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Sample records for waste operations simulator

  1. Hanford tank waste operation simulator operational waste volume projection verification and validation procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HARMSEN, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    The Hanford Tank Waste Operation Simulator is tested to determine if it can replace the FORTRAN-based Operational Waste Volume Projection computer simulation that has traditionally served to project double-shell tank utilization. Three Test Cases are used to compare the results of the two simulators; one incorporates the cleanup schedule of the Tri Party Agreement

  2. System Planning With The Hanford Waste Operations Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, T.W.; Certa, P.J.; Wells, M.N.

    2010-01-01

    At the U. S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, 216 million liters (57 million gallons) of nuclear waste is currently stored in aging underground tanks, threatening the Columbia River. The River Protection Project (RPP), a fully integrated system of waste storage, retrieval, treatment, and disposal facilities, is in varying stages of design, construction, operation, and future planning. These facilities face many overlapping technical, regulatory, and financial hurdles to achieve site cleanup and closure. Program execution is ongoing, but completion is currently expected to take approximately 40 more years. Strategic planning for the treatment of Hanford tank waste is by nature a multi-faceted, complex and iterative process. To help manage the planning, a report referred to as the RPP System Plan is prepared to provide a basis for aligning the program scope with the cost and schedule, from upper-tier contracts to individual facility operating plans. The Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS), a dynamic flowsheet simulation and mass balance computer model, is used to simulate the current planned RPP mission, evaluate the impacts of changes to the mission, and assist in planning near-term facility operations. Development of additional modeling tools, including an operations research model and a cost model, will further improve long-term planning confidence. The most recent RPP System Plan, Revision 4, was published in September 2009.

  3. HANFORD TANK WASTE OPERATIONS SIMULATOR VERSION DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALLEN, G.K.

    2003-01-01

    This document describes the software version controls established for the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS). It defines: the methods employed to control the configuration of HTWOS; the version of each of the 26 separate modules for the version 1.0 of HTWOS; the numbering rules for incrementing the version number of each module; and a requirement to include module version numbers in each case results documentation. Version 1.0 of HTWOS is the first version under formal software version control. HTWOS contains separate revision numbers for each of its 26 modules. Individual module version numbers do not reflect the major release HTWOS configured version number

  4. Operational Waste Volume Projection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STRODE, J.N.

    2000-08-28

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June. 2000.

  5. Operational waste volume projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koreski, G.M.; Strode, J.N.

    1995-06-01

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the tri-party agreement. Assumptions are current as of June 1995

  6. Operational Waste Volume Projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    STRODE, J.N.

    2000-01-01

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of June. 2000

  7. Waste Sites - Municipal Waste Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — A Municipal Waste Operation is a DEP primary facility type related to the Waste Management Municipal Waste Program. The sub-facility types related to Municipal Waste...

  8. Development of a Thermodynamic Model for the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator - 12193

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Robert; Seniow, Kendra [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, Washington (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) is the current tool used by the Hanford Tank Operations Contractor for system planning and assessment of different operational strategies. Activities such as waste retrievals in the Hanford tank farms and washing and leaching of waste in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) are currently modeled in HTWOS. To predict phase compositions during these activities, HTWOS currently uses simple wash and leach factors that were developed many years ago. To improve these predictions, a rigorous thermodynamic framework has been developed based on the multi-component Pitzer ion interaction model for use with several important chemical species in Hanford tank waste. These chemical species are those with the greatest impact on high-level waste glass production in the WTP and whose solubility depends on the processing conditions. Starting with Pitzer parameter coefficients and species chemical potential coefficients collated from open literature sources, reconciliation with published experimental data led to a self-consistent set of coefficients known as the HTWOS Pitzer database. Using Gibbs energy minimization with the Pitzer ion interaction equations in Microsoft Excel,1 a number of successful predictions were made for the solubility of simple mixtures of the chosen species. Currently, this thermodynamic framework is being programmed into HTWOS as the mechanism for determining the solid-liquid phase distributions for the chosen species, replacing their simple wash and leach factors. Starting from a variety of open literature sources, a collection of Pitzer parameters and species chemical potentials, as functions of temperature, was tested for consistency and accuracy by comparison with available experimental thermodynamic data (e.g., osmotic coefficients and solubility). Reconciliation of the initial set of parameter coefficients with the experimental data led to the development of the self-consistent set known

  9. Transportable Vitrification System: Operational experience gained during vitrification of simulated mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehouse, J.C.; Burket, P.R.; Crowley, D.A.; Hansen, E.K.; Jantzen, C.M.; Smith, M.E.; Singer, R.P.; Young, S.R.; Zamecnik, J.R.; Overcamp, T.J.; Pence, I.W. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) is a large-scale, fully-integrated, transportable, vitrification system for the treatment of low-level nuclear and mixed wastes in the form of sludges, soils, incinerator ash, and similar waste streams. The TVS was built to demonstrate the vitrification of actual mixed waste at U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Currently, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is working with Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) to apply field scale vitrification to actual mixed waste at Oak Ridge Reservation's (ORR) K-25 Site. Prior to the application of the TVS to actual mixed waste it was tested on simulated K-25 B and C Pond waste at Clemson University. This paper describes the results of that testing and preparations for the demonstration on actual mixed waste

  10. Studies on sustainability of simulated constructed wetland system for treatment of urban waste: Design and operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, A K; Bankoti, N S; Rai, U N

    2016-03-15

    New system configurations and wide range of treatability make constructed wetland (CW) as an eco-sustainable on-site approach of waste management. Keeping this view into consideration, a novel configured three-stage simulated CW was designed to study its performance efficiency and relative importance of plants and substrate in purification processes. Two species of submerged plant i.e., Potamogeton crispus and Hydrilla verticillata were selected for this study. After 6 months of establishment, operation and maintenance of simulated wetland, enhanced reduction in physicochemical parameters was observed, which was maximum in the planted CW. The percentage removal (%) of the pollutants in three-stage mesocosms was; conductivity (60.42%), TDS (67.27%), TSS (86.10%), BOD (87.81%), NO3-N (81.28%) and PO4-P (83.54%) at 72 h of retention time. Submerged macrophyte used in simulated wetlands showed a significant time dependent accumulation of toxic metals (p ≤ 0.05). P. crispus accumulated the highest Mn (86.36 μg g(-1) dw) in its tissue followed by Cr (54.16 μg g(-1) dw), Pb (31.56 μg g(-1) dw), Zn (28.06 μg g(-1) dw) and Cu (25.76 μg g(-1) dw), respectively. In the case of H. verticillata, it was Zn (45.29), Mn (42.64), Pb (22.62), Cu (18.09) and Cr (16.31 μg g(-1) dw). Thus, results suggest that the application of simulated CW tackles the water pollution problem more efficiently and could be exploited in small community level as alternative and cost effective tools of phytoremediation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Operating Range for High Temperature Borosilicate Waste Glasses: (Simulated Hanford Enveloped)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad, J.; Ramsey, W. G.; Toghiani, R. K.

    2003-01-01

    The following results are a part of an independent thesis study conducted at Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory-Mississippi State University. A series of small-scale borosilicate glass melts from high-level waste simulant were produced with waste loadings ranging from 20% to 55% (by mass). Crushed glass was allowed to react in an aqueous environment under static conditions for 7 days. The data obtained from the chemical analysis of the leachate solutions were used to test the durability of the resulting glasses. Studies were performed to determine the qualitative effects of increasing the B2O3 content on the overall waste glass leaching behavior. Structural changes in a glass arising due to B2O3 were detected indirectly by its chemical durability, which is a strong function of composition and structure. Modeling was performed to predict glass durability quantitatively in an aqueous environment as a direct function of oxide composition

  12. Virtual reality in simulation of operational procedures in radioactive waste deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, Victor Goncalves Gloria

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest problems in the nuclear area are still the radioactive waste generated in the various applications of this form of energy, all these tailings are stored in warehouses that often are monitored and restructured for better allocation of then. These tailings are stored until it is safe to release into the environment. This work presents a methodology based on virtual reality, for the development of virtual deposits of radioactive waste in order to enable virtual simulations in these deposits. As application will be developed virtually the nuclear waste repository located at the Institute of Nuclear Engineering IEN/CNEN. The development of a virtual warehouse, more specifically, makes it possible to simulate/train the allocation and reallocation of materials with low and medium level of radioactivity, seen the possibility of locomotion of virtual objects and dynamic calculation of the rate of radiation in this environment. Using this methodology it also possible know the accumulated dose, by the virtual character, during the procedures run in the virtual environment. (author)

  13. FY-97 operations of the pilot-scale glass melter to vitrify simulated ICPP high activity sodium-bearing waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musick, C.A.

    1997-11-01

    A 3.5 liter refractory-lined joule-heated glass melter was built to test the applicability of electric melting to vitrify simulated high activity waste (HAW). The HAW streams result from dissolution and separation of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) calcines and/or radioactive liquid waste. Pilot scale melter operations will establish selection criteria needed to evaluate the application of joule heating to immobilize ICPP high activity waste streams. The melter was fabricated with K-3 refractory walls and Inconel 690 electrodes. It is designed to be continuously operated at 1,150 C with a maximum glass output rate of 10 lbs/hr. The first set of tests were completed using surrogate HAW-sodium bearing waste (SBW). The melter operated for 57 hours and was shut down due to excessive melt temperatures resulting in low glass viscosity (< 30 Poise). Due to the high melt temperature and low viscosity the molten glass breached the melt chamber. The melter has been dismantled and examined to identify required process improvement areas and successes of the first melter run. The melter has been redesigned and is currently being fabricated for the second run, which is scheduled to begin in December 1997

  14. Categorizing operational radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-04-01

    The primary objective of this publication is to improve communications among waste management professionals and Member States relative to the properties and status of radioactive waste. This is accomplished by providing a standardized approach to operational waste categorization using accepted industry practices and experience. It is a secondary objective to draw a distinction between operational waste categorization and waste disposal classification. The approach set forth herein is applicable to waste generation by mature (major, advanced) nuclear programmes, small-to-medium sized nuclear programmes, and programmes with waste from other nuclear applications. It can be used for planning, developing or revising categorization methodologies. For existing categorization programmes, the approach set forth in this publication may be used as a validation and evaluation tool for assessing communication effectiveness among affected organizations or nations. This publication is intended for use by waste management professionals responsible for creating, implementing or communicating effective categorization, processing and disposal strategies. For the users of this publication, it is important to remember that waste categorization is a communication tool. As such, the operational waste categories are not suitable for regulatory purposes nor for use in health and safety evaluations. Following Section 1 (Introduction) Section 2 of this publication defines categorization and its relationship to existing waste classification and management standards, regulations and practices. It also describes the benefits of a comprehensive categorization programme and fundamental record considerations. Section 3 provides an overview of the categorization process, including primary categories and sub-categories. Sections 4 and 5 outline the specific methodology for categorizing unconditioned and conditioned wastes. Finally, Section 6 provides a brief summary of critical considerations that

  15. ORNL radioactive waste operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sease, J.D.; King, E.M.; Coobs, J.H.; Row, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    Since its beginning in 1943, ORNL has generated large amounts of solid, liquid, and gaseous radioactive waste material as a by-product of the basic research and development work carried out at the laboratory. The waste system at ORNL has been continually modified and updated to keep pace with the changing release requirements for radioactive wastes. Major upgrading projects are currently in progress. The operating record of ORNL waste operation has been excellent over many years. Recent surveillance of radioactivity in the Oak Ridge environs indicates that atmospheric concentrations of radioactivity were not significantly different from other areas in East Tennesseee. Concentrations of radioactivity in the Clinch River and in fish collected from the river were less than 4% of the permissible concentration and intake guides for individuals in the offsite environment. While some radioactivity was released to the environment from plant operations, the concentrations in all of the media sampled were well below established standards

  16. Startup and operation of a plant-scale continuous glass melter for vitrification of Savannah River Plant simulated waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    The reference process for disposal of radioactive waste from the Savannah River Plant is vitrification of the waste in borosilicate glass in a continuous glass melter. Design, startup, and operation of a plant-scale developmental melter system are discussed

  17. Waste Management Operations Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sease, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    The major function of the Program is to operate the Laboratory's systems and facilities for collecting and disposing of radioactive gaseous, liquid, and solid wastes. This includes collection and shallow land burial of about 2000 m 3 of β-γ contaminated waste and retrievable storage of about 60 m 3 of transuranium contaminated waste annually; ion-exchange treatment and release to the environment of about 450 x 10 3 m 3 of slightly contaminated water; volume reduction by evaporation of about 5000 m 3 of intermediate-level liquid waste followed by hydrofracture injection of the concentrate; and scrubbing and/or filtration of the gases from radioactive operations prior to release to the atmosphere. In addition, this year disposal of about 350,000 gal of radioactive sludge from the old (no longer in service) gunite tanks began. Operations are in conformance with rules and regulations presently applicable to ORNL. This Program is responsible for planning and for development activities for upgrading the facilities, equipment, and procedures for waste disposal to ensure ORNL work incorporates the latest technology. Major (line-item) new facilities are provided as well as substantial (GPP) upgrading of old facilities. These activities as well as the technical and engineering support to handle them are discussed

  18. Production and remediation of low-sludge, simulated Purex waste glasses, 1: Effects of sludge oxide additions on melter operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, W.G.

    1993-01-01

    Glass produced during the Purex 4 campaigns of the Integrated Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Melter System (IDMS) and the 774 Research Melter contained a lower fraction of sludge components than targeted by the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). Purex 4 glass was more durable than the benchmark (EA) glass, but less durable than most simulated SRS high-level waste glasses. Also, Purex 4 glass was considerably less durable than predicted by the algorithm which will be used to control production of DWPF glass. A melter run was performed using the 774 Research Melter to determine if the initial PCCS target composition determined for Purex 4 would produce acceptable glass whose durability could be accurately modeled by Hydration Thermodynamics. Reagent grade oxides and carbonates were added to Purex 4 melter feed stock to simulate a higher sludge loading. Each canister of glass produced was sampled and the composition, crystallinity, and durability was determined. This document details the melter operation and composition and crystallinity analyses

  19. Operational waste volume projection. Revision 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koreski, G.M.; Strode, J.N.

    1994-01-01

    Waste receipts to the double-shell tank system are analyzed and wastes through the year 2015 are projected based on generation trends of the past 12 months. A computer simulation of site operations is performed, which results in projections of tank fill schedules, tank transfers, evaporator operations, tank retrieval, and aging waste tank usage. This projection incorporates current budget planning and the clean-up schedule of the Tri-Party Agreement. Assumptions were current as of July 1994

  20. Westinghouse waste simulation and optimization software tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mennicken, Kim; Aign, Jorg

    2013-01-01

    Applications for dynamic simulation can be found in virtually all areas of process engineering. The tangible benefits of using dynamic simulation can be seen in tighter design, smoother start-ups and optimized operation. Thus, proper implementation of dynamic simulation can deliver substantial benefits. These benefits are typically derived from improved process understanding. Simulation gives confidence in evidence based decisions and enables users to try out lots of 'what if' scenarios until one is sure that a decision is the right one. In radioactive waste treatment tasks different kinds of waste with different volumes and properties have to be treated, e.g. from NPP operation or D and D activities. Finding a commercially and technically optimized waste treatment concept is a time consuming and difficult task. The Westinghouse Waste Simulation and Optimization Software Tool will enable the user to quickly generate reliable simulation models of various process applications based on equipment modules. These modules can be built with ease and be integrated into the simulation model. This capability ensures that this tool is applicable to typical waste treatment tasks. The identified waste streams and the selected treatment methods are the basis of the simulation and optimization software. After implementing suitable equipment data into the model, process requirements and waste treatment data are fed into the simulation to finally generate primary simulation results. A sensitivity analysis of automated optimization features of the software generates the lowest possible lifecycle cost for the simulated waste stream. In combination with proven waste management equipments and integrated waste management solutions, this tool provides reliable qualitative results that lead to an effective planning and minimizes the total project planning risk of any waste management activity. It is thus the ideal tool for designing a waste treatment facility in an optimum manner

  1. Westinghouse waste simulation and optimization software tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mennicken, Kim; Aign, Jorg [Westinghouse Electric Germany GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Applications for dynamic simulation can be found in virtually all areas of process engineering. The tangible benefits of using dynamic simulation can be seen in tighter design, smoother start-ups and optimized operation. Thus, proper implementation of dynamic simulation can deliver substantial benefits. These benefits are typically derived from improved process understanding. Simulation gives confidence in evidence based decisions and enables users to try out lots of 'what if' scenarios until one is sure that a decision is the right one. In radioactive waste treatment tasks different kinds of waste with different volumes and properties have to be treated, e.g. from NPP operation or D and D activities. Finding a commercially and technically optimized waste treatment concept is a time consuming and difficult task. The Westinghouse Waste Simulation and Optimization Software Tool will enable the user to quickly generate reliable simulation models of various process applications based on equipment modules. These modules can be built with ease and be integrated into the simulation model. This capability ensures that this tool is applicable to typical waste treatment tasks. The identified waste streams and the selected treatment methods are the basis of the simulation and optimization software. After implementing suitable equipment data into the model, process requirements and waste treatment data are fed into the simulation to finally generate primary simulation results. A sensitivity analysis of automated optimization features of the software generates the lowest possible lifecycle cost for the simulated waste stream. In combination with proven waste management equipments and integrated waste management solutions, this tool provides reliable qualitative results that lead to an effective planning and minimizes the total project planning risk of any waste management activity. It is thus the ideal tool for designing a waste treatment facility in an optimum manner

  2. Analysis Bounding Double Shell Tank (DST) Performance for the Hanford Tank Waste Operation Simulator Case 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMITH, D.F.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to compare the latest Tank Farm Contractor Operation and Utilization Plan (HNF-SD-WM-SP-012, Rev. 3) ''Case 2'' operating scenarios with a previous bounding analysis for the Double-Shell Tank (DST) System in order to provide a technical assessment against the current set of DST System performance requirements. A later update to HNF-SD-WM-SP-012 (i.e., Rev. 3A), released in late December 2001, did not impact the results of this analysis. This analysis provides technical support for revising the Performance Requirements for the Double-Shell Tank System, HNF-2168, Rev. 3, used as the basis for defining performance requirements noted in System Specification for the Double-Shell Tank System, HNF-SD-WM-TRD-007. Rev. 1

  3. Demonstration of an approach to waste form qualification through simulation of liquid-fed ceramic melter process operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, P.W.; Kuhn, W.L.; Peters, R.D.; Pulsipher, B.A.

    1986-07-01

    During fiscal year 1982, the US Department of Energy (DOE) assigned responsibility for managing civilian nuclear waste treatment programs in the United States to the Nuclear Waste Treatment Program (NWTP) at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). One of the principal objectives of this program is to establish relationships between vitrification process control and glass quality. Users of the liquid-fed ceramic melter (LFCM) process will need such relationships in order to establish acceptance of vitrified high-level nuclear waste at a licensed federal repository without resorting to destructive examination of the canisters. The objective is to be able to supply a regulatory agency with an estimate of the composition, durability, and integrity of the glass in each waste glass canister produced from an LFCM process simply by examining the process data collected during the operation of the LFCM. The work described here will continue through FY-1987 and culminate in a final report on the ability to control and monitor an LFCM process through sampling and process control charting of the LFCM feed system

  4. Simulation of blast furnace operation during the substitution of coke and pulverized coal with granulated waste plastic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Tihomir M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using the waste plastic as reducing agent in blast furnace for obtaining pig iron is in focus for the past couple year. The simulation of blast furnace process in BFC software has been performed in order to analyze the coke and coals saving, CO2 emission and determining the economic benefits. Three different batches were made for comparative analysis, depending on the batch composition and input of batch components into the blast furnace: case 1 (C1, case 2 (C2 and case 3 (C3. The base case, C1 contains sinter (bulk material which is needed for obtaining 1 tone of pig iron, quartz which provides slag alkalinity and coke as reducing and energy agent. C2 has the same components as C1, but contains pulverized coal instead one part of coke and C3 contains granulated waste plastic instead coke in an approximately the same amount as pulverized coal. The substitution of coke with pulverized coal and waste plastic is 18.6 % and 25.2 %, respectively. The economic, productivity and ecologic aspects have been analyzed. The consumption of each tone of waste plastic in blast furnace saves 360 $, which is 18 times more than its price, bearing in mind that the market price of coke is 380 $/t % and waste plastic 20 $/t. Regarding the specific productivity, it decreases from 2.13 for C1 to 1.87 for C3. From an environmental aspect there are two main benefits: reduction of CO2 emission and impossibility of dioxin formation. The CO2 emission was 20.18, 19.46 and 17.21 for C1, C2 and C3, respectively.

  5. Applications to waste management operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paine, D.; Uresk, V.; Schreckhise, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    Ecological studies of the 200 Area plateau waste management environs have provided preliminary answers to questions concerning the environmental health of associated biota, potential for radionuclide transport through the biotic system and risk to man. More importantly creation of this ecological data base provides visible evidence of environmental expertise so essential for maintenance of continued public confidence in waste management operations

  6. Waste streams from reprocessing operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, B.; Ericsson, A.-M.

    1978-03-01

    The three main products from reprocessing operations are uranium, plutonium and vitrified high-level-waste. The purpose of this report is to identify and quantify additional waste streams containing radioactive isotops. Special emphasis is laid on Sr, Cs and the actinides. The main part, more than 99 % of both the fission-products and the transuranic elements are contained in the HLW-stream. Small quantities sometimes contaminate the U- and Pu-streams and the rest is found in the medium-level-waste

  7. Optimizing the operating parameters of corona electrostatic separation for recycling waste scraped printed circuit boards by computer simulation of electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Lu, Hongzhou; Liu, Shushu; Xu, Zhenming

    2008-05-01

    The printed circuit board (PCB) has a metal content of nearly 28% metal, including an abundance of nonferrous metals such as copper, lead, and tin. The purity of precious metals in PCBs is more than 10 times that of rich-content minerals. Therefore, the recycling of PCBs is an important subject, not only from the viewpoint of waste treatment, but also with respect to the recovery of valuable materials. Compared with traditional process the corona electrostatic separation (CES) had no waste water or gas during the process and it had high productivity with a low-energy cost. In this paper, the roll-type corona electrostatic separator was used to separate metals and nonmetals from scraped waste PCBs. The software MATLAB was used to simulate the distribution of electric field in separating space. It was found that, the variations of parameters of electrodes and applied voltages directly influenced the distribution of electric field. Through the correlation of simulated and experimental results, the good separation results were got under the optimized operating parameter: U=20-30 kV, L=L(1)=L(2)=0.21 m, R(1)=0.114, R(2)=0.019 m, theta(1)=20 degrees and theta(2)=60 degrees .

  8. Simulators for NPP operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuzhakov, A.Yu.

    2010-01-01

    The author reports on the application of full-scale simulators for training and maintaining proficiency of unit control room operators that is an essential element of Russian NPPs personnel education system. The existing simulators for the unit control room operating personnel are listed. The integrated approach to developing and maintaining the training hardware is described. The integrated approach is being implemented on the basis of observance of the existing requirements to training hardware, improvement of regulations, control from a single centre responsible for the provision of support to the activities, inclusion into the plans of simulators for development of skills for operating control over equipment and systems, as well as control from local boards [ru

  9. The LSST operations simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Francisco; Saha, Abhijit; Chandrasekharan, Srinivasan; Cook, Kem; Petry, Catherine; Ridgway, Stephen

    2014-08-01

    The Operations Simulator for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST; http://www.lsst.org) allows the planning of LSST observations that obey explicit science driven observing specifications, patterns, schema, and priorities, while optimizing against the constraints placed by design-specific opto-mechanical system performance of the telescope facility, site specific conditions as well as additional scheduled and unscheduled downtime. It has a detailed model to simulate the external conditions with real weather history data from the site, a fully parameterized kinematic model for the internal conditions of the telescope, camera and dome, and serves as a prototype for an automatic scheduler for the real time survey operations with LSST. The Simulator is a critical tool that has been key since very early in the project, to help validate the design parameters of the observatory against the science requirements and the goals from specific science programs. A simulation run records the characteristics of all observations (e.g., epoch, sky position, seeing, sky brightness) in a MySQL database, which can be queried for any desired purpose. Derivative information digests of the observing history are made with an analysis package called Simulation Survey Tools for Analysis and Reporting (SSTAR). Merit functions and metrics have been designed to examine how suitable a specific simulation run is for several different science applications. Software to efficiently compare the efficacy of different survey strategies for a wide variety of science applications using such a growing set of metrics is under development. A recent restructuring of the code allows us to a) use "look-ahead" strategies that avoid cadence sequences that cannot be completed due to observing constraints; and b) examine alternate optimization strategies, so that the most efficient scheduling algorithm(s) can be identified and used: even few-percent efficiency gains will create substantive scientific

  10. Hanford solid waste management system simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaver, S.R.; Armacost, L.L.; Konynenbelt, H.S.; Wehrman, R.R.

    1994-12-01

    This paper describes systems analysis and simulation model development for a proposed solid waste management system at a U.S. Department of Energy Site. The proposed system will include a central storage facility, four treatment facilities, and three disposal sites. The material managed by this system will include radioactive, hazardous, and mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes. The objective of the modeling effort is to provide a means of evaluating throughput and capacity requirements for the proposed treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. The model is used to evaluate alternative system configurations and the effect on the alternatives of changing waste stream characteristics and receipt schedules. An iterative modeling and analysis approach is used that provides macro-level models early in the project and establishes credibility with the customer. The results from the analyses based on the macro models influence system design decisions and provide information that helps focus subsequent model development. Modeling and simulation of alternative system configurations and operating strategies yield a better understanding of the solid waste system requirements. The model effectively integrates information obtained through systems analysis and waste characterization to provide a consistent basis for system and facility planning

  11. Simulation of construction and demolition waste leachate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, T.G.; Jang, Y.; Thurn, L.G.

    1999-11-01

    Solid waste produced from construction and demolition (C and D) activities is typically disposed of in unlined landfills. Knowledge of C{ampersand}D debris landfill leachate is limited in comparison to other types of wastes. A laboratory study was performed to examine leachate resulting from simulated rainfall infiltrating a mixed C and D waste stream consisting of common construction materials (e.g., concrete, wood, drywall). Lysimeters (leaching columns) filled with the mixed C and D waste were operated under flooded and unsaturated conditions. Leachate constituent concentrations in the leachate from specific waste components were also examined. Leachate samples were collected and analyzed for a number of conventional water quality parameters including pH, alkalinity, total organic carbon, total dissolved solids, and sulfate. In experiments with the mixed C and D waste, high concentrations of total dissolved solids (TDS) and sulfate were detected in the leachate. C and D leachates produced as a result of unsaturated conditions exhibited TDS concentrations in the range of 570--2,200 mg/L. The major contributor to the TDS was sulfate, which ranged in concentration between 280 and 930 mg/L. The concentrations of sulfate in the leachate exceeded the sulfate secondary drinking water standard of 250 mg/L.

  12. Hazardous waste operational plan for site 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, R.S.

    1982-01-01

    This plan outlines the procedures and operations used at LLNL's Site 300 for the management of the hazardous waste generated. This waste consists primarily of depleted uranium (a by-product of U-235 enrichment), beryllium, small quantities of analytical chemicals, industrial type waste such as solvents, cleaning acids, photographic chemicals, etc., and explosives. This plan details the operations generating this waste, the proper handling of this material and the procedures used to treat or dispose of the hazardous waste. A considerable amount of information found in this plan was extracted from the Site 300 Safety and Operational Manual written by Site 300 Facility personnel and the Hazards Control Department

  13. Waste management considerations in HTGR recycle operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pence, D.T.; Shefcik, J.J.; Heath, C.A.

    1975-01-01

    Waste management considerations in the recycle of HTGR fuel are different from those encountered in the recycle of LWR fuel. The types of waste associated with HTGR recycle operations are discussed, and treatment methods for some of the wastes are described

  14. Solid waste retrieval. Phase 1, Operational basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    This Document describes the operational requirements, procedures, and options for execution of the retrieval of the waste containers placed in buried storage in Burial Ground 218W-4C, Trench 04 as TRU waste or suspect TRU waste under the activity levels defining this waste in effect at the time of placement. Trench 04 in Burial Ground 218W-4C is totally dedicated to storage of retrievable TRU waste containers or retrievable suspect TRU waste containers and has not been used for any other purpose

  15. Solid waste retrieval. Phase 1, Operational basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.M.

    1994-09-30

    This Document describes the operational requirements, procedures, and options for execution of the retrieval of the waste containers placed in buried storage in Burial Ground 218W-4C, Trench 04 as TRU waste or suspect TRU waste under the activity levels defining this waste in effect at the time of placement. Trench 04 in Burial Ground 218W-4C is totally dedicated to storage of retrievable TRU waste containers or retrievable suspect TRU waste containers and has not been used for any other purpose.

  16. WTP Waste Feed Qualification: Glass Fabrication Unit Operation Testing Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, M. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Hanford Missions Programs; Newell, J. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Process Technology Programs; Johnson, F. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Engineering Process Development; Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Engineering Process Development

    2016-07-14

    The waste feed qualification program is being developed to protect the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) design, safety basis, and technical basis by assuring waste acceptance requirements are met for each staged waste feed campaign prior to transfer from the Tank Operations Contractor to the feed receipt vessels inside the Pretreatment Facility. The Waste Feed Qualification Program Plan describes the three components of waste feed qualification: 1. Demonstrate compliance with the waste acceptance criteria 2. Determine waste processability 3. Test unit operations at laboratory scale. The glass fabrication unit operation is the final step in the process demonstration portion of the waste feed qualification process. This unit operation generally consists of combining each of the waste feed streams (high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW)) with Glass Forming Chemicals (GFCs), fabricating glass coupons, performing chemical composition analysis before and after glass fabrication, measuring hydrogen generation rate either before or after glass former addition, measuring rheological properties before and after glass former addition, and visual observation of the resulting glass coupons. Critical aspects of this unit operation are mixing and sampling of the waste and melter feeds to ensure representative samples are obtained as well as ensuring the fabrication process for the glass coupon is adequate. Testing was performed using a range of simulants (LAW and HLW simulants), and these simulants were mixed with high and low bounding amounts of GFCs to evaluate the mixing, sampling, and glass preparation steps in shielded cells using laboratory techniques. The tests were performed with off-the-shelf equipment at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that is similar to equipment used in the SRNL work during qualification of waste feed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and other waste treatment facilities at the

  17. Nuclear waste repository simulation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothfuchs, T.; Wieczorek, K.; Feddersen, H.K.; Staupendahl, G.; Coyle, A.J.; Kalia, H.; Eckert, J.

    1986-12-01

    This document is the third joint annual report on the Cooperative German-American 'Brine Migration Tests' that are in progress at the Asse salt mine in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). This Government supported mine serves as an underground test facility for research and development (R and D)-work in the field of nuclear waste repository research and simulation experiments. The tests are designed to simulate a nuclear waste repository to measure the effects of heat and gamma radiation on brine migration, salt decrepitation, disassociation of brine, and gases collected. The thermal mechanical behavior of salt, such as room closure, stresses and changes of the properties of salt are measured and compared with predicted behavior. This document covers the following sections: Issues and test objectives: This section presents issues that are investigated by the Brine Migration Test, and the test objectives derived from these issues; test site: This section describes the test site location and geology in the Asse mine; test description: A description of the test configuration, procedures, equipment, and instrumentation is given in this section; actual test chronology: The actual history of the test, in terms of the dates at which major activities occured, is presented in this section. Test results: This section presents the test results observed to data and the planned future work that is needed to complete the test; conclusions and recommendations: This section summarizes the conclusions derived to date regarding the Brine Migration Test. Additional work that would be useful to resolve the issues is discussed. (orig.)

  18. A Multiprocessor Operating System Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Gary M.; Campbell, Roy H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a multiprocessor operating system simulator that was developed by the authors in the Fall semester of 1987. The simulator was built in response to the need to provide students with an environment in which to build and test operating system concepts as part of the coursework of a third-year undergraduate operating systems course. Written in C++, the simulator uses the co-routine style task package that is distributed with the AT&T C++ Translator to provide a hierarchy of classes that represents a broad range of operating system software and hardware components. The class hierarchy closely follows that of the 'Choices' family of operating systems for loosely- and tightly-coupled multiprocessors. During an operating system course, these classes are refined and specialized by students in homework assignments to facilitate experimentation with different aspects of operating system design and policy decisions. The current implementation runs on the IBM RT PC under 4.3bsd UNIX.

  19. Robotics for mixed waste operations, demonstration description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) is developing technology to aid in the cleanup of DOE sites. Included in the OTD program are the Robotics Technology Development Program and the Mixed Waste Integrated Program. These two programs are working together to provide technology for the cleanup of mixed waste, which is waste that has both radioactive and hazardous constituents. There are over 240,000 cubic meters of mixed low level waste accumulated at DOE sites and the cleanup is expected to generate about 900,000 cubic meters of mixed low level waste over the next five years. This waste must be monitored during storage and then treated and disposed of in a cost effective manner acceptable to regulators and the states involved. The Robotics Technology Development Program is developing robotics technology to make these tasks safer, better, faster and cheaper through the Mixed Waste Operations team. This technology will also apply to treatment of transuranic waste. The demonstration at the Savannah River Site on November 2-4, 1993, showed the progress of this technology by DOE, universities and industry over the previous year. Robotics technology for the handling, characterization and treatment of mixed waste as well robotics technology for monitoring of stored waste was demonstrated. It was shown that robotics technology can make future waste storage and waste treatment facilities better, faster, safer and cheaper

  20. Operational Waste Stream Assumption for TSLCC Estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, S.

    2000-01-01

    This document provides the background and basis for the operational waste stream used in the 2000 Total System Life Cycle Cost (TSLCC) estimate for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). This document has been developed in accordance with its Development Plan (CRWMS MandO 2000a), and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''

  1. Virtual reality in simulation of operational procedures in radioactive waste deposits; Realidade virtual na simulacao de procedimentos operacionais em depositos de rejeitos radioativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Victor Goncalves Gloria

    2016-07-01

    One of the biggest problems in the nuclear area are still the radioactive waste generated in the various applications of this form of energy, all these tailings are stored in warehouses that often are monitored and restructured for better allocation of then. These tailings are stored until it is safe to release into the environment. This work presents a methodology based on virtual reality, for the development of virtual deposits of radioactive waste in order to enable virtual simulations in these deposits. As application will be developed virtually the nuclear waste repository located at the Institute of Nuclear Engineering IEN/CNEN. The development of a virtual warehouse, more specifically, makes it possible to simulate/train the allocation and reallocation of materials with low and medium level of radioactivity, seen the possibility of locomotion of virtual objects and dynamic calculation of the rate of radiation in this environment. Using this methodology it also possible know the accumulated dose, by the virtual character, during the procedures run in the virtual environment. (author)

  2. Simulation of beamline alignment operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annese, C; Miller, M G.

    1999-01-01

    The CORBA-based Simulator was a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project that applied simulation techniques to explore critical questions about distributed control systems. The simulator project used a three-prong approach that studied object-oriented distribution tools, computer network modeling, and simulation of key control system scenarios. The National Ignition Facility's (NIF) optical alignment system was modeled to study control system operations. The alignment of NIF's 192 beamlines is a large complex operation involving more than 100 computer systems and 8000 mechanized devices. The alignment process is defined by a detailed set of procedures; however, many of the steps are deterministic. The alignment steps for a poorly aligned component are similar to that of a nearly aligned component; however, additional operations/iterations are required to complete the process. Thus, the same alignment operations will require variable amounts of time to perform depending on the current alignment condition as well as other factors. Simulation of the alignment process is necessary to understand beamline alignment time requirements and how shared resources such as the Output Sensor and Target Alignment Sensor effect alignment efficiency. The simulation has provided alignment time estimates and other results based on documented alignment procedures and alignment experience gained in the laboratory. Computer communication time, mechanical hardware actuation times, image processing algorithm execution times, etc. have been experimentally determined and incorporated into the model. Previous analysis of alignment operations utilized average implementation times for all alignment operations. Resource sharing becomes rather simple to model when only average values are used. The time required to actually implement the many individual alignment operations will be quite dynamic. The simulation model estimates the time to complete an operation using

  3. Incineration of Non-radioactive Simulated Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.Z.; Abdelrazek, I.D.

    1999-01-01

    An advanced controlled air incinerator has been investigated, developed and put into successful operation for both non radioactive simulated and other combustible solid wastes. Engineering efforts concentrated on providing an incinerator which emitted a clean, easily treatable off-gas and which produced minimum amounts of secondary waste. Feed material is fed by gravity into the gas reactor without shredding or other pretreatment. The temperature of the waste is gradually increased in a reduced oxygen atmosphere as the resulting products are introduced into the combustion chamber. Steady burning is thus accomplished under easily controlled excess air conditions with the off-gas then passing through a simple dry cleaning-up system. Experimental studies showed that, at lower temperature, CO 2 , and CH 4 contents in gas reactor effluent increase by the increase of glowing bed temperature, while H 2 O, H 2 and CO decrease . It was proved that, a burn-out efficiency (for ash residues) and a volume reduction factor appeared to be better than 95.5% and 98% respectively. Moreover, high temperature permits increased volumes of incinerated material and results in increased gasification products. It was also found that 8% by weight of ashes are separated by flue gas cleaning system as it has chemical and size uniformity. This high incineration efficiency has been obtained through automated control and optimization of process variables like temperature of the glowing bed and the oxygen feed rate to the gas reactor

  4. Secondary Waste Simulant Development for Cast Stone Formulation Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rinehart, Donald E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Swanberg, David J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States); Mahoney, J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) funded Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct a waste form testing program to implement aspects of the Secondary Liquid Waste Treatment Cast Stone Technology Development Plan (Ashley 2012) and the Hanford Site Secondary Waste Roadmap (PNNL 2009) related to the development and qualification of Cast Stone as a potential waste form for the solidification of aqueous wastes from the Hanford Site after the aqueous wastes are treated at the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). The current baseline is that the resultant Cast Stone (or grout) solid waste forms would be disposed at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Data and results of this testing program will be used in the upcoming performance assessment of the IDF and in the design and operation of a solidification treatment unit planned to be added to the ETF. The purpose of the work described in this report is to 1) develop simulants for the waste streams that are currently being fed and future WTP secondary waste streams also to be fed into the ETF and 2) prepare simulants to use for preparation of grout or Cast Stone solid waste forms for testing.

  5. Mechanical compaction of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant simulated waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butcher, B.M.; Thompson, T.W.; VanBuskirk, R.G.; Patti, N.C.

    1991-06-01

    The investigation described in this report acquired experimental information about how materials simulating transuranic (TRU) waste compact under axial compressive stress, and used these data to define a model for use in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) disposal room analyses. The first step was to determine compaction curves for various simultant materials characteristic of TRU waste. Stress-volume compaction curves for various combinations of these materials were than derived to represent the combustible, metallic, and sludge waste categories. Prediction of compaction response in this manner is considered essential for the WIPP program because of the difficulties inherent in working with real (radioactive) waste. Next, full-sized 55-gallon drums of simulated combustible, metallic, and sludge waste were axially compacted. These results provided data that can be directly applied to room consolidation and data for comparison with the predictions obtained in Part 1 of the investigation. Compaction curves, which represent the combustible, metallic, and sludge waste categories, were determined, and a curve for the averaged waste inventory of the entire repository was derived. 9 refs., 31 figs., 12 tabs

  6. Mixed Waste Treatment Project: Computer simulations of integrated flowsheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietsche, L.J.

    1993-12-01

    The disposal of mixed waste, that is waste containing both hazardous and radioactive components, is a challenging waste management problem of particular concern to DOE sites throughout the United States. Traditional technologies used for the destruction of hazardous wastes need to be re-evaluated for their ability to handle mixed wastes, and in some cases new technologies need to be developed. The Mixed Waste Treatment Project (MWTP) was set up by DOE's Waste Operations Program (EM30) to provide guidance on mixed waste treatment options. One of MWTP's charters is to develop flowsheets for prototype integrated mixed waste treatment facilities which can serve as models for sites developing their own treatment strategies. Evaluation of these flowsheets is being facilitated through the use of computer modelling. The objective of the flowsheet simulations is to provide mass and energy balances, product compositions, and equipment sizing (leading to cost) information. The modelled flowsheets need to be easily modified to examine how alternative technologies and varying feed streams effect the overall integrated process. One such commercially available simulation program is ASPEN PLUS. This report contains details of the Aspen Plus program

  7. Development of Simulants to Support Mixing Tests for High Level Waste and Low Activity Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EIBLING, RUSSELLE.

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop two different types of simulants to support vendor agitator design studies and mixing studies. The initial simulant development task was to develop rheologically-bounding physical simulants and the final portion was to develop a nominal chemical simulant which is designed to match, as closely as possible, the actual sludge from a tank. The physical simulants to be developed included a lower and upper rheologically bounded: pretreated low activity waste (LAW) physical simulant; LAW melter feed physical simulant; pretreated high level waste (HLW) physical simulant; HLW melter feed physical simulant. The nominal chemical simulant, hereafter referred to as the HLW Precipitated Hydroxide simulant, is designed to represent the chemical/physical composition of the actual washed and leached sludge sample. The objective was to produce a simulant which matches not only the chemical composition but also the physical properties of the actual waste sample. The HLW Precipitated Hydroxide simulant could then be used for mixing tests to validate mixing, homogeneity and representative sampling and transferring issues. The HLW Precipitated Hydroxide simulant may also be used for integrated nonradioactive testing of the WTP prior to radioactive operation

  8. Waste and Simulant Precipitation Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, W.V.

    2000-01-01

    As Savannah River Site (SRS) personnel have studied methods of preparing high-level waste for vitrification in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), questions have arisen with regard to the formation of insoluble waste precipitates at inopportune times. One option for decontamination of the SRS waste streams employs the use of an engineered form of crystalline silicotitanate (CST). Testing of the process during FY 1999 identified problems associated with the formation of precipitates during cesium sorption tests using CST. These precipitates may, under some circumstances, obstruct the pores of the CST particles and, hence, interfere with the sorption process. In addition, earlier results from the DWPF recycle stream compatibility testing have shown that leaching occurs from the CST when it is stored at 80 C in a high-pH environment. Evidence was established that some level of components of the CST, such as silica, was leached from the CST. This report describes the results of equilibrium modeling and precipitation studies associated with the overall stability of the waste streams, CST component leaching, and the presence of minor components in the waste streams

  9. Operations planning simulation: Model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    The use of simulation modeling for the identification of system sensitivities to internal and external forces and variables is discussed. The technique provides a means of exploring alternate system procedures and processes, so that these alternatives may be considered on a mutually comparative basis permitting the selection of a mode or modes of operation which have potential advantages to the system user and the operator. These advantages are measurements is system efficiency are: (1) the ability to meet specific schedules for operations, mission or mission readiness requirements or performance standards and (2) to accomplish the objectives within cost effective limits.

  10. Unit costs of waste management operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

    1994-04-01

    This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ''cradle to grave'') cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics

  11. Defense Waste Processing Facility Process Simulation Package Life Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, K.

    1991-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will be used to immobilize high level liquid radioactive waste into safe, stable, and manageable solid form. The complexity and classification of the facility requires that a performance based operator training to satisfy Department of Energy orders and guidelines. A major portion of the training program will be the application and utilization of Process Simulation Packages to assist in training the Control Room Operators on the fluctionality of the process and the application of the Distribution Control System (DCS) in operating and managing the DWPF process. The packages are being developed by the DWPF Computer and Information Systems Simulation Group. This paper will describe the DWPF Process Simulation Package Life Cycle. The areas of package scope, development, validation, and configuration management will be reviewed and discussed in detail

  12. Impact of radioactive waste management operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paine, D.; Rogers, L.E.; Uresk, D.W.

    1977-01-01

    Impact assessment of radioactive waste management operations is considered separately for nonradiological impact on biota, impact on ecosystem structure and function and radiological impact on biota. Localized effects related to facility construction and maintenance activities probably occur but the large expanse of relatively undisturbed surrounding landscape minimizes any overall effects

  13. TRANSPORT OF WASTE SIMULANTS IN PJM VENT LINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qureshi, Z

    2007-02-21

    The experimental work was conducted to determine whether there is a potential for waste simulant to transport or 'creep' up the air link line and contaminate the pulse jet vent system, and possibly cause long term restriction of the air link line. Additionally, if simulant creep occurred, establish operating parameters for washing down the line. The amount of the addition of flush fluids and mixer downtime must be quantified.

  14. WASTES: Waste System Transportation and Economic Simulation--Version 2:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sovers, R.A.; Shay, M.R.; Ouderkirk, S.J.; McNair, G.W.; Eagle, B.G.

    1988-02-01

    The Waste System Transportation and Economic Simulation (WASTES) Technical Reference Manual was written to describe and document the algorithms used within the WASTES model as implemented in Version 2.23. The manual will serve as a reference for users of the WASTES system. The intended audience for this manual are knowledgeable users of WASTES who have an interest in the underlying principles and algorithms used within the WASTES model. Each algorithm is described in nonprogrammers terminology, and the source and uncertainties of the constants in use by these algorithms are described. The manual also describes the general philosophy and rules used to: 1) determine the allocation and priority of spent fuel generation sources to facility destinations, 2) calculate transportation costs, and 3) estimate the cost of at-reactor ex-pool storage. A detailed description of the implementation of many of the algorithms is also included in the WASTES Programmers Reference Manual (Shay and Buxbaum 1986a). This manual is separated into sections based on the general usage of the algorithms being discussed. 8 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Thermal operations conditions in a national waste terminal storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-09-01

    Some of the major technical questions associated with the burial of radioactive high-level wastes in geologic formations are related to the thermal environments generated by the waste and the impact of this dissipated heat on the surrounding environment. The design of a high level waste storage facility must be such that the temperature variations that occur do not adversely affect operating personnel and equipment. The objective of this investigation was to assist OWI by determining the thermal environment that would be experienced by personnel and equipment in a waste storage facility in salt. Particular emphasis was placed on determining the maximum floor and air temperatures with and without ventilation in the first 30 years after waste emplacement. The assumed facility design differs somewhat from those previously analyzed and reported, but many of the previous parametric surveys are useful for comparison. In this investigation a number of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional simulations of the heat flow in a repository have been performed on the HEATING5 and TRUMP heat transfer codes. The representative repository constructs used in the simulations are described, as well as the computational models and computer codes. Results of the simulations are presented and discussed. Comparisons are made between the recent results and those from previous analyses. Finally, a summary of study limitations, comparisons, and conclusions is given

  16. Corrosion of simulated nuclear waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.; Ristic, M.; Gotic, M.; Foric, J.

    1988-01-01

    In this study the preparation and characterization of borosilicate glasses of different chemical composition were investigated. Borosilicate glasses were doped with simulated nuclear waste oxides. The chemical corrosion in water of these glasses was followed by measuring the leach rates as a function of time. It was found that a simulated nuclear waste glass with the chemical composition (weight %), 15.61% Na 2 O, 10.39% B 2 O 3 , 45.31% SiO 2 , 13.42% ZnO, 6.61% TiO 2 and 8.66% waste oxides, is characterized by low melting temperature and with good corrosion resistance in water. Influence of passive layers on the leaching behaviour of nuclear waste glasses is discussed. (author) 20 refs.; 7 figs.; 4 tabs

  17. Hanford tank waste simulants specification and their applicability for the retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GR Golcar; NG Colton; JG Darab; HD Smith

    2000-04-04

    A wide variety of waste simulants were developed over the past few years to test various retrieval, pretreatment and waste immobilization technologies and unit operations. Experiments can be performed cost-effectively using non-radioactive waste simulants in open laboratories. This document reviews the composition of many previously used waste simulants for remediation of tank wastes at the Hanford reservation. In this review, the simulants used in testing for the retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification processes are compiled, and the representative chemical and physical characteristics of each simulant are specified. The retrieval and transport simulants may be useful for testing in-plant fluidic devices and in some cases for filtration technologies. The pretreatment simulants will be useful for filtration, Sr/TRU removal, and ion exchange testing. The vitrification simulants will be useful for testing melter, melter feed preparation technologies, and for waste form evaluations.

  18. Hanford tank waste simulants specification and their applicability for the retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GR Golcar; NG Colton; JG Darab; HD Smith

    2000-01-01

    A wide variety of waste simulants were developed over the past few years to test various retrieval, pretreatment and waste immobilization technologies and unit operations. Experiments can be performed cost-effectively using non-radioactive waste simulants in open laboratories. This document reviews the composition of many previously used waste simulants for remediation of tank wastes at the Hanford reservation. In this review, the simulants used in testing for the retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification processes are compiled, and the representative chemical and physical characteristics of each simulant are specified. The retrieval and transport simulants may be useful for testing in-plant fluidic devices and in some cases for filtration technologies. The pretreatment simulants will be useful for filtration, Sr/TRU removal, and ion exchange testing. The vitrification simulants will be useful for testing melter, melter feed preparation technologies, and for waste form evaluations

  19. Operation of a pilot incinerator for solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hootman, H.E.; Trapp, D.J.; Warren, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    A laboratory-scale incinerator (0.5 kg waste/hr) was built and operated for more than 18 months as part of a program to adapt and confirm technology for incineration of Savannah River Plant solid wastes, which are contaminated with about 0.3 Ci/kg of alpha-emitting transuranium (TRU) nuclides (Slide 1). About 4000 packages of simulated nonradioactive wastes were burned, including HEPA (high-efficiency particulate air) filters, resins, and other types of solid combustible waste from plutonium finishing operations. Throughputs of more than 3 kg/hr for periods up to 4 hours were demonstrated. The incinerator was oerated at temperatures above 750 0 C for more than 7700 hours during a period of 12 months, for an overall availability of 88%. The incinerator was shut down three times during the year: once to replace the primary combustion chamber electrical heater, and twice to replace oxidized electrical connectors to the secondary chamber heaters. Practical experience with this pilot facility provided the design basis for the full-size (5 kg waste/hr) nonradioactive test incinerator, which began operation in March 1979

  20. Simulators predict power plant operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltier, R.

    2002-07-01

    Mix the complexity of a new construction or major retrofit project with today's 'do more with less', a pinch of 'personnel inexperience,' and a dash of 'unintended consequences', and you have got a recipe for insomnia. Advanced simulation tools, however, can help you wring out your design train your operators before the first wire is terminated and just may be get a good night's rest. The article describes several examples of uses of simulation tools. Esscor recently completed a simulation project for a major US utility exploring the potential for furnace/duct implosion that could result from adding higher volumetric flow induced-draft fans and selective catalytic reduction to a 650-MW coal-fired plant. CAF Electronics Inc. provided a full-scope simulator for Alstom's KA24-1 combined-cycle power plant in Paris, France. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools are being used by the Gas Technology Institute to simulate the performance of the next generation of pulverized coal combustors. 5 figs.

  1. Global Simulation of Aviation Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Banavar; Sheth, Kapil; Ng, Hok Kwan; Morando, Alex; Li, Jinhua

    2016-01-01

    The simulation and analysis of global air traffic is limited due to a lack of simulation tools and the difficulty in accessing data sources. This paper provides a global simulation of aviation operations combining flight plans and real air traffic data with historical commercial city-pair aircraft type and schedule data and global atmospheric data. The resulting capability extends the simulation and optimization functions of NASA's Future Air Traffic Management Concept Evaluation Tool (FACET) to global scale. This new capability is used to present results on the evolution of global air traffic patterns from a concentration of traffic inside US, Europe and across the Atlantic Ocean to a more diverse traffic pattern across the globe with accelerated growth in Asia, Australia, Africa and South America. The simulation analyzes seasonal variation in the long-haul wind-optimal traffic patterns in six major regions of the world and provides potential time-savings of wind-optimal routes compared with either great circle routes or current flight-plans if available.

  2. Standard test method for determining liquidus temperature of immobilized waste glasses and simulated waste glasses

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 These practices cover procedures for determining the liquidus temperature (TL) of nuclear waste, mixed nuclear waste, simulated nuclear waste, or hazardous waste glass in the temperature range from 600°C to 1600°C. This method differs from Practice C829 in that it employs additional methods to determine TL. TL is useful in waste glass plant operation, glass formulation, and melter design to determine the minimum temperature that must be maintained in a waste glass melt to make sure that crystallization does not occur or is below a particular constraint, for example, 1 volume % crystallinity or T1%. As of now, many institutions studying waste and simulated waste vitrification are not in agreement regarding this constraint (1). 1.2 Three methods are included, differing in (1) the type of equipment available to the analyst (that is, type of furnace and characterization equipment), (2) the quantity of glass available to the analyst, (3) the precision and accuracy desired for the measurement, and (4) candi...

  3. Waste to energy plant operation under the influence of market and legislation conditioned changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomic, Tihomir; Dominkovic, Dominik Franjo; Pfeifer, Antun

    2017-01-01

    , waste-to-energy plants need to be adapted to market operation. This influence is tracked by the gate-fee volatility. The operation of the waste-to-energy plant on electricity markets is simulated by using EnergyPLAN and heat market is simulated in Matlab, based on hourly marginal costs. The results have......In this paper, gate-fee changes of the waste-to-energy plants are investigated in the conditions set by European Union legislation and by the introduction of the new heat market. Waste management and sustainable energy supply are core issues of sustainable development of regions, especially urban...... areas. These two energy flows logically come together in the combined heat and power facility by waste incineration. However, the implementation of new legislation influences quantity and quality of municipal waste and operation of waste-to-energy systems. Once the legislation requirements are met...

  4. Applying interactive control to waste processing operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasz, E.L.; Merrill, R.D.; Couture, S.A.

    1992-08-01

    At present waste and residue processing includes steps that require human interaction. The risk of exposure to unknown hazardous materials and the potential for radiation contamination motivates the desire to remove operators from these processes. Technologies that facilitate this include glove box robotics, modular systems for remote and automated servicing, and interactive controls that minimize human intervention. LLNL is developing an automated system which is designed to supplant the operator for glove box tasks, thus protecting the operator from the risk of radiation exposure and minimizing operator-associated waste. Although most of the processing can be automated with minimal human interaction, there are some tasks where intelligent intervention is both desirable and necessary to adapt to Enexpected circumstances and events. These activities require that the operator interact with the process using a remote manipulator which provides or reflects a natural feel to the operator. The remote manipulation system which was developed incorporates sensor fusion and interactive control, and provides the operator with an effective means of controlling the robot in a potentially unknown environment. This paper describes recent accomplishments in technology development and integration, and outlines the future goals of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for achieving this integrated interactive control capability

  5. New Waste Calciner High Temperature Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    A new Calciner flowsheet has been developed to process the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) in the INTEC Tank Farm. The new flowsheet increases the normal Calciner operating temperature from 500 C to 600 C. At the elevated temperature, sodium in the waste forms stable aluminates, instead of nitrates that melt at calcining temperatures. From March through May 2000, the new high-temperature flowsheet was tested in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Calciner. Specific test criteria for various Calciner systems (feed, fuel, quench, off-gas, etc.) were established to evaluate the long-term operability of the high-temperature flowsheet. This report compares in detail the Calciner process data with the test criteria. The Calciner systems met or exceeded all test criteria. The new flowsheet is a visible, long-term method of calcining SBW. Implementation of the flowsheet will significantly increase the calcining rate of SBW and reduce the amount of calcine produced by reducing the amount of chemical additives to the Calciner. This will help meet the future waste processing milestones and regulatory needs such as emptying the Tank Farm

  6. Overview - Defense Waste Processing Facility Operating Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norton, M.R.

    2002-01-01

    The Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the world's largest radioactive waste vitrification facility. Radioactive operations began in March 1996 and over 1,000 canisters have been produced. This paper presents an overview of the DWPF process and a summary of recent facility operations and process improvements. These process improvements include efforts to extend the life of the DWPF melter, projects to increase facility throughput, initiatives to reduce the quantity of wastewater generated, improved remote decontamination capabilities, and improvements to remote canyon equipment to extend equipment life span. This paper also includes a review of a melt rate improvement program conducted by Savannah River Technology Center personnel. This program involved identifying the factors that impacted melt rate, conducting small scale testing of proposed process changes and developing a cost effective implementation plan

  7. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department Annual Operating Report, CY 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1994-02-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the waste management operations section of the liquid and gaseous waste operations department at ORNL for 1993. The process waste, liquid low-level waste, gaseous waste systems activities are reported, as well as the low-level waste solidification project. Upgrade activities is the various waste processing and treatment systems are summarized. A maintenance activity overview is provided, and program management, training, and other miscellaneous activities are covered

  8. Operational experience acquired in radioactive waste compaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, S.; Mohr, P.; Hempelmann, W.

    1993-01-01

    The low-level radioactive waste scrapping facility in the KfK decontamination division was commissioned in 1983. Non-combustible residues and removed system components of low activity, but which are to be handled and disposed of as radioactive waste are in drums, casks or containers delivered to the facility. The waste usually undergoes pretreatment in a crusher, with the volume being definitively reduced at a pressure of 690 bar in the high-pressure compactor. In 1990, the overhead-crane was refurbished for remote control handling in the scrapping caisson. The parts to undergo scrapping are unpacked in the material lock, and then go into the scrapping caisson. It is possible to use here various mechanical and thermal methods to dismantle the respective parts. But most of the parts to undergo scrapping are such as that it is possible to directly pretreat them in the crusher. The obtained scrap is loaded into 180-liter drums. Most of the machinery in the caisson is manually operated. The operating crew enters the caisson in fully ventilated protective overalls. The drums filled with the scrap then go to the high-pressure compactor in the caisson. The compacts are temporarily stored, until recalled depending on their height and filled into drums such as that optimal drum filling is guaranteed

  9. Upgraded operator training by using advanced simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwashita, Akira; Toeda, Susumu; Fujita, Eimitsu; Moriguchi, Iwao; Wada, Kouji

    1991-01-01

    BWR Operator Training Center Corporation (BTC) has been conducting the operator training for all BWR utilities in Japan using fullscope simulators. Corresponding to increasing quantitative demands and higher qualitative needs of operator training, BTC put advanced simulators in operation (BTC-2 simulator in 1983 and BTC-3 simulator in 1989). This paper describes the methods and the effects of upgraded training contents by using these advanced simulators. These training methods are applied to the 'Advanced Operator Training course,' the 'Operator Retraining Course' and also the 'Family (crew) Training Course.' (author)

  10. Repository waste-handling operations, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottam, A.E.; Connell, L.

    1986-04-01

    The Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Mission Plan and the Generic Requirements for a Mined Geologic Disposal System state that beginning in 1998, commercial spent fuel not exceeding 70,000 metric tons of heavy metal, or a quantity of solidified high-level radioactive waste resulting from the reprocessing of such a quantity of spent fuel, will be shipped to a deep geologic repository for permanent storage. The development of a waste-handling system that can process 3000 metric tons of heavy metal annually will require the adoption of a fully automated approach. The safety and minimum exposure of personnel will be the prime goals of the repository waste handling system. A man-out-of-the-loop approach will be used in all operations including the receipt of spent fuel in shipping casks, the inspection and unloading of the spent fuel into automated hot-cell facilities, the disassembly of spent fuel assemblies, the consolidation of fuel rods, and the packaging of fuel rods into heavy-walled site-specific containers. These containers are designed to contain the radionuclides for up to 1000 years. The ability of a repository to handle more than 6000 pressurized water reactor spent-fuel rods per day on a production basis for approximately a 23-year period will require that a systems approach be adopted that combines space-age technology, robotics, and sophisticated automated computerized equipment. New advanced inspection techniques, maintenance by robots, and safety will be key factors in the design, construction, and licensing of a repository waste-handling facility for 1998

  11. Simulation for preparation of dismantling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrere, J.M.; Idasiak, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    New applications of 3D models are still emerging. At first, simulation of dismantling operations has been used to illustrate the proposed scenarios, with 3D views or animated films, for: - internal and external communication; - technical reviews; - presentation to Safety Authorities. It helps a lot to explain the structure of the facility to dismantle, the proposed solutions, to convince people that the study is detailed enough. But 3D modelling is an investment in time and money. A lot of time is spent in collecting the drawings, and checking them with pictures, videos, interviews of operators, new measurements. This investment can be much more exploited, during all the life time of the decommissioning project, to avoid problems during operations, and so to save a lot of money. It is possible to have navigation or even immersion inside 3D models of facilities to dismantle, so that the project team or the operators can be familiar with the configuration of rooms, of accesses, with the location of equipment. A 3D model can hardly be as detailed as the real facility. Some simplifications have to be done, to avoid having too heavy models. But in a training process, 3D-models help to have rapidly an overview of complex environments. Dose uptake simulation is becoming also a tool for decommissioning projects. It is possible to compute either off line, or even in real time, the dose uptake of the operators, and to compare easily different options for the ALARA principle: decontamination or not, use of shielding or not. It requires to have not only the geometrical model, but also a radiological model of the facility, but with the use of gamma camera and spectrometry, it becomes easier. 3D-models can be used to integrate in an user-friendly way all the knowledge of a facility to decommission, and to update that knowledge during operations: reports on construction, on exploitation, on shut-down, physical and radiological measurements, traceability of wastes. Progress are

  12. Mathematical simulation of a waste rock heap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharer, J.M.; Pettit, C.M.; Chambers, D.B.; Kwong, E.C.

    1994-01-01

    A computer model has been developed to simulate the generation of acidic drainage in waste rock piles. The model considers the kinetic rates of biological and chemical oxidation of sulfide minerals (pyrite, pyrrhotite) present as fines and rock particles, as well as chemical processes such as dissolution (kinetic or equilibrium controlled), complexation (from equilibrium and stoichiometry of several complexes), and precipitation (formation of complexes and secondary minerals). Through mass balance equations and solubility constraints (e.g., pH, phase equilibria) the model keeps track of the movement of chemical species through the waste pile and provides estimates of the quality of seepage (pH, sulfate, iron, acidity, etc.) leaving the heap. The model has been expanded to include the dissolution (thermodynamic and sorption equilibrium), adsorption and coprecipitation of uranium and radium. The model was applied to simulate waste rock heaps in British Columbia, Canada and in Thueringia, Germany. To improve the accuracy and confidence of long-term predictions of seepage quality, the entire history of the heaps was simulated. Cumulative acidity loads and water treatment considerations were used as a basis for evaluation of various decommissioning alternatives. Simulation of the technical leaching history of a heap in Germany showed it will generate contaminated leachate requiring treatment for acidity and radioactivity for several hundred years; cover installation was shown to provide a significant reduction of potential burdens, although chemical treatment would still be required beyond 100 years

  13. Operational radioactive waste management plan for the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-11-01

    The Operational Radioactive Waste Management Plan for the Nevada Test Site establishes procedures and methods for the safe shipping, receiving, processing, disposal, and storage of radioactive waste. Included are NTS radioactive waste disposition program guidelines, procedures for radioactive waste management, a description of storage and disposal areas and facilities, and a glossary of specifications and requirements

  14. Modeling the design and operations of the federal radioactive waste management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joy, D.S.; Nehls, J.W. Jr.; Harrison, I.G.; Miller, C.; Vogel, L.W.; Martin, J.D.; Capone, R.L.; Dougherty, L.

    1989-04-01

    Many configuration, transportation and operating alternatives are available to the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) in the design and operation of the Federal Radioactive Waste Management System (FWMS). Each alternative has different potential impacts on system throughput, efficiency and the thermal and radiological characteristics of the waste to be shipped, stored and emplaced. A need therefore exists for a quantitative means of assessing the ramifications of alternative system designs and operating strategies. We developed the Systems integration Operations/Logistics Model (SOLMOD). That model is used to replicate a user-specified system configuration and simulate the operation of that system -- from waste pickup at reactors to emplacement in a repository -- under a variety of operating strategies. The model can thus be used to assess system performance with or without Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS), with or without consolidation at the repository, with varying shipping cask availability and so forth. This simulation capability is also intended to provide a tool for examining the impact of facility and equipment capacity and redundancy on overall waste processing capacity and system performance. SOLMOD can measure the impacts on system performance of certain operating contingencies. It can be used to test effects on transportation and waste pickup schedules resulting from a shut-down of one or more hot cells in the waste handling building at the repository or MRS. Simulation can also be used to study operating procedures and rules such as fuel pickup schedules, general freight vs. dedicated freight. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Defense waste processing facility radioactive operations. Part 1 - operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, D.B.; Gee, J.T.; Barnes, W.M.

    1997-01-01

    The Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the nation's first and the world's largest vitrification facility. Following a ten year construction program and a 3 year non-radioactive test program, DWPF began radioactive operations in March 1996. This paper presents the results of the first 9 months of radioactive operations. Topics include: operations of the remote processing equipment reliability, and decontamination facilities for the remote processing equipment. Key equipment discussed includes process pumps, telerobotic manipulators, infrared camera, Holledge trademark level gauges and in-cell (remote) cranes. Information is presented regarding equipment at the conclusion of the DWPF test program it also discussed, with special emphasis on agitator blades and cooling/heating coil wear. 3 refs., 4 figs

  16. Defense Waste Processing Facility -- Radioactive operations -- Part 3 -- Remote operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, W.M.; Kerley, W.D.; Hughes, P.D.

    1997-01-01

    The Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, South Carolina is the nation's first and world's largest vitrification facility. Following a ten year construction period and nearly three years of non-radioactive testing, the DWPF began radioactive operations in March 1996. Radioactive glass is poured from the joule heated melter into the stainless steel canisters. The canisters are then temporarily sealed, decontaminated, resistance welded for final closure, and transported to an interim storage facility. All of these operations are conducted remotely with equipment specially designed for these processes. This paper reviews canister processing during the first nine months of radioactive operations at DWPF. The fundamental design consideration for DWPF remote canister processing and handling equipment are discussed as well as interim canister storage

  17. Hazardous-waste analysis plan for LLNL operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, R.S.

    1982-02-12

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is involved in many facets of research ranging from nuclear weapons research to advanced Biomedical studies. Approximately 80% of all programs at LLNL generate hazardous waste in one form or another. Aside from producing waste from industrial type operations (oils, solvents, bottom sludges, etc.) many unique and toxic wastes are generated such as phosgene, dioxin (TCDD), radioactive wastes and high explosives. One key to any successful waste management program must address the following: proper identification of the waste, safe handling procedures and proper storage containers and areas. This section of the Waste Management Plan will address methodologies used for the Analysis of Hazardous Waste. In addition to the wastes defined in 40 CFR 261, LLNL and Site 300 also generate radioactive waste not specifically covered by RCRA. However, for completeness, the Waste Analysis Plan will address all hazardous waste.

  18. Hazardous-waste analysis plan for LLNL operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, R.S.

    1982-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is involved in many facets of research ranging from nuclear weapons research to advanced Biomedical studies. Approximately 80% of all programs at LLNL generate hazardous waste in one form or another. Aside from producing waste from industrial type operations (oils, solvents, bottom sludges, etc.) many unique and toxic wastes are generated such as phosgene, dioxin (TCDD), radioactive wastes and high explosives. One key to any successful waste management program must address the following: proper identification of the waste, safe handling procedures and proper storage containers and areas. This section of the Waste Management Plan will address methodologies used for the Analysis of Hazardous Waste. In addition to the wastes defined in 40 CFR 261, LLNL and Site 300 also generate radioactive waste not specifically covered by RCRA. However, for completeness, the Waste Analysis Plan will address all hazardous waste

  19. Operation of the radioactive waste treatment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kil Jeong; Ahn, Seom Jin; Lee, Kang Moo; Lee, Young Hee; Sohn, Jong Sik; Bae, Sang Min; Kang, Kwon Ho; Lim, Kil Sung; Sohn, Young Joon; Kim, Tae Kook; Jeong, Kyung Hwan; Wi, Geum San; Park, Seung Chul; Park, Young Woong; Yoon, Bong Keun.

    1996-12-01

    The radioactive wasted generated at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) in 1996 are about 118m 3 of liquid waste and 204 drums of solid waste. Liquid waste were treated by the evaporation process, the bituminization process, and the solar evaporation process. In 1996, 100.5m 3 of liquid waste was treated. (author). 84 tabs., 103 figs

  20. Quality assurance in Hanford site defense waste operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojtasek, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses quality assurance as an integral part of conducting waste management operations. The storage, treatment, and disposal of radioactive and non- radioactive hazardous wastes at Hanford are described. The author reports that quality assurance programs provide confidence that storage, treatment, and disposal facilities and systems perform as intended. Examples of how quality assurance is applied to Hanford defense waste operations are presented

  1. ALLIANCES: simulation platform for radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deville, E.; Montarnal, Ph.; Loth, L.; Chavant, C.

    2009-01-01

    CEA, ANDRA and EDF are jointly developing the software platform ALLIANCES whose aim is to produce a tool for the simulation of nuclear waste storage and disposal. This type of simulations deals with highly coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical and radioactive (T-H-M-C-R) processes. ALLIANCES' aim is to accumulate within the same simulation environment the already acquired knowledge and to gradually integrate new knowledge. The current version of ALLIANCES contains the following modules: - Hydraulics and reactive transport in unsaturated and saturated media; - Multi-phase flow; - Mechanical thermal-hydraulics; - Thermo-Aeraulics; - Chemistry/Transport coupling in saturated media; - Alteration of waste package coupled with the environment; - Sensitivity analysis tools. The next releases will include more physical phenomena like: reactive transport in unsaturated flow and multicomponent multiphase flow; incorporation of responses surfaces in sensitivity analysis tools; integration of parallel numerical codes for flow and transport. Since the distribution of the first release of ALLIANCES (December 2003), the platform was used by ANDRA for his safety simulation program and by CEA for reactive transport simulations (migration of uranium in a soil, diffusion of different reactive species on laboratory samples, glass/iron/clay interaction). (authors)

  2. Emissions model of waste treatment operations at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, R.E.

    1995-03-01

    An integrated model of the waste treatment systems at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) was developed using a commercially-available process simulation software (ASPEN Plus) to calculate atmospheric emissions of hazardous chemicals for use in an application for an environmental permit to operate (PTO). The processes covered by the model are the Process Equipment Waste evaporator, High Level Liquid Waste evaporator, New Waste Calcining Facility and Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal facility. The processes are described along with the model and its assumptions. The model calculates emissions of NO x , CO, volatile acids, hazardous metals, and organic chemicals. Some calculated relative emissions are summarized and insights on building simulations are discussed

  3. Operator training and the training simulator experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, D.

    The author outlines the approach used by Ontario Hydro to train operators from the day they are hired as Operators-in-Training until they are Authorized Unit First Operators. He describes in detail the use of the simulator in the final year of the authorization program, drawing on experience with the Pickering NGS A simulator. Simulators, he concludes, are important aids to training but by no means all that is required to guarantee capable First Operators

  4. Defense waste management operations at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.E.; Kendall, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    Waste management activities were initiated at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to dispose of low-level wastes (LLW) produced by the Department of Energy's (DOE's) weapons testing program. Disposal activities have expanded from the burial of atmospheric weapons testing debris to demonstration facilities for greater-than-Class-C (GTCC) waste, transuranic (TRU) waste storage and certification, and the development of a mixed waste (MW) facility. Site specific operational research projects support technology development required for the various disposal facilities. The annual cost of managing the facilities is about $6 million depending on waste volumes and types. The paper discusses site selection; establishment of the Radioactive Waste Management Project; operations with respect to low-level radioactive wastes, transuranic waste storage, greater confinement disposal test, and mixed waste management facility; and related research activities such as tritium migration studies, revegetation studies, and in-situ monitoring of organics

  5. Concept of Operations for Waste Transport, Emplacement, and Retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raczka, Norman T.

    2001-01-01

    The preparation of this technical report has two objectives. The first objective is to discuss the base case concepts of waste transport, emplacement, and retrieval operations and evaluate these operations relative to a lower-temperature repository design. Aspects of the operations involved in waste transport, emplacement and retrieval may be affected by the lower-temperature operating schemes. This report evaluates the effects the lower-temperature alternatives may have on the operational concepts involved in emplacing and retrieving waste. The second objective is to provide backup material for the design description, in a traceable and defensible format, for Section 2 of the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System Description Document

  6. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant simulated RH TRU waste experiments: Data and interpretation pilot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecke, M.A.; Argueello, G.J.; Beraun, R.

    1993-04-01

    The simulated, i.e., nonradioactive remote-handled transuranic waste (RH TRU) experiments being conducted underground in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were emplaced in mid-1986 and have been in heated test operation since 9/23/86. These experiments involve the in situ, waste package performance testing of eight full-size, reference RH TRU containers emplaced in horizontal, unlined test holes in the rock salt ribs (walls) of WIPP Room T. All of the test containers have internal electrical heaters; four of the test emplacements were filled with bentonite and silica sand backfill materials. We designed test conditions to be ''near-reference'' with respect to anticipated thermal outputs of RH TRU canisters and their geometrical spacing or layout in WIPP repository rooms, with RH TRU waste reference conditions current as of the start date of this test program. We also conducted some thermal overtest evaluations. This paper provides a: detailed test overview; comprehensive data update for the first 5 years of test operations; summary of experiment observations; initial data interpretations; and, several status; experimental objectives -- how these tests support WIPP TRU waste acceptance, performance assessment studies, underground operations, and the overall WIPP mission; and, in situ performance evaluations of RH TRU waste package materials plus design details and options. We provide instrument data and results for in situ waste container and borehole temperatures, pressures exerted on test containers through the backfill materials, and vertical and horizontal borehole-closure measurements and rates. The effects of heat on borehole closure, fracturing, and near-field materials (metals, backfills, rock salt, and intruding brine) interactions were closely monitored and are summarized, as are assorted test observations. Predictive 3-dimensional thermal and structural modeling studies of borehole and room closures and temperature fields were also performed

  7. Modeling VOC transport in simulated waste drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liekhus, K.J.; Gresham, G.L.; Peterson, E.S.; Rae, C.; Hotz, N.J.; Connolly, M.J.

    1993-06-01

    A volatile organic compound (VOC) transport model has been developed to describe unsteady-state VOC permeation and diffusion within a waste drum. Model equations account for three primary mechanisms for VOC transport from a void volume within the drum. These mechanisms are VOC permeation across a polymer boundary, VOC diffusion across an opening in a volume boundary, and VOC solubilization in a polymer boundary. A series of lab-scale experiments was performed in which the VOC concentration was measured in simulated waste drums under different conditions. A lab-scale simulated waste drum consisted of a sized-down 55-gal metal drum containing a modified rigid polyethylene drum liner. Four polyethylene bags were sealed inside a large polyethylene bag, supported by a wire cage, and placed inside the drum liner. The small bags were filled with VOC-air gas mixture and the VOC concentration was measured throughout the drum over a period of time. Test variables included the type of VOC-air gas mixtures introduced into the small bags, the small bag closure type, and the presence or absence of a variable external heat source. Model results were calculated for those trials where the VOC permeability had been measured. Permeabilities for five VOCs [methylene chloride, 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (Freon-113), 1,1,1-trichloroethane, carbon tetrachloride, and trichloroethylene] were measured across a polyethylene bag. Comparison of model and experimental results of VOC concentration as a function of time indicate that model accurately accounts for significant VOC transport mechanisms in a lab-scale waste drum

  8. SIMULATORS FOR TRAINING OF ROV OPERATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. I. Shakhtarin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article issues of the organization of imitating modeling complexes for training operators of Remotely Operated Underwater Vehicle are considered. It is reported about practical development of sea exercise simulation in Bauman MSTU.

  9. Rheological properties of kaolin and chemically simulated waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, C.L.

    1981-12-01

    The Savannah River Laboratory is conducting tests to determine the best operating conditions of pumps used to transfer insoluble radioactive sludges from old to new waste tanks. Because it is not feasible to conduct these tests with real or chemically simulated sludges, kaolin clay is being used as a stand-in for the solid waste. The rheology tests described herein were conducted to determine whether the properties of kaolin were sufficiently similar to those of real sludge to permit meaningful pump tests. The rheology study showed that kaolin can be substituted for real waste to accurately determine pump performance. Once adequately sheared, kaolin properties were found to remain constant. Test results determined that kaolin should not be allowed to settle more than two weeks between pump tests. Water or supernate from the waste tanks can be used to dilute sludge on an equal volume basis because they identically affect the rheological properties of sludge. It was further found that the fluid properties of kaolin and waste are insensitive to temperature

  10. Recent technology for BWR operator training simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takao; Hashimoto, Shigeo; Kato, Kanji; Mizuno, Toshiyuki; Asaoka, Koichi.

    1990-01-01

    As one of the important factors for maintaining the high capacity ratio in Japanese nuclear power stations, the contribution of excellent operators is pointed out. BWR Operation Training Center has trained many operators using two full scope simulators for operation training modeling BWRs. But in order to meet the demands of the recent increase of training needs and the upgrading of the contents, it was decided to install the third simulator, and Hitachi Ltd. received the order to construct the main part, and delivered it. This simulator obtained the good reputation as its range of simulation is wide, and the characteristics resemble very well those of the actual plants. Besides, various new designs were adopted in the control of the simulator, and its handling became very easy. Japanese nuclear power plants are operated at constant power output, and the unexpected stop is very rare, therefore the chance of operating the plants by operators is very few. Accordingly, the training using the simulators which can simulate the behavior of the plants with computers, and can freely generate abnormal phenomena has become increasingly important. The mode and positioning of the simulators for operation training, the full scope simulator BTC-3 and so on are reported. (K.I.)

  11. Laboratory simulation of high-level liquid waste evaporation and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, P.A.

    1978-01-01

    The reprocessing of nuclear fuel generates high-level liquid wastes (HLLW) which require interim storage pending solidification. Interim storage facilities are most efficient if the HLLW is evaporated prior to or during the storage period. Laboratory evaporation and storage studies with simulated waste slurries have yielded data which are applicable to the efficient design and economical operation of actual process equipment

  12. Processing of high-temperature simulated waste glass in a continuous ceramic melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, S.M.; Brouns, R.A.; Hanson, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    Recent operations have demonstrated that high-melting-point glasses and glass-ceramics can be successfully processed in joule-heated, ceramic-lined melters with minor modifications to the existing technology. Over 500 kg of simulated waste glasses have been processed at temperatures up to 1410 0 C. The processability of the two high-temperature waste forms tested is similar to existing borosilicate waste glasses. High-temperature waste glass formulations produced in the bench-scale melter exhibit quality comparing favorably to standard waste glass formulations

  13. Defense waste management operations at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.E.; Kendall, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    Waste management activities were initiated at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to dispose of low-level wastes (LLW) produced by the Department of Energy's (DOE's) weapons testing program. Disposal activities have expanded from the burial of atmospheric weapons testing debris to demonstration facilities for greater-than-Class C (GTCC) waste, transuranic (TRU) waste storage and certification, and the development of a mixed waste (MW) facility. Site specific operational research projects support technology development required for the various disposal facilities. The annual cost of managing the facilities is about $6 million depending on waste volumes and types

  14. WASTES: Wastes system transportation and economic simulation: Version 2, Programmer's reference manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buxbaum, M.E.; Shay, M.R.

    1986-11-01

    The WASTES Version II (WASTES II) Programmer's Reference Manual was written to document code development activities performed under the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The manual will also serve as a valuable tool for programmers involved in maintenance of and updates to the WASTES II code. The intended audience for this manual are experienced FORTRAN programmers who have only a limited knowledge of nuclear reactor operation, the nuclear fuel cycle, or nuclear waste management practices. It is assumed that the readers of this manual have previously reviewed the WASTES II Users Guide published as PNL Report 5714. The WASTES II code is written in FORTRAN 77 as an extension to the SLAM commercial simulation package. The model is predominately a FORTRAN based model that makes extensive use of the SLAM file maintenance and time management routines. This manual documents the general manner in which the code is constructed and the interactions between SLAM and the WASTES subroutines. The functionality of each of the major WASTES subroutines is illustrated with ''block flow'' diagrams. The basic function of each of these subroutines, the algorithms used in them, and a discussion of items of particular note in the subroutine are reviewed in this manual. The items of note may include an assumption, a coding practice that particularly applies to a subroutine, or sections of the code that are particularly intricate or whose mastery may be difficult. The appendices to the manual provide extensive detail on the use of arrays, subroutines, included common blocks, parameters, variables, and files

  15. Design parameters and operating characteristics of animal waste anaerobic digestion systems - swine and poultry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, D T

    1983-01-01

    The development and validation of a comprehensive dynamic simulation model of the anaerobic fermentation of animal waste have been described by Hill. This model has proved to be highly accurate, both qualitatively and quantitatively, in predicting the steady-state methane productivity of conventional fermentation plants and in simulating the transient-state response of semi-batch fed digesters. Simulation studies using this model have been performed and results have been used to develop design recommendations for steady-state operations. These simulation studies have also produced a start-up procedure that will ensure successful initial operation of the digestion system and, more importantly, have allowed determination of the operational techniques that will provide recovery from failure due to organic overloading or excessively short detention time. This paper describes the results of these studies for swine and poultry (caged layer) waste and presents the design recommendations and operating techniques developed from the simulations. (Refs. 11).

  16. NPP Krsko simulator training for operations personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pribozic, F.; Krajnc, J.

    2000-01-01

    Acquisition of a full scope replica simulator represents an important achievement for Nuclear power Plant Krsko. Operating nuclear power plant systems is definitely a set of demanding and complex tasks. The most important element in the goal of assuring capabilities for handling such tasks is efficient training of operations personnel who manipulate controls in the main control room. Use of a simulator during the training process is essential and can not be substituted by other techniques. This article gives an overview of NPP Krsko licensed personnel training historical background, current experience and plans for future training activities. Reactor operator initial training lasts approximately two and a half years. Training is divided into several phases, consisting of theoretical and practical segments, including simulator training. In the past, simulator initial training and annual simulator retraining was contracted, thus operators were trained on non-specific full scope simulators. Use of our own plant specific simulator and associated infrastructure will have a significant effect on the operations personnel training process and, in addition, will also support secondary uses, with the common goal to improve safe and reliable plant operation. A regular annual retraining program has successfully started. Use of the plant specific simulator assures consistent training and good management oversight, enhances conformity of operational practices and supports optimization of operating procedures. (author)

  17. International co-operation for safe radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    As a specialised inter-governmental body, NEA pursues three main objectives for its radioactive waste management programme: - The promotion of studies to improve the data base available in support of national programmes. - The support of Research and Development through co-ordination of national activities and promotion of international projects. - An improvement in the general level of understanding of waste management issues and options, particularly in the field of waste disposal. The management of radioactive waste from nuclear activities covers several sequences of complex technical operations. However, as the ultimate objective of radioactive waste management is the disposal of the waste, the largest part of the work programme is directed towards the analysis of disposal options. In addition, NEA is active in various other areas of waste management, such as the treatment and conditioning of waste, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities and the institutional aspects of the long term management of radioactive waste

  18. A PC-based discrete event simulation model of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airth, G.L.; Joy, D.S.; Nehls, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    A System Simulation Model has been developed for the Department of Energy to simulate the movement of individual waste packages (spent fuel assemblies and fuel containers) through the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). A discrete event simulation language, GPSS/PC, which runs on an IBM/PC and operates under DOS 5.0, mathematically represents the movement and processing of radioactive waste packages through the CRWMS and the interaction of these packages with the equipment in the various facilities. This model can be used to quantify the impacts of different operating schedules, operational rules, system configurations, and equipment reliability and availability considerations on the performance of processes comprising the CRWMS and how these factors combine to determine overall system performance for the purpose of making system design decisions. The major features of the System Simulation Model are: the ability to reference characteristics of the different types of radioactive waste (age, burnup, etc.) in order to make operational and/or system design decisions, the ability to place stochastic variations on operational parameters such as processing time and equipment outages, and the ability to include a rigorous simulation of the transportation system. Output from the model includes the numbers, types, and characteristics of waste packages at selected points in the CRWMS and the extent to which various resources will be utilized in order to transport, process, and emplace the waste

  19. Operations Program Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    This document, Revision 4 of the Operations Program Plan, has been developed as the seven-year master plan for operating of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Subjects covered include public and technical communications; regulatory and environmental programs; startup engineering; radiation handling, surface operations, and underground operations; waste certification and waste handling; transportation development; geotechnical engineering; experimental operations; engineering program; general maintenance; security program; safety, radiation, and regulatory assurance; quality assurance program; training program; administration activities; management systems program; and decommissioning. 243 refs., 19 figs., 25 tabs. (SM)

  20. Abattoir operations and waste management in Nigeria: A review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abattoir operations and waste management in Nigeria: A review of challenges ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... militating against the establishment, operations and management of abattoirs are not given attention.

  1. Ferrocyanide Safety Project: Comparison of actual and simulated ferrocyanide waste properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheele, R.D.; Burger, L.L.; Sell, R.L.; Bredt, P.R.; Barrington, R.J.

    1994-09-01

    In the 1950s, additional high-level radioactive waste storage capacity was needed to accommodate the wastes that would result from the production of recovery of additional nuclear defense materials. To provide this additional waste storage capacity, the Hanford Site operating contractor developed a process to decontaminate aqueous wastes by precipitating radiocesium as an alkali nickel ferrocyanide; this process allowed disposal of the aqueous waste. The radiocesium scavenging process as developed was used to decontaminate (1) first-cycle bismuth phosphate (BiPO 4 ) wastes, (2) acidic wastes resulting from uranium recovery operations, and (3) the supernate from neutralized uranium recovery wastes. The radiocesium scavenging process was often coupled with other scavenging processes to remove radiostrontium and radiocobalt. Because all defense materials recovery processes used nitric acid solutions, all of the wastes contained nitrate, which is a strong oxidizer. The variety of wastes treated, and the occasional coupling of radiostrontium and radiocobalt scavenging processes with the radiocesium scavenging process, resulted in ferrocyanide-bearing wastes having many different compositions. In this report, we compare selected physical, chemical, and radiochemical properties measured for Tanks C-109 and C-112 wastes and selected physical and chemical properties of simulated ferrocyanide wastes to assess the representativeness of stimulants prepared by WHC

  2. Biomedical waste management operating plan. Revision C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1996-02-14

    Recent national incidents involving medical and/or infectious wastes indicated the need for tighter control of medical wastes. Within the last five years, improper management of medical waste resulted in the spread of disease, reuse of needles by drug addicts, and the closing of large sections of public beaches due to medical waste that washed ashore from ocean disposal. Several regulations, both at the federal and state level, govern management (i.e., handling, storage, transport, treatment, and disposal) of solid or liquid waste which may present a threat of infection to humans. This waste, called infectious, biomedical, biohazardous, or biological waste, generally includes non-liquid human tissue and body parts; laboratory waste which contains human disease-causing agents; discarded sharps; human blood, blood products, and other body fluids. The information that follows outlines and summarizes the general requirements of each standard or rule applicable to biohazardous waste management. In addition, it informs employees of risks associated with biohazardous waste management.

  3. Advanced technology for BWR operator training simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, Akira; Fujita, Eimitsu; Nakao, Toshihiko; Nakabaru, Mitsugu; Asaoka, Kouchi.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an operator training simulator for BWR nuclear power plants which went into service recently. The simulator is a full scope replica type simulator which faithfully replicates the control room environment of the reference plant with six main control panels and twelve auxiliary ones. In comparison with earlier simulators, the scope of the simulation is significantly extended in both width and depth. The simulation model is also refined in order to include operator training according to sympton-based emergency procedure guidelines to mitigate the results in accident cases. In particular, the core model and the calculational model of the radiation intensity distribution, if radioactive materials were released, are improved. As for simulator control capabilities by which efficient and effective training can be achieved, various advanced designs are adopted allowing easy use of the simulators. (author)

  4. Modeling and simulation with operator scaling

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Serge; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Rosiński, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Self-similar processes are useful in modeling diverse phenomena that exhibit scaling properties. Operator scaling allows a different scale factor in each coordinate. This paper develops practical methods for modeling and simulating stochastic processes with operator scaling. A simulation method for operator stable Levy processes is developed, based on a series representation, along with a Gaussian approximation of the small jumps. Several examples are given to illustrate practical application...

  5. Phasor Simulator for Operator Training Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, Jim [Electric Power Group, Llc, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2016-09-14

    Synchrophasor systems are being deployed in power systems throughout the North American Power Grid and there are plans to integrate this technology and its associated tools into Independent System Operator (ISO)/utility control room operations. A pre-requisite to using synchrophasor technologies in control rooms is for operators to obtain training and understand how to use this technology in real-time situations. The Phasor Simulator for Operator Training (PSOT) project objective was to develop, deploy and demonstrate a pre-commercial training simulator for operators on the use of this technology and to promote acceptance of the technology in utility and ISO/Regional Transmission Owner (RTO) control centers.

  6. Lean waste classification model to support the sustainable operational practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutrisno, A.; Vanany, I.; Gunawan, I.; Asjad, M.

    2018-04-01

    Driven by growing pressure for a more sustainable operational practice, improvement on the classification of non-value added (waste) is one of the prerequisites to realize sustainability of a firm. While the use of the 7 (seven) types of the Ohno model now becoming a versatile tool to reveal the lean waste occurrence. In many recent investigations, the use of the Seven Waste model of Ohno is insufficient to cope with the types of waste occurred in industrial practices at various application levels. Intended to a narrowing down this limitation, this paper presented an improved waste classification model based on survey to recent studies discussing on waste at various operational stages. Implications on the waste classification model to the body of knowledge and industrial practices are provided.

  7. Results from simulated contact-handled transuranic waste experiments at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecke, M.A.; Sorensen, N.R.; Krumhansl, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    We conducted in situ experiments with nonradioactive, contact-handled transuranic (CH TRU) waste drums at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility for about four years. We performed these tests in two rooms in rock salt, at WIPP, with drums surrounded by crushed salt or 70 wt % salt/30 wt % bentonite clay backfills, or partially submerged in a NaCl brine pool. Air and brine temperatures were maintained at ∼40C. These full-scale (210-L drum) experiments provided in situ data on: backfill material moisture-sorption and physical properties in the presence of brine; waste container corrosion adequacy; and, migration of chemical tracers (nonradioactive actinide and fission product simulants) in the near-field vicinity, all as a function of time. Individual drums, backfill, and brine samples were removed periodically for laboratory evaluations. Waste container testing in the presence of brine and brine-moistened backfill materials served as a severe overtest of long-term conditions that could be anticipated in an actual salt waste repository. We also obtained relevant operational-test emplacement and retrieval experience. All test results are intended to support both the acceptance of actual TRU wastes at the WIPP and performance assessment data needs. We provide an overview and technical data summary focusing on the WIPP CH TRU envirorunental overtests involving 174 waste drums in the presence of backfill materials and the brine pool, with posttest laboratory materials analyses of backfill sorbed-moisture content, CH TRU drum corrosion, tracer migration, and associated test observations

  8. Rheological evaluation of simulated neutralized current acid waste - transuranics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fow, C.L.; McCarthy, D.; Thornton, G.T.; Scott, P.A.; Bray, L.A.

    1986-09-01

    At the Hanford Plutonium and Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX), in Richland, Washington, plutonium and uranium products are recovered from irradiated fuel by a solvent extraction process. A byproduct of this process is an aqueous waste stream that contains fission products. This waste stream, called current acid waste (CAW), is chemically neutralized and stored in double shell tanks (DSTs) on the Hanford Site. This neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) will be transported by pipe to B-Plant, a processing plant located nearby. In B-Plant, the transuranic (TRU) elements in NCAW are separated from the non-TRU elements. The majority of the TRU elements in NCAW are in the solids. Therefore, the primary processing operation is to separate the NCAW solids (NCAW-TRU) from the NCAW liquid. These two waste streams will be pumped to suitable holding tanks before being further processed for permanent disposal. To ensure that the retrieval and transportation of NCAW and NCAW-TRU are successful, researchers at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated the rheological and transport properties of the slurries. This evaluation had two phases. First, researchers conducted laboratory rheological evaluations of simulated NCAW and NCAW-TRU. The results of these evaluations were then correlated with classical rheological models and scaled up to predict the performance that is likely to occur in the full-scale system. This scale-up procedure has already been successfully used to predict the critical transport properties of a slurry (Neutralized Cladding Removal Waste) with rheological properties similar to those displayed by NCAW and NCAW-TRU

  9. LANDFILLS FOR NON-HAZARDOUS WASTE AND INERT WASTE AND THEIR OPERATION CYCLE IN NEW SYSTEM OF THE WASTE MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Kunc

    2017-01-01

    Until 2012, the chief method of disposing of municipal waste in Poland was by storing it on non-hazardous and inert waste landfills. The introduction of a new waste management system as well as new formal and legal requirements have forced changes in key documents related to landfill installations such as processing permits, landfill operation instructions and management instructions. The operation cycle has been disturbed, reducing considerably their operation time and leading to a premature...

  10. Overview of Savannah River Plant waste management operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haywood, J.E.; Killian, T.H.

    1987-01-01

    The Du Pont Savannah River Plant (SRP) Waste Management Program is committed to the safe handling, storage, and disposal of wastes that result from the production of special nuclear materials for the US Department of Energy (US DOE). High-level radioactive liquid waste is stored in underground carbon steel tanks with double containment, and the volume is reduced by evaporation. An effluent treatment facility is being constructed to treat low-level liquid hazardous and radioactive waste. Solid low-level waste operations have been improved through the use of engineered low-level trenches, and transuranic waste handling procedures were modified in 1974 to meet new DOE criteria requiring 20-year retrievable storage. An improved disposal technique, Greater Confinement Disposal, is being demonstrated for intermediate-level waste. Nonradioactive hazardous waste is stored on site in RCRA interim status storage buildings. 5 figs

  11. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report CY 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1997-03-01

    This annual report summarizes operating activities dealing with the process waste system, the liquid low-level waste system, and the gaseous waste system. It also describes upgrade activities dealing with the process and liquid low-level waste systems, the cathodic protection system, a stack ventilation system, and configuration control. Maintenance activities are described dealing with nonradiological wastewater treatment plant, process waste treatment plant and collection system, liquid low-level waste system, and gaseous waste system. Miscellaneous activities include training, audits/reviews/tours, and environmental restoration support

  12. Computer simulation of thermal plant operations

    CERN Document Server

    O'Kelly, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This book describes thermal plant simulation, that is, dynamic simulation of plants which produce, exchange and otherwise utilize heat as their working medium. Directed at chemical, mechanical and control engineers involved with operations, control and optimization and operator training, the book gives the mathematical formulation and use of simulation models of the equipment and systems typically found in these industries. The author has adopted a fundamental approach to the subject. The initial chapters provide an overview of simulation concepts and describe a suitable computer environment.

  13. Operating Procedures to Identify Wastes of Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatea, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of sites in Iraq which have been used for nuclear activities and which contain potentially significant amounts of radioactive material. Many of these sites suffered substantial physical damage during the Gulf Wars as well as the challenging of the difficult security situation in the country.The destruction of the former nuclear facilities during the 1991 Gulf war aggravated the problem. As a result of these events, many of these nuclear facilities have lost their containment of the radioactive material and it now has an increased potential to be dispersed into the environment.Iraqi Decommissioning Directorate (IDD) is one of the Ministry of Science and Technology (MoST) formations. It deals with decommissioning of former Iraqi nuclear sites. It considers a producer of radioactive waste.Therefore, waste management represents the vital requirement to work accomplishment.The work carries out on-site waste pretreatment which considers as a minimization of waste management.W M is necessary to: Segregate 'at source' as much materials as possible to minimize quantities of radioactive waste, clear or exempt as much materials as possible and decontaminate and recycle as much radioactive waste as possible. And in more general terms: to control and account for radioactive waste to protect human health and the environment, to make sure we do not leave unnecessary burdens for future generations, to concentrate, contain and isolate the waste from the environment therefore, this make any releases to the environment to be restricted and subject to regulatory control.This procedure applies on-site waste pretreatment which comprises segregating, characterizing, minimizing, classifying, packaging and relocating of generated wastes during decommissioning of destroyed nuclear facilities. The stationary waste treatment activities are the responsibility of RWTD/MoST.The (RPC/MoE) is the national regulatory body during the whole radioactive waste management

  14. Dealing with operational power station wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper, R B [Central Electricity Generating Board, London (UK). Nuclear Health and Safety Dept.

    1981-08-01

    The disposal of wastes from nuclear power stations is discussed. Liquid and gaseous wastes, from magnox stations, which are of low level activity, are dispersed to the sea or estuaries on coastal sites or for the case of Trawfynyeld, to the nearby lake. Low activity solid wastes are either disposed of on local authority tips or in shallow land burial sites. Intermediate level wastes, consisting mainly of wet materials such as filter sludges and resins from cooling ponds, are at present stored in shielded storage tanks either dry or under water. Only one disposal route for intermediate waste is used by Britain, namely, sea-dumping. Materials for sea dumping have to be encapsulated in a durable material for example, concrete.

  15. Operation of Temporary Radioactive waste stoprage facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinseem, A A; Abulfaraj, W H; Sohsah, M A; Kamal, S M; Mamoon, A M [Nuclear Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, King Abdelazizi University jeddah-21413, Saudi Arabia (Saudi Arabia)

    1997-12-31

    Radionuclides of various half lives have been in use for several years years at different Departments of king Abdulaziz university, the university hospital, and research center. The use of unsealed radionuclides in many laboratories, resulted in considerable amounts of solid and liquid radwaste, mainly radiopharmaceuticals. To avoid accumulation of radwastes in working areas, a temporary radioactive waste storage facility was built. Segregation of radwastes according to type was carried out, followed by collection into appropriate containers and transfer to the storage facility. Average radiation dose rate inside the store was maintained at about 75 {mu} h{sup -1} through use of appropriate shielding. The dose rates at points one meter outside the store walls were maintained at about 15-20 {mu}Sv h{sup -1}. Utilization of radioisotopes during the period of 1991-1995 resulted in a volume of about 1.8 m{sup 3} of solid radwaste and about 200 L of liquid radwaste. Records of the store inventory are maintained in a computer database, listing dates, types, activities and packaging data pertinent to the radwastes delivered to the store. Quality assurance procedures are implemented during the different stages of the radwaste collection, transportation, and storage. Construction and operation of the storage facility comply with radiation safety requirements for the workers handling the radwastes, the public and the environment. The capacity of the storage facility is such that it will accommodate storage of generated radwastes of long half life up to year 2016. Permanent disposal of such radwastes may be indicated afterwards. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Annual Report of Radioactive Waste Facilities Operation in 2013

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU; Hong-ming; GAO; Zhi-gang; LIU; Fu-guo

    2013-01-01

    301,a section of Department of Radiochemistry,which manages 15 facilities and undertakes the administrative tasks of radioactive waste,is the important guarantee of scientific research production and safety in CIAE.1 The safe operation of the radioactive waste management facilities In 2013,in order to ensure the operation safety,we formulated the inspection regulations,which included regular operation inspection,week safety inspection from the leaders of the section and

  17. Evaporation Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Direct Feed Low Activity Waste Effluent Management Facility Core Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Mcclane, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Diverting the stream reduces the halides and sulfates in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. This overall program examines the potential treatment and immobilization of this stream to enable alternative disposal. The objective of this task was to demonstrate evaporation of a simulant of the LAW Melter Off-gas Condensate expected during DFLAW operations, in order to predict the composition of the effluents from the EMF evaporator to aid in planning for their disposition. This document describes the results of that test using the core simulant. This simulant formulation is designated as the “core simulant”; other additives will be included for specific testing, such as volatiles for evaporation or hazardous metals for measuring leaching properties of waste forms. The results indicate that the simulant can easily be concentrated via evaporation. During that the pH adjustment step in simulant preparation, ammonium is quickly converted to ammonia, and most of the ammonia was stripped from the simulated waste and partitioned to the condensate. Additionally, it was found that after concentrating (>12x) and cooling that a small amount of LiF and Na3(SO4)F precipitate out of solution. With the exception of ammonia, analysis of the condensate indicated very low to below detectable levels of many of the constituents in the simulant, yielding very high decontamination factors (DF).

  18. Design of Stirrer Impeller with Variable Operational Speed for a Food Waste Homogenizer

    OpenAIRE

    Idris A. Kayode; Emmanuel O. B. Ogedengbe; Marc A. Rosen

    2016-01-01

    A conceptualized impeller called KIA is designed for impact agitation of food waste in a homogenizer. A comparative analysis of the performance of KIA is made with three conventional impeller types, Rushton, Anchor, and Pitched Blade. Solid–liquid mixing of a moisture-rich food waste is simulated under various operational speeds, in order to compare the dispersions and thermal distributions at homogenous slurry conditions. Using SolidWorks, the design of the impellers employs an Application P...

  19. A PC-based discrete event simulation model of the civilian radioactive waste management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airth, G.L.; Joy, D.S.; Nehls, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses a System Simulation Model which has been developed for the Department of Energy to simulate the movement of individual waste packages (spent fuel assemblies and fuel containers) through the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS). A discrete event simulation language, GPSS/PC, which runs on an IBM/PC and operates under DOS 5.0, mathematically represents the movement and processing of radioactive waste packages through the CRWMS and the interaction of these packages with the equipment in the various facilities. The major features of the System Simulation Model are: the ability to reference characteristics of the different types of radioactive waste (age, burnup, etc.) in order to make operational and/or system design decisions, the ability to place stochastic variations on operational parameters such as processing time and equipment outages, and the ability to include a rigorous simulation of the transportation system. Output from the model includes the numbers, types, and characteristics of waste packages at selected points in the CRWMS and the extent to which various resources will be utilized in order to transport, process, and emplace the waste

  20. Transportation operations functions of the federal waste management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shappert, L.B.; Klimas, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper documents the functions that are necessary to operate the OCRWM transportation system. OCRWM's mission is to accept and transport spent fuel and high-level waste from waste generators to FWMS facilities. The emphasis is on transportation operations and assumes that all necessary facilities are in place and equipment designs and specifications are available to permit the system to operate properly. The information reported in this paper was developed for TOPO and is compatible with the draft revision of the Waste Management System Requirements and Description (SRD). 5 refs

  1. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report CY 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1995-03-01

    This report presents details about the operation of the liquid and gaseous waste department of Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the calendar year 1994. Topics discussed include; process waste system, upgrade activities, low-level liquid radioactive waste solidification project, maintenance activities, and other activities such as training, audits, and tours

  2. Solubilities of gases in simulated Tank 241-SY-101 wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norton, J.D.; Pederson, L.R.

    1995-09-01

    Oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, methane, and nitrous oxide solubilities were evaluated as a function of temperature in SYl-SIM-93B, a homogeneous simulated waste mixture containing sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate, sodium aluminate, and sodium carbonate, the principal inorganic constituents of the wastes in Tank 241-SY-101. Ammonia solubility data for this simulated waste was obtained as a function of temperature in an earlier study. The choice of a homogeneous waste mixture in this study has the advantage of eliminating complications associated with a changing electrolyte concentration as a function of temperature that would be encountered with a slurry simulant. Dissolution is one of the means by which gases may be retained in Hanford Site wastes. While models are available to estimate gas solubilities in electrolyte solutions, few data are in existence that pertain to highly concentrated, multicomponent electrolytes such as those stored in Hanford Site waste tanks

  3. Operating safety requirements for the intermediate level liquid waste system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-07-01

    The operation of the Intermediate Level Liquid Waste (ILW) System, which is described in the Final Safety Analysis, consists of two types of operations, namely: (1) the operation of a tank farm which involves the storage and transportation through pipelines of various radioactive liquids; and (2) concentration of the radioactive liquids by evaporation including rejection of the decontaminated condensate to the Waste Treatment Plant and retention of the concentrate. The following safety requirements in regard to these operations are presented: safety limits and limiting control settings; limiting conditions for operation; and surveillance requirements. Staffing requirements, reporting requirements, and steps to be taken in the event of an abnormal occurrence are also described

  4. Waste minimization for land-based drilling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurber, N.E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses engineering variables that should be addressed to minimize waste-toxicity and generation while drilling land-based wells. Proper balance of these variables provides both operational and environmental benefits

  5. Waste minimization for land-based drilling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurber, N.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses many of the engineering variables that should be addressed to minimize waste toxicity and generation during the drilling of land-based wells. Proper balance of these variables suggests both operational and environmental benefits

  6. High level waste facilities - Continuing operation or orderly shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, L.A.

    1998-04-01

    Two options for Environmental Impact Statement No action alternatives describe operation of the radioactive liquid waste facilities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The first alternative describes continued operation of all facilities as planned and budgeted through 2020. Institutional control for 100 years would follow shutdown of operational facilities. Alternatively, the facilities would be shut down in an orderly fashion without completing planned activities. The facilities and associated operations are described. Remaining sodium bearing liquid waste will be converted to solid calcine in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) or will be left in the waste tanks. The calcine solids will be stored in the existing Calcine Solids Storage Facilities (CSSF). Regulatory and cost impacts are discussed

  7. Operational experiences and upgradation of waste management facilities Trombay, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chander, Mahesh; Bodke, S.B.; Bansal, N.K.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Waste Management Facilities Trombay provide services for the safe management of radioactive wastes generated from the operation of non power sources at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. The paper describes in detail the current operational experience and facility upgradation by way of revamping of existing processes equipment and systems and augmentation of the facility by way of introducing latest processes and technologies to enhance the safety. Radioactive wastes are generated from the operation of research reactors, fuel fabrication, spent fuel reprocessing, research labs. manufacture of sealed sources and labeled compounds. Use of radiation sources in the field of medical, agriculture and industry also leads to generation of assorted solid waste and spent sealed radiation sources which require proper waste management. Waste Management Facilities Trombay comprise of Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP), Decontamination Centre (DC) and Radioactive Solid Waste Management Site (RSMS). Low level radioactive liquid effluents are received at ETP. Plant has 100 M 3 /day treatment capacity. Decontamination of liquid effluents is effected by chemical treatment method using co- precipitation as a process. Plant has 1800 M 3 of storage capacity. Chemical treatment system comprises of clarifloculator, static mixer and chemical feed tanks. Plant has concentrate management facility where chemical sludge is centrifuged to effect volume reduction of more that 15. Thickened sludge is immobilized in cement matrix. Decontamination Centre caters to the need of equipment decontamination from research reactors. Process used is ultrasonic chemical decontamination. Besides this DC provides services for decontamination of protective wears. Radioactive Solid Waste Management Site is responsible for the safe management of solid waste generated at various research reactors, plants, laboratories in Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Spent sealed radiation sources are also stored

  8. Defense Waste Processing Facility radioactive operations -- Part 2, Glass making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, J.T.; Rueter, K.J.; Ray, J.W.; Hodoh, O.

    1996-01-01

    The Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the nation's first and world's largest vitrification facility. Following a ten year construction period and nearly 3 year non-radioactive test program, the DWPF began radioactive operations in March, 1996. The results of the first 8 months of radioactive operations are presented. Topics include facility production from waste preparation batching to canister filling

  9. Retrieval process development and enhancements waste simulant compositions and defensibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, M.R.; Golcar, G.R.; Geeting, J.G.H.

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the physical waste simulant development efforts of the EM-50 Tanks Focus Area at the Hanford Site. Waste simulants are used in the testing and development of waste treatment and handling processes because performing such tests using actual tank waste is hazardous and prohibitively expensive. This document addresses the simulant development work that supports the testing of waste retrieval processes using simulants that mimic certain key physical properties of the tank waste. Development and testing of chemical simulants are described elsewhere. This work was funded through the EM-50 Tanks Focus Area as part of the Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements (RPD ampersand E) Project at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The mission of RPD ampersand E is to understand retrieval processes, including emerging and existing processes, gather performance data on those processes, and relate the data to specific tank problems to provide end users with the requisite technical bases to make retrieval and closure decisions. Physical simulants are prepared using relatively nonhazardous and inexpensive materials rather than the chemicals known to be in tank waste. Consequently, only some of the waste properties are matched by the simulant. Deciding which properties need to be matched and which do not requires a detailed knowledge of the physics of the process to be tested using the simulant. Developing this knowledge requires reviews of available literature, consultation with experts, and parametric tests. Once the relevant properties are identified, waste characterization data are reviewed to establish the target ranges for each property. Simulants are then developed that possess the desired ranges of properties

  10. Comparison of Waste Feed Delivery Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Simulant to Hanford Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, Beric E.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Rector, David R.

    2012-07-10

    The Hanford double-shell tank (DST) system provides the staging location for waste that will be transferred to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Specific WTP acceptance criteria for waste feed delivery describe the physical and chemical characteristics of the waste that must be met before the waste is transferred from the DSTs to the WTP. One of the more challenging requirements relates to the sampling and characterization of the undissolved solids (UDS) in a waste feed DST because the waste contains solid particles that settle and their concentration and relative proportion can change during the transfer of the waste in individual batches. A key uncertainty in the waste feed delivery system is the potential variation in UDS transferred in individual batches in comparison to an initial sample used for evaluating the acceptance criteria. To address this uncertainty, a number of small-scale mixing tests have been conducted as part of Washington River Protection Solutions' Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) project to determine the performance of the DST mixing and sampling systems. A series of these tests have used a five-part simulant composed of particles of different size and density and designed to be equal or more challenging than AY-102 waste. This five-part simulant, however, has not been compared with the broad range of Hanford waste, and thus there is an additional uncertainty that this simulant may not be as challenging as the most difficult Hanford waste. The purpose of this study is to quantify how the current five-part simulant compares to all of the Hanford sludge waste, and to suggest alternate simulants that could be tested to reduce the uncertainty in applying the current testing results to potentially more challenging wastes.

  11. Quantification and disposal of radioactive waste from ITER operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, G.; Devell, L.; Johnsson, B.; Gulden, W.

    1991-01-01

    The work on the safety and environment for the Next European Torus (NET) is being performed within the European Fusion Technology Safety and Environment Programme by the NET team and under NET contracts. In the area of NET-oriented investigations concerning waste management and disposal, Studsvik is concentrating on the operational waste from both NET and ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). This paper gives a characterization and quantification of the radioactive waste generated from the operation of ITER during the Physics Phase, and from the replacement of all blanket segments (European shielding blanket option) at the end of the Physics Phase after an integrated first-wall loading of 0.03 MWy/m 2 . The total activity contents and volumes of packaged waste from the Physics Phase operation and from the blanket replacement are estimated. The waste volume from replacement of the shielding blanket segments of ITER is considerably larger than estimated in earlier calculations for NET due to the fact that the ITER conceptual design includes more of the stell shielding in the removable segments. The waste handling and disposal are described using existing Swedish and German concepts for similar waste categories from nuclear fission reactors. This includes the choice of suitable packagings, intermediate storage time for cooling, and type of repository for final disposal. Some typical cost figures for waste handling are also presented. (orig.)

  12. Low-level tank waste simulant data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokken, R.O.

    1996-04-01

    The majority of defense wastes generated from reprocessing spent N- Reactor fuel at Hanford are stored in underground Double-shell Tanks (DST) and in older Single-Shell Tanks (SST) in the form of liquids, slurries, sludges, and salt cakes. The tank waste remediation System (TWRS) Program has the responsibility of safely managing and immobilizing these tank wastes for disposal. This report discusses three principle topics: the need for and basis for selecting target or reference LLW simulants, tanks waste analyses and simulants that have been defined, developed, and used for the GDP and activities in support of preparing and characterizing simulants for the current LLW vitrification project. The procedures and the data that were generated to characterized the LLW vitrification simulants were reported and are presented in this report. The final section of this report addresses the applicability of the data to the current program and presents recommendations for additional data needs including characterization and simulant compositional variability studies

  13. Loviisa starts low-level operating waste disposal in 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snellman, J.

    1996-01-01

    At an early stage Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) decided to construct a waste repository for Loviisa NPP. The suitability of the power plant site for final disposal of low- and intermediate- level operating waste was studied. In the site report in 1982 the plant site was found to be geologically suitable and economically feasible for construction. The necessary preparations started in 1992. The repository will be constructed in three phases. The first phase will cover the transport tunnel, construction of one maintenance waste tunnel and the excavation of another maintenance waste tunnel together with a hall for solidified wastes. This phase will be finished by the end of 1996. During the second phase in the beginning of next century the remaining already excavated rooms will be furnished. Finally in the third phase the repository will be extended for the decommissioning waste somewhere around years 2020-2025. (3 figs., 1 tab.)

  14. The Valduc waste incineration facility starts operations (iris process)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chateauvieux, H.; Guiberteuau, P.; Longuet, T.; Lannaud, J.; Lorich, M.

    1998-01-01

    In the operation of its facilities the Valduc Research Center produces alpha-contaminated solid waste and thus decided to build an incineration facility to treat the most contaminated combustible waste. The process selected for waste incineration is the IRIS process developed by the CEA at the Marcoule Nuclear Research Center. The Valduc Center asked SGN to build the incineration facility. The facility was commissioned in late 1996, and inactive waste incineration campaigns were run in 1997. The operator conducted tests with calibrated radioactive sources to qualify the systems for measuring holdup of active material from outside the equipment. Chlorinated waste incineration test runs were performed using the phosphatizing process developed by the Marcoule Research Center. Inspections performed after these incineration runs revealed the complete absence of corrosion in the equipment. Active commissioning of the facility is scheduled for mid-1998. The Valduc incinerator is the first industrial application of the IRIS process. (author)

  15. Operator use of procedures during simulated emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, E.M.; Mumaw, R.J.; Lewis, P.M.

    1995-04-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an empirical study of nuclear power plant operator performance in cognitively demanding simulated emergencies. During emergencies operators follow highly prescriptive written procedures. The objectives of the study were to understand and document what role higher-level cognitive activities such as diagnosis, or more generally {open_quotes}situation assessment,{close_quotes} play in guiding operator performance, given that operators utilize procedures in responding to the events. The study examined crew performance in variants of two simulated emergencies: (1) an Interfacing System Loss of Coolant Accident and (2) a Loss of Heat Sink scenario. Data on operator performance were collected using training simulators at two plant sites. Up to 11 crews from each plant participated in each of two simulated emergencies for a total of 38 cases analyzed. Crew performance was videotaped and partial transcripts were produced and analyzed. The results revealed a number of instances where higher-level cognitive activities such as situation assessment and response planning enabled operators to handle aspects of the situation that were not fully addressed by the procedures. The paper summarizes these cases and their implications for the development and evaluation of training and control room aids, as well as for human reliability analyses. The full report of the study is published as NUREG/CR-6208.

  16. Operator use of procedures during simulated emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.M.; Mumaw, R.J.; Lewis, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an empirical study of nuclear power plant operator performance in cognitively demanding simulated emergencies. During emergencies operators follow highly prescriptive written procedures. The objectives of the study were to understand and document what role higher-level cognitive activities such as diagnosis, or more generally ' situation assessment,' play in guiding operator performance, given that operators utilize procedures in responding to the events. The study examined crew performance in variants of two simulated emergencies: (1) an Interfacing System Loss of Coolant Accident and (2) a Loss of Heat Sink scenario. Data on operator performance were collected using training simulators at two plant sites. Up to 11 crews from each plant participated in each of two simulated emergencies for a total of 38 cases analyzed. Crew performance was videotaped and partial transcripts were produced and analyzed. The results revealed a number of instances where higher-level cognitive activities such as situation assessment and response planning enabled operators to handle aspects of the situation that were not fully addressed by the procedures. The paper summarizes these cases and their implications for the development and evaluation of training and control room aids, as well as for human reliability analyses. The full report of the study is published as NUREG/CR-6208

  17. Design and operation of evaporators for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamomoto, Y.

    1968-01-01

    A manual dealing with the application of evaporators to the treatment of liquid radioactive wastes. This book is the second of three commissioned by the IAEA on the three on the three principal techniques for concentrating radioactive wastes, namely chemical precipitation, evaporation and ion-exchange. Informations on different types of evaporators and related equipment and their operational procedures are given in this document. It also gives different means of disposal of evaporator condensates and concentrates and a rough estimate of costs of radioactive waste evaporator plant and its operation. 58 refs, 43 figs, 5 tabs

  18. Design and operation of evaporators for radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamomoto, Y [comp.; Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    1968-05-01

    A manual dealing with the application of evaporators to the treatment of liquid radioactive wastes. This book is the second of three commissioned by the IAEA on the three on the three principal techniques for concentrating radioactive wastes, namely chemical precipitation, evaporation and ion-exchange. Informations on different types of evaporators and related equipment and their operational procedures are given in this document. It also gives different means of disposal of evaporator condensates and concentrates and a rough estimate of costs of radioactive waste evaporator plant and its operation. 58 refs, 43 figs, 5 tabs.

  19. Phase 1 immobilized low-activity waste operational source term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burbank, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents an engineering analysis of the Phase 1 privatization feeds to establish an operational source term for storage and disposal of immobilized low-activity waste packages at the Hanford Site. The source term information is needed to establish a preliminary estimate of the numbers of remote-handled and contact-handled waste packages. A discussion of the uncertainties and their impact on the source term and waste package distribution is also presented. It should be noted that this study is concerned with operational impacts only. Source terms used for accident scenarios would differ due to alpha and beta radiation which were not significant in this study

  20. An analysis of repository waste-handling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, A.W.

    1990-09-01

    This report has been prepared to document the operational analysis of waste-handling facilities at a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. The site currently under investigation for the geologic repository is located at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. The repository waste-handling operations have been identified and analyzed for the year 2011, a steady-state year during which the repository receives spent nuclear fuel containing the equivalent of 3000 metric tons of uranium (MTU) and defense high-level waste containing the equivalent of 400 MTU. As a result of this analysis, it has been determined that the waste-handling facilities are adequate to receive, prepare, store, and emplace the projected quantity of waste on an annual basis. In addition, several areas have been identified where additional work is required. The recommendations for future work have been divided into three categories: items that affect the total waste management system, operations within the repository boundary, and the methodology used to perform operational analyses for repository designs. 7 refs., 48 figs., 11 tabs

  1. Application of stochastic dynamic simulation to waste form qualification for the HWVP vitrification process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, W.L.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Processing steps during the conversion of high-level nuclear waste into borosilicate glass in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant are being simulated on a computer by addressing transient mass balances. The results are being used to address the US Department of Energy's Waste Form Qualification requirements. The simulated addresses discontinuous (batch) operations and perturbations in the transient behavior of the process caused by errors in measurements and control actions. A collection of tests, based on process measurements, is continually checked and used to halt the simulated process when specified conditions are met. An associated set of control actions is then implemented in the simulation. The results for an example simulation are shown. 8 refs

  2. G189A analytical simulation of the RITE Integrated Waste Management-Water System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggi, J. V.; Clonts, S. E.

    1974-01-01

    This paper discusses the computer simulation of the Integrated Waste Management-Water System Using Radioisotopes for Thermal Energy (RITE) and applications of the simulation. Variations in the system temperature and flows due to particular operating conditions and variations in equipment heating loads imposed on the system were investigated with the computer program. The results were assessed from the standpoint of the computed dynamic characteristics of the system and the potential applications of the simulation to system development and vehicle integration.

  3. Analysis of a waste-heat boiler by CFD simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yongziang; Jokilaakso, A. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Waste-heat boilers play important roles in the continuous operation of a smelter and in the conservation of energy. However, the fluid flow and heat transfer behaviour has not been well studied, concerning the boiler performance and design. This presentation describes simulated gas flow and heat transfer of a waste-heat boiler in the Outokumpu copper flash smelting process. The governing transport equations for the conservation of mass, momentum and enthalpy were solved with a commercial CFD-code PHOENICS. The standard k-{epsilon} turbulence model and a composite-flux radiation model were used in the computations. The computational results show that the flow is strongly recirculating and distinctly three-dimensional in most part of the boiler, particularly in the radiation section. The predicted flow pattern and temperature distribution were in a good agreement with laboratory models and industrial measurements. The results provide detailed information of flow pattern, the temperature distribution and gas cooling efficiency. The CFD proved to be a useful tool in analysing the boiler operation. (author)

  4. Analysis of a waste-heat boiler by CFD simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yongziang; Jokilaakso, A [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    Waste-heat boilers play important roles in the continuous operation of a smelter and in the conservation of energy. However, the fluid flow and heat transfer behaviour has not been well studied, concerning the boiler performance and design. This presentation describes simulated gas flow and heat transfer of a waste-heat boiler in the Outokumpu copper flash smelting process. The governing transport equations for the conservation of mass, momentum and enthalpy were solved with a commercial CFD-code PHOENICS. The standard k-{epsilon} turbulence model and a composite-flux radiation model were used in the computations. The computational results show that the flow is strongly recirculating and distinctly three-dimensional in most part of the boiler, particularly in the radiation section. The predicted flow pattern and temperature distribution were in a good agreement with laboratory models and industrial measurements. The results provide detailed information of flow pattern, the temperature distribution and gas cooling efficiency. The CFD proved to be a useful tool in analysing the boiler operation. (author)

  5. Regulatory safety aspects of nuclear waste management operations in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundararajan, A.R.

    2000-01-01

    The Department of Atomic Energy in India as part of its programme to harness the nuclear energy for generation of nuclear power has been operating a whole range of nuclear fuel cycle facilities including waste management plants for more than four decades. The waste management plants include three high level waste immobilisation plants, one in operation, one under commissioning and one more under construction. Atomic Energy Regulatory Board is mandated to review and authorise from the safety angle the siting, the design, the construction and the operation of the waste management plants. The regulatory procedures, which involve multi-tier review adopted for ensuring the safety of these facilities, are described in this paper. (author)

  6. Training simulator for operations at LNG terminals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuta, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Tetsuka, S.; Koyama, K.

    1997-01-01

    The Tokyo Gas LNG terminals are among the major energy centers of the Tokyo area, supplying 8 million customers with city gas, and also supplying fuel for thermal power generation at the neighboring thermal power plant operated by the Tokyo Electric Power Company. For this reason, in the event of an emergency at the terminal operators have to be able to respond quickly and accurately to restore operations and prevent secondary damage. Modern LNG terminals are highly reliable and are equipped with backup systems, and occurrences of major trouble are now almost nil. Operators therefore have to be trained to respond to emergencies using simulators, in order to heighten their emergency response capabilities. Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd. has long been aware of the need for simulators and has used them in training, but a new large-scale, real-time simulator has now developed in response to new training needs, applying previously accumulated expertise to create a model of an entire LNG terminal incorporating new features. The development of this new simulator has made possible training for emergencies affecting an entire terminal, and this has been very effective in raising the standards of operators. (au)

  7. Induction melting of simulated transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenaglia, R.D.; McCall, J.L.

    1983-06-01

    Coreless induction melting was investigated as a method to melt and consolidate waste material representative of the transuranic waste (TRU) stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Waste material was introduced onto the surface of a molten cast iron bath in a coreless induction furnace. Waste metallics were incorporated into the bath. Noncombustibles formed a slag which was poured or skimmed from the bath surface. Stack sampling was performed to characterize the off-gas and particulate matter evolved. Experimental melting tests were performed for a variety of types of wastes including metallics, chemical sludge, soil, concrete, and glass. Each test also included a representative level of combustible materials consisting of paper, wood, cloth, polyvinyl chloride and polyethylene. Metallic wastes were readily processed by induction melting with a minimum of slag production. Test waste consisting primarily of chemical sludge provided fluid slags which could be poured from the bath surface. Processing of wastes consisting of soil, concrete, or glass was limited by the inability to achieve fluid slags. It appears from test results that coreless induction melting is a feasible method to process INEL-type waste materials if two problems can be resolved. First, slag fluidity must be improved to facilitate the collection of slags formed from soil, concrete, or glass containing wastes. Secondly, refractory life must be further optimized to permit prolonged processing of the waste materials. The use of a chrome-bearing high-alumina refractory was found to resist slag line attach much better than a magnesia refractory, although some attack was still noted

  8. Using simulation to assess the opportunities of dynamic waste collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mes, Martijn R.K.; Bangsow, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we illustrate the use of discrete event simulation to evaluate how dynamic planning methodologies can be best applied for the collection of waste from underground containers. We present a case study that took place at the waste collection company Twente Milieu, located in The

  9. Using Simulation to Assess the Opportunities of Dynamic Waste Collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mes, Martijn R.K.

    In this paper, we illustrate the use of discrete event simulation to evaluate how dynamic planning methodologies can be best applied for the collection of waste from underground containers. We present a case study that took place at the waste collection company Twente Milieu, located in The

  10. Operation for Rokkasho Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamizono, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    The Rokkasho Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) Disposal Center is located in Oishitai, Rokkasho-mura, Kamikitagun, of Aomori Prefecture. This district is situated in the southern part of Shimohita Peninsula in the northeastern corner of the prefecture, which lies at the northern tip of Honshu, Japan's main island. The Rokkasho LLW Disposal Center deals with only LLW generated by operating of nuclear power plants. The No.1 and No.2 disposal facility are now in operation. The disposal facilities in operation have a total dispose capacity of 80,000m 3 (equivalent to 400,000 drums). Our final business scope is to dispose of radioactive waste corresponding to 600,000 m 3 (equivalent to 3000,000 drums). For No.1 disposal facility, we have been disposing of homogeneous waste, including condensed liquid waste, spent resin, solidified with cement and asphalt, etc. For No.2 disposal facility, we can bury a solid waste solidified with mortar, such as activated metals and plastics, etc. Using an improved construction technology for an artificial barrier, the concrete pits in No.2 disposal facility could be constructed more economical and spacious than that of No.1. Both No.1 and No.2 facility will be able to bury about 200,000 waste packages (drums) each corresponding to 40,000 m 3 . As of March 17, 2008, Approximately 200,00 waste drums summing up No.1 and No.2 disposal facility have been received from Nuclear power plants and buried. (author)

  11. Low-Level Radioactive Waste siting simulation information package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    The Department of Energy's National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program has developed a simulation exercise designed to facilitate the process of siting and licensing disposal facilities for low-level radioactive waste. The siting simulation can be conducted at a workshop or conference, can involve 14-70 participants (or more), and requires approximately eight hours to complete. The exercise is available for use by states, regional compacts, or other organizations for use as part of the planning process for low-level waste disposal facilities. This information package describes the development, content, and use of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Siting Simulation. Information is provided on how to organize a workshop for conducting the simulation. 1 ref., 1 fig

  12. Minimization of mixed waste in explosive testing operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, M.A.; Sator, F.E.; Simmons, L.F.

    1993-02-01

    In the 1970s and 1980s, efforts to manage mixed waste and reduce pollution focused largely on post-process measures. In the late 1980s, the approach to waste management and pollution control changed, focusing on minimization and prevention rather than abatement, treatment, and disposal. The new approach, and the formulated guidance from the US Department of Energy, was to take all necessary measures to minimize waste and prevent the release of pollutants to the environment. Two measures emphasized in particular were source reduction (reducing the volume and toxicity of the waste source) and recycling. In 1988, a waste minimization and pollution prevention program was initiated at Site 300, where the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) conducts explosives testing. LLNL's Defense Systems/Nuclear Design (DS/ND) Program has adopted a variety of conservation techniques to minimize waste generation and cut disposal costs associated with ongoing operations. The techniques include minimizing the generation of depleted uranium and lead mixed waste through inventory control and material substitution measures and through developing a management system to recycle surplus explosives. The changes implemented have reduced annual mixed waste volumes by more than 95% and reduced overall radioactive waste generation (low-level and mixed) by more than 75%. The measures employed were cost-effective and easily implemented

  13. Community Solutions for Solid Waste Pollution, Level 6. Teacher Guide. Operation Waste Watch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia State Dept. of Waste Management, Richmond. Div. of Litter & Recycling.

    Operation Waste Watch is a series of seven sequential learning units which addresses the subject of litter control and solid waste management. Each unit may be used in a variety of ways, depending on the needs and schedules of individual schools, and may be incorporated into various social studies, science, language arts, health, mathematics, and…

  14. Operator training simulator for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiozuka, Hiromi

    1977-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, training of the operators is important. In Japan, presently there are two training centers, one is BWR operation training center at Okuma-cho, Fukushima Prefecture, and another the nuclear power generation training center in Tsuruga City, Fukui Prefecture, where the operators of PWR nuclear power plants are trained. This report describes the BWR operation training center briefly. Operation of a nuclear power plant is divided into three stages of start-up, steady state operation, and shut down. Start-up is divided into the cold-state start-up after the shut down for prolonged period due to periodical inspection or others and the hot-state start-up from stand-by condition after the shut down for a short time. In the cold-state start-up, the correction of reactivity change and the heating-up control to avoid excessive thermal stress to the primary system components are important. The BWR operation training center offers the next three courses, namely beginner's course, retraining course and specific training course. The training period is 12 weeks and the number of trainees is eight/course in the beginner's course. The simulator was manufactured by modeling No. 3 plant of Fukushima First Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co. The simulator is composed of the mimic central control panel and the digital computer. The software system comprises the monitor to supervise the whole program execution, the logic model simulating the plant interlock system and the dynamic model simulating the plant physical phenomena. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  15. W-026, transuranic waste restricted waste management (TRU RWM) glovebox operational test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-02-18

    The TRU Waste/Restricted Waste Management (LLW/PWNP) Glovebox 401 is designed to accept and process waste from the Transuranic Process Glovebox 302. Waste is transferred to the glovebox via the Drath and Schraeder Bagless Transfer Port (DO-07401) on a transfer stand. The stand is removed with a hoist and the operator inspects the waste (with the aid of the Sampling and Treatment Director) to determine a course of action for each item. The waste is separated into compliant and non compliant. One Trip Port DO-07402A is designated as ``Compliant``and One Trip Port DO-07402B is designated as ``Non Compliant``. As the processing (inspection, bar coding, sampling and treatment) of the transferred items takes place, residue is placed in the appropriate One Trip port. The status of the waste items is tracked by the Data Management System (DMS) via the Plant Control System (PCS) barcode interface. As an item is moved for sampling or storage or it`s state altered by treatment, the Operator will track an items location using a portable barcode reader and entry any required data on the DMS console. The Operational Test Procedure (OTP) will perform evolutions (described here) using the Plant Operating Procedures (POP) in order to verify that they are sufficient and accurate for controlled glovebox operation.

  16. W-026, transuranic waste restricted waste management (TRU RWM) glovebox operational test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-01-01

    The TRU Waste/Restricted Waste Management (LLW/PWNP) Glovebox 401 is designed to accept and process waste from the Transuranic Process Glovebox 302. Waste is transferred to the glovebox via the Drath and Schraeder Bagless Transfer Port (DO-07401) on a transfer stand. The stand is removed with a hoist and the operator inspects the waste (with the aid of the Sampling and Treatment Director) to determine a course of action for each item. The waste is separated into compliant and non compliant. One Trip Port DO-07402A is designated as ''Compliant''and One Trip Port DO-07402B is designated as ''Non Compliant''. As the processing (inspection, bar coding, sampling and treatment) of the transferred items takes place, residue is placed in the appropriate One Trip port. The status of the waste items is tracked by the Data Management System (DMS) via the Plant Control System (PCS) barcode interface. As an item is moved for sampling or storage or it's state altered by treatment, the Operator will track an items location using a portable barcode reader and entry any required data on the DMS console. The Operational Test Procedure (OTP) will perform evolutions (described here) using the Plant Operating Procedures (POP) in order to verify that they are sufficient and accurate for controlled glovebox operation

  17. Increasing operational efficiency in a radioactive waste processing plant - 16100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, T.W.; Watson, S.N.

    2009-01-01

    The solid waste plant at Harwell in Oxfordshire, contains a purpose built facility to input, assay, visually inspect and sort remote handled intermediate level radioactive waste (RHILW). The facility includes a suite of remote handling cells, known as the head-end cells (HEC), which waste must pass through in order to be repackaged. Some newly created waste from decommissioning works on site passes through the cells, but the vast majority of waste for processing is historical waste, stored in below ground tube stores. Existing containers are not suitable for long term storage, many are already badly corroded, so the waste must be efficiently processed and repackaged in order to achieve passive safety. The Harwell site is currently being decommissioned and the land is being restored. The site is being progressively de-licensed, and redeveloped as a business park, which can only be completed when all the nuclear liabilities have been removed. The recovery and processing of old waste in the solid waste plant is a key project linked to de-licensing of a section of the site. Increasing the operational efficiency of the waste processing plant could shorten the time needed to clear the site and has the potential to save money for the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA). The waste processing facility was constructed in the mid 1990's, and commissioned in 1999. Since operations began, the yearly throughput of the cells has increased significantly every year. To achieve targets set out in the lifetime plan (LTP) for the site, throughput must continue to increase. The operations department has measured the overall equipment effectiveness (OEE) of the process for the last few years, and has used continuous improvement techniques to decrease the average cycle time. Philosophies from operational management practices such as 'lean' and 'kaizen' have been employed successfully to drive out losses and increase plant efficiency. This paper will describe how the solid waste plant

  18. Extreme E-waste generated from successful Operations Management?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Erik Skov; Zhilyaev, Dmitry; Parajuly, Keshav

    This paper identifies how research in the field of Operations Management (OM) has been extremely successful in reducing costs for the manufacturing of electrical and electronic equipment by focusing on design for assembly and manufacturing. The downside is the generation of extreme amounts of e......-waste. Based on a literature survey, 2251 kg of e-waste and on case study, this research identifies the need to extend product lifetimes to drive down e-waste. The study concludes that more research is needed on designs for disassembly, repair, refurbishment, and remanufacturing to meet future requirements...

  19. Achieving RCRA compliance in DOE defense waste management operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankhauser, W.A.; Shepard, M.D.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) generates significant volumes of radioactive mixed waste (RMW) through its defense-related activities. Defense RMW is co-regulated by DOE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/State agencies in accordance with requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Atomic Energy Act (AEA). This paper highlights some of the problems encountered in co-regulation and discusses achievements of the defense waste management program in integrating RCRA requirements into RMW operations. Defense waste sites are planning facility modifications and major new construction projects to develop treatment, storage and disposal capacity for existing RMW inventories and projected needs

  20. Regulation imposed to nuclear facility operators for the elaboration of 'waste studies' and 'waste statuses'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This decision from the French authority of nuclear safety (ASN) aims at validating the new versions of the guidebook for the elaboration of 'waste studies' for nuclear facilities and of the specifications for the elaboration of 'waste statuses' for nuclear facilities. This paper includes two documents. The first one is a guidebook devoted to nuclear facility operators which fixes the rules of production of waste studies according to the articles 20 to 26 of the inter-ministry by-law from December 31, 1999 (waste zoning conditions and ASN's control modalities). The second document concerns the specifications for the establishment of annual waste statuses according to article 27 of the inter-ministry by-law from December 31, 1999 (rational management of nuclear wastes). (J.S.)

  1. Barnwell low-level waste disposal operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebenhack, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    The primary issue that underlies all the regulatory and public scrutiny which has been evidenced for the last few years and will continue into the future, is one in which we in the nuclear industry, based upon a scientific and rational scheme, can show others that radioactive waste materials will be isolated from the biosphere until such time as the danger of environmental degradation is passed. The entire area has been marred by emotions and bias on both sides of the issue and only through a rational and informed decision-making process, as well as an education process for both the public and ourselves, will we work through this to a satisfactory end

  2. Chemodynamics of EDTA in a simulated mixed waste: the Hanford Site's complex concentrate waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toste, A.P.; Ohnuki, Toshihiko

    1999-01-01

    Enormous stockpiles of mixed wastes at the USDOE's Hanford Site, the original US plutonium production facility, await permanent disposal. One mixed waste derived from reprocessing spent fuel was found to contain numerous nuclear related organics including chelating agents like EDTA and complexing agents, which have been used as decontamination agents, etc. Their presence in actual mixed wastes indicates that the organic content of nuclear wastes is dynamic and complicate waste management efforts. The subjects of this report is the chemo-degradation of EDTA degradation in a simulant Hanford's complex concentrate waste. The simulant was prepared by adding EDTA to an inorganic matrix, which was formulated based on past analyses of the actual waste. Aliquots of the EDTA simulant were withdrawn at different time points, derivatized via methylation and analyzed by gas chromatography and Gc/MS to monitor the disappearance of EDTA and the appearance of its' degradation products. This report also compares the results of EDTA's chemo-degradation to the g-radiolysis of EDTA in the simulant, the subject of a recently published article. Finally based on the results of these two studies, an assesment of the potential impact of EDTA degradation on the management of mixed wastes is offered. (J.P.N.)

  3. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox operational test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kersten, J.K.

    1998-01-01

    The Low Level Waste (LLW) Process Gloveboxes are designed to: receive a 55 gallon drum in an 85 gallon overpack in the Entry glovebox (GBIOI); and open and sort the waste from the 55 gallon drum, place the waste back into drum and relid in the Sorting glovebox (GB 102). In addition, waste which requires further examination is transferred to the LLW RWM Glovebox via the Drath and Schraeder Bagiess Transfer Port (DO-07-201) or sent to the Sample Transfer Port (STC); crush the drum in the Supercompactor glovebox (GB 104); place the resulting puck (along with other pucks) into another 85 gallon overpack in the Exit glovebox (GB 105). The status of the waste items is tracked by the Data Management System (DMS) via the Plant Control System (PCS) barcode interface. As an item is moved from the entry glovebox to the exit glovebox, the Operator will track an items location using a barcode reader and enter any required data on the DMS console. The Operational Test Procedure (OTP) will perform evolution's (described below) using the Plant Operating Procedures (POP) in order to verify that they are sufficient and accurate for controlled glovebox operation

  4. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox operational test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersten, J.K.

    1998-02-19

    The Low Level Waste (LLW) Process Gloveboxes are designed to: receive a 55 gallon drum in an 85 gallon overpack in the Entry glovebox (GBIOI); and open and sort the waste from the 55 gallon drum, place the waste back into drum and relid in the Sorting glovebox (GB 102). In addition, waste which requires further examination is transferred to the LLW RWM Glovebox via the Drath and Schraeder Bagiess Transfer Port (DO-07-201) or sent to the Sample Transfer Port (STC); crush the drum in the Supercompactor glovebox (GB 104); place the resulting puck (along with other pucks) into another 85 gallon overpack in the Exit glovebox (GB 105). The status of the waste items is tracked by the Data Management System (DMS) via the Plant Control System (PCS) barcode interface. As an item is moved from the entry glovebox to the exit glovebox, the Operator will track an items location using a barcode reader and enter any required data on the DMS console. The Operational Test Procedure (OTP) will perform evolution`s (described below) using the Plant Operating Procedures (POP) in order to verify that they are sufficient and accurate for controlled glovebox operation.

  5. A Simulation Base Investigation of High Latency Space Systems Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zu Qun; Crues, Edwin Z.; Bielski, Paul; Moore, Michael

    2017-01-01

    NASA's human space program has developed considerable experience with near Earth space operations. Although NASA has experience with deep space robotic missions, NASA has little substantive experience with human deep space operations. Even in the Apollo program, the missions lasted only a few weeks and the communication latencies were on the order of seconds. Human missions beyond the relatively close confines of the Earth-Moon system will involve missions with durations measured in months and communications latencies measured in minutes. To minimize crew risk and to maximize mission success, NASA needs to develop a better understanding of the implications of these types of mission durations and communication latencies on vehicle design, mission design and flight controller interaction with the crew. To begin to address these needs, NASA performed a study using a physics-based subsystem simulation to investigate the interactions between spacecraft crew and a ground-based mission control center for vehicle subsystem operations across long communication delays. The simulation, built with a subsystem modeling tool developed at NASA's Johnson Space Center, models the life support system of a Mars transit vehicle. The simulation contains models of the cabin atmosphere and pressure control system, electrical power system, drinking and waste water systems, internal and external thermal control systems, and crew metabolic functions. The simulation has three interfaces: 1) a real-time crew interface that can be use to monitor and control the vehicle subsystems; 2) a mission control center interface with data transport delays up to 15 minutes each way; 3) a real-time simulation test conductor interface that can be use to insert subsystem malfunctions and observe the interactions between the crew, ground, and simulated vehicle. The study was conducted at the 21st NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) mission between July 18th and Aug 3rd of year 2016. The NEEMO

  6. SPEEDUP simulation of liquid waste batch processing. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannahan, K.L.; Aull, J.E.; Dimenna, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has accumulated radioactive hazardous waste for over 40 years during the time SRS made nuclear materials for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors. This waste is being stored as caustic slurry in a large number of 1 million gallon steel tanks, some of which were initially constructed in the early 1950's. SRS and DOE intend to clean up the Site and convert this waste into stable forms which then can be safely stored. The liquid waste will be separated into a partially decontaminated low-level and radioactive high-level waste in one feed preparation operation, In-Tank Precipitation. The low-level waste will be used to make a concrete product called saltstone in the Saltstone Facility, a part of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The concrete will be poured into large vaults, where it will be permanently stored. The high-level waste will be added to glass-formers and waste slurry solids from another feed preparation operation, Extended Sludge Processing. The mixture will then be converted to a stable borosilicate glass by a vitrification process that is the other major part of the DWPF. This glass will be poured into stainless steel canisters and sent to a temporary storage facility prior to delivery to a permanent underground storage site

  7. Simulating the structure of gypsum composites using pulverized basalt waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buryanov Аleksandr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the possibility of simulating the structure of gypsum composite modified with basalt dust waste to make materials and products based on it. Structural simulating of the topological space in gypsum modified composite by optimizing its grain-size composition highly improves its physical and mechanical properties. Strength and density tests have confirmed the results of the simulation. The properties of modified gypsum materials are improved by obtaining of denser particle packing in the presence of hemihydrate of finely dispersed basalt and plasticizer particles in the system, and by engaging basalt waste in the structuring process of modified gypsum stone.

  8. WIPP waste package testing on simulated DHLW: emplacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecke, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Several series of simulated (nonradioactive) defense high-level waste (DHLW) package tests have been emplaced in the WIPP, a research and development facility authorized to demonstrate the safe disposal of defense-related wastes. The primary purpose of these 3-to-7 year duration tests is to evaluate the in situ materials performance of waste package barriers (canisters, overpacks, backfills, and nonradioactive DHLW glass waste form) for possible future application to a licensed waste repository in salt. This paper describes all test materials, instrumentation, and emplacement and testing techniques, and discusses progress of the various tests. These tests are intended to provide information on materials behavior (i.e., corrosion, metallurgical and geochemical alterations, waste form durability, surface interactions, etc.), as well as comparison between several waste package designs, fabrications details, and actual costs. These experiments involve 18 full-size simulated DHLW packages (approximately 3.0 m x 0.6 m diameter) emplaced in vertical boreholes in the salt drift floor. Six of the test packages contain internal electrical heaters (470 W/canister), and were emplace under approximately reference DHLW repository conditions. Twelve other simulated DHLW packages were emplaced under accelerated-aging or overtest conditions, including the artificial introduction of brine, and a thermal loading approximately three to four times higher than reference. Eight of these 12 test packages contain 1500 W/canister electrical heaters; the other four are filled with DHLW glass. 9 refs., 1 fig

  9. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report, CY 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1996-03-01

    This report describes the operating activities, upgrade activities, maintenance, and other activities regarding liquid and gaseous low level radioactive waste management at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Miscellaneous activities include training, audits, tours, and environmental restoration support

  10. Defense Waste Processing Facility staged operations: environmental information document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-11-01

    Environmental information is presented relating to a staged version of the proposed Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Plant. The information is intended to provide the basis for an Environmental Impact Statement. In either the integral or the staged design, the DWPF will convert the high-level waste currently stored in tanks into: a leach-resistant form containing about 99.9% of all the radioactivity, and a residual, slightly contaminated salt, which is disposed of as saltcrete. In the first stage of the staged version, the insoluble sludge portion of the waste and the long lived radionuclides contained therein will be vitrified. The waste glass will be sealed in canisters and stored onsite until shipped to a Federal repository. In the second stage, the supernate portion of the waste will be decontaminated by ion exchange. The recovered radionuclides will be transferred to the Stage 1 facility, and mixed with the sludge feed before vitrification. The residual, slightly contaminated salt solution will be mixed with Portland cement to form a concrete product (saltcrete) which will be buried onsite in an engineered landfill. This document describes the conceptual facilities and processes for producing glass waste and decontaminated salt. The environmental effects of facility construction, normal operations, and accidents are then presented. Descriptions of site and environs, alternative sites and waste disposal options, and environmental consultations and permits are given in the base Environmental Information Document

  11. Cold Dissolved Saltcake Waste Simulant Development, Preparation, and Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassat, Scot D.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Russell, Renee L.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Sell, Rachel L.

    2003-01-01

    CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. is identifying and developing supplemental process technologies to accelerate the Hanford tank waste cleanup mission. Bulk vitrification, containerized grout, and steam reforming are three technologies under consideration for treatment of the radioactive saltcake wastes in 68 single-shell tanks. To support development and testing of these technologies, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked with developing a cold dissolved saltcake simulant formulation to be representative of an actual saltcake waste stream, preparing 25- and 100-L batches of the simulant, and analyzing the composition of the batches to ensure conformance to formulation targets. Lacking a defined composition for dissolved actual saltcake waste, PNNL used available tank waste composition information and an equilibrium chemistry model (Environmental Simulation Program [ESP(trademark)]) to predict the concentrations of analytes in solution. Observations of insoluble solids in initial laboratory preparations for the model-predicted formulation prompted reductions in the concentration of phosphate and silicon in the final simulant formulation. The analytical results for the 25- and 100-L simulant batches, prepared by an outside vendor to PNNL specifications, agree within the expected measurement accuracy (∼10%) of the target concentrations and are highly consistent for replicate measurements, with a few minor exceptions. In parallel with the production of the 2nd simulant batch (100-L), a 1-L laboratory control sample of the same formulation was carefully prepared at PNNL to serve as an analytical standard. The instrumental analyses indicate that the vendor prepared batches of solution adequately reflect the as-formulated simulant composition. In parallel with the simulant development effort, a nominal 5-M (molar) sodium actual waste solution was prepared at the Hanford Site from a limited number of tank waste samples. Because this actual waste solution w

  12. Effects of simulant mixed waste on EPDM and butyl rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1997-11-01

    The authors have developed a Chemical Compatibility Testing Program for the evaluation of plastic packaging components which may be used in transporting mixed waste forms. In this program, they have screened 10 plastic materials in four liquid mixed waste simulants. These plastics were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer (Nitrile) rubber, cross-linked polyethylene, epichlorohydrin rubber, ethylene-propylene (EPDM) rubber, fluorocarbons (Viton and Kel-F trademark), polytetrafluoro-ethylene (Teflon), high-density polyethylene, isobutylene-isoprene copolymer (Butyl) rubber, polypropylene, and styrene-butadiene (SBR) rubber. The selected simulant mixed wastes were (1) an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite; (2) a chlorinated hydrocarbon mixture; (3) a simulant liquid scintillation fluid; and (4) a mixture of ketones. The screening testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to approximately 3 kGy of gamma radiation followed by 14-day exposures to the waste simulants at 60 C. The rubber materials or elastomers were tested using Vapor Transport Rate measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. The authors have developed a chemical compatibility program for the evaluation of plastic packaging components which may be incorporated in packaging for transporting mixed waste forms. From the data analyses performed to date, they have identified the thermoplastic, polychlorotrifluoroethylene, as having the greatest chemical compatibility after having been exposed to gamma radiation followed by exposure to the Hanford Tank simulant mixed waste. The most striking observation from this study was the poor performance of polytetrafluoroethylene under these conditions. In the evaluation of the two elastomeric materials they have concluded that while both materials exhibit remarkable resistance to these environmental conditions, EPDM has a greater resistance to this corrosive simulant mixed waste

  13. Uncertainty analysis of NDA waste measurements using computer simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwood, L.G.; Harker, Y.D.; Yoon, W.Y.; Meachum, T.R.

    2000-01-01

    Uncertainty assessments for nondestructive radioassay (NDA) systems for nuclear waste are complicated by factors extraneous to the measurement systems themselves. Most notably, characteristics of the waste matrix (e.g., homogeneity) and radioactive source material (e.g., particle size distribution) can have great effects on measured mass values. Under these circumstances, characterizing the waste population is as important as understanding the measurement system in obtaining realistic uncertainty values. When extraneous waste characteristics affect measurement results, the uncertainty results are waste-type specific. The goal becomes to assess the expected bias and precision for the measurement of a randomly selected item from the waste population of interest. Standard propagation-of-errors methods for uncertainty analysis can be very difficult to implement in the presence of significant extraneous effects on the measurement system. An alternative approach that naturally includes the extraneous effects is as follows: (1) Draw a random sample of items from the population of interest; (2) Measure the items using the NDA system of interest; (3) Establish the true quantity being measured using a gold standard technique; and (4) Estimate bias by deriving a statistical regression model comparing the measurements on the system of interest to the gold standard values; similar regression techniques for modeling the standard deviation of the difference values gives the estimated precision. Actual implementation of this method is often impractical. For example, a true gold standard confirmation measurement may not exist. A more tractable implementation is obtained by developing numerical models for both the waste material and the measurement system. A random sample of simulated waste containers generated by the waste population model serves as input to the measurement system model. This approach has been developed and successfully applied to assessing the quantity of

  14. Bituminization of simulated waste, spent resins, evaporator concentrates and animal ashes by extrusion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosche Filho, C.E.; Chandra, U.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the study of bituminization of simulated radwaste - spennt ion-exchange resins, borate evaporator/concentrates and animal ashes, are presented and discussed. Distilled and oxidizer bitumen were used. Characterization of the crude material and simulated wastes-bitumen mixtures of varying weigt composition (30, 40, 50, 60% by weight of dry waste material) was carried out. The asphaltene and parafin contents in the bitumens were also determined. Some additives and were used with an aim to improve the characteristcs of solidified wastes. For leaching studies, granular ion-exchange resins were with Cs - 134 and mixtures of resin-bitumen were prepared. The leaching studies were executed using the IAEA recommendation and the ISO method. A conventional screw-extruder, common in plastic industry, was used determine operational parameters and process difficulties. Mixtures of resin-bitumen and evaporator concentrate-bitumen obtained from differents operational conditions were characterized. (Author) [pt

  15. Bituminization of simulated waste, spent resins, evaporator concentrates and animal ashes by extrusion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosche Filho, C.E.; Chandra, U.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the study of simulated radwaste, spent ion-exchange resins, borates/evaporator-concentrates and animal ashes, in bituminized form, are presented and discussed. Distilled and oxidized bitumen were used for characterizing the crude material and simulated wastes-bitumen mixtures of varying weight composition 30, 40, 50, 60% by weight the dry waste material. The asphaltine and parafin contents in the bitumens were determined. Some additives and clays were used aiming best characteristics of solidified wastes. For leaching studies, granular ion-exchange resins were loaded with Cs 134 and mixtures of resins-bitumens were prepared. The leaching studies were executed using the IAEA recommendation and the ISO method. It was used a conventional screw-extruder, used in plastic industry, to determine operational conditions and process difficulties. Mixtures resins-bitumen and concentrate-bitumen in differents operational condition were prepared and analysed. (Author) [pt

  16. Study on cementation of simulated radioactive borated liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Qina; Li Junfeng; Wang Jianlong

    2010-01-01

    To compare sulfoaluminate cement with ordinary Portland cement on their cementation of radioactive borated liquid waste and to provide more data for formula optimization, simulated radioactive borated liquid waste were solidified by the two cements. 28 d compressive strength and strength losses after water/freezing/irradiation resistance tests were investigated. Leaching test and X-ray diffraction analysis were also conducted. The results show that it is feasible to solidify borated liquid wastes with sulfoaluminate cement and ordinary Portland cement with formulas used in the study. The 28 d compressive strengths, strength losses after tests and simulated nuclides leaching rates of the solidified waste forms meet the demand of GB 14569.1-93. The sulfoaluminate cement formula show better retention of Cs + than ordinary Portland cement formula. Boron, in form of B (OH) 4 - , incorporate in ettringite as solid solutions. (authors)

  17. Electrical resistivities of glass melts containing simulated SRP waste sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, J.R.

    1978-08-01

    One option for the long-term management of radioactive waste at the Savannah River Plant is to solidify the waste in borosilicate glass by using a continuous, joule-heated, ceramic melter. Electrical resistivities that are needed for melter design were measured for melts of two borosilicate, glass-forming mixtures, each of which was combined with various amounts of several simulated-waste sludges. The simulated sludge spanned the composition range of actual sludges sampled from SRP waste tanks. Resistivities ranged from 6 to 10 ohm-cm at 500 0 C. Melt composition and temperature were correlated with resistivity. Resistivity was not a simple function of viscosity. 15 figures, 4 tables

  18. Influence of Planetary Protection Guidelines on Waste Management Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, John A.; Fisher, John W.; Levri, Julie A.; Wignarajah, Kanapathipi; Race, Margaret S.; Stabekis, Perry D.; Rummel, John D.

    2005-01-01

    Newly outlined missions in the Space Exploration Initiative include extended human habitation on Mars. During these missions, large amounts of waste materials will be generated in solid, liquid and gaseous form. Returning these wastes to Earth will be extremely costly, and will therefore likely remain on Mars. Untreated, these wastes are a reservoir of live/dead organisms and molecules considered to be "biomarkers" i.e., indicators of life). If released to the planetary surface, these materials can potentially confound exobiology experiments and disrupt Martian ecology indefinitely (if existent). Waste management systems must therefore be specifically designed to control release of problematic materials both during the active phase of the mission, and for any specified post-mission duration. To effectively develop waste management requirements for Mars missions, planetary protection guidelines must first be established. While previous policies for Apollo lunar missions exist, it is anticipated that the increased probability of finding evidence of life on Mars, as well as the lengthy mission durations will initially lead to more conservative planetary protection measures. To facilitate the development of overall requirements for both waste management and planetary protection for future missions, a workshop was conducted to identify how these two areas interface, and to establish a preliminary set of planetary protection guidelines that address waste management operations. This paper provides background regarding past and current planetary protection and waste management issues, and their interactions. A summary of the recommended planetary protection guidelines, anticipated ramifications and research needs for waste management system design for both forward (Mars) and backward (Earth) contamination is also provided.

  19. Evaluation of environmental impact of radioactive waste from reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, J.; Pages, P.

    1989-10-01

    This paper evaluates the environmental impact of radioactive wastes from reactors operation. We estimate a case of a plant of 20 GWe power operating for 30 years which is equivalent to 600 tons of uranium per year. According to the properties, the waste is stored on surface (Aube site). Starting from the year of storage, we have defined the maximum dose equivalent for an individual from the reference group. The calculation depends on water of outlet water in which some initially stored radionuclides have migrated. Under the most pessimistic estimation, maximum annual dose was of the order of magnitude 0.5 μ Sv (0.05 mrem) for the storage 400 years after opening the site, and after 4000 years. Compared to the values obtained for the radioactive waste storage, the value of this impact is five times higher than the respective surface storage, but two time less than values for underground storage [fr

  20. Operational considerations in drift emplacement of waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benton, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the operational considerations as well as the advantages and disadvantages of emplacing waste packages in drifts in a repository. The considerations apply particularly to the potential repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste glass at Yucca Mountain, although most of the considerations and the advantages and disadvantages discussed in this paper do not necessarily represent the official views of the DOE or of the Management and Operations Contractor, since most of these considerations are still under active discussion and the final decisions will not be made for some time - perhaps years. This paper describes the issues, suggests some principles upon which decisions should be based, and states some of the most significant advantages and disadvantages of the emplacement modes, and the associated waste package types and thermal loadings

  1. Analysis by simulation of the disposition of nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turek, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    A descriptive simulation model is developed which includes all aspects of nuclear waste disposition. The model is comprised of two systems, the second system orchestrated by GASP IV. A spent fuel generation prediction module is interfaced with the AFR Program Management Information System and a repository scheduling information module. The user is permitted a wide range of options with which to tailor the simulation to any desired storage scenario. The model projects storage requirements through the year 2020. The outputs are evaluations of the impact that alternative decision policies and milestone date changes have on the demand for, the availability of, and the utilization of spent fuel storage capacities. Both graphs and detailed listings are available. These outputs give a comprehensive view of the particular scenario under observation, including the tracking, by year, of each discharge from every reactor. Included within the work is a review of the status of spent fuel disposition based on input data accurate as of August 1980. The results indicate that some temporary storage techniques (e.g., transshipment of fuel and/or additional at-reactor storage pools) must be utilized to prevent reactor shutdowns. These techniques will be required until the 1990's when several AFR facilities, and possibly one repository, can become operational

  2. Dioxins from medical waste incineration: Normal operation and transient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tong; Zhan, Ming-xiu; Yan, Mi; Fu, Jian-ying; Lu, Sheng-yong; Li, Xiao-dong; Yan, Jian-hua; Buekens, Alfons

    2015-07-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) are key pollutants in waste incineration. At present, incinerator managers and official supervisors focus only on emissions evolving during steady-state operation. Yet, these emissions may considerably be raised during periods of poor combustion, plant shutdown, and especially when starting-up from cold. Until now there were no data on transient emissions from medical (or hospital) waste incineration (MWI). However, MWI is reputed to engender higher emissions than those from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI). The emission levels in this study recorded for shutdown and start-up, however, were significantly higher: 483 ± 184 ng Nm(-3) (1.47 ± 0.17 ng I-TEQ Nm(-3)) for shutdown and 735 ng Nm(-3) (7.73 ng I-TEQ Nm(-3)) for start-up conditions, respectively. Thus, the average (I-TEQ) concentration during shutdown is 2.6 (3.8) times higher than the average concentration during normal operation, and the average (I-TEQ) concentration during start-up is 4.0 (almost 20) times higher. So monitoring should cover the entire incineration cycle, including start-up, operation and shutdown, rather than optimised operation only. This suggestion is important for medical waste incinerators, as these facilities frequently start up and shut down, because of their small size, or of lacking waste supply. Forthcoming operation should shift towards much longer operating cycles, i.e., a single weekly start-up and shutdown. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. The development of control technologies applied to waste processing operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasz, E.; Baker, S.; Couture, S.; Dennison, D.; Holliday, M.; Hurd, R.; Kettering, B.; Merrill, R.; Wilhelmson, K.

    1993-02-01

    Typical waste and residue processes involve some level of human interaction. The risk of exposure to unknown hazardous materials and the potential for radiation contamination provide the impetus for physically separating or removing operators from such processing steps. Technologies that facilitate separation of the operator from potential contamination include glove box robotics; modular systems for remote and automated servicing; and interactive controls that minimize human intervention. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing an automated system which by design will supplant the operator for glove box tasks, thus affording protection from the risk of radiation exposure and minimizing operator associated waste.This paper describes recent accomplishments in technology development and integration, and outlines the future goals at LLNL for achieving this integrated, interactive control capability

  4. An Analysis of the Waste Water Treatment Operator Occupation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Anthony B.; And Others

    The occupational analysis contains a brief job description for the waste water treatment occupations of operator and maintenance mechanic and 13 detailed task statements which specify job duties (tools, equipment, materials, objects acted upon, performance knowledge, safety considerations/hazards, decisions, cues, and errors) and learning skills…

  5. Supply, operation and radioactive waste disposal of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohrhauer, H.; Krey, M.; Haag, G.; Wolters, J.; Merz, E.; Sauermann, P.F.

    1981-07-01

    The subject of 'Nuclear Fuel Cycle' is treated in 5 reports: 1. Uranium supply; 2. Fabrication and characteristics of fuel elements; 3. Design, operation and safety of nuclear power plants after Harrisburg; 4. Radioactive waste disposal of nuclear power plants - changed political scenery after 1979; 5. Shutdown and dismantling of LWR-KKW - state of knowledge and feasibility. (HP) [de

  6. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility interim operational safety requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Covey, L I

    2000-01-01

    The Interim Operational Safety Requirements (IOSRs) for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) define acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, bases thereof, and management or administrative controls required to ensure safe operation during receipt and inspection of cesium and strontium capsules from private irradiators; decontamination of the capsules and equipment; surveillance of the stored capsules; and maintenance activities. Controls required for public safety, significant defense-in-depth, significant worker safety, and for maintaining radiological consequences below risk evaluation guidelines (EGs) are included.

  7. Steady state simulation of Joule heated ceramic melter for vitrification of high level liquid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugilal, G; Wattal, P K; Theyyunni, T K [Process Engineering and Systems Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Iyer, K N [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Inst. of Tech., Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    The Joule heated ceramic melter is emerging as an attractive alternative to metallic melters for high level waste vitrification. The inherent limitations with metallic melters viz., low capacity and short melter life, are overcome in a ceramic melter which can be adopted for continuous mode of operation. The ceramic melter has the added advantage of better operational flexibility. This paper describes the three dimensional model used for simulating the complex design conditions of the ceramic melter. (author).

  8. Steady state simulation of Joule heated ceramic melter for vitrification of high level liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugilal, G.; Wattal, P.K.; Theyyunni, T.K.; Iyer, K.N.

    1994-01-01

    The Joule heated ceramic melter is emerging as an attractive alternative to metallic melters for high level waste vitrification. The inherent limitations with metallic melters viz., low capacity and short melter life, are overcome in a ceramic melter which can be adopted for continuous mode of operation. The ceramic melter has the added advantage of better operational flexibility. This paper describes the three dimensional model used for simulating the complex design conditions of the ceramic melter. (author)

  9. Full-scale retrieval of simulated buried transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentich, D.J.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes the results of a field test conducted to determine the effectiveness of using conventional type construction equipment for the retrieval of buried transuranic (TRU) waste. A cold (nonhazardous and nonradioactive) test pit (1,100 yd 3 volume) was constructed with boxes and drums filled with simulated waste materials, such as metal, plastic, wood, concrete, and sludge. Large objects, including truck beds, tanks, vaults, pipes, and beams, were also placed in the pit. These materials were intended to simulate the type of wastes found in TRU buried waste pits and trenches. A series of commercially available equipment items, such as excavators and tracked loaders outfitted with different end effectors, were used to remove the simulated waste. Work was performed from both the abovegrade and belowgrade positions. During the demonstration, a number of observations, measurements, and analyses were performed to determine which equipment was the most effective in removing the waste. The retrieval rates for the various excavation techniques were recorded. The inherent dust control capabilities of the excavation methods used were observed. The feasibility of teleoperating reading equipment was also addressed

  10. [Co-composting high moisture vegetable waste and flower waste in a sequential fed operation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangfeng; Wang, Hongtao; Nie, Yongfeng

    2003-11-01

    Co-composting of high moisture vegetable wastes (celery and cabbage) and flower wastes (carnation) were studied in a sequential fed bed. The preliminary materials of composting were celery and carnation wastes. The sequential fed materials of composting were cabbage wastes and were fed every 4 days. Moisture content of mixture materials was between 60% and 70%. Composting was done in an aerobic static bed of composting based temperature feedback and control via aeration rate regulation. Aeration was ended when temperature of the pile was about 40 degrees C. Changes of composting of temperature, aeration rate, water content, organic matter, ash, pH, volume, NH4(+)-N, and NO3(-)-N were studied. Results show that co-composting of high moisture vegetable wastes and flower wastes, in a sequential fed aerobic static bed based temperature feedback and control via aeration rate regulation, can stabilize organic matter and removal water rapidly. The sequential fed operation are effective to overcome the difficult which traditional composting cannot applied successfully where high moisture vegetable wastes in more excess of flower wastes, such as Dianchi coastal.

  11. Efficient Simulation Modeling of an Integrated High-Level-Waste Processing Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, Michael V.; Paul, Pran K.

    2000-01-01

    An integrated computational tool named the Production Planning Model (ProdMod) has been developed to simulate the operation of the entire high-level-waste complex (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) over its full life cycle. ProdMod is used to guide SRS management in operating the waste complex in an economically efficient and environmentally sound manner. SRS HLW operations are modeled using coupled algebraic equations. The dynamic nature of plant processes is modeled in the form of a linear construct in which the time dependence is implicit. Batch processes are modeled in discrete event-space, while continuous processes are modeled in time-space. The ProdMod methodology maps between event-space and time-space such that the inherent mathematical discontinuities in batch process simulation are avoided without sacrificing any of the necessary detail in the batch recipe steps. Modeling the processes separately in event- and time-space using linear constructs, and then coupling the two spaces, has accelerated the speed of simulation compared to a typical dynamic simulation. The ProdMod simulator models have been validated against operating data and other computer codes. Case studies have demonstrated the usefulness of the ProdMod simulator in developing strategies that demonstrate significant cost savings in operating the SRS HLW complex and in verifying the feasibility of newly proposed processes

  12. Radiological and chemical source terms for Solid Waste Operations Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boothe, G.F.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the radiological and chemical source terms for the major projects of the Solid Waste Operations Complex (SWOC), including Project W-112, Project W-133 and Project W-100 (WRAP 2A). For purposes of this document, the term ''source term'' means the design basis inventory. All of the SWOC source terms involve the estimation of the radiological and chemical contents of various waste packages from different waste streams, and the inventories of these packages within facilities or within a scope of operations. The composition of some of the waste is not known precisely; consequently, conservative assumptions were made to ensure that the source term represents a bounding case (i.e., it is expected that the source term would not be exceeded). As better information is obtained on the radiological and chemical contents of waste packages and more accurate facility specific models are developed, this document should be revised as appropriate. Radiological source terms are needed to perform shielding and external dose calculations, to estimate routine airborne releases, to perform release calculations and dose estimates for safety documentation, to calculate the maximum possible fire loss and specific source terms for individual fire areas, etc. Chemical source terms (i.e., inventories of combustible, flammable, explosive or hazardous chemicals) are used to determine combustible loading, fire protection requirements, personnel exposures to hazardous chemicals from routine and accident conditions, and a wide variety of other safety and environmental requirements

  13. Solid waste operations complex engineering verification program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeson, C.L.

    1994-01-01

    This plan supersedes, but does not replace, the previous Waste Receiving and Processing/Solid Waste Engineering Development Program Plan. In doing this, it does not repeat the basic definitions of the various types or classes of development activities nor provide the rigorous written description of each facility and assign the equipment to development classes. The methodology described in the previous document is still valid and was used to determine the types of verification efforts required. This Engineering Verification Program Plan will be updated on a yearly basis. This EVPP provides programmatic definition of all engineering verification activities for the following SWOC projects: (1) Project W-026 - Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1; (2) Project W-100 - Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A; (3) Project W-112 - Phase V Storage Facility; and (4) Project W-113 - Solid Waste Retrieval. No engineering verification activities are defined for Project W-112 as no verification work was identified. The Acceptance Test Procedures/Operational Test Procedures will be part of each project's Title III operation test efforts. The ATPs/OTPs are not covered by this EVPP

  14. Description of waste pretreatment and interfacing systems dynamic simulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbrick, D.J.; Zimmerman, B.D.

    1995-05-01

    The Waste Pretreatment and Interfacing Systems Dynamic Simulation Model was created to investigate the required pretreatment facility processing rates for both high level and low level waste so that the vitrification of tank waste can be completed according to the milestones defined in the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). In order to achieve this objective, the processes upstream and downstream of the pretreatment facilities must also be included. The simulation model starts with retrieval of tank waste and ends with vitrification for both low level and high level wastes. This report describes the results of three simulation cases: one based on suggested average facility processing rates, one with facility rates determined so that approximately 6 new DSTs are required, and one with facility rates determined so that approximately no new DSTs are required. It appears, based on the simulation results, that reasonable facility processing rates can be selected so that no new DSTs are required by the TWRS program. However, this conclusion must be viewed with respect to the modeling assumptions, described in detail in the report. Also included in the report, in an appendix, are results of two sensitivity cases: one with glass plant water recycle steams recycled versus not recycled, and one employing the TPA SST retrieval schedule versus a more uniform SST retrieval schedule. Both recycling and retrieval schedule appear to have a significant impact on overall tank usage

  15. A dynamic simulation model of the Savannah River Site high level waste complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, M.V.; Aull, J.E.; Dimenna, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    A detailed, dynamic simulation entire high level radioactive waste complex at the Savannah River Site has been developed using SPEEDUP(tm) software. The model represents mass transfer, evaporation, precipitation, sludge washing, effluent treatment, and vitrification unit operation processes through the solution of 7800 coupled differential and algebraic equations. Twenty-seven discrete chemical constituents are tracked through the unit operations. The simultaneous simultaneous simulation of concurrent batch and continuous processes is achieved by several novel, customized SPEEDUP(tm) algorithms. Due to the model's computational burden, a high-end work station is required: simulation of a years operation of the complex requires approximately three CPU hours on an IBM RS/6000 Model 590 processor. The model will be used to develop optimal high level waste (HLW) processing strategies over a thirty year time horizon. It will be employed to better understand the dynamic inter-relationships between different HLW unit operations, and to suggest strategies that will maximize available working tank space during the early years of operation and minimize overall waste processing cost over the long-term history of the complex. Model validation runs are currently underway with comparisons against actual plant operating data providing an excellent match

  16. An evaluation of dental operative simulation materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Li-Hong; Foster Page, Lyndie; Purton, David

    2012-01-01

    The study was to evaluate the performance of different materials used in dental operative simulation and compare them with those of natural teeth. Three typical phantom teeth materials were compared with extracted permanent teeth by a nanoindentation system and evaluated by students and registered dentists on the drilling sensation of the materials. Moreover, the tool life (machinability) of new cylindrical diamond burs on cutting the sample materials was tested and the burs were observed. Although student and dentist evaluations were scattered and inconclusive, it was found that elastic modulus (E) and hardness (H) were not the main factors in determining the drilling sensation of the materials. The sensation of drilling is a reflection of cutting force and power consumption.An ideal material for dental simulation should be able to generate similar drilling resistance to that of natural tooth, which is the machinability of the material.

  17. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2011-12-01

    The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. Achieving the objective of modeling the performance of a disposal scenario requires describing processes involved in waste form degradation and radionuclide release at the subcontinuum scale, beginning with mechanistic descriptions of chemical reactions and chemical kinetics at the atomic scale, and upscaling into effective, validated constitutive models for input to high-fidelity continuum scale codes for coupled multiphysics simulations of release and transport. Verification and validation (V&V) is required throughout the system to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities, including at the subcontiunuum scale and the constitutive models they inform or generate. This Report outlines the nature of the V&V challenge at the subcontinuum scale, an approach to incorporate V&V concepts into subcontinuum scale modeling and simulation (M&S), and a plan to incrementally incorporate effective V&V into subcontinuum scale M&S destined for use in the NEAMS Waste IPSC work flow to meet requirements of quantitative confidence in the constitutive models informed by subcontinuum scale phenomena.

  18. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M and S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. Achieving the objective of modeling the performance of a disposal scenario requires describing processes involved in waste form degradation and radionuclide release at the subcontinuum scale, beginning with mechanistic descriptions of chemical reactions and chemical kinetics at the atomic scale, and upscaling into effective, validated constitutive models for input to high-fidelity continuum scale codes for coupled multiphysics simulations of release and transport. Verification and validation (V and V) is required throughout the system to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M and S codes and capabilities, including at the subcontiunuum scale and the constitutive models they inform or generate. This Report outlines the nature of the V and V challenge at the subcontinuum scale, an approach to incorporate V and V concepts into subcontinuum scale modeling and simulation (M and S), and a plan to incrementally incorporate effective V and V into subcontinuum scale M and S destined for use in the NEAMS Waste IPSC work flow to meet requirements of quantitative confidence in the constitutive models informed by subcontinuum scale phenomena.

  19. Operation of a prototype high-level alpha solid waste incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hootman, H.E.; Trapp, D.J.; Warren, J.H.; Dworjanyn, L.O.

    1979-01-01

    A full-scale (5 kg waste/hour) controlled-air incinerator is presently being tested as part of a program to develop technology for incineration of Savannah River Plant solid transuranic wastes. This unit is designed specifically to incinerate relatively small quantities of solid combustible wastes that are contaminated up to 10 5 times the present nominal 10 nCi/g threshold value for such isotopes as 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 242 Cm and 252 Cf. Automatic feed preparation and incinerator operation and control have been incorporated into the design to simulate the future plant design which will minimize operator radiation exposure. Over 250 kg of nonradioactive wastes characteristic of plutonium finishing operations have been incinerated at throughputs exceeding 5 kg/hr for periods up to 6 hours. Safety and reliability were major design objectives. Upon completion of an initial experimental phase to determine process sensitivity and flexibility, the facility will be used to develop bases for the production unit's safety analysis report, technical standards, and operating procedures. An ultimate use of the experimental unit will be the testing of actual production unit components and the training of Savannah River Plant operating personnel

  20. Hazardous waste incinerator permitting in Texas from inception to operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simms, M.D.; McDonnell, R.G. III

    1991-01-01

    The regulatory permitting process for hazardous waste incinerators i a long and arduous proposition requiring a well-developed overall strategy. In Texas, RCRA permits for the operation of hazardous waste incinerator facilities are issued through the federally delegated Texas Water Commission (TWC). While the TWC has primacy in the issuance of RCRA permits for hazardous waste incinerators, the Texas Air Control Board (TACB) provides a significant portion of the Part B application review and provides much of the permit language. In addition to dealing with regulatory agencies, RCRA permitting provides by significant public involvement. Often the lack of public support becomes a major roadblock for an incinerator project. In order to establish an effective strategy which addresses the concerns of regulatory agencies and the public, it is important to have an understanding of the steps involved in obtaining a permit. A permit applicant seeking to construct a new hazardous waste incinerator can expect to go through a preapplication meeting with government regulators, a site selection process, file an application, respond to calls for additional technical information from both the TACB and the TWC, defend the application in a hearing, have a recommendation from a TWC hearing examiner and, finally, receive a determination from the TWC's Commissioners. Presuming a favorable response from the Commission, the permittee will be granted a trial burn permit and may proceed with the construction, certification and execution of a trial burn at the facility. Subsequent to publication of the trial burn results and approval by the TWC, the permittee will possess an operational hazardous waste incinerator permit. The paper describes the major steps required to receive an operational permit for a hazardous waste incinerator in the State of Texas. Important issues involved in each step will be discussed including insights gained from recent incinerator permitting efforts

  1. An MCNP simulation for API applications to waste management issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunnell, L.N.

    1994-01-01

    Issues associated with waste management have increasingly become a focal point of attention for both the government and private sector since the end of the cold war. The problem are difficult to solve; the solutions are expensive to implement. Consequently, the development of a data simulation system capable of predicting the performance of a real system can save many thousands of dollars in travel expenses, optimization of experimental parameters, etc.. In this effort, computer codes were developed to simulate the production of associated particle imaging data so that its performance in a typical waste management application can be assessed

  2. Quantitative measurement of cyanide species in simulated ferrocyanide Hanford waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pool, K.H.; Matheson, J.D.

    1993-02-01

    Analytical methods for the quantification of cyanide species in Hanford simulated high-level radioactive waste were pursued in this work. Methods studied include infrared spectroscopy (solid state and solution), Raman spectroscopy, Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy-electron dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), and ion chromatography. Of these, infrared, Raman, X-ray diffraction, and ion chromatography techniques show promise in the concentration range of interest. Quantitation limits for these latter four techniques were demonstrated to be approximately 0.1 wt% (as cyanide) using simulated Hanford wastes

  3. Process simulation and uncertainty analysis of plasma arc mixed waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrada, J.J.; Welch, T.D.

    1994-01-01

    Innovative mixed waste treatment subsystems have been analyzed for performance, risk, and life-cycle cost as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)'s Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) treatment alternatives development and evaluation process. This paper concerns the analysis of mixed waste treatment system performance. Performance systems analysis includes approximate material and energy balances and assessments of operability, effectiveness, and reliability. Preliminary material and energy balances of innovative processes have been analyzed using FLOW, an object-oriented, process simulator for waste management systems under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The preliminary models developed for FLOW provide rough order-of-magnitude calculations useful for sensitivity analysis. The insight gained from early modeling of these technologies approximately will ease the transition to more sophisticated simulators as adequate performance and property data become available. Such models are being developed in ASPEN by DOE's Mixed Waste Treatment Project (MWTP) for baseline and alternative flow sheets based on commercial technologies. One alternative to the baseline developed by the MWIP support groups in plasma arc treatment. This process offers a noticeable reduction in the number of process operations as compared to the baseline process because a plasma arc melter is capable of accepting a wide variety of waste streams as direct inputs (without sorting or preprocessing). This innovative process for treating mixed waste replaces several units from the baseline process and, thus, promises an economic advantage. The performance in the plasma arc furnace will directly affect the quality of the waste form and the requirements of the off-gas treatment units. The ultimate objective of MWIP is to reduce the amount of final waste produced, the cost, and the environmental impact

  4. Corrosion studies of carbon steel under impinging jets of simulated slurries of neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) and neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D.; Elmore, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    Plans for the disposal of radioactive liquid and solid wastes presently stored in double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site call for retrieval and processing of the waste to create forms suitable for permanent disposal. Waste will be retrieved from a tank using a submerged slurry pump in conjunction with one or more rotating slurry jet mixer pumps. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has conducted tests using simulated waste slurries to assess the effects of a impinging slurry jet on the corrosion rate of the tank wall and floor, an action that could potentially compromise the tank's structural integrity. Corrosion processes were investigated on a laboratory scale with a simulated neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) slurry and in a subsequent test with simulated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) slurry. The test slurries simulated the actual NCRW and NCAW both chemically and physically. The tests simulated those conditions expected to exist in the respective double-shell tanks during waste retrieval operations. Results of both tests indicate that, because of the action of the mixer pump slurry jets, the waste retrieval operations proposed for NCAW and NCRW will moderately accelerate corrosion of the tank wall and floor. Based on the corrosion of initially unoxidized test specimens, and the removal of corrosion products from those specimens, the maximum time-averaged corrosion rates of carbon steel in both waste simulants for the length of the test was ∼4 mil/yr. The protective oxide layer that exists in each storage tank is expected to inhibit corrosion of the carbon steel

  5. Simulation of operators' response in emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, J.

    1986-09-01

    For the simulation of the accidential course of events in industrial process plants, a model is needed of operators' response to the cues presented by the system. A model is proposed, based on the simplifications which can be made when restricting attention to the operator functions having significants for a probabilistic risk analysis, and to anly skill and rule based performance, i.e., to responses in the early phase of an accident. The model is based on Brunswik's lens model, a model of the normal task repertoire, and on a taxonomy of human errors. To bring the model in perspective, a review of the state of the art of cognitive models of human behaviour is included. (author)

  6. Simulating operator decision processes at SRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoecker, D.G.; Benhardt, H.C.; Pople, H.E. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Cognitive environment simulation (CES) is both a methodology and an artificial intelligence (AI) tool. As a methodology, it denotes a technique that models human operators' cognitive processes to either (a) aid in designing the interface to a complex system (such as nuclear reactor control room) or (b) assess the cognitive causality that effects the likelihood of human error in specific accident scenarios. As an AI tool, CES is an expert system that models human intention formation and errors in a problem-solving context. The immediate objective of the reported work was to demonstrate the feasibility of applying CES to a new domain - that of the defense production reactors, whose design and operating philosophy differ in key areas from power reactors, where CES has already demonstrated interesting results

  7. CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-01-01

    This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following contact-handled (CH) packaging payloads: - Drum payload assembly - Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly - Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP) In addition, this procedure also provides operating instructions for the TRUPACT-II CH waste packaging. This document also provides instructions for performing ICV and OCV preshipment leakage rate tests on the following packaging seals, using a nondestructive helium (He) leak test: - ICV upper main O-ring seal - ICV outer vent port plug O-ring seal - OCV upper main O-ring seal - OCV vent port plug O-ring seal

  8. CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2003-01-01

    This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following contact-handled (CH) packaging payloads: - Drum payload assembly - Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly - Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP) In addition, this procedure also provides operating instructions for the TRUPACT-II CH waste packaging. This document also provides instructions for performing ICV and OCV preshipment leakage rate tests on the following packaging seals, using a nondestructive helium (He) leak test: - ICV upper main O-ring seal - ICV outer vent port plug O-ring seal - OCV upper main O-ring seal - OCV vent port plug O-ring seal

  9. CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-01-01

    This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following contact-handled (CH) packaging payloads: - Drum payload assembly - Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly - Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP) In addition, this procedure provides operating instructions for the TRUPACT-II CH waste packaging. This document also provides instructions for performing ICV and OCV preshipment leakage rate tests on the following packaging seals, using a nondestructive helium (He) leak test: - ICV upper main O-ring seal - ICV outer vent port plug O-ring seal - OCV upper main O-ring seal - OCV vent port plug O-ring seal

  10. Analysis of mercury in simulated nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Policke, T.A.; Johnson, L.C.; Best, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    Mercury, Hg, is a non-radioactive component in the High Level Waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Thus, it is a component of the Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF) process streams. It is present because mercuric nitrate (Hg(NO 3 ) 2 ) is used to dissolve spent fuel rods. Since mercury halides are extremely corrosive, especially at elevated temperatures such as those seen in a melter (1150 degrees C), its concentration throughout the process needs to be monitored so that it is at an acceptable level prior to reaching the melter off-gas system. The Hg can be found in condensates and sludge feeds and throughout the process and process lines, i.e., at any sampling point. The different samples types that require Hg determinations in the process streams are: (1) sludges, which may be basic or acidic and may or may not include aromatic organics, (2) slurries, which are sludges with frit and will always contain organics (formate and aromatics), and (3) condensates, from feed prep and melter off-gas locations. The condensates are aqueous and the mercury may exist as a complex mixture of halides, oxides, and metal, with levels between 10 and 100 ppm. The mercury in the sludges and slurries can be Hg 0 , Hg +1 , or Hg +2 , with levels between 200 and 3000 ppm, depending upon the location, both time and position, of sampling. For DWPF, both total and soluble Hg concentrations need to be determined. The text below describes how these determinations are being made by the Defense Waste Processing Technology (DWPT) Analytical Laboratory at the Savannah River Site. Both flame atomic absorption (FAA) and cold vapor atomic (CVAA) measurements are discussed. Also, the problems encountered in the steps toward measuring HG in these samples types of condensates and sludges are discussed along with their solutions

  11. Siting simulation for low-level waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roop, R.D.; Rope, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Mock Site Licensing Demonstration Project has developed the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Siting Simulation, a role-playing exercise designed to facilitate the process of siting and licensing disposal facilities for low-level waste (LLW). This paper describes the development, content, and usefulness of the siting simulation. The simulation can be conducted at a workshop or conference, involves 14 or more participants, and requires about eight hours to complete. The simulation consists of two sessions; in the first, participants negotiate the selection of siting criteria, and in the second, a preferred disposal site is chosen from three candidate sites. The project has sponsored two workshops (in Boston, Massachusetts and Richmond, Virginia) in which the simulation has been conducted for persons concerned with LLW management issues. It is concluded that the simulation can be valuable as a tool for disseminating information about LLW management; a vehicle that can foster communication; and a step toward consensus building and conflict resolution. The DOE National Low-Level Waste Management Program is now making the siting simulation available for use by states, regional compacts, and other organizations involved in development of LLW disposal facilities

  12. Regulatory off-gas analysis from the evaporation of Hanford simulated waste spiked with organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Hiroshi H; Calloway, T Bond; Ferrara, Daro M; Choi, Alexander S; White, Thomas L; Gibson, Luther V; Burdette, Mark A

    2004-10-01

    After strontium/transuranics removal by precipitation followed by cesium/technetium removal by ion exchange, the remaining low-activity waste in the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant is to be concentrated by evaporation before being mixed with glass formers and vitrified. To provide a technical basis to permit the waste treatment facility, a relatively organic-rich Hanford Tank 241-AN-107 waste simulant was spiked with 14 target volatile, semi-volatile, and pesticide compounds and evaporated under vacuum in a bench-scale natural circulation evaporator fitted with an industrial stack off-gas sampler at the Savannah River National Laboratory. An evaporator material balance for the target organics was calculated by combining liquid stream mass and analytical data with off-gas emissions estimates obtained using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-846 Methods. Volatile and light semi-volatile organic compounds (1 mm Hg vapor pressure) in the waste simulant were found to largely exit through the condenser vent, while heavier semi-volatiles and pesticides generally remain in the evaporator concentrate. An OLI Environmental Simulation Program (licensed by OLI Systems, Inc.) evaporator model successfully predicted operating conditions and the experimental distribution of the fed target organics exiting in the concentrate, condensate, and off-gas streams, with the exception of a few semi-volatile and pesticide compounds. Comparison with Henry's Law predictions suggests the OLI Environmental Simulation Program model is constrained by available literature data.

  13. Effects of simulant mixed waste on EPDM and butyl rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a Chemical Compatibility Testing Program for the evaluation of plastic packaging components which may be used in transporting mixed waste forms. In this program, we have screened 10 plastic materials in four liquid mixed waste simulants. These plastics were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer (Nitrile) rubber, cross-linked polyethylene, epi-chloro-hydrin rubber, ethylene-propylene (EPDM) rubber, fluorocarbons (Viton and Kel-F), poly-tetrafluoroethylene (Teflon), high-density polyethylene, isobutylene-isoprene copolymer (Butyl) rubber, polypropylene, and styrene-butadiene (SBR) rubber. The selected simulant mixed wastes were (1) an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite; (2) a chlorinated hydrocarbon mixture; (3) a simulant liquid scintillation fluid; and (4) a mixture of ketones. The screening testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to ∼3 kGy of gamma radiation followed by 14-day exposures to the waste simulants at 60 deg. C. The rubber materials or elastomers were tested using VTR measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. For these tests, screening criteria of ∼1 g/hr/m 2 for VTR and specific gravity change of 10% were used. Those materials that failed to meet these criteria were judged to have failed the screening tests and were excluded from the next phase of this experimental program. We have completed the comprehensive testing phase of liner materials in a simulant Hanford Tank waste consisting of an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. From the data analyses performed, we have identified the chloro-fluorocarbon Kel-F as having the greatest chemical durability after having been exposed to gamma radiation followed by exposure to the aqueous alkaline simulant mixed waste. The most striking observation from this study was the extremely poor performance of Teflon under these conditions. We have also completed the comprehensive

  14. THE HANFORD WASTE FEED DELIVERY OPERATIONS RESEARCH MODEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.; Gallaher, B.N.

    2011-01-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), the Hanford tank farm contractor, is tasked with the long term planning of the cleanup mission. Cleanup plans do not explicitly reflect the mission effects associated with tank farm operating equipment failures. EnergySolutions, a subcontractor to WRPS has developed, in conjunction with WRPS tank farms staff, an Operations Research (OR) model to assess and identify areas to improve the performance of the Waste Feed Delivery Systems. This paper provides an example of how OR modeling can be used to help identify and mitigate operational risks at the Hanford tank farms.

  15. Modeling lift operations with SASmacr Simulation Studio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Leow Soo

    2016-10-01

    Lifts or elevators are an essential part of multistorey buildings which provide vertical transportation for its occupants. In large and high-rise apartment buildings, its occupants are permanent, while in buildings, like hospitals or office blocks, the occupants are temporary or users of the buildings. They come in to work or to visit, and thus, the population of such buildings are much higher than those in residential apartments. It is common these days that large office blocks or hospitals have at least 8 to 10 lifts serving its population. In order to optimize the level of service performance, different transportation schemes are devised to control the lift operations. For example, one lift may be assigned to solely service the even floors and another solely for the odd floors, etc. In this paper, a basic lift system is modelled using SAS Simulation Studio to study the effect of factors such as the number of floors, capacity of the lift car, arrival rate and exit rate of passengers at each floor, peak and off peak periods on the system performance. The simulation is applied to a real lift operation in Sunway College's North Building to validate the model.

  16. Operational experience for liquid radioactive waste in FR Yugoslavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plecas, I.; Pavlovic, R.; Pavlovic, S.

    2003-01-01

    The present paper reports the results of the preliminary removal of sludge from the bottom of the spent fuel storage pool in the RA reactor, mechanical filtration of the pool water and sludge conditioning and storage. Yugoslavia is a country without a nuclear power plant (NPP) on its territory. The law which strictly forbids NPP construction is still valid, but, nevertheless we must handle and dispose radioactive waste. In the last forty years, in the ''Vinca'' Institute, as a result of two research reactors being operational, named RA and RB, and as a result of the application of radionuclides in medicine, industry and agriculture, radioactive waste materials of different levels of specific activity were generated. As a temporary solution, radioactive waste materials are stored in two interim storages. Radwaste materials that were immobilized in the inactive matrices are to be placed in concrete containers, for further manipulation and disposal. (orig.)

  17. Radioactive waste: from national programmes to community co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousselier, Yves

    1981-01-01

    An important community programme for the management and storage of waste was introduced 5 years ago although research and development has been carried out on a wide basis for 20 years. There is in fact no contradiction in this, but knowledge of the composition of waste has evolved with the development of nuclear energy, requirements have become stricter while the number of possible handling methods tends to result in postponement of decisions. According to the author, a thorough community co-operation in this field should make it easier to easier to known what to choose and also to decide on the course to be taken. It should also facilitate the obtaining of a consensus of opinion -acceptable to every-one- in relation to the management of radioactive waste [fr

  18. Waste Evaporator Accident Simulation Using RELAP5 Computer Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    POLIZZI, L.M.

    2004-01-01

    An evaporator is used on liquid waste from processing facilities to reduce the volume of the waste through heating the waste and allowing some of the water to be separated from the waste through boiling. This separation process allows for more efficient processing and storage of liquid waste. Commonly, the liquid waste consists of an aqueous solution of chemicals that over time could induce corrosion, and in turn weaken the tubes in the steam tube bundle of the waste evaporator that are used to heat the waste. This chemically induced corrosion could escalate into a possible tube leakage and/or the severance of a tube(s) in the tube bundle. In this paper, analyses of a waste evaporator system for the processing of liquid waste containing corrosive chemicals are presented to assess the system response to this accident scenario. This accident scenario is evaluated since its consequences can propagate to a release of hazardous material to the outside environment. It is therefore important to ensure that the evaporator system component structural integrity is not compromised, i.e. the design pressure and temperature of the system is not exceeded during the accident transient. The computer code used for the accident simulation is RELAP5-MOD31. The accident scenario analyzed includes a double-ended guillotine break of a tube in the tube bundle of the evaporator. A mitigated scenario is presented to evaluate the excursion of the peak pressure and temperature in the various components of the evaporator system to assess whether the protective actions and controls available are adequate to ensure that the structural integrity of the evaporator system is maintained and that no atmospheric release occurs

  19. Reaction chemistry of nitrogen species in hydrothermal systems: Simple reactions, waste simulants, and actual wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Orco, P.; Luan, L.; Proesmans, P.; Wilmanns, E.

    1995-01-01

    Results are presented from hydrothermal reaction systems containing organic components, nitrogen components, and an oxidant. Reaction chemistry observed in simple systems and in simple waste simulants is used to develop a model which presents global nitrogen chemistry in these reactive systems. The global reaction path suggested is then compared with results obtained for the treatment of an actual waste stream containing only C-N-0-H species

  20. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Prediction of Cesium Extraction from Actual Wastes and Actual Waste Simulants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delmau, L.H.; Haverlock, T.J.; Sloop, F.V. Jr.; Moyer, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    This report presents the work that followed the CSSX model development completed in FY2002. The developed cesium and potassium extraction model was based on extraction data obtained from simple aqueous media. It was tested to ensure the validity of the prediction for the cesium extraction from actual waste. Compositions of the actual tank waste were obtained from the Savannah River Site personnel and were used to prepare defined simulants and to predict cesium distribution ratios using the model. It was therefore possible to compare the cesium distribution ratios obtained from the actual waste, the simulant, and the predicted values. It was determined that the predicted values agree with the measured values for the simulants. Predicted values also agreed, with three exceptions, with measured values for the tank wastes. Discrepancies were attributed in part to the uncertainty in the cation/anion balance in the actual waste composition, but likely more so to the uncertainty in the potassium concentration in the waste, given the demonstrated large competing effect of this metal on cesium extraction. It was demonstrated that the upper limit for the potassium concentration in the feed ought to not exceed 0.05 M in order to maintain suitable cesium distribution ratios

  1. Simulation used to qualify nuclear waste glass for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, T.W.; Kuhn, W.L.

    1987-07-01

    A hypothetical vitrification system was simulated errors associated with controlling and predicting the composition of the nuclear waste glass produced in the system. The composition of the glass must fall within certain limits to qualify for permanent geologic disposal. The estimated error in predicting the concentrations of various constituents in the glass was 2% to 8%, depending on the strategy for sampling and analyzing the feed and on the assumed magnitudes of the process uncertainties. The estimated error in controlling the glass composition was 2% to 9%, depending on the strategy for sampling and analyzing the waste and on the assumed magnitudes of the uncertainties. This work demonstrates that simulation techniques can be used to assist in qualifying nuclear waste glass for disposal. 3 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Incineration of simulated plutonium-contaminated waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, L.H.; Jenkins, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Pyrolysis rate data are presented which will enable larger pyrolyser furnaces to be made for processing solid plutonium-contaminated materials at throughputs of up to 20 kg/h using either 1 or 2.5 kg packages as feed. The influence of liquids, such as water, kerosene or oil, on the pyrolysis process has also been assessed. The products of pyrolysis for a range of individual materials and their mixtures have been defined. The oxidation rates for both static and stirred beds of char have been obtained. The implications of both the pyrolysis and char-oxidation processes for plant design are discussed. This work has been commissioned by the Department of the Environment as part of its radioactive waste management programme. The results will be used in the formulation of government policy, but as this stage they do not necessarily represent that policy

  3. Motor operated valves problems tests and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinier, D.; Haas, J.L.

    1996-12-01

    An analysis of the two refusals of operation of the EAS recirculation shutoff valves enabled two distinct problems to be identified on the motorized valves: the calculation methods for the operating torques of valves in use in the power plants are not conservative enough, which results in the misadjustement of the torque limiters installed on their motorizations, the second problem concerns the pressure locking phenomenon: a number of valves may entrap a pressure exceeding the in-line pressure between the disks, which may cause a jamming of the valve. EDF has made the following approach to settle the first problem: determination of the friction coefficients and the efficiency of the valve and its actuator through general and specific tests and models, definition of a new calculation method. In order to solve the second problem, EDF has made the following operations: identification of the valves whose technology enables the pressure to be entrapped: the tests and numerical simulations carried out in the Research and Development Division confirm the possibility of a {open_quotes}boiler{close_quotes} effect: determination of the necessary modifications: development and testing of anti-boiler effect systems.

  4. Motor operated valves problems tests and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinier, D.; Haas, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    An analysis of the two refusals of operation of the EAS recirculation shutoff valves enabled two distinct problems to be identified on the motorized valves: the calculation methods for the operating torques of valves in use in the power plants are not conservative enough, which results in the misadjustement of the torque limiters installed on their motorizations, the second problem concerns the pressure locking phenomenon: a number of valves may entrap a pressure exceeding the in-line pressure between the disks, which may cause a jamming of the valve. EDF has made the following approach to settle the first problem: determination of the friction coefficients and the efficiency of the valve and its actuator through general and specific tests and models, definition of a new calculation method. In order to solve the second problem, EDF has made the following operations: identification of the valves whose technology enables the pressure to be entrapped: the tests and numerical simulations carried out in the Research and Development Division confirm the possibility of a open-quotes boilerclose quotes effect: determination of the necessary modifications: development and testing of anti-boiler effect systems

  5. Couplex1 test case nuclear - Waste disposal far field simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This first COUPLEX test case is to compute a simplified Far Field model used in nuclear waste management simulation. From the mathematical point of view the problem is of convection diffusion type but the parameters are highly varying from one layer to another. Another particularity is the very concentrated nature of the source, both in space and in time. (author)

  6. Running scenarios using the Waste Tank Safety and Operations Hanford Site model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahlman, E.J.

    1995-11-01

    Management of the Waste Tank Safety and Operations (WTS ampersand O) at Hanford is a large and complex task encompassing 177 tanks and having a budget of over $500 million per year. To assist managers in this task, a model based on system dynamics was developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The model simulates the WTS ampersand O at the Hanford Tank Farms by modeling the planning, control, and flow of work conducted by Managers, Engineers, and Crafts. The model is described in Policy Analysis of Hanford Tank Farm Operations with System Dynamics Approach (Kwak 1995b) and Management Simulator for Hanford Tank Farm Operations (Kwak 1995a). This document provides guidance for users of the model in developing, running, and analyzing results of management scenarios. The reader is assumed to have an understanding of the model and its operation. Important parameters and variables in the model are described, and two scenarios are formulated as examples

  7. Transuranic (Tru) waste volume reduction operations at a plutonium facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cournoyer, Michael E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nixon, Archie E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dodge, Robert L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fife, Keith W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Arnold M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garcia, Vincent E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Programmatic operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility (TA 55) involve working with various amounts of plutonium and other highly toxic, alpha-emitting materials. The spread of radiological contamination on surfaces, airborne contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone are prevented through use of a variety of gloveboxes (the glovebox, coupled with an adequate negative pressure gradient, provides primary confinement). Size-reduction operations on glovebox equipment are a common activity when a process has been discontinued and the room is being modified to support a new customer. The Actin ide Processing Group at TA-55 uses one-meter-long glass columns to process plutonium. Disposal of used columns is a challenge, since they must be size-reduced to get them out of the glovebox. The task is a high-risk operation because the glass shards that are generated can puncture the bag-out bags, leather protectors, glovebox gloves, and the worker's skin when completing the task. One of the Lessons Learned from these operations is that Laboratory management should critically evaluate each hazard and provide more effective measures to prevent personnel injury. A bag made of puncture-resistant material was one of these enhanced controls. We have investigated the effectiveness of these bags and have found that they safely and effectively permit glass objects to be reduced to small pieces with a plastic or rubber mallet; the waste can then be easily poured into a container for removal from the glove box as non-compactable transuranic (TRU) waste. This size-reduction operation reduces solid TRU waste generation by almost 2% times. Replacing one-time-use bag-out bags with multiple-use glass crushing bags also contributes to reducing generated waste. In addition, significant costs from contamination, cleanup, and preparation of incident documentation are avoided. This effort contributes to the Los Alamos

  8. Transuranic (Tru) waste volume reduction operations at a plutonium facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Nixon, Archie E.; Dodge, Robert L.; Fife, Keith W.; Sandoval, Arnold M.; Garcia, Vincent E.

    2010-01-01

    Programmatic operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility (TA 55) involve working with various amounts of plutonium and other highly toxic, alpha-emitting materials. The spread of radiological contamination on surfaces, airborne contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone are prevented through use of a variety of gloveboxes (the glovebox, coupled with an adequate negative pressure gradient, provides primary confinement). Size-reduction operations on glovebox equipment are a common activity when a process has been discontinued and the room is being modified to support a new customer. The Actin ide Processing Group at TA-55 uses one-meter-long glass columns to process plutonium. Disposal of used columns is a challenge, since they must be size-reduced to get them out of the glovebox. The task is a high-risk operation because the glass shards that are generated can puncture the bag-out bags, leather protectors, glovebox gloves, and the worker's skin when completing the task. One of the Lessons Learned from these operations is that Laboratory management should critically evaluate each hazard and provide more effective measures to prevent personnel injury. A bag made of puncture-resistant material was one of these enhanced controls. We have investigated the effectiveness of these bags and have found that they safely and effectively permit glass objects to be reduced to small pieces with a plastic or rubber mallet; the waste can then be easily poured into a container for removal from the glove box as non-compactable transuranic (TRU) waste. This size-reduction operation reduces solid TRU waste generation by almost 2% times. Replacing one-time-use bag-out bags with multiple-use glass crushing bags also contributes to reducing generated waste. In addition, significant costs from contamination, cleanup, and preparation of incident documentation are avoided. This effort contributes to the Los Alamos National

  9. Transuranic (TRU) waste volume reduction operations at a plutonium facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Nixon, Archie E.; Fife, Keith W.; Sandoval, Arnold M.; Garcia, Vincent E.; Dodge, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Programmatic operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility (TA-55) involve working with various amounts of plutonium and other highly toxic, alpha-emitting materials. The spread of radiological contamination on surfaces, airborne contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone are prevented through use of a variety of gloveboxes (the glovebox, coupled with an adequate negative pressure gradient, provides primary confinement). Size-reduction operations on glovebox equipment are a common activity when a process has been discontinued and the room is being modified to support a new customer. The Actinide Processing Group at TA-55 uses one-meter or longer glass columns to process plutonium. Disposal of used columns is a challenge, since they must be size-reduced to get them out of the glovebox. The task is a high-risk operation because the glass shards that are generated can puncture the bag-out bags, leather protectors, glovebox gloves, and the worker's skin when completing the task. One of the Lessons Learned from these operations is that Laboratory management should critically evaluate each hazard and provide more effective measures to prevent personnel injury. A bag made of puncture-resistant material was one of these enhanced controls. We have investigated the effectiveness of these bags and have found that they safely and effectively permit glass objects to be reduced to small pieces with a plastic or rubber mallet; the waste can then be easily poured into a container for removal from the glovebox as non-compactable transuranic (TRU) waste. This size-reduction operation reduces solid TRU waste volume generation by almost 2½ times. Replacing one-time-use bag-out bags with multiple-use glass crushing bags also contributes to reducing generated waste. In addition, significant costs from contamination, cleanup, and preparation of incident documentation are avoided. This effort contributes to the Los Alamos

  10. Design of Stirrer Impeller with Variable Operational Speed for a Food Waste Homogenizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idris A. Kayode

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A conceptualized impeller called KIA is designed for impact agitation of food waste in a homogenizer. A comparative analysis of the performance of KIA is made with three conventional impeller types, Rushton, Anchor, and Pitched Blade. Solid–liquid mixing of a moisture-rich food waste is simulated under various operational speeds, in order to compare the dispersions and thermal distributions at homogenous slurry conditions. Using SolidWorks, the design of the impellers employs an Application Programming Interface (API which acts as the canvas for creating a graphical user interface (GUI for automation of its assembly. A parametric analysis of the homogenizer, at varying operational speeds, enables the estimation of the critical speed of the mixing shaft diameter and the deflection under numerous mixing conditions and impeller configurations. The numerical simulation of the moisture-rich food waste (approximated as a Newtonian carrot–orange soup is performed with ANSYS CFX v.15.0. The velocity and temperature field distribution of the homogenizer for various impeller rotational speeds are analyzed. It is anticipated that the developed model will help in the selection of a suitable impeller for efficient mixing of food waste in the homogenizer.

  11. WASTES II: Waste System Transportation and Economic Simulation. Version II. User's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shay, M.R.; Buxbaum, M.E.

    1986-02-01

    The WASTES II model was developed to provide detailed analyses beyond the capabilities of other available models. WASTES uses discrete event simulation techniques to model the generation of commercial spent nuclear fuel, the buildup of spent fuel inventories within the system, and the transportation requirements for the movement of radioactive waste throughout the system. The model is written in FORTRAN 77 as an extension to the SLAM commercial simulation language package. In addition to the pool storage and dry storage located at the reactors, the WASTES model provides a choice of up to ten other storage facilities of four different types. The simulation performed by WASTES may be controlled by a combination of source- and/or destination-controlled transfers that are requested by the code user. The user supplies shipping cask characteristics for truck or rail shipment casks. As part of the facility description, the user specifies which casks the facility can use. Shipments within the system can be user specified to occur optimally, or proximally. Optimized shipping can be used when exactly two destination facilities of the same facility type are open for receipt of fuel. Optimized shipping selects source/destination pairs so that the total shipping distance or total shipping costs in a given year are minimized when both facilities are fully utilized. Proximity shipping sequentially fills the closest facility to the source according to the shipment priorities without regard for the total annual shipments. This results in sub-optimal routing of waste material but can be used to approximate an optimal shipping strategy when more than two facilities of the same type are available to receive waste. WASTES is currently able to analyze each of the commercial spent fuel logistics scenarios specified in the 1985 DOE Mission Plan

  12. Supplemental design requirements document solid waste operations complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocampo, V.P.; Boothe, G.F.; Broz, D.R.; Eaton, H.E.; Greager, T.M.; Huckfeldt, R.A.; Kooiker, S.L.; Lamberd, D.L.; Lang, L.L.; Myers, J.B.

    1994-11-01

    This document provides additional and supplemental information to the WHC-SD-W112-FDC-001, WHC-SD-W113-FDC-001, and WHC-SD-W100-FDC-001. It provides additional requirements for the design and summarizes Westinghouse Hanford Company key design guidance and establishes the technical baseline agreements to be used for definitive design common to the Solid Waste Operations Complex (SWOC) Facilities (Project W-112, Project W-113, and WRAP 2A)

  13. Determination of uranium distribution in the evaporation of simulated Savannah River Site waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.J.; Chandler, G.T.

    1995-01-01

    The results of an experimental program addressing the distribution of uranium in saltcake and supernate for two Savannah River Site waste compositions are presented. Successive batch evaporations were performed on simulated H-Area Modified Purex low-heat and post-aluminum dissolution wastes spiked with depleted uranium. Waste compositions and physical data were obtained for supernate and saltcake samples. For the H-Area Modified Purex low-heat waste, the product saltcake contained 42% of the total uranium from the original evaporator feed solution. However, precipitated solids only accounted for 10% of the original uranium mass; the interstitial liquid within the saltcake matrix contained the remainder of the uranium. In the case of the simulated post-aluminum dissolution waste; the product saltcake contained 68% of the total uranium from the original evaporator feed solution. Precipitated solids accounted for 52% of the original uranium mass; again, the interstitial liquid within the saltcake matrix contained the remainder of the uranium. An understanding of the distribution of uranium between supernatant liquid, saltcake, and sludge is required to develop a material balance for waste processing operations. This information is necessary to address nuclear criticality safety concerns

  14. Direct oxidation of strong waste waters, simulating combined wastes in extended-mission space cabins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    The applications of modern technology to the resolution of the problem of solid wastes in space cabin environments was studied with emphasis on the exploration of operating conditions that would permit lowering of process temperatures in wet oxidation of combined human wastes. It was found that the ultimate degree of degradation is not enhanced by use of a catalyst. However, the rate of oxidation is increased, and the temperature of oxidation is reduced to 400 F.

  15. LANDFILLS FOR NON-HAZARDOUS WASTE AND INERT WASTE AND THEIR OPERATION CYCLE IN NEW SYSTEM OF THE WASTE MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kunc

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Until 2012, the chief method of disposing of municipal waste in Poland was by storing it on non-hazardous and inert waste landfills. The introduction of a new waste management system as well as new formal and legal requirements have forced changes in key documents related to landfill installations such as processing permits, landfill operation instructions and management instructions. The operation cycle has been disturbed, reducing considerably their operation time and leading to a premature discontinuation of waste receipt, closure, and rehabilitation. These processes result in many irregularities in land rehabilitation which are likely to have a significant impact on the environment. The article identifies the fundamental changes which can interrupt the landfill operation cycle, and discusses the threats to the process of rehabilitation, highlighting both administrative and technical problems discovered based on processes that have been already completed. The description has been drawn up based on the study of literature, analyses and the reports of public administration bodies as well as on own research into the number of landfills faced with this problem.

  16. Immobilization of simulated high-level radioactive waste in borosilicate glass: Pilot scale demonstrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, J.A.; Hutson, N.D.; Zamecnik, J.R.; Carter, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS), operated by the Savannah River Laboratory, is a pilot scale facility used in support of the start-up and operation of the Department of Energy's Defense Waste Processing Facility. The IDMS has successfully demonstrated, on an engineering scale (one-fifth), that simulated high level radioactive waste (HLW) sludge can be chemically treated with formic acid to adjust both its chemical and physical properties, and then blended with simulated precipitate hydrolysis aqueous (PHA) product and borosilicate glass frit to produce a melter feed which can be processed into a durable glass product. The simulated sludge, PHA and frit were blended, based on a product composition program, to optimize the loading of the waste glass as well as to minimize those components which can cause melter processing and/or glass durability problems. During all the IDMS demonstrations completed thus far, the melter feed and the resulting glass that has been produced met all the required specifications, which is very encouraging to future DWPF operations. The IDMS operations also demonstrated that the volatile components of the melter feed (e.g., mercury, nitrogen and carbon, and, to a lesser extent, chlorine, fluorine and sulfur) did not adversely affect the melter performance or the glass product

  17. Hanford Waste Simulants Created to Support the Research and Development on the River Protection Project - Waste Treatment Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eibling, R.E.

    2001-07-26

    The development of nonradioactive waste simulants to support the River Protection Project - Waste Treatment Plant bench and pilot-scale testing is crucial to the design of the facility. The report documents the simulants development to support the SRTC programs and the strategies used to produce the simulants.

  18. Computerized low-level waste assay system operation manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.F.; Cowder, L.R.; Martin, E.R.

    1976-01-01

    An operation and maintenance manual for the computerized low-level waste box counter is presented, which describes routine assay techniques as well as theory of operation treated in sufficient depth so that an experienced assayist can make nonroutine assays. In addition, complete system schematics are included, along with a complete circuit description to facilitate not only maintenance and troubleshooting, but also reproduction of the instrument if desired. Complete software system descriptions are included so far as calculational algorithms are concerned, although detailed instruction listings would have to be obtained from Group R-1 at LASL in order to make machine-language code changes

  19. Modeling unsteady-state VOC transport in simulated waste drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liekhus, K.J.; Gresham, G.L.; Peterson, E.S.; Rae, C.; Hotz, N.J.; Connolly, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    This report is a revision of an EG ampersand G Idaho informal report originally titled Modeling VOC Transport in Simulated Waste Drums. A volatile organic compound (VOC) transport model has been developed to describe unsteady-state VOC permeation and diffusion within a waste drum. Model equations account for three primary mechanisms for VOC transport from a void volume within the drum. These mechanisms are VOC permeation across a polymer boundary, VOC diffusion across an opening in a volume boundary, and VOC solubilization in a polymer boundary. A series of lab-scale experiments was performed in which the VOC concentration was measured in simulated waste drums under different conditions. A lab-scale simulated waste drum consisted of a sized-down 55-gal metal drum containing a modified rigid polyethylene drum liner. Four polyethylene bags were sealed inside a large polyethylene bag, supported by a wire cage, and placed inside the drum liner. The small bags were filled with VOC-air gas mixture and the VOC concentration was measured throughout the drum over a period of time. Test variables included the type of VOC-air gas mixtures introduced into the small bags, the small bag closure type, and the presence or absence of a variable external heat source. Model results were calculated for those trials where the permeability had been measured

  20. Organic analyses of an actual and simulated mixed waste. Hanford's organic complexant waste revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toste, A.P.; Osborn, B.C.; Polach, K.J.; Lechner-Fish, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    Reanalysis of the organics in a mixed waste, an organic complexant waste, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, has yielded an 80.4% accounting of the waste's total organic content. In addition to several complexing and chelating agents (citrate, EDTA, HEDTA and NTA), 38 chelator/complexor fragments have been identified, compared to only 11 in the original analysis, all presumably formed via organic degradation. Moreover, a mis identification, methanetricarboxylic acid, has been re-identified as the chelator fragment N-(methylamine)imino-diacetic acid (MAIDA). A nonradioactive simulant of the actual waste, containing the parent organics (citrate, EDTA, HEDTA and NTA), was formulated and stored in the dark at ambient temperature for 90 days. Twenty chelator and complexor fragments were identified in the simulant, along with several carboxylic acids, confirming that myriad chelator and complexor fragments are formed via degradation of the parent organics. Moreover, their abundance in the simulant (60.9% of the organics identified) argues that the harsh chemistries of mixed wastes like Hanford's organic degradation, even in the absence of radiation. (author). 26 refs., 2 tabs

  1. Simulations for the transmutation of nuclear wastes with hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuillier, St.

    1998-06-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation, devoted to the spallation, has been built in the framework of the hybrid systems proposed for the nuclear wastes incineration. This system GSPARTE, described the reactions evolution. It takes into account and improves the nuclear codes and the low and high energy particles transport in the GEANT code environment, adapted to the geometry of the hybrid reactors. Many applications and abacus useful for the wastes transmutation, have been realized with this system: production of thick target neutrons, source definition, material damages. (A.L.B.)

  2. Pilot scale processing of simulated Savannah River Site high level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutson, N.D.; Zamecnik, J.R.; Ritter, J.A.; Carter, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    The Savannah River Laboratory operates the Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS), which is a pilot-scale test facility used in support of the start-up and operation of the US Department of Energy's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, the IDMS is used in the evaluation of the DWPF melter and its associated feed preparation and offgass treatment systems. This article provides a general overview of some of the test work which has been conducted in the IDMS facility. The chemistry associated with the chemical treatment of the sludge (via formic acid adjustment) is discussed. Operating experiences with simulated sludge containing high levels of nitrite, mercury, and noble metals are summarized

  3. Simulation applied to innovative waste management options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this workshop is to share experience and methods in the domains of neutronics, spallation, thermo-hydraulics, corrosion, materials, mechanics; to define the needs for the other domains in order to improve the evaluation of concepts: ADS, MSR, Gas cooled reactors; and to determine the necessity or not to couple codes and tools for the concepts studied in the frame of GEDEON activities. This document groups together the transparencies of 6 presentations given at this workshop: design and performances of CEA spallation targets; simulation of spallation; the neutronic benchmark on the Megapie spallation target; the core physics of fast spectrum gas cooled reactors; the study and modeling of the thermal-mechanical behaviour of composite fuel in reactor. (J.S.)

  4. Graphical models for simulation and control of robotic systems for waste handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drotning, W.D.; Bennett, P.C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses detailed geometric models which have been used within a graphical simulation environment to study transportation cask facility design and to perform design and analyses of robotic systems for handling of nuclear waste. The models form the basis for a robot control environment which provides safety, flexibility, and reliability for operations which span the spectrum from autonomous control to tasks requiring direct human intervention

  5. Recycle operations as a methodology for radioactive waste volume reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    The costs for packaging, transportation and burial of low-level radioactive metallic waste have become so expensive that an alternate method of decontamination for volume reduction prior to disposal can now be justified. The operation of a large-scale centralized recycle center for decontamination of selected low level radioactive waste has been proven to be an effective method for waste volume reduction and for retrieving valuable materials for unlimited use. The centralized recycle center concept allows application of state-of-the-art decontamination technology resulting in a reduction in utility disposal costs and a reduction in overall net amount of material being buried. Examples of specific decontamination process activities at the centralized facility will be reviewed along with a discussion of the economic impact of decontamination for recycling and volume reduction. Based on almost two years of operation of a centralized decontamination facility, a demonstrated capability exists. The concept has been cost effective and proves that valuable resources can be recycled

  6. Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, Duane J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, Charles A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Crawford, Charles L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, William R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-01-01

    (chloride, fluoride, sulfur), will have high ammonia, and will contain carryover particulates of glass-former chemicals. These species have potential to cause corrosion of tanks and equipment, precipitation of solids, release of ammonia gas vapors, and scale in the tank farm evaporator. Routing this stream to the tank farms does not permanently divert it from recycling into the WTP, only temporarily stores it prior to reprocessing. Testing is normally performed to demonstrate acceptable conditions and limits for these compounds in wastes sent to the tank farms. The primary parameter of this phase of the test program was measuring the formation of solids during evaporation in order to assess the compatibility of the stream with the evaporator and transfer and storage equipment. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW facility melter offgas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet, and, thus, the composition will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. This report discusses results of evaporation testing of the simulant. Two conditions were tested, one with the simulant at near neutral pH, and a second at alkaline pH. The neutral pH test is comparable to the conditions in the Hanford Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) evaporator, although that evaporator operates at near atmospheric pressure and tests were done under vacuum. For the alkaline test, the target pH was based on the tank farm corrosion control program requirements, and the test protocol and equipment was comparable to that

  7. Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, Duane J.; Nash, Charles A.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-01

    (chloride, fluoride, sulfur), will have high ammonia, and will contain carryover particulates of glass-former chemicals. These species have potential to cause corrosion of tanks and equipment, precipitation of solids, release of ammonia gas vapors, and scale in the tank farm evaporator. Routing this stream to the tank farms does not permanently divert it from recycling into the WTP, only temporarily stores it prior to reprocessing. Testing is normally performed to demonstrate acceptable conditions and limits for these compounds in wastes sent to the tank farms. The primary parameter of this phase of the test program was measuring the formation of solids during evaporation in order to assess the compatibility of the stream with the evaporator and transfer and storage equipment. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW facility melter offgas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet, and, thus, the composition will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. This report discusses results of evaporation testing of the simulant. Two conditions were tested, one with the simulant at near neutral pH, and a second at alkaline pH. The neutral pH test is comparable to the conditions in the Hanford Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) evaporator, although that evaporator operates at near atmospheric pressure and tests were done under vacuum. For the alkaline test, the target pH was based on the tank farm corrosion control program requirements, and the test protocol and equipment was comparable to that

  8. Extraction of technetium from simulated Hanford tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaiko, D.J.; Vojta, Y.; Takeuchi, M.

    1993-01-01

    Aqueous biphasic separation systems are being developed for the treatment of liquid radioactive wastes. These extraction systems are based on the use of polyethylene glycols (PEGs) for the selective extraction and recovery of long-lived radionuclides, such as 129 I, 75 Se, and 99 Tc, from caustic solutions containing high concentrations of nitrate, nitrite, and carbonate. Because of the high ionic strengths of supernatant liquids in Hanford underground storage tanks, aqueous biphasic systems can be generated by simply adding aqueous PEG solutions directly to the waste solution. In the process, anionic species like I - and TcO 4 - are selectively transferred to the less dense PEG phase. The partition coefficient for a wide range of inorganic cations and anions, such as sodium, potassium, aluminum, nitrate, nitrate, and carbonate, are all less than one. The authors present experimental data on extraction of technetium from several simulated Hanford tank wastes at 25 degree and 50 degree C

  9. Consolidation and Centralization of Waste Operations Business Systems - 12319

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, D. Dean [Oak Ridge Operations, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This abstract provides a comprehensive plan supporting the continued development and integration of all waste operations and waste management business systems. These include existing systems such as ATMS (Automated Transportation Management System), RadCalc, RFITS (Radio Frequency Identification Transportation System) Programs as well as incorporating key components of existing government developed waste management systems and COTS (Computer Off The Shelf) applications in order to deliver a truly integrated waste tracking and management business system. Some of these existing systems to be integrated include IWTS at Idaho National Lab, WIMS at Sandia National Lab and others. The aggregation of data and consolidation into a single comprehensive business system delivers best practices in lifecycle waste management processes to be delivered across the Department of Energy facilities. This concept exists to reduce operational costs to the federal government by combining key business systems into a centralized enterprise application following the methodology that as contractors change, the tools they use to manage DOE's assets do not. IWITS is one efficient representation of a sound architecture currently supporting multiple DOE sites from a waste management solution. The integration of ATMS, RadCalc and RFITS and the concept like IWITS into a single solution for DOE contractors will result in significant savings and increased efficiencies for DOE. Building continuity and solving collective problems can only be achieved through mass collaboration, resulting in an online community that DOE contractors and subcontractors access common applications, allowing for the collection of business intelligence at an unprecedented level. This is a fundamental shift from a solely 'for profit' business model to a 'for purpose' business model. To the conventional-minded, putting values before profit is an unfamiliar and unnatural way for a contractor to operate

  10. Savannah River Site Operating Experience with Transuranic (TRU) Waste Retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, K.A.; Milner, T.N.

    2006-01-01

    Drums of TRU Waste have been stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) on concrete pads from the 1970's through the 1980's. These drums were subsequently covered with tarpaulins and then mounded over with dirt. Between 1996 and 2000 SRS ran a successful retrieval campaign and removed some 8,800 drums, which were then available for venting and characterization for WIPP disposal. Additionally, a number of TRU Waste drums, which were higher in activity, were stored in concrete culverts, as required by the Safety Analysis for the Facility. Retrieval of drums from these culverts has been ongoing since 2002. This paper will describe the operating experience and lessons learned from the SRS retrieval activities. (authors)

  11. [Co-composting of high-moisture vegetable waste and flower waste in a batch operation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangfeng; Wang, Hongtao; Nie, Yongfeng

    2003-09-01

    Co-composting of different mixture made of vegetable waste and flower waste were studied. The first stage of composting was aerobic static bed based temperature feedback in a batch operation and control via aeration rate regulation. The second stage was window composting. The total composting period was 45 days. About the station of half of celery and half of carnation, the pile was insulated and temperatures of at least 55 degrees C were maintained for about 11 days. The highest temperature was up to 65 degrees C. This is enough to kill pathogens. Moisture of pile decreased from 64.2% to 46.3% and organic matter was degraded from 74.7% to 55.6% during composting. The value of pH was had stable at 7. Analysis of maturity and nutrition of compost show that end-products of composting were bio-stable and had abundant nutrition. This shows that co-composting of vegetable waste and flower waste can get high quality compost by optimizing composting process during 45 days. Composting can decrease non-point resource of organic solid waste by recycling nutrition to soil and improve fertility of soil.

  12. Imaging through obscurations for sluicing operations in the waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, T.J.; McMakin, D.L.; Sheen, D.M.; Chieda, M.A.

    1994-08-01

    Waste remediators have identified that surveillance of waste remediation operations and periodic inspections of stored waste are required under very demanding and difficult viewing environments. In many cases, obscurants such as dust or water vapor are generated as part of the remediation activity. Methods are required for viewing or imaging beyond the normal visual spectrum. Work space images guide the movement of remediation equipment, creating a need for rapidly updated, near real-time imaging capability. In addition, there is a need for three-dimensional topographical data to determine the contours of the wastes, to plan retrieval campaigns, and to provide a three-dimensional map of a robot's work space as basis for collision avoidance. Three basic imaging techniques were evaluated: optical, acoustic and radar. The optical imaging methods that were examined used cameras which operated in the visible region and near-infrared region and infrared cameras which operated in the 3--5 micron and 8--12 micron wavelength regions. Various passive and active lighting schemes were tested, as well as the use of filters to eliminate reflection in the visible region. Image enhancement software was used to extend the range where visual techniques could be used. In addition, the operation of a laser range finder, which operated at 0.835 microns, was tested when fog/water droplets were suspended in the air. The acoustic technique involved using commercial acoustic sensors, operating at approximately 50 kHz and 215 kHz, to determine the attenuation of the acoustic beam in a high-humidity environment. The radar imaging methods involved performing millimeter wave (94 GHz) attenuation measurement sin the various simulated sluicing environments and performing preliminary experimental imaging studies using a W-Band (75--110 GHz) linearly scanned transceiver in a laboratory environment. The results of the tests are discussed

  13. Powder technological vitrification of simulated high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahlert, S.

    1988-03-01

    High-level waste simulate from the reprocessing of light water reactor and fast breeder fuel was vitrified by powder technology. After denitration with formaldehyde, the simulated HLW is mixed with glass frit and simultaneously dried in an oil-heated mixer. After 'in-can calcination' for at least 24 hours at 850 or 950 K (depending on the type of waste and glass), the mixture is hot-pressed in-can for several hours at 920 or 1020 K respectively, at pressures between 0.4 and 1.0 MPa. The technology has been demonstrated inactively up to diameters of 30 cm. Leach resistance is significantly enhanced when compared to common borosilicate glasses by the utilization of glasses with higher silicon and aluminium content and lower sodium content. (orig.) [de

  14. Pilot-scale grout production test with a simulated low-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fow, C.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Treat, R.L.; Hymas, C.R.

    1987-05-01

    Plans are underway at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, to convert the low-level fraction of radioactive liquid wastes to a grout form for permanent disposal. Grout is a mixture of liquid waste and grout formers, including portland cement, fly ash, and clays. In the plan, the grout slurry is pumped to subsurface concrete vaults on the Hanford Site, where the grout will solidify into large monoliths, thereby immobilizing the waste. A similar disposal concept is being planned at the Savannah River Laboratory site. The underground disposal of grout was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory between 1966 and 1984. Design and construction of grout processing and disposal facilities are underway. The Transportable Grout Facility (TGF), operated by Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) for the Department of Energy (DOE), is scheduled to grout Phosphate/Sulfate N Reactor Operations Waste (PSW) in FY 1988. Phosphate/Sulfate Waste is a blend of two low-level waste streams generated at Hanford's N Reactor. Other wastes are scheduled to be grouted in subsequent years. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is verifying that Hanford grouts can be safely and efficiently processed. To meet this objective, pilot-scale grout process equipment was installed. On July 29 and 30, 1986, PNL conducted a pilot-scale grout production test for Rockwell. During the test, 16,000 gallons of simulated nonradioactive PSW were mixed with grout formers to produce 22,000 gallons of PSW grout. The grout was pumped at a nominal rate of 15 gpm (about 25% of the nominal production rate planned for the TGF) to a lined and covered trench with a capacity of 30,000 gallons. Emplacement of grout in the trench will permit subsequent evaluation of homogeneity of grout in a large monolith. 12 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs

  15. Leaching behavior of simulated high-level waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamizono, Hiroshi

    1987-03-01

    The author's work in the study on the leaching behavior of simulated high-level waste (HLW) glass were summarized. The subjects described are (1) leach rates at high temperatures, (2) effects of cracks on leach rates, (3) effects of flow rate on leach rates, and (4) an in-situ burial test in natural groundwater. In the following section, the leach rates obtained by various experiments were summarized and discussed. (author)

  16. Rheological evaluation of simulated neutralized current acid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fow, C.L.; McCarthy, D.; Thornton, G.T.

    1986-06-01

    A byproduct of the Purex process is an aqueous waste stream that contains fission products. This waste stream, called current acid waste, is chemically neutralized and stored in double shell tanks on the Hanford Site. This neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) will be transported by pipe to B-Plant, a processing plant on the Hanford Site. Rheological and transport properties of NCAW slurry were evaluated. First, researchers conducted lab rheological evaluations of simulated NCAW. The results of these evaluations were then correlated with classical rheological models and scaled up to predict the performance that is likely to occur in the full-scale system. The NCAW in the tank will either be retrieved as is, i.e., no change in the concentration presently in the tank, or will be slightly concentrated before retrieval. Sluicing may be required to retrieve the solids. Three concentrations of simulated NCAW were evaluated that would simulate the different retrieval options: NCAW in the concentration that is presently in the tank; a slightly concentrated NCAW, called NCAW5.5; and equal parts of NCAW settled solids and water (simulating the sluicing stage), called NCAW1:1. The physical and rheological properties of three samples of each concentration at 25 and 100 0 C were evaluated in the laboratory. The properties displayed by NCAW and NCAW5.5 at 25 and 100 0 C allowed it to be classified as a pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid. NCAW1:1 at 25 and 100 0 C displayed properties of a yield-pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid. The classical non-Newtonian models for pseudoplastic and yield-pseudoplastic fluids were used with the laboratory data to predict the full-scale pump-pipe network parameters

  17. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION LABORATORY TESTS WITH SIMULATED TANK WASTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HERTING DL

    2007-01-01

    Results are presented for several simulated waste tests related to development of the fractional crystallization process. Product salt dissolution rates were measured to support pilot plant equipment design. Evaporation tests were performed to evaluate the effects of organics on slurry behavior and to determine optimum antifoam addition levels. A loss-of-power test was performed to support pilot plant accident scenario analysis. Envelope limit tests were done to address variations in feed composition

  18. Operational radioactive defense waste management plan for the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    The Operational Radioactive Defense Waste Management Plan for the Nevada Test Site establishes procedures and methods for the safe shipping, receiving, processing, disposal, and storage of radioactive waste. Included are NTS radioactive waste disposition program guidelines, procedures for radioactive waste management, a description of storage and disposal areas and facilities, and a glossary of specifications and requirements

  19. Operator training simulator for BWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tadasu

    1988-01-01

    For the operation management of nuclear power stations with high reliability and safety, the role played by operators is very important. The effort of improving the man-machine interface in the central control rooms of nuclear power stations is energetically advanced, but the importance of the role of operators does not change. For the training of the operators of nuclear power stations, simulators have been used from the early stage. As the simulator facilities for operator training, there are the full scope simulator simulating faithfully the central control room of an actual plant and the small simulator mainly aiming at learning the plant functions. For BWR nuclear power stations, two full scope simulators are installed in the BWR Operator Training Center, and the training has been carried out since 1974. The plant function learning simulators have been installed in respective electric power companies as the education and training facilities in the companies. The role of simulators in operator training, the BTC No.1 simulator of a BWR-4 of 780 MWe and the BTC No.2 simulator of a BWR-5 of 1,100 MWe, plant function learning simulators, and the design of the BTC No.2 simulator and plant function learning simulators are reported. (K.I.)

  20. Status of test results of electrochemical organic oxidation of a tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colby, S.A.

    1994-06-01

    This report presents scoping test results of an electrochemical waste pretreatment process to oxidize organic compounds contained in the Hanford Site's radioactive waste storage tanks. Electrochemical oxidation was tested on laboratory scale to destroy organics that are thought to pose safety concerns, using a nonradioactive, simulated tank waste. Minimal development work has been applied to alkaline electrochemical organic destruction. Most electrochemical work has been directed towards acidic electrolysis, as in the metal purification industry, and silver catalyzed oxidation. Alkaline electrochemistry has traditionally been associated with the following: (1) inefficient power use, (2) electrode fouling, and (3) solids handling problems. Tests using a laboratory scale electrochemical cell oxidized surrogate organics by applying a DC electrical current to the simulated tank waste via anode and cathode electrodes. The analytical data suggest that alkaline electrolysis oxidizes the organics into inorganic carbonate and smaller carbon chain refractory organics. Electrolysis treats the waste without adding chemical reagents and at ambient conditions of temperature and pressure. Cell performance was not affected by varying operating conditions and supplemental electrolyte additions

  1. Large-scale continuous process to vitrify nuclear defense waste: operating experience with nonradioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosper, M.B.; Randall, C.T.; Traverso, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    The developmental program underway at SRL has demonstrated the vitrification process proposed for the sludge processing facility of the DWPF on a large scale. DWPF design criteria for production rate, equipment lifetime, and operability have all been met. The expected authorization and construction of the DWPF will result in the safe and permanent immobilization of a major quantity of existing high level waste. 11 figures, 4 tables

  2. Laboratory waste minimization during the operation startup phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, J.A.

    1995-05-01

    The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) Laboratory was opened for occupancy in October, 1994. It is the first of its kind on the Hanford Site, a low level lab located in an area of high level radiological material. The mission of the facility is to analyze process samples from two on-line effluent treatment plants. One of these plants is operating and the other is due to begin operations by the end of 1995. The VSCF also performs air sampling analysis for routine radiological surveillance filter papers drawn from around the Hanford Site. Because this type of laboratory had not been in operation before, there was only speculation about the types and amounts of waste that would be generated. The laboratory personnel assigned to WSCF were assembled from existing labs on the Hanford Site and from outside the Hanford Site community. For some, it was a first time experience working on a site where a twenty mile drive is sometimes required to visit another building. For others, it was a change in the way business is conducted using state-of-the-art equipment, a new building, and a chance to approach issues as a team from the beginning. It is how this team came together and the issues that were discussed, sometimes uncomfortably, that lead to the current success. The outcome of this process is discussed in this paper

  3. APET methodology for Defense Waste Processing Facility: Mode C operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.P. Jr.; Massey, W.M.

    1995-04-01

    Safe operation of SRS facilities continues to be the highest priority of the Savannah River Site (SRS). One of these facilities, the Defense Waste Processing Facility or DWPF, is currently undergoing cold chemical runs to verify the design and construction preparatory to hot startup in 1995. The DWPFF is a facility designed to convert the waste currently stored in tanks at the 200-Area tank farm into a form that is suitable for long term storage in engineered surface facilities and, ultimately, geologic isolation. As a part of the program to ensure safe operation of the DWPF, a probabilistic Safety Assessment of the DWPF has been completed. The results of this analysis are incorporated into the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for DWPF. The usual practice in preparation of Safety Analysis Reports is to include only a conservative analysis of certain design basis accidents. A major part of a Probabilistic Safety Assessment is the development and quantification of an Accident Progression Event Tree or APET. The APET provides a probabilistic representation of potential sequences along which an accident may progress. The methodology used to determine the risk of operation of the DWPF borrows heavily from methods applied to the Probabilistic Safety Assessment of SRS reactors and to some commercial reactors. This report describes the Accident Progression Event Tree developed for the Probabilistic Safety Assessment of the DWPF

  4. Design and operation of radioactive waste incineration facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide safety guidance for the design and operation of radioactive waste incineration facilities. The guide emphasizes the design objectives and system requirements to be met and provides recommendations for the procedure of process selection and equipment design and operation. It is recognized that some incinerators may handle only very low or 'insignificant' levels of radioactivity, and in such cases some requirements or recommendations of this guide may not fully apply. Nevertheless, it is expected that any non-compliance with the guide will be addressed and justified in the licensing process. It is also recognized that the regulatory body may place a limit on the level of the radioactivity of the waste to be incinerated at a specific installation. For the purpose of this guide an insignificant level of release of radioactivity may typically be defined as either the continuous or single event release of the design basis radionuclide inventory that represents a negligible risk to the population, the operating personnel, and/or the environment. The guidance on what constitutes a negligible risk and how to translate negligible risk or dose into level of activity can be found in Safety Series No. 89, IAEA, Vienna. 20 refs, 1 fig

  5. Construction and operation of an industrial solid waste landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Waste Management, proposes to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide PORTS with additional landfill capacity for non-hazardous and asbestos wastes. The proposed action is needed to support continued operation of PORTS, which generates non-hazardous wastes on a daily basis and asbestos wastes intermittently. Three alternatives are evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA): the proposed action (construction and operation of the X-737 landfill), no-action, and offsite shipment of industrial solid wastes for disposal.

  6. Construction and operation of an industrial solid waste landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Waste Management, proposes to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide PORTS with additional landfill capacity for non-hazardous and asbestos wastes. The proposed action is needed to support continued operation of PORTS, which generates non-hazardous wastes on a daily basis and asbestos wastes intermittently. Three alternatives are evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA): the proposed action (construction and operation of the X-737 landfill), no-action, and offsite shipment of industrial solid wastes for disposal

  7. Characterisation of Plasma Vitrified Simulant Plutonium Contaminated Material Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyatt, Neil C.; Morgan, Suzy; Stennett, Martin C.; Scales, Charlie R.; Deegan, David

    2007-01-01

    The potential of plasma vitrification for the treatment of a simulant Plutonium Contaminated Material (PCM) was investigated. It was demonstrated that the PuO 2 simulant, CeO 2 , could be vitrified in the amorphous calcium iron aluminosilicate component of the product slag with simultaneous destruction of the organic and polymer waste fractions. Product Consistency Tests conducted at 90 deg. C in de-ionised water and buffered pH 11 solution show the PCM slag product to be durable with respect to release of Ce. (authors)

  8. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SIMULATION MODELS IN WASTE MANAGEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Ian; Kossik, Rick; Voss, Charlie

    2003-01-01

    Most waste management activities are decided upon and carried out in a public or semi-public arena, typically involving the waste management organization, one or more regulators, and often other stakeholders and members of the public. In these environments, simulation modeling can be a powerful tool in reaching a consensus on the best path forward, but only if the models that are developed are understood and accepted by all of the parties involved. These requirements for understanding and acceptance of the models constrain the appropriate software and model development procedures that are employed. This paper discusses requirements for both simulation software and for the models that are developed using the software. Requirements for the software include transparency, accessibility, flexibility, extensibility, quality assurance, ability to do discrete and/or continuous simulation, and efficiency. Requirements for the models that are developed include traceability, transparency, credibility/validity, and quality control. The paper discusses these requirements with specific reference to the requirements for performance assessment models that are used for predicting the long-term safety of waste disposal facilities, such as the proposed Yucca Mountain repository

  9. Cross-flow filtration during the washing of a simulated radioactive waste stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MARK R., DUIGNAN

    2005-01-01

    0. 023 gpm/ft2 (5.64 cm/hr) at 20.1 wt percent UDS with a density of 1.17 kg/L, and yield stress of 10.4 Pa. The average permeate filter flux during the 7 hours of Cycle 1 washing was 0.018 gpm/ft2 (4.41 cm/hr). During Cycle 2 the simulated waste started at a permeate filter flux of 0.025 gpm/ft2 (6.13 cm/hr). Note that the starting flux for Cycle 2 was greater than the ending flux for Cycle 1. The period between the cycles was approximately 12 hours. While no filtering occurred during that period either solids dissolution continued and/or the filter cake was dislodged somewhat with the stopping and starting of filter operation. At the end of the second set of 22 washing steps, the permeate filter flux increased to 0.032 gpm/ft2 (7.84 cm/hr) at 20.6 wt percent UDS with a density of 1.16 kg/L, and yield stress of 8.2 Pa. The average permeate filter flux during the 4 hours of Cycle 2 washing was 029 gpm/ft2 (7.11 cm/hr)

  10. Formulation and preparation of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant direct feed low activity waste Effluent Management Facility core simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, Charles A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL; Adamson, Duane J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL

    2016-05-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate, LMOGC) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream during full WTP operations is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. However, during the Direct Feed LAW (DFLAW) scenario, planned disposition of this stream is to evaporate it in a new evaporator in the Effluent Management Facility (EMF) and then return it to the LAW melter. It is important to understand the composition of the effluents from the melter and new evaporator so that the disposition of these streams can be accurately planned and accommodated. Furthermore, alternate disposition of the LMOGC stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable less integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Alternate disposition would also eliminate this stream from recycling within WTP when it begins operations and would decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste, amongst the other problems such a recycle stream present. This LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate stream will contain components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form, such as halides and sulfate. Because this stream will recycle within WTP, these components accumulate in the Melter Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Diverting the stream reduces the halides and sulfate in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. This overall program examines the potential treatment and immobilization of this stream to enable alternative disposal. The objective of this task was to formulate and prepare a simulant of the LAW Melter

  11. Design and operation of a remotely operated plutonium waste size reduction and material handling process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, J.A. III; Charlesworth, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Noncombustible 238 Pu and 239 Pu waste is generated as a result of normal operation and decommissioning activity at the Savannah River Plant, and is being retrievably stored there. As part of the long-term plant to process the stored waste and current waste for permanent disposal, a remote size reduction and material handling process is being cold-tested at Savannah River Laboratory. The process consists of a large, low-speed shredder and material handling system, a remote worktable, a bagless transfer system, and a robotically controlled manipulator. Initial testing of the shredder and material handling system and a cycle test of the bagless transfer system has been completed. Fabrication and acceptance testing of the Telerobat, a robotically controlled manipulator has been completed. Testing is scheduled to begin in 3/86. Design features maximizing the ability to remotely maintain the equipment were incorporated. Complete cold-testing of the equipment is scheduled to be completed in 1987

  12. Operation of a pilot alpha waste incinerator at the Savannah River Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, J.H.; Hootman, H.E.

    1978-01-01

    The pilot incinerator was built and operated successfully at design throughput with simulated wastes. Operating ranges of stable incinerator performance were defined as a function of air and waste feed rates for different materials and mixtures of materials. The complete range of waste materials can be burned without producing tar or soot. The limiting capacity of this incinerator is 0.5 kg/h if all latex rubber is charged or approximately 0.84 kg/h with a waste mixture. Off-gas particulate sampling prior to scrubbing indicates negligible solid carryover. The only material which may present off-gas cleaning problems is a light white smoke which accompanies the burning of PVC. The incinerator was operated continuously between 850 and 1000 0 C from startup on September 6, 1977 until shutdown on February 2, 1978. The 3.6-kW electric heater for the primary combustion chamber burned out on January 13; however, adequate burning temperatures were provided by the eight 1.25-kW heaters in the afterburner to maintain sootless burning. As a result, future incinerator operation will be at 900 0 C rather than 1000 0 C. After 5 months of operation, the condition of the ceramics was very good, and the metal components showed no deterioration or serious corrosion. The incinerator was modified by installing a different design gas burner block, and two baffles and a choke in the afterburner to increase turbulence and mixing. It was started up again on February 27, 1978

  13. 36 CFR 6.4 - Solid waste disposal sites not in operation on September 1, 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Solid waste disposal sites... PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 6.4 Solid waste disposal sites not in operation on September 1, 1984. (a) No person may operate...

  14. Operating room waste reduction in plastic and hand surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Mark G; Rothkopf, Douglas M

    2015-01-01

    Operating rooms (ORs), combined with labour and delivery suites, account for approximately 70% of hospital waste. Previous studies have reported that recycling can have a considerable financial impact on a hospital-wide basis; however, its importance in the OR has not been demonstrated. To propose a method of decreasing cost through judicious selection of instruments and supplies, and initiation of recycling in plastic and hand surgery. The authors identified disposable supplies and instruments that are routinely opened and wasted in common plastic and hand surgery procedures, and calculated the savings that can result from eliminating extraneous items. A cost analysis was performed, which compared the expense of OR waste versus single-stream recycling and the benefit of recycling HIPAA documents and blue wrap. Fifteen total items were removed from disposable plastic packs and seven total items from hand packs. A total of US$17,381.05 could be saved per year from these changes alone. Since initiating single-stream recycling, the authors' institution has saved, on average, US$3,487 per month at the three campuses. After extrapolating at the current savings rate, one would expect to save a minimum of US$41,844 per year. OR waste reduction is an effective method of decreasing cost in the surgical setting. By revising the contents of current disposable packs and instrument sets designated for plastic and hand surgery, hospitals can reduce the amount of opened and unused material. Significant financial savings and environmental benefit can result from this judicious supply and instrument selection, as well as implementation of recycling.

  15. Minimisation of liquid radioactive operational wastes from light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumpholz, Udo

    2014-01-01

    A system for decontaminating evaporator concentrates has been developed during R and D work at the Gundremmingen (KGG) nuclear power plant, by means of which accumulation of radioactive wastes can be effectively reduced. A cooling crystallization system is involved in this case, which extracts the high percentage of non-radioactive salt components from the brines through these salts being crystallised with a high level of purity and thereby being withdrawn from the nuclear disposal procedure. A method is also available in modified form for decontaminating concentrates containing boron from PWR plants. Use of cooling crystallisation renders superfluous the otherwise usual stages of waste treatment such as for example disposal scheduling, provision of repository casks (e.g. MOSAIK registered ), their transport, packing, compilation of waste package documentation, intermediate storage and final disposal. Disposal of evaporator concentrates has no longer been necessary in KGG since 1998. It has been possible to avoid more than 500 MOSAIK registered type II casks in KGG since the procedure has been employed. Owing to the current price basis, a saving on the order of >30 million Euro has been achieved merely for cask acquisition since the procedure has been used. In addition to these advantages, operation of the cooling crystallisation system (KKA) is also reflected in a considerable dose re-duction for the personnel performing the operations, thereby fulfilling the objective derived from the German radiation protection ordinance (StrlSchV) of dose minimisation (avoidance of unnecessary exposure to radiation and dose reduction, paragraph 6 StrlSchV). Internatonal trade mark rights exist for the cooling crystallisation and boric acid decontamination procedure.

  16. Wastes from plutonium conversion and scrap recovery operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, D.C.; Bowersox, D.F.; McKerley, B.J.; Nance, R.L.

    1988-03-01

    This report deals with the handling of defense-related wastes associated with plutonium processing. It first defines the different waste categories along with the techniques used to assess waste content. It then discusses the various treatment approaches used in recovering plutonium from scrap. Next, it addresses the various waste management approaches necessary to handle all wastes. Finally, there is a discussion of some future areas for processing with emphasis on waste reduction. 91 refs., 25 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Wastes from plutonium conversion and scrap recovery operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, D.C.; Bowersox, D.F.; McKerley, B.J.; Nance, R.L.

    1988-03-01

    This report deals with the handling of defense-related wastes associated with plutonium processing. It first defines the different waste categories along with the techniques used to assess waste content. It then discusses the various treatment approaches used in recovering plutonium from scrap. Next, it addresses the various waste management approaches necessary to handle all wastes. Finally, there is a discussion of some future areas for processing with emphasis on waste reduction. 91 refs., 25 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Rotary kiln incinerator engineering tests on simulated transuranic wastes from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattengill, M.G.; Brunner, F.A.; Fasso, J.L.; Mitchel, S.R.; Praskac, R.T.

    1982-09-01

    Nine rotary kiln incineration tests were performed at Colorado School of Mines Research Institute on simulated transuranic waste materials. The rotary kiln incinerator used as 3 ft ID and 30 ft long and was included in an incineration system that also included an afterburner and a baghouse. The purpose of the incineration test program was to determine the applicability and operating characteristics of the rotary kiln with relation to the complete incineration of the simulated waste materials. The results of the study showed that the rotary kiln did completely incinerate the waste materials. Off-gas determinations showed emission levels of SO 2 , NO/sub x/, H 2 SO 4 , HC1, particulate loading, and hydrocarbons, as well as exhaust gas volume, to be within reasonable controllable ranges in a production operation. Included in the report are the results of materials and energy balances, based upon data collected, and design recommendations based upon the data and upon observations during the incineration operation

  19. Using ADA Tasks to Simulate Operating Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAcetis, Louis A.; Schmidt, Oron; Krishen, Kumar

    1990-01-01

    A method of simulating equipment using ADA tasks is discussed. Individual units of equipment are coded as concurrently running tasks that monitor and respond to input signals. This technique has been used in a simulation of the space-to-ground Communications and Tracking subsystem of Space Station Freedom.

  20. Operating document on management division waste management section in Tokai works in the 2003 fiscal year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Kentarou; Akutu, Shigeru; Sasayama, Yasuo; Nakanishi, Masahiro; Ozone, Takashi; Terunuma, Tomomi; Mogaki, Isao; Aizawa, Syuichi; Sugawara, Hiroyuki

    2005-07-01

    This document is announced about the task of Waste Management Section of Waste Management Division in 2003. Mainly, our tasks are fractionating, incinerating and storing low active solid waste and storing high active solid waste. In addition, we are performing required correspondence about management program of low level waste. We had treated and stored waste safely according to our plan. As a result, we have achieved following outcomes. (1) We incinerated the combustible low active solid waste that is generated by the operation of Tokai Reprocessing Plant and the recovery operation of incident at Low Active Liquid Waste Asphalt Solidification Facility. Waste of this recovery operation is stored in the 2nd Low Active Liquid Waste Asphalt Solidification Storage Facility. We incinerated 58 ton of wastes. (2) We stored low active solid waste 854 drums that accommodate 200L. According to the time of Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility completion, we will be able to avoid full of storage. (3) We stored high active solid waste of 148 drums that accommodate 200L. For the time being, there is no problem as regards the administration of storage facility. (4) We carried out the management program of low level solid waste according to plan. (author)

  1. Operating document on Management Division Waste Management Section in Tokai Works in the 2002 fiscal year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Kentarou; Isozaki, Kouei; Akutu, Shigeru; Nakanishi, Masahiro; Ozone, Takashi; Terunuma, Tomomi

    2004-05-01

    This document is announced about the task of Waste Management Section of Waste Management Division in 2004. Mainly, our tasks are fractionating, incinerating and storing low active solid waste and storing high active solid waste. In addition, we are performing required correspondence about management program of low level waste. We had treated and stored waste safely according to our plan. As a result, we have achieved following outcomes. (1) We incinerated the combustible low active solid waste that is generated by the operation of Tokai Reprocessing Plant and the recovery operation of incident at Low Active Liquid Waste Asphalt Solidification Facility. Waste of this recovery operation is stored in the 2nd Low Active Liquid Waste Asphalt Solidification Storage Facility. We incinerated 66.7 ton of wastes. (2) We stored low active solid waste 858 drums that accommodate 200L. According to the time of Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility completion, we will be able to avoid full of storage. (3) We stored high active solid waste of 154 drums that accommodate 200 L. For the time being, there is no problem as regards the administration of storage facility. (4) We carried out the management program of low level solid waste according to plan. (author)

  2. Evaluation of fourier transform profilometry performance: quantitative waste volume determination under simulated Hanford waste tank conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Ping-Rey; Leone, Teresa; Long, Zhiling; Mott, Melissa A.; Perry Norton, O.; Okhuysen, Walter P.; Monts, David L.

    2007-01-01

    The Hanford Site is currently in the process of an extensive effort to empty and close its radioactive single-shell and double-shell waste storage tanks. Before this can be accomplished, it is necessary to know how much residual material is left in a given waste tank and the chemical makeup of the residue. The objective of Mississippi State University's Institute for Clean Energy Technology's (ICET) efforts is to develop, fabricate, and deploy inspection tools for the Hanford waste tanks that will (1) be remotely operable; (2) provide quantitative information on the amount of wastes remaining; and (3) provide information on the spatial distribution of chemical and radioactive species of interest. A collaborative arrangement has been established with the Hanford Site to develop probe-based inspection systems for deployment in the waste tanks. ICET is currently developing an in-tank inspection system based on Fourier Transform Profilometry, FTP. FTP is a non-contact, 3-D shape measurement technique. By projecting a fringe pattern onto a target surface and observing its deformation due to surface irregularities from a different view angle, FTP is capable of determining the height (depth) distribution (and hence volume distribution) of the target surface, thus reproducing the profile of the target accurately under a wide variety of conditions. Hence FTP has the potential to be utilized for quantitative determination of residual wastes within Hanford waste tanks. We have completed a preliminary performance evaluation of FTP in order to document the accuracy, precision, and operator dependence (minimal) of FTP under conditions similar to those that can be expected to pertain within Hanford waste tanks. Based on a Hanford C-200 series tank with camera access through a riser with significant offset relative to the centerline, we devised a testing methodology that encompassed a range of obstacles likely to be encountered 'in tank'. These test objects were inspected by use

  3. Technology transfer of operator-in-the-loop simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yae, K. H.; Lin, H. C.; Lin, T. C.; Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    The technology developed for operator-in-the-loop simulation in space teleoperation has been applied to Caterpillar's backhoe, wheel loader, and off-highway truck. On an SGI workstation, the simulation integrates computer modeling of kinematics and dynamics, real-time computational and visualization, and an interface with the operator through the operator's console. The console is interfaced with the workstation through an IBM-PC in which the operator's commands were digitized and sent through an RS-232 serial port. The simulation gave visual feedback adequate for the operator in the loop, with the camera's field of vision projected on a large screen in multiple view windows. The view control can emulate either stationary or moving cameras. This simulator created an innovative engineering design environment by integrating computer software and hardware with the human operator's interactions. The backhoe simulation has been adopted by Caterpillar in building a virtual reality tool for backhoe design.

  4. Durability of cemented waste in repository and under simulated conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragolici, F.; Nicu, M.; Lungu, L.; Turcanu, C.; Rotarescu, Gh.

    2000-01-01

    The Romanian Radioactive Waste National Repository for low level and intermediate level radioactive waste was built in Baita - Bihor county, in an extinct uranium exploitation. The site is at 840 m above sea level and the host rock is crystalline with a low porosity, a good chemical homogeneity and impermeability, keeping these qualities over a considerable horizontal and vertical spans. To obtain the experimental data necessary for the waste form and package characterization together with the back-filling material behaviour in the repository environment, a medium term research programme (1996 - 2010) was implemented. The purpose of this experimental programme is to obtain a part of the data base necessary for the approach of medium and long term assessment of the safety and performance of Baita - Bihor Repository. The programme will provide: a deeper knowledge of the chemical species and reaction mechanisms, the structure, properties and performances of the final products. For safety reasons the behaviour of waste package, which is a main barrier, must be properly known in terms of long term durability in real repository conditions. Characterization of the behaviour includes many interactions between the waste package itself and the surrounding near field conditions such as mineralogy, hydrogeology and groundwater chemistry. To obtain a more deeper knowledge of the species and physical-chemical reactions participating in the matrix formation, as well as their future behaviour during the disposal period, a thorough XRD study started in 1998. For Romanian Radioactive Waste National Repository (DNDR) Baita - Bihor the following steps are planned for the conditioned waste matrix characterization in simulated and real conditions: - preparation and characterization of normal reference matrices based on different cement formulations; - preparation of reference simulated sludge cemented matrices containing iron hydroxide and iron phosphate; - selection of real and

  5. Simulated HLLW compositions for cold test of waste management development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banba, Tsunetaka; Kimura, Hideo; Kamizono, Hiroshi; Tashiro, Shingo

    1982-07-01

    Three grades of simulated high-level liquid waste (HLLW)-JW-A, JW-B, and JW-C - were proposed to be used respectively according to stages of various cold tests for safety assessment of HLW management. The composition of HLLW was estimated taking into account the spectrum of fission products and actinides, waste volume, corrosion products, and chemical additives. One of conditions, the spectrum of fission products and actinides of LWR spent fuels, was calculated by DCHAIN-code. Fuel burn-up of 28,000 MWD/tUO 2 and 33,000 MWD/tUO 2 were adopted as normal and maximum values of Japanese LWR power plants. The other conditions were estimated using the data obtained at Marcoule plant in France. (author)

  6. Compatibility of packaging components with simulant mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of hazardous and radioactive materials packaging is to enable these materials to be transported without posing a threat to the health or property of the general public. To achieve this aim, regulations in the US have been written establishing general design requirements for such packagings. While no regulations have been written specifically for mixed waste packaging, regulations for the constituents of mixed wastes, i.e., hazardous and radioactive substances, have been codified by the US Department of Transportation (US DOT, 49 CFR 173) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC, 10 CFR 71). Based on these national requirements, a Chemical Compatibility Testing Program was developed in the Transportation Systems Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The program provides a basis to assure any regulatory body that the issue of packaging material compatibility towards hazardous and radioactive materials has been addressed. In this paper, the authors present the results of the second phase of this testing program. The first phase screened five liner materials and six seal materials towards four simulant mixed wastes. This phase involved the comprehensive testing of five candidate liner materials to an aqueous Hanford Tank simulant mixed waste. The comprehensive testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials a matrix of four gamma radiation doses (∼ 1, 3, 6, and 40 kGy), three temperatures (18, 50, and 60 C), and four exposure times (7, 14, 28, and 180 days). Following their exposure to these combinations of conditions, the materials were evaluated by measuring five material properties. These properties were specific gravity, dimensional changes, hardness, stress cracking, and mechanical properties

  7. The management of radioactive wastes arising from reprocessing operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsden, A.D.

    1980-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the following headings: objectives of waste management; steps in waste management (treatment prior to storage or immobilisation; interim storage; immobilisation; storage; transport; disposal); industry requirements; examples of waste management systems; what industry needs (engineering process evaluations, development and design in specified areas, to enable implementation of an optimised waste management system). (U.K.)

  8. Airline Operations Center Simulation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Airspace Systems Program (ASP) uses a large suite of models, simulations, and laboratories to develop and assess new ATM concepts and technologies. Most of...

  9. The EPR operators are trained on simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maincent, G.

    2009-01-01

    Three years before the EPR reactor of Flamanville (Normandie, France) is generating its very first kilowatt hours, Electricite de France has started to train its teams on a simulator which reproduces the man-machine interface of the future nuclear power plant. The simulator used is an evolutive tool specific to the Flamanville reactor and capable to test about 20 different accidental situations. (J.S.)

  10. Solid Waste from the Operation and Decommissioning of Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Marilyn Ann [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); D' Arcy, Daniel [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lapsa, Melissa Voss [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sharma, Isha [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Li, Yufei [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2017-01-05

    This baseline report examines the solid waste generated by the U.S. electric power industry, including both waste streams resulting from electricity generation and wastes resulting from the decommissioning of power plants. Coal and nuclear plants produce large volumes of waste during electricity generation, and this report describes the policies and procedures for handling these materials. Natural gas and oil-fired power plants face similar waste challenges. Renewables considered in this baseline report include hydropower, wind and solar.

  11. A One System Integrated Approach to Simulant Selection for Hanford High Level Waste Mixing and Sampling Tests - 13342

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thien, Mike G.; Barnes, Steve M.

    2013-01-01

    The Hanford Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) contractor are both engaged in demonstrating mixing, sampling, and transfer system capabilities using simulated Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) formulations. This represents one of the largest remaining technical issues with the high-level waste treatment mission at Hanford. Previous testing has focused on very specific TOC or WTP test objectives and consequently the simulants were narrowly focused on those test needs. A key attribute in the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2010-2 is to ensure testing is performed with a simulant that represents the broad spectrum of Hanford waste. The One System Integrated Project Team is a new joint TOC and WTP organization intended to ensure technical integration of specific TOC and WTP systems and testing. A new approach to simulant definition has been mutually developed that will meet both TOC and WTP test objectives for the delivery and receipt of HLW. The process used to identify critical simulant characteristics, incorporate lessons learned from previous testing, and identify specific simulant targets that ensure TOC and WTP testing addresses the broad spectrum of Hanford waste characteristics that are important to mixing, sampling, and transfer performance are described. (authors)

  12. A One System Integrated Approach to Simulant Selection for Hanford High Level Waste Mixing and Sampling Tests - 13342

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thien, Mike G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, P.O Box 850, Richland WA, 99352 (United States); Barnes, Steve M. [Waste Treatment Plant, 2435 Stevens Center Place, Richland WA 99354 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Hanford Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) contractor are both engaged in demonstrating mixing, sampling, and transfer system capabilities using simulated Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) formulations. This represents one of the largest remaining technical issues with the high-level waste treatment mission at Hanford. Previous testing has focused on very specific TOC or WTP test objectives and consequently the simulants were narrowly focused on those test needs. A key attribute in the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2010-2 is to ensure testing is performed with a simulant that represents the broad spectrum of Hanford waste. The One System Integrated Project Team is a new joint TOC and WTP organization intended to ensure technical integration of specific TOC and WTP systems and testing. A new approach to simulant definition has been mutually developed that will meet both TOC and WTP test objectives for the delivery and receipt of HLW. The process used to identify critical simulant characteristics, incorporate lessons learned from previous testing, and identify specific simulant targets that ensure TOC and WTP testing addresses the broad spectrum of Hanford waste characteristics that are important to mixing, sampling, and transfer performance are described. (authors)

  13. A One System Integrated Approach to Simulant Selection for Hanford High Level Waste Mixing and Sampling Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thien, Mike G.; Barnes, Steve M.

    2013-01-01

    The Hanford Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) contractor are both engaged in demonstrating mixing, sampling, and transfer system capabilities using simulated Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) formulations. This represents one of the largest remaining technical issues with the high-level waste treatment mission at Hanford. Previous testing has focused on very specific TOC or WTP test objectives and consequently the simulants were narrowly focused on those test needs. A key attribute in the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2010-2 is to ensure testing is performed with a simulant that represents the broad spectrum of Hanford waste. The One System Integrated Project Team is a new joint TOC and WTP organization intended to ensure technical integration of specific TOC and WTP systems and testing. A new approach to simulant definition has been mutually developed that will meet both TOC and WTP test objectives for the delivery and receipt of HLW. The process used to identify critical simulant characteristics, incorporate lessons learned from previous testing, and identify specific simulant targets that ensure TOC and WTP testing addresses the broad spectrum of Hanford waste characteristics that are important to mixing, sampling, and transfer performance are described

  14. Stream-simulation experiments for waste-repository investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    The potential for radionuclide migration by groundwater flow from a breached-water repository depends on the leaching process and on chemical changes that might occur as the radionuclide moves away from the repository. Therefore, migration involves the interactions of leached species with (1) the waste and canister, (2) the engineered barrier, and (3) the geologic materials surrounding the repository. Rather than attempt to synthesize each species and study it individually, another approach is to integrate all species and interactions using stream-simulation experiments. Interactions identified in these studies can then be investigated in detail in simpler experiments

  15. Management of radioactive wastes from the operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawickhorst, W.

    1997-01-01

    A prerequisite for the acceptance of the nuclear energy system is the effective management of the rad-wastes. Among the wastes to be considered, there are the wastes from the operation and decommissioning of nuclear power plants, as well as those from the nuclear fuel cycle. For the management of operating wastes, processes and facilities optimized in the course of several decades, are available, with which the raw solid and liquid wastes can be reduced in volume and turned into products which are physically and chemically stable and thus suitable for final disposal. The management of spent fuel can be done either by direct final disposal or reprocessing. The required interim storage facilities are ready for operation. The methods and a facility for packaging spent fuel for direct final disposal are in an advanced stage of development and construction. If fuel assemblies are to be reprocessed abroad, the wastes generated from the process must be taken back. Decommissioning wastes have technical properties which correspond essentially to the various groups of operating wastes and can thus be processed with similar methods; however since large quantities of them are generated in relatively short times, they present particular logistic problems. All waste types end up in final disposal sites to be built under the responsibility of the federal government. A final disposal site for low level wastes is in operation. In addition, two final disposal projects for accommodating higher level wastes including spent fuel for direct disposal and vitrified wastes from reprocessing, are being pursued. (orig.)

  16. Improving operator training and performance through simulator observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the methods and results of INPO observations of simulator training for licensed operators. It discusses the history of the observation program to the present. Effective methods for conducting and documenting simulator observations are discussed. The methods used to analyze the observations is also discussed. The major conclusion of the analysis is that opportunities exist for improvement in the use of emergency operating procedures. Teamwork, communication, and simulator instructor skills are also areas where improvement could be made

  17. An adaptive simulation model for analysis of nuclear material shipping operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerigter, S.T.; Sena, D.J.; Fasel, J.H.

    1998-01-01

    Los Alamos has developed an advanced simulation environment designed specifically for nuclear materials operations. This process-level simulation package, the Process Modeling System (ProMoS), is based on high-fidelity material balance criteria and contains intrinsic mechanisms for waste and recycle flows, contaminant estimation and tracking, and material-constrained operations. Recent development efforts have focused on coupling complex personnel interactions, personnel exposure calculations, and stochastic process-personnel performance criteria to the material-balance simulation. This combination of capabilities allows for more realistic simulation of nuclear material handling operations where complex personnel interactions are required. They have used ProMoS to assess fissile material shipping performance characteristics at the Los Alamos National Laboratory plutonium facility (TA-55). Nuclear material shipping operations are ubiquitous in the DOE complex and require the largest suite of varied personnel interacting in a well-timed manner to accomplish the task. They have developed a baseline simulation of the present operations and have estimated the operational impacts and requirement of the pit production mission at TA-55 as a result of the SSM-PEIS. Potential bottlenecks have been explored and mechanisms for increasing operational efficiency are identified

  18. Operation technology of the ventilation system of the radioactive waste treatment facility(II) - Design and operation note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K. M.; Lee, B. C.; Bae, S. M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-12-01

    As the radioactive waste treatment work, such as compaction and/or solidification of wastes, are done directly by the workers in the Radioactive Waste Treatment Facility, the reasonable design and operation of the ventilation system is essential. In this report, the design criteria and specification of the ventilation equipment, system operation method are described for the effective design and operation of ventilation system in the radioactive waste treatment facility. And the anti-vibration work which was done in the Radioactive Waste Treatment Facility in KAERI to reduce the effect of vibration due to the continuous operation of big rotational equipment, the intake fans and the exhaust fans, are described in the report. 11 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs. (Author)

  19. Separation of technetium from nuclear waste stream simulants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, S.H.

    1995-01-01

    The author studied liquid anion exchangers, such as Aliquat-336 nitrate, various pyridinium nitrates, and related salts, so that they may be applied toward a specific process for extracting (partitioning) and recovering 99 TcO 4 - from nuclear waste streams. Many of the waste streams are caustic and contain a variety of other ions. For this reason, the author studied waste stream simulants that are caustic and contain appropriate concentrations of selected, relevant ions. Methods of measuring the performance of the exchangers and extractant systems included contact experiments. Batch contact experiments were used to determine the forward and reverse extraction parameters as a function of temperature, contact time, phase ratio, concentration, solvent (diluent), and other physical properties. They were also used for stability and competition studies. Specifically, the author investigated the solvent extraction behavior of salts of perrhenate (ReO 4 - ), a stable (non-radioactive) chemical surrogate for 99 TcO 4 - . Results are discussed for alternate organic solvents; metalloporphyrins, ferrocenes, and N-cetyl pyridium nitrate as alternate extractant salts; electroactive polymers; and recovery of ReO 4 - and TcO 4 -

  20. Separation of technetium from nuclear waste stream simulants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, S.H. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-09-11

    The author studied liquid anion exchangers, such as Aliquat-336 nitrate, various pyridinium nitrates, and related salts, so that they may be applied toward a specific process for extracting (partitioning) and recovering {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} from nuclear waste streams. Many of the waste streams are caustic and contain a variety of other ions. For this reason, the author studied waste stream simulants that are caustic and contain appropriate concentrations of selected, relevant ions. Methods of measuring the performance of the exchangers and extractant systems included contact experiments. Batch contact experiments were used to determine the forward and reverse extraction parameters as a function of temperature, contact time, phase ratio, concentration, solvent (diluent), and other physical properties. They were also used for stability and competition studies. Specifically, the author investigated the solvent extraction behavior of salts of perrhenate (ReO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}), a stable (non-radioactive) chemical surrogate for {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}. Results are discussed for alternate organic solvents; metalloporphyrins, ferrocenes, and N-cetyl pyridium nitrate as alternate extractant salts; electroactive polymers; and recovery of ReO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} and TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}.

  1. Sampling and analysis plan for ORNL filter press cake waste from the Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartling, M.H.; Bayne, C.K.; Cunningham, G.R.

    1994-09-01

    This document defines the sampling and analytical procedures needed for the initial characterization of the filter press cake waste from the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It is anticipated that revisions to this document will occur as operating experience and sample results suggest appropriate changes be made. Application of this document will be controlled through the ORNL Waste Management and Remedial Action Division. The sampling strategy is designed to ensure that the samples collected present an accurate representation of the waste process stream. Using process knowledge and preliminary radiological activity screens, the filter press cake waste is known to contain radionuclides. Chemical characterization under the premise of this sampling and analysis plan will provide information regarding possible treatments and ultimately, disposal of filter press cake waste at an offsite location. The sampling strategy and analyses requested are based on the K-25 waste acceptance criteria and the Nevada Test Site Defense Waste Acceptance Criteria, Certification, and Transfer Requirements [2, NVO-325, Rev. 1]. The sampling strategy will demonstrate that for the filter press cake waste there is (1) an absence of RCRA and PCBs wastes, (2) an absence of transuranic (TRU) wastes, and (3) a quantifiable amount of radionuclide activity

  2. Study of physical properties, gas generation and gas retention in simulated Hanford waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Scheele, R.D.

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the chemical and physical processes responsible for the generation and retention of gases within high-level waste from Tank 101-SY on the Hanford Site. This research, conducted using simulated waste on a laboratory scale, supports the development of mitigation/remediation strategies for Tank 101-SY. Simulated waste formulations are based on actual waste compositions. Selected physical properties of the simulated waste are compared to properties of actual Tank 101-SY waste samples. Laboratory studies using aged simulated waste show that significant gas generation occurs thermally at current tank temperatures (∼60 degrees C). Gas compositions include the same gases produced in actual tank waste, primarily N 2 , N 2 O, and H 2 . Gas stoichiometries have been shown to be greatly influenced by several organic and inorganic constituents within the simulated waste. Retention of gases in the simulated waste is in the form of bubble attachment to solid particles. This attachment phenomenon is related to the presence of organic constituents (HEDTA, EDTA, and citrate) of the simulated waste. A mechanism is discussed that relates the gas bubble/particle interactions to the partially hydrophobic surface produced on the solids by the organic constituents

  3. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report, CY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, M.A.; Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1993-03-01

    A total of 6.05 x 10{sup 7} gal of liquid waste was decontaminated by the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) ion exchange system during CY 1992. This averaged to 115 gpm throughout the year. When necessary, a wastewater sidestream of 50--80 gpm was treated through the use of a natural zeolite treatment system. An additional 8.00 x 10{sup 6} gal (average of 15 gpm throughout the year) were treated by the zeolite system. Therefore, the average total flow treated at the PWTP for CY 1992 was 130 gpm. In mid-June, the zeolite system was repiped to allow it the capability to treat the ion exchange system`s discharge due to rising Cs problems in the wastewater. While being used to treat the ion exchange system`s discharge, it cannot treat a sidestream of wastewater. During the year, the regeneration of the cation exchange resins resulted in the generation of 7.83 x 10{sup 3} gal of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) concentrate and 1.15 x 10{sup 4} gal of LLLW evaporator feed. The head-end softening process (precipitation/clarification) generated 604 drums (4.40 x 10{sup 3} ft{sup 3}) of solid low-level waste sludge. The zeolite treatment system generated approximately 8.40 x 10{sup 2} ft{sup 3} of spent zeolite resin, which was turned over to the Solid Waste Operations Department for disposal. See Table 1 for a monthly summary of activities at the PWTP. Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4 show a comparison of operations at the PWTP in 1992 with previous years. Figure 5 shows a comparison of annual rainfall at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1987. A total of 1.55 x 10{sup 8} gal of liquid waste (average of 294 gpm throughout the year) was treated at the Nonradiological Wastewater Treatment Plant (NRWTP). Of this amount, 1.40 x 10{sup 7} gal were treated by the precipitation/clarification process for removal of heavy metals. Twenty-five boxes (1.60 x 10{sup 3} ft{sup 3}) of solid sludge generated by the precipitation/clarification process were removed from the filter press room.

  4. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report, CY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, M.A.; Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1993-03-01

    A total of 6.05 x 10[sup 7] gal of liquid waste was decontaminated by the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) ion exchange system during CY 1992. This averaged to 115 gpm throughout the year. When necessary, a wastewater sidestream of 50--80 gpm was treated through the use of a natural zeolite treatment system. An additional 8.00 x 10[sup 6] gal (average of 15 gpm throughout the year) were treated by the zeolite system. Therefore, the average total flow treated at the PWTP for CY 1992 was 130 gpm. In mid-June, the zeolite system was repiped to allow it the capability to treat the ion exchange system's discharge due to rising Cs problems in the wastewater. While being used to treat the ion exchange system's discharge, it cannot treat a sidestream of wastewater. During the year, the regeneration of the cation exchange resins resulted in the generation of 7.83 x 10[sup 3] gal of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) concentrate and 1.15 x 10[sup 4] gal of LLLW evaporator feed. The head-end softening process (precipitation/clarification) generated 604 drums (4.40 x 10[sup 3] ft[sup 3]) of solid low-level waste sludge. The zeolite treatment system generated approximately 8.40 x 10[sup 2] ft[sup 3] of spent zeolite resin, which was turned over to the Solid Waste Operations Department for disposal. See Table 1 for a monthly summary of activities at the PWTP. Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4 show a comparison of operations at the PWTP in 1992 with previous years. Figure 5 shows a comparison of annual rainfall at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1987. A total of 1.55 x 10[sup 8] gal of liquid waste (average of 294 gpm throughout the year) was treated at the Nonradiological Wastewater Treatment Plant (NRWTP). Of this amount, 1.40 x 10[sup 7] gal were treated by the precipitation/clarification process for removal of heavy metals. Twenty-five boxes (1.60 x 10[sup 3] ft[sup 3]) of solid sludge generated by the precipitation/clarification process were removed from the filter

  5. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report, CY 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, M.A.; Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1993-03-01

    A total of 6.05 x 10 7 gal of liquid waste was decontaminated by the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) ion exchange system during CY 1992. This averaged to 115 gpm throughout the year. When necessary, a wastewater sidestream of 50--80 gpm was treated through the use of a natural zeolite treatment system. An additional 8.00 x 10 6 gal (average of 15 gpm throughout the year) were treated by the zeolite system. Therefore, the average total flow treated at the PWTP for CY 1992 was 130 gpm. In mid-June, the zeolite system was repiped to allow it the capability to treat the ion exchange system's discharge due to rising Cs problems in the wastewater. While being used to treat the ion exchange system's discharge, it cannot treat a sidestream of wastewater. During the year, the regeneration of the cation exchange resins resulted in the generation of 7.83 x 10 3 gal of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) concentrate and 1.15 x 10 4 gal of LLLW evaporator feed. The head-end softening process (precipitation/clarification) generated 604 drums (4.40 x 10 3 ft 3 ) of solid low-level waste sludge. The zeolite treatment system generated approximately 8.40 x 10 2 ft 3 of spent zeolite resin, which was turned over to the Solid Waste Operations Department for disposal. See Table 1 for a monthly summary of activities at the PWTP. Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4 show a comparison of operations at the PWTP in 1992 with previous years. Figure 5 shows a comparison of annual rainfall at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1987. A total of 1.55 x 10 8 gal of liquid waste (average of 294 gpm throughout the year) was treated at the Nonradiological Wastewater Treatment Plant (NRWTP). Of this amount, 1.40 x 10 7 gal were treated by the precipitation/clarification process for removal of heavy metals. Twenty-five boxes (1.60 x 10 3 ft 3 ) of solid sludge generated by the precipitation/clarification process were removed from the filter press room

  6. Training manual for process operation and management of radioactive waste treatment facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shon, J. S.; Kim, K. J.; Ahn, S. J. [and others

    2004-12-01

    Radioactive Waste Treatment Facility (RWTF) has been operating for safe and effective treatment of radioactive wastes generated in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). In RWTF, there are evaporation, bituminization and solar evaporation processes for liquid waste, solid waste treatment process and laundry process. As other radioactive waste treatment facilities in foreign countries, the emergency situation such as fire and overflow of liquid waste can be taken place during the operation and result in the spread of contamination of radioactivity. So, easy and definite operating procedure is necessary for the safe operation of the facility. This manual can be available as easy and concise training materials for new employees and workers dispatched from service agency. Especially, in case of emergency urgently occurred during operation, everyone working in the facility can quickly stop the facility following this procedure.

  7. Training manual for process operation and management of radioactive waste treatment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shon, J. S.; Kim, K. J.; Ahn, S. J.

    2004-12-01

    Radioactive Waste Treatment Facility (RWTF) has been operating for safe and effective treatment of radioactive wastes generated in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). In RWTF, there are evaporation, bituminization and solar evaporation processes for liquid waste, solid waste treatment process and laundry process. As other radioactive waste treatment facilities in foreign countries, the emergency situation such as fire and overflow of liquid waste can be taken place during the operation and result in the spread of contamination of radioactivity. So, easy and definite operating procedure is necessary for the safe operation of the facility. This manual can be available as easy and concise training materials for new employees and workers dispatched from service agency. Especially, in case of emergency urgently occurred during operation, everyone working in the facility can quickly stop the facility following this procedure

  8. 36 CFR 6.5 - Solid waste disposal sites in operation on September 1, 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (7 U.S.C. 136 et seq.); (vi) Sludge from a waste treatment plant... leased by the operator; and (iii) the solid waste disposal site lacks road, rail, or adequate water... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Solid waste disposal sites in...

  9. Fuzzy Simulation-Optimization Model for Waste Load Allocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motahhare Saadatpour

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper present simulation-optimization models for waste load allocation from multiple point sources which include uncertainty due to vagueness of the parameters and goals. This model employs fuzzy sets with appropriate membership functions to deal with uncertainties due to vagueness. The fuzzy waste load allocation model (FWLAM incorporate QUAL2E as a water quality simulation model and Genetic Algorithm (GA as an optimization tool to find the optimal combination of the fraction removal level to the dischargers and pollution control agency (PCA. Penalty functions are employed to control the violations in the system.  The results demonstrate that the goal of PCA to achieve the best water quality and the goal of the dischargers to use the full assimilative capacity of the river have not been satisfied completely and a compromise solution between these goals is provided. This fuzzy optimization model with genetic algorithm has been used for a hypothetical problem. Results demonstrate a very suitable convergence of proposed optimization algorithm to the global optima.

  10. Complexant Identification in Hanford Waste Simulant Sr/TRU Filtrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannochie, C.J.

    2003-01-01

    This project was designed to characterize the available multidentate ligand species and metal ion complexes of iron, strontium and manganese formed with the parent chelators, complexing agents and their fragment products. Complex identification was applied to AN-102 and AN-107 filtrate simulants for Hanford waste after an oxidation reaction with sodium permanganate to create a freshly precipitated manganese dioxide solid for adsorption of transuranic elements. Separation efficiency of different ligands was investigated based on the exchange capability of different ion exchange and ion exclusion analytical columns including Dionex IonPac AS-5A, AS-10, AS-11 and AS-6. The elution programs developed with different mobile phase concentrations were based on the change in the effective charge of the anionic species and therefore the retention on the stationary phase. In the present work, qualitative and quantitative assessments of multidentate ligands were investigated. Identification methods for the metal ion complexes responsible for solubilizing Fe, Mn and Sr were applied to aged and fresh simulant waste filtrates. Although concentration measurements of both fresh and 3-week aged filtrates showed that the degradation process occurs mainly due to the harsh chemical environment, it was found that the concentration of iron and manganese did not increase, within the error of the analytical measurements, after three weeks when compared with fresh filtrate

  11. Simulation of operator team behavior. Introduction of emotional function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Seiichi; Hasegawa, Naoko

    1997-01-01

    Operator's behavior may be influenced by the atmosphere in a control room. Therefore, it is important to consider operator's emotions especially when abnormal situations occur in a plant. SYBORG (Simulation System for the Behavior of an Operating Group) is a system for simulating the behavior of an operator team. Based on 1) Investigations of how operators feel the situations in a control room and 2) biological and psychological similarities between emotion and immunity, an emotional function was tried to be incorporated into SYBORG using immune algorithm. (author)

  12. Fundamental Science-Based Simulation of Nuclear Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devanathan, Ramaswami; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-10-04

    This report presents a hierarchical multiscale modeling scheme based on two-way information exchange. To account for all essential phenomena in waste forms over geological time scales, the models have to span length scales from nanometer to kilometer and time scales from picoseconds to millenia. A single model cannot cover this wide range and a multi-scale approach that integrates a number of different at-scale models is called for. The approach outlined here involves integration of quantum mechanical calculations, classical molecular dynamics simulations, kinetic Monte Carlo and phase field methods at the mesoscale, and continuum models. The ultimate aim is to provide science-based input in the form of constitutive equations to integrated codes. The atomistic component of this scheme is demonstrated in the promising waste form xenotime. Density functional theory calculations have yielded valuable information about defect formation energies. This data can be used to develop interatomic potentials for molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage. Potentials developed in the present work show a good match for the equilibrium lattice constants, elastic constants and thermal expansion of xenotime. In novel waste forms, such as xenotime, a considerable amount of data needed to validate the models is not available. Integration of multiscale modeling with experimental work is essential to generate missing data needed to validate the modeling scheme and the individual models. Density functional theory can also be used to fill knowledge gaps. Key challenges lie in the areas of uncertainty quantification, verification and validation, which must be performed at each level of the multiscale model and across scales. The approach used to exchange information between different levels must also be rigorously validated. The outlook for multiscale modeling of wasteforms is quite promising.

  13. Intermodal terminals simulation for operation management

    OpenAIRE

    Baldassarra, Alessandro; Impastato, Stefano; Ricci, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    A freight terminal is a key node in a transportation network and the transit time of containers through this terminal represents one of the most relevant bottlenecks in logistic chains. The system performance reduction and the corresponding increase of transit time are often due to the increase of the freight flow without a corresponding increase of stacking and handling capacity. For this purpose it was decided to approach the problem by a discrete event simulation model, in order to reprodu...

  14. Mathematical simulation for safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandstetter, A.; Raymond, J.R.; Benson, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical models are being developed as part of the Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP) for assessing the post-closure safety of nuclear waste storage in geologic formations. The objective of this program is to develop the methods and data necessary to determine potential events that might disrupt the integrity of a waste repository and provide pathways for radionuclides to reach the bioshpere, primarily through groundwater transport. Four categories of mathematical models are being developed to assist in the analysis of potential release scenarios and consequences: (1) release scenario analysis models; (2) groundwater flow models; (3) contaminant transport models; and (4) radiation dose models. The development of the release scenario models is in a preliminary stage; the last three categories of models are fully operational. The release scenario models determine the bounds of potential future hydrogeologic changes, including potentially disruptive events. The groundwater flow and contaminant transport models compute the flowpaths, travel times, and concentrations of radionuclides that might migrate from a repository in the event of a breach and potentially reach the biosphere. The dose models compute the radiation doses to future populations. Reference site analyses are in progress to test the models for application to different geologies, including salt domes, bedded salt, and basalt

  15. Results of two years' operation of the waste processing cell PROLIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecomte, M.; Madic, C.; Broudic, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    Solid wastes, contaminated by alpha, beta, gamma radioisotopes, are produced by spent fuel reprocessing and isotope production. The PROLIXE plant, prototype for leaching and encapsulation was put into operation in March 1988 for waste management with the following aims: development of decontamination by oxidative leaching of alpha wastes, to obtain less than 0.1 Ci/t for surface storage; recycling radioactive isotope recovered especially transuranium elements; define a versatile process for various solid radioactive waste for an industrial plant [fr

  16. Study on the construction and operation for management system of municipal domestic wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Wei; Wang Shuqiang; Chen Jingxin

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, the quantity of our country's municipal domestic wastes increase rapidly, but the waste disposal still has problems, such as the simple way of processing, wasting the resources, the serious environmental pollution and so on. By holding waste minimization as the center, the developed countries have formed perfect waste management system. Based on analyzing the status quo and problems of processing in our country, on the principle of benefit, scale,waste minimization, reclamation and hazard-free treatment, according to the recycling model of processing, the article has constructed our country's domestic wastes management system, proposed the measures of promoting the operation of system. It has realized the transformation of waste management system from terminal disposal to source reduction,achieved the goals, including domestic wastes categorizing and reclaiming, industrialization and non-pollution processing,and finally brought sustainable development for resources, environment, economy and society.

  17. Preparation and evaporation of Hanford Waste treatment plant direct feed low activity waste effluent management facility simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Howe, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-07

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate, LMOGC) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream during full WTP operations is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation, and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. However, during the Direct Feed LAW (DFLAW) scenario, planned disposition of this stream involves concentrating the condensate in a new evaporator at the Effluent Management Facility (EMF) and returning it to the LAW melter. The LMOGC stream will contain components, e.g. halides and sulfates, that are volatile at melter temperatures, have limited solubility in glass waste forms, and present a material corrosion concern. Because this stream will recycle within WTP, these components are expected to accumulate in the LMOGC stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Diverting the stream reduces the halides and sulfates in the glass and is a key objective of this program. In order to determine the disposition path, it is key to experimentally determine the fate of contaminants. To do this, testing is needed to account for the buffering chemistry of the components, determine the achievable evaporation end point, identify insoluble solids that form, determine the formation and distribution of key regulatoryimpacting constituents, and generate an aqueous stream that can be used in testing of the subsequent immobilization step. This overall program examines the potential treatment and immobilization of the LMOGC stream to enable alternative disposal. The objective of this task was to (1) prepare a simulant of the LAW Melter Off-gas Condensate expected during DFLAW operations, (2) demonstrate evaporation in order to predict the final composition of the effluents from the EMF

  18. SIMULATION OF AIR-CONDITIONNED OPERATING THEATRES

    OpenAIRE

    El Gharbi , N.; Benzaoui , A ,

    2006-01-01

    International audience; A hospital is a place where we find simultaneously people whose health state is weakened, or vulnerable, and pathogenic microorganisms able to worsen their health. The quality of the air in a hospital must be in conformity with precise criteria in such buildings in everyday usage, and in particular in the areas of the buildings where some risks of specific pollution exist such as in operating rooms. In this paper, we present a modelisation and three dimensional numeric...

  19. Programmatic Assessment of Radioactive Waste Management Nuclear Fuel And Waste Programs. Operational Planning and Development (Activity No. AR OS 10 05 K; ONL-WN06)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1980-06-30

    Gilbert/Commonwealth (G/C) has performed an assessment of the waste management operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The objective of this study was to review radioactive waste management as practiced at ORNL and to recommend improvements or alternatives for further study. The study involved: 1) an on-site survey of ORNL radioactive waste management operations; 2) a review of radioactive waste source data, records, and regulatory requirements; 3) an assessment of existing and planned treatment, storage, and control facilities; and 4) identification of alternatives for improving waste management operations. Information for this study was obtained from both personal interviews and written reports. The G/C suggestions for improving ORNL waste management operations are summarized. Regulatory requirements governing ORNL waste management operations are discussed. Descriptions and discussions of the radioactive liquid, solid, and gaseous waste systems are presented. The waste operations control complex is discussed.

  20. Nuclear waste repository simulation experiments, Asse Salt Mine, Federal Republic of Germany. Annual report, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothfuchs, T.; Luebker, D.; Coyle, A.; Kalia, H.

    1984-10-01

    This is the First Annual report (1983) which describes experiments simulating a nuclear waste respository at the 800-meter level of the Asse Salt Mine in the Federal Republic of Germany. The report describes the test equipment, the Asse Salt Mine, the pretest properties of the salt in the test gallery, and the mine proper. Also included are test data for the first six months of operations on brine migration rates, room closure rates, extensometer readings, stress measurements, and thermal mechanical behavior of the salt. The duration of the experiments will be two years, ending in December 1985. 3 references, 34 figures, 13 tables

  1. Pipeline operators training and certification using thermohydraulic simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Claudio V.; Plasencia C, Jose [Pontificia Universidade Catolica (PUC-Rio), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Nucleo de Simulacao Termohidraulica de Dutos (SIMDUT); Montalvao, Filipe; Costa, Luciano [TRANSPETRO - PETROBRAS Transporte S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The continuous pipeline operators training and certification of the TRANSPETRO's Pipeline National Operations Control Center (CNCO) is an essential task aiming the efficiency and safety of the oil and derivatives transport operations through the Brazilian pipeline network. For this objective, a hydraulic simulator is considered an excellent tool that allows the creation of different operational scenarios for training the pipeline hydraulic behavior as well as for testing the operator's responses to normal and abnormal real time operational conditions. The hydraulic simulator is developed based on a pipeline simulation software that supplies the hydraulic responses normally acquired from the pipeline remote units in the field. The pipeline simulation software has a communication interface system that sends and receives data to the SCADA supervisory system database. Using the SCADA graphical interface to create and to customize human machine interfaces (HMI) from which the operator/instructor has total control of the pipeline/system and instrumentation by sending commands. Therefore, it is possible to have realistic training outside of the real production systems, while acquiring experience during training hours with the operation of a real pipeline. A pilot Project was initiated at TRANSPETRO - CNCO targeting to evaluate the hydraulic simulators advantages in pipeline operators training and certification programs. The first part of the project was the development of three simulators for different pipelines. The excellent results permitted the project expansion for a total of twenty different pipelines, being implemented in training programs for pipelines presently operated by CNCO as well as for the new ones that are being migrated. The main objective of this paper is to present an overview of the implementation process and the development of a training environment through a pipe simulation environment using commercial software. This paper also presents

  2. Corrosion of a carbon steel in simulated liquid nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenz Gonzalez, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    This work is part of a collaboration agreement between CNEA (National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina) and USDOE (Department of Energy of the United States of America), entitled 'Tank Corrosion Chemistry Cooperation', to study the corrosion behavior of carbon steel A537 class 1 in different simulated non-radioactive wastes in order to establish the safety concentration limits of the tank waste chemistry at Hanford site (Richland-US). Liquid high level nuclear wastes are stored in tanks made of carbon steel A537 (ASTM nomenclature) that were designed for a service life of 20 to 50 years. A thickness reduction of some tank walls, due to corrosion processes, was detected at Hanford site, beyond the existing predicted values. Two year long-term immersion tests were started using non radioactive simulated liquid nuclear waste solutions at 40 C degrees. This work extends throughout the first year of immersion. The simulated solutions consist basically in combinations of the 10 most corrosion significant chemical components: 5 main components (NaNO 3 , NaCl, NaF, NaNO 2 and NaOH) at three concentration levels and 5 secondary components at two concentration levels. Measurements of the general corrosion rate with time were performed for carbon steel coupons, both immersed in the solutions and in the vapor phases, using weight loss and electrochemistry impedance spectroscopy techniques. Optic and scanning electron microscopy examination, analysis of U-bend samples and corrosion potential measurements, were also done. Localized corrosion susceptibility (pitting and crevice corrosion) was assessed in isolated short-term tests by means of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization curves. The effect of the simulated waste composition on the corrosion behavior of A537 steel was studied based on statistical analyses. The Surface Response Model could be successfully applied to the statistical analysis of the A537 steel corrosion in the studied solutions. General corrosion was not

  3. Factors affecting the leachability of caesium and strontium from cemented simulant evaporator wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.J.; Brown, D.J.

    1981-08-01

    Leach rates of stable cesium and strontium from a range of simulated evaporator waste/cement formulations have been determined. Important factors in plant operation are assessed for their effect on leach rates. Increasing the curing time and lowering the water/cement ratio has been shown to reduce leach rates by up to a factor of four. Incorporation of additives such as clays and supplementary cementatious materials can reduce leach rates by up to three orders magnitude, and coating the surface of the waste form with a neat cement grout can reduce the cesium leach rate by up to four orders of magnitude. The effects of permeability of the matrix and its cesium absorption capacity on the leach rates have been analysed qualitatively. (U.K.)

  4. Changes in the Optical Properties of Simulated Shuttle Waste Water Deposits- Urine Darkening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albyn, Keith; Edwards, David; Alred, John

    2004-01-01

    Manned spacecraft have historically dumped the crew generated waste waster overboard, into the environment in which the spacecraft operates, sometimes depositing the waste water on the external spacecraft surfaces. The change in optical properties of wastewater deposited on spacecraft external surfaces, from exposure to space environmental effects, is not well understood. This study used nonvolatile residue (NVR) from Human Urine to simulate wastewater deposits and documents the changes in the optical properties of the NVR deposits after exposure to ultra violet (UV) radiation. Twenty NVR samples of, 0-angstromes/sq cm to 1000-angstromes/sq cm, and one sample contaminated with 1 to 2-mg/sq cm were exposed to UV radiation over the course of approximately 6151 equivalent sun hours (ESH). Random changes in sample mass, NVR, solar absorbance, and infrared emission were observed during the study. Significant changes in the UV transmittance were observed for one sample contaminated at the mg/sq cm level.

  5. Changes in the Optical Properties of Simulated Shuttle Waste Water Deposits: Urine Darkening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albyn, Keith; Edwards, David; Alred, John

    2003-01-01

    Manned spacecraft have historically dumped the crew generated waste water overboard, into the environment in which the spacecraft operates, sometimes depositing the waste water on the external spacecraft surfaces. The change in optical properties of wastewater deposited on spacecraft external surfaces, from exposure to space environmental effects, is not well understood. This study used nonvolatile residue (NVR) from Human Urine to simulate wastewater deposits and documents the changes in the optical properties of the NVR deposits after exposure to ultra violet(UV)radiation. Twenty four NVR samples of, 0-angstromes/sq cm to 1000-angstromes/sq cm, and one sample contaminated with 1 to 2-mg/sq cm were exposed to UV radiation over the course of approximately 6151 equivalent sun hours (ESH). Random changes in sample mass, NVR, solar absorbance, and infrared emission were observed during the study. Significant changes in the UV transmittance were observed for one sample contaminated at the mg/sq cm level.

  6. Study on operational condition of electro-decontamination by computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amamoto, Ippei; Sato, Koji; Kawabe, Akihiro; Fujita, Reiko; Terai, Takayuki

    2005-01-01

    The molten-salt electro-decontamination method can be taken up as adecontamination method for contaminated metal systems generated in the reprocessing using the fluoride volatility method, etc. This method makes a small amount of secondary waste and is able to construct a small-size process in which a critical state is easily controlled. It can be further expected that an electrolytic current penetrates inside contaminated substances of complex shape. In this report, an appropriate operational condition was theoretically obtained by the simulation on the applicability of this method to decontamination of metal materials, and it was confirmed by a fundamental testing that the simulation result is reasonable. (M.H.)

  7. Operational improvement to the flue gas cleaning system in radioactive waste incineration facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Bowen; Li Xiaohai; Wang Peiyi

    2012-01-01

    After years of operation, some problems, such as corrosion and waste water treatment, have been found in the first domestic whole-scale radioactive waste incineration facility. According to the origin of the problems, the flue gas cleaning system has been optimized and improved in terms of technical process, material and structure. It improves the operational stability, extends the equipment life-time, and also reduces the amount of secondary waste. In addition, as major sources of problems, waste management, operational experiences and information exchange deserve more attention. (authors)

  8. Adapting Modeling & SImulation for Network Enabled Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Awareness in Aerospace Operations ( AGARD - CP -478; pp. 5/1-5/8), Neuilly Sur Seine, France: NATO- AGARD . 243 ChApter 8 ShAping uk defenCe poliCy...Chapter 3 73 Increasing the Maturity of Command to Deal with Complex, Information Age Environments • Players could concentrate on their own areas; they...The results are shown in figure 4.16, which shows the fit for the first four serials. The model still explains 73 % of the vari- ability, down from 82

  9. Occupational and Public Exposure During Normal Operation of Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    M. V. Vedernikova; I. A. Pron; M. N. Savkin; N. S. Cebakovskaya

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on occupational and public exposure during operation of disposal facilities receiving liquid and solid radioactive waste of various classes and provides a comparative analysis of the relevant doses: actual and calculated at the design stage. Occupational and public exposure study presented in this paper covers normal operations of a radioactive waste disposal facility receiving waste. Results: Analysis of individual and collective occupational doses was performed based on d...

  10. Analysis of capital and operating costs associated with high level waste solidification processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckman, R.A.; Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1978-03-01

    An analysis was performed to evaluate the sensitivity of annual operating costs and capital costs of waste solidification processes to various parameters defined by the requirements of a proposed Federal waste repository. Five process methods and waste forms examined were: salt cake, spray calcine, fluidized bed calcine, borosilicate glass, and supercalcine multibarrier. Differential cost estimates of the annual operating and maintenance costs and the capital costs for the five HLW solidification alternates were developed

  11. Safe Management of Waste Generated during Shale Gas Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukulska-Zając, Ewa; Król, Anna; Holewa-Rataj, Jadwiga

    2017-04-01

    Exploration and exploitation of hydrocarbon deposits, regardless of their type, are connected with the generation of waste, which may have various environmental effects. Such wastes may pose a serious risk to the surrounding environment and public health because they usually contain numerous potentially toxic chemicals. Waste associated with exploration and exploitation of unconventional hydrocarbon deposits is composed of a mixture of organic and inorganic materials, the qualitative and quantitative composition of which changes widely over time, depending on numerous factors. As a result the proper characteristic of this type of waste is very important. Information gained from detailed chemical analyses of drilling chemicals, drilling wastes, and flowback water can be used to manage shale gas-related wastes more appropriately, to develop treatment methods, to store the waste, and assess the potential environmental and health risk. The following paper will focus mainly on the results of research carried out on waste samples coming from the unconventional hydrogen exploration sites. Additionally, regulatory frameworks applicable to the management of wastes produced during this type of works will be discussed. The scope of research concerning physicochemical parameters for this type of wastes will also be presented. The presented results were obtained during M4ShaleGas project realization. The M4ShaleGas project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement no. 640715.

  12. Characterisation of radioactive waste at Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iordache, M.; Bujoreanu, L.; Popescu, I. V.

    2008-01-01

    During the operation of a nuclear plant significant quantities of radioactive waste results that have a very large diversity. At Cernavoda NPP the important waste categories are non-radioactive wastes and radioactive wastes, which are manipulated completely different from which other. For a CANDU type reactor, the production of radioactive wastes is due to contamination with the following types of radioactive substances: - fission products resulting from nuclear fuel burning; - activated products of materials which form part of the technological systems; - activated products of process fluids. Radioactive wastes can be in solid, liquid or gas form. At Cernavoda NPP the solid wastes represent about 70% of the waste volume which is produced during plant operation and as a consequence of maintenance and decontamination activities. The most important types of solid wastes that are obtained and then handled, processed (if required) and temporarily stored are: solid low level radioactive wastes (classified as compact and non-compact), solid medium radioactive wastes, spent resins, used filters and filter cartridges. The liquid radioactive waste class includes organic liquids (used oil, scintillator liquids and used solvents) and aqueous wastes resulting from process system operating, decontamination and maintenance operations. Radioactive gas wastes occur subsequent to the fission process inside the fuel elements as well as due to the process fluids neutron activation in the reactor systems. As result of the plant operation, iodine, noble gases, tritium and radioactive particles occur and are passed to the ventilation stack in a controlled manner so that an exceeding of the maximum permissible concentrations of radioactive material to the environment should not occur. (authors)

  13. Aviation Shipboard Operations Modeling and Simulation (ASOMS) Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose:It is the mission of the Aviation Shipboard Operations Modeling and Simulation (ASOMS) Laboratory to provide a means by which to virtually duplicate products...

  14. Simulation of worst-case operating conditions for integrated circuits operating in a total dose environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhuva, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Degradations in the circuit performance created by the radiation exposure of integrated circuits are so unique and abnormal that thorough simulation and testing of VLSI circuits is almost impossible, and new ways to estimate the operating performance in a radiation environment must be developed. The principal goal of this work was the development of simulation techniques for radiation effects on semiconductor devices. The mixed-mode simulation approach proved to be the most promising. The switch-level approach is used to identify the failure mechanisms and critical subcircuits responsible for operational failure along with worst-case operating conditions during and after irradiation. For precise simulations of critical subcircuits, SPICE is used. The identification of failure mechanisms enables the circuit designer to improve the circuit's performance and failure-exposure level. Identification of worst-case operating conditions during and after irradiation reduces the complexity of testing VLSI circuits for radiation environments. The results of test circuits for failure simulations using a conventional simulator and the new simulator showed significant time savings using the new simulator. The savings in simulation time proved to be circuit topology-dependent. However, for large circuits, the simulation time proved to be orders of magnitude smaller than simulation time for conventional simulators

  15. Effects of mixed waste simulants on transportation packaging plastic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of hazardous and radioactive materials packaging is to, enable these materials to be transported without posing a threat to the health or property of the general public. To achieve this aim, regulations have been written establishing general design requirements for such packagings. While no regulations have been written specifically for mixed waste packaging, regulations for the constituents of mixed wastes, i.e., hazardous and radioactive substances, have been codified. The design requirements for both hazardous and radioactive materials packaging specify packaging compatibility, i.e., that the materials of the packaging and any contents be chemically compatible with each other. Furthermore, Type A and Type B packaging design requirements stipulate that there be no significant chemical, galvanic, or other reaction between the materials and contents of the package. Based on these requirements, a Chemical Compatibility Testing Program was developed in the Transportation Systems Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The program, supported by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Transportation Management Division, EM-261 provides the means to assure any regulatory body that the issue of packaging material compatibility towards hazardous and radioactive materials has been addressed. In this paper, we describe the general elements of the testing program and the experimental results of the screening tests. The implications of the results of this testing are discussed in the general context of packaging development. Additionally, we present the results of the first phase of this experimental program. This phase involved the screening of five candidate liner and six seal materials against four simulant mixed wastes

  16. Synthetic vision systems: operational considerations simulation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Williams, Steven P.; Bailey, Randall E.; Glaab, Louis J.

    2007-04-01

    Synthetic vision is a computer-generated image of the external scene topography that is generated from aircraft attitude, high-precision navigation information, and data of the terrain, obstacles, cultural features, and other required flight information. A synthetic vision system (SVS) enhances this basic functionality with real-time integrity to ensure the validity of the databases, perform obstacle detection and independent navigation accuracy verification, and provide traffic surveillance. Over the last five years, NASA and its industry partners have developed and deployed SVS technologies for commercial, business, and general aviation aircraft which have been shown to provide significant improvements in terrain awareness and reductions in the potential for Controlled-Flight-Into-Terrain incidents / accidents compared to current generation cockpit technologies. It has been hypothesized that SVS displays can greatly improve the safety and operational flexibility of flight in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) to a level comparable to clear-day Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC), regardless of actual weather conditions or time of day. An experiment was conducted to evaluate SVS and SVS-related technologies as well as the influence of where the information is provided to the pilot (e.g., on a Head-Up or Head-Down Display) for consideration in defining landing minima based upon aircraft and airport equipage. The "operational considerations" evaluated under this effort included reduced visibility, decision altitudes, and airport equipage requirements, such as approach lighting systems, for SVS-equipped aircraft. Subjective results from the present study suggest that synthetic vision imagery on both head-up and head-down displays may offer benefits in situation awareness; workload; and approach and landing performance in the visibility levels, approach lighting systems, and decision altitudes tested.

  17. Synthetic Vision Systems - Operational Considerations Simulation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Williams, Steven P.; Bailey, Randall E.; Glaab, Louis J.

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic vision is a computer-generated image of the external scene topography that is generated from aircraft attitude, high-precision navigation information, and data of the terrain, obstacles, cultural features, and other required flight information. A synthetic vision system (SVS) enhances this basic functionality with real-time integrity to ensure the validity of the databases, perform obstacle detection and independent navigation accuracy verification, and provide traffic surveillance. Over the last five years, NASA and its industry partners have developed and deployed SVS technologies for commercial, business, and general aviation aircraft which have been shown to provide significant improvements in terrain awareness and reductions in the potential for Controlled-Flight-Into-Terrain incidents/accidents compared to current generation cockpit technologies. It has been hypothesized that SVS displays can greatly improve the safety and operational flexibility of flight in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) to a level comparable to clear-day Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC), regardless of actual weather conditions or time of day. An experiment was conducted to evaluate SVS and SVS-related technologies as well as the influence of where the information is provided to the pilot (e.g., on a Head-Up or Head-Down Display) for consideration in defining landing minima based upon aircraft and airport equipage. The "operational considerations" evaluated under this effort included reduced visibility, decision altitudes, and airport equipage requirements, such as approach lighting systems, for SVS-equipped aircraft. Subjective results from the present study suggest that synthetic vision imagery on both head-up and head-down displays may offer benefits in situation awareness; workload; and approach and landing performance in the visibility levels, approach lighting systems, and decision altitudes tested.

  18. Lumbar Spine Musculoskeletal Physiology and Biomechanics During Simulated Military Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0043 TITLE: Lumbar Spine Musculoskeletal Physiology and Biomechanics During Simulated Military Operations PRINCIPAL...31May2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Lumbar Spine Musculoskeletal Physiology and Biomechanics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER During Simulated Military Operations 5b... Biomechanics , Cincinnati, 2015. § Website(s) or other Internet site(s) § Nothing to report § Technologies or techniques § Nothing to report

  19. Date palm waste gasification in downdraft gasifier and simulation using ASPEN HYSYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassyouni, M.; Waheed ul Hasan, Syed; Abdel-Aziz, M.H.; Abdel-hamid, S.M.-S.; Naveed, Shahid; Hussain, Ahmed; Ani, Farid Nasir

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Simulation of date palm waste gasification using ASPEN HYSYS was studied. • A steady state simulation of downdraft gasifier has been developed. • The results were used to predict synthesis gas composition. • Simulation results and experimental results are in good agreement. - Abstract: The present research aims to study the simulation of date palm waste gasification using ASPEN HYSYS. A steady state simulation of downdraft gasifier firing date palm leaves has been developed. The model is able to predict syngas composition with sound accuracy and can be used to find optimal operating conditions of the gasifier. Biomass is defined as an unconventional hypothetical solid component in HYSYS. A set of six reactor models simulates various reaction zones of the downdraft gasifier in accordance with its hydrodynamics. Biomass decomposition into constituents in the pyrolysis zone is modeled with a conversion reactor. The combustion of char and volatiles in the combustion zone are modeled with equilibrium and Gibbs reactor models respectively. The gasification zone is modeled with a Gibbs and equilibrium reactor. The results of simulation are validated against experimental results of a parametric variability study on a lab scale gasifier. The proportion of synthesis gas increase as temperature increases (concentration, molar fraction, and partial pressure). CO 2 and CH 4 in the product gases were also found to decrease with increasing temperature. At 800 °C, the exit gas reaches a stable molar composition (H 2 = 56.27%, CO = 21.71%, CO 2 = 18.24%, CH 4 = 3.78%). Increasing steam to biomass ratio increases CO 2 and H 2 at the expense of CO, governed by shift reaction. Steam induction increases the methane contents, thereby improves the heating value of the product gas

  20. Date palm waste gasification in downdraft gasifier and simulation using ASPEN HYSYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassyouni, M. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Rabigh 21911 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Chemical Engineering, Higher Technological Institute, Tenth of Ramdan City (Egypt); Waheed ul Hasan, Syed [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Rabigh 21911 (Saudi Arabia); Abdel-Aziz, M.H., E-mail: helmy2002@gmail.com [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Rabigh 21911 (Saudi Arabia); Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Alexandria University, Alexandria (Egypt); Abdel-hamid, S. M.-S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Higher Technological Institute, Tenth of Ramdan City (Egypt); Naveed, Shahid [Punjab Institute of Contemporary Sciences, 5.5 KM Raiwind Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Hussain, Ahmed [Department of Nuclear Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Ani, Farid Nasir [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, UTM 81310 Johor Bahru (Malaysia)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Simulation of date palm waste gasification using ASPEN HYSYS was studied. • A steady state simulation of downdraft gasifier has been developed. • The results were used to predict synthesis gas composition. • Simulation results and experimental results are in good agreement. - Abstract: The present research aims to study the simulation of date palm waste gasification using ASPEN HYSYS. A steady state simulation of downdraft gasifier firing date palm leaves has been developed. The model is able to predict syngas composition with sound accuracy and can be used to find optimal operating conditions of the gasifier. Biomass is defined as an unconventional hypothetical solid component in HYSYS. A set of six reactor models simulates various reaction zones of the downdraft gasifier in accordance with its hydrodynamics. Biomass decomposition into constituents in the pyrolysis zone is modeled with a conversion reactor. The combustion of char and volatiles in the combustion zone are modeled with equilibrium and Gibbs reactor models respectively. The gasification zone is modeled with a Gibbs and equilibrium reactor. The results of simulation are validated against experimental results of a parametric variability study on a lab scale gasifier. The proportion of synthesis gas increase as temperature increases (concentration, molar fraction, and partial pressure). CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} in the product gases were also found to decrease with increasing temperature. At 800 °C, the exit gas reaches a stable molar composition (H{sub 2} = 56.27%, CO = 21.71%, CO{sub 2} = 18.24%, CH{sub 4} = 3.78%). Increasing steam to biomass ratio increases CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} at the expense of CO, governed by shift reaction. Steam induction increases the methane contents, thereby improves the heating value of the product gas.

  1. Development of a training simulator for offshore crane operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, S.J.

    2003-01-01

    The crane simulator, trade name KraneSIM-6000, underpins an integrated training package developed to provide crane operator exposure to simulated normal and dangerous conditions in a safe training environment. The prototype simulator is significantly more sophisticated than the system initially envisaged: a number of conceptual changes incorporated during its development ensured that the very latest in simulation computer technology was incorporate unique in that it offers the opportunity to practice the lifting and laying down of loads between a moving (floating) rig and moving supply vessels, together with the possibility of benchmarking crane operator competency. Concludes that there is great scope for expansion of the simulator facilities so far developed. In particular, it is recognised that training and competency testing of teams of personnel such as banksman and supply ship's master could be integrated into crane simulator training scenarios, and that this approach offers great potential for reducing the number of crane related accidents. (Author)

  2. Optimization of Operations Resources via Discrete Event Simulation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, B.; Morris, D.; White, N.; Unal, R.

    1996-01-01

    The resource levels required for operation and support of reusable launch vehicles are typically defined through discrete event simulation modeling. Minimizing these resources constitutes an optimization problem involving discrete variables and simulation. Conventional approaches to solve such optimization problems involving integer valued decision variables are the pattern search and statistical methods. However, in a simulation environment that is characterized by search spaces of unknown topology and stochastic measures, these optimization approaches often prove inadequate. In this paper, we have explored the applicability of genetic algorithms to the simulation domain. Genetic algorithms provide a robust search strategy that does not require continuity and differentiability of the problem domain. The genetic algorithm successfully minimized the operation and support activities for a space vehicle, through a discrete event simulation model. The practical issues associated with simulation optimization, such as stochastic variables and constraints, were also taken into consideration.

  3. Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.; Elliott, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs were established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste was performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property ,models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions.

  4. Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: Process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.

    1996-04-01

    A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs have been established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste is being performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions.

  5. Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.; Elliott, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs were established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste was performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property ,models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions

  6. Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: Process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.

    1996-04-01

    A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs have been established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste is being performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions

  7. Operation of low-level radioactive waste incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, E.C.; Drolet, T.S.; Stewart, W.B.; Campbell, A.V.

    1979-01-01

    Ontaro Hydro's radioactive waste incinerator designed to reduce the volume of low-level combustible wastes from nuclear generating station's was declared in-service in September 1977. Hiterto about 1500 m 3 of combustible waste have been processed in over 90 separate batches. The process has resulted in 40:1 reduction in the volume and 12.5:1 reduction in the weight of the Type 1 wastes. The ultimate volume reduction factor after storage is 23:1. Airborne emissions has been maintained at the order of 10 -3 to 10 -5 % of the Derived Emission Limits. Incineration of radioactive combustible wastes has been proven feasible, and will remain as one of the most important processes in Ontario Hydro's Radioactive Waste Management Program

  8. Modeling and Simulation for Mission Operations Work System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierhuis, Maarten; Clancey, William J.; Seah, Chin; Trimble, Jay P.; Sims, Michael H.

    2003-01-01

    Work System analysis and design is complex and non-deterministic. In this paper we describe Brahms, a multiagent modeling and simulation environment for designing complex interactions in human-machine systems. Brahms was originally conceived as a business process design tool that simulates work practices, including social systems of work. We describe our modeling and simulation method for mission operations work systems design, based on a research case study in which we used Brahms to design mission operations for a proposed discovery mission to the Moon. We then describe the results of an actual method application project-the Brahms Mars Exploration Rover. Space mission operations are similar to operations of traditional organizations; we show that the application of Brahms for space mission operations design is relevant and transferable to other types of business processes in organizations.

  9. Rapid immobilization of simulated radioactive soil waste by microwave sintering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Shu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Shunzhang; Yang, Huimin; Hou, Chenxi; Mao, Xueli; Chi, Fangting; Song, Mianxin; Lu, Xirui

    2017-09-05

    A rapid and efficient method is particularly necessary in the timely disposal of seriously radioactive contaminated soil. In this paper, a series of simulated radioactive soil waste containing different contents of neodymium oxide (3-25wt.%) has been successfully vitrified by microwave sintering at 1300°C for 30min. The microstructures, morphology, element distribution, density and chemical durability of as obtained vitrified forms have been analyzed. The results show that the amorphous structure, homogeneous element distribution, and regular density improvement are well kept, except slight cracks emerge on the magnified surface for the 25wt.% Nd 2 O 3 -containing sample. Moreover, all the vitrified forms exhibit excellent chemical durability, and the leaching rates of Nd are kept as ∼10 -4 -10 -6 g/(m 2 day) within 42days. This demonstrates a potential application of microwave sintering in radioactive contaminated soil disposal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Leaching characteristics of actinides from simulated reactor waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weed, H.C.; Coles, D.G.; Bradley, D.J.; Mensing, R.W.; Schweiger, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    Two methods for measuring the leach rates of simulated high level waste glass are compared. One is a modification of the standard IAEA method and the other is a one-pass method in which fresh leachant solution is pumped over the sample at a controlled flow rate and temperature. For times up to 3 days, there is close agreement between results from the two methods at 25.0 0 C. Leach rates from the one-pass method show a correlation with flow rate only on day 1 at 25.0 0 C, whereas they show a correlation with flow rate for all three days at 75.0 0 C. 237 Np rates at 75.0 0 C are greater than those at 25.0 0 C, but 239 Pu rates at 75.0 0 C are less than or equal to those at 25.0 0 C

  11. The Impact of a Simulation Game on Operations Management Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasin, Federico; Giroux, Helene

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a new simulation game and analyzes its impact on operations management education. The proposed simulation was empirically tested by comparing the number of mistakes during the first and second halves of the game. Data were gathered from 100 teams of four or five undergraduate students in business administration, taking their…

  12. Simulation Modeling of a Facility Layout in Operations Management Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Hulya Julie

    2006-01-01

    Teaching quantitative courses can be challenging. Similarly, layout modeling and lean production concepts can be difficult to grasp in an introductory OM (operations management) class. This article describes a simulation model developed in PROMODEL to facilitate the learning of layout modeling and lean manufacturing. Simulation allows for the…

  13. Concrete Plant Operations Optimization Using Combined Simulation and Genetic Algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Ming; Lu, Ming; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2004-01-01

    This work presents a new approach for concrete plant operations optimization by combining a ready mixed concrete (RMC) production simulation tool (called HKCONSIM) with a genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization procedure. A revamped HKCONSIM computer system can be used to automate the simulation

  14. Upgrade of the Hunterston B AGR operator training simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, J.; Nicol, D.; Hacking, D.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear power plant simulators provide a vital tool in the training of operational staff in the statutory procedures and operational requirements of the nuclear industry. Scottish Nuclear, and its predecessor the South of Scotland Electricity Board, recognised the value such facilities offered to safety and efficiency and commissioned the construction of the Hunterston Operator Training Simulator as early as 1980. The simulator is a full scope, total plant, and real time system, with a complete 'as plant' replication of the operator interface, together with extensive instructor and tutorial facilities. Its uses have extended beyond the operator training role into plant engineering post incident analysis, evolving to be an essential feature of the station as a whole. Operation of the simulator for the foreseeable life of the station was the main driving force behind the current simulator update project, and whilst the need to move to a new computing platform, avoiding impending obsolescence problems, was the prime reason, the retention of 17 years of software development was seen as a valuable legacy to preserve. This paper discusses the main criteria considered during the simulator upgrade programme, highlighting the main technical issues and risks involved. (author)

  15. Current waste-management practices and operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenhower, B.M.; Oakes, T.W.; Coobs, J.H.; Weeter, D.W.

    1982-09-01

    The need for efficient management of industrial chemical wastes, especially those considered hazardous or radioactive, is receiving increased attention in the United States. During the past five years, several federal laws have addressed the establishment of stronger programs for the control of hazardous and residual wastes. At a facility such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), an efficient waste management program is an absolute necessity to ensure protection of human health and compliance with regulatory requirements addressing the treatment and disposal of hazardous, nonhazardous, and radioactive wastes. This report highlights the major regulatory requirements under which the Laboratory must operate and their impact on ORNL facilities. Individual waste streams, estimates of quantities of waste, and current waste management operations are discussed.

  16. The Swedish concept for disposal of waste arising from the operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, J.

    1996-01-01

    The Swedish nuclear power programme consists of 12 reactors producing 50% of the electricity in Sweden. It is stated by law that a waste producer has to make sure a safe handling and disposal of his radioactive waste. SKB is performing necessary activities on behalf of the waste producers. A system is in operation today that will manage all the radioactive waste produced in the country. The system consists of a transportation system, a final repository for operational waste and an interim storage facility for spent fuel. What remains to be built is an encapsulation plant for the spent fuel and a deep repository for final disposal of spent fuel and other long lived waste. All costs for managing and disposal of radioactive waste is paid by the owners of the nuclear power utilities. (author) 9 figs

  17. Current waste-management practices and operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenhower, B.M.; Oakes, T.W.; Coobs, J.H.; Weeter, D.W.

    1982-09-01

    The need for efficient management of industrial chemical wastes, especially those considered hazardous or radioactive, is receiving increased attention in the United States. During the past five years, several federal laws have addressed the establishment of stronger programs for the control of hazardous and residual wastes. At a facility such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), an efficient waste management program is an absolute necessity to ensure protection of human health and compliance with regulatory requirements addressing the treatment and disposal of hazardous, nonhazardous, and radioactive wastes. This report highlights the major regulatory requirements under which the Laboratory must operate and their impact on ORNL facilities. Individual waste streams, estimates of quantities of waste, and current waste management operations are discussed

  18. Physical and Liquid Chemical Simulant Formulations for Transuranic Waste in Hanford Single-Shell Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassat, Scot D.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Russell, Renee L.; Caldwell, Dustin D.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.

    2003-01-01

    CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) is in the process of identifying and developing supplemental process technologies to accelerate the tank waste cleanup mission. A range of technologies is being evaluated to allow disposal of Hanford waste types, including transuranic (TRU) process wastes. Ten Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs) have been identified whose contents may meet the criteria for designation as TRU waste: the B-200 series (241-B-201, -B-202, -B 203, and B 204), the T-200 series (241-T-201, T 202, -T-203, and -T-204), and Tanks 241-T-110 and -T-111. CH2M HILL has requested vendor proposals to develop a system to transfer and package the contact-handled TRU (CH-TRU) waste retrieved from the SSTs for subsequent disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Current plans call for a modified ''dry'' retrieval process in which a liquid stream is used to help mobilize the waste for retrieval and transfer through lines and vessels. This retrieval approach requires that a significant portion of the liquid be removed from the mobilized waste sludge in a ''dewatering'' process such as centrifugation prior to transferring to waste packages in a form suitable for acceptance at WIPP. In support of CH2M HILL's effort to procure a TRU waste handling and packaging process, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed waste simulant formulations to be used in evaluating the vendor's system. For the SST CH-TRU wastes, the suite of simulants includes (1) nonradioactive chemical simulants of the liquid fraction of the waste, (2) physical simulants that reproduce the important dewatering properties of the waste, and (3) physical simulants that can be used to mimic important rheological properties of the waste at different points in the TRU waste handling and packaging process. To validate the simulant formulations, their measured properties were compared with the limited data for actual TRU waste samples. PNNL developed the final simulant formulations

  19. Modeling and simulation of ventilation devices in nuclear waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yumeng

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to develop models and algorithms to simulate efficiently the mass exchanges occurring at the interface between the nuclear waste deep geological repositories and the ventilation excavated galleries. To model such physical processes, one needs to account in the porous medium for the flow of the liquid and gas phases including the vaporization of the water component in the gas phase and the dissolution of the gaseous components in the liquid phase. In the free flow region, a single phase gas free flow is considered assuming that the liquid phase is instantaneously vaporized at the interface. This gas free flow has to be compositional to account for the change of the relative humidity in the free flow region which has a strong feedback on the liquid flow rate at the interface. In chapter 1, three formulations of the gas liquid compositional Darcy flow are studied. Their equivalence from the point of phase transitions is shown and they are compared numerically on 1D and 3D test cases including gas appearance and liquid disappearance. The 3D discretization is based on the Vertex Approximate Gradient (VAG) scheme and takes into account discontinuous capillary pressures. In chapter 2, a reduced model coupling a 3D gas liquid compositional Darcy flow in a fractured porous medium, and a 1D compositional free gas flow is introduced. The VAG discretization is extended to such models taking into account the coupling between the 3D matrix, the 2D network of fractures and the 1D gallery. Its convergence is studied both for the linear single phase stationary model and for a non linear model coupling the Richards equation to a single phase 1D flow or a 1D tracer equation in the gallery. Different test cases with Andra data sets are presented. In Chapter 3, a splitting algorithm to solve the coupling between the gas liquid compositional Darcy flow in the porous medium and the gas compositional free flow in the gallery is developed. The idea is to

  20. Concept of operator support system based on cognitive simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasou, Kunihide; Takano, Kenichi

    1999-01-01

    Hazardous technologies such chemical plants, nuclear power plants, etc. have introduced multi-layered defenses to prevent accidents. One of those defenses is experienced operators in control rooms. Once an abnormal condition occurs, they are the front line people to cope with it. Therefore, operators' quick recognition of the plant conditions and fast decision making on responses are quite important for trouble shooting. In order to help operators to deal with abnormalities in process plants, lots of efforts had been done to develop operator support systems since early 1980s (IAEA, 1993). However, the boom in developing operator support systems has slumped due to the limitations of knowledge engineering, artificial knowledge, etc (Yamamoto, 1998). The limitations had also biased the focus of the system development to abnormality detection, root cause diagnosis, etc (Hajek, Hashemi, Sharma and Chandrasekaran, 1986). Information or guidance about future plant behavior and strategies/tactics to deal with abnormal events are important and helpful for operators but researches and development of those systems made a belated start. Before developing these kinds of system, it is essential to understand how operators deal with abnormalities. CRIEPI has been conducting a project to develop a computer system that simulates behavior of operators dealing with abnormal operating conditions in a nuclear power plant. This project had two stages. In the first stage, the authors developed a prototype system that simulates behavior of a team facing abnormal events in a very simplified power plant (Sasou, Takano and Yoshimura, 1995). In the second stage, the authors applied the simulation technique developed in the first stage to construct a system to simulate a team's behavior in a nuclear power plant. This paper briefly summarizes the simulation system developed in the second stage, main mechanism for the simulation and the concept of an operator support system based on this

  1. Simulator experiments: effects of NPP operator experience on performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beare, A.N.; Gray, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments are being conducted on nuclear power plant (NPP) control room training simulators by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, its subcontractor, General Physics Corporation, and participating utilities. The experiments are sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Human Factors and Safeguards Branch, Division of Risk Analysis and Operations, and are a continuation of prior research using simulators, supported by field data collection, to provide a technical basis for NRC human factors regulatory issues concerned with the operational safety of nuclear power plants. During the FY83 research, a simulator experiment was conducted at the control room simulator for a GE boiling water reactor (BWR) NPP. The research subjects were licensed operators undergoing requalification training and shift technical advisors (STAs). This experiment was designed to investigate the effects of (a) senior reactor operator (SRO) experience, (b) operating crew augmentation with an STA and (c) practice, as a crew, upon crew and individual operator performance, in response to anticipated plant transients. The FY84 experiments are a partial replication and extension of the FY83 experiment, but with PWR operators and simulator. Methodology and results to date are reported

  2. Operating limit study for the proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.W.; Wang, J.C.; Kocher, D.C.

    1995-06-01

    A proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) would accept wastes generated during normal operations that are identified as non-radioactive. These wastes may include small amounts of radioactive material from incidental contamination during plant operations. A site-specific analysis of the new solid waste landfill is presented to determine a proposed operating limit that will allow for waste disposal operations to occur such that protection of public health and the environment from the presence of incidentally contaminated waste materials can be assured. Performance objectives for disposal were defined from existing regulatory guidance to establish reasonable dose limits for protection of public health and the environment. Waste concentration limits were determined consistent with these performance objectives for the protection of off-site individuals and inadvertent intruders who might be directly exposed to disposed wastes. Exposures of off-site individuals were estimated using a conservative, site-specific model of the groundwater transport of contamination from the wastes. Direct intrusion was analyzed using an agricultural homesteader scenario. The most limiting concentrations from direct intrusion or groundwater transport were used to establish the concentration limits for radionuclides likely to be present in PGDP wastes.

  3. Operating limit study for the proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.W.; Wang, J.C.; Kocher, D.C.

    1995-06-01

    A proposed solid waste landfill at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) would accept wastes generated during normal operations that are identified as non-radioactive. These wastes may include small amounts of radioactive material from incidental contamination during plant operations. A site-specific analysis of the new solid waste landfill is presented to determine a proposed operating limit that will allow for waste disposal operations to occur such that protection of public health and the environment from the presence of incidentally contaminated waste materials can be assured. Performance objectives for disposal were defined from existing regulatory guidance to establish reasonable dose limits for protection of public health and the environment. Waste concentration limits were determined consistent with these performance objectives for the protection of off-site individuals and inadvertent intruders who might be directly exposed to disposed wastes. Exposures of off-site individuals were estimated using a conservative, site-specific model of the groundwater transport of contamination from the wastes. Direct intrusion was analyzed using an agricultural homesteader scenario. The most limiting concentrations from direct intrusion or groundwater transport were used to establish the concentration limits for radionuclides likely to be present in PGDP wastes

  4. Potential pollution prevention and waste minimization for Department of Energy operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, J.; Ischay, C.; Kennicott, M.; Pemberton, S.; Tull, D.

    1995-10-01

    With the tightening of budgets and limited resources, it is important to ensure operations are carried out in a cost-effective and productive manner. Implementing an effective Pollution Prevention strategy can help to reduce the costs of waste management and prevent harmful releases to the environment. This document provides an estimate of the Department of Energy's waste reduction potential from the implementation of Pollution Prevention opportunities. A team of Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention professionals was formed to collect the data and make the estimates. The report includes a list of specific reduction opportunities for various waste generating operations and waste types. A generic set of recommendations to achieve these reduction opportunities is also provided as well as a general discussion of the approach and assumptions made for each waste generating operation

  5. The management of intermediate-level radioactive wastes arising from reprocessing operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsden, A.D.

    1984-01-01

    The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel results in the generation of radioactive wastes in the form of liquids, gases and solids. This paper outlines the principles and major elements of the waste management systems currently in use or under development for the category of waste known as intermediate-level wastes. To enable implementation of an optimized waste management system, engineering process evaluations, development and design in the following areas are required: The definition of cost effective options taking account of constraints which may arise from other operations in the overall system, e.g. from transport requirements or from criteria derived from environmental impact assessments of alternative disposal routes; Plant and equipment development to enable acceptable system and active plant operations on an industrial scale; Safety and reliability studies to ensure adequate protection of both the general public and plant operators during all stages of the waste management system including disposal

  6. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Title I operator dose calculations. Final report, LATA report No. 90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, P.S.; Rigdon, L.D.

    1980-02-01

    The radiation exposure dose was estimated for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) operating personnel who do the unloading and transporting of the transuranic contact-handled waste. Estimates of the radiation source terms for typical TRU contact-handled waste were based on known composition and properties of the waste. The operations sequence for waste movement and storage in the repository was based upon the WIPP Title I data package. Previous calculations had been based on Conceptual Design Report data. A time and motion sequence was developed for personnel performing the waste handling operations both above and below ground. Radiation exposure calculations were then performed in several fixed geometries and folded with the time and motion studies for individual workers in order to determine worker exposure on an annual basis

  7. Incinerator performance: effects of changes in waste input and furnace operation on air emissions and residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas; Riber, Christian; Pedersen, Anne Juul

    2011-01-01

    Waste incineration can be considered a robust technology for energy recovery from mixed waste. Modern incinerators are generally able to maintain relatively stable performance, but changes in waste input and furnace operation may affect emissions. This study investigated how inorganic air emissions...... including ‘as-large-as-possible’ changes in furnace operation (oxygen levels, air supply and burnout level) only using normal MSW as input. The experiments showed that effects from the added waste materials were significant in relation to: air emissions (in particular As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Sb), element transfer...... coefficients, and residue composition (As, Cd, Cl, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mo, Ni, Pb, S, Sb, Zn). Changes in furnace operation could not be directly linked to changes in emissions and residues. The results outlined important elements in waste which should be addressed in relation to waste incinerator performance. Likely...

  8. Upgrading BWR training simulators for annual outage operation training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakabe, K.; Nakajima, A.; Shiyama, H.; Noji, K.; Okabe, N.; Murata, F.

    2006-01-01

    Based upon the recently developed quality assurance program by the Japanese electric companies, BWR Operator Training Center (BTC) identified the needs to enhance operators' knowledge and skills for operations tasks during annual outage, and started to develop a dedicated operator training course specialized for them. In this paper, we present the total framework of the training course for annual outage operations and the associated typical three functions of our full-scope simulators specially developed and upgraded to conduct the training; namely, (1) Simulation model upgrade for the flow and temperature behavior concerning residual heat removal (RHR) system with shutdown cooling mode, (2) Addition of malfunctions for DC power supply equipment, (3) Simulation model upgrade for water filling operation for reactor pressurization (future development). We have implemented a trial of the training course by using the upgraded 800MW full-scope training simulator with functions (1) and (2) above. As the result of this trial, we are confident that the developed training course is effective for enhancing operators' knowledge and skills for operations tasks during annual outage. (author)

  9. Annual Report of Radioactive Waste Facilities Operation in 2015

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU; Hong-ming; GAO; Zhi-gang; DIAO; Lei; SHEN; Zheng; LI; Wen-ge

    2015-01-01

    301of the Department of Radiochemistry,is in charge of the management of radioactive waste and the safety of the relative facilities to meet the request of the scientific research production.There are 16radioactive waste facilities,including9facilities which are closed and monitored

  10. Demonstration of remotely operated TRU waste size reduction and material handling equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looper, M.G.; Charlesworth, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) is developing remote size reduction and material handling equipment to prepare 238 Pu contaminated waste for permanent disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. The waste is generated at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) from normal operation and decommissioning activity and is retrievably stored onsite. A Transuranic Waste Facility for preparing, size-reducing, and packaging this waste for disposal is scheduled for completion in 1995. A cold test facility for demonstrating the size reduction and material handling equipment was built, and testing began in January 1987. 9 figs., 1 tab

  11. International co-operation in the management of radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Changsun [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-07-01

    The use of nuclear energy faces with the problem of radioactive waste disposal. The public simply abhors radioactive wastes without rightful cause. Hence, the immediate concern is to overcome this hostile preconception of the public, and to come up with safe and economic ways of disposal which are acceptable to the public. Without it, the public may not accept the idea of further use of nuclear energy. Some have concern about safeguards of fissile plutonium with respect to proliferation while others have concerns regarding protection beyond national borders related to movement of radioactive wastes for foreign disposal. Now, the disposal of radioactive waste is a global problem rather than a problem for individual nation. In this aspect, close international cooperation is recently being brought up more than ever in jointly: improving public acceptance, minimizing waste generation, eliminating the burden on future generations, developing internationally acceptable practices, exploring disposal concepts, and collaborating on R and D. (author)

  12. International co-operation in the management of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Changsun

    1998-01-01

    The use of nuclear energy faces with the problem of radioactive waste disposal. The public simply abhors radioactive wastes without rightful cause. Hence, the immediate concern is to overcome this hostile preconception of the public, and to come up with safe and economic ways of disposal which are acceptable to the public. Without it, the public may not accept the idea of further use of nuclear energy. Some have concern about safeguards of fissile plutonium with respect to proliferation while others have concerns regarding protection beyond national borders related to movement of radioactive wastes for foreign disposal. Now, the disposal of radioactive waste is a global problem rather than a problem for individual nation. In this aspect, close international cooperation is recently being brought up more than ever in jointly: improving public acceptance, minimizing waste generation, eliminating the burden on future generations, developing internationally acceptable practices, exploring disposal concepts, and collaborating on R and D. (author)

  13. Learning the ABCs: Activity based costing in waste operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zocher, Marc A.

    1992-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is facing a challenging new national role based on current world events, changing public perception and awareness, and a legacy of wastes generated in the past. Clearly, the DOE must put mechanisms in place to comply with environmental rules, regulations, and good management practices so that public health risk is minimized while programmatic costs are controlled. DOE has begun this process and has developed a Five-Year Plan to describe the activities necessary to comply with both cleanup, or environmental restoration, and waste management of existing waste streams. The focus of this paper is how to best manage the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of waste throughout the DOE weapons complex by using Activity Based Costing (ABC) to both plan and control expenditures in DOE Waste Management (WM). The basics of ABC, along with an example, will be detailed. (author)

  14. Qualified operator training in the simulated control room environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, Teodor; Studineanu, Emil; Radulescu, Catalina; Bolocan, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Mainly designed for the training of the Cernavoda NPP Unit 2 operators, the virtual simulated environment allows the training of the already qualified operators for Cernavoda NPP Unit 1, adding to the already trained knowledge, the differences which has occurred in the Unit 2 design. Using state-of-the-art computers and displays and qualified software, the virtual simulated panels could offer a viable alternative to classic hardware-based training. This approach allows quick training of the new procedures required by the new configuration of the re-designed operator panels in the main control room of Cernavoda NPP Unit 2. (authors)

  15. Qualified operator training in the simulated control room environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, Teodor; Studineanu, Emil; Radulescu, Catalina; Bolocan, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    Mainly designed for the training of the Cernavoda NPP Unit 2 operators, the virtual simulated environment allows the training of the already qualified operators for Cernavoda NPP Unit 1, adding to the already trained knowledge, the differences which have occurred in the Unit 2 design. Using state-of-the-art computers and displays and qualified software, the virtual simulated panels could offer a viable alternative to classic hardware-based training. This approach allows quick training of the new procedures required by the new configuration of the re-designed operator panels in the main control room of Cernavoda NPP Unit 2. (authors)

  16. BIM-Integrated Construction Operation Simulation for Just-In-Time Production Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WoonSeong Jeong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Traditional construction planning, which depends on historical data and heuristic modification, prevents the integration of managerial details such as productivity dynamics. Specifically, the distance between planning and execution brings cost overruns and duration extensions. To minimize variations, this research presents a Building Information Modeling (BIM-integrated simulation framework for predicting productivity dynamics at the construction planning phase. To develop this framework, we examined critical factors affecting productivity at the operational level, and then forecast the productivity dynamics. The resulting plan includes specific commands for retrieving the required information from BIM and executing operation simulations. It consists of the following steps: (1 preparing a BIM model to produce input data; (2 composing a construction simulation at the operational level; and (3 obtaining productivity dynamics from the BIM-integrated simulation. To validate our framework, we applied it to a structural steel model; this was due to the significance of steel erections. By integrating BIM with construction operation simulations, we were able to create reliable construction plans that adapted to project changes. Our results show that the developed framework facilitates the reliable prediction of productivity dynamics, and can contribute to improved schedule reliability, optimized resource allocation, cost savings associated with buffers, and reduced material waste.

  17. Development and operation of a real-time simulation at the NASA Ames Vertical Motion Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Christopher; Sheppard, Shirin; Chetelat, Monique

    1993-01-01

    The Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) facility at the NASA Ames Research Center combines the largest vertical motion capability in the world with a flexible real-time operating system allowing research to be conducted quickly and effectively. Due to the diverse nature of the aircraft simulated and the large number of simulations conducted annually, the challenge for the simulation engineer is to develop an accurate real-time simulation in a timely, efficient manner. The SimLab facility and the software tools necessary for an operating simulation will be discussed. Subsequent sections will describe the development process through operation of the simulation; this includes acceptance of the model, validation, integration and production phases.

  18. Categorisation of waste streams arising from the operation of a low active waste incinerator and justification of discharge practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Waste streams arising from the low active waste incinerator at Harwell are described, and the radiological impact of each exposure pathway discussed. The waste streams to be considered are: (i) discharge of scrubber liquors after effluent treatment to the river Thames; (ii) disposal of incinerator ash; and (iii) discharge of airborne gaseous effluents to the atmosphere. Doses to the collective population and critical groups as a result of the operation of the incinerator are assessed and an attempt made to justify the incineration practice by consideration of the radiological impact and monetary costs associated with alternative disposal methods. (author)

  19. Operational experience from SFR - Final repository for low- and intermediate level waste in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skogsberg, Marie; Ingvarsson, Roger

    2006-01-01

    SFR, the Swedish Final Repository for Radioactive Waste, has been in operation since April 1988. It was designed for short lived LLW/ILW from the operation and maintenance of all Swedish Nuclear Power Plants. The first stage was constructed for 63 000 m 3 which was assumed to give a margin and flexibility for the preliminary operational period. Today this volume represents the whole prediction of operational waste. Until the end of 2005 SFR has received 30 930 m 3 waste. In average it has been 2-3 derivations per year at the repository. The most derivations happened in the years 1993-1995, and that was also the years when the repository received the most volume of waste. The most of the derivations those years was related to the waste packages. The dose rate to the personal has always been very low in the latest years the collective dose has been under 0,1 mmanSv/year. (author)

  20. Simulation in training for nuclear power plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stammers, R.B.

    1979-08-01

    The need for simulation in nuclear operator training is reviewed, and the use of simulators is justified on a number of criteria. The role of simulators is discussed against the background of training media that are or could be used. The question of the degree of realism or fidelity of simulation is tackled, with comparisons being made between views from the industry and views from the area of instructional technology. Training research in the general area of process control is outlined and emphasis is placed on the importance of instructional control. Finally, some future directions for study are sketched. (author)

  1. Characterization and reaction behavior of ferrocyanide simulants and Hanford Site high-level ferrocyanide waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeppson, D.W.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-02-01

    Nonradioactive waste simulants and initial ferrocyanide tank waste samples were characterized to assess potential safety concerns associated with ferrocyanide high-level radioactive waste stored at the Hanford Site in underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). Chemical, physical, thermodynamic, and reaction properties of the waste simulants were determined and compared to properties of initial samples of actual ferrocyanide wastes presently in the tanks. The simulants were shown to not support propagating reactions when subjected to a strong ignition source. The simulant with the greatest ferrocyanide concentration was shown to not support a propagating reaction that would involve surrounding waste because of its high water content. Evaluation of dried simulants indicated a concentration limit of about 14 wt% disodium mononickel ferrocyanide, below which propagating reactions could not occur in the ambient temperature bulk tank waste. For postulated localized hot spots where dried waste is postulated to be at an initial temperature of 130 C, a concentration limit of about 13 wt% disodium mononickel ferrocyanide was determined, below which propagating reactions could not occur. Analyses of initial samples of the presently stored ferrocyanide waste indicate that the waste tank ferrocyanide concentrations are considerably lower than the limit for propagation for dry waste and that the water content is near that of the as-prepared simulants. If the initial trend continues, it will be possible to show that runaway ferrocyanide reactions are not possible under present tank conditions. The lower ferrocyanide concentrations in actual tank waste may be due to tank waste mixing and/or degradation from radiolysis and/or hydrolysis, which may have occurred over approximately 35 years of storage

  2. Dynamic bioconversion mathematical modelling and simulation of urban organic waste co-digestion in continuously stirred tank reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitamo, Temesgen Mathewos; Boldrin, Alessio; Dorini, G.

    of this study was to apply a dynamic mathematical model to simulate the co-digestion of different urban organic wastes (UOW). The modelling was based on experimental activities, during which two reactors (R1, R2) were operated at hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 30, 20, 15, 10 days, in thermophilic conditions......The application of anaerobic digestion (AD) as process technology is increasing worldwide: the production of biogas, a versatile form of renewable energy, from biomass and organic waste materials allows mitigating greenhouse gas emission from the energy and transportation sectors while treating...... waste. However, the successful operation of AD processes is challenged by economic and technological issues. To overcome these barriers, mathematical modelling of the bioconversion process can provide support to develop strategies for controlling and optimizing the AD process. The objective...

  3. Chemical compatibility screening results of plastic packaging to mixed waste simulants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a chemical compatibility program for evaluating transportation packaging components for transporting mixed waste forms. We have performed the first phase of this experimental program to determine the effects of simulant mixed wastes on packaging materials. This effort involved the screening of 10 plastic materials in four liquid mixed waste simulants. The testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to ∼3 kGy of gamma radiation followed by 14 day exposures to the waste simulants of 60 C. The seal materials or rubbers were tested using VTR (vapor transport rate) measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. For these tests, a screening criteria of ∼1 g/m 2 /hr for VTR and a specific gravity change of 10% was used. It was concluded that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only VITON passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture simulant mixed waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. It is anticipated that those materials with the lowest VTRs will be evaluated in the comprehensive phase of the program. For specific gravity testing of liner materials the data showed that while all materials with the exception of polypropylene passed the screening criteria, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE were found to offer the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals

  4. Operational Strategies for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Site in Egypt - 13513

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Yasser T.

    2013-01-01

    The ultimate aims of treatment and conditioning is to prepare waste for disposal by ensuring that the waste will meet the waste acceptance criteria of a disposal facility. Hence the purpose of low-level waste disposal is to isolate the waste from both people and the environment. The radioactive particles in low-level waste emit the same types of radiation that everyone receives from nature. Most low-level waste fades away to natural background levels of radioactivity in months or years. Virtually all of it diminishes to natural levels in less than 300 years. In Egypt, The Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center has been established since 1983, as a waste management facility for LLW and ILW and the disposal site licensed for preoperational in 2005. The site accepts the low level waste generated on site and off site and unwanted radioactive sealed sources with half-life less than 30 years for disposal and all types of sources for interim storage prior to the final disposal. Operational requirements at the low-level (LLRW) disposal site are listed in the National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control NCNSRC guidelines. Additional procedures are listed in the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility Standards Manual. The following describes the current operations at the LLRW disposal site. (authors)

  5. Applying fluid dynamics simulations to improve processing and remediation of nuclear waste - 59172

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, Kelly J.; Peltier, Joel; Berkoe, Jon; Rosendall, Brigette; Kennedy, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Transport and processing of nuclear waste for treatment and storage can involve unique and complex thermal and fluid dynamic conditions that pose potential for safety risk and/or design uncertainty and also are likely to be subjected to more precise performance requirements than in other industries. From an engineering analysis perspective, certainty of outcome is essential. Advanced robust methods for engineering analysis and simulation of critical processes can help reduce risk of design uncertainty and help mitigate or reduce the amount of expensive full-scale demonstration testing. This paper will discuss experience gained in applying computational fluid dynamics models to key processes for mixing, transporting, and thermal treatment of nuclear waste as part of designing a massive vitrification process plant that will convert high and low level nuclear waste into glass for permanent storage. Examples from industrial scale simulations will be presented. The computational models have shown promise in replicating several complex physical processes such as solid-liquid flows in suspension, blending of slurries, and cooling of materials at extremely high temperature. Knowledge gained from applying simulation has provided detailed insight into determining the most critical aspects of these complex processes that can ultimately be used to help guide the optimum design of waste handling equipment based on credible calculations while ensuring risk of design uncertainty is minimized. The WTP Project is faced with complex technical challenges that must have solutions that enable the successful operation of the plant for its 30+ year operating life. The Project chose to reduce those risks by employing an experienced team that applied CFD in a disciplined manner and adhered to an established guideline with the following benefits: - Gained an improvement in accuracy of predictions for complex physical situations; - Gained an improvement of the quality of experimental

  6. Developement of porous media burner operating on waste vegetable oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapirattanakun, Arwut; Charoensuk, Jarruwat

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Steam was successfully applied to promote combustion of WVO. • A specially designed porous domain was an essential element for stable combustion of WVO. • The performance of WVO burner was in the range of cooking stove. • Nozzle clog up in domestic WVO burner can be avoided when replacing it with a steam-assisted nozzle. - Abstract: A newly designed cooking stove using Wasted Vegetable Oil (WVO) as fuel was introduced. Porous media, containing 2 cm diameter of spherical ceramic balls, was used as a flame stabilizer. Steam was successfully applied in a burner at this scale to atomize WVO droplet and entrain air into the combustion zone as well as to reduce soot and CO emission. DIN EN 203-1 testing standard was adopted and the experiment was conducted at various firing rate with the water flow rate at 0.16, 0.20 and 0.22 kg/min. Temperature, emissions, visible flame length, thermal efficiency as well as combustion efficiency were evaluated. Under the current WVOB design, it was suitable to operate the burner at the range of nominal firing rate between 325 and 548 kW/m"2 with water flow rate of 0.16 kg/min, at burner height to diameter ratio of 0.75, giving CO and NO_x emissions up to 171 and 40 ppm, respectively (at 6% O_2). Thermal efficiency was at around 28% where the combustion efficiency was approximately at 99.5%. The performance of WVO burner could be improved further if increasing the H/D ratio to 1.5, yielding thermal efficiency up to 42%.

  7. High performance biological process for waste water treatment proven in operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timm, C.; Wienands, H.; Brauch, G.; Schlaeger, M.

    1993-01-01

    A BIOMEMBRAT plant has been in operation for over one year at the Thor Chemie GmbH facility at Speyer, Germany. The process is particularly suitable for waste water with a high organic content and with degradation-resistant components or high nitrogen contents. This article presents the operating results obtained so far with the waste water treatment plant and the operator's experience. (orig.) [de

  8. Los Alamos controlled air incinerator upgrade for TRU/mixed waste operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavruska, J.S.; Borduin, L.C.; Hutchins, D.A.; Warner, C.L.; Thompson, T.K.

    1989-01-01

    The Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) is undergoing a major process upgrade to accept Laboratory-generated transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed wastes on a production basis. In the interim,prior to the scheduled 1992 operation of a new on-site LLW/mixed waste incinerator, the CAI will also be accepting solid and liquid low-level mixed wastes. This paper describes major modifications that have been made to the process to enhance safety and ensure reliability for long-term, routine waste incineration operations. The regulatory requirements leading to operational status of the system are also briefly described. The CAI was developed in the mid-1970s as a demonstration system for volume reduction of TRU combustible solid wastes. It continues as a successful R and D system well into the 1980s during which incineration tests on a wide variety of radioactive and chemical waste forms were performed. In 1985, a DOE directive required Los Alamos to reduce the volume of its TRU waste prior to ultimate placement in the geological repository at the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP). With only minor modifications to the original process flowsheet, the Los Alamos CAI was judged capable of conversion to a TRU waste operations mode. 9 refs., 1 fig

  9. Evaluation of the transport and resuspension of a simulated nuclear waste slurry: Nuclear Waste Treatment Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carleson, T.E.; Drown, D.C.; Hart, R.E.; Peterson, M.E.

    1987-09-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Idaho conducted research on the transport and resuspension of a simulated high-level nuclear waste slurry. In the United States, the reference process for treating both defense and civilian HLLW is vitrification using the liquid-fed ceramic melter process. The non-Newtonian behavior of the slurry complicates the evaluation of the transport and resuspension characteristics of the slurry. The resuspension of a simulated (nonradioactive) melter feed slurry was evaluated using a slurry designated as WV-205. The simulated slurry was developed for the West Valley Demonstration Project and was used during a pilot-scale ceramic melter (PSCM) experiment conducted at PNL in July 1985 (PSCM-21). This study involved determining the transport characteristics of a fully suspended slurry and the resuspension characteristics of settled solids in a pilot-scale pipe loop. The goal was to predict the transport and resuspension of a full-scale system based on rheological data for a specific slurry. The rheological behavior of the slurry was evaluated using a concentric cylinder rotational viscometer, a capillary tube viscometer, and the pilot-scale pipe loop. The results obtained from the three approaches were compared. 40 refs., 74 figs., 15 tabs

  10. Design and operating features of the high-level waste vitrification system for the West Valley demonstration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemens, D.H.; Beary, M.M.; Barnes, S.M.; Berger, D.N.; Brouns, R.A.; Chapman, C.C.; Jones, R.M.; Peters, R.D.; Peterson, M.E.

    1986-03-01

    A liquid-fed joule-heated ceramic melter system is the reference process for immobilization of the high-level liquid waste in the US and several foreign countries. This system has been under development for over ten years at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and other national laboratories operated for the US Department of Energy. Pacific Northwest Laboratory contributed to this research through its Nuclear Waste Treatment Program and used applicable data to design and test melters and related systems using remote handling of simulated radioactive wastes. This report describes the equipment designed in support of the high-level waste vitrification program at West Valley, New York. Pacific Northwest Laboratory worked closely with West Valley Nuclear Services Company to design a liquid-fed ceramic melter, a liquid waste preparation and feed tank and pump, an off-gas treatment scrubber, and an enclosed turntable for positioning the waste canisters. Details of these designs are presented including the rationale for the design features and the alternatives considered

  11. Numerical simulations of waste forms from the reprocessing of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    The usage of fissile material for nuclear fuel causes that alongside radioactive wastes are produced. These waste materials are created during all handling or usage operations within the nuclear fuel cycle. The main source of radiotoxicity is produced during the usage of nuclear fuel within the reactor. Energy is released by neutron induced fission reactions in heavy isotopes. Parts of the created fission products have large radiotoxicities. Due to neutron capture within the nuclear fuel the radiotoxicity is furthermore increased. These waste streams from the nuclear fuel cycle must be stored in a safe way to prevent any contamination of the biosphere and any harm to the civilization or the environment. The waste packages must be treated and conditioned for the final disposal. These created packages are subject to an independent product control to ensure there acceptability for transport, interim and final storage. The independent product control is a significant component of an effective waste management system. The aim of this work is the development of a software system used for the assessment of radioactive waste packages. The software shall permit the auditor to perform scenario analysis to forecast the product properties of a certain waste stream and therefore optimize the needed inspection scope in preparation of a new campaign. The software is designed as a modular library this permits the most flexible use of the software components and a high reusability of written analysis software. The software system is used for coupling of established and well-known simulation programs used for nuclear systems. The results of Monte-Carlo simulations and burn-up calculations are automatically imported and prepared for user interaction. The usage of simulation programs cause different challenges to the computing infrastructure. The scenario analyses need a large number of parameter variations which are bound to the computing time. For this reason additional to the

  12. A Cost Simulation Tool for Estimating the Cost of Operating Government Owned and Operated Ships

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Horngren , C.T., Foster, G., Datar, S.M., Cost Accounting : A Management Emphasis, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1994 IBM Corporation, A Graphical...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A COST SIMULATION TOOL FOR 5. FUNDING NUMBERS ESTIMATING THE COST OF OPERATING GOVERNMENT OWNED AND OPERATED SHIPS 6. AUTHOR( S ...normally does not present a problem to the accounting department. The final category, the cost of operating the government owned and operated ships is

  13. Simulator experiments: effects of NPP operator experience on performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beare, A.N.; Gray, L.H.

    1984-01-01

    During the FY83 research, a simulator experiment was conducted at the control room simulator for a GE Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) NPP. The research subjects were licensed operators undergoing requalification training and shift technical advisors (STAs). This experiment was designed to investigate the effects of senior reactor operator (SRO) experience, operating crew augmentation with an STA and practice, as a crew, upon crew and individual operator performance, in response to anticipated plant transients. Sixteen two-man crews of licensed operators were employed in a 2 x 2 factorial design. The SROs leading the crews were split into high and low experience groups on the basis of their years of experience as an SRO. One half of the high- and low-SRO experience groups were assisted by an STA. The crews responded to four simulated plant casualties. A five-variable set of content-referenced performance measures was derived from task analyses of the procedurally correct responses to the four casualties. System parameters and control manipulations were recorded by the computer controlling the simulator. Data on communications and procedure use were obtained from analysis of videotapes of the exercises. Questionnaires were used to collect subject biographical information and data on subjective workload during each simulated casualty. For four of the five performance measures, no significant differences were found between groups led by high (25 to 114 months) and low (1 to 17 months as an SRO) experience SROs. However, crews led by low experience SROs tended to have significantly shorter task performance times than crews led by high experience SROs. The presence of the STA had no significant effect on overall team performance in responding to the four simulated casualties. The FY84 experiments are a partial replication and extension of the FY83 experiment, but with PWR operators and simulator

  14. A High-Speed Train Operation Plan Inspection Simulation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Rui

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed a train operation simulation tool to inspect a train operation plan. In applying an improved Petri Net, the train was regarded as a token, and the line and station were regarded as places, respectively, in accordance with the high-speed train operation characteristics and network function. Location change and running information transfer of the high-speed train were realized by customizing a variety of transitions. The model was built based on the concept of component combination, considering the random disturbance in the process of train running. The simulation framework can be generated quickly and the system operation can be completed according to the different test requirements and the required network data. We tested the simulation tool when used for the real-world Wuhan to Guangzhou high-speed line. The results showed that the proposed model can be developed, the simulation results basically coincide with the objective reality, and it can not only test the feasibility of the high-speed train operation plan, but also be used as a support model to develop the simulation platform with more capabilities.

  15. Pu speciation in actual and simulated aged wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lezama-pacheco, Juan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Conradson, Steven D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (XAFS) at the Pu L{sub II/III} edge was used to determine the speciation of this element in (1) Hanford Z-9 Pu crib samples, (2) deteriorated waste resins from a chloride process ion-exchange purification line, and (3) the sediments from two Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Liter Scale simulant brine systems. The Pu speciation in all of these samples except one is within the range previously displayed by PuO{sub 2+x-2y}(OH){sub y}{center_dot}zH{sub 2}O compounds, which is expected based on the putative thermodynamic stability of this system for Pu equilibrated with excess H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} under environmental conditions. The primary exception was a near neutral brine experiment that displayed evidence for partial substitution of the normal O-based ligands with Cl{sup -} and a concomitant expansion of the Pu-Pu distance relative to the much more highly ordered Pu near neighbor shell in PuO{sub 2}. However, although the Pu speciation was not necessarily unusual, the Pu chemistry identified via the history of these samples did exhibit unexpected patterns, the most significant of which may be that the presence of the Pu(V)-oxo species may decrease rather than increase the overall solubility of these compounds. Several additional aspects of the Pu speciation have also not been previously observed in laboratory-based samples. The molecular environmental chemistry of Pu is therefore likely to be more complicated than would be predicted based solely on the behavior of PuO{sub 2} under laboratory conditions.

  16. Plasma processing of compacted drums of simulated radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geimer, R.; Batdorf, J.; Larsen, M.M.

    1991-01-01

    The charter of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) is to identify and develop technologies that have potential application in the treatment of DOE wastes. One particular waste of concern within the DOE is transuranic (TRU) waste, which is generated and stored at several DOE sites. High temperature DC arc generated plasma technology is an emerging treatment method for TRU waste, and its use has the potential to provide many benefits in the management of TRU. This paper begins by discussing the need for development of a treatment process for TRU waste, and the potential benefits that a plasma waste treatment system can provide in treating TRU waste. This is followed by a discussion of the results of a project conducted for the DOE to demonstrate the effectiveness of a plasma process for treating supercompacted TRU waste. 1 fig., 1 tab

  17. Laboratory-Scale SuperLig 639 Column Tests With Hanford Waste Simulants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, William D.; Spencer, William A.; Bussey, Myra Pettis

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the results of SuperLig 639 column tests conducted at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) in support of the Hanford River Protection Project - Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP). The RPP-WTP contract was awarded to Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) for the design, construction, and initial operation of a plant for the treatment and vitrification of millions of gallons of radioactive waste currently stored in tanks at Hanford, WA. Part of the current treatment process involves the removal of technetium from tank supernate solutions using columns containing SuperLig 639 resin. This report is part of a body of work intended to quantify and optimize the operation of the technetium removal columns with regard to various parameters (such as liquid flow rate, column aspect ratio, resin particle size, loading and elution temperature, etc.). The tests were conducted using nonradioactive simulants of the actual tank waste samples containing rhenium as a surrogate for the technetium in the actual waste. A previous report focused on the impacts of liquid flow rate and column aspect ratio upon performance. More recent studies have focused on the impacts of resin particle size, solution composition, and temperature. This report describes column loading experiments conducted varying temperature and solution composition. Each loading experiment was followed by high temperature elution of the sorbed rhenium. Results from limited testing are also described which were intended to evaluate the physical stability of SuperLig 639 resin during exposure to repeated temperature cycles covering the range of potential processing extremes

  18. ASPEN Plus simulation of coal integrated gasification combined blast furnace slag waste heat recovery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Wenjun; Yu, Qingbo; Wang, Kun; Qin, Qin; Hou, Limin; Yao, Xin; Wu, Tianwei

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An integrated system of coal gasification with slag waste heat recovery was proposed. • The goal of BF slag heat saving and emission reduction was achieved by this system. • The optimal parameters were obtained and the waste heat recovery rate reached 83.08%. • About 6.64 kmol/min syngas was produced when using one ton BF slag to provide energy. - Abstract: This article presented a model for the system of coal gasification with steam and blast furnace slag waste heat recovery by using the ASPEN Plus as the simulating and modeling tool. Constrained by mass and energy balance for the entire system, the model included the gasifier used to product syngas at the chemical equilibrium based on the Gibbs free energy minimization approach and the boiler used to recover the heat of the blast furnace slag (BF slag) and syngas. Two parameters of temperature and steam to coal ratio (S/C) were considered to account for their impacts on the Datong coal (DT coal) gasification process. The carbon gasification efficiency (CE), cold gasification efficiency (CGE), syngas product efficiency (PE) and the heating value of syngas produced by 1 kg pulverized coal (HV) were adopted as the indicators to examine the gasification performance. The optimal operating temperature and S/C were 800 °C and 1.5, respectively. At this condition, CE reached above 90% and the maximum values of the CGE, PE and HV were all obtained. Under the optimal operating conditions, 1000 kg/min BF slag, about 40.41 kg/min DT pulverized coal and 77.94 kg/min steam were fed into the gasifier and approximate 6.64 kmol/min syngas could be generated. Overall, the coal was converted to clean syngas by gasification reaction and the BF slag waste heat was also recovered effectively (reached up to 83.08%) in this system, achieving the objective of energy saving and emission reduction

  19. A system dynamics-based environmental performance simulation of construction waste reduction management in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhikun; Yi, Guizhen; Tam, Vivian W Y; Huang, Tengyue

    2016-05-01

    A huge amount of construction waste has been generated from increasingly higher number of construction activities than in the past, which has significant negative impacts on the environment if they are not properly managed. Therefore, effective construction waste management is of primary importance for future sustainable development. Based on the theory of planned behaviors, this paper develops a system dynamic model of construction waste reduction management at the construction phase to simulate the environmental benefits of construction waste reduction management. The application of the proposed model is shown using a case study in Shenzhen, China. Vensim is applied to simulate and analyze the model. The simulation results indicate that source reduction is an effective waste reduction measure which can reduce 27.05% of the total waste generation. Sorting behaviors are a premise for improving the construction waste recycling and reuse rates which account for 15.49% of the total waste generated. The environmental benefits of source reduction outweigh those of sorting behaviors. Therefore, to achieve better environmental performance of the construction waste reduction management, attention should be paid to source reduction such as low waste technologies and on-site management performance. In the meantime, sorting behaviors encouragement such as improving stakeholders' waste awareness, refining regulations, strengthening government supervision and controlling illegal dumping should be emphasized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Simulator training and licensing examination for nuclear power station operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Pingsheng

    2007-01-01

    For the recruitment, training and position qualification of the simulator instructors and feedback of training effect, the management approaches are formulated in 'The System for Simulator Training and Licensing Examination of Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station Operators'. The concrete requirements on the professional knowledge, work experience and foreign language ability of a simulator instructor are put forward. The process of instructor training is designed. The training items include the trainer training, pedagogy training, time management training, operation activities training during outage of unit, 'shadow' training and on-the-jot training on simulator courses. Job rotation is realized between simulator instructor and licensing personnel on site. New simulator instructor must pass the qualification identification. After a duration of 2 years, re-qualification has to be carried out. On the basis of the operator training method introduced from EDF (electricite De France), some new courses are developed and the improvement on the initial training, retaining courses, the technical support and the experience feedback by using the simulator is done also. (authors)

  1. Overview of Nevada Test Site Radioactive and Mixed Waste Disposal Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carilli, J.T.; Krenzien, S.K.; Geisinger, R.G.; Gordon, S.J.; Quinn, B.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Management Program is responsible for carrying out the disposal of on-site and off-site generated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and low-level radioactive mixed waste (MW) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Core elements of this mission are ensuring safe and cost-effective disposal while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. This paper focuses on the impacts of new policies, processes, and opportunities at the NTS related to LLW and MW. Covered topics include: the first year of direct funding for NTS waste disposal operations; zero tolerance policy for non-compliant packages; the suspension of mixed waste disposal; waste acceptance changes; DOE Consolidated Audit Program (DOECAP) auditing; the 92-Acre Area closure plan; new eligibility requirements for generators; and operational successes with unusual waste streams

  2. Apparatus of vaporizing and condensing liquid radioactive wastes and its operation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, Hiromitsu; Tajima, Fumio.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To prevent corrosion of material for a vapor-condenser and a vapor heater and to prevent radioactive contamination of heated vapor. Structure: Liquid waste is fed from a liquid feeding tank to a vapor-condenser to vaporize and condense the waste. Uncondensed liquid waste, which is not in a level of a given density, is temporally stored in a batch tank through a switching valve and a pipe. Prior to successive feeding from the liquid feeding tank, the uncondensed liquid waste within the batch tank is returned by a return pump to the condenser, after which a new liquid is fed from the liquid feeding tank for re-vaporization and condensation in the vapor-condenser. Then, similar operation is repeated until the uncondensed liquid waste assumes a given density, and when the uncondensed liquid waste reaches a given density, the condensed liquid waste is discharged into the storage tank through the switching valve. (Ohara, T.)

  3. DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT WITH 2-CM CENTRIFUGAL CONTRACTORS USING TANK 49H WASTE AND WASTE SIMULANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Caldwell, T.; Pak, D; Fink, S.; Blessing, R.; Washington, A.

    2011-09-27

    Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet using MaxCalix for the decontamination of high level waste (HLW). The demonstration was completed using a 12-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This represents the first CSSX process demonstration of the MaxCalix solvent system with Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW. Two tests lasting 24 and 27 hours processed non-radioactive simulated Tank 49H waste and actual Tank 49H HLW, respectively. Conclusions from this work include the following. The CSSX process is capable of reducing {sup 137}Cs in high level radioactive waste by a factor of more than 40,000 using five extraction, two scrub, and five strip stages. Tests demonstrated extraction and strip section stage efficiencies of greater than 93% for the Tank 49H waste test and greater than 88% for the simulant waste test. During a test with HLW, researchers processed 39 liters of Tank 49H solution and the waste raffinate had an average decontamination factor (DF) of 6.78E+04, with a maximum of 1.08E+05. A simulant waste solution ({approx}34.5 liters) with an initial Cs concentration of 83.1 mg/L was processed and had an average DF greater than 5.9E+03, with a maximum DF of greater than 6.6E+03. The difference may be attributable to differences in contactor stage efficiencies. Test results showed the solvent can be stripped of cesium and recycled for {approx}25 solvent turnovers without the occurrence of any measurable solvent degradation or negative effects from minor components. Based on the performance of the 12-stage 2-cm apparatus with the Tank 49H HLW, the projected DF for MCU with seven extraction, two scrub, and seven strip stages operating at a nominal efficiency of 90% is {approx}388,000. At 95% stage efficiency, the DF in MCU would be {approx}3.2 million. Carryover of organic solvent in aqueous streams (and aqueous in organic

  4. Design and operational parameters of transportable supercritical water oxidation waste destruction unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarland, R.D.; Brewer, G.R.; Rofer, C.K.

    1991-12-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is the destruction of hazardous waste by oxidation in the presence of water at temperatures and pressures above its critical point. A 1 gal/h SCWO waste destruction unit (WDU) has been designed, built, and operated at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This unit is transportable and is intended to demonstrate the SCWO technology on wastes at Department of Energy sites. This report describes the design of the WDU and the preliminary testing phase leading to demonstration

  5. Design and operation of a low-level solid-waste disposal site at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balo, K.A.; Wilson, N.E.; Warren, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    Since the mid-1940's, approximately 185000 m 3 of low-level and transuranic radioactive solid waste, generated in operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, have been disposed of by on-site shallow land burial. Procedures and facilities have been designed and evaluated in the areas of waste acceptance, treatment and storage, disposal, traffic control, and support systems. The methodologies assuring the proper management and disposal of radioactive solid waste are summarized

  6. Survey of Optimal Temperature and Moisture for Worms Growth and Operating Vermicompost Production of Food Wastes

    OpenAIRE

    A Eslami; A Nabaey; R Rostami

    2009-01-01

    "n "nBackground and Objectives:Nowadays vermicompost production of food wastes is posed as one of appropriate methods to food wastes. disposal, its production used in agriculture and gardening. Moreover this process has some by products beside useful fertilizer that one of them is the worms. we can use them in variety of products specially in production of poultry and fish food. So determination of optimal condition for operating vermicompost production process of food wastes and worms. growt...

  7. Development and implementation of the waste diversion program at MDS Nordion's Cobalt Operations Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasiak, T.

    2004-01-01

    Historically, the MDS Nordion (MDSN) Cobalt Operations Facility sent solid waste for disposal to Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd.'s Chalk River Laboratories (AECL-CRL). A large portion of this waste was not contaminated. Because this non-contaminated waste originated in the 'active area' of the MDSN facility, it was routinely disposed of as low-level active waste. In 2002, MDSN undertook an initiative to develop and implement a more sophisticated and more economical waste management program. The Waste Diversion Program (WDP) ensures continued environmental and public protection, and reduces the demand on Canada's limited capacity for storage of radioactive material and the associated operating costs. The goal of the WDP is to reduce the volume of waste currently being shipped to AECL-CRL's Waste Management Operation as low-level active waste. The presentation discusses key elements of both the development and the implementation of WDP. It focuses on the following areas: the regulatory environment surrounding the waste disposal issues in Canada and abroad. Methods used by MDSN for determination of radionuclides, which could be present in the facility. Choice of equipment and calculation of individual alarm levels for each identified radionuclide. Key elements of the practical implementation of the program. CNSC Regulatory approval process. The bottom line - dollars and cents. The primary objective of the WDP is to ensure that only waste, which meets regulatory requirements, is diverted from the solid active waste stream. This has been successfully accomplished in MDSN's Cobalt Operations Facility. The objective of the presentation is to share the knowledge and experience obtained in the development process, and thus provide a guideline for other nuclear facilities interested in establishing similar proactive and cost effective programs. (author)

  8. Hydration products and mechanical properties of hydroceramics solidified waste for simulated Non-alpha low and intermediate level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jin; Hong Ming; Wang Junxia; Li Yuxiang; Teng Yuancheng; Wu Xiuling

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, simulated non-alpha low and intermediate level radioactive wastes was handled as curing object and that of 'alkali-slag-coal fly ash-metakaolin' hydroceramics waste forms were prepared by hydrothermal synthesis method. The hydration products were analyzed by X ray diffraction. The composition of hydrates and the compressive strength of waste forms were determined and measured. The results indicate that the main crystalline phase of hydration products were analcite when the temperature was 150 to 180 degree C and the salt content ratio was 0.10 to 0.30. Analcite diffraction peaks in hydration products is increasing when the temperature was raised and the reaction time prolonged. Strength test results show that the solidified waste forms have superior compressive strength. The compressive strength gradually decreased with the increase in salt content ratio in waste forms. (authors)

  9. Computer simulation as an operational and training aid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.J.; Tottman-Trayner, E.

    1995-01-01

    The paper describes how the rapid development of desktop computing power, the associated fall in prices, and the advancement of computer graphics technology driven by the entertainment industry has enabled the nuclear industry to achieve improvements in operation and training through the use of computer simulation. Applications are focused on the fuel handling operations at Torness Power Station where visualization through computer modelling is being used to enhance operator awareness and to assist in a number of operational scenarios. It is concluded that there are significant benefits to be gained from the introduction of the facility at Torness as well as other locations. (author)

  10. A practical guide for operational validation of discrete simulation models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Leal

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available As the number of simulation experiments increases, the necessity for validation and verification of these models demands special attention on the part of the simulation practitioners. By analyzing the current scientific literature, it is observed that the operational validation description presented in many papers does not agree on the importance designated to this process and about its applied techniques, subjective or objective. With the expectation of orienting professionals, researchers and students in simulation, this article aims to elaborate a practical guide through the compilation of statistical techniques in the operational validation of discrete simulation models. Finally, the guide's applicability was evaluated by using two study objects, which represent two manufacturing cells, one from the automobile industry and the other from a Brazilian tech company. For each application, the guide identified distinct steps, due to the different aspects that characterize the analyzed distributions

  11. Numerical simulation of manual operation at MID stand control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doca, C.; Dobre, A.; Predescu, D.; Mielcioiu, A.

    2003-01-01

    Since 2000 at INR Pitesti a package of software products devoted to numerical simulation of manual operations at fueling machine control room was developed. So far, specified, designed, worked out and implemented was the PUPITRU code. The following issues were solved: graphical aspects of specific computer - human operator interface; functional and graphical simulation of the whole associated equipment of the control desk components; implementation of the main notation as used in the automated schemes of the control desk in view of the fast identification of the switches, lamps, instrumentation, etc.; implementation within PUPITRU code of the entire data base used in the frame of MID tests; implementation of a number of about 1000 numerical simulation equations describing specific operational MID testing situations

  12. The denitration of simulated fast reactor highly active liquor waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saum, C.J.; Ford, L.H.; Blatts, N.

    1981-01-01

    A short series of tests have been made with simulated HAL containing representative concentrations of palladium and phosphate ion. The information obtained has been confirmed in a small scale continuous denitration plant. These cases of four stirred pot reactors arranged in cascade. One possible advantage of this plant would be the low mean acidity in the first stage compared to the feed material which would limit to some extent the violence of the reaction. This would lead to a lower rate of gas evolution and may permit operation even with liquors where foaming is a problem. (DG)

  13. Safe operation of existing radioactive waste management facilities at Dalat Nuclear Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham Van Lam; Ong Van Ngoc; Nguyen Thi Nang

    2000-01-01

    The Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor was reconstructed from the former TRIGA MARK-II in 1982 and put into operation in March 1984. The combined technology for radioactive waste management was newly designed and put into operation in 1984. The system for radioactive waste management at the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute (DNRI) consists of radioactive liquid waste treatment station and disposal facilities. The treatment methods used for radioactive liquid waste are coagulation and precipitation, mechanical filtering and ion- exchange. Near-surface disposal of radioactive wastes is practiced at DNRI In the disposal facilities eight concrete pits are constructed for solidification and disposal of low level radioactive waste. Many types of waste generated in DNRI and in some Nuclear Medicine Departments in the South of Vietnam are stored in the disposal facilities. The solidification of sludge has been done by cementation. Hydraulic compactor has done volume reduction of compatible waste. This paper presents fifteen-years of safe operation of radioactive waste management facilities at DNRI. (author)

  14. The development of WIPPVENT, a windows based interactive mine ventilation simulation software program at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaniel, K.H.

    1995-01-01

    An interactive mine ventilation simulation software program (WIPPVENT) was developed at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The WIPP is a US Department of Energy (DOE) research and development project located near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The facility is designed to provide a permanent, safe underground disposal of US defense generated transuranic waste in bedded salt. In addition to it's regular functions, the underground ventilation system is engineered to prevent the uncontrolled spread of radioactive materials in the unlikely event of a release. To enhance the operability system, Westinghouse Electric Corporation has developed an interactive mine ventilation simulation software program (WIPPVENT). While WIPPVENT includes most of the functions of the commercially available simulation program VNETPC (copyright 1991 Mine Ventilation Services, Inc.), the user interface has been completely rewritten as a Windows reg-sign application and screen graphics have been added. WIPPVENT is designed to interact with the WIPP ventilation monitoring systems through the site wide Central Monitoring System

  15. Research for correction pre-operative MRI images of brain during operation using particle method simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shino, Ryosaku; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Sakai, Mikio; Ito, Hirotaka; Iseki, Hiroshi; Muragaki, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    In the neurosurgical procedures, surgeon formulates a surgery plan based on pre-operative images such as MRI. However, the brain is transformed by removal of the affected area. In this paper, we propose a method for reconstructing pre-operative images involving the deformation with physical simulation. First, the domain of brain is identified in pre-operative images. Second, we create particles for physical simulation. Then, we carry out the linear elastic simulation taking into account the gravity. Finally, we reconstruct pre-operative images with deformation according to movement of the particles. We show the effectiveness of this method by reconstructing the pre-operative image actually taken before surgery. (author)

  16. Pyrolysis of plastic packaging waste: A comparison of plastic residuals from material recovery facilities with simulated plastic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrados, A.; Marco, I. de; Caballero, B.M.; López, A.; Laresgoiti, M.F.; Torres, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Pyrolysis of plastic waste. ► Comparison of different samples: real waste, simulated and real waste + catalyst. ► Study of the effects of inorganic components in the pyrolysis products. - Abstract: Pyrolysis may be an alternative for the reclamation of rejected streams of waste from sorting plants where packing and packaging plastic waste is separated and classified. These rejected streams consist of many different materials (e.g., polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), aluminum, tetra-brik, and film) for which an attempt at complete separation is not technically possible or economically viable, and they are typically sent to landfills or incinerators. For this study, a simulated plastic mixture and a real waste sample from a sorting plant were pyrolyzed using a non-stirred semi-batch reactor. Red mud, a byproduct of the aluminum industry, was used as a catalyst. Despite the fact that the samples had a similar volume of material, there were noteworthy differences in the pyrolysis yields. The real waste sample resulted, after pyrolysis, in higher gas and solid yields and consequently produced less liquid. There were also significant differences noted in the compositions of the compared pyrolysis products.

  17. Waste-to-Energy Thermal Destruction Identification for Forward Operating Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    volume reduction, anaerobic and aerobic digestion, food waste comminution etc)  Upfront reduction in waste (i.e. biodegradable shipping materials...or more gallons of cooling water. Biological driven processes depend on microorganisms , which cannot survive in the extreme military operation or

  18. Morsleben repository for radioactive waste (ERAM). Operational safety, radiation protection and environmental monitoring. Release: December 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The report overviews the monitoring activities of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection at the Morsleben repository for radioactive waste (ERAM), focussing the ERAM inventory of radioactive waste and the measures and results of geomechanical and hydrogeological monitoring, operational radiation protection, the monitoring of discharges of radioactive substances, environmental monitoring, and the dose levels expected from discharges of radioactive substances. (orig.)

  19. Time parallelization of advanced operation scenario simulations of ITER plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samaddar, D; Casper, T A; Kim, S H; Houlberg, W A; Berry, L A; Elwasif, W R; Batchelor, D

    2013-01-01

    This work demonstrates that simulations of advanced burning plasma operation scenarios can be successfully parallelized in time using the parareal algorithm. CORSICA -an advanced operation scenario code for tokamak plasmas is used as a test case. This is a unique application since the parareal algorithm has so far been applied to relatively much simpler systems except for the case of turbulence. In the present application, a computational gain of an order of magnitude has been achieved which is extremely promising. A successful implementation of the Parareal algorithm to codes like CORSICA ushers in the possibility of time efficient simulations of ITER plasmas.

  20. Long-term management of wastes resulting from dismantling operations. Storing the very low-level activity wastes at Morvilliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duret, F.; Dutzer, M.; Beranger, V.; Lecoq, P.

    2003-01-01

    Extension of dismantling operations in France in the years to come poses the question of availability of long-term waste facility. Large amount of such wastes will be produced after progressive shutdown of the 58 pressurized water reactors now in operation, not before 2010. However, France is already confronted with dismantling of 9 power reactors (6 of which of gas cooled graphite type), the first reprocessing plant at Marcoule, as well as, dismantling of other installations, for instance the CEA reactors or laboratories. The systems of processing the dismantling waste are not different from those used for wastes resulting from nuclear operations. For the high-level or long-term intermediate level activity disposal the debates must start by 2006, as based on the results of the research conducted according to different provisions of the December 30, 1991 law. These wastes represent however small amounts from the dismantling (around 2000 t for the 9 reactors at shutdown) and they will be stored until a decision will be made. A specific storing system should be implemented by 2008-2010 for the graphite wastes (around 23,000 t) which contain significant amount of long-lived radioelements, although their gross activity is low. But the most significant amount will come from low-level or intermediate-level of short lifetime or from wastes of very low activity. The first category is stored at Storage Center at Aube (CSA), its capacity being of 1,000,000 m 3 of drums. The total volume stored by the end of 2002 amounted 136,500 m 3 with an annual delivering of 12-15,000 m 3 at design rate of 30,000 m 3 /y. This center will be able to absorb the flux increase resulting from dismantling of the decommissioned nuclear installations (around 50,000 t from the dismantling of the 9 power reactor). The Center at Aube can be also adapted for storing wastes of large sizes as for instance the lid of the reactor vessel. According to the French regulation, the wastes produced within a

  1. Establishment of cementation parameters of dried waste from evaporation coming from NPP operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Érica R.; Tello, Clédola C.O.; Costa, Bruna S.

    2017-01-01

    The radioactive wastes generated in Brazil are treated and sent to initial and intermediate storages. The 'Project RBMN' proposes the implantation of the Brazilian repository to receive and permanently dispose the low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. The CNEN NN 6.09 standard - Acceptance Criteria for Disposal of Low and Intermediate Radioactive Wastes (LIRW) - establishes the fundamental requirements to accept the wastes packages in the repository. The evaporator concentrate is one of liquid wastes generated in a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) operation and usually it is cemented directly inside the packing. The objective of this research is to increase the amount of the incorporated waste in each package, using the drying process before the cementation, consequently reducing the volume of the waste to be disposed. Drying and cementation parameters were established in order to scale-up the process aiming at waste products that comply with the requirements of CNEN standard. The cementation of the resulting dry wastes was carried out with different formulations, varying the amount of cement, dry waste and water. These tests were analyzed in order to select the best products, with higher waste incorporation than current process and its complying the requirements of the standard CNEN NN 6.09. (author)

  2. Establishment of cementation parameters of dried waste from evaporation coming from NPP operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Érica R.; Tello, Clédola C.O., E-mail: erica.engqui@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte/MG (Brazil); Costa, Bruna S., E-mail: brusilveirac@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The radioactive wastes generated in Brazil are treated and sent to initial and intermediate storages. The 'Project RBMN' proposes the implantation of the Brazilian repository to receive and permanently dispose the low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. The CNEN NN 6.09 standard - Acceptance Criteria for Disposal of Low and Intermediate Radioactive Wastes (LIRW) - establishes the fundamental requirements to accept the wastes packages in the repository. The evaporator concentrate is one of liquid wastes generated in a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) operation and usually it is cemented directly inside the packing. The objective of this research is to increase the amount of the incorporated waste in each package, using the drying process before the cementation, consequently reducing the volume of the waste to be disposed. Drying and cementation parameters were established in order to scale-up the process aiming at waste products that comply with the requirements of CNEN standard. The cementation of the resulting dry wastes was carried out with different formulations, varying the amount of cement, dry waste and water. These tests were analyzed in order to select the best products, with higher waste incorporation than current process and its complying the requirements of the standard CNEN NN 6.09. (author)

  3. WASTE PACKAGE OPERATIONS FY99 CLOSURE METHODS REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. C. Knapp

    1999-09-23

    The waste package (WP) closure weld development task is part of a larger engineering development program to develop waste package designs. The purpose of the larger waste package engineering development program is to develop nuclear waste package fabrication and closure methods that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission will find acceptable and will license for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF), non-fuel components, and vitrified high-level waste within a Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Within the WP closure development program are several major development tasks, which, in turn, are divided into subtasks. The major tasks include: WP fabrication development, WP closure weld development, nondestructive examination (NDE) development, and remote in-service inspection development. The purpose of this report is to present the objectives, technical information, and work scope relating to the WP closure weld development.and NDE tasks and subtasks and to report results of the closure weld and NDE development programs for fiscal year 1999 (FY-99). The objective of the FY-99 WP closure weld development task was to develop requirements for closure weld surface and volumetric NDE performance demonstrations, investigate alternative NDE inspection techniques, and develop specifications for welding, NDE, and handling system integration. In addition, objectives included fabricating several flat plate mock-ups that could be used for NDE development, stress relief peening, corrosion testing, and residual stress testing.

  4. WASTE PACKAGE OPERATIONS FY-99 CLOSURE METHODS REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. C. Knapp

    1999-01-01

    The waste package (WP) closure weld development task is part of a larger engineering development program to develop waste package designs. The purpose of the larger waste package engineering development program is to develop nuclear waste package fabrication and closure methods that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission will find acceptable and will license for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF), non-fuel components, and vitrified high-level waste within a Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Within the WP closure development program are several major development tasks, which, in turn, are divided into subtasks. The major tasks include: WP fabrication development, WP closure weld development, nondestructive examination (NDE) development, and remote in-service inspection development. The purpose of this report is to present the objectives, technical information, and work scope relating to the WP closure weld development.and NDE tasks and subtasks and to report results of the closure weld and NDE development programs for fiscal year 1999 (FY-99). The objective of the FY-99 WP closure weld development task was to develop requirements for closure weld surface and volumetric NDE performance demonstrations, investigate alternative NDE inspection techniques, and develop specifications for welding, NDE, and handling system integration. In addition, objectives included fabricating several flat plate mock-ups that could be used for NDE development, stress relief peening, corrosion testing, and residual stress testing

  5. Operational procedures for receiving, packaging, emplacing, and retrieving high-level and transuranic waste in a geologic repository in TUFF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, A.W.; Mulkin, R.

    1984-01-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project, directed by the Nevada Operations Office of the Department of Energy, is currently developing conceptual designs for a commercial nuclear waste repository. In this paper, the preliminary repository operating plans are identified and the proposed repository waste inventory is discussed. The receipt rates for truck and rail car shipments of waste are determined as are the required repository waste emplacement rates

  6. Formulation Efforts for Direct Vitrification of INEEL Blend Calcine Waste Simulate: Fiscal Year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Vienna, John D.; Peeler, David K.; Reamer, I. A.

    2001-03-30

    This report documents the results of glass formulation efforts for Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) high level waste (HWL) calcine. Two waste compositions were used during testing. Testing started by using the Run 78 calcine composition and switched to simulated Blend calcine composition when it became available. The goal of the glass formulation efforts was to develop a frit composition that will accept higher waste loading that satisfies the glass processing and product acceptance constraints. 1. Melting temperature of 1125 ? 25?C 2. Viscosity between 2 and 10 Pa?s at the melting temperature 3. Liquidus temperature at least 100?C below the melting temperature 4. Normalized release of B, Li and Na each below 1 g/m2 (per ASTM C 1285-97) Glass formulation efforts tested several frit compositions with variable waste loadings of Run 78 calcine waste simulant. Frit 107 was selected as the primary candidate for processing since it met all process and performance criteria up to 45 mass% waste loading. When the simulated Blend calcine waste composition became available Frits 107 and 108 compositions were retested and again Frit 107 remained the primary candidate. However, both frits suffered a decrease in waste loading when switching from the Run 78 calcine to simulated Blend calcine waste composition. This was due to increase concentrations of both F and Al2O3 along with a decrease in CaO and Na2O in the simulate Blend calcine waste all of which have strong impacts on the glass properties that limit waste loading of this type of waste.

  7. Leaching of actinides from simulated nuclear waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickering, S.; Walker, C.T.; Offermann, P.

    1982-01-01

    Two types of simulated nuclear waste glass doped with actinides were leached at 200 0 C in distilled water and salt solutions. Am, Np, Pu and U were all preferentially retained in the surface layer on the glass. Leaching ratios of 0.1 to 0.2 for Np and approx. 0.02 for Am were measured. The losses of Am and Np to the leachant were proportional to the total weight loss of the glass and were larger at 10 ml leachant/cm 2 glass than at 5 ml/cm 2 . Weight loss from the glass occurred only at the start of the experiments for periods ranging from 10 h to 10 days according to leachant composition and volume. Wt losses from the C31-3-EC glass were much greater in saturated NaCl solution than in distilled water. Enrichment in the outer surface layer of Al or Ca according to glass type could be correlated with leachant pH, glass composition and weight loss measurements

  8. Leaching characteristics of actinides from simulated reactor waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weed, H.C.; Coles, D.G.; Bradley, D.J.; Mensing, R.W.; Schweiger, J.S.

    1979-01-18

    Two methods for measuring the leach rates of simulated high level waste glass are compared. One is a modification of the standard IAEA method and the other is a one-pass method in which fresh leachant solution is pumped over the sample at a controlled flow rate and temperature. For times up to 3 days, there is close agreement between results from the two methods at 25.0/sup 0/C. Leach rates from the one-pass method show a correlation with flow rate only on day 1 at 25.0/sup 0/C, whereas they show a correlation with flow rate for all three days at 75.0/sup 0/C. /sup 237/Np rates at 75.0/sup 0/C are greater than those at 25.0/sup 0/C, but /sup 239/Pu rates at 75.0/sup 0/C are less than or equal to those at 25.0/sup 0/C.

  9. Spray drying test of simulated borated waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Hongxiang; Zhou Lianquan; Fan Zhiwen; Sun Qi; Lin Xiaolong

    2007-01-01

    Performance and the effecting factors of spray drying of simulated borated waste solutions is studied for three contaeting methods between the atomized beads and the heated air, in which boron concentration is around 21000 ppm. The contacting modes are centrifugal atomizing co-current flow, pneumatic atomizing co-current flow and mixed flow. The results show that a free-flowing product in all these tests when the temperature of the solutions is between 62 degree C and 64 degree C, the inlet temperature of the spray drying chamber is between 210 degree C and 220 degree C, the temperature of the outlet of the spray drying chamber is between 110 and 120 degree C, the flow rate of the pressure air is 8.0 m 3 /h, the rotational speed of the centrifugal atomizer is 73.0 m/s. The diameters of the powder product which account for 95% of the feed range from 0.356 mm to 0.061 mm. The production capacity and water content in the powder increase in the order of pneumatic atomizing co-current flow, mixed flow and centrifugal atomizing co-current flow. The volume reduction coeffecient of spray drying is in the ranged of 0.22 and 0.27. (authors)

  10. Stochastic and simulation models of maritime intercept operations capabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01

    The research formulates and exercises stochastic and simulation models to assess the Maritime Intercept Operations (MIO) capabilities. The models focus on the surveillance operations of the Maritime Patrol Aircraft (MPA). The analysis using the models estimates the probability with which a terrorist vessel (Red) is detected, correctly classified, and escorted for intensive investigation and neutralization before it leaves an area of interest (AOI). The difficulty of obtaining adequate int...

  11. FCFPYRO simulation of the first year FCF hot operation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaw, J.R.; Li, S.X.; Benedict, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    A simulation study has been successfully completed according to the first year FCF operational plan for the treatment of EBR-II spent fuels. Material flow by nuclides for each processing step and radioactive decays during the process are considered. The FCFPYRO code package is a very useful tool to provide step-by-step information essential to the analysis of operational strategy, process chemistry, heat removal, criticality safety, and radiological health issues in FCF

  12. Simulation of the operational monitoring of a BWR with Simulate-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez F, J. O.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Fuentes M, L.; Francois L, J. L.

    2015-09-01

    This work was developed in order to describe the methodology for calculating the fuel burned of nuclear power reactors throughout the duration of their operating cycle and for each fuel reload. In other words, simulate and give monitoring to the main operation parameters of sequential way along its operation cycles. For this particular case, the operational monitoring of five consecutive cycles of a reactor was realized using the information reported by their processes computer. The simulation was performed with the Simulate-3 software and the results were compared with those of the process computer. The goal is to get the fuel burned, cycle after cycle for obtain the state conditions of the reactor needed for the fuel reload analyses, stability studies and transients analysis, and the development of a methodology that allows to manage and resolve similar cases for future fuel cycles of the nuclear power plant and explore the various options offered by the simulator. (Author)

  13. Microcomputer simulation model for facility performance assessment: a case study of nuclear spent fuel handling facility operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chockie, A.D.; Hostick, C.J.; Otis, P.T.

    1985-10-01

    A microcomputer based simulation model was recently developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to assist in the evaluation of design alternatives for a proposed facility to receive, consolidate and store nuclear spent fuel from US commercial power plants. Previous performance assessments were limited to deterministic calculations and Gantt chart representations of the facility operations. To insure that the design of the facility will be adequate to meet the specified throughput requirements, the simulation model was used to analyze such factors as material flow, equipment capability and the interface between the MRS facility and the nuclear waste transportation system. The simulation analysis model was based on commercially available software and application programs designed to represent the MRS waste handling facility operations. The results of the evaluation were used by the design review team at PNL to identify areas where design modifications should be considered. 4 figs

  14. Legislative impacts on Savannah River waste management operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Today everyone has to be prepared to meet the challenges presented by new legislative actions. The Savannah River Plant is also impacted by this legislation as the exclusive nature of the Atomic Energy Act slowly erodes. This paper discusses the management of three types of radioactive waste from the production of defense nuclear materials and the impacts of major environmental legislation on the handling of these wastes. The paper briefly discusses the major environmental statutes, covers the statutes impact on the technical processes and, finally, considers the nontechnical impact of the statutes

  15. Design and operation of a prototype incinerator for beta-gamma waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farber, M.G.; Hootman, H.E.; Becker, G.W. Jr.; Makohon, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    A full-scale test incinerator has been built at the Savannah River Laboratory to provide a design basis for a radioactive facility that will burn low-level beta-gamma contaminated waste. The processing steps include waste feed loading, incineration, ash residue packaging, and off-gas cleanup. Both solid and liquid waste will be incinerated during the test program. The components of the solid waste are cellulose, latex, polyethylene, and PVC; the solvent is composed of n-paraffin and TBP. A research program will confirm the feasibility of the design and determine the operating parameters

  16. Long-term durability experiments with concrete-based waste packages in simulated repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ipatti, A.

    1993-03-01

    Two extensive experiments on long-term durability of waste packages in simulated repository conditions are described. The first one is a 'half-scale experiment' comprising radioactive waste product and half-scale concrete containers in site specific groundwater conditions. The second one is 'full-scale experiment' including simulated inactive waste product and full-scale concrete container stored in slowly flowing fresh water. The scope of the experiments is to demonstrate long-term behaviour of the designed waste packages in contact with moderately concrete aggressive groundwater, and to evaluate the possible interactions between the waste product, concrete container and ground water. As the waste packages are made of high-quality concrete, provisions have been made to continue the experiments for several years

  17. Performance assessment for continuing and future operations at solid waste storage area 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    This revised performance assessment (PA) for the continued disposal operations at Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) has been prepared to demonstrate compliance with the performance objectives for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal contained in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. This revised PA considers disposal operations conducted from September 26, 1988, through the projects lifetime of the disposal facility

  18. Performance assessment for continuing and future operations at solid waste storage area 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This revised performance assessment (PA) for the continued disposal operations at Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) has been prepared to demonstrate compliance with the performance objectives for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal contained in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. This revised PA considers disposal operations conducted from September 26, 1988, through the projects lifetime of the disposal facility.

  19. Low-level radioactive waste disposal operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanford, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) generates Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) from various activities: research and development, sampling and storage of TRU wastes, decommissioning and decontamination of facilities, and from LANL's major role in stockpile stewardship. The Laboratory has its own active LLW disposal facility located at Technical Area 54, Area G. This paper will identify the current operations of the facility and the issues pertaining to operating a disposal facility in today's compliance and cost-effective environment

  20. Monju operator training report. Training results and upgrade of the operation training simulator in 2002 YF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyagoshi, Naoki; Sasaki, Kazuichi; Sawada, Makoto; Kawanishi, Tomotake; Yoshida, Kazuo

    2003-09-01

    The prototype fast breeder reactor, Monju, has been performing deliberately the operator training which is composed of the regulated training required by the government and the self-training. The training used a full scope type simulator (MARS: Monju Advanced Reactor Simulator) plays an important role among of the above mentioned trainings and greatly contributes to the Monju operator training for Monju restarting. This report covers the activities of Monju operator training in 2002 FY, i.e. the training results and the remodeling working of the MARS in progress since 1999. (1) Eight simulator training courses were carried out 46 times and 180 trainees participated. Additionally, both the regulated training and self-training were held total 10 times by attended 34 trainees, as besides simulator training. (2) Above training data was reduced compare with the last year's data (69 times (338 trainees)) due to the indispensable training courses in Monju operator training were changed by reorganized operator's number and decreasing of training times owing to remodeling working of the simulator was conducted. (3) By means of upgrading of the MARS completed in 2002 FY, its logic arithmetic time was became speedier and its instructing function was improved remarkably, thus, the simulator training was became to be more effective. Moreover, it's planning to do both remodeling in the next year as the final working: remodeling of reactor core model with the aim of improvement simulating accuracy and corresponding to the sodium leakage measures. Regarding on the Monju training results and simulator's remodeling so far finished, please referring JNC report number of JNC TN 4410 2002-001 Translation of Monju Simulator Training owing Monju Accident and Upgrade of MARS''. (author)

  1. Laboratory optimization tests of technetium decontamination of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant low activity waste melter off-gas condensate simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable simplified operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste.

  2. Test plan for Fauske and Associates to perform tube propagation experiments with simulated Hanford tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, C.D.; Babad, H.

    1996-05-01

    This test plan, prepared at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for Westinghouse Hanford Company, provides guidance for performing tube propagation experiments on simulated Hanford tank wastes and on actual tank waste samples. Simulant compositions are defined and an experimental logic tree is provided for Fauske and Associates (FAI) to perform the experiments. From this guidance, methods and equipment for small-scale tube propagation experiments to be performed at the Hanford Site on actual tank samples will be developed. Propagation behavior of wastes will directly support the safety analysis (SARR) for the organic tanks. Tube propagation may be the definitive tool for determining the relative reactivity of the wastes contained in the Hanford tanks. FAI have performed tube propagation studies previously on simple two- and three-component surrogate mixtures. The simulant defined in this test plan more closely represents actual tank composition. Data will be used to support preparation of criteria for determining the relative safety of the organic bearing wastes

  3. Effect of fluidization number on the combustion of simulated municipal solid waste in a fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar Johari; Mutahharah, M.M.; Abdul, A.; Salema, A.; Kalantarifard, A.; Rozainee, M.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of fluidization number on the combustion of simulated municipal solid was in a fluidized bed was investigated. Simulated municipal solid waste was used a sample and it was formulated from major waste composition found in Malaysia which comprised of food waste, paper, plastic and vegetable waste. Proximate and ultimate analyses of the simulated were conducted and results showed its composition was similar to the actual Malaysian municipal solid waste composition. Combustion study was carried out in a rectangular fluidized bed with sand of mean particle size of 0.34 mm as a fluidising medium. The range of fluidization numbers investigated was 3 to 11 U mf . The combustion was carried out at stoichiometric condition (Air Factor = 1). Results showed that the best fluidization number was in the range of 5 to 7 U mf with 5 U mf being the most optimum in which the bed temperature was sustained in a much longer period. (author)

  4. Simulation and OR (operations research) in combination for practical optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, N.; van der Sluis, E.; Haijema, R.; Al-Ibrahim, A.; van der Wal, J.; Kuhl, M.E.; Steiger, N.M.; Armstrong, F.B.; Joines, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Should we pool capacities or not? This is a question that one can regularly be confronted with in operations and service management. It is a question that necessarily requires a combination of queueing (as OR discipline) and simulation (as evaluative tool) and further steps for optimization. It will

  5. An efficiency improvement in warehouse operation using simulation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samattapapong, N.

    2017-11-01

    In general, industry requires an efficient system for warehouse operation. There are many important factors that must be considered when designing an efficient warehouse system. The most important is an effective warehouse operation system that can help transfer raw material, reduce costs and support transportation. By all these factors, researchers are interested in studying about work systems and warehouse distribution. We start by collecting the important data for storage, such as the information on products, information on size and location, information on data collection and information on production, and all this information to build simulation model in Flexsim® simulation software. The result for simulation analysis found that the conveyor belt was a bottleneck in the warehouse operation. Therefore, many scenarios to improve that problem were generated and testing through simulation analysis process. The result showed that an average queuing time was reduced from 89.8% to 48.7% and the ability in transporting the product increased from 10.2% to 50.9%. Thus, it can be stated that this is the best method for increasing efficiency in the warehouse operation.

  6. Task 5: role of simulators in operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the report is to present an analysis of the role of simulators in the training of nuclear power plant operators, from a human factors point of view. Task 5, and this report, consist of the following main parts: 'Current practices in operator training with simulators' (its objective was to identify the role of simulators in the operator training programs, from a human factors point of view, in OECD countries; the information requested was oriented towards the techniques and criteria used for establishing and evaluating that role in the different countries). 'Experiences or studies on specific issues' (its objective was to discuss in-depth some of the issues more difficult or not completely solved yet, with the aim to draw lessons learned and current practices which are used to avoid incidents originated by operator errors due to inadequate training; the selected issues were: Teamwork, Diagnosis and Decision-Making, Stress, and Simulator Fidelity, Issues and Concerns). 'Conclusions and recommendations' (its objective was to gather, present and sum up the conclusions and recommendations reached all over the contributions reported by the ETF-HF members and during the discussions held at the ETF-HF meetings)

  7. Use of simulators in operative dental education: experience in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Background: Though the use of simulators in operative dentistry is not new, the teaching and learning practices that take place during clinical sessions in skills laboratories are rarely reported. This study was designed to determine the current prac- tices relating to teaching and learning of dental clinical skills in ...

  8. The role of the operator of nuclear power plants in disposal of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaussade, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Public opinion polls show that the French have largely understood the importance of our nuclear programme in maintaining French independence with regard to power supply and its security and that they have confidence in the technicians for the proper construction and operation of these power plants, but that they retain many questions concerning the disposal of nuclear waste. They have the impression that solutions remain to be found, and especially that the Electricite de France (EDF) devised the nuclear power programme without concern for the disposal of waste. This lack of information is fortunately far from reality, EDF, under the supervision of the security authorities, manages the waste produced in the nuclear power plants. Final stocking of waste is handled by a body that is independent of the waste producer, the ''Agence nationale pour la gestion des dechets radioactifs'' (Andra) (National Agency for the Management of Radioactive Waste). (author). 7 refs., 1 tab

  9. Design and operational experience of low level radioactive waste disposal in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimwood, P. D.

    1997-01-01

    Low level radioactive wastes have been disposed of at the Drigg near-surface disposal site for over 30 years. These are carried out under a disposal authorization granted by the UK Environment Agency. This is augmented by a three tier comprehensive system of waste controls developed by BNFL involving wasteform specification, consignor and waste stream qualification and waste consignment verification. Until 1988 wastes were disposed of into trench facilities. However, based on a series of integrated optioneering studies, new arrangements have since been brought into operation. Central to these is a wasteform specification based principally on high force compaction of wastes, grouting within 20 m 3 steel overpack containers to essentially eliminate associated voidage and subsequent disposal in concrete lined vaults. These arrangements ensure efficient utilisation of the Drigg site capacity and a cost-effective disposal concept which meets both national and international standards. (author). 7 figs

  10. Environmental assessment for the construction and operation of waste storage facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    DOE is proposing to construct and operate 3 waste storage facilities (one 42,000 ft 2 waste storage facility for RCRA waste, one 42,000 ft 2 waste storage facility for toxic waste (TSCA), and one 200,000 ft 2 mixed (hazardous/radioactive) waste storage facility) at Paducah. This environmental assessment compares impacts of this proposed action with those of continuing present practices aof of using alternative locations. It is found that the construction, operation, and ultimate closure of the proposed waste storage facilities would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required

  11. CJSC ECOMET-S facility for reprocessing and utilisation of radioactive metal waste: operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelbutovsky, A.B.; Kishkin, S.A.; Mochenov, M.I.; Troshev, A.V.; Cheremisin, P.I.; Chernichenko, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    The principal objective of the paper is to present operating experience in management of radioactive metal waste, originating at nuclear power facilities of the Russian Federation. Issues of radioactive metal waste recycling by melting, with the purpose of unrestricted re-use in industry, or restricted re-use within the nuclear industry, have been considered. The necessity for using a method of melting at the final stage of radioactive metal waste recycling has been proved. Priority measures to be taken and results achieved in the implementation of the Governmental purpose-oriented programme 'Radioactive Metal Waste Reprocessing and Utilization' have been considered, the CJSC ECOMET-S being the main contractor on the Programme. Main specifications and results of operating a commercial melting facility, owned by CJSC 'ECOMET-S' and used to recycle low-level radioactive metal waste originated at the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant, have been presented. (author)

  12. Groundwater-stream-simulation experiments for the evaluation of the safety of proposed nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, M.G.

    1981-01-01

    A bench-scale experimental design which integrates repository components to simulate a groundwater stream infiltrating a breached repository is described in this paper. An experiment performed with a nuclear waste solid and one rock core is briefly summarized. The nuclear waste solid consists of borosilicate glass containing formulated nuclear waste and is the source of the leached radionuclides. The rock core used is of granite and serves as the adsorption medium for the leached radionuclides

  13. ANALYSIS OF OPERATING INSTRUMENT LANDING SYSTEM ACCURACY UNDER SIMULATED CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy MERKISZ

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The instrument landing system (ILS is the most popular landing aid in the world. It is a distance-angled support system for landing in reduced visibility, while its task is the safe conduct of the aircraft from the prescribed course landing on the approach path. The aim of this study is to analyse the correctness of the ILS in simulated conditions. The study was conducted using a CKAS MotionSim5 flight simulator in the Simulation Research Laboratory of the Institute of Combustion Engines and Transport at Poznan University of Technology. With the advancement of technical equipment, it was possible to check the operation of the system in various weather conditions. Studies have shown that the impact of fog, rain and snow on the correct operation of the system is marginal. Significant influence has been observed, however, during landing in strong winds.

  14. A research reactor simulator for operators training and teaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Carvalho, R. P.; Maiorino, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    This work describes a training simulator of Research Reactors (RR). The simulator is an interactive tool for teaching and operator training of the bases of the RR operation, reactor physics and thermal hydraulics. The Brazilian IEA-R1 RR was taken as the reference (default configuration). The implementation of the simulator consists of the modeling of the process and system (neutronics, thermal hydraulics), its numerical solution, and the implementation of the man-machine interface through visual interactive screens. The point kinetics model was used for the nuclear process and the heat and mass conservation models were used for the thermal hydraulic feed back in the average core channel. The heat exchanger and cooling tower were also modeled. The main systems were: the reactivity control system, including the automatic control, and the primary and secondary coolant systems. The Visual C++ was used to codes and graphics lay-outs. The simulator is to be used in a PC with Windows XP system. The simulator allows simulation in real time of start up, power maneuver, and shut down. (authors)

  15. Sophistication of operator training using BWR plant simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshiro, Nobuo; Endou, Hideaki; Fujita, Eimitsu; Miyakita, Kouji

    1986-01-01

    In Japanese nuclear power stations, owing to the improvement of fuel management, thorough maintenance and inspection, and the improvement of facilities, high capacity ratio has been attained. The thorough training of operators in nuclear power stations also contributes to it sufficiently. The BWR operator training center was established in 1971, and started the training of operators in April, 1974. As of the end of March, 1986, more than 1800 trainees completed training. At present, in the BWR operator training center, No.1 simulator of 800 MW class and No.2 simulator of 1100 MW class are operated for training. In this report, the method, by newly adopting it, good result was obtained, is described, that is, the method of introducing the feeling of being present on the spot into the place of training, and the new testing method introduced in retraining course. In the simulator training which is apt to place emphasis on a central control room, the method of stimulating trainees by playing the part of correspondence on the spot and heightening the training effect of multiple monitoring was tried, and the result was confirmed. The test of confirmation on the control board was added. (Kako, I.)

  16. [Numerical simulation and operation optimization of biological filter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zong-Sen; Shi, Han-Chang; Chen, Xiang-Qiang; Xie, Xiao-Qing

    2014-12-01

    BioWin software and two sensitivity analysis methods were used to simulate the Denitrification Biological Filter (DNBF) + Biological Aerated Filter (BAF) process in Yuandang Wastewater Treatment Plant. Based on the BioWin model of DNBF + BAF process, the operation data of September 2013 were used for sensitivity analysis and model calibration, and the operation data of October 2013 were used for model validation. The results indicated that the calibrated model could accurately simulate practical DNBF + BAF processes, and the most sensitive parameters were the parameters related to biofilm, OHOs and aeration. After the validation and calibration of model, it was used for process optimization with simulating operation results under different conditions. The results showed that, the best operation condition for discharge standard B was: reflux ratio = 50%, ceasing methanol addition, influent C/N = 4.43; while the best operation condition for discharge standard A was: reflux ratio = 50%, influent COD = 155 mg x L(-1) after methanol addition, influent C/N = 5.10.

  17. Integrated training support system for PWR operator training simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, Junichi; Komatsu, Yasuki

    1999-01-01

    The importance of operator training using operator training simulator has been recognized intensively. Since 1986, we have been developing and providing many PWR simulators in Japan. We also have developed some training support systems connected with the simulator and the integrated training support system to improve training effect and to reduce instructor's workload. This paper describes the concept and the effect of the integrated training support system and of the following sub-systems. We have PES (Performance Enhancement System) that evaluates training performance automatically by analyzing many plant parameters and operation data. It can reduce the deviation of training performance evaluation between instructors. PEL (Parameter and Event data Logging system), that is the subset of PES, has some data-logging functions. And we also have TPES (Team Performance Enhancement System) that is used aiming to improve trainees' ability for communication between operators. Trainee can have conversation with virtual trainees that TPES plays automatically. After that, TPES automatically display some advice to be improved. RVD (Reactor coolant system Visual Display) displays the distributed hydraulic-thermal condition of the reactor coolant system in real-time graphically. It can make trainees understand the inside plant condition in more detail. These sub-systems have been used in a training center and have contributed the improvement of operator training and have gained in popularity. (author)

  18. A Real-Time Simulation Platform for Power System Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cha, Seung-Tae; Østergaard, Jacob; Wu, Qiuwei

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the real-time digital simulation platform that can be used for power system operation, analysis, and power system modeling. This particular platform gives grid operators, planners and researchers the opportunity to observe how a power system behaves and can be used...... in real time. Various phenomena commonly encountered when dealing with the two-area system is studied. Despite its small size, it mimics very closely the behavior of typical systems in actual operation. The electromagnetic transient type of simulation made in RSCAD enables the study of fast and detailed...... phenomena like single-phase faults in the two-area network and to observe their effects on a larger time scale. Also, the case study of 11 bus system with 5 generators has been also used and the results are presented....

  19. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) Waste Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. L. Schwendiman

    2006-01-01

    This Waste Management Plan describes waste management and waste minimization activities for Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory. The waste management activities described in this plan support the selected response action presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. This plan identifies the waste streams that will be generated during implementation of the remedial action and presents plans for waste minimization, waste management strategies, and waste disposition

  20. Simulating sanitation and waste flows and their environmental impacts in East African urban centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oyoo, R.

    2014-01-01

    Simulating Sanitation and Waste Flows and their Environmental Impacts in East African Urban Centres

    Abstract

    If improperly managed, urban waste flows can pose a significant threat to the quality of both the natural environment and public health.

  1. Potential radiological impacts of upper-bound operational accidents during proposed waste disposal alternatives for Hanford defense waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishima, J.; Sutter, S.L.; Hawley, K.A.; Jenkins, C.E.; Napier, B.A.

    1986-02-01

    The Geologic Disposal Alternative, the In-Place Stabilization and Disposal Alternative, and the Reference Disposal Alternative are being evaluated for disposal of Hanford defense high-level, transuranic, and tank wastes. Environmental impacts associated with disposal of these wastes according to the alternatives listed above include potential doses to the downwind population from operation during the application of the handling and processing techniques comprising each disposal alternative. Scenarios for operational accident and abnormal operational events are postulated, on the basis of the currently available information, for the application of the techniques employed for each waste class for each disposal alternative. From these scenarios, an upper-bound airborne release of radioactive material was postulated for each waste class and disposal alternative. Potential downwind radiologic impacts were calculated from these upper-bound events. In all three alternatives, the single postulated event with the largest calculated radiologic impact for any waste class is an explosion of a mixture of ferri/ferro cyanide precipitates during the mechanical retrieval or microwave drying of the salt cake in single shell waste tanks. The anticipated downwind dose (70-year dose commitment) to the maximally exposed individual is 3 rem with a total population dose of 7000 man-rem. The same individual would receive 7 rem from natural background radiation during the same time period, and the same population would receive 3,000,000 man-rem. Radiological impacts to the public from all other postulated accidents would be less than that from this accident; furthermore, the radiological impacts resulting from this accident would be less than one-half that from the natural background radiation dose.

  2. Potential radiological impacts of upper-bound operational accidents during proposed waste disposal alternatives for Hanford defense waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, J.; Sutter, S.L.; Hawley, K.A.; Jenkins, C.E.; Napier, B.A.

    1986-02-01

    The Geologic Disposal Alternative, the In-Place Stabilization and Disposal Alternative, and the Reference Disposal Alternative are being evaluated for disposal of Hanford defense high-level, transuranic, and tank wastes. Environmental impacts associated with disposal of these wastes according to the alternatives listed above include potential doses to the downwind population from operation during the application of the handling and processing techniques comprising each disposal alternative. Scenarios for operational accident and abnormal operational events are postulated, on the basis of the currently available information, for the application of the techniques employed for each waste class for each disposal alternative. From these scenarios, an upper-bound airborne release of radioactive material was postulated for each waste class and disposal alternative. Potential downwind radiologic impacts were calculated from these upper-bound events. In all three alternatives, the single postulated event with the largest calculated radiologic impact for any waste class is an explosion of a mixture of ferri/ferro cyanide precipitates during the mechanical retrieval or microwave drying of the salt cake in single shell waste tanks. The anticipated downwind dose (70-year dose commitment) to the maximally exposed individual is 3 rem with a total population dose of 7000 man-rem. The same individual would receive 7 rem from natural background radiation during the same time period, and the same population would receive 3,000,000 man-rem. Radiological impacts to the public from all other postulated accidents would be less than that from this accident; furthermore, the radiological impacts resulting from this accident would be less than one-half that from the natural background radiation dose

  3. Thermal phase stability of some simulated Defense waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, R.P.

    1981-04-01

    Three simulated defense waste glass compositions developed by Savannah River Laboratories were studied to determine viscosity and compositional effects on the comparative thermal phase stabilities of these glasses. The glass compositions are similar except that the 411 glasses are high in lithium and low in sodium compared to the 211 glass, and the T glasses are high in iron and low in aluminum compared to the C glass. Specimens of these glasses were heat treated using isothermal anneals as short as 10 min and up to 15 days over the temperature range of 450 0 C to 1100 0 C. Additionally, a specimen of each glass was cooled at a constant cooling rate of 7 0 C/hour from an 1100 0 C melt down to 500 0 C where it was removed from the furnace. The following were observed. The slow cooling rate of 7 0 C/hour is possible as a canister centerline cooling rate for large canisters. Accordingly, it is important to note that a short range diffusion mechanism like cooperative growth phenomena can result in extensive devitrification at lower temperatures and higher yields than a long-range diffusion mechanism can; and can do it without the growth of large crystals that can fracture the glass. Refractory oxides like CeO 2 and (Ni, Mn, Fe) 2 O 4 form very rapidly at higher temperatures than silicates and significant yields can be obtained at sufficiently high temperatures that settling of these dense phases becomes a major microstructural feature during slow cooling of some glasses. These annealing studies further show that below 500 0 C there is but little devitrification occurring implying that glass canisters stored at 300 0 C may be kinetically stable despite not being thermodynamically so

  4. Thermal phase stability of some simulated Defense waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, R.P.

    1981-04-01

    Three simulated defense waste glass compositions developed by Savannah River Laboratories were studied to determine viscosity and compositional effects on the comparative thermal phase stabilities of these glasses. The glass compositions are similar except that the 411 glasses are high in lithium and low in sodium compared to the 211 glass, and the T glasses are high in iron and low in aluminum compared to the C glass. Specimens of these glasses were heat treated using isothermal anneals as short as 10 min and up to 15 days over the temperature range of 450/sup 0/C to 1100/sup 0/C. Additionally, a specimen of each glass was cooled at a constant cooling rate of 7/sup 0/C/hour from an 1100/sup 0/C melt down to 500/sup 0/C where it was removed from the furnace. The following were observed. The slow cooling rate of 7/sup 0/C/hour is possible as a canister centerline cooling rate for large canisters. Accordingly, it is important to note that a short range diffusion mechanism like cooperative growth phenomena can result in extensive devitrification at lower temperatures and higher yields than a long-range diffusion mechanism can; and can do it without the growth of large crystals that can fracture the glass. Refractory oxides like CeO/sub 2/ and (Ni, Mn, Fe)/sub 2/O/sub 4/ form very rapidly at higher temperatures than silicates and significant yields can be obtained at sufficiently high temperatures that settling of these dense phases becomes a major microstructural feature during slow cooling of some glasses. These annealing studies further show that below 500/sup 0/C there is but little devitrification occurring implying that glass canisters stored at 300/sup 0/C may be kinetically stable despite not being thermodynamically so.

  5. Laboratory Scoping Tests Of Decontamination Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, Charles A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Crawford, Charles L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, William R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-01-21

    compatible with longterm tank storage and immobilization methods. For this new application, testing is needed to demonstrate acceptable treatment sorbents and precipitating agents and measure decontamination factors for additional radionuclides in this unique waste stream. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in high concentration in this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream is Technetium-99 (99Tc). Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford WTP, and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass by repeated recycle of the off-gas condensate into the LAW melter. Other radionuclides that are also expected to be in appreciable concentration in the LAW Off-Gas Condensate are 129I, 90Sr, 137Cs, and {sup 241}Am. This report discusses results of preliminary radionuclide decontamination testing of the simulant. Testing examined use of Monosodium Titanate (MST) to remove 90Sr and actinides, inorganic reducing agents for 99Tc, and zeolites for 137Cs. Test results indicate that excellent removal of 99Tc was achieved using Sn(II)Cl2 as a reductant, coupled with sorption onto hydroxyapatite, even in the presence of air and at room temperature. This process was very effective at neutral pH, with a Decontamination

  6. INVESTIGATING SUSPENSION OF MST, CST, AND SIMULATED SLUDGE SLURRIES IN A PILOT-SCALE WASTE TANK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, M.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Steeper, T.; Williams, M.

    2011-05-24

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for suspending and resuspending monosodium titanate (MST), crystalline silicotitanate (CST), and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is for the pumps to resuspend the MST, CST, and simulated sludge particles so that they can be removed from the tank, and to suspend the MST so it can contact strontium and actinides. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of Tank 41H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 41H. The pump locations correspond to the proposed locations in Tank 41H by the SCIX program (Risers B5, B3, and B1). Previous testing showed that three Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank, and to resuspend MST that has settled in a waste tank at nominal 45 C for four weeks. The conclusions from this analysis are: (1) Three SMPs will be able to resuspend more than 99.9% of the MST and CST that has settled for four weeks at nominal 45 C. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 84% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. (2) Three SMPs will be able to resuspend more than 99.9% of the MST, CST, and simulated sludge that has settled for four weeks at nominal 45 C. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 82% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. (3) A contact time of 6-12 hours is needed for strontium sorption by MST in a jet mixed tank with cooling coils, which is consistent with bench-scale testing and actinide removal process (ARP) operation.

  7. Development of simulated tank wastes for the US Department of Energy's Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmore, M.R.; Colton, N.G.; Jones, E.O.

    1992-08-01

    The purpose of the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (USTID) is to identify and evaluate technologies that may be used to characterize, retrieve, treat, and dispose of hazardous and radioactive wastes contained in tanks on US Department of Energy sites. Simulated wastes are an essential component of the evaluation process because they provide controlled samples for technology assessment, and minimize costs and risks involved when working with radioactive wastes. Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed a recipe to simulate Hanford single-shell tank, (SST) waste. The recipe is derived from existing process recipes, and elemental concentrations are based on characterization data from 18 SSTs. In this procedure, salt cake and metal oxide/hydroxide sludge are prepared individually, and mixed together at varying ratios depending on the specific tank, waste to be simulated or the test being conducted. Elemental and physical properties of the stimulant are comparable with analyzed tank samples, and chemical speciation in the simulant is being improved as speciation data for actual wastes become available. The nonradioactive chemical waste simulant described here is useful for testing technologies on a small scale

  8. Viscosity calculations of simulated ion-exchange resin waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Cheon Woo; Park, Jong Kil; Lee, Kyung Ho; Lee, Myung Chan; Song, Myung Jae; BRUNELOT, Pierre

    2000-01-01

    An induction cold crucible melter (CCM) located in the NETEC-KEPCO has been used to vitrify simulated ion-exchange resin. During vitrification, the CCM operations were tightly constrained by glass viscosity as an important process parameter. Understanding the role of viscosity and quantifying viscosity is highly required in the determination of optimized feed formulations and in the selection of the processing temperature. Therefore, existing process models of glass viscosity based on a relationship between the glass composition, its structure polymerization, and the temperature were searched and adapted to our borosilicate glass systems. Calculated data using a viscosity model based on calculation of non-bridging oxygen (NBO) were in good agreement with the measured viscosity data of benchmark glasses

  9. Asse salt mine nuclear waste repository simulation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coyle, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    The field tests underway in Asse, Federal Republic of Germany are dicected toward the development of test plans, techniques and equipment to be used in Exploratory Shafts or At Depth Test Facilities confirmation tests. These simulated repository tests will also provide information which address the following issues: brine migration (liquid and vapor); radiation effects of gamma rays; gas generation caused by radiation and corrosion; accelerated corrosion and leaching; altered properties of salt (the effects of heat, radiation and brine); and the effects of heat and radiation on test assemblies, instruments, and various materials exposed to repository conditions. This paper is a status of the first 82 days of operation of the Asse Brine Migration Tests, which were initiated on May 25, 1983. 6 references

  10. Reliability and safety program plan outline for the operational phase of a waste isolation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammer, H.G.; Wood, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    A Reliability and Safety Program plan outline has been prepared for the operational phase of a Waste Isolation Facility. The program includes major functions of risk assessment, technical support activities, quality assurance, operational safety, configuration monitoring, reliability analysis and support and coordination meetings. Detailed activity or task descriptions are included for each function. Activities are time-phased and presented in the PERT format for scheduling and interactions. Task descriptions include manloading, travel, and computer time estimates to provide data for future costing. The program outlined here will be used to provide guidance from a reliability and safety standpoint to design, procurement, construction, and operation of repositories for nuclear waste. These repositories are to be constructed under the National Waste Terminal Storage program under the direction of the Office of Waste Isolation, Union Carbide Corp. Nuclear Division

  11. Transporting spent fuel and reactor waste in Sweden experience from 5 years of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dybeck, P.; Gustafsson, B.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that since the Final Repository for Reactor Waste, SFR, was taken into operation in 1988, the SKB sea transportation system is operating at full capacity by transporting spent fuel and now also reactor waste from the 12 Swedish reactors to CLAB and SFR. Transports from the National Research Center, Studsvik to the repository has recently also been integrated in the system. CLAB, the central intermediate storage for spent fuel, has been in operation since 1985. The SKB Sea Transportation System consists today of the purpose built ship M/s Sigyn, 10 transport casks for spent fuel, 2 casks for spent core components, 27 IP-2 shielded steel containers for reactor waste and 5 terminal vehicles. During an average year about 250 tonnes of spent fuel and 3 -- 4000 m 3 of reactor waste are transported to CLAB and SFR respectively, corresponding to around 30 sea voyages

  12. Operating experience during high-level waste vitrification at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valenti, P.J.; Elliott, D.I.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides a summary of operational experiences, component and system performance, and lessons learned associated with the operation of the Vitrification Facility (VF) at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). The VF was designed to convert stored high-level radioactive waste (HLW) into a stable waste form (borosilicate glass) suitable for disposal in a federal repository. Following successful completion on nonradioactive test, HLW processing began in July 1995. Completion of Phase 1 of HLW processing was reached on 10 June 1998 and represented the processing of 9.32 million curies of cesium-137 (Cs-137) and strontium-90 (Sr-90) to fill 211 canisters with over 436,000 kilograms of glass. With approximately 85% of the total estimated curie content removed from underground waste storage tanks during Phase 1, subsequent operations will focus on removal of tank heel wastes

  13. An innovative simulation tool for waste to energy generation opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Abderezzak

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The new world energy policies encourage the use of renewable energy sources with clean technologies, and abandon progressively the fossil fuel dependence. Another energy generation trend called commonly the “Waste-to-Energy” solution, uses organic waste as a response for two major problems: energy generation and waste management. Thanks to the anaerobic digestion, the organic waste can provide a biogas composed essentially from Carbone dioxide (CO2 and Methane (CH4. This work aims essentially to help students, researchers and even decision makers to consider the importance of biogas generation. The proposed tool is the last version of our previous tool which is enhanced and completed. It presents the potential to produce biogas of any shortlisted kind of waste, including also some energy valorization ways. A technical economical data are introduced for eventual feasibility studies.

  14. Safety evaluation report of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant safety analysis report: Contact-handled transuranic waste disposal operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    DOE 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, requires that the US Department of Energy conduct an independent, defensible, review in order to approve a Safety Analysis Report (SAR). That review and the SAR approval basis is documented in this formal Safety Evaluation Report (SER). This SER documents the DOE's review of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant SAR and provides the Carlsbad Area Office Manager, the WIPP SAR approval authority, with the basis for approving the safety document. It concludes that the safety basis documented in the WIPP SAR is comprehensive, correct, and commensurate with hazards associated with planned waste disposal operations

  15. FY94 Office of Technology Development Mixed Waste Operations Robotics Demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriikku, E.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) develops technologies to help solve waste management and environmental problems at DOE sites. The OTD includes the Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP) and the Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP). Together these programs will provide technologies for DOE mixed waste cleanup projects. Mixed waste contains both radioactive and hazardous constituents. DOE sites currently store over 240,000 cubic meters of low level mixed waste and cleanup activities will generate several hundred thousand more cubic meters. Federal and state regulations require that this waste must be processed before final disposal. The OTD RTDP Mixed Waste Operations (MWO) team held several robotic demonstrations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during November of 1993. Over 330 representatives from DOE, Government Contractors, industry, and universities attended. The MWO team includes: Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Oak Ridge National Engineering Laboratory (ORNL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). SRTC is the lead site for MWO and provides the technical coordinator. The primary demonstration objective was to show that robotic technologies can make DOE waste facilities run better, faster, more cost effective, and safer. To meet the primary objective, the demonstrations successfully showed the following remote waste drum processing activities: non-destructive drum examination, drum transportation, drum opening, removing waste from a drum, characterize and sort waste items, scarify metal waste, and inspect stored drums. To further meet the primary objective, the demonstrations successfully showed the following remote waste box processing activities: swing free crane control, workcell modeling, and torch standoff control

  16. Taking into account dismantling and decommissioning waste management in conception and operation phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poncet, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Managing waste during the Dismantling and Decommissioning (D and D) phase is quite specific and different from what it was during the operation phase. Indeed, waste generated during dismantling could present some analogy especially with regards to the radionuclides spectrum and contents. However waste from dismantling and cleanup could actually presents a lower level of radiologic activity but produced in much larger quantities, which requires new solutions. Moreover the characteristics and quantities of waste to be managed during D and D are highly depending on the way the facility was designed and also how it was actually operated during its life time. Taking future D and D into consideration in the early design as well as during the operation of new facilities is becoming more and more mandatory. It is now an explicit requirement set by safety authorities, to provide - in the license application for news plants - a description of design provisions and future plans for D and D as well as anticipated technical and financial impacts,. Two major aspects are driving the cost and complexity of future D and D operations: waste volumes by categories and occupational exposure while performing the work. To reduce such impacts, key approaches are to maintain areas clean, segregate the waste types and provide appropriate provisions in the design. The paper's first part describes the related design and operation concepts derived from lessons learned, and illustrations by examples are presented in a second part. (author)

  17. Landfill operation and waste management procedures in the reduction of methane and leachate pollutant emissions from municipal solid waste landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokela, J.

    2002-07-01

    loading rate of 3.8 gT.O.N t-TS{sup -1}{sub waste}d-1 without adverse effects on the methanation of waste. In an on-site pilot study a leachate nitrification level of above 90 % was achieved in a crushed brick biofilter with a loading rate of 50 mgNH{sub 4}-N/l d even at 5 - 10 deg C. The effective separation and biological treatment of putrescibles is important in minimising the emission potential of MSW and thus environmental impacts of MSW management. The amount and the rate of release of methane as well as organic matter and nitrogen into leachate can be controlled by active landfill operation. Rapid methanation of MSW by controlling waste moisture and inoculation seems to be the key to achieve low emissions in modern landfills. The controlled access of water and/or leachate can be recommended during the post-closure operation of a landfill. Nitrification in a low-cost biofilter followed by denitrification in a landfill body appears to be feasible method for the removal of nitrogen in landfill leachate in colder climates. (orig.)

  18. Nuclear waste repository simulation experiments. Asse salt mine: Annual report 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothfuchs, T.; Feddersen, H.K.; Schwarzianeck, P.; Staupendahl, G.; Coyle, A.J.; Kalia, H.; Eckert, J.

    1985-01-01

    This is the Second Annual Report (1984) which describes experiments simulating a nuclear waste repository at the 800 meter-level of the Asse Salt Mine in the Federal Republic of Germany. The report describes the Asse Salt Mine, the test equipment, and the pretest properties of the salt in the mine and in the vicinity of the test area. Also included are test data for the first sixteen months of operation on the following: brine migration rates, thermal mechanical behavior of the salt (including room closure, stress readings and thermal profiles) and borehole gas pressures. In addition to field data laboratory analyses of results are also included in this report. The duration of the experiment will be two years, ending in December 1985. (orig.)

  19. Nuclear waste repository simulation experiments, Asse salt mine, Federal Republic of Germany. Annual report 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothfuchs, T.; Feddersen, H.K.; Schwarzianeck, P.; Staupendahl, G.; Coyle, A.J.; Eckert, J.; Kalia, H.

    1986-07-01

    This is the second joint annual report (1984) on experiments simulating a nuclear waste repository at the 800-m (2624-ft) level of the Asse salt mine in the Federal Republic of Germany. This report describes the Asse salt mine, the test equipment, and the pretest properties of the salt in the mine and in the vicinity of the test area. Also included are test data for the first 19 months of operation on the following: brine migration rates, thermal mechanical behavior of the salt (including room closure, stress reading, and thermal profiles), and borehole gas pressures. In addition to field data, laboratory analyses of results are included in this report. The duration of the experiment will be 2 years, ending in December 1985

  20. Simulation of Industrial Wastewater Treatment from the Suspended Impurities into the Flooded Waste Mining Workings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondareva, L.; Zakharov, Yu; Goudov, A.

    2017-04-01

    The paper is dedicated to the mathematical model of slurry wastewater treatment and disposal in a flooded mine working. The goal of the research is to develop and analyze the mathematical model of suspended impurities flow and distribution. Impurity sedimentation model is under consideration. Due to the sediment compaction problem solution domain can be modified. The model allows making a forecast whether volley emission is possible. Numerical simulation results for “Kolchuginskaya” coal mine presented. Impurity concentration diagrams in outflow corresponding to the real full-scale data obtained. Safely operation time mine workings like a wastewater treatment facility are estimated. The carried out calculations demonstrate that the method of industrial wastewater treatment in flooded waste mine workings can be put into practice but it is very important to observe all the processes going on to avoid volley emission of accumulated impurities.

  1. Operational NDT simulator, towards human factors integration in simulated probability of detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodat, Damien; Guibert, Frank; Dominguez, Nicolas; Calmon, Pierre

    2017-02-01

    In the aeronautic industry, the performance demonstration of Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) procedures relies on Probability Of Detection (POD) analyses. This statistical approach measures the ability of the procedure to detect a flaw with regard to one of its characteristic dimensions. The inspection chain is evaluated as a whole, including equipment configuration, probe effciency but also operator manipulations. Traditionally, a POD study requires an expensive campaign during which several operators apply the procedure on a large set of representative samples. Recently, new perspectives for the POD estimation have been introduced using NDT simulation to generate data. However, these approaches do not offer straightforward solutions to take the operator into account. The simulation of human factors, including cognitive aspects, often raises questions. To address these diffculties, we propose a concept of operational NDT simulator [1]. This work presents the first steps in the implementation of such simulator for ultrasound phased array inspection of composite parts containing Flat Bottom Holes (FBHs). The final system will look like a classical ultrasound testing equipment with a single exception: the displayed signals will be synthesized. Our hardware (ultrasound acquisition card, 3D position tracker) and software (position analysis, inspection scenario, synchronization, simulations) environments are developed as a bench to test the meta-modeling techniques able to provide fast-simulated realistic ultra-sound signals. The results presented here are obtained by on-the-fly merging of real and simulated signals. They confirm the feasibility of our approach: the replacement of real signals by purely simulated ones has been unnoticed by operators. We believe this simulator is a great prospect for POD evaluation including human factors, and may also find applications for training or procedure set-up.

  2. Improved operating strategies for uranium extraction: a stochastic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broekman, B.R.

    1986-01-01

    Deterministic and stochastic simulations of a Western Transvaal uranium process are used in this research report to determine more profitable uranium plant operating strategies and to gauge the potential financial benefits of automatic process control. The deterministic simulation model was formulated using empirical and phenomenological process models. The model indicated that profitability increases significantly as the uranium leaching strategy becomes harsher. The stochastic simulation models use process variable distributions corresponding to manually and automatically controlled conditions to investigate the economic gains that may be obtained if a change is made from manual to automatic control of two important process variables. These lognormally distributed variables are the pachuca 1 sulphuric acid concentration and the ferric to ferrous ratio. The stochastic simulations show that automatic process control is justifiable in certain cases. Where the leaching strategy is relatively harsh, such as that in operation during January 1986, it is not possible to justify an automatic control system. Automatic control is, however, justifiable if a relatively mild leaching strategy is adopted. The stochastic and deterministic simulations represent two different approaches to uranium process modelling. This study has indicated the necessity for each approach to be applied in the correct context. It is contended that incorrect conclusions may have been drawn by other investigators in South Africa who failed to consider the two approaches separately

  3. Results Of The Extraction-Scrub-Strip Testing Using An Improved Solvent Formulation And Salt Waste Processing Facility Simulated Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-01

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent - also known as the next generation solvent (NGS) - for deployment at the Savannah River Site to remove cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is a collaborative effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). As part of the program, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has performed a number of Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests. These batch contact tests serve as first indicators of the cesium mass transfer solvent performance with actual or simulated waste. The test detailed in this report used simulated Tank 49H material, with the addition of extra potassium. The potassium was added at 1677 mg/L, the maximum projected (i.e., a worst case feed scenario) value for the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The results of the test gave favorable results given that the potassium concentration was elevated (1677 mg/L compared to the current 513 mg/L). The cesium distribution value, DCs, for extraction was 57.1. As a comparison, a typical D Cs in an ESS test, using the baseline solvent formulation and the typical waste feed, is ∼15. The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) uses the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process to remove cesium (Cs) from alkaline waste. This process involves the use of an organic extractant, BoBCalixC6, in an organic matrix to selectively remove cesium from the caustic waste. The organic solvent mixture flows counter-current to the caustic aqueous waste stream within centrifugal contactors. After extracting the cesium, the loaded solvent is stripped of cesium by contact with dilute nitric acid and the cesium concentrate is transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), while the organic solvent is cleaned and recycled for further use. The Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), under

  4. PROBABILISTIC SAFETY ASSESSMENT OF OPERATIONAL ACCIDENTS AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rucker, D.F.

    2000-09-01

    This report presents a probabilistic safety assessment of radioactive doses as consequences from accident scenarios to complement the deterministic assessment presented in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The International Council of Radiation Protection (ICRP) recommends both assessments be conducted to ensure that ''an adequate level of safety has been achieved and that no major contributors to risk are overlooked'' (ICRP 1993). To that end, the probabilistic assessment for the WIPP accident scenarios addresses the wide range of assumptions, e.g. the range of values representing the radioactive source of an accident, that could possibly have been overlooked by the SAR. Routine releases of radionuclides from the WIPP repository to the environment during the waste emplacement operations are expected to be essentially zero. In contrast, potential accidental releases from postulated accident scenarios during waste handling and emplacement could be substantial, which necessitates the need for radiological air monitoring and confinement barriers (DOE 1999). The WIPP Safety Analysis Report (SAR) calculated doses from accidental releases to the on-site (at 100 m from the source) and off-site (at the Exclusive Use Boundary and Site Boundary) public by a deterministic approach. This approach, as demonstrated in the SAR, uses single-point values of key parameters to assess the 50-year, whole-body committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The basic assumptions used in the SAR to formulate the CEDE are retained for this report's probabilistic assessment. However, for the probabilistic assessment, single-point parameter values were replaced with probability density functions (PDF) and were sampled over an expected range. Monte Carlo simulations were run, in which 10,000 iterations were performed by randomly selecting one value for each parameter and calculating the dose. Statistical information was then derived

  5. PROBABILISTIC SAFETY ASSESSMENT OF OPERATIONAL ACCIDENTS AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucker, D.F.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents a probabilistic safety assessment of radioactive doses as consequences from accident scenarios to complement the deterministic assessment presented in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The International Council of Radiation Protection (ICRP) recommends both assessments be conducted to ensure that ''an adequate level of safety has been achieved and that no major contributors to risk are overlooked'' (ICRP 1993). To that end, the probabilistic assessment for the WIPP accident scenarios addresses the wide range of assumptions, e.g. the range of values representing the radioactive source of an accident, that could possibly have been overlooked by the SAR. Routine releases of radionuclides from the WIPP repository to the environment during the waste emplacement operations are expected to be essentially zero. In contrast, potential accidental releases from postulated accident scenarios during waste handling and emplacement could be substantial, which necessitates the need for radiological air monitoring and confinement barriers (DOE 1999). The WIPP Safety Analysis Report (SAR) calculated doses from accidental releases to the on-site (at 100 m from the source) and off-site (at the Exclusive Use Boundary and Site Boundary) public by a deterministic approach. This approach, as demonstrated in the SAR, uses single-point values of key parameters to assess the 50-year, whole-body committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The basic assumptions used in the SAR to formulate the CEDE are retained for this report's probabilistic assessment. However, for the probabilistic assessment, single-point parameter values were replaced with probability density functions (PDF) and were sampled over an expected range. Monte Carlo simulations were run, in which 10,000 iterations were performed by randomly selecting one value for each parameter and calculating the dose. Statistical information was then derived from the 10,000 iteration

  6. LABORATORY OPTIMIZATION TESTS OF TECHNETIUM DECONTAMINATION OF HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT LOW ACTIVITY WASTE OFF-GAS CONDENSATE SIMULANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Nash, C.; McCabe, D.

    2014-09-29

    compatible with longterm tank storage and immobilization methods. For this new application, testing is needed to demonstrate acceptable treatment sorbents and precipitating agents and measure decontamination factors for additional radionuclides in this unique waste stream. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in greatest abundance in this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream is Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc). Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford WTP, and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass by repeated recycle of the off-gas condensate into the LAW melter. Other radionuclides that are low but are also expected to be in measurable concentration in the LAW Off-Gas Condensate are {sup 129}I, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Pu, and {sup 241}Am. These are present due to their partial volatility and some entrainment in the off-gas system. This report discusses results of optimized {sup 99}Tc decontamination testing of the simulant. Testing examined use of inorganic reducing agents for {sup 99}Tc. Testing focused on minimizing the quantity of sorbents/reactants added, and minimizing mixing time to reach the decontamination targets in this simulant formulation. Stannous chloride and ferrous sulfate were tested as reducing agents to determine the minimum needed to convert soluble pertechnetate

  7. On shift simulation in aeromedical operations - making it work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Glasheen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Patient care in the prehospital and retrieval medicine (PHARM environment presents many technical and non-technical challenges. Clinicians are frequently required to perform complex interventions in a time critical and resource limited setting. Intensive training is required prior to operational deployment, and ongoing training is vital to ensure optimal team performance in the delivery of high quality patient care. Regular simulation training with high situational fidelity is valuable in developing and maintaining excellence in PHARM. We describe the methods employed by two Australian aeromedical retrieval services to facilitate daily on shift simulation.

  8. Summary of LLNL's accomplishments for the FY93 Waste Processing Operations Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasz, E.; Domning, E.; Heggins, D.; Huber, L.; Hurd, R.; Martz, H.; Roberson, P.; Wilhelmsen, K.

    1994-04-01

    Under the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Technology Development (OTD)-Robotic Technology Development Program (RTDP), the Waste Processing Operations (WPO) Program was initiated in FY92 to address the development of automated material handling and automated chemical and physical processing systems for mixed wastes. The Program's mission was to develop a strategy for the treatment of all DOE mixed, low-level, and transuranic wastes. As part of this mission, DOE's Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) was charged with the development of innovative waste treatment technologies to surmount shortcomings of existing baseline systems. Current technology advancements and applications results from cooperation of private industry, educational institutions, and several national laboratories operated for DOE. This summary document presents the LLNL Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER and WM) Automation and Robotics Section's contributions in support of DOE's FY93 WPO Program. This document further describes the technological developments that were integrated in the 1993 Mixed Waste Operations (MWO) Demonstration held at SRTC in November 1993

  9. Implementation of high fidelity models for the conditions of operation in stop in PWR simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Sevillano, I.; Jimenez Bogarin, R.; Ortega Pascual, F.

    2014-01-01

    The operation in stop cold conditions and in particular the States of operation with reduced inventory, the call of half loop or half nozzle, is becoming increasingly more important. These States of operation are characterized by having the coolant level approximately on the generatrix of the branches, so that any deviation in the level or malfunction of the system for the disposal of waste heat could lead to compromising situations. The importance of this type of situation is reflected in the APS in other modes (APSOM), which show that the risk in these conditions may be comparable to the power. Hence the importance that the simulator training programmes include scenarios that cover these States of operation. The article describes on the one hand, the difficulties encountered in the simulation of situations characterized by low pressure and presence of Non-Condensable and, on the other hand, its implementation, not only in the field of training of plant personnel, but also in the field of review/validation of operating procedures. (Author)

  10. The Herfa-Neurode hazardous waste repository in bedded salt as an operating model for safe mixed waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, N.T.

    1991-01-01

    For 18 years, The Herfa-Neurode underground repository has demonstrated the environmentally sound disposal of hazardous waste in a former potash mine. Its principal characteristics make it an excellent analogue to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The Environmental Protection Agency has ruled in its first conditional no-migration determination that is reasonably certain that no hazardous constituents of the mixed waste, destined for the WIPP during its test phase, will migrate from the site for up to ten years. Knowledge of and reference to the Herfa-Neurode operating model may substantially improve the no-migration variance petition for the WIPP's disposal phase and thereby expedite its approval. 2 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  11. Preparation and Characterization of Chemical Plugs Based on Selected Hanford Waste Simulants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Parker, Kent E.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Gunderson, Katie M.; Baum, Steven R.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Poloski, Adam P.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents the results of preparation and characterization of chemical plugs based on selected Hanford Site waste simulants. Included are the results of chemical plug bench testing conducted in support of the M1/M6 Flow Loop Chemical Plugging/Unplugging Test (TP-RPP-WTP-495 Rev A). These results support the proposed plug simulants for the chemical plugging/ unplugging tests. Based on the available simulant data, a set of simulants was identified that would likely result in chemical plugs. The three types of chemical plugs that were generated and tested in this task consisted of: 1. Aluminum hydroxide (NAH), 2. Sodium aluminosilicate (NAS), and 3. Sodium aluminum phosphate (NAP). While both solvents, namely 2 molar (2 M) nitric acid (HNO3) and 2 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) at 60 C, used in these tests were effective in dissolving the chemical plugs, the 2 M nitric acid was significantly more effective in dissolving the NAH and NAS plugs. The caustic was only slightly more effecting at dissolving the NAP plug. In the bench-scale dissolution tests, hot (60 C) 2 M nitric acid was the most effective solvent in that it completely dissolved both NAH and NAS chemical plugs much faster (1.5 - 2 x) than 2 M sodium hydroxide. So unless there are operational benefits for the use of caustic verses nitric acid, 2 M nitric acid heated to 60 C should be the solvent of choice for dissolving these chemical plugs. Flow-loop testing was planned to identify a combination of parameters such as pressure, flush solution, composition, and temperature that would effectively dissolve and flush each type of chemical plug from preformed chemical plugs in 3-inch-diameter and 4-feet-long pipe sections. However, based on a review of the results of the bench-top tests and technical discussions, the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) Research and Technology (R and T), Engineering and Mechanical Systems (EMS), and Operations concluded that flow-loop testing of the chemically plugged pipe sections

  12. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant full-scale feed preparation testing with water and process simulant slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaskill, J.R.; Larson, D.E.; Abrigo, G.P.

    1996-03-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant was intended to convert selected, pretreated defense high-level waste and transuranic waste from the Hanford Site into a borosilicate glass. A full-scale testing program was conducted with nonradioactive waste simulants to develop information for process and equipment design of the feed-preparation system. The equipment systems tested included the Slurry Receipt and Adjustment Tank, Slurry Mix Evaporator, and Melter-Feed Tank. The areas of data generation included heat transfer (boiling, heating, and cooling), slurry mixing, slurry pumping and transport, slurry sampling, and process chemistry. 13 refs., 129 figs., 68 tabs

  13. Volumetric change of simulated radioactive waste glass irradiated by electron accelerator. [Silica glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Seichi; Furuya, Hirotaka; Inagaki, Yaohiro; Kozaka, Tetsuo; Sugisaki, Masayasu

    1987-11-01

    Density changes of simulated radioactive waste glasses, silica glass and Pyrex glass irradiated by an electron accelerator were measured by a ''sink-float'' technique. The density changes of the waste and silica glasses were less than 0.05 %, irradiated at 2.0 MeV up to the fluence of 1.7 x 10/sup 17/ ecm/sup 2/, while were remarkably smaller than that of Pyrex glass of 0.18 % shrinkage. Precision of the measurements in the density changes of the waste glass was lower than that of Pyrex glass possibly because of the inhomogeneity of the waste glass

  14. Operative team communication during simulated emergencies: Too busy to respond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, W Austin; Jones, Seth; Crowell-Kuhnberg, Adrianna M; O'Keeffe, Dara; Boyle, Kelly M; Klainer, Suzanne B; Smink, Douglas S; Yule, Steven

    2017-05-01

    Ineffective communication among members of a multidisciplinary team is associated with operative error and failure to rescue. We sought to measure operative team communication in a simulated emergency using an established communication framework called "closed loop communication." We hypothesized that communication directed at a specific recipient would be more likely to elicit a check back or closed loop response and that this relationship would vary with changes in patients' clinical status. We used the closed loop communication framework to code retrospectively the communication behavior of 7 operative teams (each comprising 2 surgeons, anesthesiologists, and nurses) during response to a simulated, postanesthesia care unit "code blue." We identified call outs, check backs, and closed loop episodes and applied descriptive statistics and a mixed-effects negative binomial regression to describe characteristics of communication in individuals and in different specialties. We coded a total of 662 call outs. The frequency and type of initiation and receipt of communication events varied between clinical specialties (P communication events than anesthesiologists. For the average participant, directed communication increased the likelihood of check back by at least 50% (P = .021) in periods preceding acute changes in the clinical setting, and exerted no significant effect in periods after acute changes in the clinical situation. Communication patterns vary by specialty during a simulated operative emergency, and the effect of directed communication in eliciting a response depends on the clinical status of the patient. Operative training programs should emphasize the importance of quality communication in the period immediately after an acute change in the clinical setting of a patient and recognize that communication patterns and needs vary between members of multidisciplinary operative teams. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Simulation-based decision support for evaluating operational plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Schubert

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe simulation-based decision support techniques for evaluation of operational plans within effects-based planning. Using a decision support tool, developers of operational plans are able to evaluate thousands of alternative plans against possible courses of events and decide which of these plans are capable of achieving a desired end state. The objective of this study is to examine the potential of a decision support system that helps operational analysts understand the consequences of numerous alternative plans through simulation and evaluation. Operational plans are described in the effects-based approach to operations concept as a set of actions and effects. For each action, we examine several different alternative ways to perform the action. We use a representation where a plan consists of several actions that should be performed. Each action may be performed in one of several different alternative ways. Together these action alternatives make up all possible plan instances, which are represented as a tree of action alternatives that may be searched for the most effective sequence of alternative actions. As a test case, we use an expeditionary operation with a plan of 43 actions and several alternatives for these actions, as well as a scenario of 40 group actors. Decision support for planners is provided by several methods that analyze the impact of a plan on the 40 actors, e.g., by visualizing time series of plan performance. Detailed decision support for finding the most influential actions of a plan is presented by using sensitivity analysis and regression tree analysis. Finally, a decision maker may use the tool to determine the boundaries of an operation that it must not move beyond without risk of drastic failure. The significant contribution of this study is the presentation of an integrated approach for evaluation of operational plans.

  16. Occupational and Public Exposure During Normal Operation of Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Vedernikova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on occupational and public exposure during operation of disposal facilities receiving liquid and solid radioactive waste of various classes and provides a comparative analysis of the relevant doses: actual and calculated at the design stage. Occupational and public exposure study presented in this paper covers normal operations of a radioactive waste disposal facility receiving waste. Results: Analysis of individual and collective occupational doses was performed based on data collected during operation of near-surface disposal facilities for short-lived intermediate-, lowand very low-level waste in France, as well as nearsurface disposal facilities for long-lived waste in Russia. Further analysis of occupational and public doses calculated at the design stage was completed covering a near-surface disposal facility in Belgium and deep disposal facilities in the United Kingdom and the Nizhne-Kansk rock massive (Russia. The results show that engineering and technical solutions enable almost complete elimination of internal occupational exposure, whereas external exposure doses would fall within the range of values typical for a basic nuclear facility. Conclusion: radioactive waste disposal facilities being developed, constructed and operated meet the safety requirements effective in the Russian Federation and consistent with relevant international recommendations. It has been found that individual occupational exposure doses commensurate with those received by personnel of similar facilities abroad. Furthermore, according to the forecasts, mean individual doses for personnel during radioactive waste disposal would be an order of magnitude lower than the dose limit of 20 mSv/year. As for the public exposure, during normal operation, potential impact is virtually impossible by delaminating boundaries of a nuclear facility sanitary protection zone inside which the disposal facility is located and can be solely attributed to the use

  17. Constant extension rate testing of Type 304L stainless steel in simulated waste tank environments

    International Nu