01

    The Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) within the US DOE has recently initiated the Industrial Waste Reduction Program, which is designed to reduce industrial energy use and pollution by reducing the amount of waste materials generated. The Program's primary focus is to develop and commercialize waste reduction technologies and practices in conjunction with industrial partners. OIT recognizes that adoption of these technologies is often inhibited by an assortment of institutional barriers that are unrelated to technical or economic performance. Therefore, OIT is examining selected barriers to industrial waste reduction to help identify and remove impediments to wider technology implementation. This report examines the incentives and disincentives to industrial waste reduction that are provided in an assortment of legislation and regulations. The intent is to shed light on how our environmental laws affect industry's implementation of waste reduction, what particular problems exist with current legislation/regulations, and what general options are available for correcting any deficiencies. Our study was confined strictly to federal legislation and regulations. During the course of the study, (March and May 1991), we examined 16 pieces of existing legislation and their attendant regulations plus 22 pieces of proposed legislation. In addition, the authors consulted representatives from industry and from the government agencies administering or sponsoring the legislation. The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) is by far the most comprehensive and dominant piece of legislation affecting solid waste disposal. This is because RCRA, which governs, the management of both nonhazardous and hazardous waste, places the most restrictive requirements on industry. Other important pieces of legislation that exert a direct influence on waste reduction per se include the Clean Air Act and the Pollution Prevention Act. 90 refs., 12 tabs

  18. Soil-structure interaction effects on high level waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.A.; Costantino, C.J.; Heymsfeld, E.

    1991-01-01

    High Level Waste Tanks consist of steel tanks located in concrete vaults which are usually completely embedded in the soil. Many of these tanks are old and were designed to seismic standards which are not compatible with current requirements. The objective if this paper is to develop simple methods of modeling SSI effects for such structures and to obtain solutions for a range of parameters that can be used to identify significant aspects of the problem

  19. Storage of low-level radioactive waste and regulatory control of sealed sources in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahola, T.; Markkanen, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is concentrated on the non nuclear low-level radioactive waste. The cornerstone for maintaining radioactive sources under control in Finland is that all practices involving sources are subject to authorization and all licensing information, including information on each individual source, are entered into a register which is continuously updated based on applications and notifications received from the licenses. Experiences during the past twenty years have shown that source-specific records of sources combined with regular inspections at the places of use have prevented efficiency losing control over sealed radioactive sources. The current capacity in the interim storage for State owned waste is not adequate for all used sealed sources and other small user waste which are currently kept in the possession of the licensees. Thus, expansion of the storage capacity and other options for taking care of the small user waste is under consideration. (N.C.)

  20. Regulatory aspects and practices of low level radioactive waste disposal in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellerin, P [CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-les-Durance (France). Service de Protection contre les Rayonnements

    1982-01-01

    For the use of radioactivity in medicine, universities and conventional industries as well as nuclear power generation in France, the licensing of the users is performed on the basis of competence certification, the justification of application, the responsibility of the users and the record of all discharge and waste. Radioprotection survey is a responsibility of specialized doctors and biologists. The procedure of obtaining the license when people want to use artificial radionuclides is explained. The ORIS has devoted to the production and distribution of radioisotopes. The delivery of major isotopes to medicine and industries as non-sealed sources and sealed sources is reported. The obligation of the users, the licensing of their gaseous and liquid discharge, and the provisory storage of solid wastes are described. The problems are the diversity of the nature of wastes, the specialization of the means of treating each type of wastes, the dispersion of waste producers and the low volume to pick up. The solution in France is the establishment of a national agency five years ago. The waste processing and disposal system in France is explained. Radioprotection is not only a question of science, but also of philosophy, moral, extreme wisdom, economy, politics and public judgement.

  1. Regulatory and management requirements for investigation-derived waste generated during environmental investigations and cleanups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clary, M.B.

    1994-01-01

    Environmental cleanup efforts often result in the generation of waste materials, such as soil samples, drill cuttings, decontamination water, drilling muds, personal protective equipment, and disposable sampling equipment. The management of associated with site characterization and remediation issues is a complicated issue at many CERCLA/RCRA facilities throughout the country, primarily because of the federal hazardous waste regulations. The hazardous waste regulations were intended to apply to the active generation of hazardous waste at industrial facilities and do not often make sense when applied to sites con by poor disposal practices of the past. In order to manage investigation derived waste in a more rational, logical manner, EPA issued guidance on the management of investigation-derived waste (IDW) at Superfund sites in January, 1992. The basic intent of the EPA guidance is to provide Superfund Site Managers with options for handling, managing, and disposing of IDW. The second part of this paper provides a detailed analysis of current IDW practices at various Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and Superfund sites across the nation. Some sites, particularly the DOE facilities, with more complicated on-going cleanup efforts have developed site-specific written procedures for managing IDW, often incorporating risk assessment. In come cases, these site-specific policies are going farther than the current EPA and Colorado policies in terms of conservatively managing IDW

  2. Regulatory aspects and practices of low level radioactive waste disposal in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellerin, P.

    1982-01-01

    For the use of radioactivity in medicine, universities and conventional industries as well as nuclear power generation in France, the licensing of the users is performed on the basis of competence certification, the justification of application, the responsibility of the users and the record of all discharge and waste. Radioprotection survey is a responsibility of specialized doctors and biologists. The procedure of obtaining the license when people want to use artificial radionuclides is explained. The ORIS has devoted to the production and distribution of radioisotopes. The delivery of major isotopes to medicine and industries as non-sealed sources and sealed sources is reported. The obligation of the users, the licensing of their gaseous and liquid discharge, and the provisory storage of solid wastes are described. The problems are the diversity of the nature of wastes, the specialization of the means of treating each type of wastes, the dispersion of waste producers and the low volume to pick up. The solution in France is the establishment of a national agency five years ago. The waste processing and disposal system in France is explained. Radioprotection is not only a question of science, but also of philosophy, moral, extreme wisdom, economy, politics and public judgement. (Kako,I.)

  3. Regulatory aspects of underground disposal of radioactive waste in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    It is a basic principle of radioactive waste management in the U.K. to comply with the system of dose limitations laid down by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The Radioactive Substances Act, 1960, prohibits the disposal of radioactive waste on or from all premises (except those belonging to the Crown) unless authorised by the appropriate authority. Consultation, as necessary, with local and public authorities is provided for. Under the Nuclear Installations Act, 1965, nuclear installations, with some exceptions, require to be licensed by the Health and safety executive. Installations for the disposal of radioactive waste are not, as such, prescribed as nuclear installations under the Nuclear Installations Act, 1965 (and thereby governed by the licensing procedure under the Act), but they may be, if they involve the storage of bulk quantities of radioactive waste. The Secretary of State for the Environment, together with the Secretaries of State for Scotland and Wales are responsible for the development of a nuclear waste management policy, helped in this task by the newly-formed Radioactive Waste Management Advisory Committee. (NEA) [fr

  4. Development of Risk Insights for Regulatory Review of a Near-Surface Disposal Facility for Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esh, D.W.; Ridge, A.C.; Thaggard, M.

    2006-01-01

    Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA) requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consult with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) about non-High Level Waste (HLW) determinations. In its consultative role, NRC performs technical reviews of DOE's waste determinations but does not have regulatory authority over DOE's waste disposal activities. The safety of disposal is evaluated by comparing predicted disposal facility performance to the performance objectives specified in NRC regulations for the disposal of low-level waste (10 CFR Part 61 Subpart C). The performance objectives contain criteria for protection of the public, protection of inadvertent intruders, protection of workers, and stability of the disposal site after closure. The potential radiological dose to receptors typically is evaluated with a performance assessment (PA) model that simulates the release of radionuclides from the disposal site, transport of radionuclides through the environment, and exposure of potential receptors to residual contamination for thousands of years. This paper describes NRC's development and use of independent performance assessment modeling to facilitate review of DOE's non-HLW determination for the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) at the Savannah River Site. NRC's review of the safety of near-surface disposal of radioactive waste at the SDF was facilitated and focused by risk insights developed with an independent PA model. The main components of NRC's performance assessment model are presented. The development of risk insights that allow the staff to focus review efforts on those areas that are most important to satisfying the performance objectives is discussed. Uncertainty analysis was performed of the full stochastic model using genetic variable selection algorithms. The results of the uncertainty analysis were then used to guide the development of simulations of other scenarios to understand the key risk

  5. Healthcare waste management: an interpretive structural modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Vikas; Anbanandam, Ramesh

    2016-06-13

    Purpose - The World Health Organization identified infectious healthcare waste as a threat to the environment and human health. India's current medical waste management system has limitations, which lead to ineffective and inefficient waste handling practices. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to: first, identify the important barriers that hinder India's healthcare waste management (HCWM) systems; second, classify operational, tactical and strategical issues to discuss the managerial implications at different management levels; and third, define all barriers into four quadrants depending upon their driving and dependence power. Design/methodology/approach - India's HCWM system barriers were identified through the literature, field surveys and brainstorming sessions. Interrelationships among all the barriers were analyzed using interpretive structural modeling (ISM). Fuzzy-Matrice d'Impacts Croisés Multiplication Appliquée á un Classement (MICMAC) analysis was used to classify HCWM barriers into four groups. Findings - In total, 25 HCWM system barriers were identified and placed in 12 different ISM model hierarchy levels. Fuzzy-MICMAC analysis placed eight barriers in the second quadrant, five in third and 12 in fourth quadrant to define their relative ISM model importance. Research limitations/implications - The study's main limitation is that all the barriers were identified through a field survey and barnstorming sessions conducted only in Uttarakhand, Northern State, India. The problems in implementing HCWM practices may differ with the region, hence, the current study needs to be replicated in different Indian states to define the waste disposal strategies for hospitals. Practical implications - The model will help hospital managers and Pollution Control Boards, to plan their resources accordingly and make policies, targeting key performance areas. Originality/value - The study is the first attempt to identify India's HCWM system barriers and prioritize

  6. Structural and regulatory diversity shape HLA-C protein expression levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur, Gurman; Gras, Stephanie; Mobbs, Jesse I

    2017-01-01

    expression of HLA-C allomorphs at the cell surface by influencing the structure of the peptide-binding cleft and the diversity of peptides bound by the HLA-C molecules. Together with a phylogenetic analysis, these results highlight the diversity and long-term balancing selection of regulatory factors...

  7. A Review of International Telecommunications Industry Issues, Structure, and Regulatory Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Jack E.; And Others

    Industry structure studies prior to 1968 are briefly reviewed, and an overview of industrial and technological developments up to the present is provided through synopses of more recent studies. Areas covered include overseas telephone and record carriers; the creation of the Communications Satellite Corporation; the current regulatory and…

  8. Regulatory off-gas analysis from the evaporation of Hanford simulated waste spiked with organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Hiroshi H; Calloway, T Bond; Ferrara, Daro M; Choi, Alexander S; White, Thomas L; Gibson, Luther V; Burdette, Mark A

    2004-10-01

    After strontium/transuranics removal by precipitation followed by cesium/technetium removal by ion exchange, the remaining low-activity waste in the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant is to be concentrated by evaporation before being mixed with glass formers and vitrified. To provide a technical basis to permit the waste treatment facility, a relatively organic-rich Hanford Tank 241-AN-107 waste simulant was spiked with 14 target volatile, semi-volatile, and pesticide compounds and evaporated under vacuum in a bench-scale natural circulation evaporator fitted with an industrial stack off-gas sampler at the Savannah River National Laboratory. An evaporator material balance for the target organics was calculated by combining liquid stream mass and analytical data with off-gas emissions estimates obtained using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-846 Methods. Volatile and light semi-volatile organic compounds (1 mm Hg vapor pressure) in the waste simulant were found to largely exit through the condenser vent, while heavier semi-volatiles and pesticides generally remain in the evaporator concentrate. An OLI Environmental Simulation Program (licensed by OLI Systems, Inc.) evaporator model successfully predicted operating conditions and the experimental distribution of the fed target organics exiting in the concentrate, condensate, and off-gas streams, with the exception of a few semi-volatile and pesticide compounds. Comparison with Henry's Law predictions suggests the OLI Environmental Simulation Program model is constrained by available literature data.

  9. Organizational structures, roles and responsibilities within the Swiss waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCombie, C.; Issler, H.; Kowalski, E.

    1993-01-01

    The organizational structures and the division of responsibilities within the Swiss radioactive waste management program are based strongly on the principle that waste producers must assume full responsibility for choosing and implementing appropriate methods for treatment and disposal of residues while independent oversight and control by government safety authorities must be guaranteed. The structures within the governmental bodies ensure that proper regulatory and control functions are as free as possible from any conflicts of interest and that appropriate technical expertise is available. The more detailed organization within Nagra, which is necessary to over the wide range of tasks--in technical projects as well as in legal matters and in the area of communication--is also described. Important boundary conditions which determine the allocation of roles and responsibilities, and which are rather specific to Switzerland, include the small absolute size of the country and its nuclear program, the absence of a major centralized national geological survey, the high level of technical expertise in engineering organizations and in the university system, and the modest size of all bodies involved

  10. Safety cases for radioactive waste disposal facilities: guidance on confidence building and regulatory review IAEA-ASAM co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Belfadhel, M.; Bennett, D.G.; Metcalf, P.; Nys, V.; Goldammer, W.

    2008-01-01

    The IAEA has been conducting two co-ordinated research programmes (CRPs) projects to develop and apply improved safety assessment methodologies for near-surface radioactive waste disposal facilities. The more recent of these projects, ASAM (application of safety assessment methodologies), included a Regulatory Review Working Group (RRWG) which has been working to develop guidance on how to gain confidence in safety assessments and safety cases, and on how to conduct regulatory reviews of safety assessments. This paper provides an overview of the ASAM project, focusing on the safety case and regulatory review. (authors)

  11. The regulatory and waste safety infrastructure of Bangladesh: Present status and future direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazi, O.A.

    2001-01-01

    Although nuclear energy and ionizing radiation exist as this planet earth exists, the history of human use of these energies is only a little over hundred years old. Nuclear and radiological practices are of immense benefit to society. But, like all other practices, nuclear and radiological practices also involve risks of a special type and nature. People and media are particularly sensitive to the use as well as to any accident or emergency involving the practices. Necessary laws and regulatory bodies have existed in many countries for a long time to control and keep the risks within acceptable limits. Nonetheless, accidents do occur and emergencies arise, which leads to the questioning of such regulatory systems' effectiveness. International interaction and co-operation are essential to addressing societal concerns appropriately. Bangladesh, though late, has also enacted laws and established a regulatory system to control the practices. This paper focuses on the country's regulatory status, hurdles being faced in implementing the legal requirements, and future thinking to increase effectiveness and efficiency. (author)

  12. A study on the establishment of the regulatory guide to the characteristics and classification criteria of low and intermediate level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Geon Jae; Paek, Min Hoon; Park, Jong Gil; Han, Byeong Seop; Cheong, Jae Hak; Lee, Hae Chan; Yang, Jin Yeong; Hong, Hei Kwan; Park, Jin Baek [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-15

    The objectives of this study are the development of regulatory guidance to the establishment of the necessary technology standard of the characteristics and classification criteria of low and intermediate level radioactive waste for the safe operation of the waste repositories. In followings, the contents of our report will be presented in two parts. Survey of the characteristics of radioactive waste : investigate and analyze the source, types and characteristics of domestic radioactive waste as a basis for this study, radiochemical analysis of radioactive waste based on foreign and domestic data base, determination of the methodology for the application of the characteristic analysis of waste classification technology. Establishment of the classification criteria of the radioactive waste : collection and analysis of foreign and domestic data base on the classification methodology and criteria, development of low and intermediate level waste classification criteria and the set up of the classification methodology through the analysis of waste data, establishment of the systematic classification methodology of the low and intermediate radioactive waste through the careful survey of the current domestic regulation.

  13. Regulatory policy and structural change in the natural gas industry: A transaction cost perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has recently promoted policy initiatives designed to substitute market responsive industry practices for the micro-management regulatory practices previously employed. These new policies are expected to generate a flexible gas pricing policy that more accurately reflects market supply and demand conditions. Historically, much of the regulation of this industry was enacted to ensure that pipeline companies would be able to recover the very large up-front investments in immobile equipment that characterize the production, transportation, storage, and distribution of natural gas. The institutional detail available from historical accounts of the development of the industry are used to describe structural change over time. Regulatory policy, the level of asset specificity, and the extent of secondary environmental uncertainty are all shown to exert significant effects on the level of integration into production, storage and marketing

  14. Regulatory challenges in the management of aging of structural materials in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelo, C.; Mendoza, C.; Mas, E.; Conde, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses two major pathways by which a regulatory body, and in particular the CSN, may participate in the acquisition of the necessary knowledge on mechanisms of aging of nuclear structural materials: to participate in forums to share operational experience and R and R project, both nationally and internationally. It notes the importance of this participation to carry out its regulatory function based on the knowledge acquired and the unique challenge of transferring that knowledge to rules and guidelines for their application. The article discusses various R and D projects in which the CSN participates directly. It calls for the presence of regulatory bodies in R and D project funded by the EU and the transfer of the results of such projects to codes, standards or guidelines for feasible implementation. (Author)

  15. Regulatory Project Manager for Salina and Permian Basins for the NWTS [National Waste Terminal Storage] Program: Final techical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    The identification of candidate sites for nuclear waste repositories involves geological and environmental studies to characterize potential sites. These investigations include the collection and analysis of detailed geological and environmental data and comparison of the data against predetermined site performance criteria, i.e., geologic characteristics, environmental protection, and socioeconomic impacts. The work summarized in this final technical report encompasses mainly ''environmental characterization'' studies in the Permian Basin in the Texas Panhandle during the period of 1977-86; in the earlier phase of the contract, regional environmental work was also done in the Salina Basin (1977-79) and certain licensing support activities and safety analyses were conducted (1977-82). Considerable regulatory support work was also performed during 1986. 9 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Regulatory aspects of the transport of high radiation level and alpha waste in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devillers, C.; Grenier, M.; Lombard, J.; Mathieu, F.

    1993-01-01

    The introduction of the 10 mSv.h -1 at 3 m limit for LSA unshielded material makes it impossible to transport, as LSA material, the highest radiation level wastes from EdF PWR's operations. At present, the EdF's waste blocks can be transported as LSA III material by special arrangement. A new package design, equivalent to a Type B package, will be available for their transport before the end of the year 1995. It consists of a re-usable steel cylinder over-packing each block. Compliance of this package model with transport safety requirements will be demonstrated by taking into account the non-dispersability, as LSA III material, of the irradiating waste. A two-step approach has been accepted by the French Competent Authority for the transport of these wastes: (1) a specific ISO 20 container, thermally insulated, can be used by special arrangement for the transport of LSA combustible material having a total activity per conveyance higher than 100 A2. Furthermore, additional safety measures have to be implemented for these consignments. (2) After the end of 1995, a Type B package must be used for activity contents per conveyance higher than 100 A2. A specific 20' ISO container, complying with Type B requirements, is being developed for that purpose. (author)

  17. Argentina Nuclear Regulatory Authority and the final disposition gives to radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petraits, E.; Siraky, G.; Novo, R.

    1998-01-01

    This work describes the alignment legislative and regulator in which is carried out the final disposition the radioactive wastes in the Argentina Republic . Timbers the activities are presented the Authority Nuclear Regulator (RNA) and the applied focuses in connection with the inspections to the facilities, the evaluations security the associate systems and the collaboration with the international organizations in this matter

  18. Nuclear power plant decommissioning and radioactive waste management in the U.K.. A regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, W.M.

    1993-01-01

    Effective control of the decommissioning and radioactive waste management of nuclear power plant in United Kingdom are introduced. The Government established the legislative framework and national strategy, operators provided the necessary skills and equipment for implementation, and the regulators used the legislative controls to ensure a safe system of work is achieved and maintained

  19. Authorization of radioactive waste disposal under RSA93: regulatory experience and developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, J.O.

    1997-01-01

    The Environment Agency was formed in 1996 and is responsible for regulating radioactive waste disposal in England and Wales. In determining applications for disposal authorizations, it consults other statutory bodies including the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food and the Health and Safety Executive. The Agency has published updated guidance on the principles and requirements for authorization of geological disposal of low and intermediate level waste. It will apply a risk target of 10 -6 per year in determining authorizations for waste disposal. Further work is required to elaborate the concept of 'critical group' to which the risk target should be applied. The Agency has also considered amending the methodology it uses for regulation of radioactive waste discharges from nuclear installations. Concerns expressed by the nuclear industry about the lack of operational flexibility in discharge authorizations, led the Agency to develop an alternative method of regulation. Responses to this initiative were mixed. In the future, the Department of the Environment will be reviewing the principles underpinning regulation of discharges, with the intention of setting out guidance on the objectives to be achieved and factors to be taken into account. (author)

  20. Economic evaluation of small modular nuclear reactors and the complications of regulatory fee structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vegel, Benjamin; Quinn, Jason C.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon emission concerns and volatility in fossil fuel resources have renewed world-wide interest in nuclear energy as a solution to growing energy demands. Several large nuclear reactors are currently under construction in the United States, representing the first new construction in over 30 years. Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) have been in design for many years and offer potential technical and economic advantages compared with traditionally larger reactors. Current SMR capital and operational expenses have a wide range of uncertainty. This work evaluates the potential for SMRs in the US, develops a robust techno-economic assessment of SMRs, and leverages the model to evaluate US regulatory fees structures. Modeling includes capital expenses of a factory facility and capital and operational expenses with multiple scenarios explored through a component-level capital cost model. Policy regarding the licensing and regulation of SMRs is under development with proposed annual US regulatory fees evaluated through the developed techno-economic model. Results show regulatory fees are a potential barrier to the economic viability of SMRs with an alternate fee structure proposed and evaluated. The proposed fee structure is based on the re-distribution of fees for all nuclear reactors under a single structure based on reactor thermal power rating. - Highlights: • Potential demand for new small modular nuclear power in the US is established. • Capital costs are broken down on component level and include factory production. • US regulatory fees structures are evaluated, results show potential barrier. • An additional fee structure is proposed and compared with current US fee structures.

  1. Waste disposal of HYLIFE II structure: Issues and assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    Initial analysis has shown that by using 304 stainless steel (SS) a significant fraction (92 wt%) of the structural mass in the initial HYLIFE-II design could be disposed of by shallow burial. And if all the structural components are mixed together and treated as one entity, all of it could be disposed of by shallow burial. Two other types of SSs assessed, Mn-modified 316 and Prime Candidate Alloy (PCA), were found to require disposal by deep geologic burial of most of the structural mass. The presents of Nb and Mo in Mn-modified 316 and Prime Candidate Alloy (PCA), were found to dominate the generation of long term wastes produced and their presence should be avoided

  2. End of FY10 report - used fuel disposition technical bases and lessons learned : legal and regulatory framework for high-level waste disposition in the United States.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiner, Ruth F.; Blink, James A. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Rechard, Robert Paul; Perry, Frank (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Jenkins-Smith, Hank C. (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK); Carter, Joe (Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC); Nutt, Mark (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Cotton, Tom (Complex Systems Group, Washington DC)

    2010-09-01

    This report examines the current policy, legal, and regulatory framework pertaining to used nuclear fuel and high level waste management in the United States. The goal is to identify potential changes that if made could add flexibility and possibly improve the chances of successfully implementing technical aspects of a nuclear waste policy. Experience suggests that the regulatory framework should be established prior to initiating future repository development. Concerning specifics of the regulatory framework, reasonable expectation as the standard of proof was successfully implemented and could be retained in the future; yet, the current classification system for radioactive waste, including hazardous constituents, warrants reexamination. Whether or not consideration of multiple sites are considered simultaneously in the future, inclusion of mechanisms such as deliberate use of performance assessment to manage site characterization would be wise. Because of experience gained here and abroad, diversity of geologic media is not particularly necessary as a criterion in site selection guidelines for multiple sites. Stepwise development of the repository program that includes flexibility also warrants serious consideration. Furthermore, integration of the waste management system from storage, transportation, and disposition, should be examined and would be facilitated by integration of the legal and regulatory framework. Finally, in order to enhance acceptability of future repository development, the national policy should be cognizant of those policy and technical attributes that enhance initial acceptance, and those policy and technical attributes that maintain and broaden credibility.

  3. Meeting the regulatory challenges of mixed waste storage and monitoring: A novel approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, Dennis; Shaw, Mark

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes an original approach to providing safe storage of Remote Handled TRU Mixed Waste that is required to meet the EPA double liner and leachate collection system standards. This system, known as the 'Environmental Vault Liner', also allows a cost effective means of complying with the EPA's inspection requirements per 40 CFR 265.170, Use and Management of Containers. This approach is modular in nature, allowing additional storage capacity to be added on a demand basis, thereby eliminating significant upfront costs associated with large storage facilities built on estimated needs over many years. It reduces the financial and technical risks associated with large storage construction projects, allows modifications to new Liners put into service based on changing regulations and technologies. The Environmental Vault Liner offers additional benefits including easy waste retrieval, a 300 year design life, continuous below ground liquid detection and monitoring, replaceable instrumentation, inert (Nitrogen) atmosphere for container storage, continuous air monitoring, and remote visual container inspections. (author)

  4. Regulatory aspects of underground disposal of radioactive waste in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hookway, B.R.

    1980-01-01

    Government policy towards radioactive waste management in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is based on the system of dose limitations laid down by ICRP as interpreted by the National Radiological Protection Board for use in the United Kingdom. The paper describes the legislative and administrative arrangements by which this policy is enforced, including the work of the principal inspectorates, the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate and the Radiochemical Inspectorate together with the latter's equivalents in Scotland and Northern Ireland. It is concluded that the present legislation, including that relating to planning and the setting up of public inquiries, is sufficiently all-embracing to ensure both strict control of the disposal of all the radioactive waste currently arising or which will arise in the future and a high degree of public involvement in the necessary decisions. (author)

  5. Waste processing plant eco-auditing system for minimization of environmental risk: European Communities regulatory proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunetti, N.

    1993-01-01

    This paper delineates a system of process control and monitoring checks to be applied to municipal-industrial waste processing and disposal plants to ensure their energy efficient, environmentally safe and reliable operation. In line with European Communities environmental protection strategies, this eco-auditing system requires the preparation of environmental impacts statements on a regular basis during plant operation, as well as, prior to plant start-up. Continuous plant environmental compatibility evaluations are to ascertain: material and energy inputs and outputs; the composition and amounts of exhaust gases released into the atmosphere and the integrity of treatment liquids; control and monitoring instrumentation reliability. The implementation of the auditing system is to be carried out under the supervision of authorized auditing personnel. Waste processing and disposal plants are to make maximum use of energy and materials recovery processes so as to minimize energy consumption and risk to the environment

  6. Below Regulatory Concern Owners Group: An evaluation of dry active waste sorting: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, S.M.

    1989-02-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the accuracy of manual inspection of Dry Active Waste (DAW). Three studies were conducted at two nuclear power plants in which unmodified DAW waste streams of roughly 10,000 items each were inspected by technicians using pancake probes. Sorting performance was measured unobtrusively by intercepting the ''outflow'' from inspection stations. Verification of sorting accuracy was performed with a prototype, semi-automated sorting table employing a matrix of fixed plastic scintillation detectors. More than 30,000 items of trash were examined, classified, counted, and verified, and the composition of the ''inflow'' to the inspection stations was determined by reconstructing the ''outflow'' components, as determined during verification procedures. The results showed that between 1 and 19% of all items in each of the three DAW waste streams were contaminated at levels ≥100 ccpm. Sixty-two percent of the ''contaminated'' items in Study I, 87% of the contaminated items in Study II, and 97% of the contaminated items in Study III were detected. One-half to one percent of all items classified as <100 ccpm by technicians were actually ≥100 ccpm. False positive rates were very high in all three studies. The production rates and accuracy obtained on the semi-automated plastic scintillation sorting table used during the verification stages of this project greatly exceeded the rates for manual sorting. 9 figs., 13 tabs

  7. Development of a regulatory guide about the content and criteria for the elaboration of the radioactive waste management plans in Spanish nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez de la Higuera, Julia; Alvarez Alonso, M. Angeles; Simon Cirujano, Maria I.; Suarez Llorente, Beatriz

    2008-01-01

    Full text:The Spanish legislation requires the licensees to develop, among other documents, a Radioactive Waste Management Plan (RWMP) as an official report in the application for the operation and for the dismantling and decommissioning of a nuclear facility. These Plans should describe the types of waste, inventory, characterization, treatment, conditioning and storage of wastes. The Spanish regulatory body, Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN), promoted a working group to analyze the content and scope of the RWMP, bringing together the electric power industry association (UNESA), the waste management organisation (ENRESA) and the nuclear fuel industry (ENUSA). The objective of the RWMP is to establish the criteria and instructions to ensure a safe and optimized management, taking into account the normative and technological developments. The Plan is based on support Studies that contain the basic information for the analysis of the waste management options and deals with: (1) Actual generation and management options in the facility; (2) Classification of the facility in waste generation zones; (3) Experience analysis and identification of potential management improvements; (4) Selection, justification and introduction of new management modes. The RWMP will develop the following issues: a) Waste generation and management (for each waste type, information in terms of the origin, physico-chemical and radiological properties, volume of production and implemented management routes); b) Classification of the facility in waste zones. The facility will differentiate those areas where contaminated or activated wastes can be produced (Radioactive Waste Zone - RWZ) or not (Conventional Waste Zone - CWZ). To avoid mixing and allow this separation, two lines of defense will be established. The first one is the classification and setting marks in the Zones and the second one the controls on the non-radioactive wastes at the exit of the facility: a) Selection of foreseen lines

  8. Application of international recommendations and guidance on low level radioactive waste management and remediation of contaminated land at the national level: Experience of regulatory support in Northwest Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneve, M.; Smith, G.M.; Kerrigan, E

    2005-01-01

    This paper notes the developments in international recommendations on radioactive waste management and remediation of contaminated land and considers their implementation in the context of the Norwegian Plan of Action to improve nuclear safety in North West Russia. Summary information is provided on projects to implement waste management activities (so-called Industrial Projects) and on projects to support regulatory supervision of waste management activities (so-called Regulatory Support Projects). The links between international recommendations and national practice are discussed and it is concluded that, in practice, the details of national standards differ both among themselves and, in some respects, from the recommendations of the ICRP and IAEA. Examples of further potential collaboration projects are listed. While separate responsibilities among organisations have to clear and maintained, combined involvement of operators and regulators is recognised as a prioritised area in future cooperation between NRPA and Russia. (author)

  9. Evaluation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant classification of systems, structures and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    A review of the classification system for systems, structures, and components at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was performed using the WIPP Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and Bechtel document D-76-D-03 as primary source documents. The regulations of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) covering ''Disposal of High level Radioactive Wastes in Geologic Repositories,'' 10 CFR 60, and the regulations relevant to nuclear power plant siting and construction (10 CFR 50, 51, 100) were used as standards to evaluate the WIPP design classification system, although it is recognized that the US Department of Energy (DOE) is not required to comply with these NRC regulations in the design and construction of WIPP. The DOE General Design Criteria Manual (DOE Order 6430.1) and the Safety Analysis and Review System for AL Operation document (AL 54f81.1A) were reviewed in part. This report includes a discussion of the historical basis for nuclear power plant requirements, a review of WIPP and nuclear power plant classification bases, and a comparison of the codes and standards applicable to each quality level. Observations made during the review of the WIPP SAR are noted in the text of this reoport. The conclusions reached by this review are: WIPP classification methodology is comparable to corresponding nuclear power procedures. The classification levels assigned to WIPP systems are qualitatively the same as those assigned to nuclear power plant systems

  10. Making Plant-Support Structures From Waste Plant Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Robert C.; < oscjmocl. < attjew K/; {ertzbprm. A,amda; Ej (e. Cjad); Hunt, John

    2006-01-01

    Environmentally benign, biodegradable structures for supporting growing plants can be made in a process based on recycling of such waste plant fiber materials as wheat straw or of such derivative materials as paper and cardboard. Examples of structures that can be made in this way include plant plugs, pots, planter-lining mats, plant fences, and root and shoot barriers. No chemical binders are used in the process. First, the plant material is chopped into smaller particles. The particles are leached with water or steam to remove material that can inhibit plant growth, yielding a fibrous slurry. If the desired structures are plugs or sheets, then the slurry is formed into the desired shapes in a pulp molding subprocess. If the desired structures are root and shoot barriers, pots, or fences, then the slurry is compression-molded to the desired shapes in a heated press. The processed materials in these structures have properties similar to those of commercial pressboard, but unlike pressboard, these materials contain no additives. These structures have been found to withstand one growth cycle, even when wet

  11. Suggested state requirements and criteria for a low-level radioactive waste disposal site regulatory program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratliff, R.A.; Dornsife, B.; Autry, V.; Gronemyer, L.; Vaden, J.; Cashman, T.

    1985-08-01

    Description of criteria and procedure is presented for a state to follow in the development of a program to regulate a LLW disposal site. This would include identifying those portions of the NRC regulations that should be matters of compatibility, identifying the various expertise and disciplines that will be necessary to effectively regulate a disposal site, identifying the resources necessary for conducting a confirmatory monitoring program, and providing suggestions in other areas which, based on experiences, would result in a more effective regulatory program

  12. A regulatory view of the seismic assessment of existing nuclear structures in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inkester, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes the background to the seismic assessment of existing nuclear structures in the United Kingdom. Nuclear installations in this country were not designed specifically to resist earthquakes until the nineteen-seventies, although older plants were robustly constructed. The seismic capability of these older installations is now being evaluated as part of the periodic safety reviews which nuclear licensees are required to carry out. The regulatory requirements which set the framework for these studies are explained. The licensees' processes of hazard appraisal and examination of the response of the structure are briefly summarized. Regulatory views on some of the criteria used to judge the adequacy of safety are discussed. Finally the paper provides some comments on future initiatives and possible areas of development. (author)

  13. A Two-Way Street: Regulatory Interplay between RNA Polymerase and Nascent RNA Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinwei; Landick, Robert

    2016-04-01

    The vectorial (5'-to-3' at varying velocity) synthesis of RNA by cellular RNA polymerases (RNAPs) creates a rugged kinetic landscape, demarcated by frequent, sometimes long-lived, pauses. In addition to myriad gene-regulatory roles, these pauses temporally and spatially program the co-transcriptional, hierarchical folding of biologically active RNAs. Conversely, these RNA structures, which form inside or near the RNA exit channel, interact with the polymerase and adjacent protein factors to influence RNA synthesis by modulating pausing, termination, antitermination, and slippage. Here, we review the evolutionary origin, mechanistic underpinnings, and regulatory consequences of this interplay between RNAP and nascent RNA structure. We categorize and rationalize the extensive linkage between the transcriptional machinery and its product, and provide a framework for future studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Regulatory perspectives on model validation in high-level radioactive waste management programs: A joint NRC/SKI white paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wingefors, S.; Andersson, J.; Norrby, S. [Swedish Nuclear Power lnspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden). Office of Nuclear Waste Safety; Eisenberg, N.A.; Lee, M.P.; Federline, M.V. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards; Sagar, B.; Wittmeyer, G.W. [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1999-03-01

    Validation (or confidence building) should be an important aspect of the regulatory uses of mathematical models in the safety assessments of geologic repositories for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level radioactive wastes (HLW). A substantial body of literature exists indicating the manner in which scientific validation of models is usually pursued. Because models for a geologic repository performance assessment cannot be tested over the spatial scales of interest and long time periods for which the models will make estimates of performance, the usual avenue for model validation- that is, comparison of model estimates with actual data at the space-time scales of interest- is precluded. Further complicating the model validation process in HLW programs are the uncertainties inherent in describing the geologic complexities of potential disposal sites, and their interactions with the engineered system, with a limited set of generally imprecise data, making it difficult to discriminate between model discrepancy and inadequacy of input data. A successful strategy for model validation, therefore, should attempt to recognize these difficulties, address their resolution, and document the resolution in a careful manner. The end result of validation efforts should be a documented enhancement of confidence in the model to an extent that the model's results can aid in regulatory decision-making. The level of validation needed should be determined by the intended uses of these models, rather than by the ideal of validation of a scientific theory. This white Paper presents a model validation strategy that can be implemented in a regulatory environment. It was prepared jointly by staff members of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate-SKI. This document should not be viewed as, and is not intended to be formal guidance or as a staff position on this matter. Rather, based on a review of the literature and previous

  15. Regulatory perspectives on model validation in high-level radioactive waste management programs: A joint NRC/SKI white paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wingefors, S.; Andersson, J.; Norrby, S.

    1999-03-01

    Validation (or confidence building) should be an important aspect of the regulatory uses of mathematical models in the safety assessments of geologic repositories for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level radioactive wastes (HLW). A substantial body of literature exists indicating the manner in which scientific validation of models is usually pursued. Because models for a geologic repository performance assessment cannot be tested over the spatial scales of interest and long time periods for which the models will make estimates of performance, the usual avenue for model validation- that is, comparison of model estimates with actual data at the space-time scales of interest- is precluded. Further complicating the model validation process in HLW programs are the uncertainties inherent in describing the geologic complexities of potential disposal sites, and their interactions with the engineered system, with a limited set of generally imprecise data, making it difficult to discriminate between model discrepancy and inadequacy of input data. A successful strategy for model validation, therefore, should attempt to recognize these difficulties, address their resolution, and document the resolution in a careful manner. The end result of validation efforts should be a documented enhancement of confidence in the model to an extent that the model's results can aid in regulatory decision-making. The level of validation needed should be determined by the intended uses of these models, rather than by the ideal of validation of a scientific theory. This white Paper presents a model validation strategy that can be implemented in a regulatory environment. It was prepared jointly by staff members of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate-SKI. This document should not be viewed as, and is not intended to be formal guidance or as a staff position on this matter. Rather, based on a review of the literature and previous

  16. Leak rates and structural integrity tests for Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant primary containment. Regulatory experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamani Alegria, Yuri Raul; Salgado Gonzalez, Julio Ricardo

    1996-01-01

    In the Appendix A General Design Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants of the US Code of Federal Regulations title 10 part 50 (10CFR50) is established the Criterion 1 Quality standards and records which requires that structures, systems and components important to safety should be tested to quality standards according with the importance of the safety function to be performed. This regulation has been adopted by the Mexican Regulatory Body (CNSNS) for their nuclear power plants. (author)

  17. Strategical Approaches and Regulatory Infrastructure for Radioactive Waste Management in the Republic of Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozdyalouskaya, L.

    2016-01-01

    Three major types of RW, each requiring special consideration: • Institutional RW buried and disposed for long-term storage at the national centralized RW management facility Ekores; • Waste generated in the process of clean-up activity in the Chernobyl contaminated areas; and • RW to be generated during operation of the first Belorussian NPP after its commissioning in 2018. The paper presents strategic approaches exercised for managing the RW in past and expected developments and options for RW management in Belarus in future

  18. Structural and microstructural aspects of asbestos-cement waste vitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaszko, Józef; Zawada, Anna; Przerada, Iwona; Lubas, Małgorzata

    2018-04-01

    The main goal of the work was to evaluate the vitrification process of asbestos-cement waste (ACW). A mixture of 50 wt% ACW and 50 wt% glass cullet was melted in an electric furnace at 1400 °C for 90 min and then cast into a steel mold. The vitrified product was subjected to annealing. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to evaluate the effects of the vitrification. The chemical constitution of the material before and after the vitrification process was also analyzed. It was found that the vitrified product has an amorphous structure in which the components of asbestos-cement waste are incorporated. MIR spectroscopy showed that the absorption bands of chrysotile completely disappeared after the vitrification process. The results of the spectroscopic studies were confirmed by X-ray studies - no diffraction reflections from the chrysotile crystallographic planes were observed. As a result of the treatment, the fibrous asbestos construction, the main cause of its pathogenic properties, completely disappeared. The vitrified material was characterized by higher resistance to ion leaching in an aquatic environment than ACW and a smaller volume of nearly 72% in relation to the apparent volume of the substrates. The research has confirmed the high effectiveness of vitrification in neutralizing hazardous waste containing asbestos and the FT-IR spectroscopy was found to be useful to identify asbestos varieties and visualizing changes caused by the vitrification process. The work also presents the current situation regarding the utilization of asbestos-containing products.

  19. Differential T cell response against BK virus regulatory and structural antigens: A viral dynamics modelling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Blazquez-Navarro

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available BK virus (BKV associated nephropathy affects 1-10% of kidney transplant recipients, leading to graft failure in about 50% of cases. Immune responses against different BKV antigens have been shown to have a prognostic value for disease development. Data currently suggest that the structural antigens and regulatory antigens of BKV might each trigger a different mode of action of the immune response. To study the influence of different modes of action of the cellular immune response on BKV clearance dynamics, we have analysed the kinetics of BKV plasma load and anti-BKV T cell response (Elispot in six patients with BKV associated nephropathy using ODE modelling. The results show that only a small number of hypotheses on the mode of action are compatible with the empirical data. The hypothesis with the highest empirical support is that structural antigens trigger blocking of virus production from infected cells, whereas regulatory antigens trigger an acceleration of death of infected cells. These differential modes of action could be important for our understanding of BKV resolution, as according to the hypothesis, only regulatory antigens would trigger a fast and continuous clearance of the viral load. Other hypotheses showed a lower degree of empirical support, but could potentially explain the clearing mechanisms of individual patients. Our results highlight the heterogeneity of the dynamics, including the delay between immune response against structural versus regulatory antigens, and its relevance for BKV clearance. Our modelling approach is the first that studies the process of BKV clearance by bringing together viral and immune kinetics and can provide a framework for personalised hypotheses generation on the interrelations between cellular immunity and viral dynamics.

  20. Differential T cell response against BK virus regulatory and structural antigens: A viral dynamics modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazquez-Navarro, Arturo; Schachtner, Thomas; Stervbo, Ulrik; Sefrin, Anett; Stein, Maik; Westhoff, Timm H; Reinke, Petra; Klipp, Edda; Babel, Nina; Neumann, Avidan U; Or-Guil, Michal

    2018-05-01

    BK virus (BKV) associated nephropathy affects 1-10% of kidney transplant recipients, leading to graft failure in about 50% of cases. Immune responses against different BKV antigens have been shown to have a prognostic value for disease development. Data currently suggest that the structural antigens and regulatory antigens of BKV might each trigger a different mode of action of the immune response. To study the influence of different modes of action of the cellular immune response on BKV clearance dynamics, we have analysed the kinetics of BKV plasma load and anti-BKV T cell response (Elispot) in six patients with BKV associated nephropathy using ODE modelling. The results show that only a small number of hypotheses on the mode of action are compatible with the empirical data. The hypothesis with the highest empirical support is that structural antigens trigger blocking of virus production from infected cells, whereas regulatory antigens trigger an acceleration of death of infected cells. These differential modes of action could be important for our understanding of BKV resolution, as according to the hypothesis, only regulatory antigens would trigger a fast and continuous clearance of the viral load. Other hypotheses showed a lower degree of empirical support, but could potentially explain the clearing mechanisms of individual patients. Our results highlight the heterogeneity of the dynamics, including the delay between immune response against structural versus regulatory antigens, and its relevance for BKV clearance. Our modelling approach is the first that studies the process of BKV clearance by bringing together viral and immune kinetics and can provide a framework for personalised hypotheses generation on the interrelations between cellular immunity and viral dynamics.

  1. Regulatory Strategies To Minimize Generation Of Regulated Wastes From Cleanup, Continued Use Or Decommissioning Of Nuclear Facilities Contaminated With Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBS) - 11198

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowry, N.

    2010-01-01

    Disposal costs for liquid PCB radioactive waste are among the highest of any category of regulated waste. The high cost is driven by the fact that disposal options are extremely limited. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) regulations require most liquids with PCBs at concentration of (ge) 50 parts-per-million to be disposed by incineration or equivalent destructive treatment. Disposal fees can be as high as $200 per gallon. This figure does not include packaging and the cost to transport the waste to the disposal facility, or the waste generator's labor costs for managing the waste prior to shipment. Minimizing the generation of liquid radioactive PCB waste is therefore a significant waste management challenge. PCB spill cleanups often generate large volumes of waste. That is because the removal of PCBs typically requires the liberal use of industrial solvents followed by a thorough rinsing process. In a nuclear facility, the cleanup process may be complicated by the presence of radiation and other occupational hazards. Building design and construction features, e.g., the presence of open grating or trenches, may also complicate cleanup. In addition to the technical challenges associated with spill cleanup, selection of the appropriate regulatory requirements and approach may be challenging. The TSCA regulations include three different sections relating to the cleanup of PCB contamination or spills. EPA has also promulgated a separate guidance policy for fresh PCB spills that is published as Subpart G of 40 CFR 761 although it is not an actual regulation. Applicability is based on the circumstances of each contamination event or situation. Other laws or regulations may also apply. Identification of the allowable regulatory options is important. Effective communication with stakeholders, particularly regulators, is just as important. Depending on the regulatory path that is taken, cleanup may necessitate the generation of large quantities of regulated waste

  2. Regulatory design for RES-E support mechanisms: Learning curves, market structure, and burden-sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batlle, C.; Pérez-Arriaga, I.J.; Zambrano-Barragán, P.

    2012-01-01

    Drawing from relevant experiences in power systems around the world, this paper offers a review of existing policy support mechanisms for RES-E, with a detailed analysis of their regulatory implications. While recent studies provide an account of current RES-E support systems, in this paper we focus on some of the impacts these mechanisms have on the overall energy market structure and its performance. Given the rising importance of RES-E in systems everywhere, these impacts should no longer be overlooked. - Highlights: ► This paper offers a critical review of RES-E support mechanisms and their regulatory implications. ► The discussion focuses on how the different schemes impact the performance of the energy markets. ► We propose to redesign of current RES-E mechanisms to optimize incentives and market performance. ► Our recommendation is also to gradually move from price-based mechanisms to auctions.

  3. Ownership options, financing structures, and regulatory considerations affecting independent power production projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper is a framework for analysis of the legal, financing, and policy differences between independent power production projects (IPPs) and projects with qualifying facility status (QFs) under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA). At a basic level, there is no fundamental difference in types of ownership and financing structures available to IPPs and QFS. The key consideration, though, is the regulatory and legal implications to project participants. Significant issues arise for equity participants, lenders, developers, and project operators that are considering IPP projects. Of course, many of these same issues apply to certain types of QF projects that are not fully exempt from the Public Utility Holding Company Act (PUHCA) and the Federal Power Act (FPA)

  4. Regulatory decision making in the presence of uncertainty in the context of the disposal of long lived radioactive wastes. Third report of the Working group on principles and criteria for radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-10-01

    Plans for disposing of radioactive wastes have raised a number of unique and mostly philosophical problems, mainly due to the very long time-scales which have to be considered. While there is general agreement on disposal concepts and on many aspects of a safety philosophy, consensus on a number of issues remains to be achieved. The IAEA established a subgroup under the International Radioactive Waste Management Advisory Committee (INWAC). The subgroup started its work in 1991 as the ''INWAC Subgroup on Principles and Criteria for Radioactive Waste Disposal''. With the reorganization in 1995 of IAEA senior advisory committees in the nuclear safety area, the title of the group was changed to ''Working Group on Principles and Criteria for Radioactive Waste Disposal''. The working group is intended to provide an open forum for: (1) the discussion and resolution of contentious issues, especially those with an international component, in the area of principles and criteria for safe disposal of waste; (2) the review and analysis of new ideas and concepts in the subject area; (3) establishing areas of consensus; (4) the consideration of issues related to safety principles and criteria in the IAEA's Radioactive Waste Safety Standards (RADWASS) programme; (5) the exchange of information on national safety criteria and policies for radioactive waste disposal. This is the third report of the working group and it deals with the subject of regulatory decision making under conditions of uncertainty which is a matter of concern with respect to disposal of radioactive wastes underground. 14 refs

  5. Standard Review Plan for a petition for rulemaking on radioactive waste streams below regulatory concern: Expedited review in accordance with Appendix B to 10 CFR, Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larkins, P.M.

    1989-10-01

    The Standard Review Plan (SRP) provides guidance to staff reviewers acting on rulemaking petitions in an expeditious manner to exempt from regulation radioactive waste determined to be Below Regulatory Concern (BRC), as called for in the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985. The review plan is designed to ensure the quality and uniformity of staff reviews and to present a well-defined basis for the staff's evaluation of BRC petitions. The plan serves to improve the understanding of the staff's review by interested members of the public and the industry. It also provides information about the BRC rulemaking process to a wider audience. 6 refs., 7 figs

  6. Structural and regulatory differences in amylase isoenzymes in germinating Brazilian barley cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg-Kraemer J.E.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The amylase electrophoretic patterns of 10 Brazilian brewing-barley varieties with different malting grades and diastatic power were analyzed during the 7-day germination which occurs during the malting process. Intra and inter-variety genetic variability was observed at both the structural and regulatory level. In the first few days after germination all varieties showed a few active loci, all of them with low activity. In subsequent days, new loci became active and those already detected since early germination showed increased activity. All varieties showed a continuous increase in amylase synthesis until the 3rd and/or 4th day after germination. Some varieties maintained high amylase activity until the last day of germination, while others showed a decrease in activity on the 5th or 6th day. No specific band increased or decreased its intensity independently of the others. A total of 14 loci were detected, out of which only one locus was polymorphic, indicating very low structural genetic variability, with only 2.8% polymorphic loci, an average of 1.04 alleles per loci, and an average expected heterozygosity of only 0.7%. The mean intra-variety Jaccard similarity coefficient complement (1 - S J was 0.009. The mean intra-variety difference based on regulatory differences was higher (1 - S J = 0.17 than that obtained based on structural differences, suggesting differential gene activation. Inter-variety differentiation also showed low structural variability, with 1 - S J = 0.026 and a Nei genetic distance (D value of 0.0076, and a remarkable increase in divergence caused by differential gene activation (1 - S J = 0.34. These results indicate that regulatory polymorphism is the principal agent responsible for amylase variability in the barley varieties analyzed.

  7. Structural analysis of ORNL underground gunite waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    The North Tank Farm (NTF) and the South Tank Farm (STF) located at ORNL contains 8 underground waste storage tanks which were built around 1943. The tanks were used to collect and store the liquid portion of the radioactive and/or hazardous chemical wastes produced as part of normal facility operations at ORNL, but are no longer part of the active Low Level Liquid Waste system of the Laboratory. The tanks were constructed of gunite. The six STF tanks are 50 ft in diameter, and have a 12 ft sidewall, and an arched dome rising another 6.25 ft. The sidewall are 6 in. thick and have an additional 1.5 in. gunite liner on the inside. There is a thickened ring at the wall-dome juncture. The dome consists of two 5 in. layers of gunite. The two tanks in the NTF are similar, but smaller, having a 25 ft diameter, no inner liner, and a dome thickness of 3.5 in. Both sets of tanks have welded wire mesh and vertical rebars in the walls, welded wire mesh in the domes, and horizontal reinforcing hoop bars pre-tensioned to 35 to 40 ksi stress in the walls and thickened ring. The eight tanks are entirely buried under a 6 ft layer of soil cover. The present condition of the tanks is not accurately known, since access to them is extremely limited. In order to evaluate the structural capability of the tanks, a finite element analysis of each size tank was performed. Both static and seismic loads were considered. Three sludge levels, empty, half-full, and full were evaluated. In the STF analysis, the effects of wall deterioration and group spacing were evaluated. These analyses found that the weakest element in the tanks is the steel resisting the circumferential (or hoop) forces in the dome ring, a fact verified separately by an independent reviewer. However, the hoop steel has an adequate demand/capacity ratio. Buckling of the dome and the tank walls is not a concern

  8. Hulls and structural material waste conditioning by high pressure compaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frotscher, H.

    1991-01-01

    Since 1986 KfK is developing a conditioning process. Main subjects of the investigations were the development of the production technique and the planning of the most important equipments of the process under remote conditions. The process is based on an extensive program of experiments. Inactive bulks of hulls and structural material components were compacted using maximum axial pressure load of about 300 MPa. The product density as function of press force was experimentally determinated. The mechanical loads of the press and tools were estimated for the design of these equipments. The hydraulic press consists a horizontal four-cylinder press. The maximum force of the press is 25 MN. The main advantage is the modular design of the press which is open on all sides. Especially the free accessibility from top is ensured. The report also represents relevant radiological data of the alternative product. Co-60 is the dominating activity of the product due to the effects of the heat production. An amount of 10 kg hull waste or 25 kg top and bottom pieces of the spent fuel assemblies per package is already beyond the Co-60 limit of the KONRAD regulations. The nuclear thermal power of a filled container is approximately sixty times lower compared with a vitrified HLW-container. Since the product shows thermal stability beyond 200 0 C, this it is suited for a combined disposal together with vitrified HLW-containers in salt bore holes of a geological disposal. The preliminary cost evaluation is based on a reprocessing throughput of 500 t HM per year and volume reduction factor of 5.3. Accordingly there are produced 300 waste packages with hulls only or 625 units with hulls and top and bottom pieces which require 1.6 or 2.3 millions DM respectively

  9. Inference of gene regulatory networks with sparse structural equation models exploiting genetic perturbations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Cai

    Full Text Available Integrating genetic perturbations with gene expression data not only improves accuracy of regulatory network topology inference, but also enables learning of causal regulatory relations between genes. Although a number of methods have been developed to integrate both types of data, the desiderata of efficient and powerful algorithms still remains. In this paper, sparse structural equation models (SEMs are employed to integrate both gene expression data and cis-expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL, for modeling gene regulatory networks in accordance with biological evidence about genes regulating or being regulated by a small number of genes. A systematic inference method named sparsity-aware maximum likelihood (SML is developed for SEM estimation. Using simulated directed acyclic or cyclic networks, the SML performance is compared with that of two state-of-the-art algorithms: the adaptive Lasso (AL based scheme, and the QTL-directed dependency graph (QDG method. Computer simulations demonstrate that the novel SML algorithm offers significantly better performance than the AL-based and QDG algorithms across all sample sizes from 100 to 1,000, in terms of detection power and false discovery rate, in all the cases tested that include acyclic or cyclic networks of 10, 30 and 300 genes. The SML method is further applied to infer a network of 39 human genes that are related to the immune function and are chosen to have a reliable eQTL per gene. The resulting network consists of 9 genes and 13 edges. Most of the edges represent interactions reasonably expected from experimental evidence, while the remaining may just indicate the emergence of new interactions. The sparse SEM and efficient SML algorithm provide an effective means of exploiting both gene expression and perturbation data to infer gene regulatory networks. An open-source computer program implementing the SML algorithm is freely available upon request.

  10. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance structural studies of peptides and proteins from the vaso-regulatory System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sizun, Philippe

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to show how Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) allows to determine the 3D structure of peptides and proteins in solution. A comparative study of peptides involved in the vaso-regulatory System (form small hormonal peptide to the 65 amido-acid protein hirudin) has allowed to design most efficient NMR 1D and 2D strategies. It rapidly appeared that the size of the peptide plays a key role in the structuration of the molecule, smallest peptides being weakly structured owing to the lack of cooperative effects. As the molecular size increases or if conformational locks are present (disulfide bridges) the probability of stable secondary structure increases. For the protein hirudin, a combination of ail available NMR parameters deduced form dedicated experiments (chemical shifts, coupling constants, overhauser effects, accessibility of amide protons) and molecular modelling under constraints allows a clear 3D structure to be proposed for this protein in solution. Finally, a comparative study of the experimental structures and of those deduced form prediction rules has shed light on the concept of structural predisposition, the latter being of high value for a better understanding of structure-activity relationships. (author) [fr

  11. Structural studies of bacterial transcriptional regulatory proteins by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkman, Brian Finley [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to elucidate detailed structural information for peptide and protein molecules. A small peptide was designed and synthesized, and its three-dimensional structure was calculated using distance information derived from two-dimensional NMR measurements. The peptide was used to induce antibodies in mice, and the cross-reactivity of the antibodies with a related protein was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Two proteins which are involved in regulation of transcription in bacteria were also studied. The ferric uptake regulation (Fur) protein is a metal-dependent repressor which controls iron uptake in bacteria. Two- and three-dimensional NMR techniques, coupled with uniform and selective isotope labeling allowed the nearly complete assignment of the resonances of the metal-binding domain of the Fur protein. NTRC is a transcriptional enhancer binding protein whose N-terminal domain is a "receiver domain" in the family of "two-component" regulatory systems. Phosphorylation of the N-terminal domain of NTRC activates the initiation of transcription of aeries encoding proteins involved in nitrogen regulation. Three- and four-dimensional NMR spectroscopy methods have been used to complete the resonance assignments and determine the solution structure of the N-terminal receiver domain of the NTRC protein. Comparison of the solution structure of the NTRC receiver domain with the crystal structures of the homologous protein CheY reveals a very similar fold, with the only significant difference being the position of helix 4 relative to the rest of the protein. The determination of the structure of the NTRC receiver domain is the first step toward understanding a mechanism of signal transduction which is common to many bacterial regulatory systems.

  12. Structural Dimensions, Fabrication, Materials, and Operational History for Types I and II Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiersma, B.J.

    2000-01-01

    Radioactive waste is confined in 48 underground storage tanks at the Savannah River Site. The waste will eventually be processed and transferred to other site facilities for stabilization. Based on waste removal and processing schedules, many of the tanks, including those with flaws and/or defects, will be required to be in service for another 15 to 20 years. Until the waste is removed from storage, transferred, and processed, the materials and structures of the tanks must maintain a confinement function by providing a leak-tight barrier to the environment and by maintaining acceptable structural stability during design basis event which include loading from both normal service and abnormal conditions

  13. Municipal solid waste generation in municipalities: quantifying impacts of household structure, commercial waste and domestic fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebersorger, S; Beigl, P

    2011-01-01

    Waste management planning requires reliable data concerning waste generation, influencing factors on waste generation and forecasts of waste quantities based on facts. This paper aims at identifying and quantifying differences between different municipalities' municipal solid waste (MSW) collection quantities based on data from waste management and on socio-economic indicators. A large set of 116 indicators from 542 municipalities in the Province of Styria was investigated. The resulting regression model included municipal tax revenue per capita, household size and the percentage of buildings with solid fuel heating systems. The model explains 74.3% of the MSW variation and the model assumptions are met. Other factors such as tourism, home composting or age distribution of the population did not significantly improve the model. According to the model, 21% of MSW collected in Styria was commercial waste and 18% of the generated MSW was burned in domestic heating systems. While the percentage of commercial waste is consistent with literature data, practically no literature data are available for the quantity of MSW burned, which seems to be overestimated by the model. The resulting regression model was used as basis for a waste prognosis model (Beigl and Lebersorger, in preparation). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Municipal solid waste generation in municipalities: Quantifying impacts of household structure, commercial waste and domestic fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebersorger, S.; Beigl, P.

    2011-01-01

    Waste management planning requires reliable data concerning waste generation, influencing factors on waste generation and forecasts of waste quantities based on facts. This paper aims at identifying and quantifying differences between different municipalities' municipal solid waste (MSW) collection quantities based on data from waste management and on socio-economic indicators. A large set of 116 indicators from 542 municipalities in the Province of Styria was investigated. The resulting regression model included municipal tax revenue per capita, household size and the percentage of buildings with solid fuel heating systems. The model explains 74.3% of the MSW variation and the model assumptions are met. Other factors such as tourism, home composting or age distribution of the population did not significantly improve the model. According to the model, 21% of MSW collected in Styria was commercial waste and 18% of the generated MSW was burned in domestic heating systems. While the percentage of commercial waste is consistent with literature data, practically no literature data are available for the quantity of MSW burned, which seems to be overestimated by the model. The resulting regression model was used as basis for a waste prognosis model (Beigl and Lebersorger, in preparation).

  15. Viimsi water treatment plant for Ra removal: NORM residue/waste generation, radiation safety issues, and regulatory response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiisk, M.; Suursoo, S.; Realo, E.; Jantsikene, A.; Lumiste, L.; Vaeaer, K.; Isakar, K.; Koch, R. [University of Tartu (Estonia)

    2014-07-01

    values established for these radionuclides. The design and construction of the plant have underestimated the importance of aspects related to NORM accumulation and their management. Therefore, the level of Ra accumulation, ingrowth of daughter radionuclides (Th-228, Pb-210) and generation of Rn-220 and Rn-222 may pose great difficulties for the operation of the plant, especially in the case when/if the filter material is classified as NORM residue/waste with elevated radiation hazard for plant workers, public and the environment. As the first large-scale water treatment plant of the kind, there are no routine legal experience or administrative practice established in Estonia. This paper presents an overview of the operation of Viimsi Vesi Ltd. water treatment plant. The legal aspects and issues associated with management of NORM waste/residues, including classification (residue vs. waste), potential management options, optimisation of the management and radiation safety of the workers are discussed. Views of both the operator and the regulatory authority will be considered. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  16. Implementation of the waste management transfer act. Requirements from a regulatory point of view; Zur Umsetzung des Entsorgungsuebergangsgesetzes. Anforderungen aus regulatorischer Sicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Dehn, Christian [PreussenElektra GmbH, Hannover (Germany). Regulierung, Grundsatzfragen

    2017-11-15

    In future in Germany, the state will be responsible for financing and handling the interim and final storage of radioactive waste from nuclear power plants. With regard to interim storage, this objective is achieved with the provisions of the Waste Management Transfer Act. Regulatory implementation is based on these regulations. BGZ Gesellschaft fuer Zwischenlager mbH is responsible for interim storage on behalf of the Federal Government. Simultaneously with the transfer of interim storage facilities to BGZ a legal transfer of approval is carried out. Insofar as there is a technical, organisational or personnel conjunction with the nuclear power plant operation, which continues to exist beyond this deadline and is relevant for regulatory purposes, a regulation is made via a service contract with the BGZ. This ensures compliance with the licensing regulations. Irradiated fuel assemblies and the waste from reprocessing can be handed over to BGZ from 1 January 2019 onwards and waste with negligible heat generation can be disposed of as of the determination of their proper packaging.

  17. An approach to the exemption from regulatory control of radioactive waste not linked to the nuclear fuel cycle in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaller, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    When radioactive material is handled, treated, administered or stored, and spills or residues and contamination are foreseeable, there must be ways and means of distinguishing between a radioactive waste which needs no further registration and one needing appropriate control and regulation. This report examines the actual situation of exemption from regulatory control for unrestricted or conditional release for disposal of some radioactive waste produced outside the nuclear fuel cycle, particularly in hospitals, research and industry. Recently introduced dose-based and risk-based approaches to exemption are then summarized and their application to radioactive waste produced outside the nuclear fuel cycle is reviewed. It has been shown that current practices are generally safe, but that there is a clear need for harmonization among European Community Member States of exemption levels based on sound radiological protection criteria. 24 refs

  18. Official publication of the regulatory guide concerning control of LAW and MAW with negligible heat release, which are not delivered to the waste collection station of the Land

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Control of the LAW and MAW from nuclear installations is to be made so as to ensure that amounts, residence and status of conditioning of the wastes can be determined any time in order to provide for a safe interim storage or ultimate disposal by supervision and control of all waste management steps (waste treatment, conditioning, interim storage, transport). The checks have to determine the radionuclide inventory, and, independent of aforesaid measurements, the nuclear fuel content (e.g. Pu) has to be declared if the limit of 74 Bq/g is exceeded. The provisions of the regulatory guide are intended to be valid for a period of three years, and shall then be replaced by a statutory instrument (an ordinance to be prepared by the joint Committee of the Laender for Nuclear Energy - Executive Committee). (orig./HP) [de

  19. The Role of Level-3 PSA in the Regulatory Structure for the Licensing of Future NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jong Tae; Han, Sang Hoon

    2008-01-01

    The probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) provides a systematic analysis to identify and quantify all risks that the plant imposed to the operators, general public and the environment and thus demonstrates compliance to regulatory risk criteria. Therefore, the PSA has been being played an important role in the development of safety requirements for the existing plants, mainly reactors using light water technology. However, the existing safety requirements may not be fully applicable to the future reactors due to the advances in technology, new safety options, and new strategies for managing abnormal plant conditions. Therefore, a comprehensive set of technology-neutral safety requirements are being developed by the IAEA and USNRC. Especially, USNRC is developing a basis for a regulatory structure that is applicable to all types of reactor designs, including gas-cooled, liquid metal, and heavy and light water-moderated reactors because metrics such as core damage and large early release may not be applicable to some advanced reactor designs. They are developing this kind of basis for a regulatory structure in order to provide a technology neutral safety approach that will guide the design, construction and operation, as well as safety assessment, of innovative reactors. They are using the quantitative safety goals expressed by means of a frequency-consequence diagram. Within this approach, the scope of the PSA needs to encompass a whole spectrum of off-normal events including frequent, infrequent, and rare initiating events and event sequences. These events include a spectrum of releases from minor to major, and sequences that address conditions less than the core damage sequences. It also needs to address the dose consequences of these event sequences as measured at the exclusion area boundary (EAB). In order to obtain dose consequences for the whole spectrum of off-normal events, the dose evaluation by using the deterministic and probabilistic approaches has to be

  20. Alternate approaches to verifying the structural adequacy of the Defense High Level Waste Shipping Cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmer, A.; Koploy, M.

    1991-12-01

    In the early 1980s, the US Department of Energy/Defense Programs (DOE/DP) initiated a project to develop a safe and efficient transportation system for defense high level waste (DHLW). A long-standing objective of the DHLW transportation project is to develop a truck cask that represents the leading edge of cask technology as well as one that fully complies with all applicable DOE, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations. General Atomics (GA) designed the DHLW Truck Shipping Cask using state-of-the-art analytical techniques verified by model testing performed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The analytical techniques include two approaches, inelastic analysis and elastic analysis. This topical report presents the results of the two analytical approaches and the model testing results. The purpose of this work is to show that there are two viable analytical alternatives to verify the structural adequacy of a Type B package and to obtain an NRC license. It addition, this data will help to support the future acceptance by the NRC of inelastic analysis as a tool in packaging design and licensing

  1. The effect of gender and age structure on municipal waste generation in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talalaj, Izabela Anna; Walery, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An effect of gender and age structure on municipal waste generation was presented. • The waste accumulation index is influenced by a number of unemployed women. • Greater share of women in society contributes to greater waste production. • A model describing the analyzed dependences was determined. - Abstract: In this study the effect of gender and age structure on municipal waste generation was investigated. The data from 10-year period, from 2001 to 2010 year, were taken into consideration. The following parameters of gender and age structure were analyzed: men and woman quantity, female to male ratio, number of working, pre-working and post-working age men/women, number of unemployed men/women. The results have showed a strong correlation of annual per capita waste generation rate with number of unemployed women (r = 0.70) and female to male ratio (r = 0.81). This indicates that waste generation rate is more depended on ratio of men and women that on quantitative size of each group. Using the regression analysis a model describing the dependence between female to male ratio, number of unemployed woman and waste quantity was determined. The model explains 70% of waste quantity variation. Obtained results can be used both to improve waste management and to a fuller understanding of gender behavior

  2. The effect of gender and age structure on municipal waste generation in Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talalaj, Izabela Anna, E-mail: izabela.tj@gmail.com; Walery, Maria, E-mail: m.walery@pb.edu.pl

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • An effect of gender and age structure on municipal waste generation was presented. • The waste accumulation index is influenced by a number of unemployed women. • Greater share of women in society contributes to greater waste production. • A model describing the analyzed dependences was determined. - Abstract: In this study the effect of gender and age structure on municipal waste generation was investigated. The data from 10-year period, from 2001 to 2010 year, were taken into consideration. The following parameters of gender and age structure were analyzed: men and woman quantity, female to male ratio, number of working, pre-working and post-working age men/women, number of unemployed men/women. The results have showed a strong correlation of annual per capita waste generation rate with number of unemployed women (r = 0.70) and female to male ratio (r = 0.81). This indicates that waste generation rate is more depended on ratio of men and women that on quantitative size of each group. Using the regression analysis a model describing the dependence between female to male ratio, number of unemployed woman and waste quantity was determined. The model explains 70% of waste quantity variation. Obtained results can be used both to improve waste management and to a fuller understanding of gender behavior.

  3. Relating structural parameters to leachability in a glass-bonded ceramic waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, S. M.; Johnson, S. G.; Moschetti, T. L.

    1998-01-01

    Lattice parameters for a crystalline material can be obtained by several methods, notably by analyzing x-ray powder diffraction patterns. By utilizing a computer program to fit a pattern, one can follow the evolution or subtle changes in a structure of a crystalline species in different environments. This work involves such a study for an essential component of the ceramic waste form that is under development at Argonne National Laboratory. Zeolite 4A and zeolite 5A are used to produce two different types of waste forms: a glass-bonded sodalite and a glass-bonded zeolite, respectively. Changes in structure during production of the waste forms are discussed. Specific salt-loadings in the sodalite waste form are related to relative peak intensities of certain reflections in the XRD patterns. Structural parameters for the final waste forms will also be given and related to leachability under standard conditions

  4. A multimedia exposure assessment methodology for evaluating the performance of the design of structures containing chemical and radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephanatos, B.N.; Molholt, B.; Walter, K.P.; MacGregor, A.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this work are to develop a multimedia exposure assessment methodology for the evaluation of existing and future design of structures containing chemical and radioactive wastes and to identify critical parameters for design optimization. The designs are evaluated in terms of their compliance with various federal and state regulatory requirements. Evaluation of the performance of a particular design is presented within the scope of a given exposure pathway. An exposure pathway has four key components: (1) a source and mechanism of chemical release, (2) a transport medium; (3) a point of exposure; and (4) a route of exposure. The first step in the analysis is the characterization of the waste source behavior. The rate and concentration of releases from the source are evaluated using appropriate mathematical models. The migration of radionuclides and chemicals is simulated through each environmental medium to the exposure point. The total exposure to the potential receptor is calculated, and an estimate of the health effects of the exposure is made. Simulation of the movement of radionuclides and chemical wastes from the source to the receptor point includes several processes. If the predicted human exposure to contaminants meets the performance criteria, the design has been validated. Otherwise the structure design is improved to meet the performance criteria. A phased modeling approach is recommended at a particular mixed waste site. A relatively simple model is initially used to pinpoint critical fate and transport processes and design parameters. The second phase of the modeling effort involves the use of more complex and resource intensive fate and transport models. This final step in the modeling process provides more accurate estimates of contaminant concentrations at the point of exposure. Thus the human dose is more accurately predicted, providing better design validation

  5. Basic regulatory requirements for carrying out investigations, reasoning and the approving of the disposal of radioactive and other industrial waste in geological formations in the U.S.S.R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimenov, M.K.

    1980-01-01

    Legislation and other regulatory standards in force or in preparation in the USSR relating to the disposal and storage of radioactive and other industrial wastes in underground formations are discussed in the report. A tentative outline of the basic operations involved in the disposal of radioactive and other industrial wastes into geological formations is given. Supervision, control and penalties provided by law are also discussed. Conclusions are made that the comparison of national legislative instruments and regulatory documents and procedures relating to underground disposal of radioactive and industrial wastes into geological formations is timely and urgent. (author)

  6. National legislative and regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2009-01-01

    This part gathers the national legislative and regulatory activities. The subjects tackled are as follow: radiological protection (Belgium), transport of radioactive materials (Belgium, France), general legislation (Brazil, Ireland, Republic of Moldova, Serbia, Turkey), third part liability (Japan), radioactive waste management (Korea, Romania, Slovenia, Usa), regime of radioactive materials (Romania), organisation and structure (Switzerland), regime of nuclear installations (Usa), regulations on nuclear trade (Usa). (N.C)

  7. National legislative and regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This section treats of the following National legislative and regulatory activities: 1 - Canada: Liability and compensation; 2 - France: Liability and compensation; Nuclear safety and radiological protection; 3 - Greece: Organisation and structure; 4 - Hungary: General legislation; 5 - India: Liability and compensation; 6 - Japan: Liability and compensation; 7 - Korea: Liability and compensation; 8 - Lithuania: General legislation; Transport of radioactive material; 9 - Slovak Republic: International co-operation; Liability and compensation; 10 - Slovenia: General legislation; 11 - Switzerland: Liability and compensation; 12 - United States: Radioactive waste management

  8. Sodium zirconium phosphate (NZP) as a host structure for nuclear waste immobilization: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheetz, B.E.; Agrawal, D.K.; Breval, E.; Roy, R.

    1994-01-01

    Sodium zirconium phosphate [NZP] structural family, of which NaZr 2 P 3 O 12 is the parent composition, has been reviewed as a host ceramic waste form for nuclear waste immobilization. NZP compounds are characterized for their ionic conductivity, low thermal expansion and structural flexibility to accommodate a large number of multivalent ions. This latter property of the [NZP] structure allows the incorporation of almost all 42 nuclides present in a typical commercial nuclear waste. The leach studies of simulated waste forms based on NZP have shown reasonable resistance for the release of its constituents. The calculation of dissolution rates of NZP structure has demonstrated that it would take 20,000 times longer to dissolved NZP than quartz

  9. Regulatory analysis and lessons learned from the LLRW [low-level radioactive waste] disposal area at West Valley, New York: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority has sponsored a project to develop an integrated set of site management plans for the West Valley low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) disposal area. The plans were directed to upgrade the disposal area so that passive custodial care and monitoring activities would be sufficient to protect public health and safety and the environment. Tasks 5 and 6, Regulatory Analysis and Lessons Learned, are the subject of this report. The regulatory analysis identified areas of inconsistencies between the historic site operations and the current state and federal LLRW disposal regulations and guidelines. The lessons learned task identified the causes of the disposal problems at West Valley, discussed the lessons learned, and described the responses developed by the NRC and industry to the lessons learned. 85 refs., 6 figs., 19 tabs

  10. Hierarchical structure and modules in the Escherichia coli transcriptional regulatory network revealed by a new top-down approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buer Jan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular functions are coordinately carried out by groups of genes forming functional modules. Identifying such modules in the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN of organisms is important for understanding the structure and function of these fundamental cellular networks and essential for the emerging modular biology. So far, the global connectivity structure of TRN has not been well studied and consequently not applied for the identification of functional modules. Moreover, network motifs such as feed forward loop are recently proposed to be basic building blocks of TRN. However, their relationship to functional modules is not clear. Results In this work we proposed a top-down approach to identify modules in the TRN of E. coli. By studying the global connectivity structure of the regulatory network, we first revealed a five-layer hierarchical structure in which all the regulatory relationships are downward. Based on this regulatory hierarchy, we developed a new method to decompose the regulatory network into functional modules and to identify global regulators governing multiple modules. As a result, 10 global regulators and 39 modules were identified and shown to have well defined functions. We then investigated the distribution and composition of the two basic network motifs (feed forward loop and bi-fan motif in the hierarchical structure of TRN. We found that most of these network motifs include global regulators, indicating that these motifs are not basic building blocks of modules since modules should not contain global regulators. Conclusion The transcriptional regulatory network of E. coli possesses a multi-layer hierarchical modular structure without feedback regulation at transcription level. This hierarchical structure builds the basis for a new and simple decomposition method which is suitable for the identification of functional modules and global regulators in the transcriptional regulatory network of E

  11. Tetrahelical structural family adopted by AGCGA-rich regulatory DNA regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocman, Vojč; Plavec, Janez

    2017-05-01

    Here we describe AGCGA-quadruplexes, an unexpected addition to the well-known tetrahelical families, G-quadruplexes and i-motifs, that have been a focus of intense research due to their potential biological impact in G- and C-rich DNA regions, respectively. High-resolution structures determined by solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy demonstrate that AGCGA-quadruplexes comprise four 5'-AGCGA-3' tracts and are stabilized by G-A and G-C base pairs forming GAGA- and GCGC-quartets, respectively. Residues in the core of the structure are connected with edge-type loops. Sequences of alternating 5'-AGCGA-3' and 5'-GGG-3' repeats could be expected to form G-quadruplexes, but are shown herein to form AGCGA-quadruplexes instead. Unique structural features of AGCGA-quadruplexes together with lower sensitivity to cation and pH variation imply their potential biological relevance in regulatory regions of genes responsible for basic cellular processes that are related to neurological disorders, cancer and abnormalities in bone and cartilage development.

  12. Bisphenol A and its structural analogues in household waste paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivnenko, Kostyantyn; Pedersen, Gitte Alsing; Eriksson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    , information to what extent BPA alternatives have been used in paper is sparse. The aim of the present work was to quantify BPA and its alternatives (bisphenol S (BPS), bisphenol E (BPE), bisphenol B (BPB), 4-cumylphenol (HPP) and bisphenol F (BPF)) in waste paper and board from Danish households, thermal...... paper receipts, non-carbon copy paper and conventional printer paper. BPA was found in all waste paper samples analysed, while BPS was identified in 73% of them. Only BPB was not identified in any of the samples. BPA and BPS were found in the majority of the receipts, which contained no measurable...... concentrations of the remaining alternatives. Although receipts showed the highest concentrations of BPA and BPS, office paper, flyers and corrugated boxes, together with receipts, represented the major flux of the two compounds in waste paper streams....

  13. Perturbation of seafloor bacterial community structure by drilling waste discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tan T; Cochrane, Sabine K J; Landfald, Bjarne

    2018-04-01

    Offshore drilling operations result in the generation of drill cuttings and localized smothering of the benthic habitats. This study explores bacterial community changes in the in the upper layers of the seafloor resulting from an exploratory drilling operation at 1400m water depth on the Barents Sea continental slope. Significant restructurings of the sediment microbiota were restricted to the sampling sites notably affected by the drilling waste discharge, i.e. at 30m and 50m distances from the drilling location, and to the upper 2cm of the seafloor. Three bacterial groups, the orders Clostridiales and Desulfuromonadales and the class Mollicutes, were almost exclusively confined to the upper two centimeters at 30m distance, thereby corroborating an observed increase in anaerobicity inflicted by the drilling waste deposition. The potential of these phylogenetic groups as microbial bioindicators of the spatial extent and persistence of drilling waste discharge should be further explored. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Technical assistance for regulatory development: review and evaluation of the EPA standard 40 CFR191 for disposal of high-level waste. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, N.R.; Wahi, K.K.

    1983-04-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has prepared a draft Standard (40CFR191, Draft 19) which, when finalized, will provide the overall system requirements for the geologic disposal of radioactive waste. This document (Vol. 1) provides an Executive Summary of the work performed at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, under contract to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to analyze certain aspects of the draft Standard. The issues of radionuclide release limits, interpretation, uncertainty, achievability, and assessment of compliance with respect to the requirements of the draft Standard are addressed based on the detailed analyses presented in five companion volumes to this report

  15. Through the regulatory hoop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirner, N.P.

    1985-01-01

    There are many regulatory hoops through which waste generators, brokers, and disposal site operators must jump to dispose of waste safely. As the proposed exclusionary date of January 1, 1986, approaches, these regulatory hoops have the distinct possibility of multiplying or at least changing shape. The state of Washington, in its role as an Agreement State with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, licenses and inspects the commercial operator of the Northwest Compact's low-level radioactive waste disposal site on the Hanford Reservation. Washington has received as much as 53%, or 1.4 million cubic feet per year, of the nation's total volume of waste disposed. To control such a large volume of waste, a regulatory program involving six agencies has developed over the years in Washington

  16. Structural Composite Construction Materials Manufactured from Municipal Solid Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-20

    alternatives. One company uses the wastes from leg cutouts in disposable diaper manufacture as a supply stream. Another is turning used carpet into plastic...sheathing type applications. While it offers a number of desirable properties, fiberglass suffers from degradation from solar exposure and embrittlement

  17. Effect of acute resistance exercise and sex on human patellar tendon structural and regulatory mRNA expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sullivan, B.E.; Carroll, C.C.; Jemiolo, B.

    2009-01-01

    Sullivan BE, Carroll CC, Jemiolo B, Trappe SW, Magnusson SP, Dossing S, Kjaer M, Trappe TA. Effect of acute resistance exercise and sex on human patellar tendon structural and regulatory mRNA expression. J Appl Physiol 106: 468-475, 2009. First published November 20, 2008; doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.......91341.2008.-Tendon is mainly composed of collagen and an aqueous matrix of proteoglycans that are regulated by enzymes called matrix metalloproteinases ( MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Although it is known that resistance exercise (RE) and sex influence tendon metabolism...... and mechanical properties, it is uncertain what structural and regulatory components contribute to these responses. We measured the mRNA expression of tendon's main fibrillar collagens (type I and type III) and the main proteoglycans (decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin, and versican) and the regulatory enzymes MMP...

  18. Porosity structure of green polybag of medium density fiberboard from seaweed waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamsjah, M. A.; Subekti, S.; Lamid, M.; Pujiastuti, D. Y.; Kurnia, H.; Rifadi, R. R.

    2018-04-01

    The last decade shown that the needs Medium Density Fibreboard (MDF) rapidly growing in Asia Pacific and Europe up to more 15 % per year. MDF made up of fibers lignoselulosa which combined with synthetic resin or tied other suitable but high temperatures and pressure. Technology engineering for green polybag of MDF from seaweed waste of Kappaphycus alvarezii and Gracilaria verrucosa is an alternative effort for ecosystem stability and technological innovations that is environmentally friendly. Structure porosity from the shape of green polybag shows that performance seaweed waste of K. alvarezii is better than seaweed waste of G. verrucosa. The circulation of water happened more optimal in green polybag formed from MDF of seaweed waste of K. alvarezii with size porosity 3.976 µm, while size porosity of seaweed waste of G. verrucosa measurable 4.794 µm. Structure of green polybag of MDF from seaweed waste showed that C components greater 50 % to K. alvarezii while C components less than 50 % to G. verrucosa. This resulted in the ties to structure of MDF stronger found in green polybag derived from seaweed waste of K. alvarezii than G. verrucosa.

  19. Solution structure and dynamics of C-terminal regulatory domain of Vibrio vulnificus extracellular metalloprotease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji-Hye; Kim, Heeyoun [Department of Biochemistry, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jung Eun [Department of Biotechnology, College of Natural Sciences, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Sup, E-mail: jsplee@mail.chosun.ac.kr [Department of Biotechnology, College of Natural Sciences, Chosun University, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Weontae, E-mail: wlee@spin.yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have determined solution structures of vEP C-terminal regulatory domain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer vEP C-ter100 has a compact {beta}-barrel structure with eight anti-parallel {beta}-strands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solution structure of vEP C-ter100 shares its molecular topology with that of the collagen-binding domain of collagenase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residues in the {beta}3 region of vEP C-ter100 might be important in putative ligand/receptor binding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer vEP C-ter100 interacts strongly with iron ion. -- Abstract: An extracellular metalloprotease (vEP) secreted by Vibrio vulnificus ATCC29307 is a 45-kDa proteolytic enzyme that has prothrombin activation and fibrinolytic activities during bacterial infection. The action of vEP could result in clotting that could serve to protect the bacteria from the host defense machinery. Very recently, we showed that the C-terminal propeptide (C-ter100), which is unique to vEP, is involved in regulation of vEP activity. To understand the structural basis of this function of vEP C-ter100, we have determined the solution structure and backbone dynamics using multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The solution structure shows that vEP C-ter100 is composed of eight anti-parallel {beta}-strands with a unique fold that has a compact {beta}-barrel formation which stabilized by hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding networks. Protein dynamics shows that the overall structure, including loops, is very rigid and stabilized. By structural database analysis, we found that vEP C-ter100 shares its topology with that of the collagen-binding domain of collagenase, despite low sequence homology between the two domains. Fluorescence assay reveals that vEP C-ter100 interacts strongly with iron (Fe{sup 3+}). These findings suggest that vEP protease might recruit substrate molecules, such as collagen, by binding at C-ter100 and that vEP participates

  20. A structural basis for the regulatory inactivation of DnaA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingping; McMullan, Daniel; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C; Duan, Lian; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Feuerhelm, Julie; Hale, Joanna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K; Johnson, Hope A; Klock, Heath E; Knuth, Mark W; Kozbial, Piotr; Sri Krishna, S; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Miller, Mitchell D; Morse, Andrew T; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L; Sefcovic, Natasha; Trame, Christine; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Hodgson, Keith O; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Wilson, Ian A

    2009-01-16

    Regulatory inactivation of DnaA is dependent on Hda (homologous to DnaA), a protein homologous to the AAA+ (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) ATPase region of the replication initiator DnaA. When bound to the sliding clamp loaded onto duplex DNA, Hda can stimulate the transformation of active DnaA-ATP into inactive DnaA-ADP. The crystal structure of Hda from Shewanella amazonensis SB2B at 1.75 A resolution reveals that Hda resembles typical AAA+ ATPases. The arrangement of the two subdomains in Hda (residues 1-174 and 175-241) differs dramatically from that of DnaA. A CDP molecule anchors the Hda domains in a conformation that promotes dimer formation. The Hda dimer adopts a novel oligomeric assembly for AAA+ proteins in which the arginine finger, crucial for ATP hydrolysis, is fully exposed and available to hydrolyze DnaA-ATP through a typical AAA+ type of mechanism. The sliding clamp binding motifs at the N-terminus of each Hda monomer are partially buried and combine to form an antiparallel beta-sheet at the dimer interface. The inaccessibility of the clamp binding motifs in the CDP-bound structure of Hda suggests that conformational changes are required for Hda to form a functional complex with the clamp. Thus, the CDP-bound Hda dimer likely represents an inactive form of Hda.

  1. Evaluating the performance and intellectual structure of construction and demolition waste research during 2000-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanli; Sun, Tiantian; Yang, Lie

    2017-08-01

    Construction and demolition (C&D) waste diminishes scarce land resources and endangers human health and the surrounding environment. Quantitative and visualized analysis was conducted to evaluate worldwide scientific research output on C&D waste from 2000 to 2016. The related information of 857 publications was collected from SCI-Expanded database and statistically analyzed. The number of documents about C&D waste presented a general growth during the last 17 years. Construction and Building Materials publication ranked first in the most productive journals. China and Spain acted as dominated roles comparing to other countries, and Hong Kong Polytechnic University was the institution with the largest amount of C&D waste research. Recycled aggregates, sustainable C&D waste management, and the rewarding program and commerce system were the hottest topics during 2000-2016 and in the near future according to the intellectual structure analysis.

  2. Determination of the Structure of Vitrified Hydroceramic/CBC Waste Form Glasses Manufactured from DOE Reprocessing Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheetz, B.E.; White, W. B.; Chesleigh, M.; Portanova, A.; Olanrewaju, J.

    2005-01-01

    The selection of a glass-making option for the solidification of nuclear waste has dominated DOE waste form programs since the early 1980's. Both West Valley and Savannah River are routinely manufacturing glass logs from the high level waste inventory in tank sludges. However, for some wastes, direct conversion to glass is clearly not the optimum strategy for immobilization. INEEL, for example, has approximately 4400 m 3 of calcined high level waste with an activity that produces approximately 45 watts/m 3 , a rather low concentration of radioactive constituents. For these wastes, there is value in seeking alternatives to glass. An alternative approach has been developed and the efficacy of the process demonstrated that offers a significant savings in both human health and safety exposures and also a lower cost relative to the vitrification option. The alternative approach utilizes the intrinsic chemical reactivity of the highly alkaline waste with the addition of aluminosilicate admixtures in the appropriate proportions to form zeolites. The process is one in which a chemically bonded ceramic is produced. The driving force for reaction is derived from the chemical system itself at very modest temperatures and yet forms predominantly crystalline phases. Because the chemically bonded ceramic requires an aqueous medium to serve as a vehicle for the chemical reaction, the proposed zeolite-containing waste form can more adequately be described as a hydroceramic. The hydrated crystalline materials are then subject to hot isostatic pressing (HIP) which partially melts the material to form a glass ceramic. The scientific advantages of the hydroceramic/CBC approach are: (1) Low temperature processing; (2) High waste loading and thus only modest volumetric bulking from the addition of admixtures; (3) Ability to immobilize sodium; (4) Ability to handle low levels of nitrate (2-3% NO 3 - ); (5) The flexibility of a vitrifiable waste; and (6) A process that is based on an

  3. Lessons Learned from Characterization, Performance Assessment, and EPA Regulatory Review of the 1996 Actinide Source Term for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, K.W.; Moore, R.C.; Nowak, E.J.; Papenguth, H.W.; Jow, H.

    1999-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility for the permanent disposal of transuranic waste from defense activities. In 1996, the DOE submitted the Title 40 CFR Part 191 Compliance Certification Application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (CCA) to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The CCA included a probabilistic performance assessment (PA) conducted by Sandia National Laboratories to establish compliance with the quantitative release limits defined in 40 CFR 191.13. An experimental program to collect data relevant to the actinide source term began around 1989, which eventually supported the 1996 CCA PA actinide source term model. The actinide source term provided an estimate of mobile dissolved and colloidal Pu, Am, U, Th, and Np concentrations in their stable oxidation states, and accounted for effects of uncertainty in the chemistry of brines in waste disposal areas. The experimental program and the actinide source term included in the CCA PA underwent EPA review lasting more than 1 year. Experiments were initially conducted to develop data relevant to the wide range of potential future conditions in waste disposal areas. Interim, preliminary performance assessments and actinide source term models provided insight allowing refinement of experiments and models. Expert peer review provided additional feedback and confidence in the evolving experimental program. By 1995, the chemical database and PA predictions of WIPP performance were considered reliable enough to support the decision to add an MgO backfill to waste rooms to control chemical conditions and reduce uncertainty in actinide concentrations, especially for Pu and Am. Important lessons learned through the characterization, PA modeling, and regulatory review of the actinide source term are (1) experimental characterization and PA should evolve together, with neither activity completely dominating the other, (2) the understanding of physical processes

  4. Regulatory Focus as a Mediator of the Influence of Initiating Structure and Servant Leadership on Employee Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubert, Mitchell J.; Kacmar, K. Michele; Carlson, Dawn S.; Chonko, Lawrence B.; Roberts, James A.

    2008-01-01

    In this research, the authors test a model in which the regulatory focus of employees at work mediates the influence of leadership on employee behavior. In a nationally representative sample of 250 workers who responded over 2 time periods, prevention focus mediated the relationship of initiating structure to in-role performance and deviant…

  5. Final storage of radioactive waste in Germany. Are administrative structures in need of modification?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Horst

    2011-01-01

    Delays in commissioning the Konrad Mine as a repository for radioactive waste not generating heat, and in exploring the Gorleben salt dome for suitability as a repository for high-level waste generating heat, invite the question whether the legal regulations in place, especially administration and funding of the repository, are suitable for solving current problems or whether they are in need of improvement. The key principles of the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle, final storage included, were laid down as rules in 1976. Execution of the necessary waste management steps, from radioactive waste arisings to their final disposal, was split between private responsibilities and government competences. Final storage, to this day, has been of prime importance. Pursuant to the Atomic Energy Act, the federal government is required to set up facilities for final storage of radioactive waste. The waste management duties incumbent upon private parties, from radioactive waste arisings to delivery, are mainly subject to safety criteria under the Atomic Energy Act and the Radiation Protection Ordinance. As far as administration is concerned, the private parties are free in the way they comply with regulatory requirements. They are required to bear the cost in accordance with the polluter-pays-principle. In the light of the sluggish execution of government tasks from 1976 to this day, the question of improvements has become more acute than ever. This is where assignment offers an approach towards better administration which can be taken at short notice, as assignment implies a reduction in the number of interfaces and clearer responsibilities. However, even the best administration is unable to lead to the repositories required by law if those responsible in government fail to act in accordance with the spirit and letter of the law. (orig.)

  6. Waste-efficient materials procurement for construction projects: A structural equation modelling of critical success factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Saheed O; Oyedele, Lukumon O

    2018-05-01

    Albeit the understanding that construction waste is caused by activities ranging from all stages of project delivery process, research efforts have been concentrated on design and construction stages, while the possibility of reducing waste through materials procurement process is widely neglected. This study aims at exploring and confirming strategies for achieving waste-efficient materials procurement in construction activities. The study employs sequential exploratory mixed method approach as its methodological framework, using focus group discussion, statistical analysis and structural equation modelling. The study suggests that for materials procurement to enhance waste minimisation in construction projects, the procurement process would be characterised by four features. These include suppliers' commitment to low waste measures, low waste purchase management, effective materials delivery management and waste-efficient Bill of Quantity, all of which have significant impacts on waste minimisation. This implies that commitment of materials suppliers to such measures as take back scheme and flexibility in supplying small materials quantity, among others, are expected of materials procurement. While low waste purchase management stipulates the need for such measures as reduced packaging and consideration of pre-assembled/pre-cut materials, efficient delivery management entails effective delivery and storage system as well as adequate protection of materials during the delivery process, among others. Waste-efficient specification and bill of quantity, on the other hand, requires accurate materials take-off and ordering of materials based on accurately prepared design documents and bill of quantity. Findings of this study could assist in understanding a set of measures that should be taken during materials procurement process, thereby corroborating waste management practices at other stages of project delivery process. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Cultural and structural changes in radioactive waste management organisations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    In recent years the socio-political environment of radioactive waste management (RWM) has been changing in a significant way. Stakeholder dialogue has become a leading principle. How have RWM organisations adapted to this societal transition? How do they balance the requirement of openness and the increasing concerns over the security of facilities? Are there organisations that have successfully changed from a technical- to a customer-focused culture? What resistance was met? Which tools and instruments helped organisations evolve? This report documents the changes observed by RWM managers and sets those changes in an organisational sciences framework. All those who are intent on learning about the changes that have taken place in the field of radioactive waste management, or whose own organisations in any sector must adapt to societal demand, will be interested by the experience and insight reported here. (authors)

  8. Charging generators for waste management costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.B.; Homan, F.J.

    1988-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the need for waste management that incorporates improved waste-handling techniques and more stringent regulatory requirements to prevent future liabilities such as Superfund sites. DOE-Oak Ridge Operations (DOE-ORO) has recognized that an effective waste management program focuses on control at the source and that the burden for responsible waste management can be placed on generators by charging for waste management costs. The principle of including the waste management costs in the total cost of the product, even when the product is research and development, is being implemented at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This paper summarizes a plan to charge waste generators, the administrative structure of the plan, a comparison between the rate structure and changes in waste disposal operations, and issues that have surfaced as the plan is implemented

  9. Bisphenol A and its structural analogues in household waste paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivnenko, K; Pedersen, G A; Eriksson, E; Astrup, T F

    2015-10-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an industrial chemical produced in large volumes. Its main use is associated with polycarbonate plastic, epoxy resins and thermal paper. In contrast to other applications, thermal paper contains BPA in its un-reacted form as an additive, which is subjected to migration. Receiving a significant amount of attention from the scientific community and beyond, due to its controversial endocrine-disrupting effects, the industry is attempting to substitute BPA in variety of applications. Alternative phenolic compounds have been proposed for use in thermal paper; however, information to what extent BPA alternatives have been used in paper is sparse. The aim of the present work was to quantify BPA and its alternatives (bisphenol S (BPS), bisphenol E (BPE), bisphenol B (BPB), 4-cumylphenol (HPP) and bisphenol F (BPF)) in waste paper and board from Danish households, thermal paper receipts, non-carbon copy paper and conventional printer paper. BPA was found in all waste paper samples analysed, while BPS was identified in 73% of them. Only BPB was not identified in any of the samples. BPA and BPS were found in the majority of the receipts, which contained no measurable concentrations of the remaining alternatives. Although receipts showed the highest concentrations of BPA and BPS, office paper, flyers and corrugated boxes, together with receipts, represented the major flux of the two compounds in waste paper streams. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Opportunities and challenges for structural health monitoring of radioactive waste systems and structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor [University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Mendez Torres, Adrian E. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Radioactive waste systems and structures (RWSS) are safety-critical facilities in need of monitoring over prolonged periods of time. Structural health monitoring (SHM) is an emerging technology that aims at monitoring the state of a structure through the use of networks of permanently mounted sensors. SHM technologies have been developed primarily within the aerospace and civil engineering communities. This paper addresses the issue of transitioning the SHM concept to the monitoring of RWSS and evaluates the opportunities and challenges associated with this process. Guided wave SHM technologies utilizing structurally-mounted piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) have a wide range of applications based on both propagating-wave and standing-wave methodologies. Hence, opportunities exist for transitioning these SHM technologies into RWSS monitoring. However, there exist certain special operational conditions specific to RWSS such as: radiation field, caustic environments, marine environments, and chemical, mechanical and thermal stressors. In order to address the high discharge of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and the limited space in the storage pools the U.S. the Department of Energy (DOE) has adopted a 'Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste' (January 2013). This strategy endorses the key principles that underpin the Blue Ribbon Commission's on America's Nuclear Future recommendations to develop a sustainable program for deploying an integrated system capable of transporting, storing, and disposing of UNF and high-level radioactive waste from civilian nuclear power generation, defense, national security, and other activities. This will require research to develop monitoring, diagnosis, and prognosis tools that can aid to establish a strong technical basis for extended storage and transportation of UNF. Monitoring of such structures is critical for assuring the safety and security of the

  11. Encapsulating fly ash and acidic process waste water in brick structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koseoglu, K.; Polat, M.; Polat, H.

    2010-01-01

    Fly ash contains metals such as cadmium, iron, lead, aluminum and zinc in its structure in appreciable amounts. These metals can leach out into surface and ground waters if fly ash is not properly disposed of. A similar problem also exists for acidic process waste waters discharged by numerous industries. The purpose of this study was to utilize such wastes as additives in the production of construction quality bricks for the purpose of waste elimination. The bricks produced were subjected to flexural strength and water retention capacity tests along with heavy metal leaching experiments in order to determine the applicability of the procedure and the best possible recipes. This paper summarizes the results obtained in these tests along with the possible mechanisms involved in stabilizing the two wastes in the brick structure.

  12. Regulatory Promotion of Waste Wood Reused as an Energy Source and the Environmental Concerns about Ash Residue in the Industrial Sector of Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Tien Tsai

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to provide a preliminary analysis of the utilization of energy derived from waste wood in Taiwan, a highly industrialized country with a high dependence (over 99% on imported energy. The discussion focuses on the status of waste wood generation and its management over the past decade. Findings show that the quantities of biomass waste collected for reuse purposes in the industrial sectors of Taiwan has exhibited an increasing trend, from about 4000 tons in 2001 to over 52,000 tons in 2010. Although waste wood can be reused as a fuel and raw material for a variety of applications based on regulatory promotion, the most commonly used end use is to directly utilize it as an auxiliary fuel in industrial utilities (e.g., boilers, heaters and furnaces for the purpose of co-firing with coal/fuel oil. The most progressive measure for promoting biomass-to-power is to introduce the feed-in tariff (FIT mechanism according to the Renewable Energy Development Act passed in June 2009. The financial support for biomass power generation has been increasing over the years from 0.070 US$/kWh in 2010 to 0.094 US$/kWh in 2012. On the other hand, the environmental regulations in Taiwan regarding the hazard identification of wood-combusted ash (especially in filter fly-ash and its options for disposal and utilization are further discussed in the paper, suggesting that waste wood impregnated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA and other copper-based preservatives should be excluded from the wood-to-energy system. Finally, some recommendations for promoting wood-to-energy in the near future of Taiwan are addressed.

  13. A numerical study on the structural behavior of underground rock caverns for radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Hoon; Choi, Kyu Sup; Lee, Kyung Jin; Kim, Dae Hong

    1991-01-01

    In order to design safe and economical underground disposal structures for radioactive wastes, understanding the behavior of discontinuous rock masses is essential. This study includes discussions about the computational model for discontinuous rock masses and the structural analysis method for underground storage structures. Then, based on an engineering judgement a suitable selection and slight modifications on computational models and analysis methods have been made in order to analyze and understand the structural behavior of the rock cavern with discontinuities

  14. STRUCTURAL CALCULATIONS FOR THE CODISPOSAL OF TRIGA SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN A WASTE PACKAGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Mastilovic

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to determine the structural response of a TRIGA Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) codisposal canister placed in a 5-Defense High Level Waste (DHLW) waste package (WP) and subjected to a tipover design basis event (DBE) dynamic load; the results will be reported in terms of displacements and stress magnitudes. This activity is associated with the WP design

  15. Immobilization of defense high-level waste: an assessment of technological strategies and potential regulatory goals. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-06-01

    This volume contains the following appendices: selected immobilization processes, directory of selected European organizations involved in HLW management, U.S. high-level waste inventories, and selected European HLW program

  16. Performance allocation traceable to regulatory criteria as applied to site characterization work at the Basalt Waste Isolation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deju, R.A.; Babad, H.; Bensky, M.S.; Jacobs, G.K.

    1983-01-01

    The Basalt Waste Isolation Project has developed a method for defining in detail the work required to demonstrate the feasibility of emplacing and providing for the safe isolation of nuclear wastes in a repository in the deep basalts at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Criteria analysis allows the identification of areas of significant technical uncertainty or controversy that can be highlighted as issues. A preliminary analysis has been conducted, which, by identifying key radionuclides and allocating performance among the multiple barriers in a repository constructed in a basalt, allows the design and development testing activities at the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to be put into perspective. Application of sophisticated uncertainty analysis techniques will allow refinements in the analysis to be made and to further guide characterization and testing activities. Preliminary results suggest that a repository constructed in basalt will provide for the safe isolation of nuclear wastes in a cost-effective and reliable manner with a high degree of confidence

  17. Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovard, Pierre

    The origin of the wastes (power stations, reprocessing, fission products) is determined and the control ensuring the innocuity with respect to man, public acceptance, availability, economics and cost are examined [fr

  18. Accelerated safety analyses - structural analyses Phase I - structural sensitivity evaluation of single- and double-shell waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.L.

    1994-11-01

    Accelerated Safety Analyses - Phase I (ASA-Phase I) have been conducted to assess the appropriateness of existing tank farm operational controls and/or limits as now stipulated in the Operational Safety Requirements (OSRs) and Operating Specification Documents, and to establish a technical basis for the waste tank operating safety envelope. Structural sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the response of the different waste tank configurations to variations in loading conditions, uncertainties in loading parameters, and uncertainties in material characteristics. Extensive documentation of the sensitivity analyses conducted and results obtained are provided in the detailed ASA-Phase I report, Structural Sensitivity Evaluation of Single- and Double-Shell Waste Tanks for Accelerated Safety Analysis - Phase I. This document provides a summary of the accelerated safety analyses sensitivity evaluations and the resulting findings

  19. National legislative and regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This section treats of the following National legislative and regulatory activities: 1 - Argentina: Organisation and structure; 2 - France: Radioactive waste management (Act No. 2016-1015 of 25 July 2016 specifying the procedures for creating a reversible deep geological repository for long-lived medium and high-level radioactive waste), Liability and compensation (Decree No. 2016-333 of 21 March 2016 implementing Article L. 597-28 of the French Environmental Code and relating to third party liability in the field of nuclear energy; Ministerial Order of 19 August 2016 listing the sites benefiting from a reduced amount of liability pursuant to decree No. 2016-333 of 21 March 2016 implementing Article L. 597-28 of the French Environmental Code and relating to third party liability in the field of nuclear energy), Nuclear facilities (Decree No. 2016-846 of 28 June 2016 related to the modification, final shutdown and decommissioning of basic nuclear installations, and to subcontracting); 3 - Germany: Nuclear trade - including non-proliferation (Amendments to the Foreign Trade Act and the Foreign Trade Ordinance (2015)), Radioactive waste management (Act on the Organisational Restructuring in the Field of Radioactive Waste Management (2016); Final report of the Commission to Review the Financing for the Phase-out of Nuclear Energy; Draft Bill of an Act on the Reorganisation of the Responsibility of Nuclear Waste Disposal (2016)); 4 - Lithuania: Nuclear safety and radiological protection (including nuclear emergency planning), Nuclear security (Physical security of sources of ionising radiation), Radioactive waste management, Licensing and regulatory infrastructure (Enforcement measures); 5 - Luxembourg: Radioactive waste management (Agreement between the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg and the Kingdom of Belgium on the Management and Final Disposal of the Radioactive Waste of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg on the Territory of the Kingdom of Belgium, signed on 4 July 2016); 6

  20. Structural and Thermal Safety Analysis Report for the Type B Radioactive Waste Transport Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. H.; Seo, K. S.; Lee, J. C.; Bang, K. S

    2007-09-15

    We carried out structural safety evaluation for the type B radioactive waste transport package. Requirements for type B packages according to the related regulations such as IAEA Safety Standard Series No. TS-R-1, Korea Most Act. 2001-23 and US 10 CFR Part 71 were evaluated. General requirements for packages such as those for a lifting attachment, a tie-down attachment and pressure condition were considered. For the type B radioactive waste transport package, the structural, thermal and containment analyses were carried out under the normal transport conditions. Also the safety analysis were conducted under the accidental transport conditions. The 9 m drop test, 1 m puncture test, fire test and water immersion test under the accidental transport conditions were consecutively done. The type B radioactive waste transport packages were maintained the structural and thermal integrities.

  1. An overview of the DOE high-level waste storage tank structural integrity assessment guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Bush, S.; Kassir, M.; Mather, B.; Shewmon, P.; Streicher, M.; Thompson, B.; van Rooyen, D.; Weeks, J.

    1995-01-01

    The basic elements of a structural integrity program for high-level waste storage tanks include identifying significant aging degradation mechanisms, developing programs to monitor and control these degradation processes, and developing management options and procedures to minimize impact on the environment should tank leakage develop. A Waste Tank Structural Integrity Panel (TSIP) was established by Brookhaven National Laboratory at the request of the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management to review these elements and prepare a set of guidelines that could be used by DOE and its contractors to manage the structural integrity of these tanks. These guidelines emphasize the identification of significant degradation mechanisms for both the steel and concrete components of the tanks, the recommended monitoring and inspection programs, and the indicated management options

  2. Assessment on regulatory framework for safety of radioactive waste management as preparation for future NPP in Indonesia; a comparison study with South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setianingsih, Lilis Susanti; Jeong, Seung Young

    2012-01-01

    information regarding natural radioactive sources downhole in oil and gas exploration and exploitation. Tracer is another type of nuclear energy utilization in industrial facilities. Tracer is operated by utilizing radioactive source attached to the system to follow the behavior pathway of one or more components of the particular system. It is used to detect easily and clearly on low concentration radioactive level of the system, as well as to detect and take samples without destroying the active system. Number of total radioactive and/or nuclear facilities for industrial purposes in Indonesia tends to be increasing as the implementation is getting wider. One of the nuclear authorities in Indonesia is the Nuclear Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) which on behalf of the government grants the licenses to the respective facilities and monitors the regulation implementation on the facilities to ensure the safety, security and safeguard for the purpose providing protection to the people, property and environment. Considering the wide use of nuclear energy application and implementation in industrial purposes facilities, qualified human resources for controlling the law enforcement to ensure the proper standards of safety and security including the management of the waste generated by various nuclear energy utilization. Wide progressive demands of electricity for the future give challenges to the government to meet the projected needs of energy to be fulfilled. One of the options which can be considered reasonable in answering such problem to provide the high request of energy is by building nuclear power plant. Understanding the much wider use of nuclear energy implementation within the country, nuclear and radioactive waste facilities need to be developed in meeting the capacity required for prospective requirements

  3. Assessment on regulatory framework for safety of radioactive waste management as preparation for future NPP in Indonesia; a comparison study with South Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setianingsih, Lilis Susanti [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seung Young [KINS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    information regarding natural radioactive sources downhole in oil and gas exploration and exploitation. Tracer is another type of nuclear energy utilization in industrial facilities. Tracer is operated by utilizing radioactive source attached to the system to follow the behavior pathway of one or more components of the particular system. It is used to detect easily and clearly on low concentration radioactive level of the system, as well as to detect and take samples without destroying the active system. Number of total radioactive and/or nuclear facilities for industrial purposes in Indonesia tends to be increasing as the implementation is getting wider. One of the nuclear authorities in Indonesia is the Nuclear Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN) which on behalf of the government grants the licenses to the respective facilities and monitors the regulation implementation on the facilities to ensure the safety, security and safeguard for the purpose providing protection to the people, property and environment. Considering the wide use of nuclear energy application and implementation in industrial purposes facilities, qualified human resources for controlling the law enforcement to ensure the proper standards of safety and security including the management of the waste generated by various nuclear energy utilization. Wide progressive demands of electricity for the future give challenges to the government to meet the projected needs of energy to be fulfilled. One of the options which can be considered reasonable in answering such problem to provide the high request of energy is by building nuclear power plant. Understanding the much wider use of nuclear energy implementation within the country, nuclear and radioactive waste facilities need to be developed in meeting the capacity required for prospective requirements.

  4. French Regulatory Framework for the Recycling/Reuse of Nuclear Waste and the Dismantling of George Besse Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Themines, R., E-mail: robert.themines@areva.com [AREVA (France)

    2011-07-15

    The regulatory framework in France governing the management of materials containing low levels of radionuclides is described. The plans for the management of the materials arising from the dismantling of the Georges Besse Gaseous Diffusion Plant are described as an example of the application of the regulations. (author)

  5. Developing a strategy and closure criteria for radioactive and mixed waste sites in the ORNL remedial action program: Regulatory interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trabalka, J.R.

    1987-09-01

    Some options for stabilization and treatment of contaminated sites can theoretically provide a once-and-for-all solution (e.g., removal or destruction of contaminants). Most realizable options, however, leave contaminants in place (in situ), potentially isolated by physical or chemical, but more typically, by hydrologic measures. As a result of the dynamic nature of the interactions between contaminants, remedial measures, and the environment, in situ stablization measures are likely to have limited life spans, and maintenance and monitoring of performance become an essential part of the scheme. The length of formal institutional control over the site and related questions about future uses of the land and waters are of paramount importance. Unique features of the ORNL site and environs appear to be key ingredients in achieving the very long term institutional control necessary for successful financing and implementation of in situ stabilization. Some formal regulatory interface is necessary to ensure that regulatory limitations and new guidance which can affect planning and implementation of the ORNL Remedial Action Program are communicated to ORNL staff and potential technical and financial limitations which can affect schedules or alternatives for achievement of long-term site stabilization and the capability to meet environmental regulations are provided to regulatory bodies as early as possible. Such an interface should allow decisions on closure criteria to be based primarily on technical merit and protection of human health and the environment. A plan for interfacing with federal and state regulatory authorities is described. 93 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  6. Disposal of radwastes and recycling of wastes and structural materials -fundamental principles, concepts, results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaller, G.; Arens, G.; Brennecke, P.; Goertz, R.; Poschner, J.; Thieme, M.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the German concept for the disposal of radioactive waste, and the re-use or recycling of contaminated materials. All radioactive waste can be disposed of in deep geological formations (practised at ERAM disposal site, planned for Konrad disposal site). Radioactively contaminated material below clearance levels can proceed for disposal at waste disposal sites and incineration plants, or for re-use and recycling, especially where the material consists of contaminated steel and of buildings. The basic principles (dose limits and model structures for deriving recommendations), reference values, or limits are described. The latest concepts are described in greater detail. Waste management in Germany is compared with international concepts. (orig.) [de

  7. An Approach for the Analysis of Regulatory Analytes in High Level Radioactive Waste Stored at Hanford, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiemers, K.D.; Miller, M.; Lerchen, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation levels, salt concentration, and the oxidizing nature of the waste dictates modifications to the SW-846 methods. Modified methods will be used to meet target EQLs and QC currently in SW-846. Method modifications will be validated per SW-846 and HASQARD and will be documented consistent with WAC 173-303-910. The affect of modifications to holding times and storage conditions will be evaluated using techniques developed by Maskarinec and Bayne (1996). After validating the methods and performing the holding time study on a minimum of two Phase 1 candidate feed source tank wastes, DOE and Ecology will assess: whether different methods are needed, whether holding time/storage conditions should be altered, whether the high priority analyte list should be refined, and which additional tank waste needs to be characterized

  8. NEGOTIATING STRUCTURAL VULNERABILITY FOLLOWING REGULATORY CHANGES TO A PROVINCIAL METHADONE PROGRAM IN VANCOUVER, CANADA: A QUALITATIVE STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Ryan; Kerr, Thomas; Anderson, Solanna; Maher, Lisa; Keewatin, Chereece; Milloy, MJ; Wood, Evan; Small, Will

    2015-01-01

    While regulatory frameworks governing methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) require highly regimented treatment programs that shape treatment outcomes, little research has examined the effects of regulatory changes to these programs on those receiving treatment, and located their experiences within the wider context of socialstructural inequities. In British Columbia (BC), Canada, provincial regulations governing MMT have recently been modified, including: replacing the existing methadone formulation with Methadose® (pre-mixed and 10 times more concentrated); prohibiting pharmacy delivery of methadone; and, prohibiting pharmacies incentives for methadone dispensation. We undertook this study to examine the impacts of these changes on a structurally vulnerable population enrolled in MMT in Vancouver, BC. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 34 people enrolled in MMT and recruited from two ongoing observational prospective cohort studies comprised of drug-using individuals in the six-month period in 2014 following these regulatory changes. Interview transcripts were analyzed thematically, and by drawing on the concept of ‘structural vulnerability’. Findings underscore how these regulatory changes disrupted treatment engagement, producing considerable health and social harms. The introduction of Methadose® precipitated increased withdrawal symptoms. The discontinuation of pharmacy delivery services led to interruptions in MMT and codispensed HIV medications due to constraints stemming from their structural vulnerability (e.g., poverty, homelessness). Meanwhile, the loss of pharmacy incentives limited access to material supports utilized by participants to overcome barriers to MMT, while diminishing their capacity to assert some degree of agency in negotiating dispensation arrangements with pharmacies. Collectively, these changes functioned to compromise MMT engagement and increased structural vulnerability to harm, including re-initiation of injection drug

  9. Results of detailed ground geophysical surveys for locating and differentiating waste structures in waste management area 'A' at Chalk River Laboratories, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomsons, D.K.; Street, P.J.; Lodha, G.S.

    1999-01-01

    Waste Management Area 'A' (WMA 'A'), located in the outer area of the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) was in use as a waste burial site from 1946 to 1955. Waste management structures include debris-filled trenches, concrete bunkers and miscellaneous contaminated solid materials, and ditches and pits used for liquid dispersal. In order to update historical records, it was proposed to conduct detailed ground geophysical surveys to define the locations of waste management structures in WMA 'A', assist in planning of the drilling and sampling program to provide ground truth for the geophysics investigation and to predict the nature and locations of unknown/undefined shallow structures. A detailed ground geophysical survey grid was established with a total of 127 grid lines, oriented NNE and spaced one metre apart. The geophysical surveys were carried out during August and September, 1996. The combination of geophysical tools used included the Geonics EM61 metal detector, the GSM-19 magnetometer/gradiometer and a RAMAC high frequency ground penetrating radar system. The geophysical surveys were successful in identifying waste management structures and in characterizing to some extent, the composition of the waste. The geophysical surveys are able to determine the presence of most of the known waste management structures, especially in the western and central portions of the grid which contain the majority of the metallic waste. The eastern portion of the grid has a completely different geophysical character. While historical records show that trenches were dug, they are far less evident in the geophysical record. There is clear evidence for a trench running between lines 30E and 63E at 70 m. There are indications from the radar survey of other trench-like structures in the eastern portion. EM61 data clearly show that there is far less metallic debris in the eastern portion. The geophysical surveys were also successful in identifying previously unknown locations of waste

  10. Crystal structure of the regulatory subunit of archaeal initiation factor 2B (aIF2B) from hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3: a proposed structure of the regulatory subcomplex of eukaryotic IF2B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakuta, Yoshimitsu; Tahara, Maino; Maetani, Shigehiro; Yao, Min; Tanaka, Isao; Kimura, Makoto

    2004-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B (eIF2B) is the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor for eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2). eIF2B is a heteropentameric protein composed of α-ε subunits. The α, β, and δ subunits form a regulatory subcomplex, while the γ and ε form a catalytic subcomplex. Archaea possess homologues of α, β, and δ subunits of eIF2B. Here, we report the three-dimensional structure of an archaeal regulatory subunit (aIF2Bα) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 A resolution. aIF2Bα consists of two subdomains, an N-domain (residues 1-95) and a C-domain (residues 96-276), connected by a long α-helix (α5: 78-106). The N-domain contains a five helix bundle structure, while the C-domain folds into the α/β structure, thus showing similarity to D-ribose-5-phosphate isomerase structure. The presence of two molecules in the crystallographic asymmetric unit and the gel filtration analysis suggest a dimeric structure of aIF2Bα in solution, interacting with each other by C-domains. Furthermore, the crystallographic 3-fold symmetry generates a homohexameric structure of aIF2Bα; the interaction is primarily mediated by the long α-helix at the N-domains. This structure suggests an architecture of the three subunits, α, β, and δ, in the regulatory subcomplex within eIF2B

  11. The structures and stability of media intended for the immobilization of high level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tempest, P.A.

    1979-05-01

    High level radioactive waste contains about 40 different elements and, in time, many of these elements are transformed by radioactive decay into different-sized atoms with new chemical properties. The suitability of ordered crystal structures and unordered glass structures as media for immobilising the waste elements is compared. The structural properties of a mixture of synthetic minerals (SYNROC) are described and the various minerals' ability to accommodate ions of different radii and charge assessed. Similary the unordered structure of glass is examined and the probability of the glass remaining non-crystalline during manufacture and storage taken into account. Alternative glassification technologies in the form of the French AVM continuous process and the UK HARVEST batch processes are described and compared, and their likely effect on the structural properties of the final solid glass block considered. (author)

  12. Low-level radioactive waste from commercial nuclear reactors. Volume 3. Bibliographic abstracts of significant source references. Part 2. Bibliography for treatment, storage, disposal and transportation regulatory constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolley, R.L.; Rodgers, B.R.

    1986-05-01

    The overall task of this program was to provide an assessment of currently available technology for treating commercial low-level radioactive waste (LLRW), to initiate development of a methodology for choosing one technology for a given application, and to identify research needed to improve current treatment techniques and decision methodology. The resulting report is issued in four volumes. Volume 3 of this series is a collection of abstracts of most of the reference documents used for this study. Because of the large volume of literature, the abstracts have been printed in two separate parts. Federal, state, and local regulations affect the decision process for selecting technology applications. Regulations may favor a particular technology and may prevent application of others. Volume 3, part 2 presents abstracts of the regulatory constraint documents that relate to all phases of LLRW management (e.g., treatment, packaging, storage, transportation, and disposal).

  13. Self-Censorship Regulatory Structure: Can We Control Political of Hates, Violence & Sex in Children Computer & Video Games?

    OpenAIRE

    Zanuddin, Hasmah

    2008-01-01

    This article examines some of the extreme negative content available to teenagers and young children in the market. Extreme negative values such as political of hates, violence and sex in some of the children computer and video games were made possible due to several factors such as lacking in regulatory structure, week policy implementation, rampant of illegal and uncensored materials. Computer and video games have been the subject of frequent controversy and censorship, due to the depiction...

  14. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission natural analogue research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovach, L.A.; Ott, W.R.

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the natural analogue research program of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC). It contains information on the regulatory context and organizational structure of the high-level radioactive waste research program plan. It also includes information on the conditions and processes constraining selection of natural analogues, describes initiatives of the US NRC, and describes the role of analogues in the licensing process

  15. Soil structural analysis tools and properties for Hanford site waste tank evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.J.; Holtz, R.D.; Wagenblast, G.R.; Weiner, E.D.; Marlow, R.S.

    1995-09-01

    As Hanford Site contractors address future structural demands on nuclear waste tanks, built as early as 1943, it is necessary to address their current safety margins and ensure safe margins are maintained. Although the current civil engineering practice guidelines for soil modeling are suitable as preliminary design tools, future demands potentially result in loads and modifications to the tanks that are outside the original design basis and current code based structural capabilities. For example, waste removal may include cutting a large hole in a tank. This report addresses both spring modeling of site soils and finite-element modeling of soils. Additionally seismic dynamic modeling of Hanford Site soils is also included. Of new and special interest is Section 2.2 that Professor Robert D. Holtz of the University of Washington wrote on plane strain soil testing versus triaxial testing with Hanford Site application to large buried waste tanks

  16. Soil structural analysis tools and properties for Hanford site waste tank evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, C.J.; Holtz, R.D.; Wagenblast, G.R.; Weiner, E.D.; Marlow, R.S.

    1995-09-01

    As Hanford Site contractors address future structural demands on nuclear waste tanks, built as early as 1943, it is necessary to address their current safety margins and ensure safe margins are maintained. Although the current civil engineering practice guidelines for soil modeling are suitable as preliminary design tools, future demands potentially result in loads and modifications to the tanks that are outside the original design basis and current code based structural capabilities. For example, waste removal may include cutting a large hole in a tank. This report addresses both spring modeling of site soils and finite-element modeling of soils. Additionally seismic dynamic modeling of Hanford Site soils is also included. Of new and special interest is Section 2.2 that Professor Robert D. Holtz of the University of Washington wrote on plane strain soil testing versus triaxial testing with Hanford Site application to large buried waste tanks.

  17. Reactors licensing: proposal of an integrated quality and environment regulatory structure for nuclear research reactors in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serra, Reynaldo Cavalcanti

    2014-01-01

    A new integrated regulatory structure based on quality and integrated issues has been proposed to be implemented on the licensing process of nuclear research reactors in Brazil. The study starts with a literature review about the licensing process in several countries, all of them members of the International Atomic Energy Agency. After this phase it is performed a comparative study with the Brazilian licensing process to identify good practices (positive aspects), the gaps on it and to propose an approach of an integrated quality and environmental management system, in order to contribute with a new licensing process scheme in Brazil. The literature review considered the following research nuclear reactors: Jules-Horowitz and OSIRIS (France), Hanaro (Korea), Maples 1 and 2 (Canada), OPAL (Australia), Pallas (Holand), ETRR-2 (Egypt) and IEA-R1 (Brazil). The current nuclear research reactors licensing process in Brazil is conducted by two regulatory bodies: the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) and the Brazilian Institute of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources (IBAMA). CNEN is responsible by nuclear issues, while IBAMA by environmental one. To support the study it was applied a questionnaire and interviews based on the current regulatory structure to four nuclear research reactors in Brazil. Nowadays, the nuclear research reactor’s licensing process, in Brazil, has six phases and the environmental licensing process has three phases. A correlation study among these phases leads to a proposal of a new quality and environmental integrated licensing structure with four harmonized phases, hence reducing potential delays in this process. (author)

  18. AKAP18:PKA-RIIα structure reveals crucial anchor points for recognition of regulatory subunits of PKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Frank; Roske, Yvette; Schulz, Maike Svenja; Autenrieth, Karolin; Bertinetti, Daniela; Faelber, Katja; Zühlke, Kerstin; Kreuchwig, Annika; Kennedy, Eileen J; Krause, Gerd; Daumke, Oliver; Herberg, Friedrich W; Heinemann, Udo; Klussmann, Enno

    2016-07-01

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) interact with the dimerization/docking (D/D) domains of regulatory subunits of the ubiquitous protein kinase A (PKA). AKAPs tether PKA to defined cellular compartments establishing distinct pools to increase the specificity of PKA signalling. Here, we elucidated the structure of an extended PKA-binding domain of AKAP18β bound to the D/D domain of the regulatory RIIα subunits of PKA. We identified three hydrophilic anchor points in AKAP18β outside the core PKA-binding domain, which mediate contacts with the D/D domain. Such anchor points are conserved within AKAPs that bind regulatory RII subunits of PKA. We derived a different set of anchor points in AKAPs binding regulatory RI subunits of PKA. In vitro and cell-based experiments confirm the relevance of these sites for the interaction of RII subunits with AKAP18 and of RI subunits with the RI-specific smAKAP. Thus we report a novel mechanism governing interactions of AKAPs with PKA. The sequence specificity of each AKAP around the anchor points and the requirement of these points for the tight binding of PKA allow the development of selective inhibitors to unequivocally ascribe cellular functions to the AKAP18-PKA and other AKAP-PKA interactions. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  19. Optimization of process for creating porous structure of materials from industrial waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangutova-Stoilkovska, Bianka

    2005-01-01

    Republic of Macedonia, as many European countries, possesses great quantities of industrial waste materials from thermo electrical power stations and metallurgical capacities. The powder from waste fly ash and metallurgical slag was specified from chemical, geometrical, structural and thermochemical aspects. After the consolidation, the compacts were specified from structural, mechanical and thermophysical aspects. Using three kinds of waste glasses (TV glass, window and flask), the sintering temperature was significantly reduced and ecologically risky components were fixed molecularly in the matrix based on fly ash and metallurgical slag. The glass was characterized from chemical, geometrical and thermophysical point of view. The amount of glass in the composites varied from 10%-50%. The mechanical and thermal expansion properties of the sintered compacts, in the temperature region from 800 o -1200 o C were determined. The thermodynamic stability, mechanical properties and chemical inertness have been used as criterion for selection of the consolidated compacts. Special attention was given to the creation of highly porous structure. For the purpose to obtain a high joint porous structure, several types of porosity have been used: polyurethane foam, hydrogen peroxide, limestone, carbon ash and carbon fibres. The obtained glass-ceramic materials could be used in the building industry, for making filters for gases and liquids as well as diffusers for waste water aeration. (Author)

  20. Structural evaluation of thermocouple probes for 241-AZ-101 waste tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanjilal, S.K.

    1994-01-01

    This document reports on the structural analysis of the thermocouple probe to be installed in 241-AZ-101 waste tank. The thermocouple probe is analyzed for normal pump mixing operation and potential earthquake induced loads required by the Hanford Site Design Criteria SDC-4.1

  1. Structural evaluation of thermocouple probes for 241-AZ-101 waste tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanjilal, S.K.

    1994-12-06

    This document reports on the structural analysis of the thermocouple probe to be installed in 241-AZ-101 waste tank. The thermocouple probe is analyzed for normal pump mixing operation and potential earthquake induced loads required by the Hanford Site Design Criteria SDC-4.1.

  2. Creating a Comprehensive, Efficient, and Sustainable Nuclear Regulatory Structure: A Process Report from the U.S. Department of Energy's Material Protection, Control and Accounting Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, Troy L.; O'Brien, Patricia E.; Hazel, Michael J.; Tuttle, John D.; Cunningham, Mitchel E.; Schlegel, Steven C.

    2010-01-01

    With the congressionally mandated January 1, 2013 deadline for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC and A) program to complete its transition of MPC and A responsibility to the Russian Federation, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) management directed its MPC and A program managers and team leaders to demonstrate that work in ongoing programs would lead to successful and timely achievement of these milestones. In the spirit of planning for successful project completion, the NNSA review of the Russian regulatory development process confirmed the critical importance of an effective regulatory system to a sustainable nuclear protection regime and called for an analysis of the existing Russian regulatory structure and the identification of a plan to ensure a complete MPC and A regulatory foundation. This paper describes the systematic process used by DOE's MPC and A Regulatory Development Project (RDP) to develop an effective and sustainable MPC and A regulatory structure in the Russian Federation. This nuclear regulatory system will address all non-military Category I and II nuclear materials at State Corporation for Atomic Energy 'Rosatom,' the Federal Service for Ecological, Technological, and Nuclear Oversight (Rostechnadzor), the Federal Agency for Marine and River Transport (FAMRT, within the Ministry of Transportation), and the Ministry of Industry and Trade (Minpromtorg). The approach to ensuring a complete and comprehensive nuclear regulatory structure includes five sequential steps. The approach was adopted from DOE's project management guidelines and was adapted to the regulatory development task by the RDP. The five steps in the Regulatory Development Process are: (1) Define MPC and A Structural Elements; (2) Analyze the existing regulatory documents using the identified Structural Elements; (3) Validate the analysis with Russian colleagues and define the list of documents to be

  3. The effect of concentration on the structure and crystallinity of a cementitious waste form for caustic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Chul-Woo; Turo, Laura A.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Johnson, Bradley R.; McCloy, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cast Stone: Portland cement, fly ash, blast furnace slag, and simulated nuclear waste. ► Caustic secondary waste from the off-gas of a vitrification process was targeted. ► Crystallinity, micro- and mesostructure, and engineering properties characterized. ► Waste concentration varied from 0 to 2.5 M, but caused minimal changes. ► Cast Stone shows good compositional versatility as a secondary waste form. -- Abstract: Cement-based waste forms have long been considered economical technologies for disposal of various types of waste. A solidified cementitious waste form, Cast Stone, has been identified to immobilize the radioactive secondary waste from vitrification processes. In this work, Cast Stone was considered for a Na-based caustic liquid waste, and its physical properties were analyzed as a function of liquid waste loading up to 2 M Na. Differences in crystallinity (phase composition), microstructure, mesostructure (pore size distribution and surface area), and macrostructure (density and compressive strength) were investigated using various analytical techniques, in order to assess the suitability of Cast Stone as a chemically durable waste. It was found that the concentration of secondary waste simulant (caustic waste) had little effect on the relevant engineering properties of Cast Stone, showing that Cast Stone could be an effective and tolerant waste form for a wide range of concentrations of high sodium waste

  4. Structural and seismic analyses of waste facility reinforced concrete storage vaults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Facility 317 of Argonne National Laboratory consists of several reinforced concrete waste storage vaults designed and constructed in the late 1940's through the early 1960's. In this paper, structural analyses of these concrete vaults subjected to various natural hazards are described, emphasizing the northwest shallow vault. The natural phenomenon hazards considered include both earthquakes and tornados. Because these vaults are deeply embedded in the soil, the SASSI (System Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction) code was utilized for the seismic calculations. The ultimate strength method was used to analyze the reinforced concrete structures. In all studies, moment and shear strengths at critical locations of the storage vaults were evaluated. Results of the structural analyses show that almost all the waste storage vaults meet the code requirements according to ACI 349--85. These vaults also satisfy the performance goal such that confinement of hazardous materials is maintained and functioning of the facility is not interrupted

  5. Statement of Robert Bernero, Deputy Director, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, Nuclear Regulatory Commission: Accompanied by Robert Browning, Director, Division of High-Level Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Mr. Chairman, members of the Committee, thank you for this opportunity to present the views of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the Department of Energy's (DOE) program for disposal of civilian high-level wastes. I have with me Mr. Robert Browning, Director of NRC's Division of High-Level Waste Management. As you know, we are in the pre-licensing consultation phase of the repository program. DOE has the responsibility to conduct site characterization activities to acquire data necessary to evaluate the suitability of each candidate site for an application to the Commission for construction authorization. I would like to discuss some of our concerns about site characterization at the three sites recommended to an approved by the President for characterization as candidate sites. It will then discuss our comments on DOE's Draft Mission Plan Amendment dated January, 1987 and, more generally, our interaction with DOE. Finally, I would like to describe our quality assurance activities. I will be happy to respond to any questions from the Committee

  6. Federal, state, and local regulation of radioactive-waste transportation: Progress toward a definition of regulatory authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingston-Behan, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    The supremacy clause, the commerce clause, and the equal-protection guarantees of the U.S. Constitution establish the basic framework for defining the authority of Federal, State, and local governments to regulate the transportation of radioactive waste. Court decisions and advisory rulings of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) suggest that State and local regulation of the transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste is precluded under supremacy-clause principles to the extent that such regulation addresses nuclear safety or aspects of transportation that are already specifically regulated by the Federal government. Even where State and local requirements are found to be valid under the supremacy clause, they must still satisfy constitutional requirements under the commerce and equal-protection clauses. Despite stringent standards of review, State and local transportation requirements have been upheld where directly related to the traditional exercise of police powers in the area of transportation. Legitimate State and local police-power activities identified to date by the DOT and the courts include inspection and enforcement, immediate accident reporting, local regulation of traffic, and certain time-of-day curfews. The extent to which State and local permitting requirements and license fees may be determined valid by the DOT and the courts remains unclear. Continued clarification by the DOT and the courts as to the validity of permits and fees will serve to further define the appropriate balance for Federal, State, and local regulation of radioactive-waste transportation

  7. Structural characterization of hog iron oxide content glasses obtained from zinc hydrometallurgy wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, M.; Rincon, J.M.; Musik, S.; Kozhujharov, W.

    1997-01-01

    It has been carried out the structural characterization of high oxide content glasses obtained by melting of a goethite industrial waste from the zinc hydrometallurgy with other raw materials as dolomite and glass cullet. The structural characterization has been carried out by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-Ray Diffraction by Amorphous Dispersion (RDF) and Mossbauer spectroscopy. It has been determined the interatomic distance, the oxidation state and the coordination of iron atoms in these glasses. (Author) 16 refs

  8. Towards a single European electricity market : A structured approach to regulatory mode decision-making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, H.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on the processes through which the rules and regulations that govern European electricity markets - and inherently, their integration process - are established. So far, European policy makers have largely followed a 'trial-and-error' approach to finding an appropriate regulatory

  9. Regulatory Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Poul F.; Vetterlein, Antje

    2018-01-01

    Regulatory governance frameworks have become essential building blocks of world society. From supply chains to the regimes surrounding international organizations, extensive governance frameworks have emerged which structure and channel a variety of social exchanges, including economic, political...... by the International Transitional Administrations (ITAs) in Kosovo and Iraq as well as global supply chains and their impact on the garment industry in Bangladesh....

  10. Co-disposal of mixed waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, S.J.; Alexander, R.G.; Crane, P.J.; England, J.L.; Kemp, C.J.; Stewart, W.E.

    1993-08-01

    Co-disposal of process waste streams with hazardous and radioactive materials in landfills results in large, use-efficiencies waste minimization and considerable cost savings. Wasterock, produced from nuclear and chemical process waste streams, is segregated, treated, tested to ensure regulatory compliance, and then is placed in mixed waste landfills, burial trenches, or existing environmental restoration sites. Large geotechnical unit operations are used to pretreat, stabilize, transport, and emplace wasterock into landfill or equivalent subsurface structures. Prototype system components currently are being developed for demonstration of co-disposal

  11. Understanding the differences amongst national regulatory criteria for the long-term safety of radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, C.M.; Ferch, R.; Pescatore, C.

    2008-01-01

    Carl-Magnus Larsson detailed then the work of the Regulators' Forum and the origin of the LTSC initiative. He explained that one of the objectives of the LTSC was to identify a set of issues on long-term protection criteria and collate findings in a report. He explained why the idea of a 'collective opinion' was abandoned and why it should be replaced by a common understanding where differences between countries ought to be explained and understood. C.-M. Larsson detailed the different types of approaches to regulating long-term safety and the different approaches for numerical targets. He gave some explanations of the reasons for the differences in regulatory targets between countries (level of conservatism, progress in the safety case methodology, etc.). The regulatory function takes into account the nature of the demonstration (illustrations and societal demands). C.-M. Larsson referred to the evolution of IAEA safety fundamentals and stressed that the 'sustainability' concept, introduced by the Joint Convention, is not mentioned in the new safety standard. The term 'adequately protected' is now preferred in relation to future generations. The ICRP recommends that less emphasis be placed on assessment of doses in the long term. C.-M. Larsson concluded that one of the challenges for the regulator is not to promise nor require the impossible. (authors)

  12. STRUCTURAL CALCULATION OF AN EMPLACEMENT PALLET STATICALLY LOADED BY A WASTE PACKAGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Mastilovic

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the emplacement pallet (EP) subjected to static load from the mounted waste package (WP). The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensity magnitudes. This calculation is associated with the waste emplacement systems design; calculations are performed by the Waste Package Design group. AP-3.12Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, Calculations, is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. The finite element solutions are performed by using the commercially available ANSYS Version (V) 5.4 finite element code. The results of these calculations are provided in terms of maximum stress intensity magnitudes

  13. Application of Molecular Techniques to Elucidate the Influence of Cellulosic Waste on the Bacterial Community Structure at a Simulated Low-Level-Radioactive-Waste Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, Erin K.; D'Imperio, Seth; Miller, Amber R.; VanEngelen, Michael R.; Gerlach, Robin; Lee, Brady D.; Apel, William A.; Peyton, Brent M.

    2010-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste sites, including those at various U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, frequently contain cellulosic waste in the form of paper towels, cardboard boxes, or wood contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides such as chromium and uranium. To understand how the soil microbial community is influenced by the presence of cellulosic waste products, multiple soil samples were obtained from a non-radioactive model low-level waste test pit at the Idaho National Laboratory. Samples were analyzed using 16S rDNA clone libraries and 16S rRNA gene microarray (PhyloChip) analyses. Both the clone library and PhyloChip results revealed changes in the bacterial community structure with depth. In all samples, the PhyloChip detected significantly more unique Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs), and therefore more relative diversity, than the clone libraries. Calculated diversity indices suggest that diversity is lowest in the Fill (F) and Fill Waste (FW) layers and greater in the Wood Waste (WW) and Waste Clay (WC) layers. Principal coordinates analysis and lineage specific analysis determined that Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria phyla account for most of the significant differences observed between the layers. The decreased diversity in the FW layer and increased members of families containing known cellulose degrading microorganisms suggests the FW layer is an enrichment environment for cellulose degradation. Overall, these results suggest that the presence of the cellulosic material significantly influences the bacterial community structure in a stratified soil system.

  14. Analysis of regulatory structure for a potential fusion-reactor industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    The report is divided into eight sections. The preface describes the authors of the report, the methodology used in its preparation, and some basic legal terms. The summary describes the principal features of the proposed regulatory system and also includes two flow charts comparing our model with present NRC practices and a summary table briefly outlining the reasoning behind our recommendations. The main body of the report is divided into six sections. This part of the report discusses the existing federal and state programs for regulating electric energy, describes NRC operations and the criticisms of that agency, discusses the features of our proposed regulatory model, recommends certain steps for implementing the proposed model, and states the conclusions of the report

  15. Causal structure of oscillations in gene regulatory networks: Boolean analysis of ordinary differential equation attractors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mengyang; Cheng, Xianrui; Socolar, Joshua E S

    2013-06-01

    A common approach to the modeling of gene regulatory networks is to represent activating or repressing interactions using ordinary differential equations for target gene concentrations that include Hill function dependences on regulator gene concentrations. An alternative formulation represents the same interactions using Boolean logic with time delays associated with each network link. We consider the attractors that emerge from the two types of models in the case of a simple but nontrivial network: a figure-8 network with one positive and one negative feedback loop. We show that the different modeling approaches give rise to the same qualitative set of attractors with the exception of a possible fixed point in the ordinary differential equation model in which concentrations sit at intermediate values. The properties of the attractors are most easily understood from the Boolean perspective, suggesting that time-delay Boolean modeling is a useful tool for understanding the logic of regulatory networks.

  16. Hierarchical porous structured zeolite composite for removal of ionic contaminants from waste streams and effective encapsulation of hazardous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Jubouri, Sama M. [Chemical Engineering & Analytical Science, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Curry, Nicholas A. [Materials Science, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Holmes, Stuart M., E-mail: stuart.holmes@manchester.ac.uk [Chemical Engineering & Analytical Science, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    A hierarchical structured composite made from clinoptilolite supported on date stones carbon is synthesized using two techniques. The composites are manufactured by fixing a natural zeolite (clinoptilolite) to the porous surface of date stones carbon or by direct hydrothermal synthesis on to the surface to provide a supported high surface area ion-exchange material for metal ion removal from aqueous streams. The fixing of the clinoptilolite is achieved using sucrose and citric acid as a binder. The composites and pure clinoptilolite were compared to test the efficacy for the removal of Sr{sup 2+} ions from an aqueous phase. The encapsulation of the Sr{sup 2+} using either vitrification or a geo-polymer addition was tested to ensure that the hazardous waste can be made safe for disposal. The hierarchical structured composites were shown to achieve a higher ion exchange capacity per gram of zeolite than the pure clinoptilolite (65 mg/g for the pure natural clinoptilolite and 72 mg/g for the pure synthesized clinoptilolite) with the synthesized composite (160 mg/g) having higher capacity than the natural clinoptilolite composite (95 mg/g). The rate at which the equilibria were established followed the same trend showing the composite structure facilitates diffusion to the ion-exchange sites in the zeolite.

  17. Structural design and analysis of the multi-function waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnworth, S.K.; Stine, M.D.; Miller, L.K.

    1993-10-01

    This paper describes structural design and analysis procedures to be used for the Multi-function Waste Tank Facility underground waste storage tanks proposed for the Hanford Site. The Multi-function Waste Tank Facility will consist of four one-million-gallon nominal capacity, double-shell, underground waste storage tanks and will include the associated process and control systems and aboveground structures. The tanks will consist of an inner primary steel tank and an outer secondary reinforced-concrete steel-lined tank. The primary tank head will be structurally attached to the concrete dome. A supporting layer of material will be placed between the bottom of the primary steel tank and the bottom of the steel liner on the secondary tank. The tank analysis is undertaken jointly by a team of engineers and analysts representing Kaiser Engineers Hanford, the site architect/engineer, and Westinghouse Hanford Company, the site management and operating contractor. This analysis is planned in several phases. Heat transfer solutions will address the anticipated mixing pump and cyclic fill/drain environment to provide steel and concrete temperature distributions. With this information, an in situ static analysis of the reinforced-concrete secondary tank will be carried out over the structure design life and will give material states and deformations along with strength and stability checks. Seismic analysis, accounting for soil-structure interaction and liquid loads, will be conducted with the most conservative material state, and the in situ deformations will be incorporated. Finally, penetrations and other components will be analyzed

  18. Structural design and analysis of the multi-function waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnworth, S.K.; Stine, M.D.; Miller, L.K.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes structural design and analysis procedures to be used for the Multi-function Waste Tank Facility underground waste storage tanks proposed for the Hanford Site. The Multi-function Waste Tank Facility will consist of four one-million-gallon nominal capacity, double-shell, underground waste storage tanks and will include the associated process and control systems and aboveground structures. The tanks will consist of an inner primary steel tank and an outer secondary reinforced-concrete steel-linked tank. The primary tank head will be structurally attached to the concrete dome. A supporting layer of material will be placed between the bottom of the primary steel tank and the bottom of the steel linear on the secondary tank. The tank analysis is undertaken jointly by a team of engineers and analysts representing Kaiser Engineers Hanford, the site architect/engineer, and Westinghouse Hanford Company, the site management and operating contractor. This analysis is planned in several phases. Heat transfer solutions will address the anticipated mixing pump and cyclic fill/drain environment to provide steel and concrete temperature distributions. With this information, an in situ static analysis of the reinforced-concrete secondary tank will be carried out over the structure design life and will give material states and deformations along with strength and stability checks. Seismic analysis, accounting for soil-structure interaction and liquid loads, will be conducted with the most conservative material state, and the in situ deformations will be incorporated. Finally, penetrations and other components will be analyzed

  19. Using a Consensus Conference to Characterize Regulatory Concerns Regarding Bioremediation of Radionuclides and Heavy Metals in Mixed Waste at DOE Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denise Lach; Stephanie Sanford

    2006-01-01

    A consensus workshop was developed and convened with ten state regulators to characterize concerns regarding emerging bioremediation technology to be used to clean-up radionuclides and heavy metals in mixed wastes at US DOE sites. Two questions were explored: integrated questions: (1) What impact does participation in a consensus workshop have on the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of state regulators regarding bioremediation technology? (2) How effective is a consensus workshop as a strategy for eliciting and articulating regulators concerns regarding the use of bioremediation to clean up radionuclides and heavy metals in mixed wastes at U.S. Department of Energy Sites around the county? State regulators met together for five days over two months to learn about bioremediation technology and develop a consensus report of their recommendations regarding state regulatory concerns. In summary we found that panel members: quickly grasped the science related to bioremediation and were able to effectively interact with scientists working on complicated issues related to the development and implementation of the technology; are generally accepting of in situ bioremediation, but concerned about costs, implementation (e.g., institutional controls), and long-term effectiveness of the technology; are concerned equally about technological and implementation issues; and believed that the consensus workshop approach to learning about bioremediation was appropriate and useful. Finally, regulators wanted decision makers at US DOE to know they are willing to work with DOE regarding innovative approaches to clean-up at their sites, and consider a strong relationship between states and the DOE as critical to any effective clean-up. They do not want perceive themselves to be and do not want others to perceive them as barriers to successful clean-up at their sites

  20. Charging for waste motivates generators to optimize waste control at the source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.B.; Homan, F.J.

    1988-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the need for waste management that incorporates improved waste-handling techniques and more stringent regulatory requirements to prevent future liabilities such as Superfund sites. DOE-Oak Ridge Operations (DOE-ORO) has recognized that an effective waste management program focuses on control at the source and that the burden for responsible waste management can be placed on generators by charging for waste management costs. The principle of including the waste management costs in the total cost of the product, even when the product is research and development, is being implemented at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Charging waste management costs to generators creates an incentive to optimize processes so that less waste is produced, and it provides a basis for determining the cost effectiveness of capital improvements so that the mature phase of waste management can be attained. Improving waste management practices requires a long-range commitment and consistent administration. Making this commitment and providing adequate funding for proper waste disposal are most cost-effective measures than the alternative of paying for remedial actions after improper disposal. This paper summarizes a plan to charge waste generators, the administrative structure of the plan, a comparison between the rate structure and changes in waste disposal operations, and issues that have surfaced as the plan is implemented

  1. Compounds with magnetoplumbite or SLNA type structure as materials for nuclear waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thery, J.; Vivien, D.; Lejus, A.M.; Collongues, R.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetoplumbite-like structure, and related phases (sodium-lanthanide aluminates: SLNA) are able to accommodate a wide range of elements with various charges and ionic radii. The available coordinences are 4, 5 or 6 for the small cations and 9 or 12 for the large ones. This kind of compounds, which in addition present good chemical inertia, could possibly be used for the immobilization of nuclear waste [fr

  2. Bedfordshire County Structure Plan. Proposed alterations. Results of public consultation. Policy 97: Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The document refers to Alterations to the County Structure Plan, proposed by Bedfordshire County Council and submitted to the Secretary of State for the Environment. An additional Alteration initiated at the County Council's meeting, dealing with nuclear waste, had not been the subject of prior public consultation. Consultation had since been arranged, and the present document summarises the responses that have been received, and describes the next action to be taken. (U.K.)

  3. Regulatory structures for gene therapy medicinal products in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Bettina; Celis, Patrick; Carr, Melanie; Reinhardt, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Taking into account the complexity and technical specificity of advanced therapy medicinal products: (gene and cell therapy medicinal products and tissue engineered products), a dedicated European regulatory framework was needed. Regulation (EC) No. 1394/2007, the "ATMP Regulation" provides tailored regulatory principles for the evaluation and authorization of these innovative medicines. The majority of gene or cell therapy product development is carried out by academia, hospitals, and small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Thus, acknowledging the particular needs of these types of sponsors, the legislation also provides incentives for product development tailored to them. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) and, in particular, its Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) provide a variety of opportunities for early interaction with developers of ATMPs to enable them to have early regulatory and scientific input. An important tool to promote innovation and the development of new medicinal products by micro-, small-, and medium-sized enterprises is the EMA's SME initiative launched in December 2005 to offer financial and administrative assistance to smaller companies. The European legislation also foresees the involvement of stakeholders, such as patient organizations, in the development of new medicines. Considering that gene therapy medicinal products are developed in many cases for treatment of rare diseases often of monogenic origin, the involvement of patient organizations, which focus on rare diseases and genetic and congenital disorders, is fruitful. Two such organizations are represented in the CAT. Research networks play another important role in the development of gene therapy medicinal products. The European Commission is funding such networks through the EU Sixth Framework Program. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Results of detailed ground geophysical surveys for locating and differentiating waste structures in waste management area 'A' at Chalk River Laboratories, Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomsons, D.K.; Street, P.J.; Lodha, G.S

    1999-07-01

    Waste Management Area 'A' (WMA 'A'), located in the outer area of the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) was in use as a waste burial site from 1946 to 1955. Waste management structures include debris-filled trenches, concrete bunkers and miscellaneous contaminated solid materials, and ditches and pits used for liquid dispersal. In order to update historical records, it was proposed to conduct detailed ground geophysical surveys to define the locations of waste management structures in WMA 'A', assist in planning of the drilling and sampling program to provide ground truth for the geophysics investigation and to predict the nature and locations of unknown/undefined shallow structures. A detailed ground geophysical survey grid was established with a total of 127 grid lines, oriented NNE and spaced one metre apart. The geophysical surveys were carried out during August and September, 1996. The combination of geophysical tools used included the Geonics EM61 metal detector, the GSM-19 magnetometer/gradiometer and a RAMAC high frequency ground penetrating radar system. The geophysical surveys were successful in identifying waste management structures and in characterizing to some extent, the composition of the waste. The geophysical surveys are able to determine the presence of most of the known waste management structures, especially in the western and central portions of the grid which contain the majority of the metallic waste. The eastern portion of the grid has a completely different geophysical character. While historical records show that trenches were dug, they are far less evident in the geophysical record. There is clear evidence for a trench running between lines 30E and 63E at 70 m. There are indications from the radar survey of other trench-like structures in the eastern portion. EM61 data clearly show that there is far less metallic debris in the eastern portion. The geophysical surveys were also successful in identifying

  5. Composition - structure - properties relationships of peraluminous glasses for nuclear waste containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piovesan, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Part of the Research and Development program concerning high level nuclear waste conditioning aims to assess new glass formulations able to incorporate a high waste content with enhanced properties in terms of homogeneity, thermal stability, long term behavior and process ability. This study focuses on peraluminous glasses, defined by an excess of aluminum ions Al"3"+ in comparison with modifier elements such as Na"+, Li"+ or Ca"2"+. A Design of Experiment approach has been employed to determine relationships between composition of simplified peraluminous glasses (SiO_2 - B_2O_3 - Al_2O_3 - Na_2O - Li_2O - CaO - La_2O_3) and their physical properties such as viscosity, glass transition temperature and glass homogeneity. Moreover, some structural investigation (NMR) was performed in order to better understand the structural role of Na"+, Li"+ and Ca"2"+ and the structural organization of peraluminous glasses. Then, physical and chemical properties of fully simulated peraluminous glasses were characterized to evaluate transposition between simplified and fully simulated glasses and also to put forward the potential of peraluminous glasses for nuclear waste containment. (author) [fr

  6. Waste-surface mapping of the Fernald K-65 silos using a structured light measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burks, B.L.; DePiero, F.W.; Dinkins, M.A.; Rowe, J.C.; Selleck, C.B.; Jacoboski, D.L.

    1992-10-01

    A remotely operated surface-mapping measurement system was developed by the Robotics ampersand Process Systems Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use in the K-65 waste-storage silos at Fernald, Ohio. The mapping system used three infrared line-generating laser diodes as illumination sources and three high-resolution, low-lux, calibrated, black-and-white, charge-coupled-device video cameras as receivers. These components were combined to form structured light source range and direction sensors with six different possible emitter-receiver pairs. A technology demonstration and predeployment tests were performed at Fernald using the empty Silo 4 into which was placed rectangular objects of known dimensions. These objects were scanned by the structured light sources to demonstrate functionality and verify that the system was giving sufficiently accurate range data in three dimensions. The structured light sources were deployed in Silos 1 and 2 to scan the waste surfaces. The resulting data were merged to create three-dimensional maps of those surfaces. A bentonite clay cap was placed over the waste surfaces and surface maps were obtained. The change in surface height before and after bentonite addition was utilized as a measure of clay cap thickness

  7. Design criteria development for the structural stability of nuclear waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, C H [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yu, T S [Daewoo Engineering Company, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Ko, H M [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-11-15

    The objective of the present project is to develop design criteria for the structural stability of rock cavity for the underground repository are defined, according to which detailed descriptions for design methodologies, design stages and stability analysis of the cavity are made. The proposed criteria can be used as a guide for the preparation of design codes which are to be established as the site condition and technical emplacement procedure are fixed. The present report first reviews basic safety requirements and criteria of the underground disposal of nuclear wastes for the establishment of design concepts and stability analysis of the rock cavity. Important factors for the design are also described by considering characteristics of the wastes and underground facilities. The present project has investigated technical aspects on the design of underground structures based on the currently established underground construction technologies, and presented a proposal for design criteria for the structural stability of the nuclear waste repository. The proposed criteria consist of general provisions, geological exploration, rock classification, design process and methods, supporting system, analyses and instrumentation.

  8. Management of waste from nuclear facilities as a regulatory problem. Requirements to be met by legislation under conditions of uncertainty. Die Entsorgung der Kernenergie als Regelungsproblem. Zu den Anforderungen an Gesetzgebung unter Ungewissheitsbedingungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladeur, K.H.

    1989-07-01

    The author presents a brief review of the development of the nuclear waste management regime in the Atomic Energy Act, referring also to court decissions and the literature. The article analyses the constitutionality of the waste management regulations of section 9a and following sections, and of the provisions on reprocessing (section 7, sub-sec. (1)), primarily under the aspect of the principle of proviso of legality in general, reformulated by the theory of materiality, and in particular with regard to the requirement of 'backfitting' in order to improve the regulatory system for complex and especially technological matters. (orig./RST).

  9. Management of solid waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, W. T.; Stinton, L. H.

    1980-04-01

    Compliance with the latest regulatory requirements addressing disposal of radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste criteria in the selection, design, and operation of solid waste management facilities. Due to the state of flux of these regulatory requirements from EPA and NRC, several waste management options were of solid waste. The current regulatory constraints and the design and operational requirements for construction of both storage and disposal facilities for use in management of DOE-ORO solid waste are highlighted. Capital operational costs are included for both disposal and storage options.

  10. Management of solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, W.T.; Stinton, L.H.

    1980-01-01

    Compliance with the latest regulatory requirements addressing disposal of radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste requires the application of numerous qualitative and quantitative criteria in the selection, design, and operation of solid waste management facilities. Due to the state of flux of these regulatory requirements from EPA and NRC several waste management options were identified as being applicable to the management of the various types of solid waste. This paper highlights the current regulatory constraints and the design and operational requirements for construction of both storage and disposal facilities for use in management of DOE-ORO solid waste. Capital and operational costs are included for both disposal and storage options

  11. Management of solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, W.T.; Stinton, L.H.

    1980-01-01

    Compliance with the latest regulatory requirements addressing disposal of radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste requires the application of numerous qualitative and quantitative criteria in the selection, design, and operation of solid waste management facilities. Due to the state of flux of these regulatory requirements from EPA and NRC, several waste management options were identified as being applicable to the management of the various types of solid waste. This paper highlights the current regulatory constraints and the design and operational requirements for construction of both storage and disposal facilities for use in management of DOE-ORO solid waste. Capital and operational costs are included for both disposal and storage options

  12. Structure reveals regulatory mechanisms of a MaoC-like hydratase from Phytophthora capsici involved in biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huizheng; Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Jie; Song, Weiwei; Zhao, Li; Zhang, Xiuguo

    2013-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) have attracted increasing attention as "green plastic" due to their biodegradable, biocompatible, thermoplastic, and mechanical properties, and considerable research has been undertaken to develop low cost/high efficiency processes for the production of PHAs. MaoC-like hydratase (MaoC), which belongs to (R)-hydratase involved in linking the β-oxidation and the PHA biosynthetic pathways, has been identified recently. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms of (R)-hydratase catalysis is critical for efficient production of PHAs that promise synthesis an environment-friendly plastic. We have determined the crystal structure of a new MaoC recognized from Phytophthora capsici. The crystal structure of the enzyme was solved at 2.00 Å resolution. The structure shows that MaoC has a canonical (R)-hydratase fold with an N-domain and a C-domain. Supporting its dimerization observed in structure, MaoC forms a stable homodimer in solution. Mutations that disrupt the dimeric MaoC result in a complete loss of activity toward crotonyl-CoA, indicating that dimerization is required for the enzymatic activity of MaoC. Importantly, structure comparison reveals that a loop unique to MaoC interacts with an α-helix that harbors the catalytic residues of MaoC. Deletion of the loop enhances the enzymatic activity of MaoC, suggesting its inhibitory role in regulating the activity of MaoC. The data in our study reveal the regulatory mechanism of an (R)-hydratase, providing information on enzyme engineering to produce low cost PHAs.

  13. Structure reveals regulatory mechanisms of a MaoC-like hydratase from Phytophthora capsici involved in biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huizheng Wang

    Full Text Available Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs have attracted increasing attention as "green plastic" due to their biodegradable, biocompatible, thermoplastic, and mechanical properties, and considerable research has been undertaken to develop low cost/high efficiency processes for the production of PHAs. MaoC-like hydratase (MaoC, which belongs to (R-hydratase involved in linking the β-oxidation and the PHA biosynthetic pathways, has been identified recently. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms of (R-hydratase catalysis is critical for efficient production of PHAs that promise synthesis an environment-friendly plastic.We have determined the crystal structure of a new MaoC recognized from Phytophthora capsici. The crystal structure of the enzyme was solved at 2.00 Å resolution. The structure shows that MaoC has a canonical (R-hydratase fold with an N-domain and a C-domain. Supporting its dimerization observed in structure, MaoC forms a stable homodimer in solution. Mutations that disrupt the dimeric MaoC result in a complete loss of activity toward crotonyl-CoA, indicating that dimerization is required for the enzymatic activity of MaoC. Importantly, structure comparison reveals that a loop unique to MaoC interacts with an α-helix that harbors the catalytic residues of MaoC. Deletion of the loop enhances the enzymatic activity of MaoC, suggesting its inhibitory role in regulating the activity of MaoC.The data in our study reveal the regulatory mechanism of an (R-hydratase, providing information on enzyme engineering to produce low cost PHAs.

  14. Medusa structure of the gene regulatory network: dominance of transcription factors in cancer subtype classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuchun; Feng, Ying; Trivedi, Niraj S; Huang, Sui

    2011-05-01

    Gene expression profiles consisting of ten thousands of transcripts are used for clustering of tissue, such as tumors, into subtypes, often without considering the underlying reason that the distinct patterns of expression arise because of constraints in the realization of gene expression profiles imposed by the gene regulatory network. The topology of this network has been suggested to consist of a regulatory core of genes represented most prominently by transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs, that influence the expression of other genes, and of a periphery of 'enslaved' effector genes that are regulated but not regulating. This 'medusa' architecture implies that the core genes are much stronger determinants of the realized gene expression profiles. To test this hypothesis, we examined the clustering of gene expression profiles into known tumor types to quantitatively demonstrate that TFs, and even more pronounced, microRNAs, are much stronger discriminators of tumor type specific gene expression patterns than a same number of randomly selected or metabolic genes. These findings lend support to the hypothesis of a medusa architecture and of the canalizing nature of regulation by microRNAs. They also reveal the degree of freedom for the expression of peripheral genes that are less stringently associated with a tissue type specific global gene expression profile.

  15. Fabrication of unglazed ceramic tile using dense structured sago waste and clay composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aripin; S Tani; S Mitsudo; T Saito; T Idehara

    2010-01-01

    In Indonesia, the sago processing industry generates every year huge amount of sago waste, and converting this waste into a useful material is possible. In the present study, physical properties of dense structured sago waste and clay composite were investigated in order to study the feasibility of reuse this sample as raw material in the producing of ceramics. Firstly, the chemical composition of ash (obtained from the sago waste) and clay was characterized. The prepared sample was sintered at the temperature range from 800 to 1,200 °C using electric furnace. The density, linear shrinkage and water absorption of the sintered sample were determined by using the Archimedes' method. The experimental result indicated that the density of the sintered sample increased with increasing sintering temperature up to 1100°C and then slightly decreased afterward. The water absorption of the products decreased with an increase in sintering temperature. In the sintered sample at 1,100 °C, the water absorption decreased rapidly and water adsorption of less than 1 % was achieved. This water absorption was less than 5 % which was needed for unglazed floor tile. The result of water adsorption suggest that it is possible to use this sample as a raw material for producing the ceramic floor tile. (author)

  16. Amending the Structure of Renewable Carbon from Biorefinery Waste-Streams for Energy Storage Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hoi Chun; Goswami, Monojoy; Chen, Jihua; Keum, Jong K; Naskar, Amit K

    2018-05-29

    Biorefineries produce impure sugar waste streams that are being underutilized. By converting this waste to a profitable by-product, biorefineries could be safeguarded against low oil prices. We demonstrate controlled production of useful carbon materials from the waste concentrate via hydrothermal synthesis and carbonization. We devise a pathway to producing tunable, porous spherical carbon materials by modeling the gross structure formation and developing an understanding of the pore formation mechanism utilizing simple reaction principles. Compared to a simple hydrothermal synthesis from sugar concentrate, emulsion-based synthesis results in hollow spheres with abundant microporosity. In contrast, conventional hydrothermal synthesis produces solid beads with micro and mesoporosity. All the carbonaceous materials show promise in energy storage application. Using our reaction pathway, perfect hollow activated carbon spheres can be produced from waste sugar in liquid effluence of biomass steam pretreatment units. The renewable carbon product demonstrated a desirable surface area of 872 m 2 /g and capacitance of up to 109 F/g when made into an electric double layer supercapacitor. The capacitor exhibited nearly ideal capacitive behavior with 90.5% capacitance retention after 5000 cycles.

  17. Federal and state regulatory schemes affecting liability for high-level waste transportation incidents: opportunities for clarification and amendment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friel, L.E.; Livingston-Behan, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Price-Anderson Act of 1957 provides extensive public liability coverage in the event of a serious accident involving the transportation of nuclear materials to or from certain federally-licensed, or federal contractor-operated facilities. While actual liability for a nuclear incident and the extent of damages are usually determined by state law, the Act establishes a comprehensive system for the payment of such damages. Despite the federally-mandated scheme for liability coverage several aspects of the Act's application to transportation to a permanent repository have not yet been settled and are open to various interpretations. Some areas of uncertainty apply not only to future waste transport to a repository, but also to current transportation activities, and include: coverage for emergency response and clean-up costs; coverage for precautionary evacuations; and the federal government's financial liability. The need to address liability issues is also increasingly recognized at the state level. The state laws which are used to determine liability and the extent of damages in the event of a transportation accident vary widely among states and significantly affect the compensation that an injured person will receive under the provisions of the Price-Anderson Act. Areas of state law deserving special attention include: standards for determining liability; statutes of limitations; standards for proof of causation; state sovereign immunity statutes; and recovery of unique emergency response costs

  18. Survey on depth distribution of underground structures for consideration of human intrusion into TRU waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Senoo, Muneaki; Sugimoto, Junichiro; Ohishi, Kiyotaka; Okishio, Masanori; Shimizu, Haruo.

    1996-01-01

    Depth distributions of some kinds of underground structure in Japan have been investigated to get an information about suitable depth of underground repository for TRU waste that is arising from reprocessing and MOX fuel fabrication plants. The underground structures investigated in this work were foundation pile of multistoried building, that of elevated expressway, that of JR shinkansen railway, tunnel of subway and wells. The major depth distribution of the underground structures except for the wells was in range from 30 to 50m, and their maximum depth was less than 100m. On the other hand, the 99% of wells was less than 300m in depth. Maximum depth of the other underground structures has been also investigated for a survey of the utilization of underground by artificial structures in Japan. (author)

  19. The management of household hazardous waste in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, R J; Gronow, J R; Voulvoulis, N

    2009-01-01

    Waste legislation in the United Kingdom (UK) implements European Union (EU) Directives and Regulations. However, the term used to refer to hazardous waste generated in household or municipal situations, household hazardous waste (HHW), does not occur in UK, or EU, legislation. The EU's Hazardous Waste Directive and European Waste Catalogue are the principal legislation influencing HHW, although the waste categories described are difficult to interpret. Other legislation also have impacts on HHW definition and disposal, some of which will alter current HHW disposal practices, leading to a variety of potential consequences. This paper discusses the issues affecting the management of HHW in the UK, including the apparent absence of a HHW-specific regulatory structure. Policy and regulatory measures that influence HHW management before disposal and after disposal are considered, with particular emphasis placed on disposal to landfill.

  20. Life-cycle modelling of waste management in Europe: tools, climate change and waste prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentil, Emmanuel

    . The outcome of the study indicates that, despite a common ‘minimum’ regulatory regime, the performance of waste management systems is very different among member states. The best performing member states are the nations which have promoted efficient material and energy recovery, leading to significant...... operated by each member state (structural indicators). Managing waste appropriately generates environmental benefits, leading to the comforting, and potentially misleading impression that waste generation is acceptable, as long as environmental value is gained from the recovery of materials and energy....... However, it is quite clear that, if waste is not produced in the first place, through waste prevention activities, waste management impacts and benefits cease to exist. Problem solved. The issue is that a ‘waste free’ or a ‘zero waste’ society is a purely abstract concept that has little value...

  1. In vivo genome-wide profiling of RNA secondary structure reveals novel regulatory features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yiliang; Tang, Yin; Kwok, Chun Kit; Zhang, Yu; Bevilacqua, Philip C; Assmann, Sarah M

    2014-01-30

    RNA structure has critical roles in processes ranging from ligand sensing to the regulation of translation, polyadenylation and splicing. However, a lack of genome-wide in vivo RNA structural data has limited our understanding of how RNA structure regulates gene expression in living cells. Here we present a high-throughput, genome-wide in vivo RNA structure probing method, structure-seq, in which dimethyl sulphate methylation of unprotected adenines and cytosines is identified by next-generation sequencing. Application of this method to Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings yielded the first in vivo genome-wide RNA structure map at nucleotide resolution for any organism, with quantitative structural information across more than 10,000 transcripts. Our analysis reveals a three-nucleotide periodic repeat pattern in the structure of coding regions, as well as a less-structured region immediately upstream of the start codon, and shows that these features are strongly correlated with translation efficiency. We also find patterns of strong and weak secondary structure at sites of alternative polyadenylation, as well as strong secondary structure at 5' splice sites that correlates with unspliced events. Notably, in vivo structures of messenger RNAs annotated for stress responses are poorly predicted in silico, whereas mRNA structures of genes related to cell function maintenance are well predicted. Global comparison of several structural features between these two categories shows that the mRNAs associated with stress responses tend to have more single-strandedness, longer maximal loop length and higher free energy per nucleotide, features that may allow these RNAs to undergo conformational changes in response to environmental conditions. Structure-seq allows the RNA structurome and its biological roles to be interrogated on a genome-wide scale and should be applicable to any organism.

  2. Plans and schedules for implementation of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission responsibilities under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (P.L. 99-240)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunkelman, M.M.

    1987-08-01

    This document makes available the plans and schedules for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) implementation of its responsibilities under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA). The present document identifies the provisions of the LLRWPAA that affect the programs of the NRC, identifies what the NRC must do to fulfill each of its requirements under the LLRWPAA, and establishes schedules for carrying out these requirements

  3. 5' Region of the human interleukin 4 gene: structure and potential regulatory elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eder, A; Krafft-Czepa, H; Krammer, P H

    1988-01-25

    The lymphokine Interleukin 4 (IL-4) is secreted by antigen or mitogen activated T lymphocytes. IL-4 stimulates activation and differentiation of B lymphocytes and growth of T lymphocytes and mast cells. The authors isolated the human IL-4 gene from a lambda EMBL3 genomic library. As a probe they used a synthetic oligonucleotide spanning position 40 to 79 of the published IL-4 cDNA sequence. The 5' promoter region contains several sequence elements which may have a cis-acting regulatory function for IL-4 gene expression. These elements include a TATA-box, three CCAAT-elements (two are on the non-coding strand) and an octamer motif. A comparison of the 5' flanking region of the human murine IL-4 gene (4) shows that the region between position -306 and +44 is highly conserved (83% homology).

  4. Structural evaluations of existing underground reinforced concrete tanks for radioactive waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollert, F.R.

    1979-10-01

    Structural integrity evaluations are being conducted for underground, steel-lined reinforced concrete tanks for storing radioactive wastes. The tanks sustain large soil overburden loads and elevated temperatures from the waste for long time periods. The evaluations include laboratory experiments to determine the long-term effects of elevated temperatures on the elastic properties of concrete, and to estimate the effect of the waste chemicals on concrete durability. Available concrete samples from the tanks were also tested to determine the quality of the concrete in the tanks and for comparison with the laboratory data. Finite element, nonlinear, time-dependent analyses are performed to show the thermal creep, cracking, and stresses occurring in the concrete tanks due to the service conditions. Ultimate load analyses are made to assess the safety margin in the tanks. Finally, seismic analyses of a tank in the stressed condition due to the soil and thermal loadings were conducted to determine that the structure has sufficient reserve capacity to withstand 0.25 g earthquake accelerations

  5. An experimental analysis on property and structure variations of agricultural wastes undergoing torrefaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wei-Hsin; Lu, Ke-Miao; Tsai, Chi-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Coffee residue, sawdust and rice husk undergoing torrefaction are investigated. ► A high-volatile bituminous coal and a low-volatile one are also regarded for comparison. ► Coffee residue is the most active biomass to torrefaction. ► Torrefied wastes approach the high-volatile coal as increasing temperature and duration. ► Torrefaction is conducive to the applications of biomass in industrial furnaces. -- Abstract: Three agricultural wastes, consisting of coffee residue, sawdust and rice husk, undergoing torrefaction are investigated to evaluate the potential of biomass as solid fuel. Two different torrefaction temperatures (240 and 270 °C) and durations (0.5 and 1 h) are considered in the study, and the properties and structures of the raw and torrefied wastes are extensively investigated by means of proximate, elemental, fiber, calorific, thermogravimetric, SEM and FTIR analyses. A high-volatile bituminous coal and a low-volatile one are also regarded for comparison. By virtue of more hemicellulose contained in the coffee residue, it is the most active biomass to torrefaction and its higher heating value (HHV) is improved up to 38%. The empirical atomic formula of the raw wastes is expressed by CH 1.54–1.76 O 0.65–0.89 and it changes to CH 1.02–1.57 O 0.26–0.64 after undergoing torrefaction. The torrefied biomasses approach high-volatile coal when the torrefaction temperature and duration increase. From fuel point of view, the improved properties and changed molecular structure are conducive to the applications of biomass in industrial furnaces such as boilers and blast furnaces.

  6. Electric Industry Structure and Regulatory Responses in a High Distributed Energy Resources Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corneli, Steve [Seventhwave, Madison, WI (United States); Kihm, Steve [Seventhwave, Madison, WI (United States); Schwartz, Lisa [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of distributed energy resources (DERs) that can generate, manage and store energy on the customer side of the electric meter is widely recognized as a transformative force in the power sector. This report focuses on two key aspects of that transformation: structural changes in the electric industry and related changes in business organization and regulation that are likely to result from them. Both industry structure and regulation are inextricably linked. History shows that the regulation of the power sector has responded primarily to innovation in technologies and business models that created significant structural changes in the sector’s cost and organizational structure.

  7. Structures of the Porphyromonas gingivalis OxyR regulatory domain explain differences in expression of the OxyR regulon in Escherichia coli and P. gingivalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svintradze, David V.; Peterson, Darrell L.; Collazo-Santiago, Evys A.; Lewis, Janina P.; Wright, H. Tonie

    2013-01-01

    Differences in OxyR regulated expression of oxidative stress genes between Escherichia coli and Porphyromonas gingivalis are explained by very minor differences in structure and amino-acid sequence of the respective oxidized and reduced OxyR regulatory domains. These differences affect OxyR quaternary structures and are predicted from model building of full length OxyR–DNA complexes to confer distinct modes of DNA binding on this transcriptional regulator. OxyR transcriptionally regulates Escherichia coli oxidative stress response genes through a reversibly reducible cysteine disulfide biosensor of cellular redox status. Structural changes induced by redox changes in these cysteines are conformationally transmitted to the dimer subunit interfaces, which alters dimer and tetramer interactions with DNA. In contrast to E. coli OxyR regulatory-domain structures, crystal structures of Porphyromonas gingivalis OxyR regulatory domains show minimal differences in dimer configuration on changes in cysteine disulfide redox status. This locked configuration of the P. gingivalis OxyR regulatory-domain dimer closely resembles the oxidized (activating) form of the E. coli OxyR regulatory-domain dimer. It correlates with the observed constitutive activation of some oxidative stress genes in P. gingivalis and is attributable to a single amino-acid insertion in P. gingivalis OxyR relative to E. coli OxyR. Modelling of full-length P. gingivalis, E. coli and Neisseria meningitidis OxyR–DNA complexes predicts different modes of DNA binding for the reduced and oxidized forms of each

  8. Structures of the Porphyromonas gingivalis OxyR regulatory domain explain differences in expression of the OxyR regulon in Escherichia coli and P. gingivalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svintradze, David V. [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298-0566 (United States); Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23219-1540 (United States); Peterson, Darrell L. [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23219-1540 (United States); Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298-0614 (United States); Collazo-Santiago, Evys A.; Lewis, Janina P. [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298-0566 (United States); Wright, H. Tonie, E-mail: xrdproc@vcu.edu [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23219-1540 (United States); Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298-0614 (United States); Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298-0566 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Differences in OxyR regulated expression of oxidative stress genes between Escherichia coli and Porphyromonas gingivalis are explained by very minor differences in structure and amino-acid sequence of the respective oxidized and reduced OxyR regulatory domains. These differences affect OxyR quaternary structures and are predicted from model building of full length OxyR–DNA complexes to confer distinct modes of DNA binding on this transcriptional regulator. OxyR transcriptionally regulates Escherichia coli oxidative stress response genes through a reversibly reducible cysteine disulfide biosensor of cellular redox status. Structural changes induced by redox changes in these cysteines are conformationally transmitted to the dimer subunit interfaces, which alters dimer and tetramer interactions with DNA. In contrast to E. coli OxyR regulatory-domain structures, crystal structures of Porphyromonas gingivalis OxyR regulatory domains show minimal differences in dimer configuration on changes in cysteine disulfide redox status. This locked configuration of the P. gingivalis OxyR regulatory-domain dimer closely resembles the oxidized (activating) form of the E. coli OxyR regulatory-domain dimer. It correlates with the observed constitutive activation of some oxidative stress genes in P. gingivalis and is attributable to a single amino-acid insertion in P. gingivalis OxyR relative to E. coli OxyR. Modelling of full-length P. gingivalis, E. coli and Neisseria meningitidis OxyR–DNA complexes predicts different modes of DNA binding for the reduced and oxidized forms of each.

  9. Project of an information integrated system to provide support to the regulatory control of the radioactive waste inventory; Projeto de um sistema integrado de informacao para suporte ao controle regulatorio do inventario de rejeitos radioativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christovao, Marilia Tavares

    2005-05-15

    Sources and radioactive waste deriving from industry activities, medical practice and other areas are collected, received, and stored as waste on Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) Institutes, that also generate, treat and store their own radioactive waste. The object of this project is to present an Integrated Information System named SICORR, having as guidelines, the referred processes to the radioactive waste regulatory control, under the responsibility of the Radioactive Waste Division (DIREJ), the General Coordination of Licensing and Control (CGLC), the Directorate of Safety and Radiation Protection (DRS) and the CNEN. The main objective of the work was reached, once the project SICORR modeling considers the radioactive waste control inventory, enclosing the treatment and integration of the radioactive waste and the radionuclides data and processes; the installations that produce, use, transport or store radiation sources data; and, CNEN Institutes responsible for the radioactive waste management data. The SICORR functions or essential modules involve the data treatment, integration, standardization and consistency between the processes. The SICORR specification and the analysis results are registered in documents, Software Specification Proposal (PESw) and Software Requirements Specification (ERSw), and are presented in text, in diagrams and user interfaces. Use cases have been used in the SICORR context diagram. The user interfaces for each use case have been detailed, defining the graphical layout, the relationships description with other interfaces, the interface details properties and the commands and the product entrances and exits. For objects radioactive waste and radionuclides, states diagrams have been drawn. The activities diagram represents the business model process. The class diagram represents the static objects and relationships that exist between them, under the specification point of view. The class diagram have been determined

  10. The effects of uranium oxide high-level waste on the structure of iron phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badyal, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Because of their unusually good chemical durability, iron phosphate glasses are a natural candidate for a nuclear waste disposal glass. We have studied the effects of UO 2 high-level waste on the structure of iron phosphate glasses with both neutron and high-energy x-ray diffraction using the GLAD instrument of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source and the 1-BM bending magnet beamline of the Advanced Photon Source, respectively. The results of neutron scattering, which is mostly sensitive to correlations involving light atoms i.e. O-O, Fe-O and P-O, suggest the main structural features of the base glass are largely unaffected by the addition of UO 2 . The nearest-neighbor P-O, Fe-O and O-O peaks remain at the same position in real space and their intensities scale approximately with concentration. These findings are consistent with the earlier results of Raman scattering and EXAFS on the Fe-K edge wherein both cases the spectra remain similar to the base glass. High-energy x-ray scattering which is sensitive to correlations involving the heavier atoms and thus complements the neutron measurements, is also consistent with uranium occupying interstitial sites in the relatively undisturbed base glass structure. However, important questions remain as to the precise local structure and oxidation state of uranium in these glasses

  11. Modifications to an existing waste containment structure at Niagara Falls Storage Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paez-Restrepo, A.; Darby, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    The Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), located near Lewiston, New York, is an interim waste containment facility for low-level radioactive waste. The facility was completed in 1986 and is managed for the Department of Energy (DOE) by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The waste containment structure (WCS) at NFSS is approximately 297 m (975 ft) long and 137 m (450 ft) wide and reaches a maximum height of 10.4 m (34 ft). The peripheral slopes rise at an angle of 3:1 (h:v) for a width of about 16.8 m (55 ft), where the inclination decreases to 7.5%. The apex of the pile is higher at the south end, sloping about 1.2 m (4 ft) to the north. The interim layered cap consists of 0.9 m (3 ft) of clay overlain by 0.45 m (1.5 ft) of topsoil. The uppermost 15 cm (6 in.) of soil was loosely compacted to permit the development of a grass cover. In the summer of 1991, approximately 2,677 m 3 (3,500 yd 3 ) of additional contaminated soil and material in temporary storage elsewhere at NFSS was incorporated into the WCS. To accommodate the waste, a portion of the cap roughly centered with the pile [including 0.45 m (1.5 ft) of topsoil and 0.6 m (2 ft) of clay cap] was removed from an area 99 m (325 ft) long and 58.5 m (192 ft) wide, leaving a minimum of 0.3 m (I ft) of clay over the old waste as a radiation and radon barrier. The newly incorporated waste forms a layer 0.6 m (2 ft) thick, replacing the clay portion of the excavated cap. The waste is contained laterally by the old cap and sealed by a new cap, which also consists of 0.9 m (3 ft) of compacted clay and 0.45 m (1.5 ft) of topsoil. A transition zone about 6.1 m (20 ft) wide feathers the new cap to the old cap (see Fig. 3). Except for the uppermost 10.5 to 15.2 cm (4 to 6 in.) of vegetated topsoil, the excavated cap materials were stockpiled and reused in constructing the new cap. Additional material required to complete cap construction was imported from

  12. RADWASS update. Radioactive Waste Safety Standards Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delattre, D.

    2000-01-01

    By the late 1980s, the issue of radioactive wastes and their management was becoming increasingly politically important. The IAEA responded by establishing a high profile family of safety standards, the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards (RADWASS). By this means, the IAEA intended to draw attention to the fact that well-established procedures for the safe management of radioactive wastes already were in place. The programme was intended to establish an ordered structure for safety documents on waste management and to ensure comprehensive coverage of all relevant subject areas. RADWASS documents are categorized under four subject areas - discharges, predisposal, disposal, and environmental restoration. The programme is overseen through a formalized review and approval mechanism that was established in 1996 for all safety standards activities. The Waste Safety Standards Committee (WASSC) is a standing body of senior regulatory officials with technical expertise in radioactive waste safety. To date, three Safety Requirements and seven Safety Guides have been issued

  13. Brand names of Portuguese medication: understanding the importance of their linguistic structure and regulatory issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Carla; Vigário, Marina; Cavaco, Afonso

    2015-08-01

    Among other regulatory requirements, medicine brands should be composed of single names without abbreviations to prevent errors in prescription of medication. The purposes of the study were to investigate the compliance of a sam ple of Portuguese medicine brand names with Portuguese pharmaceutical regulations. This includes identifying their basic linguistic characteristics and comparing these features and their frequency of occurrence with benchmark values of the colloquial or informal language. A sample of 474 brand names was selected. Names were analyzed using manual (visual analyses) and computer methods (FreP - Frequency Patterns of Phonological Objects in Portuguese and MS word). A significant number of names (61.3%) failed to comply with the Portuguese phonologic system (related to the sound of words) and/or the spelling system (related to the written form of words) contained more than one word, comprised a high proportion of infrequent syllable types or stress patterns and included abbreviations. The results suggest that some of the brand names of Portuguese medication should be reevaluated, and that regulation on this issue should be enforced and updated, taking into consideration specific linguistic and spelling codes.

  14. The crystal structure of the regulatory domain of the human sodium-driven chloride/bicarbonate exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvadia, Carolina M; Sommer, Theis; Bjerregaard-Andersen, Kaare; Damkier, Helle Hasager; Montrasio, Michele; Aalkjaer, Christian; Morth, J Preben

    2017-09-21

    The sodium-driven chloride/bicarbonate exchanger (NDCBE) is essential for maintaining homeostatic pH in neurons. The crystal structure at 2.8 Å resolution of the regulatory N-terminal domain of human NDCBE represents the first crystal structure of an electroneutral sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter. The crystal structure forms an equivalent dimeric interface as observed for the cytoplasmic domain of Band 3, and thus establishes that the consensus motif VTVLP is the key minimal dimerization motif. The VTVLP motif is highly conserved and likely to be the physiologically relevant interface for all other members of the SLC4 family. A novel conserved Zn 2+ -binding motif present in the N-terminal domain of NDCBE is identified and characterized in vitro. Cellular studies confirm the Zn 2+ dependent transport of two electroneutral bicarbonate transporters, NCBE and NBCn1. The Zn 2+ site is mapped to a cluster of histidines close to the conserved ETARWLKFEE motif and likely plays a role in the regulation of this important motif. The combined structural and bioinformatics analysis provides a model that predicts with additional confidence the physiologically relevant interface between the cytoplasmic domain and the transmembrane domain.

  15. Basalt waste isolation project. Quarterly report, April 1, 1981-June 30, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deju, R.A.

    1981-08-01

    This document reports progress made in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project during the third quarter of fiscal year 1981. Efforts are described for the following programs of the project work breakdown structure: systems; waste package; site; repository; regulatory and institutional; test facilities; in situ test facilities.

  16. An Analysis of Malaysia’s Regulatory Framework and Challenges in the Structured Product Market

    OpenAIRE

    Ling, Eu Meng

    2008-01-01

    Structured products are becoming increasingly popular and important to the development of Malaysia’s capital market and had experience impressive growth over the last few years after it was first introduced to the Malaysian market in 2004. Like any industry in its early stage, issues and challenges are expected but for structured products, such challenges require more attention due to the complexity inherent in these instruments. This study uses a qualitative research approach in an attempt t...

  17. Conceptual structure of performance assessments conducted for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helton, J.C.; Marietta, M.G.; Rechard, R.P.

    1993-04-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico is being developed by the US Department of Energy as a disposal facility for transuranic waste. In support of this project, Sandia National Laboratories is conducting an ongoing performance assessment (PA) for the WIPP. The ordered triple representation for risk proposed by Kaplan and Garrick is used to provide a clear conceptual structure for this PA. This presentation describes how the preceding representation provides a basis in the WIPP PA for (1) the definition of scenarios and the calculation of scenario probabilities and consequences, (2) the separation of subjective and stochastic uncertainties, (3) the construction of the complementary cumulative distribution functions required in comparisons with the US Environmental Protection Agency's standard for the geologic disposal of radioactive waste (i.e., 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart B), and (4) the performance of uncertainty and sensitivity studies. Results obtained in a preliminary PA for the WIPP completed in December of 1991 are used for illustration

  18. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for predicting potential ecological hazard of organic chemicals for use in regulatory risk assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comber, Mike H I; Walker, John D; Watts, Chris; Hermens, Joop

    2003-08-01

    The use of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for deriving the predicted no-effect concentration of discrete organic chemicals for the purposes of conducting a regulatory risk assessment in Europe and the United States is described. In the United States, under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), the TSCA Interagency Testing Committee and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) use SARs to estimate the hazards of existing and new chemicals. Within the Existing Substances Regulation in Europe, QSARs may be used for data evaluation, test strategy indications, and the identification and filling of data gaps. To illustrate where and when QSARs may be useful and when their use is more problematic, an example, methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE), is given and the predicted and experimental data are compared. Improvements needed for new QSARs and tools for developing and using QSARs are discussed.

  19. XPS studies of ceramics with pyrochlore structure for radioactive wastes disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teterin, Yu.A.; Vukchevich, L.; Ivanov, K.E.; Utkin, I.O; Teterin, A. Yu.; Maslakov, K.I.; Yudintseva, T.S.; Yudintsev, S.V.; Stefanovsky, S.V.; Lapina, M.I. . E-mail address of corresponding author: vukas@rc.pmf.cg.ac.yu; Vukchevich, L.)

    2005-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study of ceramics CaThSn 2 O 7 and CaThZr 2 O 7 with pyrochlore structure used as matrixes for the disposal of long lived high level radioactive wastes was done. On the basis of the XPS parameters of the core and outer electrons in the binding energy range 0 - 1000 eV the oxidation states of the included metals were determined, quantitative elemental and ionic analysis was carried out and a conclusion on the monophaseness of the studied samples was drawn. The obtained data agree with the X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy results. (author)

  20. Structural analysis of an underground reinforced concrete waste storage tank due to over-pressurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Bandyopadhyay, K.; Shteyngart, S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a structural analysis performed by use of the finite element method in determining the pressure-carrying capacity of an underground tank which contains nuclear wastes. The tank and surrounding soil were modeled and analyzed using the ABAQUS program. Special emphasis as given to determining the effects of soil-containment interaction by employing a Coulomb friction model. The effect of material properties was investigated by considering two sets of stress-strain data for the steel plates. In addition, a refined mesh was used to evaluate the strain concentration effects at steel liner thickness discontinuities

  1. Corrosion of candidate iron-base waste package structural barrier materials in moist salt environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerman, R.E.; Pitman, S.G.

    1984-11-01

    Mild steels are considered to be strong candidates for waste package structural barrier (e.g., overpack) applications in salt repositories. Corrosion rates of these materials determined in autoclave tests utilizing a simulated intrusion brine based on Permian Basin core samples are low, generally <25 μm (1 mil) per year. When the steels are exposed to moist salts containing simulated inclusion brines, the corrosion rates are found to increase significantly. The magnesium in the inclusion brine component of the environment is believed to be responsible for the increased corrosion rates. 1 reference, 4 figures, 2 tables

  2. Bedfordshire County Structure Plan. Proposed alterations -Public participation statement. Policy 97: Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The document describes steps taken, in accord with the Town and Country Planning Act 1971, by Bedfordshire County Council, submitting proposed Alterations to the County Structure Plan to the Secretary of State for the Environment. When approving the submission the Council decided to add an additional Alteration dealing with nuclear waste: as this had not been the subject of public consultation the Council decided to seek the public's views on the proposal before submitting the Alteration. The arrangements for consultation and a list of persons and organizations consulted are given, together with the arrangements for considering comments. (U.K.)

  3. Structural basis for regulation of rhizobial nodulation and symbiosis gene expression by the regulatory protein NolR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soon Goo; Krishnan, Hari B; Jez, Joseph M

    2014-04-29

    The symbiosis between rhizobial microbes and host plants involves the coordinated expression of multiple genes, which leads to nodule formation and nitrogen fixation. As part of the transcriptional machinery for nodulation and symbiosis across a range of Rhizobium, NolR serves as a global regulatory protein. Here, we present the X-ray crystal structures of NolR in the unliganded form and complexed with two different 22-base pair (bp) double-stranded operator sequences (oligos AT and AA). Structural and biochemical analysis of NolR reveals protein-DNA interactions with an asymmetric operator site and defines a mechanism for conformational switching of a key residue (Gln56) to accommodate variation in target DNA sequences from diverse rhizobial genes for nodulation and symbiosis. This conformational switching alters the energetic contributions to DNA binding without changes in affinity for the target sequence. Two possible models for the role of NolR in the regulation of different nodulation and symbiosis genes are proposed. To our knowledge, these studies provide the first structural insight on the regulation of genes involved in the agriculturally and ecologically important symbiosis of microbes and plants that leads to nodule formation and nitrogen fixation.

  4. Investigating the construction of open-quotes pyramidclose quotes super-structures to dispose of radioactive and hazardous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    The technical challenges involved in disposing of radioactive and hazardous waste using systems that rely on open-quotes natural barriersclose quotes have been underestimated. Technology has advanced dramatically in the areas of materials, science, and engineering. As a result, traditional approaches to waste disposal must be rethought, focusing instead on ways to apply new technology breakthroughs to waste disposal problems. This paper will discuss problems currently faced by waste disposal systems that rely on natural barriers for containment, propose a general design and approach for constructing pyramid super-structures to dispose of (and store) waste, and present the benefits of such a system. The originality of this paper is that it proposes the construction of fully retrievable waste disposal systems that capitalize on the unique geometric properties of a pyramid and rely on engineered barriers and preventive measurements for containment, rather than natural barriers. In addition, this paper offers a new perspective on waste disposal issues confronting many countries. The desired effect is that by challenging conventional thought, new ideas could be developed to help solve existing problems. This paper is of specific interest to: (1) Policy makers, decisionmakers, and managers because the paper discusses the root causes of problems facing waste disposal and possible solutions. (2) Regulators because the paper discusses reasons for relying more on engineered barriers and preventive measurements to achieve confidence and reliability in containment. (3) Design engineers the paper offers new concepts for engineered barriers. 21 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Absence of residual structure in the intrinsically disordered regulatory protein CP12 in its reduced state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Launay, Hélène; Barré, Patrick [Laboratory of integrative Structural and Chemical Biology (iSCB), Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie de Marseille (CRCM), CNRS UMR 7258, INSERM U 1068, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Aix-Marseille Universités, Marseille 13009 (France); Puppo, Carine [Aix-Marseille Université, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR 7281, Laboratoire de Bioénergétique et Ingénierie des Protéines, 31 Chemin Joseph Aiguier, 13402, Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Manneville, Stéphanie [Laboratory of integrative Structural and Chemical Biology (iSCB), Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie de Marseille (CRCM), CNRS UMR 7258, INSERM U 1068, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Aix-Marseille Universités, Marseille 13009 (France); Gontero, Brigitte [Aix-Marseille Université, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR 7281, Laboratoire de Bioénergétique et Ingénierie des Protéines, 31 Chemin Joseph Aiguier, 13402, Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Receveur-Bréchot, Véronique, E-mail: veronique.brechot@inserm.fr [Laboratory of integrative Structural and Chemical Biology (iSCB), Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie de Marseille (CRCM), CNRS UMR 7258, INSERM U 1068, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Aix-Marseille Universités, Marseille 13009 (France)

    2016-08-12

    The redox switch protein CP12 is a key player of the regulation of the Benson–Calvin cycle. Its oxidation state is controlled by the formation/dissociation of two intramolecular disulphide bridges during the day/night cycle. CP12 was known to be globally intrinsically disordered on a large scale in its reduced state, while being partly ordered in the oxidised state. By combining Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Small Angle X-ray Scattering experiments, we showed that, contrary to secondary structure or disorder predictions, reduced CP12 is fully disordered, with no transient or local residual structure likely to be precursor of the structures identified in the oxidised active state and/or in the bound state with GAPDH or PRK. These results highlight the diversity of the mechanisms of regulation of conditionally disordered redox switches, and question the stability of oxidised CP12 scaffold. - Highlights: • CP12 is predicted to form two helices in its N-terminal sequence. • Reduced CP12 is disordered as a random coil according to SAXS. • Limited or no transient structures are observed in reduced CP12 by NMR.

  6. Absence of residual structure in the intrinsically disordered regulatory protein CP12 in its reduced state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Launay, Hélène; Barré, Patrick; Puppo, Carine; Manneville, Stéphanie; Gontero, Brigitte; Receveur-Bréchot, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    The redox switch protein CP12 is a key player of the regulation of the Benson–Calvin cycle. Its oxidation state is controlled by the formation/dissociation of two intramolecular disulphide bridges during the day/night cycle. CP12 was known to be globally intrinsically disordered on a large scale in its reduced state, while being partly ordered in the oxidised state. By combining Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Small Angle X-ray Scattering experiments, we showed that, contrary to secondary structure or disorder predictions, reduced CP12 is fully disordered, with no transient or local residual structure likely to be precursor of the structures identified in the oxidised active state and/or in the bound state with GAPDH or PRK. These results highlight the diversity of the mechanisms of regulation of conditionally disordered redox switches, and question the stability of oxidised CP12 scaffold. - Highlights: • CP12 is predicted to form two helices in its N-terminal sequence. • Reduced CP12 is disordered as a random coil according to SAXS. • Limited or no transient structures are observed in reduced CP12 by NMR.

  7. The structure of F₁-ATPase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae inhibited by its regulatory protein IF₁.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Graham C; Bason, John V; Montgomery, Martin G; Fearnley, Ian M; Mueller, David M; Leslie, Andrew G W; Walker, John E

    2013-02-13

    The structure of F₁-ATPase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae inhibited by the yeast IF₁ has been determined at 2.5 Å resolution. The inhibitory region of IF₁ from residues 1 to 36 is entrapped between the C-terminal domains of the α(DP)- and β(DP)-subunits in one of the three catalytic interfaces of the enzyme. Although the structure of the inhibited complex is similar to that of the bovine-inhibited complex, there are significant differences between the structures of the inhibitors and their detailed interactions with F₁-ATPase. However, the most significant difference is in the nucleotide occupancy of the catalytic β(E)-subunits. The nucleotide binding site in β(E)-subunit in the yeast complex contains an ADP molecule without an accompanying magnesium ion, whereas it is unoccupied in the bovine complex. Thus, the structure provides further evidence of sequential product release, with the phosphate and the magnesium ion released before the ADP molecule.

  8. The structure of F1-ATPase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae inhibited by its regulatory protein IF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Graham C.; Bason, John V.; Montgomery, Martin G.; Fearnley, Ian M.; Mueller, David M.; Leslie, Andrew G. W.; Walker, John E.

    2013-01-01

    The structure of F1-ATPase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae inhibited by the yeast IF1 has been determined at 2.5 Å resolution. The inhibitory region of IF1 from residues 1 to 36 is entrapped between the C-terminal domains of the αDP- and βDP-subunits in one of the three catalytic interfaces of the enzyme. Although the structure of the inhibited complex is similar to that of the bovine-inhibited complex, there are significant differences between the structures of the inhibitors and their detailed interactions with F1-ATPase. However, the most significant difference is in the nucleotide occupancy of the catalytic βE-subunits. The nucleotide binding site in βE-subunit in the yeast complex contains an ADP molecule without an accompanying magnesium ion, whereas it is unoccupied in the bovine complex. Thus, the structure provides further evidence of sequential product release, with the phosphate and the magnesium ion released before the ADP molecule. PMID:23407639

  9. Radium bearing waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tope, W.G.; Nixon, D.A.; Smith, M.L.; Stone, T.J.; Vogel, R.A.; Schofield, W.D.

    1995-01-01

    Fernald radium bearing ore residue waste, stored within Silos 1 and 2 (K-65) and Silo 3, will be vitrified for disposal at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). A comprehensive, parametric evaluation of waste form, packaging, and transportation alternatives was completed to identify the most cost-effective approach. The impacts of waste loading, waste form, regulatory requirements, NTS waste acceptance criteria, as-low-as-reasonably-achievable principles, and material handling costs were factored into the recommended approach

  10. Detailed Structural Analyses of KOH Activated Carbon from Waste Coffee Beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahata, Tomokazu; Toda, Ikumi; Ono, Hiroki; Ohshio, Shigeo; Akasaka, Hiroki; Himeno, Syuji; Kokubu, Toshinori; Saitoh, Hidetoshi

    2009-11-01

    The relationship of the detailed structural change of KOH activated carbon and hydrogen storage ability was investigated in activated carbon materials fabricated from waste coffee beans. The specific surface area of porous carbon materials calculated from N2 adsorption isotherms stood at 2070 m2/g when the weight ratio of KOH to carbon materials was 5:1, and pore size was in the range of approximately 0.6 to 1.1 nm as micropores. In the structural analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis and Raman spectroscopy indicated structural change in these carbon materials through KOH activation. The order of the graphite structure changed to a smaller scale with this activation. It is theorized that specific surface area increased using micropores provided by carbon materials developed from the descent of the graphite structure. Hydrogen storage ability improved with these structural changes, and reached 0.6 wt % at 2070 m2/g. These results suggest that hydrogen storage ability is conferred by the chemical effect on graphite of carbon materials.

  11. The regulatory aspects linked to wastes management. The fundamental safety rules; Les aspects reglementaires lies a la gestion des dechets. Les regles fondamentales de surete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viala, M. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    2001-07-01

    The radioactive waste management implies a well-established legislative frame. That is that frame that is discussed here, general principles, official authorities, wastes classification, high level radioactive waste management, regulation relative to storage, to uranium ore processing. (N.C.)

  12. Recycled construction and demolition concrete waste as aggregate for structural concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf M. Wagih

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In major Egyptian cities there is a surge in construction and demolition waste (CDW quantities causing an adverse effect on the environment. The use of such waste as recycled aggregate in concrete can be useful for both environmental and economical aspects in the construction industry. This study discusses the possibility to replace natural coarse aggregate (NA with recycled concrete aggregate (RCA in structural concrete. An investigation into the properties of RCA is made using crushing and grading of concrete rubble collected from different demolition sites and landfill locations around Cairo. Aggregates used in the study were: natural sand, dolomite and crushed concretes obtained from different sources. A total of 50 concrete mixes forming eight groups were cast. Groups were designed to study the effect of recycled coarse aggregates quality/content, cement dosage, use of superplasticizer and silica fume. Tests were carried out for: compressive strength, splitting strength and elastic modulus. The results showed that the concrete rubble could be transformed into useful recycled aggregate and used in concrete production with properties suitable for most structural concrete applications in Egypt. A significant reduction in the properties of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC made of 100% RCA was seen when compared to natural aggregate concrete (NAC, while the properties of RAC made of a blend of 75% NA and 25% RCA showed no significant change in concrete properties.

  13. Concrete structural analysis tools and properties for Hanford site waste tank evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.J.; Peterson, W.S.; Winkel, B.V.; Weiner, E.O.

    1995-09-01

    As Hanford Site Contractors address maintenance and future structural demands on nuclear waste tanks built as early as 1943, it is necessary to address their current safety margins and ensure safe margins are maintained. Although the current civil engineering practice has building codes for reinforced concrete design guidelines, the tanks were not constructed to today's building codes and future demands potentially result in loads and modifications to the tanks that are outside the original design basis and current practice. The Hanford Site engineering staff has embraced nonlinear finite-element modeling of concrete in an effort to obtain a more accurate understanding of the actual tank margins. This document brings together and integrates past Hanford Site nonlinear reinforced concrete analysis methods, past Hanford Site concrete testing, public domain research testing, and current concrete research directions. This document, including future revisions, provides the structural engineering overview (or survey) for a consistent, accurate approach to nonlinear finite-element modeling of reinforced concrete for Hanford Site waste storage tanks. This report addresses concrete strength and modulus degradation with temperature, creep, shrinkage, long-term sustained loads, and temperature degradation of rebar and concrete bonds. Recommendations are given for parameter studies and evaluation techniques for review of nonlinear finite-element analysis of concrete

  14. Searching for New Regulatory Frameworks for the Intermediate Financial Structure in Post-Crisis Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Sayuri Shirai

    2001-01-01

    Intermediate Financial Structure 1. In a number of Asian countries, commercial banks are already playing an important role in the corporate bond market as issuers, underwriters, investors, and guarantors. This reflects banks’ already dominant financial positions in their financial markets, good reputation, and informational advantages. Thus, the role of banks for fostering the development of the corporate bond market and their complementary roles should be encouraged. 2. This financial landsc...

  15. Mixed waste management options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owens, C.B.; Kirner, N.P.

    1992-01-01

    Currently, limited storage and treatment capacity exists for commercial mixed waste streams. No commercial mixed waste disposal is available, and it has been estimated that if and when commercial mixed waste disposal becomes available, the costs will be high. If high disposal fees are imposed, generators may be willing to apply extraordinary treatment or regulatory approaches to properly dispose of their mixed waste. This paper explores the feasibility of several waste management scenarios and management options. Existing data on commercially generated mixed waste streams are used to identify the realm of mixed waste known to be generated. Each waste stream is evaluated from both a regulatory and technical perspective in order to convert the waste into a strictly low-level radioactive or a hazardous waste. Alternative regulatory approaches evaluated in this paper include a delisting petition) no migration petition) and a treatability variance. For each waste stream, potentially available treatment options are identified that could lead to these variances. Waste minimization methodology and storage for decay are also considered. Economic feasibility of each option is discussed broadly. Another option for mixed waste management that is being explored is the feasibility of Department of Energy (DOE) accepting commercial mixed waste for treatment, storage, and disposal. A study has been completed that analyzes DOE treatment capacity in comparison with commercial mixed waste streams. (author)

  16. Development of in-structure design spectra for dome mounted equipment on underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julyk, L.J.

    1995-09-01

    In-structure response spectra for dome mounted equipment on underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site are developed on the basis of recent soil-structure-interaction analyses. Recommended design spectra are provided for various locations on the tank dome

  17. Load requirements for maintaining structural integrity of Hanford single-shell tanks during waste feed delivery and retrieval activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JULYK, L.J.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides structural load requirements and their basis for maintaining the structural integrity of the Hanford Single-Shell Tanks during waste feed delivery and retrieval activities. The requirements are based on a review of previous requirements and their basis documents as well as load histories with particular emphasis on the proposed lead transfer feed tanks for the privatized vitrification plant

  18. Nonlinear analysis techniques for use in the assessment of high-level waste tank structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.J.; Julyk, L.J.; Fox, G.L.; Dyrness, A.D.

    1991-01-01

    Reinforced concrete in combination with a steel liner has had a wide application to structures containing hazardous material. The buried double-shell waste storage tanks at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site use this construction method. The generation and potential ignition of combustible gases within the primary tank is postulated to develop beyond-design-basis internal pressure and possible impact loading. The scope of this paper includes the illustration of analysis techniques for the assessment of these beyond-design-basis loadings. The analysis techniques include the coupling of the gas dynamics with the structural response, the treatment of reinforced concrete in regimes of inelastic behavior, and the treatment of geometric nonlinearities. The techniques and software tools presented provide a powerful nonlinear analysis capability for storage tanks

  19. Structural considerations in the design of a repository to store radioactive waste in basalt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deju, R.A.; Board, M.P.; Gephart, R.E.; Myers, C.W.

    1978-01-01

    The Columbia River Basalt is being studied as a potential site for a spent fuel repository for the United States of America. To accomplish this end, a design study and environmental feasibility studies are being conducted to assess the feasibility of building tunnels at depths of approximately 1,000 meters to store the spent fuel. Of prime consideration is the design of the tunnels in such a way that the overall underground structure can withstand the thermal loading effect resulting from dissipation of heat released from the spent fuel canisters as the radioactive material decays. This paper discusses structural design considerations needed to construct such a repository subject to the loading conditions and safety considerations that must be applied to guaranteeing that the waste emplaced in these tunnels will remain isolated from mankind for long geologic periods of time

  20. Nonliner analysis techniques for use in the assessment of high-level waste storage tank structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.J.; Julyk, L.J.; Fox, G.L.; Dyrness, A.D.

    1991-09-01

    Reinforced concrete in combination with a steel liner has had a wide application to structures containing hazardous material. The buried double-shell waste storage tanks at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site use this construction method. The generation and potential ignition of combustible gases within the primary tank is postulated to develop beyond-design-basis internal pressure and possible impact loading. The scope of this paper includes the illustration of analysis techniques for the assessment of these beyond-design-basis loadings. The analysis techniques include the coupling of the gas dynamics with the structural response, the treatment of reinforced concrete in regimes of inelastic behavior, and the treatment of geometric nonlinearities. The techniques and software tools presented provide a powerful nonlinear analysis capability for storage tanks. 10 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  1. A Sequence and Structure Based Method to Predict Putative Substrates, Functions and Regulatory Networks of Endo Proteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatraman, Prasanna; Balakrishnan, Satish; Rao, Shashidhar; Hooda, Yogesh; Pol, Suyog

    2009-01-01

    Background Proteases play a central role in cellular homeostasis and are responsible for the spatio- temporal regulation of function. Many putative proteases have been recently identified through genomic approaches, leading to a surge in global profiling attempts to characterize their function. Through such efforts and others it has become evident that many proteases play non-traditional roles. Accordingly, the number and the variety of the substrate repertoire of proteases are expected to be much larger than previously assumed. In line with such global profiling attempts, we present here a method for the prediction of natural substrates of endo proteases (human proteases used as an example) by employing short peptide sequences as specificity determinants. Methodology/Principal Findings Our method incorporates specificity determinants unique to individual enzymes and physiologically relevant dual filters namely, solvent accessible surface area-a parameter dependent on protein three-dimensional structure and subcellular localization. By incorporating such hitherto unused principles in prediction methods, a novel ligand docking strategy to mimic substrate binding at the active site of the enzyme, and GO functions, we identify and perform subjective validation on putative substrates of matriptase and highlight new functions of the enzyme. Using relative solvent accessibility to rank order we show how new protease regulatory networks and enzyme cascades can be created. Conclusion We believe that our physiologically relevant computational approach would be a very useful complementary method in the current day attempts to profile proteases (endo proteases in particular) and their substrates. In addition, by using functional annotations, we have demonstrated how normal and unknown functions of a protease can be envisaged. We have developed a network which can be integrated to create a proteolytic world. This network can in turn be extended to integrate other regulatory

  2. Regulatory agencies and regulatory risk

    OpenAIRE

    Knieps, Günter; Weiß, Hans-Jörg

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show that regulatory risk is due to the discretionary behaviour of regulatory agencies, caused by a too extensive regulatory mandate provided by the legislator. The normative point of reference and a behavioural model of regulatory agencies based on the positive theory of regulation are presented. Regulatory risk with regard to the future behaviour of regulatory agencies is modelled as the consequence of the ex ante uncertainty about the relative influence of inter...

  3. Insights into soybean transcriptome reconfiguration under hypoxic stress: Functional, regulatory, structural, and compositional characterization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago J Nakayama

    Full Text Available Soybean (Glycine max is one of the major crops worldwide and flooding stress affects the production and expansion of cultivated areas. Oxygen is essential for mitochondrial aerobic respiration to supply the energy demand of plant cells. Because oxygen diffusion in water is 10,000 times lower than in air, partial (hypoxic or total (anoxic oxygen deficiency is important component of flooding. Even when oxygen is externally available, oxygen deficiency frequently occurs in bulky, dense or metabolically active tissues such as phloem, meristems, seeds, and fruits. In this study, we analyzed conserved and divergent root transcriptional responses between flood-tolerant Embrapa 45 and flood-sensitive BR 4 soybean cultivars under hypoxic stress conditions with RNA-seq. To understand how soybean genes evolve and respond to hypoxia, stable and differentially expressed genes were characterized structurally and compositionally comparing its mechanistic relationship. Between cultivars, Embrapa 45 showed less up- and more down-regulated genes, and stronger induction of phosphoglucomutase (Glyma05g34790, unknown protein related to N-terminal protein myristoylation (Glyma06g03430, protein suppressor of phyA-105 (Glyma06g37080, and fibrillin (Glyma10g32620. RNA-seq and qRT-PCR analysis of non-symbiotic hemoglobin (Glyma11g12980 indicated divergence in gene structure between cultivars. Transcriptional changes for genes in amino acids and derivative metabolic process suggest involvement of amino acids metabolism in tRNA modifications, translation accuracy/efficiency, and endoplasmic reticulum stress in both cultivars under hypoxia. Gene groups differed in promoter TATA box, ABREs (ABA-responsive elements, and CRT/DREs (C-repeat/dehydration-responsive elements frequency. Gene groups also differed in structure, composition, and codon usage, indicating biological significances. Additional data suggests that cis-acting ABRE elements can mediate gene expression

  4. Insights into soybean transcriptome reconfiguration under hypoxic stress: Functional, regulatory, structural, and compositional characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Thiago J; Rodrigues, Fabiana A; Neumaier, Norman; Marcolino-Gomes, Juliana; Molinari, Hugo B C; Santiago, Thaís R; Formighieri, Eduardo F; Basso, Marcos F; Farias, José R B; Emygdio, Beatriz M; de Oliveira, Ana C B; Campos, Ângela D; Borém, Aluízio; Harmon, Frank G; Mertz-Henning, Liliane M; Nepomuceno, Alexandre L

    2017-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) is one of the major crops worldwide and flooding stress affects the production and expansion of cultivated areas. Oxygen is essential for mitochondrial aerobic respiration to supply the energy demand of plant cells. Because oxygen diffusion in water is 10,000 times lower than in air, partial (hypoxic) or total (anoxic) oxygen deficiency is important component of flooding. Even when oxygen is externally available, oxygen deficiency frequently occurs in bulky, dense or metabolically active tissues such as phloem, meristems, seeds, and fruits. In this study, we analyzed conserved and divergent root transcriptional responses between flood-tolerant Embrapa 45 and flood-sensitive BR 4 soybean cultivars under hypoxic stress conditions with RNA-seq. To understand how soybean genes evolve and respond to hypoxia, stable and differentially expressed genes were characterized structurally and compositionally comparing its mechanistic relationship. Between cultivars, Embrapa 45 showed less up- and more down-regulated genes, and stronger induction of phosphoglucomutase (Glyma05g34790), unknown protein related to N-terminal protein myristoylation (Glyma06g03430), protein suppressor of phyA-105 (Glyma06g37080), and fibrillin (Glyma10g32620). RNA-seq and qRT-PCR analysis of non-symbiotic hemoglobin (Glyma11g12980) indicated divergence in gene structure between cultivars. Transcriptional changes for genes in amino acids and derivative metabolic process suggest involvement of amino acids metabolism in tRNA modifications, translation accuracy/efficiency, and endoplasmic reticulum stress in both cultivars under hypoxia. Gene groups differed in promoter TATA box, ABREs (ABA-responsive elements), and CRT/DREs (C-repeat/dehydration-responsive elements) frequency. Gene groups also differed in structure, composition, and codon usage, indicating biological significances. Additional data suggests that cis-acting ABRE elements can mediate gene expression independent of ABA

  5. SUMMARY OF 2010 DOE EM INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM STUDIES OF WASTE GLASS STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.; Choi, A.; Marra, J.; Billings, A.

    2011-02-07

    Collaborative work between the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and SIA Radon in Russia was divided among three tasks for calendar year 2010. The first task focused on the study of simplified high level waste glass compositions with the objective of identifying the compositional drivers that lead to crystallization and poor chemical durability. The second task focused on detailed characterization of more complex waste glass compositions with unexpectedly poor chemical durabilities. The third task focused on determining the structure of select high level waste glasses made with varying frit compositions in order to improve models under development for predicting the melt rate of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glasses. The majority of these tasks were carried out at SIA Radon. Selection and fabrication of the glass compositions, along with chemical composition measurements and evaluations of durability were carried out at SRNL and are described in this report. SIA Radon provided three summary reports based on the outcome of the three tasks. These reports are included as appendices to this document. Briefly, the result of characterization of the Task 1 glasses may indicate that glass compositions where iron is predominantly tetrahedrally coordinated have more of a tendency to crystallize nepheline or nepheline-like phases. For the Task 2 glasses, the results suggested that the relatively low fraction of tetrahedrally coordinated boron and the relatively low concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} available to form [BO{sub 4/2}]{sup -}Me{sup +} and [AlO{sub 4/2}]{sup -}Me{sup +} tetrahedral units are not sufficient to consume all of the alkali ions, and thus these alkali ions are easily leached from the glasses. All of the twelve Task 3 glass compositions were determined to be mainly amorphous, with some minor spinel phases. Several key structural units such as metasilicate chains and rings were identified, which confirms the current modeling

  6. Search for 5'-leader regulatory RNA structures based on gene annotation aided by the RiboGap database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghdi, Mohammad Reza; Smail, Katia; Wang, Joy X; Wade, Fallou; Breaker, Ronald R; Perreault, Jonathan

    2017-03-15

    The discovery of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) and their importance for gene regulation led us to develop bioinformatics tools to pursue the discovery of novel ncRNAs. Finding ncRNAs de novo is challenging, first due to the difficulty of retrieving large numbers of sequences for given gene activities, and second due to exponential demands on calculation needed for comparative genomics on a large scale. Recently, several tools for the prediction of conserved RNA secondary structure were developed, but many of them are not designed to uncover new ncRNAs, or are too slow for conducting analyses on a large scale. Here we present various approaches using the database RiboGap as a primary tool for finding known ncRNAs and for uncovering simple sequence motifs with regulatory roles. This database also can be used to easily extract intergenic sequences of eubacteria and archaea to find conserved RNA structures upstream of given genes. We also show how to extend analysis further to choose the best candidate ncRNAs for experimental validation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Longterm performance of structural component of intermediate- and low-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whang, J. H.; Kim, S. S.; Chun, T. H.; Lee, J. M.; Yum, M. O.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, M. S.

    1997-03-01

    Underground repository for intermediate- and low-level radioactive waste is to be sealed and closed after operation. Structural components, which are generally made of cement concrete, are designed and accommodated in the repository for the purpose of operational convenience and stability after closure. To forecast the change of long-term integrity of the structural components, experimental verification, using in-situ or near in-situ conditions, is necessary. Domestic and foreign requirements with regard to the selection criteria and the performance criteria for structural components in disposal facility were surveyed. Characteristics of various types of cement were studied. Materials and construction methods of structural components similar to those of disposal facility was investigated and test items and methods for integrity of cement concrete were included. Literature survey for domestic groundwater characteristics was performed together with Ca-type bentonite ore which is a potential backfill material. Causes or factors affecting the durability of the cement structures were summarized. Experiments to figure out the ions leaching out from and migrating into cement soaked in distilled water and synthetic groundwater, respectively, were carried out. And finally, diffusion of chloride ion through cement was experimentally measured

  8. Creating a comprehensive, efficient, and sustainable nuclear regulatory structure. A Process Report from the U.S. Department of Energy's Material Protection, Control and Accounting Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Gregory E.; Brownell, Lorilee; Wright, Troy L.; Tuttle, John D.; Cunningham, Mitchel E.; O'Brien, Patricia E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the strategies and process used by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC and A) Regulatory Development Project (RDP) to restructure its support for MPC and A regulations in the Russian Federation. The RDP adopted a project management approach to defining, implementing, and managing an effective nuclear regulatory structure. This approach included defining and developing the regulatory documents necessary to provide the Russian Federation with a comprehensive regulatory structure that supports an effective and sustainable MPC and A Program in Russia. This effort began in February 2005, included a series of three multi-agency meetings in April, June, and July, and culminated in August 2005 in a mutually agreed-upon plan to define and populate the nuclear regulatory system in the Russian Federation for non-military, weapons-usable material. This nuclear regulatory system will address all non-military Category I and II nuclear material at the Russian Federal Atomic Energy Agency (Rosatom), the Russian Agency for Industry (Rosprom), and the Federal Agency for Marine and River Transport (FAMRT) facilities; nuclear material in transport and storage; and nuclear material under the oversight of the Federal Environmental, Industrial and Nuclear Supervisory Service of Russia (Rostechnadzor). The Russian and U.S. MPC and A management teams approved the plan, and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) NA-255, Office of Infrastructure and Sustainability (ONIS), is providing funding. The Regulatory Development Project is managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) NNSA

  9. A STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY EVALUATION OF THE TANK FARM WASTE TRANSFER SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B.

    2006-03-09

    Radioactive supernate, salt, and/or sludge wastes (i.e., high level wastes) are confined in 49 underground storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The waste is transported between tanks within and between the F and H area tank farms and other facilities on site via underground and a limited number of aboveground transfer lines. The Department of Energy - Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR) performed a comprehensive assessment of the structural integrity program for the Tank Farm waste transfer system at the SRS. This document addresses the following issues raised during the DOE assessment: (1) Inspections of failed or replaced transfer lines indicated that the wall thickness of some core and jacket piping is less than nominal; (2) No corrosion allowance is utilized in the transfer line structural qualification calculations. No basis for neglecting corrosion was provided in the calculations; (3) Wall loss due to erosion is not addressed in the transfer line structural qualification calculations; and (4) No basis is provided for neglecting intergranular stress corrosion cracking in the transfer line structural qualification calculations. The common theme in most of these issues is the need to assess the potential for occurrence of material degradation of the transfer line piping. The approach used to resolve these issues involved: (1) Review the design and specifications utilized to construct and fabricate the piping system; (2) Review degradation mechanisms for stainless steel and carbon steel and determine their relevance to the transfer line piping; (3) Review the transfer piping inspection data; (4) Life estimation calculations for the transfer lines; and (5) A Fitness-For-Service evaluation for one of the transfer line jackets. The evaluation concluded that the transfer line system piping has performed well for over fifty years. Although there have been instances of failures of the stainless steel core pipe during off-normal service, no significant

  10. Structural and dynamic characterization of eukaryotic gene regulatory protein domains in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Andrew Loyd [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-05-01

    Solution NMR was primarily used to characterize structure and dynamics in two different eukaryotic protein systems: the δ-Al-ε activation domain from c-jun and the Drosophila RNA-binding protein Sex-lethal. The second system is the Drosophila Sex-lethal (Sxl) protein, an RNA-binding protein which is the ``master switch`` in sex determination. Sxl contains two adjacent RNA-binding domains (RBDs) of the RNP consensus-type. The NMR spectrum of the second RBD (Sxl-RBD2) was assigned using multidimensional heteronuclear NMR, and an intermediate-resolution family of structures was calculated from primarily NOE distance restraints. The overall fold was determined to be similar to other RBDs: a βαβ-βαβ pattern of secondary structure, with the two helices packed against a 4-stranded anti-parallel β-sheet. In addition 15N T1, T2, and 15N/1H NOE relaxation measurements were carried out to characterize the backbone dynamics of Sxl-RBD2 in solution. RNA corresponding to the polypyrimidine tract of transformer pre-mRNA was generated and titrated into 3 different Sxl-RBD protein constructs. Combining Sxl-RBD1+2 (bht RBDs) with this RNA formed a specific, high affinity protein/RNA complex that is amenable to further NMR characterization. The backbone 1H, 13C, and 15N resonances of Sxl-RBD1+2 were assigned using a triple-resonance approach, and 15N relaxation experiments were carried out to characterize the backbone dynamics of this complex. The changes in chemical shift in Sxl-RBD1+2 upon binding RNA are observed using Sxl-RBD2 as a substitute for unbound Sxl-RBD1+2. This allowed the binding interface to be qualitatively mapped for the second domain.

  11. Regulatory Experience on Structural Integrity Issues of The Oldest Reactor Pressure Vessel in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang-Min; Cho, Doo-Ho; Kim, Jin-Su; Kim, Yong-Beum; Chung, Hae-Dong; Kim, Se-Chang; Choi, Jae-Boong

    2015-01-01

    A reactor pressure vessel plays a crucial role of retaining reactor coolant and core assemblies. The RPV integrity should be evaluated in consideration with the design transient condition and the material deterioration of RPV belt-line region. Especially, the pressurized thermal shock has been considered as one of the most important issues regarding the RPV integrity since Rancho Seco nuclear power plant accident in 1978. In this paper, the structural integrity evaluation of the oldest RPV in Korea was performed by using finite element analysis. PTS conditions like small break loss of coolant accident and Turkey Point steam line break were applied as loading conditions. Neutron fluence data equivalent to 40 years was used to determine the fracture toughness of RPV material. The 3-dimensional finite element model including a circumferential surface flaw was considered for fracture mechanics analysis. The RPV integrity was evaluated according to Japan Electric Association Code. (authors)

  12. Life-cycle cost as basis to optimize waste collection in space and time: A methodology for obtaining a detailed cost breakdown structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Vitor; Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Vaz, João M; Meireles, Inês

    2018-05-01

    Extensive research has been carried out on waste collection costs mainly to differentiate costs of distinct waste streams and spatial optimization of waste collection services (e.g. routes, number, and location of waste facilities). However, waste collection managers also face the challenge of optimizing assets in time, for instance deciding when to replace and how to maintain, or which technological solution to adopt. These issues require a more detailed knowledge about the waste collection services' cost breakdown structure. The present research adjusts the methodology for buildings' life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis, detailed in the ISO 15686-5:2008, to the waste collection assets. The proposed methodology is then applied to the waste collection assets owned and operated by a real municipality in Portugal (Cascais Ambiente - EMAC). The goal is to highlight the potential of the LCC tool in providing a baseline for time optimization of the waste collection service and assets, namely assisting on decisions regarding equipment operation and replacement.

  13. Mix design and properties of fly ash waste lightweight aggregates in structural lightweight concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu S. Nadesan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is one of the most widely used construction materials and has the ability to consume industrial wastes in high volume. As the demand for concrete is increasing, one of the effective ways to reduce the undesirable environmental impact of the concrete is by the use of waste and by-product materials as cement and aggregate substitutes in concrete. One such waste material is fly ash, which is produced in large quantities from thermal power plants as a by-product. A substantial amount of fly ash is left unused posing environmental and storage problems. The production of sintered lightweight aggregate with fly ash is an effective method to dispose of fly ash in large quantities. Due to lack of a proper mix design procedure, the production and application of lightweight aggregate in structural concrete are not much entertained. The absorption characteristic of lightweight aggregate is a major concern, while developing the mix proportioning of lightweight concretes. The present study is an attempt to establish a new mix design procedure for the development of sintered fly ash lightweight aggregate concretes, which is simple and more reliable than the existing procedures. Also, the proposed methodology has been validated by developing a spectrum of concretes having water cement ratios varying from 0.25 to 0.75. From the study, it is obvious that the development of 70 MPa concrete is possible by using cement alone without any additives. Also, it is ensured that all the concretes have densities less than 2000 kg/m3.

  14. National legislative and regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This section of the Bulletin presents a summary of the recent national legislative and regulatory activities sorted by country and topic: - Algeria: Nuclear security. - France: Radioactive waste management; Nuclear safety and radiological protection; General legislation; International co-operation. - Germany: International trade. - Indonesia: Nuclear security, General legislation. - Ireland: Nuclear safety and radiological protection; General legislation. - Lithuania: Nuclear security; Nuclear safety and radiological protection. - Slovak Republic: International co-operation; Liability and compensation; Environmental protection. - Switzerland: Radioactive waste management. - United Arab Emirates: Liability and compensation. - United States: Radioactive waste management; Licensing and regulatory infrastructure

  15. Proteome-wide Structural Analysis of PTM Hotspots Reveals Regulatory Elements Predicted to Impact Biological Function and Disease*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, Henry; Sundararaman, Niveda

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) regulate protein behavior through modulation of protein-protein interactions, enzymatic activity, and protein stability essential in the translation of genotype to phenotype in eukaryotes. Currently, less than 4% of all eukaryotic PTMs are reported to have biological function - a statistic that continues to decrease with an increasing rate of PTM detection. Previously, we developed SAPH-ire (Structural Analysis of PTM Hotspots) - a method for the prioritization of PTM function potential that has been used effectively to reveal novel PTM regulatory elements in discrete protein families (Dewhurst et al., 2015). Here, we apply SAPH-ire to the set of eukaryotic protein families containing experimental PTM and 3D structure data - capturing 1,325 protein families with 50,839 unique PTM sites organized into 31,747 modified alignment positions (MAPs), of which 2010 (∼6%) possess known biological function. Here, we show that using an artificial neural network model (SAPH-ire NN) trained to identify MAP hotspots with biological function results in prediction outcomes that far surpass the use of single hotspot features, including nearest neighbor PTM clustering methods. We find the greatest enhancement in prediction for positions with PTM counts of five or less, which represent 98% of all MAPs in the eukaryotic proteome and 90% of all MAPs found to have biological function. Analysis of the top 1092 MAP hotspots revealed 267 of truly unknown function (containing 5443 distinct PTMs). Of these, 165 hotspots could be mapped to human KEGG pathways for normal and/or disease physiology. Many high-ranking hotspots were also found to be disease-associated pathogenic sites of amino acid substitution despite the lack of observable PTM in the human protein family member. Taken together, these experiments demonstrate that the functional relevance of a PTM can be predicted very effectively by neural network models, revealing a large but testable

  16. Proteome-wide Structural Analysis of PTM Hotspots Reveals Regulatory Elements Predicted to Impact Biological Function and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Matthew P; Dewhurst, Henry; Sundararaman, Niveda

    2016-11-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) regulate protein behavior through modulation of protein-protein interactions, enzymatic activity, and protein stability essential in the translation of genotype to phenotype in eukaryotes. Currently, less than 4% of all eukaryotic PTMs are reported to have biological function - a statistic that continues to decrease with an increasing rate of PTM detection. Previously, we developed SAPH-ire (Structural Analysis of PTM Hotspots) - a method for the prioritization of PTM function potential that has been used effectively to reveal novel PTM regulatory elements in discrete protein families (Dewhurst et al., 2015). Here, we apply SAPH-ire to the set of eukaryotic protein families containing experimental PTM and 3D structure data - capturing 1,325 protein families with 50,839 unique PTM sites organized into 31,747 modified alignment positions (MAPs), of which 2010 (∼6%) possess known biological function. Here, we show that using an artificial neural network model (SAPH-ire NN) trained to identify MAP hotspots with biological function results in prediction outcomes that far surpass the use of single hotspot features, including nearest neighbor PTM clustering methods. We find the greatest enhancement in prediction for positions with PTM counts of five or less, which represent 98% of all MAPs in the eukaryotic proteome and 90% of all MAPs found to have biological function. Analysis of the top 1092 MAP hotspots revealed 267 of truly unknown function (containing 5443 distinct PTMs). Of these, 165 hotspots could be mapped to human KEGG pathways for normal and/or disease physiology. Many high-ranking hotspots were also found to be disease-associated pathogenic sites of amino acid substitution despite the lack of observable PTM in the human protein family member. Taken together, these experiments demonstrate that the functional relevance of a PTM can be predicted very effectively by neural network models, revealing a large but testable

  17. The correlation between composition, structure and properties of high-level waste solidification products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, L.; Vojtech, O.; Santarova, M.; Stejskal, I.; Gulinskij, V.

    1977-01-01

    The final product of a high-level liquid waste solidification process must meet a number of quantitative criteria. The necessary data can be obtained by direct measurement of certain parameters of the product (leachability of important radionuclides from the basic matrix, total solubility of the final product, thermal conductivity, mechanical properties, the temperature dependence of viscosity, etc.). Some insight can also be obtained on the basis of a profound analysis of micro- and macrostructure of the solid product. Detailed knowledge of the structure makes it easier to evaluate the final product. In this paper an effort is made to find a relationship between composition and structure of the system and the properties of the product obtained under the specific conditions of the process. The results are demonstrated using a phosphate matrix in which fission products and corrosion products are included in a wide range of concentrations. For analysis of the structure properties, X-ray diffraction, microscopic and electron probe microanalysis (back-scattered electrons and characteristic X-radiation detection) have been used. Using standard methods, the hydrolytical resistance of the product and the selective leachability of caesium, strontium and rare-earth ions have been measured. The results obtained so far have confirmed the usefulness of structure analysis as a parallel method for product evaluation in the development of the process and probably also for large-scale application. (author)

  18. Structural analysis of Hanford's single-shell 241-C-106 tank: A first step toward waste-tank remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.P.; Julyk, L.J.; Marlow, R.S.; Moore, C.J.; Day, J.P.; Dyrness, A.D.; Jagadish, P.; Shulman, J.S.

    1993-10-01

    The buried single-shell waste tank 241-C-106, located at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site, has been a repository for various liquid radioactive waste materials since its construction in 1943. A first step toward waste tank remediation is demonstrating that remediation activities can be performed safely. Determination of the current structural capacity of this high-heat tank is an important element in this assessment. A structural finite-element model of tank 241-C-106 has been developed to assess the tank's structural integrity with respect to in situ conditions and additional remediation surface loads. To predict structural integrity realistically, the model appropriately addresses two complex issues: (1) surrounding soil-tank interaction associated with thermal expansion cycling and surcharge load distribution and (2) concrete-property degradation and creep resulting from exposure to high temperatures generated by the waste. This paper describes the development of the 241-C-106 structural model, analysis methodology, and tank-specific structural acceptance criteria

  19. Plans and schedules for implementation of US Nuclear Regulatory Commission responsibilities under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (P.L. 99-240)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunkelman, M.M.; Kearney, M.S.; MacDougall, R.D.

    1986-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to make available to the states and other interested parties, the plans and schedules for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) implementation of its responsibilities under Public Law 99-240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA). This document identifies the provisions of the LLRWPAA which affect the programs of the NRC, identifies what the NRC must do to fulfill each of its requirements under the LLRWPAA, and establishes schedules for carrying out these requirements. The plans and schedules are current as of June 1986

  20. Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    The NEA Nuclear Waste Bulletin has been prepared by the Radiation Protection and Waste Management Division of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency to provide a means of communication amongst the various technical and policy groups within the waste management community. In particular, it is intended to provide timely and concise information on radioactive waste management activities, policies and programmes in Member countries and at the NEA. It is also intended that the Bulletin assists in the communication of recent developments in a variety of areas contributing to the development of acceptable technology for the management and disposal of nuclear waste (e.g., performance assessment, in-situ investigations, repository engineering, scientific data bases, regulatory developments, etc)

  1. Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic. Annual Report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seliga, M.

    2001-01-01

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic in 2000 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Foreword and organisation structure; (2) Mission of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority; (3) Legislation; (4) Assessment and inspection of nuclear installations; (5) Safety analyses; (6) Nuclear materials and physical protection of nuclear installations; (7) Radioactive waste; (8) Quality assurance; (9) Personnel qualification and training; (10) Emergency preparedness; (11) International co-operation; (12) Public information; (13) Personnel and economic data of the UJD; (14) Conclusion; (15) Attachments: Abbreviations; Radiation safety

  2. Communication planning by the nuclear regulatory body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    , both routine and emergency, and, for example, following events that give rise to public interest. The range of subjects for such programmes includes: the safety of nuclear installations; radiation protection and the safety of radiation sources: the safe transport of radioactive materials; planning. preparedness and response to emergencies; and the safe management of radioactive waste. For the sake of simplicity, unless otherwise stated, the term 'nuclear safety' is used in this publication to include nuclear, radiation, radioactive waste and transport safety. Section 2 outlines the general aspects of a communication programme. Section 3 describes the elements of a structured programme, including guidance for its implementation and evaluation. Section 4 summarizes the activities of the regulatory body in relation to the programme

  3. Application of structured flowsheets to global evaluation of tank waste processing alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, G.; Knutson, B.J.; Niccoli, L.G.; Frank, D.D.

    1994-01-01

    Remediation of the Hanford waste tanks requires integration of chemical technologies and evaluation of alternatives from the perspective of the overall Hanford cleanup purpose. The use of Design/IDEF (R) logic to connect chemical process functions to the overall cleanup mission in the Hanford Strategic Analysis (HSA) and to Aspen Plus (R) process models can show the effect of each process step on global performance measures such as safety, cost, and public perception. This hybrid of chemical process analysis and systems engineering produces structured material balance flowsheets at any level of process aggregation within the HSA. Connectivity and consistent process and stream nomenclature are automatically transferred between detailed process models, the HSA top purpose, and the global material balance flowsheet evaluation. Applications to separation processes is demonstrated for a generic Truex-Sludge Wash flowsheet with many process options and for the aggregation of a Clean Option flowsheet from a detailed chemical process level to a global evaluation level

  4. Regulatory guidance document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program Management System Manual requires preparation of the OCRWM Regulatory Guidance Document (RGD) that addresses licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance. The document provides: regulatory compliance policy; guidance to OCRWM organizational elements to ensure a consistent approach when complying with regulatory requirements; strategies to achieve policy objectives; organizational responsibilities for regulatory compliance; guidance with regard to Program compliance oversight; and guidance on the contents of a project-level Regulatory Compliance Plan. The scope of the RGD includes site suitability evaluation, licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance, in accordance with the direction provided by Section 4.6.3 of the PMS Manual. Site suitability evaluation and regulatory compliance during site characterization are significant activities, particularly with regard to the YW MSA. OCRWM's evaluation of whether the Yucca Mountain site is suitable for repository development must precede its submittal of a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Accordingly, site suitability evaluation is discussed in Chapter 4, and the general statements of policy regarding site suitability evaluation are discussed in Section 2.1. Although much of the data and analyses may initially be similar, the licensing process is discussed separately in Chapter 5. Environmental compliance is discussed in Chapter 6. Safety and Health compliance is discussed in Chapter 7

  5. Regulatory challenges in the management of aging of structural materials in nuclear power plants; Retos reguladores en la gestion del envejecimiento de los materiales estructurales de centrales nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelo, C.; Mendoza, C.; Mas, E.; Conde, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    The article discusses two major pathways by which a regulatory body, and in particular the CSN, may participate in the acquisition of the necessary knowledge on mechanisms of aging of nuclear structural materials: to participate in forums to share operational experience and R and R project, both nationally and internationally. It notes the importance of this participation to carry out its regulatory function based on the knowledge acquired and the unique challenge of transferring that knowledge to rules and guidelines for their application. The article discusses various R and D projects in which the CSN participates directly. It calls for the presence of regulatory bodies in R and D project funded by the EU and the transfer of the results of such projects to codes, standards or guidelines for feasible implementation. (Author)

  6. Reconstruction of the inner structure of small scale mining waste dumps by combining GPR and ERTdata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniess, Rudolf; Martin, Tina

    2015-04-01

    Two abandoned small waste dumps in the west of the Harz mountains (Germany) were analysed using ground penetrating radar (GPR) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Aim of the project (ROBEHA, funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (033R105)) is the assessment of the recycling potential of the mining residues taking into account environmental risks of reworking the dump site. One task of the geophysical prospection is the investigation of the inner structure of the mining dump. This is important for the estimation of the approximate volume of potentially reusable mining deposits within the waste dump. The two investigated dump sites are different in age and therefore differ in their structure. The older residues (mining dumps. The resistivities of the dumped material differ from the bedrock resistivities at both sites. The GPR measurements show near surface layer boundaries down to 3 - 4 m. In consecutive campaigns 100 MHz and 200 MHz antennas were used. The GPR results (layer boundaries) were included into the ERT inversion algorithm to enable more precise and stable resistivity models. This needs some special preprocessing steps. The 3D-Position of every electrode from ERT measurement and the GPR antenna position on the surface require an accuracy of less than 1cm. At some points, the layer boundaries and radar wave velocities can be calibrated with borehole stratigraphic data from a mineralogical drilling campaign. This is important for a precise time-depth conversion of reflectors from GPR measurement. This reflectors were taken from radargram and have been adopted as resistivity boundary in the start model of the geoelectric inversion algorithm.

  7. The structural integrity of high level waste containers for deep disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keer, T.J.; Martindale, N.J.; Haijtink, B.

    1990-01-01

    Most countries with a nuclear power program are developing plans to dispose of high level waste in deep geological repositories. These facilities are typically in the range 500-1000m below ground. Although long term safety analyses mainly rely on the isolation function of the geological barrier, for the medium term (between 500 and 1000 years) a barrier such as a container (overpack) may play an important role. This paper addresses the mechanical/structural behavior of these structures under extreme geological pressures. The work described in the paper was conducted within the COMPAS project (Container Mechanical Performance Assessment) funded by the Commission of the European Communities and the United Kingdom Department of the Environment. The work was aimed at predicting the modes of failure and failure pressures which characterize the heavy, thick walled mild steel containers which might be considered for the disposal of vitrified waste. The work involved a considerable amount of analytical work, using 3-D non-linear finite element techniques, coupled with a large parallel program of experimental work. The experimental work consisted of a number of scale model tests in which the response of the containers was examined under external pressures as high as 120MPa. Extensive strain-gauge instrumentation was used to record the behavior of the models as they were driven to collapse. A number of comparative computer calculations were carried out by organizations from various European countries. Correlations were established between experimental and analytical data and guidelines regarding the choice of suitable software were established. The work concluded with a full 3-D simulation of the behavior of a container under long-term disposal conditions. In this analysis, non-linearities due to geological effects and material/geometry effects in the container were properly accounted for. 6 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Development of activated carbon pore structure via physical and chemical activation of biomass fibre waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Paul T.; Reed, Anton R.

    2006-01-01

    Biomass waste in the form of biomass flax fibre, produced as a by-product of the textile industry was processed via both physical and chemical activation to produce activated carbons. The surface area of the physically activated carbons were up to 840 m 2 g -1 and the carbons were of mesoporous structure. Chemical activation using zinc chloride produced high surface area activated carbons up to 2400 m 2 g -1 and the pore size distribution was mainly microporous. However, the process conditions of temperature and zinc chloride concentration could be used to manipulate the surface area and porosity of the carbons to produce microporous, mesoporous and mixed microporous/mesoporous activated carbons. The physically activated carbons were found to be a mixture of Type I and Type IV carbons and the chemically activated carbons were found to be mainly Type I carbons. The development of surface morphology of physically and chemically activated carbons observed via scanning electron microscopy showed that physical activation produced activated carbons with a nodular and pitted surface morphology whereas activated carbons produced through chemical activation had a smooth surface morphology. Transmission electron microscopy analysis could identify mesopore structures in the physically activated carbon and microporous structures in the chemically activated carbons

  9. Healthcare waste management research: A structured analysis and review (2005-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Vikas; Ramesh, A

    2015-10-01

    The importance of healthcare waste management in preserving the environment and protecting the public cannot be denied. Past research has dealt with various issues in healthcare waste management and disposal, which spreads over various journals, pipeline research disciplines and research communities. Hence, this article analyses this scattered knowledge in a systematic manner, considering the period between January 2005 and July 2014. The purpose of this study is to: (i) identify the trends in healthcare waste management literature regarding journals published; (ii) main topics of research in healthcare waste management; (iii) methodologies used in healthcare waste management research; (iv) areas most frequently researched by researchers; and (v) determine the scope of future research in healthcare waste management. To this end, the authors conducted a systematic review of 176 articles on healthcare waste management taken from the following eight esteemed journals: International Journal of Environmental Health Research, International Journal of Healthcare Quality Assurance, Journal of Environmental Management, Journal of Hazardous Material, Journal of Material Cycles and Waste Management, Resources, Conservations and Recycling, Waste Management, and Waste Management & Research. The authors have applied both quantitative and qualitative approaches for analysis, and results will be useful in the following ways: (i) results will show importance of healthcare waste management in healthcare operations; (ii) findings will give a comparative view of the various publications; (c) study will shed light on future research areas. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Structural analysis of a 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase with an N-terminal chorismate mutase-like regulatory domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Light, Samuel H.; Halavaty, Andrei S.; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Anderson, Wayne F. (NWU)

    2012-06-27

    3-Deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAHPS) catalyzes the first step in the biosynthesis of a number of aromatic metabolites. Likely because this reaction is situated at a pivotal biosynthetic gateway, several DAHPS classes distinguished by distinct mechanisms of allosteric regulation have independently evolved. One class of DAHPSs contains a regulatory domain with sequence homology to chorismate mutase - an enzyme further downstream of DAHPS that catalyzes the first committed step in tyrosine/phenylalanine biosynthesis - and is inhibited by chorismate mutase substrate (chorismate) and product (prephenate). Described in this work, structures of the Listeria monocytogenes chorismate/prephenate regulated DAHPS in complex with Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 2+} + phosphoenolpyruvate reveal an unusual quaternary architecture: DAHPS domains assemble as a tetramer, from either side of which chorismate mutase-like (CML) regulatory domains asymmetrically emerge to form a pair of dimers. This domain organization suggests that chorismate/prephenate binding promotes a stable interaction between the discrete regulatory and catalytic domains and supports a mechanism of allosteric inhibition similar to tyrosine/phenylalanine control of a related DAHPS class. We argue that the structural similarity of chorismate mutase enzyme and CML regulatory domain provides a unique opportunity for the design of a multitarget antibacterial.

  11. Molecular Dynamics-based Simulations of Bulk/Interfacial Structures and Diffusion Behaviors in Nuclear Waste Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Jincheng

    2018-03-16

    This NEUP Project aimed to generate accurate atomic structural models of nuclear waste glasses by using large-scale molecular dynamics-based computer simulations and to use these models to investigate self-diffusion behaviors, interfacial structures, and hydrated gel structures formed during dissolution of these glasses. The goal was to obtain realistic and accurate short and medium range structures of these complex oxide glasses, to provide a mechanistic understanding of the dissolution behaviors, and to generate reliable information with predictive power in designing nuclear waste glasses for long-term geological storage. Looking back of the research accomplishments of this project, most of the scientific goals initially proposed have been achieved through intensive research in the three and a half year period of the project. This project has also generated a wealth of scientific data and vibrant discussions with various groups through collaborations within and outside of this project. Throughout the project one book chapter and 14 peer reviewed journal publications have been generated (including one under review) and 16 presentations (including 8 invited talks) have been made to disseminate the results of this project in national and international conference. Furthermore, this project has trained several outstanding graduate students and young researchers for future workforce in nuclear related field, especially on nuclear waste immobilization. One postdoc and four PhD students have been fully or partially supported through the project with intensive training in the field material science and engineering with expertise on glass science and nuclear waste disposal

  12. Structural geology of the Columbia Plateau and environs as related to the waste isolation safety assessment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coombs, H.A.

    1979-01-01

    This report provides information on the structural geology of the Columbia Plateau in regard to selecting a site for radioactive waste disposal. This report describes the folding and faulting that has taken place during the past several million years, thus providing background for the general stress conditions of the area and giving clues to the mechanism of deformation

  13. International regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2009-01-01

    In this last part is reviewed international regulatory activities and bilateral agreements including two parts: concerning European atomic energy community with European commission proposal for a council directive setting up a community framework for nuclear safety, update of the nuclear illustrative programme in the context of the second strategic energy review, european commission recommendation on criteria for the export of radioactive waste and spent fuel to third countries and a communication on nuclear non-proliferation and the second part in relation with international atomic energy agency with a joint convention on the safety of spent fuel management and on safety of radioactive waste management (third review meeting). (N.C.)

  14. Soil structure interaction analysis for the Hanford Site 241-SY-101 double-shell waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giller, R.A.; Weiner, E.O.

    1991-09-01

    The 241-SY-101 tank is a double-shell waste storage tank buried in the 241-SY tank farm in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. This analysis addresses the effects of seismic soil-structure interaction on the tank structure and includes a parametric soil-structure interaction study addressing three configurations: two-dimensional soil structure, a two-dimensional structure-soil-structure, and a three-dimensional soil-structure interaction. This study was designed to determine an optimal method for addressing seismic-soil effects on underground storage tanks. The computer programs calculate seismic-soil pressures on the double-shell tank walls and and seismic acceleration response spectra in the tank. The results of this soil-structure interaction parametric study as produced by the computer programs are given in terms of seismic soil pressures and response spectra. The conclusions of this soil-structure interaction evaluation are that dynamically calculated soil pressures in the 241-SY-101 tank are significantly reduce from those using standard hand calculation methods and that seismic evaluation of underground double-shell waste storage tanks must consider soil-structure interaction effects in order to predict conservative structural response. Appendixes supporting this study are available in Volume 2 of this report

  15. Prediction of municipal solid waste generation using artificial neural network approach enhanced by structural break analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamović, Vladimir M; Antanasijević, Davor Z; Ristić, Mirjana Đ; Perić-Grujić, Aleksandra A; Pocajt, Viktor V

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a general regression neural network (GRNN) model for the prediction of annual municipal solid waste (MSW) generation at the national level for 44 countries of different size, population and economic development level. Proper modelling of MSW generation is essential for the planning of MSW management system as well as for the simulation of various environmental impact scenarios. The main objective of this work was to examine the potential influence of economy crisis (global or local) on the forecast of MSW generation obtained by the GRNN model. The existence of the so-called structural breaks that occur because of the economic crisis in the studied period (2000-2012) for each country was determined and confirmed using the Chow test and Quandt-Andrews test. Two GRNN models, one which did not take into account the influence of the economic crisis (GRNN) and another one which did (SB-GRNN), were developed. The novelty of the applied method is that it uses broadly available social, economic and demographic indicators and indicators of sustainability, together with GRNN and structural break testing for the prediction of MSW generation at the national level. The obtained results demonstrate that the SB-GRNN model provide more accurate predictions than the model which neglected structural breaks, with a mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) of 4.0 % compared to 6.7 % generated by the GRNN model. The proposed model enhanced with structural breaks can be a viable alternative for a more accurate prediction of MSW generation at the national level, especially for developing countries for which a lack of MSW data is notable.

  16. Concrete material characterization reinforced concrete tank structure Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkel, B.V.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Project position on the concrete mechanical properties needed to perform design/analysis calculations for the MWTF secondary concrete structure. This report provides a position on MWTF concrete properties for the Title 1 and Title 2 calculations. The scope of the report is limited to mechanical properties and does not include the thermophysical properties of concrete needed to perform heat transfer calculations. In the 1970's, a comprehensive series of tests were performed at Construction Technology Laboratories (CTL) on two different Hanford concrete mix designs. Statistical correlations of the CTL data were later generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL). These test results and property correlations have been utilized in various design/analysis efforts of Hanford waste tanks. However, due to changes in the concrete design mix and the lower range of MWTF operating temperatures, plus uncertainties in the CTL data and PNL correlations, it was prudent to evaluate the CTL data base and PNL correlations, relative to the MWTF application, and develop a defendable position. The CTL test program for Hanford concrete involved two different mix designs: a 3 kip/in 2 mix and a 4.5 kip/in 2 mix. The proposed 28-day design strength for the MWTF tanks is 5 kip/in 2 . In addition to this design strength difference, there are also differences between the CTL and MWTF mix design details. Also of interest, are the appropriate application of the MWTF concrete properties in performing calculations demonstrating ACI Code compliance. Mix design details and ACI Code issues are addressed in Sections 3.0 and 5.0, respectively. The CTL test program and PNL data correlations focused on a temperature range of 250 to 450 F. The temperature range of interest for the MWTF tank concrete application is 70 to 200 F

  17. Structure, mechanical and thermal behaviour of mixtures of polyester resin and dental ceramic waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña Rodríguez, G.; Martínez Maldonado, L.; Dulce Moreno, H. J.

    2016-02-01

    The tensile strength and bending strength, structure and thermal behaviour of mixtures of polyester resin (P-2000) and powders (ASTM sieve 200, dental ceramic wastes (dentals impressions, alginate and gypsum) was reported. The samples consisted of mixtures with percentage weights of 50-50%, 60-40%, 70-30%, 80-20%, 90-10%, where the resin was the majority phase, the Mekc (4% wt) was used as catalyst. The structure was studied using SEM and XRD, the thermal behaviour using DSC, TGA and DMA, while the mechanical strength was tested using standards ASTM D790 and D638. Irregular morphology and presence of small agglomerations was observed, with particle sizes between 29.63 and 38.67μm, the presence of different phases of calcium sulphate was found, and that to the increasing the concentration of the powder, the materials becomes more crystalline, increasing its density. An average service temperature of 69.15±4.60°C was found. Vickers hardness values are reported in ranges from 18.65 to 27.96. Considering the elastic modules was established that the materials become more rigid by having more powder concentration.

  18. Acoustic remote monitoring of rock and concrete structures for nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, R.P.

    2000-01-01

    Excavation and thermally induced damage is of significance for many types of engineering structures but no more so than in the case of nuclear waste repository design. My research and that of my group, formally at Queen's University Canada and Keele University UK and now at the University of Liverpool UK, has focused on the development of acoustic techniques for the in situ detection and quantification of induced damage and fracturing. The application of earthquake seismology to this problem has provided the opportunity to study the micro mechanics of damage mechanisms in situ and provide validation data for predictive geomechanical models used for engineering design. Since 1987 I have been a principal investigator at Atomic Energy of Canada's Underground Research Laboratory (URL), responsible for the development of acoustic emission techniques (AE). In the last twelve years, the application of acoustic techniques to rock damage assessment has been pioneered by my group at the URL and successfully applied in several other major international projects including the ZEDEX, Retrieval and Prototype repository experiments at the Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) of SKB Sweden. In this paper I describe what information is available by remote acoustic monitoring of rock and concrete structures and demonstrate this with reference to two international scientific experiments carried out at the URL Canada and the HRL Sweden. (author)

  19. Conceptual structure of the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HELTON, JON CRAIG; ANDERSON, D. RICHARD; BASABILVAZO, G.; JOW, HONG-NIAN; MARIETTA, MELVIN G.

    2000-01-01

    The conceptual structure of the 1996 performance assessment (PA) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is described. This structure involves three basic entities (EN1, EN2, EN3): (1) EN1, a probabilistic characterization of the likelihood of different futures occurring at the WIPP site over the next 10,000 yr, (2) EN2, a procedure for estimating the radionuclide releases to the accessible environment associated with each of the possible futures that could occur at the WIPP site over the next 10,000 yr, and (3) EN3, a probabilistic characterization of the uncertainty in the parameters used in the definition of EN1 and EN2. In the formal development of the 1996 WIPP PA, EN1 is characterized by a probability space (S st , P st , p st ) for stochastic (i.e., aleatory) uncertainly; EN2 is characterized by a function (line i ntegral) that corresponds to the models and associated computer programs used to estimate radionuclide releases; and EN3 is characterized by a probability space (S su , P su , p su ) for subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertainty. A high-level overview of the 1996 WIPP PA and references to additional sources of information are given in the context of (S st , P st , p st ), (line i ntegral) and (S su , P su , p su )

  20. Structure of automated system for tracking the formation and burial of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, A.A.

    1993-01-01

    Intermediate- and low-activity wastes are formed when radionuclides are used in science, industry, agriculture, and medicine. A centralized system, including territorial specialized complexes and radioactive-waste burial sites (RWBS), has been created for collection, processing, and long-term storage. At this time, however, the records kept of wastes for long-term storage and assessment of their preparation for burial do not come up to current scientific and technical requirements at most RWBSs in Russia. It is necessary, therefore, to create an automated tracking system. Earlier studies, considered the design of a system for monitoring and recording the handling of sources of ionizing radiation, which are the most hazardous part of the wastes. The novel proposed automated system incorporates distinctive functional elements and makes for higher quality waste processing and efficient data exchange. It performs such functions as recording the wastes earmarked for burial, processing, and long-term storage, and where they are stored in the RWBS; ensuring an optimum cycle of collection, transportation, processing, and long-term storage of wastes; recording planned monitored levels of discharges and ejections of substances at the RWBSs; recording the wastes delivered for storage and stored on RWBSs; making calculations, including an estimate of the costs of transport, processing, and storage of wastes for each enterprise, with allowance for penalties; classifying wastes according to processing methods and determining the optimum operating regime and technological facilities; identifying the parameters of wastes delivered for processing and burial; and predicting the deliveries of wastes to RWBSs, planning the construction of new special storage facilities and containers for temporary and long-term storage of wastes

  1. Structure and catalytic regulatory function of ubiquitin specific protease 11 N-terminal and ubiquitin-like domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Stephen; Gratton, Hayley E; Cornaciu, Irina; Oberer, Monika; Scott, David J; Emsley, Jonas; Dreveny, Ingrid

    2014-05-13

    The ubiquitin specific protease 11 (USP11) is implicated in DNA repair, viral RNA replication, and TGFβ signaling. We report the first characterization of the USP11 domain architecture and its role in regulating the enzymatic activity. USP11 consists of an N-terminal "domain present in USPs" (DUSP) and "ubiquitin-like" (UBL) domain, together referred to as DU domains, and the catalytic domain harboring a second UBL domain. Crystal structures of the DU domains show a tandem arrangement with a shortened β-hairpin at the two-domain interface and altered surface characteristics compared to the homologues USP4 and USP15. A conserved VEVY motif is a signature feature at the two-domain interface that shapes a potential protein interaction site. Small angle X-ray scattering and gel filtration experiments are consistent with the USP11DU domains and full-length USP11 being monomeric. Unexpectedly, we reveal, through kinetic assays of a series of deletion mutants, that the catalytic activity of USP11 is not regulated through intramolecular autoinhibition or activation by the N-terminal DU or UBL domains. Moreover, ubiquitin chain cleavage assays with all eight linkages reveal a preference for Lys(63)-, Lys(6)-, Lys(33)-, and Lys(11)-linked chains over Lys(27)-, Lys(29)-, and Lys(48)-linked and linear chains consistent with USP11's function in DNA repair pathways that is mediated by the protease domain. Our data support a model whereby USP11 domains outside the catalytic core domain serve as protein interaction or trafficking modules rather than a direct regulatory function of the proteolytic activity. This highlights the diversity of USPs in substrate recognition and regulation of ubiquitin deconjugation.

  2. Joint US Geological Survey, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission workshop on research related to low-level radioactive waste disposal, May 4-6, 1993, National Center, Reston, Virginia; Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Peter R.; Nicholson, Thomas J.

    1996-01-01

    This report contains papers presented at the "Joint U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Technical Workshop on Research Related to Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) Disposal" that was held at the USGS National Center Auditorium, Reston, Virginia, May 4-6, 1993. The objective of the workshop was to provide a forum for exchange of information, ideas, and technology in the geosciences dealing with LLW disposal. This workshop was the first joint activity under the Memorandum of Understanding between the USGS and NRC's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research signed in April 1992.Participants included invited speakers from the USGS, NRC technical contractors (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories and universities) and NRC staff for presentation of research study results related to LLW disposal. Also in attendance were scientists from the DOE, DOE National Laboratories, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, State developmental and regulatory agencies involved in LLW disposal facility siting and licensing, Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL), private industry, Agricultural Research Service, universities, USGS and NRC.

  3. PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL AND STRUCTURAL EVOLUTIION OF ZEOLITE-CONTAINING WASTE FORMS PRODUCED FROM METAKAOLINITE AND CALCINED SODUIM BEARING WASTE (HLW AND/OR LLW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grutzeck, Michael W.

    2003-01-01

    Zeolites can adsorb liquids and gases, take part in catalytic reactions and serve as cation exchange media. They are commercially available as finely divided powders. Using zeolites to manage radioactive waste is not new, but a process by which zeolites can be made to act both as a host phase and a cementing agent is. It is notable that zeolites occur in nature as well consolidated/cemented deposits. The Romans used blocks of Neapolitan zeolitized tuff as a building material and some of these buildings are still standing. Zeolites are easy to synthesize from a wide range of both natural and man-made precursor materials. The method of making a ''hydroceramic'' is derived from a process in which metakaolinite (thermally dehydroxylated kaolinite) is slurried with a dilute sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution and then reacted for hours to days at mildly elevated temperatures (60-200 C). The zeolites that form in solution are finely divided powders containing micrometer sized crystals. However, if the process is changed and only enough concentrated sodium hydroxide solution (e.g. 12 M) is added to the metakaolinite to give the mixture a putty-like consistency and the mixture is then cured under similar conditions, the mixture becomes a very hard ceramic-like material containing distinct tectosilicate crystallites (zeolites and feldspathoids) imbedded in an X-ray amorphous sodium aluminosilicate hydrate matrix. Due to the material's vitreous character, the composite has been called a hydroceramic. Similar to zeolite/feldspathoid powders, a hydroceramic is able to sequester cations and a wide range of salt molecules (e.g., nitrate, nitrite and sulfate) in lattice positions and within structural channels and voids thus rendering them ''insoluble'' and making them an ideal contingency waste form for solidifying radioactive waste. The obvious similarities between a hydroceramic waste form and a waste form based on solidified Portland-cement grout are superficial because their

  4. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste

  5. Assessment of national systems for obtaining local siting acceptance of nuclear waste management facilities (October 1, 1985). Volume I. Political structure and formal system for obtaining approvals for siting waste management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paige, H.W.; Numark, N.J.

    1985-01-01

    This report is the fourth in a series of periodic surveys of approaches and progress in other countries in dealing with the problems of obtaining local acceptance for siting of waste management facilities. This volume contains the following sections: Nation's political/industrial structure for obtaining waste management siting decisions; and Nation's formal legal procedure for obtaining necessary approvals for siting nuclear waste management facilities. Two of the countries visited, Finland and Sweden, have had major changes in the past two years in their formal/legal procedures for obtaining waste management siting decisions. (LM)

  6. Regulatory issues for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant long-term compliance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 40 CFR 191B and 268

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.R.; Marietta, M.G.; Higgins, P.J. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    Before disposing of transuranic radioactive waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) must evaluate compliance with long-term regulations of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), specifically the Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191), and the Land Disposal Restrictions (40 CFR 268) of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting iterative performance assessments (PAs) of the WIPP for the DOE to provide interim guidance while preparing for final compliance evaluations. This paper provides background information on the regulations, describes the SNL WIPP PA Departments approach to developing a defensible technical basis for consistent compliance evaluations, and summarizes the major observations and conclusions drawn from the 1991 and 1992 PAs

  7. Evaluation of optional fee structures for solid waste management in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun-Ga; Chu, Zhu-Jie; Zhuang, Jun

    2018-06-01

    A municipal solid waste fee has become an important means for the implementation of the waste management rendered by the government all around the world. Based on the ecological environmental compensation theory, this article constructs an analytical framework of waste charging from the perspective of public policy evaluation, to carry on the comprehensive comparison and analysis to the operability, feasibility, validity, rationality, and universality of the two modes of waste charging: Ration charge and unit-pricing modes. The results indicate that in the cities with large amounts of waste production, long time of waste charging, and high disposal rate, pilot projects should be carried out; and the government needs to improve the construction of associated laws and regulations.

  8. Regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This publication, compiled in 8 chapters, presents the regulatory system developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) of the Argentine Republic. The following activities and developed topics in this document describe: the evolution of the nuclear regulatory activity in Argentina; the Argentine regulatory system; the nuclear regulatory laws and standards; the inspection and safeguards of nuclear facilities; the emergency systems; the environmental systems; the environmental monitoring; the analysis laboratories on physical and biological dosimetry, prenatal irradiation, internal irradiation, radiation measurements, detection techniques on nuclear testing, medical program on radiation protection; the institutional relations with national and international organization; the training courses and meeting; the technical information

  9. Nuclear-waste problems are deemed less technological than institutional

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear waste management needs administrative re-organization to separate management, regulation, and research and development responsibilities. New stable, but adaptable, institutions need to be established to clarify criteria for containing and isolating nuclear waste and to ensure that criteria are met. Present structure, which puts much of the temporary responsibility on the private sector and permanent responsibility on ERDA, does not encourage efficiency. Government regulations and public pressure have provided some incentives, but military nuclear wastes have no independent regulation to protect the public, and the states have proved ineffective in regulating commercial operations. Recommendations for reorganization are: (1) to establish a national public corporation to manage high-level and transuranic wastes; (2) to consolidate regulatory authority under a comprehensive Nuclear Regulatory Commission; and (3) to establish a commission within the International Atomic Energy Agency for licensing and review of disposal operations

  10. Large scale waste combustion projects. A study of financial structures and sensitivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandler, A.

    1993-01-01

    The principal objective of the study was to determine the key contractual and financial aspects of large scale energy-from-waste projects, and to provide the necessary background information on financing to appreciate the approach lenders take when they consider financing waste combustion projects. An integral part of the study has been the preparation of a detailed financial model, incorporating all major financing parameters, to assess the economic and financial viability of typical waste combustion projects. (author)

  11. A study on the development of regulatory guide to stability conformation and classification criteria of low and intermediate level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Geon Jae; Paek, Min Hoon; Park, Jong Gil; Han, Byeong Seop; Cheong, Jae Hak; Lee, Hae Chan; Yang, Jin Yeong; Hong, Hei Kwan; Park, Jin Baek [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-01-15

    The objectives of this study are to examine basic principles and terms and to suggest and recommend definite methods and criteria necessary for the classification and stability conformation of radioactive wastes. In this study, following studies were performed : investigate the domestic regulations related with the stability conformation and classification of radioactive wastes in order to keep mutual relationship and consistency between the regulations, investigate the sources, types and characteristics of domestic radioactive wastes as a basis for this study, investigate the classification criteria and methods of others countries in a general point of view and in the view point of disposal method, select the classification criteria factors for the domestic case and general case in the both general and domestic points of view, investigate the general test items for the stability conformation of radioactive waste forms and analysis on the test items and criteria of others countries for the mined cavity disposal and shallow land disposal in the view point of disposal method, experimental leaching and immersion tests for the borate and spent resin wastes as a study on the stability conformation of waste forms, selection of acceptance criteria for the both of disposal methods in the domestic and general cases.

  12. Survey of computer codes applicable to waste facility performance evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsharif, M.; Pung, D.L.; Rivera, A.L.; Dole, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    This study is an effort to review existing information that is useful to develop an integrated model for predicting the performance of a radioactive waste facility. A summary description of 162 computer codes is given. The identified computer programs address the performance of waste packages, waste transport and equilibrium geochemistry, hydrological processes in unsaturated and saturated zones, and general waste facility performance assessment. Some programs also deal with thermal analysis, structural analysis, and special purposes. A number of these computer programs are being used by the US Department of Energy, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and their contractors to analyze various aspects of waste package performance. Fifty-five of these codes were identified as being potentially useful on the analysis of low-level radioactive waste facilities located above the water table. The code summaries include authors, identification data, model types, and pertinent references. 14 refs., 5 tabs

  13. Structurally controlled 'teleconnection' of large-scale mass wasting (Eastern Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, Marc; Sanders, Diethard

    2015-04-01

    In the Brenner Pass area (Eastern Alps) , closely ahead of the most northward outlier ('nose') of the Southern-Alpine continental indenter, abundant deep-seated gravitational slope deformations and a cluster of five post-glacial rockslides are present. The indenter of roughly triangular shape formed during Neogene collision of the Southern-Alpine basement with the Eastern-Alpine nappe stack. Compression by the indenter activated a N-S striking, roughly W-E extensional fault northward of the nose of the indenter (Brenner-normal fault; BNF), and lengthened the Eastern-Alpine edifice along a set of major strike-slip faults. These fault zones display high seismicity, and are the preferred locus of catastrophic rapid slope failures (rockslides, rock avalanches) and deep-seated gravitational slope deformations. The seismotectonic stress field, earthquake activity, and structural data all indicate that the South-Alpine indenter still - or again - exerts compression; in consequence, the northward adjacent Eastern Alps are subject mainly to extension and strike-slip. For the rockslides in the Brenner Pass area, and for the deep-seated gravitational slope deformations, the fault zones combined with high seismic activity predispose massive slope failures. Structural data and earthquakes mainly record ~W-E extension within an Eastern Alpine basement block (Oetztal-Stubai basement complex) in the hangingwall of the BNF. In the Northern Calcareous Alps NW of the Oetztal-Stubai basement complex, dextral faults provide defacement scars for large rockfalls and rockslides. Towards the West, these dextral faults merge into a NNW-SSE striking sinistral fault zone that, in turn, displays high seismic activity and is the locus of another rockslide cluster (Fern Pass cluster; Prager et al., 2008). By its kinematics dictated by the South-Alpine indenter, the relatively rigid Oetztal-Stubai basement block relays faulting and associated mass-wasting over a N-S distance of more than 60

  14. Modeling internal deformation of salt structures targeted for radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemia, Zurab

    2008-01-01

    This thesis uses results of systematic numerical models to argue that externally inactive salt structures, which are potential targets for radioactive waste disposal, might be internally active due to the presence of dense layers or blocks within a salt layer. The three papers that support this thesis use the Gorleben salt diapir (NW Germany), which was targeted as a future final repository for high-grade radioactive waste, as a general guideline. The first two papers present systematic studies of the parameters that control the development of a salt diapir and how it entrains a dense anhydrite layer. Results from these numerical models show that the entrainment of a dense anhydrite layer within a salt diapir depends on four parameters: sedimentation rate, viscosity of salt, perturbation width and the stratigraphic location of the dense layer. The combined effect of these four parameters, which has a direct impact on the rate of salt supply (volume/area of the salt that is supplied to the diapir with time), shape a diapir and the mode of entrainment. Salt diapirs down-built with sedimentary units of high viscosity can potentially grow with an embedded anhydrite layer and deplete their source layer (salt supply ceases). However, when salt supply decreases dramatically or ceases entirely, the entrained anhydrite layer/segments start to sink within the diapir. In inactive diapirs, sinking of the entrained anhydrite layer is inevitable and strongly depends on the rheology of the salt, which is in direct contact with the anhydrite layer. During the post-depositional stage, if the effective viscosity of salt falls below the threshold value of around 10 18 -10 19 Pa s, the mobility of anhydrite blocks might influence any repository within the diapir. However, the internal deformation of the salt diapir by the descending blocks decreases with increase in effective viscosity of salt. The results presented in this thesis suggest that it is highly likely that salt structures

  15. Analysis of the matrix structure of the Nuclear Weapons Complex waste minimization and hazard reduction program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churnetski, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    Two of the primary goals of this program in waste minimization that the major waste problems facing the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) are being addressed systematically and to prevent duplication of effort by forming an integrated approach across the complex. Production, disposal, and the hazards of both the wastes and the in-process chemicals used were to be studied. The eight waste streams chosen (electroplating, miscellaneous, mixed, plutonium, polymers, solvents, tritium, and uranium) were deemed to be the most serious problems facing the Nuclear Weapons Complex

  16. New data on the cost structure of thermal waste treatment; Neue Daten zur Kostenstruktur der thermischen Abfallbehandlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auksutat, M. [Goepfert, Reimer und Partner Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    In order to obtain current data and cost estimates for the most important waste treatment and disposal techniques the Federal Environmental Agency commissioned Consulting Engineers Goepfert, Reimer and Associates (GRP) and uve Environmental Management and Planning to carry out an R+D project titled ``Study on the cost structure of waste disposal techniques``. This paper presents a part of the results relating to the topic of ``thermal waste treatment``. [Deutsch] Um aktuelle Daten und Kostenschaetzungen fuer die wesentlichen Abfallbehandlungs- und Ablagerungstechniken zu erhalten, hatte das Umweltbundesamt die Goepfert, Reimer und Partner Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH (GRP) und die uve Umweltmanagement und -planung GmbH mit der Bearbeitung des F+E-Vorhabens `Kostenstrukturuntersuchung von Abfallbeseitigungsverfahren` beauftragt. Dieser Beitrag stellt einen Teil der Ergebnisse fuer den Bereich `Thermische Abfallbehandlung` vor. (orig./SR)

  17. STRUCTURAL CALCULATIONS FOR THE LIFTING IN VERTICAL ORIENTATION OF 5-DHLW/DOE SNF SINGLE CRM WASTE PACKAGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. Mastilovic

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this activity is to determine the structural response of the extension of outer shell (which is referred to as skirt throughout this document) designs of both long and short design concepts of 5-Defense High-Level Waste (DHLW) Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) single corrosion resistant material (CRM) waste packages (WP), subjected to a gravitational load in the course of lifting in vertical orientation. The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensity magnitudes. This activity is associated with the WP design; calculations are performed by the Waste Package Design group. AP-3.124, Revision 0, ICN 0, Calculations, is used to perform the calculation and develop the document

  18. A conserved RNA structural element within the hepatitis B virus post-transcriptional regulatory element enhance nuclear export of intronless transcripts and repress the splicing mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visootsat, Akasit; Payungporn, Sunchai; T-Thienprasert, Nattanan P

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a primary cause of hepatocellular carcinoma and liver cirrhosis worldwide. To develop novel antiviral drugs, a better understanding of HBV gene expression regulation is vital. One important aspect is to understand how HBV hijacks the cellular machinery to export unspliced RNA from the nucleus. The HBV post-transcriptional regulatory element (HBV PRE) has been proposed to be the HBV RNA nuclear export element. However, the function remains controversial, and the core element is unclear. This study, therefore, aimed to identify functional regulatory elements within the HBV PRE and investigate their functions. Using bioinformatics programs based on sequence conservation and conserved RNA secondary structures, three regulatory elements were predicted, namely PRE 1151-1410, PRE 1520-1620 and PRE 1650-1684. PRE 1151-1410 significantly increased intronless and unspliced luciferase activity in both HepG2 and COS-7 cells. Likewise, PRE 1151-1410 significantly elevated intronless and unspliced HBV surface transcripts in liver cancer cells. Moreover, motif analysis predicted that PRE 1151-1410 contains several regulatory motifs. This study reported the roles of PRE 1151-1410 in intronless transcript nuclear export and the splicing mechanism. Additionally, these results provide knowledge in the field of HBV RNA regulation. Moreover, PRE 1151-1410 may be used to enhance the expression of other mRNAs in intronless reporter plasmids.

  19. A Review on the Use of Agriculture Waste Material as Lightweight Aggregate for Reinforced Concrete Structural Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Hung Mo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The agriculture industry is one of the main industries in the Southeast Asia region due to its favourable conditions for plantations. In fact, Southeast Asia region is the world’s largest producer of palm oil and coconut. Nevertheless, vast plantation of these agriculture products leads to equally large amount of waste materials emanating from these industries. Previously, researchers have attempted to utilize the resulting waste materials such as oil palm shell, palm oil clinker, and coconut shell from these industries as lightweight aggregate to produce structural grade lightweight aggregate concrete. In order to promote the concept of using such concrete for actual structural applications, this paper reviews the use of such agriculture-based lightweight aggregate concrete in reinforced concrete structural members such as beam and slab, which were carried out by researchers in the past. The behaviour of the structural members under flexural, shear, and torsional load was also summarized. It is hoped that the knowledge attained from the paper will provide design engineers with better idea and proper application of design criteria for structural members using such agriculture waste as lightweight aggregate.

  20. National legislative and regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This section treats of the following National legislative and regulatory activities: 1 - France: General legislation, regulations and instruments; Nuclear trade (including non-proliferation); International co-operation; 2 - India: Licensing and regulatory infrastructure; Liability and compensation; 3 - Ireland: Nuclear safety and radiological protection (including nuclear emergency planning); Transport of radioactive material; Nuclear trade (including non-proliferation); 4 - Lithuania: Licensing and regulatory infrastructure; Nuclear safety and radiological protection (including nuclear emergency planning); Radioactive waste management; 5 - Luxembourg: Nuclear safety and radiological protection (including nuclear emergency planning); 6 - Slovak Republic: International co-operation; General legislation, regulations and instruments; 7 - Spain: Radioactive materials (including physical protection); Radioactive waste management; 8 - United States: Licensing and regulatory infrastructure

  1. Structure study and properties of rare earth-rich glassed for the conditioning of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardez, I.

    2004-11-01

    A new nuclear glass composition, able to immobilize highly radioactive liquid wastes from high burn-up UO 2 fuel, was established and its structure studied. The composition of the selected rare earth-rich glass is (molar %): 61.79 SiO 2 - 8.94 B 2 O 3 - 3.05 Al 2 O 3 - 14.41 Na 2 O - 6.32 CaO - 1.89 ZrO 2 - 3.60 RE 2 O 3 (with RE = La, Ce, Pr and Nd) The aim of this study was to determine the local environment of the rare earth in this glass and also to glean information about the effect of glass composition on the rare earth neighbouring (influence of Si, B, Al, Na and Ca contents). To this end, several series of glasses, prepared from the baseline glass, were studied by different characterisation methods such as EXAFS spectroscopy at the neodymium L III -edge, optical absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and 29 Si, 27 Al and 11 B MAS-NMR. By coupling all the results obtained, several hypotheses about the nature of the rare earth neighbouring in the glass were proposed. (author)

  2. Structure and properties of rare earth-rich glassed for nuclear waste immobilisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardez, I.

    2004-11-01

    A new nuclear glass composition, able to immobilize highly radioactive liquid wastes from high burn-up UO 2 fuel, was established and its structure studied. The composition of the selected rare earth-rich glass is (molar %): 61.79 SiO 2 - 8.94 B 2 O 3 - 3.05 Al 2 O 3 - 14.41 Na 2 O - 6.32 CaO - 1.89 ZrO 2 - 3.60 RE 2 O 3 (with RE = La, Ce, Pr and Nd). The aim of this study was to determine the local environment of the rare earth in this glass and also to glean information about the effect of glass composition on the rare earth neighbouring (influence of Si, B, Al, Na and Ca contents). To this end, several series of glasses, prepared from the baseline glass, were studied by different characterisation methods such as EXAFS spectroscopy at the neodymium LIII-edge, optical absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and 29 Si, 27 Al and 11 B MAS-NMR. By coupling all the results obtained, several hypotheses about the nature of the rare earth neighbouring in the glass were proposed. (author)

  3. Origin and evolution of cup-shaped structures on leached nuclear waste containment glass surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, C.; Villa, F.; Chambaudet, A.; Vernaz, E.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional surface microanalysis system equipped with a sensitive topographical probe was used to quantify the evolution of cup-shaped structures formed by aqueous leaching of nuclear waste containment glass. A model of the dissolution phenomenon provides satisfactory correlation between calculated and measured cup radius and depth. Dissolution cups form from cracks on the initially cut glass surface. Large cracks control the phenomenon by forming the largest cups, which gradually absorb smaller ones. The evolution of the size and shape of the dissolution cups was described by a model that assumes a constant dissolution rate on the surface, diminishing with crack depth. The best fit with the experimental data was obtained with a dissolution rate one hundred times lower at the bottom of the crack than at the surface. Moreover, it is predictable that all the cups will gradually disappear as they grow larger and flatter over a leaching period of some 2 years, for the glass composition and experimental leaching procedures used in this work

  4. A structural model analysis of public opposition to a high-level radioactive waste facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, J.; Mertz, C.K.; Slovic, P.; Burns, W.

    1991-09-01

    Studies show that most Nevada residents and almost all state officials oppose the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository project at Yucca Mountain. Surveys of the public show that individual citizens view the Yucca Mountain repository as having high risk; nuclear experts, in contrast, believe the risks are very low. Policy analysts have suggested that public risk perceptions may be reduced by better program management, increased trust in the federal government, and increased economic benefits for accepting a repository. The model developed in this study is designed to examine the relationship between public perceptions of risk, trust in risk management, and potential economic impacts of the current repository program using a confirmatory multivariate method known as covariance structure analysis. The results indicate that perceptions of potential economic gains have little relationship to opposition to the repository. On the other hand, risk perceptions and the level of trust in repository management are closely related to each other and to opposition. The impacts of risk perception and trust in management on opposition to the repository result from a combination of their direct influences as well as their indirect influences operating through perceptions that the repository would have serious negative impacts on the state's economy due to stigmatization and reduced tourism

  5. Electrical, thermal and structural properties of plasticized waste cooking oil-based polyurethane solid polymer electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huzaizi, Rahmatina Mohd; Tahir, Syuhada Mohd; Mahbor, Kamisah Mohamad

    2017-12-01

    Waste cooking oil-based polyol was synthesized using epoxidation and hydroxylation methods. The polyol was combined with 4,4-diphenylmethane diisocyanate to produce polyurethane (PU) to be used as polymer host in solid polymer electrolyte. 30 wt% LiClO4 was added as doping salt and two types of plasticizers were used; ethylene carbonate (PU-EC) and polyethylene glycol (PU-PEG). The SPE films were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The highest conductivity achieved was 8.4 x 10-8 S cm-1 upon addition of 10 wt% EC. The XRD results showed a decrease of crystalline peaks in PU-EC and the increase in PU-PEG. DSC results revealed that the films; PU, PU-EC and PU-PEG had glass transition temperatures of 159.7, 106.0 and 179.7 °C, respectively. The results showed that the addition of EC increased the amorphous region and the free volume in the SPE structure, thus resulted in higher ionic conductivity.

  6. Microbial community structure and diversity in a municipal solid waste landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Cao, Aixin; Zhao, Guozhu; Zhou, Chuanbin; Xu, Rui

    2017-08-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills are the most prevalent waste disposal method and constitute one of the largest sources of anthropogenic methane emissions in the world. Microbial activities in disposed waste play a crucial role in greenhouse gas emissions; however, only a few studies have examined metagenomic microbial profiles in landfills. Here, the MiSeq high-throughput sequencing method was applied for the first time to examine microbial diversity of the cover soil and stored waste located at different depths (0-150cm) in a typical MSW landfill in Yangzhou City, East China. The abundance of microorganisms in the cover soil (0-30cm) was the lowest among all samples, whereas that in stored waste decreased from the top to the middle layer (30-90cm) and then increased from the middle to the bottom layer (90-150cm). In total, 14 phyla and 18 genera were found in the landfill. A microbial diversity analysis showed that Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were the dominant phyla, whereas Halanaerobium, Methylohalobius, Syntrophomonas, Fastidiosipila, and Spirochaeta were the dominant genera. Methylohalobius (methanotrophs) was more abundant in the cover layers of soil than in stored waste, whereas Syntrophomonas and Fastidiosipila, which affect methane production, were more abundant in the middle to bottom layers (90-150cm) in stored waste. A canonical correlation analysis showed that microbial diversity in the landfill was most strongly correlated with the conductivity, organic matter, and moisture content of the stored waste. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Nuclear regulatory developments in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binder, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper from CNSC discusses nuclear regulatory developments in Canada. It starts with the Fukushima accident and the effect on the nuclear sector. It summarises what CNSC has done, what it has learned and their plans going forward. It has made recommendations to IAEA for international enhancements to regulatory procedures. It outline the activities of Canada's nuclear power plants, Canada's uranium projects, deep geological repository and waste management as well as nuclear research in Canada.

  8. Structure and short time degradation studies of sodium zirconium phosphate ceramics loaded with simulated fast breeder (FBR) waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ananthanarayanan, A., E-mail: arvinda@barc.gov.in [Process Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Ambashta, R.D., E-mail: aritu@barc.gov.in [Process Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sudarsan, V. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Ajithkumar, T. [Applied Catalysis Unit, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008 (India); Sen, D.; Mazumder, S. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Wattal, P.K. [Process Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2017-04-15

    Sodium zirconium phosphate (NZP) ceramics have been prepared using conventional sintering and hot isostatic pressing (HIP) routes. The structure of NZP ceramics, prepared using the HIP route, has been compared with conventionally sintered NZP using a combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and ({sup 31}P and {sup 23}Na) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy techniques. It is observed that NZP with no waste loading is aggressive toward the steel HIP-can during hot isostatic compaction and significant fraction of cations from the steel enter the ceramic material. Waste loaded NZP samples (10 wt% simulated FBR waste) show significantly low can-interaction and primary NZP phase is evident in this material. Upon exposure of can-interacted and waste loaded NZP to boiling water and steam, {sup 31}P NMR does not detect any major modifications in the network structure. However, the {sup 23}Na NMR spectra indicate migration of Na{sup +} ions from the surface and possible re-crystallization. This is corroborated by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) data and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) measurements carried out on these samples.

  9. Development and problems of radioactive waste management infrastructure in Estonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putnik, H.; Realo, E.

    2001-01-01

    Estonia is one of a few countries where the establishment of radiation protection and radioactive waste management infrastructure started only recently, soon after regaining independence in the beginning of 1990's. Both legislative and regulatory infrastructure had to be built from scratch, in parallel with the beginning of urgent activities and practices to manage waste streams inherited from the past. Despite significant deficiency of local expertise and specialists in the field, the main objectives of the establishment were set up: to enforce national legislation basing on contemporary international principles, criteria, requirements and to implement structures and procedures for an efficient regulation of radiation safety issues, including practices involving radioactive waste management and decommissioning

  10. Regulatory aspects of sludge management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharples, F.E.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of radioactive waste land disposal restrictions by discussing the following topics: highlights of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act history; purposes of land disposal restrictions; regulatory definition of land disposal; US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) implementation of land disposal restrictions; schedules for implementing land disposal restrictions; solvent and dioxin wastes; classification of liquid hazardous and radioactive wastes; generator and treatment, storage, and disposal responsibilities; variances and extensions; and options for mixed waste management. Land disposal restrictions take into account the long-term uncertainties associated with land disposal, the need to manage waste right the first time they are disposed, and the persistence toxicity, mobility, propensity to bioaccumulate, and volume. In the Department of Energy system land disposal restrictions affect mixed waste management and site remedial action programs

  11. Crystallization and quaternary structure analysis of an Lrp-like regulatory protein from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedelnikova, S.E.; Smits, S.H.J.; Leonard, P.M.; Brinkman, A.B.; Oost, van der J.; Rafferty, J.B.

    2001-01-01

    The LrpA transcriptional regulator from Pyrococcus furiosus, a member of the leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) family, has been crystallized by the hanging-drop method of vapour diffusion using ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. The crystals belong to the tetragonal system and are in

  12. Structural basis for regulation of rhizobial nodulation and symbiosis gene expression by the regulatory NolR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The symbiosis between rhizobial microbes and host plants involves the coordinated expression of multiple genes, which leads to nodule formation and nitrogen fixation. As part of the transcriptional machinery for nodulation and symbiosis across a range of Rhizobium, NolR serves as a global regulatory...

  13. Long-term Effects of Organic Waste Fertilizers on Soil Structure, Tracer Transport, and Leaching of Colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekfeldt, Jonas Duus Stevens; Kjaergaard, Charlotte; Magid, Jakob

    2017-07-01

    Organic waste fertilizers have previously been observed to significantly affect soil organic carbon (SOC) content and soil structure. However, the effect of organic waste fertilizers on colloid dispersibility and leaching of colloids from topsoil has not yet been studied extensively. We investigated how the repeated application of different types of agricultural (liquid cattle slurry and solid cattle manure) and urban waste fertilizers (sewage sludge and composted organic household waste) affected soil physical properties, colloid dispersion from aggregates, tracer transport, and colloid leaching from intact soil cores. Total porosity was positively correlated with SOC content. Yearly applications of sewage sludge increased absolute microporosity (pores 30 μm) compared with the unfertilized control, whereas organic household waste compost fertilization increased both total porosity and the absolute porosity in all pore size classes (though not significant for 100-600 μm). Treatments receiving large amounts of organic fertilizers exhibited significantly lower levels of dispersible colloids compared with an unfertilized control and a treatment that had received moderate applications of cattle slurry. The content of water-dispersible colloids could not be explained by a single factor, but differences in SOC content, electrical conductivity, and sodium adsorption ratio were important factors. Moreover, we found that the fertilizer treatments did not significantly affect the solute transport properties of the topsoil. Finally, we found that the leaching of soil colloids was significantly decreased in treatments that had received large amounts of organic waste fertilizers, and we ascribe this primarily to treatment-induced differences in effluent electrical conductivity during leaching. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  14. Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Department of Energy has proposed a draft plan for investigating the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site to determine if it suitable for a waste repository. This fact sheet provides information on the status of DOE's and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's efforts to streamline what NRC expects will be the largest and most complex nuclear-licensing proceeding in history, including the development of an electronic information management system called the Licensing Support System

  15. Mix design and properties of fly ash waste lightweight aggregates in structural lightweight concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Manu S. Nadesan; P. Dinakar

    2017-01-01

    Concrete is one of the most widely used construction materials and has the ability to consume industrial wastes in high volume. As the demand for concrete is increasing, one of the effective ways to reduce the undesirable environmental impact of the concrete is by the use of waste and by-product materials as cement and aggregate substitutes in concrete. One such waste material is fly ash, which is produced in large quantities from thermal power plants as a by-product. A substantial amount of ...

  16. Preliminary analysis of the induced structural radioactivity inventory of the base-case aqueous accelerator transmutation of waste reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezdecny, J.A.; Vance, K.M.; Henderson, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Accelerator Transmutation of (Nuclear) Waste (ATW) project is the substantial reduction in volume of long-lived high-level radioactive waste of the US in a safe and energy-efficient manner. An evaluation of the ATW concept has four aspects: material balance, energy balance, performance, and cost. An evaluation of the material balance compares the amount of long-lived high-level waste transmuted with the amount and type, of waste created in the process. One component of the material balance is the activation of structural materials over the lifetime of the transmutation reactor. A preliminary radioactivity and radioactive mass balance analysis has been performed on four structure regions of the reaction chamber: the tungsten target, the lead annulus, six tubing materials carrying the actinide slurry, and five reaction vessel structural materials. The amount of radioactive material remaining after a 100-yr cooling period for the base-case ATW was found to be 338 kg of radionuclides. The bulk of this material (313 kg) was generated in the zirconium-niobium (Zr-Nb) actinide tubing material. Replacement of the Zr-Nb tubing material with one of the alternative tubing materials analyzed would significantly reduce the short- and long-term radioactive mass produced. The alternative vessel material Al-6061 alloys, Tenelon, HT-9, and 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo and the alternative actinide tubing materials Al-6061 alloy, carbon-carbon matrix, silicon carbide, and Ti-6 Al-4 V qualify for shallow land burial. Alternative disposal options for the base-case structural material Type 304L stainless steel and the actinide tubing material Zr-Nb will need to be considered as neither qualifies for shallow land burial

  17. Evaluation of solid waste and plastic clay mixtures for structural ceramic use; Avaliacao de misturas de residuo solido com argila plastica para aplicacao em ceramica vermelha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Neli Iloni Warpechowski da [Fundacao de Ciencia e Tecnologia (CIENTEC), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Belo, Pedro [Ceramics Representacoes Comerciais Ltda, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    1996-07-01

    This work aims to verify the behaviour of the organic solid waste added by 10%, 15% and 20% in mixture in a plastic clay. It intends to emphasize the influence of the waste in the mixture. Technology tests have been carried out in the clay and mixtures to obtain possible uses in the structural ceramics. (author) 1 ref., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Organization of nuclear regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blidaru, Valentin

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the structure, missions and organizational aspects of the CNCAN, the National Commission for the control of nuclear activities in Romania. The paper addresses the following main issues: 1.General aspects; 2.Organizational structure of the NRA in Romania; 3.General description of the Division for Nuclear Safety Assessments; 4.Specific activities; 5.Regulatory approaches and practices. Under the title of 'General aspects' the following three basic statements are highlighted: 1.CNCAN is a governmental organization responsible for the development of the regulatory framework, the control of its implementation and the licensing of nuclear facilities; 2.CNCAN is the national authority competent in exercising the regulatory activity, authorization and control in the nuclear field provided by the law No. 111/ 1996 republished in 1998; 3.The Commission exercises its functions independently of the ministries and other authorities of the public control administration being subordinated to the Romanian Government. The organizational structure is as follows: - President, the Managerial Council and the Advisory Council coordinating the four General Divisions that are responsible for: - Nuclear Safety with Division of Nuclear Safety Assessment and Division of Nuclear Objectives Surveillance; - Radiological Safety with Division of Radiological Safety Assessment and Division of Operational Radiation Protection; - Surveillance of Environmental Radioactivity with Division of Assessment and Analysis and Division of National Network; - Development and Resource with the Division of Economy and Division of Human Resources. In addition under direct coordination of the President operate the Division of Radiation Protection, Transport and Radioactive Waste and the Division of International Cooperation and Communication. Specific activities are listed describing among others the issues of: - Safety of nuclear installation; - Evaluation relating to licensing of nuclear

  19. Decree 328/003. Is approve the organizational structure reformulation project of the regulatory unit of Unit 006 Energy and water services of subsection 02 Presidency of the Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This decree approve the organizational structure project of The regulatory energy and water services ( URSEA). This unit is responsible for monitoring the activities related to electricity, gas, drinking water, sanitation and oil, fuel and other hydrocarbon derivatives

  20. Chemical and Charge Imbalance Induced by Radionuclide Decay: Effects on Waste Form Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Jaffe, John E.; Jiang, Weilin; Strachan, Denis M.

    2011-04-01

    This is a milestone document covering the activities to validate theoretical calculations with experimental data for the effect of the decay of 90Sr to 90Zr on materials properties. This was done for a surragate waste form strontium titanate.

  1. Structure of technical systems: interpersonal networks and performance in nuclear waste and photovoltaic research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrum, W.M. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The organization of scientific technology in modern, industrialized societies is examined by comparing two large-scale, multi-organizational, mission-oriented research networks. Using national data from personal interviews with 297 scientists, engineers, research managers, and policy makers from 97 organizations involved in nuclear waste management and solar-photovoltaic development, this study develops and tests hypotheses on the relationships among governmental, academic, private, and public interest sectors and the kinds of social linkages which are associated with technical performance. The principal finding is that in photovoltaic research, contacts with the research community are associated with high levels of performance, while for nuclear waste researchers, they are not. Instead, linkages to the governmental sector predict performance in nuclear waste research. This difference is explained by the governmental domination of the nuclear-waste system and the lack of private-sector involvement

  2. HUMIC ACID-LIKE MATTER ISOLATED FROM GREEN URBAN WASTES. PART I: STRUCTURE AND SURFACTANT PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo Montoneri

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A humic acid-like substance (cHAL2 isolated from urban green wastes before composting was compared to a humic acid-like substance (cHAL isolated from a mix of urban organic humid waste fraction and green residues composted for 15 days. cHAL2 was found to contain more aliphatic and O-alkyl C atoms relative to aromatic, phenol, and carboxyl C atoms, and to yield higher critical micellar concentration (cmc = 0.97 g L-1 and surface tension at the cmc (cmc = 37.8 mN/min water than cHAL (cmc = 0.40 g L-1; cmc = 36.1 mN/m. The results point out that biomass wastes may be an interesting source of biosurfactants with diversified properties that depend on the nature of waste and on its process of treatment.

  3. Structural and crystallisation study of a rare earth alumino borosilicate glass designed for nuclear waste confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintas, A.

    2007-09-01

    This work is devoted to the study of a rare earth alumino borosilicate glass, which molar composition is 61,81 SiO 2 - 3,05 Al 2 O 3 - 8,94 B 2 O 3 - 14,41 Na 2 O - 6,33 CaO - 1,90 ZrO 2 - 3,56 Nd 2 O 3 , and envisaged for the immobilization of nuclear wastes originating from the reprocessing of high discharge burn up spent fuel. From a structural viewpoint, we investigated the role of the modifier cations on the arrangement of the glass network through different modifications of the glass composition: variation of the Na/Ca ratio and modification of the nature of the alkali and alkaline earth cations. The NMR and Raman spectroscopic techniques were useful to determine the distribution of modifier cations among the glass network and also to cast light on the competition phenomena occurring between alkali and alkaline earth cations for charge compensation of [AlO 4 ] - and [BO 4 ] - species. The neodymium local environment could be probed by optical absorption and EXAFS spectroscopies which enabled to better understand the insertion mode of Nd 3+ ions among the silicate domains of the glass network. Concerning the crystallization behavior we were interested in how the glass composition may influence the crystallization processes and especially the formation of the apatite phase of composition Ca 2 Nd 8 (SiO 4 ) 6 O 2 . In particular, this work underlined the important role of both alkaline earth and rare earth cations on the crystallization of the apatite phase. (author)

  4. Environmental effects on metal structures and connection in NFS waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    The integrity of the existing NFS high-level waste tanks was evaluated, based upon information available in the literature. Failure modes were identified and analyzed. The occurrence of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) was established as the most probable failure mechanism. Factors that would minimize the occurrence of SCC were identified as post-welding stress relief and control of the NO - 3 -to-NO - 2 ratio within the waste

  5. A Structural Scale for the Factors of Waste Sensors and Transducers Recycling Based on Consumer Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Ke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article first introduced the research results of both domestic and foreign scholars on the factors of waste sensors and transducers recycling, and in consideration of the four main bodies in waste sensors and transducers recycling, 14 influencing indicators of waste sensors and transducers recycling are extracted. Then this paper designed a questionnaire according to the 15 indicators of waste home appliance recycling, and put it on a research website. After verification of reliability and validity of the questionnaire, this paper analyzed the influencing factors of waste sensors and transducers recycling by using SPSS 13.0. Finally this article used factor analysis method to identify the representative factors. Two factors are concluded: Factor 1 mainly represents laws and regulations of government, governmental subsidy, governmental technology support, governmental market guidance, governmental monitor and control, recycling knowledge publication by government, social responsibilities of producers and recyclers, technique disposition ability of producers and recyclers, recyclers' service, therefore it could be summarized as government and enterprise disposition capability; while Factor 2 mainly represents consumers' benefit from recycling, convenience of consumers' recycling, mental satisfaction of consumers from recycling, consumers' recycling knowledge, social recycling environment, and thus they could be summarized as consumer incentive factor. This paper would provide some references for the analysis and research on influencing factors of waste sensors and transducers recycling.

  6. PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL AND STRUCTURAL EVOLUTIION OF ZEOLITE-CONTAINING WASTE FORMS PRODUCED FROM METAKAOLINITE AND CALCINED SODUIM BEARING WASTE (HLW AND/OR LLW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grutzeck, Michael W.

    2004-01-01

    Zeolites are extremely versatile. They can adsorb liquids and gases and serve as cation exchange media. They occur in nature as well cemented deposits. The Romans used blocks of zeolitized tuff as a building material. Using zeolites for the management of radioactive waste is not new, but a process by which the zeolites can be made to act as a cementing agent is. Zeolitic materials are relatively easy to synthesize from a wide range of both natural and man-made precursors. The process under study is derived from a well known method in which metakaolin (thermally dehydroxylated kaolin a mixture of kaolinite and smaller amounts of quartz and mica that has been heated to ∼700 C) is mixed with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and water and reacted in slurry form (for a day or two) at mildly elevated temperatures. The zeolites form as finely divided powders containing micrometer ((micro)m) sized crystals. However, if the process is changed slightly and just enough concentrated sodium hydroxide solution is added to the metakaolinite to make a thick paste and then the paste is cured under mild hydrothermal conditions (60-200 C), the mixture forms a concrete-like ceramic material made up of distinct crystalline tectosilicate minerals (zeolites and feldspathoids) imbedded in an X-ray amorphous hydrated sodium aluminosilicate matrix. Due to its vitreous character we have chosen to call this composite a ''hydroceramic''. Similar to zeolite powders, a hydroceramic is able to sequester cations in both lattice positions and within the channels and voids present in its tectosilicate framework structure. It can also accommodate a wide range of salt molecules (e.g., sodium nitrate) within these same openings thus rendering them insoluble. Due to its fine crystallite size and cementing character, the matrix develops significant physical strength. The obvious similarities between a hydroceramic waste form and a waste form based on solidified Portland cement grout are only superficial because

  7. Identification of locally available structural material as co-substrate for organic waste composting in Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, C; Heldt, N

    2016-06-01

    Owing to the lack in structural strength while composting certain kinds of organic wastes, 11 co-substrates were tested that are generally locally available in rural areas of northern Tamil Nadu, India. In addition to the classical composting parameters such as carbon/nitrogen ratio, moisture content, dry matter and organic dry matter, a compression test was conducted to evaluate the structural strength and the suitability as bulking agent for composting processes. Additionally, with respect to the climatic conditions in India, the water holding capacity was also evaluated. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Battery waste management status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, B.M.; Sabatini, J.C.; Wolsky, S.

    1993-01-01

    The paper consists of a series of slides used in the conference presentation. The topics outlined in the slides are: an overview of battery waste management; waste management of lead acid batteries; lead acid recycling; typical legislation for battery waste; regulatory status in European countries; mercury use in cells; recent trends in Hg and Cd use; impact of batteries to air quality at MSW incinerators; impact of electric vehicles; new battery technologies; and unresolved issues

  9. Mixed Low-Level Radioactive Waste (MLLW) Primer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwinkendorf, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    This document presents a general overview of mixed low-level waste, including the regulatory definitions and drivers, the manner in which the various kinds of mixed waste are regulated, and a discussion of the waste treatment options

  10. Mixed Low-Level Radioactive Waste (MLLW) Primer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. E. Schwinkendorf

    1999-04-01

    This document presents a general overview of mixed low-level waste, including the regulatory definitions and drivers, the manner in which the various kinds of mixed waste are regulated, and a discussion of the waste treatment options.

  11. The German Final Repository Konrad for Low and Intermediate Level Waste with Negligible Heat Generation - Water Law Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boetsch, W.; Grundler, D.; Kugel, K.; Brennecke, P.; Steyer, S.

    2009-01-01

    A survey on the conceptual realization of the requirements due to water law aspects within the license the KONRAD repository for radioactive waste with negligible heat generation in Germany is given [1]. The regulatory decision for the implementation and operation of the repository KONRAD includes, among other things, water law issues. In particular, the KONRAD license includes waste requirements concerning non-radioactive hazardous material (waste package constituents) which have to be considered producing KONRAD waste packages. The intended philosophy of waste acceptance and waste package quality assurance measures to be considered by the KONRAD site operator as well as by the waste producer will be presented. It will demonstrate the selected procedure of the waste declaration and acceptance and describe the structure and logic of tools and aids to comply with the legal requirements of the license and its collateral clause issued under water law. (authors)

  12. Regulatory Control of Radiation Sources. Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This Safety Guide is intended to assist States in implementing the requirements established in Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-1, Legal and Governmental Infrastructure for Nuclear, Radiation, Radioactive Waste and Transport Safety, for a national regulatory infrastructure to regulate any practice involving radiation sources in medicine, industry, research, agriculture and education. The Safety Guide provides advice on the legislative basis for establishing regulatory bodies, including the effective independence of the regulatory body. It also provides guidance on implementing the functions and activities of regulatory bodies: the development of regulations and guides on radiation safety; implementation of a system for notification and authorization; carrying out regulatory inspections; taking necessary enforcement actions; and investigating accidents and circumstances potentially giving rise to accidents. The various aspects relating to the regulatory control of consumer products are explained, including justification, optimization of exposure, safety assessment and authorization. Guidance is also provided on the organization and staffing of regulatory bodies. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Legal framework for a regulatory infrastructure; 3. Principal functions and activities of the regulatory body; 4. Regulatory control of the supply of consumer products; 5. Functions of the regulatory body shared with other governmental agencies; 6. Organization and staffing of the regulatory body; 7. Documentation of the functions and activities of the regulatory body; 8. Support services; 9. Quality management for the regulatory system.

  13. Twenty-third water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 3, structural and seismic engineering, primary systems integrity, equipment operability and aging, ECCS strainer blockage research and regulatory issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteleone, S. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-03-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty- Third Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 23-25, 1995. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Italy, Japan, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and Switzerland. This document, Volume 3, presents topics in Structural & Seismic Engineering, Primary Systems Integrity, Equipment Operability and Aging, and ECCS Strainer Blockage Research & Regulatory Issues. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  14. Twenty-third water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 3, structural and seismic engineering, primary systems integrity, equipment operability and aging, ECCS strainer blockage research and regulatory issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteleone, S.

    1996-03-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty- Third Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 23-25, 1995. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Italy, Japan, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and Switzerland. This document, Volume 3, presents topics in Structural ampersand Seismic Engineering, Primary Systems Integrity, Equipment Operability and Aging, and ECCS Strainer Blockage Research ampersand Regulatory Issues. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  15. STUDY ON MORPHOLOGICAL AND STRUCTURAL CHANGES INDUCED BY ULTRASONIC DEGR EASING OF WOOL AND HUMAN HAIR WASTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BĂLĂU MÎNDRU Tudorel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Recovery and reuse of wool and hair waste is a challenge with the ultimate goal environment protection. One of the early stages of the recovery process is the operation of scouring-degreasing wool and human hair waste. In recent decades the use of ultrasound technology has established an important place in different industrial processes and has started to revolutionize environmental protection. The power of ultrasound can enhance a wide variety of chemical and physical processes, mainly due to the phenomenon known as cavitation in a liquid medium. The objective of the present work is to develop eco-friendly effective degreasing system for keratin fiber waste with the aid of ultrasound, using distilled water and also trichlorethylene as a medium of propagation-degreasing, and realized a comparative analysis of efficiency of fat extraction by Soxhlet classical method and via ultrasonication. This work investigate the effect that ultrasonic irradiation has on the structure of wool and hair fibers. Thus were highlighted both morphological and structural changes of treated materials using optical microscopy, and FTIR spectroscopy. By using the unconventional method of cleaning and degreasing with an ultrasonic resonator tube are possible reductions in utility and solvents consumption together with changes in the cuticular layer of wool and hair fibers.

  16. Achievement of process control, safety, and regulatory compliance in a mixed waste evaporator system at the Hanford Site using data quality objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Bargen, B.H.

    1995-01-01

    The Data Quality Objectives (DQO) Process was applied to the operation of the 242-A Evaporator at the Hanford Site. A team consisting of representatives from process engineering, environmental engineering, regulatory compliance, analytical laboratories, and DOE utilized the step by step DQO process to define the issues, variables, and inputs necessary to develop the decision rules which govern plant operations. The sampling and analyses required to make these decisions was then optimized concerning factors such as sample number, total analyses, cost, radiation exposure, quality assurance, and deliverables

  17. Finite-element model evaluation of barrier configurations to reduce infiltration into waste-disposal structures: preliminary results and design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, A.H.; Phillips, S.J.; Adams, M.R.

    1982-09-01

    Barriers to reduce infiltration into waste burial disposal structures (trenches, pits, etc.) may be required to provide adequate waste confinement. The preliminary engineering design of these barriers should consider interrelated barrier performance factors. This paper summarizes preliminary computer simulation activities to further engineering barrier design efforts. Several barrier configurations were conceived and evaluated. Models were simulated for each barrier configuration using a finite element computer code. Results of this preliminary evaluation indicate that barrier configurations, depending on their morphology and materials, may significantly influence infiltration, flux, drainage, and storage of water through and within waste disposal structures. 9 figures

  18. Construction of the thermal/structural interactions in situ tests at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munson, D.E.; Matalucci, R.V. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hoag, D.L.; Blankenship D.A. [RE/SPEC Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    The Department of Energy has constructed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to develop the technology for the disposal of radioactive waste from defense programs. Sandia National Laboratories has the responsibility for experimental activities at the WIPP and has emplaced several large-scale Thermal/Structural Interactions (TSI) in situ tests to validate techniques used to predict repository performance. The construction of the tests relied heavily on earlier excavations at the WIPP site to provide a basis for selecting excavation, surveying, and instrumentation methods, and achievable construction tolerances. The tests were constructed within close tolerances to provide consistent room dimensions and accurate placement of gages. This accuracy has contributed to the high quality of data generated which in turn has facilitated the comparison of test results to numerical predictions. The purpose of this report is to detail the construction activities of the TSI tests.

  19. Construction of the thermal/structural interactions in situ tests at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, D.E.; Matalucci, R.V.; Hoag, D.L.; Blankenship D.A.

    1997-02-01

    The Department of Energy has constructed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to develop the technology for the disposal of radioactive waste from defense programs. Sandia National Laboratories has the responsibility for experimental activities at the WIPP and has emplaced several large-scale Thermal/Structural Interactions (TSI) in situ tests to validate techniques used to predict repository performance. The construction of the tests relied heavily on earlier excavations at the WIPP site to provide a basis for selecting excavation, surveying, and instrumentation methods, and achievable construction tolerances. The tests were constructed within close tolerances to provide consistent room dimensions and accurate placement of gages. This accuracy has contributed to the high quality of data generated which in turn has facilitated the comparison of test results to numerical predictions. The purpose of this report is to detail the construction activities of the TSI tests

  20. Hollow Few-Layer Graphene-Based Structures from Parafilm Waste for Flexible Transparent Supercapacitors and Oil Spill Cleanup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc Dung; Hsieh, Ping-Yen; Tsai, Meng-Ting; Lee, Chi-Young; Tai, Nyan-Hwa; To, Bao Dong; Vu, Duc Tu; Hsu, Chia Chen

    2017-11-22

    We report a versatile strategy to exploit parafilm waste as a carbon precursor for fabrication of freestanding, hollow few-layer graphene fiber mesh (HFGM) structures without use of any gaseous carriers/promoters via an annealing route. The freestanding HFGMs possess good mechanical flexibility, tailorable transparency, and high electrical conductivity, consequently qualifying them as promising electrochemical electrodes. Because of the hollow spaces, electrolyte ions can easily access into and contact with interior surfaces of the graphene fibers, accordingly increasing electrode/electrolyte interfacial area. As expected, solid-state supercapacitors based on the HFGMs exhibit a considerable enhancement in specific capacitance (20-30 fold) as compared to those employing chemical vapor deposition compact graphene films. Moreover, the parafilm waste is found to be beneficial for one-step fabrication of nanocarbon/few-layer graphene composite meshes with superior electrochemical performance, outstanding superhydrophobic property, good self-cleaning ability, and great promise for oil spill cleanup.