WorldWideScience

Sample records for waste mechancial sludge

  1. Wasting Away: To Sludge or Not to Sludge?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Nicolle

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Following a century of high standards of sanitation, food and water safety in North America are often taken for granted. Recent outbreaks of illness attributed to food and water contamination, however, have challenged this complacency. Now, sludge is added to the list of concerns. Sewage sludge is the muddy substance that remains after the treatment of municipal sewage. This material includes not only human waste, but also household and industrial toxic wastes disposed of in local sewers. Federal and provincial Canadian regulations support the use of this material as fertilizer, within acceptable guidelines, as does the Environmental Protection Agency in the United States. The safety of sludge, however, is questioned by some individuals and groups. Specifically, the risk of infectious agents and toxins to workers or other exposed individuals, and the potential for heavy metals and organic chemicals to be transferred from sludge-treated fields into crops are concerns.

  2. Utilizing waste activated sludge for animal feeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beszedits, S.

    1981-01-01

    Activated sludge has a high protein content and is a good source of B-group vitamins and generally also of minerals (Ca, Mg, Fe and K). Propionibacterium freudenreichii can be readily incorporated into the activated sludge to synthesize vitamin B12, particularly high vitamin yields being obtained with sewage mixed with dairy waste. Numerous examples of successful use of activated sludge in animal feeding are given.

  3. Bacteriological studies on dairy waste activated sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adamse, A.D.

    1966-01-01

    Dairy-waste activated sludge was examined for bacterial composition and response to different conditions. Strains isolated were classified mainly into three groups: predominantly coryneform bacteria (largely Arthrobacter), some Achromobacteraceae and a small groups of Pseudomonadaceae.

  4. Effect of microwave pre-treatment of thickened waste activated sludge on biogas production from co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste, thickened waste activated sludge and municipal sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ara, E; Sartaj, M; Kennedy, K

    2014-12-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste, with thickened waste activated sludge and primary sludge has the potential to enhance biodegradation of solid waste, increase longevity of existing landfills and lead to more sustainable development by improving waste to energy production. This study reports on mesophilic batch and continuous studies using different concentrations and combinations (ratios) of organic fraction of municipal solid waste, thickened waste activated sludge (microwave pre-treated and untreated) and primary sludge to assess the potential for improved biodegradability and specific biogas production. Improvements in specific biogas production for batch assays, with concomitant improvements in total chemical oxygen demand and volatile solid removal, were obtained with organic fraction of municipal solid waste:thickened waste activated sludge:primary sludge mixtures at a ratio of 50:25:25 (with and without thickened waste activated sludge microwave pre-treatment). This combination was used for continuous digester studies. At 15 d hydraulic retention times, the co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste:organic fraction of municipal solid waste:primary sludge and organic fraction of municipal solid waste:thickened waste activated sludge microwave:primary sludge resulted in a 1.38- and 1.46-fold increase in biogas production and concomitant waste stabilisation when compared with thickened waste activated sludge:primary sludge (50:50) and thickened waste activated sludge microwave:primary sludge (50:50) digestion at the same hydraulic retention times and volumetric volatile solid loading rate, respectively. The digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste with primary sludge and thickened waste activated sludge provides beneficial effects that could be implemented at municipal wastewater treatment plants that are operating at loading rates of less than design capacity. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Improved waste-activated sludge dewatering using sludge/oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ultrasonication had low dewatering and energy efficiency with long irradiation times, indicating that it would be difficult to implement in a field plant. The water content of sludge was reduced to 60% within 120 s using microwaves, but dewatering efficiency depended on the thickness and volume of the sludge. In a pilot-scale ...

  6. Effect of ultrasonic specific energy on waste activated sludge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of ultrasonic specific energy on waste activated sludge (WAS) solubilization and enzyme activity was investigated in this study. Experimental results showed that the increase of ultrasonic specific energy in the range of 0 - 90000 kJ/kg dried sludge (DS) benefited WAS particle size reduction and the solubilization ...

  7. Co-digestion of pig slaughterhouse waste with sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Sebastian; Kubacki, Przemysław

    2015-06-01

    Slaughterhouse wastes (SHW) are potentially very attractive substrates for biogas production. However, mono-digestion of these wastes creates great technological problems associated with the inhibitory effects of ammonia and fatty acids on methanogens as well as with the foaming in the digesters. In the following study, the co-digestion of slaughterhouse wastes with sewage sludge (SS) was undertaken. Batch and semi-continuous experiments were performed at 35°C with municipal sewage sludge and pig SHW composed of meat tissue, intestines, bristles and post-flotation sludge. In batch assays, meat tissue and intestinal wastes gave the highest methane productions of 976 and 826 dm(3)/kg VS, respectively, whereas the methane yield from the sludge was only 370 dm(3)/kg VS. The co-digestion of sewage sludge with 50% SHW (weight basis) provided the methane yield exceeding 600 dm(3)/kg VS, which was more than twice as high as the methane production from sewage sludge alone. However, when the loading rate exceeded 4 kg VS/m(3) d, a slight inhibition of methanogenesis was observed, without affecting the digester stability. The experiments showed that the co-digestion of sewage sludge with large amount of slaughterhouse wastes is feasible, and the enhanced methane production does not affect the digester stability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Biodegradation of waste PET based copolyesters in thermophilic anaerobic sludge

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hermanová, S.; Šmejkalová, P.; Merna, J.; Zarevúcka, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 111, Jan (2015), s. 176-184 ISSN 0141-3910 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : poly(ethylene terephthalate) * copolymers * sludge * biodegradation * hydrolysis * waste Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 3.120, year: 2015

  9. Enzyme Activities in Waste Water and Activated Sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybroe, Ole; Jørgensen, Per Elberg; Henze, Mogens

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential of selected enzyme activity assays to determine microbial abundance and heterotrophic activity in waste water and activated sludge. In waste water, esterase and dehydrogenase activities were found to correlate with microbial abundance...

  10. Biogas potential from anaerobic co-digestion of faecal sludge with food waste and garden waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifah, Ukhtiy; Priadi, Cindy Rianti

    2017-03-01

    The limited faecal sludge management can be optimized by converting the sludge into biogas. This study purposed to optimize the biogas potential of faecal sludge with food waste and garden waste. The system using Anaerobic Co-digestion on the variation 25% and 50% concentration of faecal sludge based on Volatile Solids (VS). Inoculum used was cow's rumen. The study was operated using lab-scale batch reactor 51 L for 42 days. Biogas produced at 25% concentration of faecal sludge is 0,30 m3CH4/kg with 71,93% VS and 72,42% COD destruction. Meanwhile, at 50% concentration of faecal sludge produce 0,56 m3CH4/kg VS biogas with 92,43% VS and 87,55% COD destruction. This study concludes that biogas potential of 50% concentration greater than 25% concentration of faecal sludge.

  11. High Level Waste System Impacts from Acid Dissolution of Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KETUSKY, EDWARD

    2006-04-20

    This research evaluates the ability of OLI{copyright} equilibrium based software to forecast Savannah River Site High Level Waste system impacts from oxalic acid dissolution of Tank 1-15 sludge heels. Without further laboratory and field testing, only the use of oxalic acid can be considered plausible to support sludge heel dissolution on multiple tanks. Using OLI{copyright} and available test results, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Material and energy balances, coupled with the model, identify potential safety concerns. Overpressurization and overheating are shown to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen could, however, overwhelm the tank ventilation. While pH adjustment can restore the minimal hydrogen generation, resultant precipitates will notably increase the sludge volume. OLI{copyright} is used to develop a flowsheet such that additional sludge vitrification canisters and other negative system impacts are minimized. Sensitivity analyses are used to assess the processability impacts from variations in the sludge/quantities of acids.

  12. Thermoradiation treatment of sewage sludge using reactor waste fission products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, M. C.; Hagengruber, R. L.; Zuppero, A. C.

    1974-06-01

    The hazards to public health associated with the application of municipal sewage sludge to land usage are reviewed to establish the need for disinfection of sludge prior to its distribution as a fertilizer, especially in the production of food and fodder. The use of ionizing radiation in conjunction with mild heating is shown to be an effective disinfection treatment and an economical one when reactor waste fission products are utilized. A program for researching and experimental demonstration of the process on sludges is also outlined.

  13. Sludge as dioxins suppressant in hospital waste incineration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Mi; Li, Xiaodong; Yang, Jie; Chen, Tong; Lu, Shengyong; Buekens, Alfons G; Olie, Kees; Yan, Jianhua

    2012-07-01

    Nitrogen containing compounds such as ammonia, urea and amines can effectively inhibit the formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). Sewage sludge accumulates both sulfur and nitrogen during wastewater treatment so it could be used to reduce PCDD/Fs formation. Indeed, it is observed in this study that the gas evolving from the sludge drying process can significantly suppress chlorobenzene (CBz) and PCDD/Fs formation from fly ash collected from a hospital waste incinerator. For instance, the reduction of hexachlorobenzene (HxCBz) and PCDD/Fs amount was 92.1% and 78.7%, respectively, when the drying gas evolving from 2g sludge flew through 2g fly ash. These tests were conducted in the frame of projects devoted to hospital waste incineration. The disposal technology for hospital waste (HW), developed in this institute, features rotary kiln pyrolysis combined with post-combustion followed by flue gas cleaning. Hence, some preliminary tests were devoted to investigate dioxins suppression by co-pyrolysis and co-combustion of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and sludge in lab scale. More experimental research will be conducted to appropriately assess these effects of sludge on PCDD/Fs emissions during co-pyrolysis/combustion of HW and sludge. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Anaerobic bioleaching of metals from waste activated sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meulepas, Roel J.W., E-mail: roel.meulepas@wetsus.nl [UNESCO-IHE, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft (Netherlands); Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela [UNESCO-IHE, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft (Netherlands); King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Water Desalination and Reuse Center, Thuwal 13955-69000 (Saudi Arabia); Teshager, Fitfety Melese; Witharana, Ayoma [UNESCO-IHE, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft (Netherlands); Saikaly, Pascal E. [King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Water Desalination and Reuse Center, Thuwal 13955-69000 (Saudi Arabia); Lens, Piet N.L. [UNESCO-IHE, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-05-01

    Heavy metal contamination of anaerobically digested waste activated sludge hampers its reuse as fertilizer or soil conditioner. Conventional methods to leach metals require aeration or the addition of leaching agents. This paper investigates whether metals can be leached from waste activated sludge during the first, acidifying stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion without the supply of leaching agents. These leaching experiments were done with waste activated sludge from the Hoek van Holland municipal wastewater treatment plant (The Netherlands), which contained 342 μg g{sup −1} of copper, 487 μg g{sup −1} of lead, 793 μg g{sup −1} of zinc, 27 μg g{sup −1} of nickel and 2.3 μg g{sup −1} of cadmium. During the anaerobic acidification of 3 g{sub dry} {sub weight} L{sup −1} waste activated sludge, 80–85% of the copper, 66–69% of the lead, 87% of the zinc, 94–99% of the nickel and 73–83% of the cadmium were leached. The first stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion can thus be optimized as an anaerobic bioleaching process and produce a treated sludge (i.e., digestate) that meets the land-use standards in The Netherlands for copper, zinc, nickel and cadmium, but not for lead. - Highlights: • Heavy metals were leached during anaerobic acidification of waste activated sludge. • The process does not require the addition of chelating or oxidizing agents. • The metal leaching efficiencies (66 to 99%) were comparable to chemical leaching. • The produced leachate may be used for metal recovery and biogas production. • The produced digested sludge may be used as soil conditioner.

  15. The final treatment of FGD-waste water sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugghen, F.W. van der (N.V. KEMA, Arnhem (Netherlands))

    1993-01-01

    FGD installations based on lime/limestone gypsum processes produce waste water. This waste water has to be treated prior to discharge. The sludge formed during this waste water treatment contains gypsum, CaF[sub 2], Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], SiO[sub 2], Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3] and MgO as well as minor amounts of heavy metals like As, Cd, Pb, Zn and Hg. There are three methods for the final treatment of the sludges: disposal; mixing with gypsum; coffering in the boiler. An inventory has been made of the amounts and composition of the sludge produced by FGD plants in The Netherlands. The consequences of the three treatment methods for emissions, by-product quality and costs are described and compared. 1 ref., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Anaerobic bioleaching of metals from waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulepas, Roel J W; Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Teshager, Fitfety Melese; Witharana, Ayoma; Saikaly, Pascal E; Lens, Piet N L

    2015-05-01

    Heavy metal contamination of anaerobically digested waste activated sludge hampers its reuse as fertilizer or soil conditioner. Conventional methods to leach metals require aeration or the addition of leaching agents. This paper investigates whether metals can be leached from waste activated sludge during the first, acidifying stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion without the supply of leaching agents. These leaching experiments were done with waste activated sludge from the Hoek van Holland municipal wastewater treatment plant (The Netherlands), which contained 342 μg g(-1) of copper, 487 μg g(-1) of lead, 793 μg g(-1) of zinc, 27 μg g(-1) of nickel and 2.3 μg g(-1) of cadmium. During the anaerobic acidification of 3 gdry weight L(-1) waste activated sludge, 80-85% of the copper, 66-69% of the lead, 87% of the zinc, 94-99% of the nickel and 73-83% of the cadmium were leached. The first stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion can thus be optimized as an anaerobic bioleaching process and produce a treated sludge (i.e., digestate) that meets the land-use standards in The Netherlands for copper, zinc, nickel and cadmium, but not for lead. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Anaerobic bioleaching of metals from waste activated sludge

    KAUST Repository

    Meulepas, Roel J W

    2015-05-01

    Heavy metal contamination of anaerobically digested waste activated sludge hampers its reuse as fertilizer or soil conditioner. Conventional methods to leach metals require aeration or the addition of leaching agents. This paper investigates whether metals can be leached from waste activated sludge during the first, acidifying stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion without the supply of leaching agents. These leaching experiments were done with waste activated sludge from the Hoek van Holland municipal wastewater treatment plant (The Netherlands), which contained 342μgg-1 of copper, 487μgg-1 of lead, 793μgg-1 of zinc, 27μgg-1 of nickel and 2.3μgg-1 of cadmium. During the anaerobic acidification of 3gdry weightL-1 waste activated sludge, 80-85% of the copper, 66-69% of the lead, 87% of the zinc, 94-99% of the nickel and 73-83% of the cadmium were leached. The first stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion can thus be optimized as an anaerobic bioleaching process and produce a treated sludge (i.e., digestate) that meets the land-use standards in The Netherlands for copper, zinc, nickel and cadmium, but not for lead.

  18. Anaerobic co-digestion of sewage sludge and food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Meghanath S; Mutnuri, Srikanth

    2016-04-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of organic matter improves digester operating characteristics and its performance. In the present work, food waste was collected from the institute cafeteria. Two types of sludge (before centrifuge and after centrifuge) were collected from the fluidised bed reactor of the institute treating sewage wastewater. Food waste and sludge were studied for their physico-chemical characteristics, such as pH, chemical oxygen demand, total solids, volatile solids, ammoniacal nitrogen, and total nitrogen. A biomethane potential assay was carried out to find out the optimum mixing ratio of food waste and sludge for anaerobic co-digestion. Results indicated that food waste mixed with sludge in the ratio of 1:2 produced the maximum biogas of 823 ml gVS(-1)(21 days) with an average methane content of 60%. Batch studies were conducted in 5 L lab-glass reactors at a mesophilic temperature. The effect of different substrate loading rates on biogas production was investigated. The mixing ratio of food waste and sludge was 1:2. A loading rate of 1 gVS L d(-1)gave the maximum biogas production of 742 ml g(-1)VS L d(-1)with a methane content of 50%, followed by 2 gVS L d(-1)with biogas of 539 ml g(-1)VS L d(-1) Microbial diversity of the reactor during fed batch studies was investigated by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism. A pilot-scale co-digestion of food waste and sludge (before centrifuge) indicated the process stability of anaerobic digestion. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Additional paper waste in pulping sludge for biohydrogen production by heat-shocked sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chairattanamanokorn, Prapaipid; Tapananont, Supachok; Detjaroen, Siriporn; Sangkhatim, Juthatip; Anurakpongsatorn, Patana; Sirirote, Pramote

    2012-01-01

    Dark anaerobic fermentation is an interesting alternative method for producing biohydrogen (H(2)) as a renewable fuel because of its low cost and various usable organic substrates. Pulping sludge from wastewater treatment containing plentiful cellulosic substrate could be feasibly utilized for H(2) production by dark fermentation. The objective of this study was to investigate the optimal proportion of pulping sludge to paper waste, the optimal initial pH, and the optimal ratio of carbon and nitrogen (C/N) for H(2) production by anaerobic seed sludge pretreated with heat. The pulping sludge was pretreated with NaOH solution at high temperature and further hydrolyzed with crude cellulase. Pretreatment of the pulping sludge with 3% NaOH solution under autoclave at 121 °C for 2 h, hydrolysis with 5 FPU crude cellulase at 50 °C, and pH 4.8 for 24 h provided the highest reducing sugar production yield (229.68 ± 2.09 mg/g(TVS)). An initial pH of 6 and a C/N ratio of 40 were optimal conditions for H(2) production. Moreover, the supplement of paper waste in the pulping sludge enhanced the cumulative H(2) production yield. The continuous hydrogen production was further conducted in a glass reactor with nylon pieces as supporting media and the maximum hydrogen production yield was 151.70 ml/g(TVS).

  20. Leachability of fired clay brick incorporating with sewage sludge waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Salim, Nurul Salhana Abdul; Sarani, Noor Amira; Rahmat, Nur Aqma Izurin; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri

    2017-09-01

    Sewage sludge is sewerage from wastewater treatment plants that generates millions tons of sludge ever year. Regarding this activity, it causes lack management of waste which is harmful to the surrounding conditions. Therefore, this study is focuses on the incorporation of sewage sludge waste into fired clay brick to provide an option of disposal method, producing adequate quality of brick as well as limiting the heavy metal leachability to the environment. Sewage sludge brick (SSB) mixtures were incorporated with 0%, 1%, 5%, 10%, 20% and 30% of sewage sludge waste (SSW). Heavy metals of crushed SSB were determined by using Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) according to Method 1311 of United State Environment Protection Agency (USEPA) standard. From the results obtained, up to 20% of SSW could be incorporated into fired clay brick and comply with the USEPA standard. Therefore, this study revealed that by incorporating SSW into fired clay brick it could be an alternative method to dispose the SSW and also could act as a replacement material for brick manufacturing with appropriate mix and design.

  1. Effect of ultrasonic specific energy on waste activated sludge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-03-22

    Mar 22, 2010 ... Key word: Waste activated sludge (WAS), ultrasonic, solubilization, disintegration degree, enzyme activity. ... E-mail: fengleiyu2001@yahoo.com.cn. .... treated by ultrasonics at different specific energies, the mean particle size changed dramatically. For example, at the specific energy of 15000 kJ/kg DS, the ...

  2. Continuous biohydrogen production from waste bread by anaerobic sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei; Huang, Jingang; Zhao, Hongting; Li, Yongfeng

    2016-07-01

    In this study, continuous biohydrogen production from waste bread by anaerobic sludge was performed. The waste bread was first hydrolyzed by the crude enzymes which were generated by Aspergillus awamori and Aspergillus oryzae via solid-state fermentation. It was observed that 49.78g/L glucose and 284.12mg/L free amino nitrogen could be produced with waste bread mass ratio of 15% (w/v). The waste bread hydrolysate was then used for biohydrogen production by anaerobic sludge in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The optimal hydrogen production rate of 7.4L/(Ld) was achieved at chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 6000mg/L. According to the results obtained from this study, 1g waste bread could generate 0.332g glucose which could be further utilized to produce 109.5mL hydrogen. This is the first study which reports continuous biohydrogen production from waste bread by anaerobic sludge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Properties of fired clay brick incorporating with sewage sludge waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Salim, Nurul Salhana Abdul; Sarani, Noor Amira; Rahmat, Nur Aqma Izurin; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri

    2017-09-01

    The production of sludge in wastewater treatment plant is about to increase every year and most of the sludge was directly disposed to landfill. In addition, the constraint to treat sludge is very high in cost and time- consuming could be disadvantages to the responsible parties. Therefore, this research was conducted to utilize sludge produced from the wastewater treatment plant into fired clay brick as one of the alternatives of disposal method. In this study, the research attempt to incorporate sewage sludge waste (SSW) into fired clay brick. The sewage sludge brick (SSB) mixtures were incorporated with 0%, 1%, 5%, 10%, and 20% of SSW. The manufactured bricks were fired at 1050°C with heating rate of 1°C/min. Physical and mechanical properties test were conducted such as shrinkage, density, water absorption and compressive strength. As the conclusion, brick with utilization 5% of SSW is acceptable to produce good quality of brick. This study shows by using SSW in fired clay brick could be an alternative method to dispose of the SSW and also could act as a replacement material for brick manufacturing with appropriate mix and design.

  4. Improvement of permeability of waste sludge by mixing with slag or construction and demolition waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Hiroshi; Endo, Kazuto; Yamada, Masato; Inoue, Yuzo; Ono, Yusaku

    2009-06-01

    To determine the allowable ratio of waste sludge required to ensure an aerobic zone in the landfill, we investigated sludge permeability, which involved mixing sludge, the major landfill waste in Japan, at different mixing ratios with other wastes (slag and construction and demolition waste (C&D)). We measured parameters of sample permeability and analyzed parameters that exert a large influence on oxygen penetration depth with a simulation model accounting for both diffusion and convection driven by temperature gradients. We also determined the critical volumetric contents in which gas and/or water permeability change significantly when sludge is mixed with sand or gravel. From the results of the simulations, gas permeability of the layer, the difference between inside and outside temperatures and the oxygen consumption rate exert a large influence on the resulting oxygen penetration depth. The allowable ratio of sludge required to ensure an aerobic zone in the landfill was determined by considering the balance of the above three parameters. By keeping volumetric sludge content to below 25%, air convection and oxygen penetration depth of several meters were achieved in the modeling.

  5. CFD analysis of sludge accumulation and hydraulic performance of a waste stabilization pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Andres; Sanchez, Esteban; Durazno, Galo; Vesvikar, Mehul; Nopens, Ingmar

    2012-01-01

    Sludge management in waste stabilization ponds (WSPs) is essential for safeguarding the system performance. Sludge accumulation patterns in WSPs are strongly influenced by the pond hydrodynamics. CFD modeling was applied to study the relation between velocity profiles and sludge deposition during 10 years of operation of the Ucubamba WSP in Cuenca (Ecuador). One tracer experiment was performed and three sludge accumulation scenarios based on bathymetric surveys were simulated. A residence time distribution (RTD) analysis illustrated the decrease of residence times due to sludge deposition. Sludge accumulation rates were calculated. The influence of flow pattern on the sludge deposition was studied, enabling better planning of future pond operation and desludging.

  6. VOC transport in vented drums containing simulated waste sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liekhus, K.J.; Gresham, G.L.; Rae, C.; Connolly, M.J.

    1994-02-01

    A model is developed to estimate the volatile organic compound (VOC) concentration in the headspace of the innermost layer of confinement in a lab-scale vented waste drum containing simulated waste sludge. The VOC transport model estimates the concentration using the measured VOC concentration beneath the drum lid and model parameters defined or estimated from process knowledge of drum contents and waste drum configuration. Model parameters include the VOC diffusion characteristic across the filter vent, VOC diffusivity in air, size of opening in the drum liner lid, the type and number of layers of polymer bags surrounding the waste, VOC permeability across the polymer, and the permeable surface area of the polymer bags. Comparison of model and experimental results indicates that the model can accurately estimate VOC concentration in the headspace of the innermost layer of confinement. The model may be useful in estimating the VOC concentration in actual waste drums.

  7. The effect of operating conditions on aquatic worms eating waste sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, T.L.G.; Temmink, H.; Elissen, H.J.H.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2009-01-01

    Several techniques are available for dealing with the waste sludge produced in biological waste water treatment. A biological approach uses aquatic worms to consume and partially digest the waste sludge. In our concept for a worm reactor, the worms (Lumbriculus variegatus) are immobilised in a

  8. Aged refuse enhances anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianwei; Gui, Lin; Wang, Qilin; Liu, Yiwen; Wang, Dongbo; Ni, Bing-Jie; Li, Xiaoming; Xu, Rui; Zeng, Guangming; Yang, Qi

    2017-10-15

    In this work, a low-cost alternative approach (i.e., adding aged refuse (AR) into waste activated sludge) to significantly enhance anaerobic digestion of sludge was reported. Experimental results showed that with the addition dosage of AR increasing from 0 to 400 mg/g dry sludge soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD) increased from 1150 to 5240 mg/L at the digestion time of 5 d, while the maximal production of volatile fatty acids (VFA) increased from 82.6 to 183.9 mg COD/g volatile suspended solids. Although further increase of AR addition decreased the concentrations of both soluble COD and VFA, their contents in these systems with AR addition at any concentration investigated were still higher than those in the blank, which resulted in higher methane yields in these systems. Mechanism studies revealed that pertinent addition of AR promoted solubilization, hydrolysis, and acidogenesis processes and did not affect methanogenesis significantly. It was found that varieties of enzymes and anaerobes in AR were primary reason for the enhancement of anaerobic digestion. Humic substances in AR benefited hydrolysis and acidogenesis but inhibited methanogenesis. The effect of heavy metals in AR on sludge anaerobic digestion was dosage dependent. Sludge anaerobic digestion was enhanced by appropriate amounts of heavy metals but inhibited by excessive amounts of heavy metals. The relative abundances of microorganisms responsible for sludge hydrolysis and acidogenesis were also observed to be improved in the system with AR addition, which was consistent with the performance of anaerobic digestion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Laboratory stabilization/solidification of surrogate and actual mixed-waste sludge in glass and grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, R.D.; Gilliam, T.M.; Mattus, C.H.; Mattus, A.J.

    1998-03-03

    Grouting and vitrification are currently the most likely stabilization/solidification technologies for mixed wastes. Grouting has been used to stabilize and solidify hazardous and low-level waste for decades. Vitrification has long been developed as a high-level-waste alternative and has been under development recently as an alternative treatment technology for low-level mixed waste. Laboratory testing has been performed to develop grout and vitrification formulas for mixed-waste sludges currently stored in underground tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and to compare these waste forms. Envelopes, or operating windows, for both grout and soda-lime-silica glass formulations for a surrogate sludge were developed. One formulation within each envelope was selected for testing the sensitivity of performance to variations ({+-}10 wt%) in the waste form composition and variations in the surrogate sludge composition over the range previously characterized in the sludges. In addition, one sludge sample of an actual mixed-waste tank was obtained, a surrogate was developed for this sludge sample, and grout and glass samples were prepared and tested in the laboratory using both surrogate and the actual sludge. The sensitivity testing of a surrogate tank sludge in selected glass and grout formulations is discussed in this paper, along with the hot-cell testing of an actual tank sludge sample.

  10. Effects of waste glass additions on quality of textile sludge-based bricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Ari; Urabe, Takeo; Kishimoto, Naoyuki; Mizuhara, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    This research investigated the utilization of textile sludge as a substitute for clay in brick production. The addition of textile sludge to a brick specimen enhanced its pores, thus reducing the quality of the product. However, the addition of waste glass to brick production materials improved the quality of the brick in terms of both compressive strength and water absorption. Maximum compressive strength was observed with the following composition of waste materials: 30% textile sludge, 60% clay and 10% waste glass. The melting of waste glass clogged up pores on the brick, which improved water absorption performance and compressive strength. Moreover, a leaching test on a sludge-based brick to which 10% waste glass did not detect significant heavy metal compounds in leachates, with the product being in conformance with standard regulations. The recycling of textile sludge for brick production, when combined with waste glass additions, may thus be promising in terms of both product quality and environmental aspects.

  11. Gas Retention and Release from Hanford Site Sludge Waste Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meacham, Joseph E.; Follett, Jordan R.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Schonewill, Philip P.

    2015-02-18

    Radioactive wastes from nuclear fuel processing are stored in large underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. Solid wastes can be divided into saltcake (mostly precipitated soluble sodium nitrate and nitrite salts with some interstitial liquid consisting of concentrated salt solutions) and sludge (mostly low solubility aluminum and iron compounds with relatively dilute interstitial liquid). Waste generates hydrogen through the radiolysis of water and organic compounds, radio-thermolytic decomposition of organic compounds, and corrosion of a tank’s carbon steel walls. Nonflammable gases, such as nitrous oxide and nitrogen, are also produced. Additional flammable gases (e.g., ammonia and methane) are generated by chemical reactions between various degradation products of organic chemicals present in the tanks.

  12. Fabrication of microfibrillated cellulose gel from waste pulp sludge via mild maceration combined with mechanical shearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusheng Chen; Junyong Zhu; Zhaohui Tong

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a facile route, which combines mild maceration of waste pulp sludge and a mechanical shearing process, to prepare microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) with a high storage modulus. In the maceration, the mixture of glacial acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide was used to extract cellulose from never-dried waste pulp sludge. Then, two different mechanical...

  13. Characterization and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 3) and REDOX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 4) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, Lanee A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-02-13

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.(a) The testing program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual wastetesting program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR)—are the subjects of this report. Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, requiring caustic leaching. Characterization of the composite Group 3 and Group 4 waste samples confirmed them to be high in gibbsite. The focus of the Group 3 and 4 testing was on determining the behavior of gibbsite during caustic leaching. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  14. Filtration and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Sludge and REDOX Cladding Sludge Actual Waste Sample Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-03-02

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes and Voke 2006). The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP RPP WTP 467 (Fiskum et al. 2007), eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan. • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups. • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest. • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on a filtration/leaching test performed using two of the eight waste composite samples. The sample groups examined in this report were the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR). Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, thus requiring caustic leaching. WTP RPT 167 (Snow et al. 2008) describes the homogenization, characterization, and parametric leaching activities before benchtop filtration/leaching testing of these two waste groups. Characterization and initial parametric data in that report were used to plan a single filtration/leaching test using a blend of both wastes. The test focused on filtration testing of the waste and caustic leaching for aluminum, in the form

  15. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtrations Testing of Ferrocyanide Tank sludge (Group 8) Actual Waste Composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

    2009-02-28

    This is the final report in a series of eight reports defining characterization, leach, and filtration testing of a wide variety of Hanford tank waste sludges. The information generated from this series is intended to supplement the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) project understanding of actual waste behaviors associated with tank waste sludge processing through the pretreatment portion of the WTP. The work described in this report presents information on a high-iron waste form, specifically the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge. Iron hydroxide has been shown to pose technical challenges during filtration processing; the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge represented a good source of the high-iron matrix to test the filtration processing.

  16. Using cement, lignite fly ash and baghouse filter waste for solidification of chromium electroplating treatment sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wantawin, C.

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to use baghouse filter waste as a binder mixed with cement and lignite fly ash to solidify sludge from chromium electroplating wastewater treatment. To save cost of solidification, reducing cement in binder and increasing sludge in the cube were focused on. Minimum percent cement in binder of 20 for solidification of chromium sludge was found when controlling lignite fly ash to baghouse filter waste at the ratio of 30:70, sludge to binder ratio of 0.5, water to mixer ratio of 0.3 and curing time of 7 days. Increase of sludge to binder ratio from 0.5 to 0.75 and 1 resulted in increase in the minimum percent cement in binder up to 30 percent in both ratios. With the minimum percent cement in binder, the calculated cement to sludge ratios for samples with sludge to binder ratios of 0.5, 0.75 and 1 were 0.4, 0.4 and 0.3 respectively. Leaching chromium and compressive strength of the samples with these ratios could achieve the solidified waste standard by the Ministry of Industry. For solidification of chromium sludge at sludge to binder ratio of 1, the lowest cost binder ratio of cement to lignite fly ash and baghouse filter waste in this study was 30:21:49. The cost of binder in this ratio was 718 baht per ton dry sludge.

  17. Thermophilic slurry-phase treatment of petroleum hydrocarbon waste sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaldi, F.J.; Bombaugh, K.J. [Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States); McFarland, B. [Chevron Research and Technology Co., Richmond, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Chemoheterotrophic thermophilic bacteria were used to achieve enhanced hydrocarbon degradation during slurry-phase treatment of oily waste sludges from petroleum refinery operations. Aerobic and anaerobic bacterial cultures were examined under thermophilic conditions to assess the effects of mode of metabolism on the potential for petroleum hydrocarbon degradation. The study determined that both aerobic and anaerobic thermophilic bacteria are capable of growth on petroleum hydrocarbons. Thermophilic methanogenesis is feasible during the degradation of hydrocarbons when a strict anaerobic condition is achieved in a slurry bioreactor. Aerobic thermophilic bacteria achieved the largest apparent reduction in chemical oxygen demand, freon extractable oil, total and volatile solid,s and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) when treating oily waste sludges. The observed shift with time in the molecular weight distribution of hydrocarbon material was more pronounced under aerobic metabolic conditions than under strict anaerobic conditions. The changes in the hydrocarbon molecular weight distribution, infrared spectra, and PAH concentrations during slurry-phase treatment indicate that the aerobic thermophilic bioslurry achieved a higher degree of hydrocarbon degradation than the anaerobic thermophilic bioslurry during the same time period.

  18. Using cement, lignite fly ash and baghouse filter waste for solidification of chromium electroplating treatment sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Wantawin, C.; Chobthiangtham, P.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the study is to use baghouse filter waste as a binder mixed with cement and lignite fly ash to solidify sludge from chromium electroplating wastewater treatment. To save cost of solidification, reducing cement in binder and increasing sludge in the cube were focused on. Minimum percent cement in binder of 20 for solidification of chromium sludge was found when controlling lignite fly ash to baghouse filter waste at the ratio of 30:70, sludge to binder ratio of 0.5, water to m...

  19. EU landfill waste acceptance criteria and EU Hazardous Waste Directive compliance testing of incinerated sewage sludge ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donatello, S; Tyrer, M; Cheeseman, C R

    2010-01-01

    A hazardous waste assessment has been completed on ash samples obtained from seven sewage sludge incinerators operating in the UK, using the methods recommended in the EU Hazardous Waste Directive. Using these methods, the assumed speciation of zinc (Zn) ultimately determines if the samples are hazardous due to ecotoxicity hazard. Leaching test results showed that two of the seven sewage sludge ash samples would require disposal in a hazardous waste landfill because they exceed EU landfill waste acceptance criteria for stabilised non-reactive hazardous waste cells for soluble selenium (Se). Because Zn cannot be proven to exist predominantly as a phosphate or oxide in the ashes, it is recommended they be considered as non-hazardous waste. However leaching test results demonstrate that these ashes cannot be considered as inert waste, and this has significant implications for the management, disposal and re-use of sewage sludge ash.

  20. Effects of waste glass and waste foundry sand additions on reclaimed tiles containing sewage sludge ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Deng-Fong; Luo, Huan-Lin; Lin, Kuo-Liang; Liu, Zhe-Kun

    2017-07-01

    Applying sewage sludge ash (SSA) to produce reclaimed tiles is a promising recycling technology in resolving the increasing sludge wastes from wastewater treatment. However, performance of such reclaimed tiles is inferior to that of original ceramic tiles. Many researchers have therefore tried adding various industrial by-products to improve reclaimed tile properties. In this study, multiple materials including waste glass and waste foundry sand (WFS) were added in an attempt to improve physical and mechanical properties of reclaimed tiles with SSA. Samples with various combinations of clay, WFS, waste glass and SSA were made with three kiln temperatures of 1000°C, 1050°C, and 1100°C. A series of tests on the samples were next conducted. Test results showed that waste glass had positive effects on bending strength, water absorption and weight loss on ignition, while WFS contributed the most in reducing shrinkage, but could decrease the tile bending strength when large amount was added at a high kiln temperature. This study suggested that a combination of WFS from 10% to 15%, waste glass from 15% to 20%, SSA at 10% at a kiln temperature between 1000°C and 1050°C could result in quality reclaimed tiles with a balanced performance.

  1. Effect of gamma-ray irradiation on the dewaterability of waste activated sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuqi; Jiang, Yinghe; Ke, Guojun; Liu, Yingjiu

    2017-01-01

    The effect of gamma-ray irradiation on waste activated sludge (WAS) dewaterability was investigated with irradiation doses of 0-15 kGy. Time to filter (TTF50), specific resistance of filtration (SRF) and water content of sludge cake were measured to evaluate sludge dewaterability. Soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD), soluble extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) concentration and sludge particle size were determined to explain changes in sludge dewaterability. The optimal irradiation dose to obtain the maximum dewaterability characteristics was 1-4 kGy, which generated sludge with optimal disintegration (1.5-4.0%), soluble EPS concentration (590-750 mg/L) and particle size distribution (100-115 μm diameter). The combination of irradiation and cationic polyacrylamide (CPAM) addition exhibited minimal synergistic effect on increasing sludge dewatering rate compared with CPAM conditioning alone.

  2. Intensification of the anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge by pulsed electric field technology

    OpenAIRE

    Appels, Lise; Houtmeyers, Sofie; Van Impe, Jan; Dewil, Raf

    2012-01-01

    Huge amounts of excess sludge are generated during biological wastewater treatment. This sludge must undergo further treatment steps prior to disposal, resulting in treatment costs up to 50 % of the total wastewater treatment costs. Anaerobic digestion as a sludge treatment step is widely applied due to the increasing trend towards energy recovery of this waste stream. Its main advantage is the production of an energy-rich biogas (55-70 % methane), which can be valorized energetically in a CH...

  3. Sewage sludge drying process integration with a waste-to-energy power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, A; Bonfiglioli, L; Pellegrini, M; Saccani, C

    2015-08-01

    Dewatered sewage sludge from Waste Water Treatment Plants (WWTPs) is encountering increasing problems associated with its disposal. Several solutions have been proposed in the last years regarding energy and materials recovery from sewage sludge. Current technological solutions have relevant limits as dewatered sewage sludge is characterized by a high water content (70-75% by weight), even if mechanically treated. A Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) with good thermal characteristics in terms of Lower Heating Value (LHV) can be obtained if dewatered sludge is further processed, for example by a thermal drying stage. Sewage sludge thermal drying is not sustainable if the power is fed by primary energy sources, but can be appealing if waste heat, recovered from other processes, is used. A suitable integration can be realized between a WWTP and a waste-to-energy (WTE) power plant through the recovery of WTE waste heat as energy source for sewage sludge drying. In this paper, the properties of sewage sludge from three different WWTPs are studied. On the basis of the results obtained, a facility for the integration of sewage sludge drying within a WTE power plant is developed. Furthermore, energy and mass balances are set up in order to evaluate the benefits brought by the described integration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Study on substrate metabolism process of saline waste sludge and its biological hydrogen production potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zengshuai; Guo, Liang; Li, Qianqian; Zhao, Yangguo; Gao, Mengchun; She, Zonglian

    2017-07-01

    With the increasing of high saline waste sludge production, the treatment and utilization of saline waste sludge attracted more and more attention. In this study, the biological hydrogen production from saline waste sludge after heating pretreatment was studied. The substrate metabolism process at different salinity condition was analyzed by the changes of soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD), carbohydrate and protein in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and dissolved organic matters (DOM). The excitation-emission matrix (EEM) with fluorescence regional integration (FRI) was also used to investigate the effect of salinity on EPS and DOM composition during hydrogen fermentation. The highest hydrogen yield of 23.6 mL H 2 /g VSS and hydrogen content of 77.6% were obtained at 0.0% salinity condition. The salinity could influence the hydrogen production and substrate metabolism of waste sludge.

  5. Reduction of Fecal Streptococcus and Salmonella by selected treatment methods for sludge and organic waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Svend Erik; Krause, Michael; Grüttner, Henrik

    1997-01-01

    The increasing utilization of waste water sludge and source-separated organic household waste in agriculture has brought the quality aspects into focus, among others the hygienic aspects. In this study, the reducting effect on Fecal Streptococcus (FS) and Salmonella of different methods...... for stabilization and methods for further treatment of sludge and organic waste has been investigated. The most common methods for stabilization, i.e. aerobic and anaerobic stabilization, only reduce the indicator organisms by approximately 1 logarithmic decade. Methods for further treatment of sludge and organic...... waste have shown reductions of microorganisms allowing for unrestricted utilization in agriculture, meeting the product control:FS below 100/g and no Salmonella detected. The effect of storage of sludge at summer and winter temperatures respectively has been investigated. At temperatures (around 20°C...

  6. Actual waste demonstration of the nitric-glycolic flowsheet for sludge batch 9 qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newell, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pareizs, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Martino, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Reboul, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Coleman, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Johnson, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-03-09

    For each sludge batch that is processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performs qualification testing to demonstrate that the sludge batch is processable. Based on the results of this actual-waste qualification and previous simulant studies, SRNL recommends implementation of the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet in DWPF. Other recommendations resulting from this demonstration are reported in section 5.0.

  7. Self-heating co-pyrolysis of excessive activated sludge with waste biomass: energy balance and sludge reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hong-Sheng; Jiang, Hong

    2013-04-01

    In this work, co-pyrolysis of sludge with sawdust or rice husk was investigated. The results showed that the co-pyrolysis technology could be used to dispose of the excessive activated sludge without external energy input. The results also demonstrated that no obvious synergistic effect occurred except for heat transfer in the co-pyrolysis if the co-feeding biomass and sludge had similar thermogravimetric characteristics. The experimental results combined with calculation showed that adding sawdust accounting for 49.6% of the total feedstock or rice husk accounting for 74.7% could produce bio-oil to keep the energy balance of the co-pyrolysis system and self-heat it. The sludge from solar drying bed can be further reduced by 38.6% and 35.1% by weight when co-pyrolyzed with rice husk and sawdust, respectively. This study indicates that sludge reduction without external heat supply through co-pyrolysis of sludge with waste biomass is practically feasible. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Waste metal hydroxide sludge as adsorbent for a reactive dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sílvia C R; Vílar, Vítor J P; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2008-05-30

    An industrial waste sludge mainly composed by metal hydroxides was used as a low-cost adsorbent for removing a reactive textile dye (Remazol Brilliant Blue) in solution. Characterization of this waste material included chemical composition, pH(ZPC) determination, particle size distribution, physical textural properties and metals mobility under different pH conditions. Dye adsorption equilibrium isotherms were determined at 25 and 35 degrees C and pH of 4, 7 and 10 revealing reasonably fits to Langmuir and Freundlich models. At 25 degrees C and pH 7, Langmuir fit indicates a maximum adsorption capacity of 91.0mg/g. An adsorptive ion-exchange mechanism was identified from desorption studies. Batch kinetic experiments were also conducted at different initial dye concentration, temperature, adsorbent dosage and pH. A pseudo-second-order model showed good agreement with experimental data. LDF approximation model was used to estimate homogeneous solid diffusion coefficients and the effective pore diffusivities. Additionally, a simulated real effluent containing the selected dye, salts and dyeing auxiliary chemicals, was also used in equilibrium and kinetic experiments and the adsorption performance was compared with aqueous dye solutions.

  9. Minimisation and utilisation of waste mineral sludge from sodium perborate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilc, Viktor; Jersan, Rok

    2002-10-01

    Various approaches to waste minimisation, waste treatment and recycling or safe disposal of the waste mineral sludge from sodium perborate production are presented and critically discussed. Some most promising actions for waste (or its harmful potential) reduction on the production level are identified. These include: a) use of better raw materials (richer boron ore), b) improvement of the ore leaching process, and c) intensification of sludge washing and dewatering. These source reduction measures have already resulted in 50% reduction of boron content in the sludge. Utilisation of the raw or treated (e.g. dried, compacted) waste sludge could be found in agriculture, civil engineering and construction material production. Agricultural use (as a lime substitute) is based on favourable content of calcium-magnesium minerals and alkali pH value of the sludge, and simultaneous absence of heavy metals. Application in civil engineering (as an aggregate) is possible after calcination, which is costly, or as a cement kiln additive. Stabilisation of sludge before disposal, when no utilisation is available, is possible by small addition of commercial binders (e.g. Portland cement) or larger amounts of pozzolanic wastes (e.g. coal fly ash).

  10. Thermal treatment of sewage sludge from waste water. Tratamiento termico de lodos procedentes de aguas residuales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreottola, G. (Universidad de Trento (Italy)); Canziani, R.; Ragazzi, M. (Politicnico de Milan (Italy))

    1994-01-01

    Thermal Treatment of sewage sludge can be beneficial as a pre-treatment step of many treatment/disposal options, but above all, it allows the recovery of the energetic content sludge. Energy recovery from sewage sludge can be performed in many ways; direct incineration thermal drying followed by incineration and co-combustion with municipal solid wastes or other non conventional fuels. Another option is the recovery of waste energy (e.g. from an endo thermal engine using biogas as fuel) to dry sludge wich, in turn can be used as a fuel. The paper will evaluate several options of thermal treatment of sewage sludge, with particular emphasis on the energetic yield from different processes. (Author)

  11. Sludge accumulation and distribution impact the hydraulic performance in waste stabilisation ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggins, Liah X; Ghisalberti, Marco; Ghadouani, Anas

    2017-03-01

    Waste stabilisation ponds (WSPs) are used worldwide for wastewater treatment, and throughout their operation require periodic sludge surveys. Sludge accumulation in WSPs can impact performance by reducing the effective volume of the pond, and altering the pond hydraulics and wastewater treatment efficiency. Traditionally, sludge heights, and thus sludge volume, have been measured using low-resolution and labour intensive methods such as 'sludge judge' and the 'white towel test'. A sonar device, a readily available technology, fitted to a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) was shown to improve the spatial resolution and accuracy of sludge height measurements, as well as reduce labour and safety requirements. Coupled with a dedicated software package, the profiling of several WSPs has shown that the ROV with autonomous sonar device is capable of providing sludge bathymetry with greatly increased spatial resolution in a greatly reduced profiling time, leading to a better understanding of the role played by sludge accumulation in hydraulic performance of WSPs. The high-resolution bathymetry collected was used to support a much more detailed hydrodynamic assessment of systems with low, medium and high accumulations of sludge. The results of the modelling show that hydraulic performance is not only influenced by the sludge accumulation, but also that the spatial distribution of sludge plays a critical role in reducing the treatment capacity of these systems. In a range of ponds modelled, the reduction in residence time ranged from 33% in a pond with a uniform sludge distribution to a reduction of up to 60% in a pond with highly channelized flow. The combination of high-resolution measurement of sludge accumulation and hydrodynamic modelling will help in the development of frameworks for wastewater sludge management, including the development of more reliable computer models, and could potentially have wider application in the monitoring of other small to medium water bodies

  12. [From waste to treasure: turning activated sludge into bioplastic poly-3-hydroxybutyrate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia'ni

    2017-12-25

    Large quantity of activated sludge is generated from wastewater treatment but without yet an appropriate deposition. High temperature can lyse the activate sludge so that nitrogen and phosphorus containing nutrients are released. Halomonas CJN was found to grow on the heat lysed activated sludge and glucose for production of bioplastic poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) in the absence of yeast extract, nitrogen and phosphorus sources as well as trace elements. This reduces the PHB production cost significantly. Furthermore, acetic acid formed from anaerobic fermentation of heat lysed activated sludge can be used to replace glucose for cell growth but not much for PHB production. After construction of an additional PHB synthesis pathway in Halomonas CJN, we can produce PHB entirely from heat lysed activated sludge, reducing production cost of PHB roughly from ¥ 30 000 Yuan/ton to ¥ 20 000 Yuan/ton, thus turning waste activated sludge to valuable raw material resource.

  13. Sewage sludge, compost and other representative organic wastes as agricultural soil amendments: Benefits versus limiting factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarenga, Paula; Mourinha, Clarisse; Farto, Márcia; Santos, Teresa; Palma, Patrícia; Sengo, Joana; Morais, Marie-Christine; Cunha-Queda, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    Nine different samples of sewage sludges, composts and other representative organic wastes, with potential interest to be used as agricultural soil amendments, were characterized: municipal sewage sludge (SS1 and SS2), agro industrial sludge (AIS), municipal slaughterhouse sludge (MSS), mixed municipal solid waste compost (MMSWC), agricultural wastes compost (AWC), compost produced from agricultural wastes and sewage sludge (AWSSC), pig slurry digestate (PSD) and paper mill wastes (PMW). The characterization was made considering their: (i) physicochemical parameters, (ii) total and bioavailable heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn and Hg), (iii) organic contaminants, (iv) pathogenic microorganisms and (v) stability and phytotoxicity indicators. All the sludges, municipal or other, comply with the requirements of the legislation regarding the possibility of their application to agricultural soil (with the exception of SS2, due to its pathogenic microorganisms content), with a content of organic matter and nutrients that make them interesting to be applied to soil. The composts presented, in general, some constraints regarding their application to soil, and their impairment was due to the existence of heavy metal concentrations exceeding the proposed limit of the draft European legislation. As a consequence, with the exception of AWSSC, most compost samples were not able to meet these quality criteria, which are more conservative for compost than for sewage sludge. From the results, the composting of sewage sludge is recommended as a way to turn a less stabilized waste into a material that is no longer classified as a waste and, judging by the results of this work, with lower heavy metal content than the other composted materials, and without sanitation problems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of the Radioactive Sludge from the ORNL MVST Waste Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, J.M.

    2001-10-24

    Over the last several years most of the sludge and liquid from the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) tanks at ORNL has been transferred and consolidated in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST). The contents of the MVST tanks at the time the sludge samples were collected for this report included the original inventory in the MVSTs along with the sludge and liquid from the Bethel Valley Evaporator Service Tanks (BVEST), Old Hydrofracture (OHF) tanks, and the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT). During the summer of 2001 full core samples of sludge were collected from the MVST tanks. The purpose of this sampling campaign was to characterize and validate that the current radiochemical and chemical contents of the MVST sludge, which was needed to meet the contract agreements prior to the transfer of the waste to another DOE contractor for processing. This report only discusses the analytical characterization of the sludge from the MVST waste tanks. The isotopic data presented in this report supports the position that fissile isotopes of uranium ({sup 233}U and {sup 235}U) and plutonium ({sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu) were ''denatured'' as required by the administrative controls stated in the ORNL LLLW waste acceptance criteria (WAC). In general, the MVST sludge was found to be hazardous by RCRA characteristics based on total analysis of chromium, mercury, and lead. Also, the alpha activity due to transuranic isotopes was well above the 100 nCi/g limit for TRU waste. The characteristics of the MVST sludge relative to the WIPP WAC limits for fissile gram equivalent, plutonium equivalent activity, and thermal power from decay heat, were estimated from the data in previous reports and found to be far below the upper boundary for any of the remote-handled transuranic waste (RH-TRU) requirements for disposal of the waste in WIPP. Therefore, the WIPP WAC limits were not evaluated for this set of samples.

  15. Alternative Chemical Cleaning Methods for High Level Waste Tanks: Actual Waste Testing with SRS Tank 5F Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, William D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hay, Michael S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-30

    Solubility testing with actual High Level Waste tank sludge has been conducted in order to evaluate several alternative chemical cleaning technologies for the dissolution of sludge residuals remaining in the tanks after the exhaustion of mechanical cleaning and sludge sluicing efforts. Tests were conducted with archived Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive sludge solids that had been retrieved from Tank 5F in order to determine the effectiveness of an optimized, dilute oxalic/nitric acid cleaning reagent toward dissolving the bulk non-radioactive waste components. Solubility tests were performed by direct sludge contact with the oxalic/nitric acid reagent and with sludge that had been pretreated and acidified with dilute nitric acid. For comparison purposes, separate samples were also contacted with pure, concentrated oxalic acid following current baseline tank chemical cleaning methods. One goal of testing with the optimized reagent was to compare the total amounts of oxalic acid and water required for sludge dissolution using the baseline and optimized cleaning methods. A second objective was to compare the two methods with regard to the dissolution of actinide species known to be drivers for SRS tank closure Performance Assessments (PA). Additionally, solubility tests were conducted with Tank 5 sludge using acidic and caustic permanganate-based methods focused on the “targeted” dissolution of actinide species.

  16. Co-composting of organic solid waste and sewage sludge – a waste management option for University Campus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Fei-Baffoe

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Co-composting organic solid waste with dewatered sewage sludge was carried out to determine its suitability for managing waste on a University campus. Windrow composting method was employed in which dewatered sewage sludge and organic solid waste were mixed at volume ratios: 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 0:1 and 1:0 sludge/organic solid waste. Parameters such as pH, percentage N, C, P, K, Ca, Mg, organic matter, ash content and C/N ratio were determined weekly. Total and faecal coliform population were measured biweekly with Pb and Cd levels determined at the beginning and end of the composting. With the exception of ratio 1:0 sludge/organic solid waste, all other ratios attained a favourable Carbon to Nitrogen (C/N ratio both at the start and end of the composting process. Levels of major nutrients measured were found to be favourable for use as organic fertilizer. There was a general decline in carbon and organic matter in all the compost piles except the sewage sludge pile (1:0. Apart from the compost ratio 1:0 sludge/organic solid waste, all other ratios attained a temperature of 55°C within 8 days of composting. Generally the compost ratios 1:2, 1:3 and 0:1 (sludge/organic solid waste were found to be the most suitable for use as organic fertilizer.     International Journal of Environment Vol. 5 (1 2016,  pp: 14-31     

  17. Sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, David

    1992-01-01

    Cites a recycling success story involving sludge production from wastewater and transformation into an effective plant fertilizer. Discusses related concerns such as dealing with pollutants like heavy metals and PCBs often found in sludge. Provides an example of an application of sludge produced in Chicago to an area reclamation site. (MCO)

  18. Ultrasonic waste activated sludge disintegration for recovering multiple nutrients for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guo-Jun; Liu, Bing-Feng; Wang, Qilin; Ding, Jie; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2016-04-15

    Waste activated sludge is a valuable resource containing multiple nutrients, but is currently treated and disposed of as an important source of pollution. In this work, waste activated sludge after ultrasound pretreatment was reused as multiple nutrients for biofuel production. The nutrients trapped in sludge floc were transferred into liquid medium by ultrasonic disintegration during first 30 min, while further increase of pretreatment time only resulted in slight increase of nutrients release. Hydrogen production by Ethanoligenens harbinense B49 from glucose significantly increased with the concentration of ultrasonic sludge, and reached maximum yield of 1.97 mol H2/mol glucose at sludge concentration of 7.75 g volatile suspended solids/l. Without addition of any other chemicals, waste molasses rich in carbohydrate was efficiently turned into hydrogen with yield of 189.34 ml H2/g total sugar by E. harbinense B49 using ultrasonic sludge as nutrients. The results also showed that hydrogen production using pretreated sludge as multiple nutrients was higher than those using standard nutrients. Acetic acid produced by E. harbinense B49 together with the residual nutrients in the liquid medium were further converted into hydrogen (271.36 ml H2/g total sugar) by Rhodopseudomonas faecalis RLD-53 through photo fermentation, while ethanol was the sole end product with yield of 220.26 mg/g total sugar. Thus, pretreated sludge was an efficient nutrients source for biofuel production, which could replace the standard nutrients. This research provided a novel strategy to achieve environmental friendly sludge disposal and simultaneous efficient biofuel recovery from organic waste. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge with grease trap sludge and municipal solid waste as co-substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosser, A; Neczaj, E; Singh, B R; Almås, Å R; Brattebø, H; Kacprzak, M

    2017-05-01

    The feasibility of simultaneous treatment of multiple wastes via co-digestion was studied in semi-continuous mode at mesophilic conditions. The obtained results indicated that sewage sludge, organic fraction of municipal waste (OFMSW) and grease trap sludge (GTS) possess complementary properties that can be combined for successful anaerobic digestion. During the co-digestion period, methane yield and VS removal were significantly higher in comparison to digestion of sewage sludge alone. Addition of GTS to digesters treating sewage sludge resulted in increased VS removal and methane yield up to 13% (from 50 to 56.4) and 52% (from 300 to 456,547m(3)/Mg VSadd), respectively. While the use of OFMSW as the next co-substrate in the feedstock, can boost methane yield and VS removal up to 82% (300-547m(3)/Mg VSadd) and approximately 29% (from 50% to 64.7%), respectively. Moreover, the results of the present laboratory study revealed that the addition of co-substrates to the feedstock had a significant influence on biogas composition. During the experiment methane content in biogas ranged from 67% to 69%. While, the concentration of LCFAs was increasing with the gradual increase in the share of co-substrates in the mixtures, wherein only the oleic acid was higher than some inhibition concentrations which have been reported in the literature. However, it did not significantly affect the efficiency of the co-digestion process. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Waste heat usage in sludge incineration; Abwaermenutzung Schlammverbrennung. ARA Basel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fath, H.

    2001-07-01

    This preliminary report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) discusses the results of measurements made on a sewage-sludge incineration plant in Basle, Switzerland, that was fitted with heat recovery apparatus in 1999. A comparison is made between the energy balance of the incineration installation before and after its modification. The values for waste-heat recovery that were measured - normalised to enable the comparison - are presented. The use of the heat recovered for local heating purposes and for feeding into Basle's district heating system is described. The reasons for the discrepancy between the energy quantities that were initially expected and those actually attained are discussed: Increased in-house heating requirements and losses caused for unexpected reasons (partial drying of the flue gasses of one of the ovens to prevent corrosion) are quoted as causes for the discrepancy. The authors also note that the emergency cooler previously used before the heat-recovery system was added is no longer needed.

  1. Oxidative Alkaline leaching of Americium from simulated high-level nuclear waste sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Wendy A.; Garnov, Alexander Yu.; Rao, Linfeng; Nash, Kenneth L.; Bond, Andrew H.

    2004-01-23

    Oxidative alkaline leaching has been proposed to pre-treat the high-level nuclear waste sludges to remove some of the problematic (e.g., Cr) and/or non-radioactive (e.g., Na, Al) constituents before vitrification. It is critical to understand the behavior of actinides, americium and plutonium in particular, in oxidative alkaline leaching. We have studied the leaching behavior of americium from four different sludge simulants (BiPO{sub 4}, BiPO{sub 4 modified}, Redox, PUREX) using potassium permanganate and potassium persulfate in alkaline solutions. Up to 60% of americium sorbed onto the simulants is leached from the sludges by alkaline persulfate and permanganate. The percentage of americium leached increases with [NaOH] (between 1.0 and 5.0 M). The initial rate of americium leaching by potassium persulfate increases in the order BiPO{sub 4} sludge < Redox sludge < PUREX sludge. The data are most consistent with oxidation of Am{sup 3+} in the sludge to either AmO{sub 2}{sup +} or AmO{sub 2}{sup 2+} in solution. Though neither of these species is expected to exhibit long-term stability in solution, the potential for mobilization of americium from sludge samples would have to be accommodated in the design of any oxidative leaching process for real sludge samples.

  2. Digestion of sludge and organic waste in the sustainability concept for Malmö, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    la Cour Jansen, J; Gruvberger, C; Hanner, N; Aspegren, H; Svärd, A

    2004-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of sludge has been part of the treatment plant in Malmö for many years and several projects on optimisation of the digestion process have been undertaken in full scale as well as in pilot scale. In order to facilitate a more sustainable solution in the future for waste management, solid waste organic waste is sorted out from households for anaerobic treatment in a newly built city district. The system for treatment of the waste is integrated in a centralised solution located at the existing wastewater treatment plant. A new extension of the digester capacity enables separate as well as co-digestion of sludge together with urban organic waste from households, industry, restaurants, big kitchens, food stores, supermarkets, green markets etc. for biogas production and production of fertiliser. Collection and pre-treatment of different types of waste are in progress together with examination of biogas potential for different types of organic waste. Collection of household waste as well as anaerobic digestion in laboratory and pilot scale has been performed during the last year. It is demonstrated that organic household waste can be digested separately or in combination with sludge. In the latter case a higher biogas yield is found than should be expected from digestion of the two materials separately. Household waste from a system based on collection of organic waste from grinders could be digested at mesophilic conditions whereas digestion failed at thermophilic conditions.

  3. Digestion of sludge and organic waste in the sustainability concept for Malmoe, Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, Jes la Cour; Gruvberger, Christopher; Hanner, Niklas; Aspegren, Henrik; Svaerd, Aasa

    2003-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion of sludge has been part of the treatment plant in Malmoe for many years and several projects on optimisation of the digestion process have been undertaken in full scale as well as in pilot scale. In order to facilitate a more sustainable solution in the future for waste management, solid waste organic waste is sorted out from households for anaerobic treatment in a newly built city district. The system for treatment of the waste is integrated in a centralised solution located at the existing wastewater treatment plant. A new extension of the digester capacity enables separate as well as co-digestion of sludge together with urban organic waste from households, industry, restaurants, big kitchens, food stores, supermarkets, green markets etc. for biogas production and production of fertiliser. Collection and pre-treatment of different types of waste are in progress together with examination of biogas potential for different types of organic waste. Collection of household waste as well as anaerobic digestion in laboratory and pilot scale has been performed during the last year. It is demonstrated that organic household waste can be digested separately or in combination with sludge. In the latter case a higher biogas yield is found than should be expected from digestion of the two materials separately. Household waste from a system based on collection of organic waste from grinders could be digested at mesophilic conditions whereas digestion failed at thermophilic conditions.

  4. Application of forward osmosis (FO) under ultrasonication on sludge thickening of waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nguyen Cong; Nguyen, Hau Thi; Chen, Shiao-Shing; Nguyen, Nhat Thien; Li, Chi-Wang

    2015-01-01

    Forward osmosis (FO) is an emerging process for dewatering solid-liquid stream which has the potential to be innovative and sustainable. However, the applications have still been hindered by low water flux and membrane fouling when activated sludge is used as the feed solution due to bound water from microbial cells. Hence, a novel strategy was designed to increase sludge thickening and reduce membrane fouling in the FO process under ultrasonic condition. The results from the ultrasound/FO hybrid system showed that the sludge concentration reached up to 20,400 and 28,400 mg/L from initial sludge concentrations of 3000 and 8000 mg/L with frequency of 40 kHz after 22 hours, while the system without ultrasound had to spend 26 hours to achieve the same sludge concentration. This identifies that the presence of ultrasound strongly affected sludge structure as well as sludge thickening of the FO process. Furthermore, the ultrasound/FO hybrid system could achieve NH4+-N removal efficiency of 96%, PO4(3-)-P of 98% and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of 99%. The overall performance demonstrates that the proposed ultrasound/FO system using seawater as a draw solution is promising for sludge thickening application.

  5. Multiple syntrophic interactions drive biohythane production from waste sludge in microbial electrolysis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Ren, Zhiyong Jason; Huang, Cong; Liu, Bingfeng; Ren, Nanqi; Xing, Defeng

    2016-01-01

    Biohythane is a new and high-value transportation fuel present as a mixture of biomethane and biohydrogen. It has been produced from different organic matters using anaerobic digestion. Bioenergy can be recovered from waste activated sludge through methane production during anaerobic digestion, but energy yield is often insufficient to sludge disposal. Microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) is also a promising approach for bioenergy recovery and waste sludge disposal as higher energy efficiency and biogas production. The systematic understanding of microbial interactions and biohythane production in MEC is still limited. Here, we report biohythane production from waste sludge in biocathode microbial electrolysis cells and reveal syntrophic interactions in microbial communities based on high-throughput sequencing and quantitative PCR targeting 16S rRNA gene. The alkali-pretreated sludge fed MECs (AS-MEC) showed the highest biohythane production rate of 0.148 L·L(-1)-reactor·day(-1), which is 40 and 80 % higher than raw sludge fed MECs (RS-MEC) and anaerobic digestion (open circuit MEC, RS-OCMEC). Current density, metabolite profiles, and hydrogen-methane ratio results all confirm that alkali-pretreatment and microbial electrolysis greatly enhanced sludge hydrolysis and biohythane production. Illumina Miseq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons indicates that anode biofilm was dominated by exoelectrogenic Geobacter, fermentative bacteria and hydrogen-producing bacteria in the AS-MEC. The cathode biofilm was dominated by fermentative Clostridium. The dominant archaeal populations on the cathodes of AS-MEC and RS-MEC were affiliated with hydrogenotrophic Methanobacterium (98 %, relative abundance) and Methanocorpusculum (77 %), respectively. Multiple pathways of gas production were observed in the same MEC reactor, including fermentative and electrolytic H2 production, as well as hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and electromethanogenesis. Real-time quantitative PCR

  6. Potential utilisation of sewage sludge and paper mill waste for biosorption of metals from polluted waterways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, S K; Line, M A

    2001-08-01

    The adsorption of cadmium, copper(II), lead and zinc ions from aqueous solution by sewage sludge, paper mill waste (PMW) and composted PMW was investigated along with the influence of pre-treatment on composted PMW. Langmuir adsorption isotherms were fitted where appropriate. Sewage sludge was the most effective biosorbent of the waste products for all metal ions examined, adsorbing, for example, up to 39.3 mg/g of Pb at an initial concentration of 77.8 mg/l. PMW was a less effective biosorbent than sewage sludge. However, it was found that composting the PMW resulted in an increase in metal uptake capacity and both sewage sludge and composted PMW have potential for low-cost remediation of high leachate wastewaters. The desorption of metal ions from PMW compost was most effective using 0.1 N H2SO4 and 1 mM nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA).

  7. New insights into co-digestion of activated sludge and food waste: Biogas versus biofertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingqun; Yin, Yao; Liu, Yu

    2017-10-01

    This study explored two holistic approaches for co-digestion of activated sludge and food waste. In Approach 1, mixed activated sludge and food waste were first hydrolyzed with fungal mash, and produced hydrolysate without separation was directly subject to anaerobic digestion. In Approach 2, solid generated after hydrolysis of food waste by fungal mash was directly converted to biofertilizer, while separated liquid with high soluble COD concentration was further co-digested with activated sludge for biomethane production. Although the potential energy produced from Approach 1 was about 1.8-time higher than that from Approach 2, the total economic revenue generated from Approach 2 was about 1.9-fold of that from Approach 1 due to high market value of biofertilizer. It is expected that this study may lead to a paradigm shift in biosolid management towards environmental and economic sustainability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. STABILIZATION AND TESTING OF MERCURY CONTAINING WASTES: BORDEN SLUDGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report details the stability assessment of a mercury containing sulfide treatment sludge. Information contained in this report will consist of background data submitted by the geneerator, landfill data supplied by EPA and characterization and leaching studies conducted by UC...

  9. Increased CPC batch size study for Tank 42 sludge in the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, W.E.

    2000-01-06

    A series of experiments have been completed at TNX for the sludge-only REDOX adjusted flowsheet using Tank 42 sludge simulant in response to the Technical Task Request HLW/DWPT/TTR-980013 to increase CPC batch sizes. By increasing the initial SRAT batch size, a melter feed batch at greater waste solids concentration can be prepared and thus increase melter output per batch by about one canister. The increased throughput would allow DWPF to dispose of more waste in a given time period thus shortening the overall campaign.

  10. The effect of operating conditions on aquatic worms eating waste sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickx, T L G; Temmink, H; Elissen, H J H; Buisman, C J N

    2009-03-01

    Several techniques are available for dealing with the waste sludge produced in biological waste water treatment. A biological approach uses aquatic worms to consume and partially digest the waste sludge. In our concept for a worm reactor, the worms (Lumbriculus variegatus) are immobilised in a carrier material. For correct sizing and operation of such a worm reactor, the effect of changes in dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration, ammonia concentration, temperature and light exposure were studied in sequencing batch experiments. DO concentration had an effect on both sludge consumption rate and sludge reduction efficiency. Sludge consumption rate was four times higher at DO concentrations above 8.1 mg/L, when compared to DO concentrations below 2.5 mg/L. Sludge reduction was 36 and 77% at these respective DO concentrations. The effect is most likely the result of a difference in gut residence time. An increase in unionised ammonia concentration drastically decreased the consumption rate. Ammonia is released by the worms at a rate of 0.02 mg N/mg TSS digested; therefore, replacing the effluent in the worm reactor is required to maintain a low ammonia concentration. The highest sludge consumption rates were measured at a temperature around 15 degrees C, whilst the highest TSS reduction was achieved at 10 degrees C. Not exposing the worms to light did not affect consumption or digestion rates. High temperatures (above 25 degrees C) as well as low DO concentrations (below 1 mg/L) in the worm reactor should be avoided as these lead to significant decreases in the number of worms. The main challenges for applying the worm reactor at a larger scale are the supply of oxygen to the worms and maintaining a low ammonia concentration in the worm reactor. Applying a worm reactor at a waste water treatment plant was estimated to increase the oxygen consumption and the ammonia load by 15-20% and 5% respectively.

  11. Impact of gas injection on the apparent viscosity and viscoelastic property of waste activated sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobade, Veena; Baudez, Jean Christophe; Evans, Geoffery; Eshtiaghi, Nicky

    2017-05-01

    Gas injection is known to play a major role on the particle size of the sludge, the oxygen transfer rate, as well as the mixing efficiency of membrane bioreactors and aeration basins in the waste water treatment plants. The rheological characteristics of sludge are closely related to the particle size of the sludge floc. However, particle size of sludge floc depends partly on the shear induced in the sludge and partly on physico-chemical nature of the sludge. The objective of this work is to determine the impact of gas injection on both the apparent viscosity and viscoelastic property of sludge. The apparent viscosity of sludge was investigated by two methods: in-situ and after sparging. Viscosity curves obtained by in-situ measurement showed that the apparent viscosity decreases significantly from 4000 Pa s to 10 Pa s at low shear rate range (below 10 s-1) with an increase in gas flow rate (0.5LPM to 3LPM); however the after sparging flow curve analysis showed that the reduction in apparent viscosity throughout the shear rate range is negligible to be displayed. Torque and displacement data at low shear rate range revealed that the obtained lower apparent viscosity in the in-situ method is not the material characteristics, but the slippage effect due to a preferred location of the bubbles close to the bob, causing an inconsistent decrease of torque and increase of displacement at low shear rate range. In linear viscoelastic regime, the elastic and viscous modulus of sludge was reduced by 33% & 25%, respectively, due to gas injection because of induced shear. The amount of induced shear measured through two different tests (creep and time sweep) were the same. The impact of this induced shear on sludge structure was also verified by microscopic images. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INCIPIENT SLUDGE MIXING IN RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE STORAGE TANKS DURING SALT SOLUTION BLENDING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Steeper, T.; Fowley, M.; Parkinson, K.

    2011-01-12

    This paper is the second in a series of four publications to document ongoing pilot scale testing and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of mixing processes in 85 foot diameter, 1.3 million gallon, radioactive liquid waste, storage tanks at Savannah River Site (SRS). Homogeneous blending of salt solutions is required in waste tanks. Settled solids (i.e., sludge) are required to remain undisturbed on the bottom of waste tanks during blending. Suspension of sludge during blending may potentially release radiolytically generated hydrogen trapped in the sludge, which is a safety concern. The first paper (Leishear, et. al. [1]) presented pilot scale blending experiments of miscible fluids to provide initial design requirements for a full scale blending pump. Scaling techniques for an 8 foot diameter pilot scale tank were also justified in that work. This second paper describes the overall reasons to perform tests, and documents pilot scale experiments performed to investigate disturbance of sludge, using non-radioactive sludge simulants. A third paper will document pilot scale CFD modeling for comparison to experimental pilot scale test results for both blending tests and sludge disturbance tests. That paper will also describe full scale CFD results. The final paper will document additional blending test results for stratified layers in salt solutions, scale up techniques, final full scale pump design recommendations, and operational recommendations. Specifically, this paper documents a series of pilot scale tests, where sludge simulant disturbance due to a blending pump or transfer pump are investigated. A principle design requirement for a blending pump is UoD, where Uo is the pump discharge nozzle velocity, and D is the nozzle diameter. Pilot scale test results showed that sludge was undisturbed below UoD = 0.47 ft{sup 2}/s, and that below UoD = 0.58 ft{sup 2}/s minimal sludge disturbance was observed. If sludge is minimally disturbed, hydrogen will not be

  13. Enhanced anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge digestion by the addition of zero valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yinghong; Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie; Chen, Suo

    2014-04-01

    Anaerobic digestion is promising technology to recover energy from waste activated sludge. However, the sludge digestion is limited by its low efficiency of hydrolysis-acidification. Zero valent iron (ZVI) as a reducing material is expected to enhance anaerobic process including the hydrolysis-acidification process. Considering that, ZVI was added into an anaerobic sludge digestion system to accelerate the sludge digestion in this study. The results indicated that ZVI effectively enhanced the decomposition of protein and cellulose, the two main components of the sludge. Compared to the control test without ZVI, the degradation of protein increased 21.9% and the volatile fatty acids production increased 37.3% with adding ZVI. More acetate and less propionate are found during the hydrolysis-acidification with ZVI. The activities of several key enzymes in the hydrolysis and acidification increased 0.6-1 time. ZVI made the methane production raise 43.5% and sludge reduction ratio increase 12.2 percent points. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that the abundances of hydrogen-consuming microorganisms including homoacetogens and hydrogenotrophic methanogens with ZVI were higher than the control, which reduced the H2 accumulation to create a beneficial condition for the sludge digestion in thermodynamics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Oil refinery sludge and green waste simulated windrow composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountoulakis, M S; Terzakis, S; Georgaki, E; Drakopoulou, S; Sabathianakis, I; Kouzoulakis, M; Manios, T

    2009-04-01

    Oil refinery sludge (ORS) was mixed with shredded green wastes (GW) at ratios of 1:1 v/v (RI) and 1:3 v/v (RII). The mixtures, of approximately volumes of 1,020 l and 990 l respectively, were introduced in metal cubic containers of 1.0 m(3) volume, opened at the top and with small holes punctured in the bottom and the side. The containers were additionally insulated with a layer of rockwool (20 mm). The boxes were emptied, the mixtures were turned and water was added occasionally, in one to two weeks intervals, simulating a windrow composting system. Temperature, physiochemical characteristics, mineral oil and grease (MOG) concentration, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) concentration, carbon dioxide emission, methane emission and microorganisms presence were recorded either daily or every time the mixtures were turned, for a period of 120 days. RII recorded temperatures as high as 62 degrees C, reaching 56 degrees C in Day 6 and retained temperatures above 50 degrees C for more than 40 days. RI recorded its highest temperature of 53 degrees C in Day 77. The reason why the two mixtures behaved so differently can be explained by: (i) extended co-digestion phenomena by the microorganisms decomposing the GW in RII, (ii) toxic effect of ORS in RI due to the far larger amounts used (840 kg in RI in comparison with the 460 kg in RII). After Day 36 temperature increased gradually in RI and MOG and PAHs reduction was first noted. At the end of the experiment MOG concentration in RI was 57.2 mg/kg dry weight (dw) (52.1% reduction) where in RII was 34.3 mg/kg dw (62.1% reduction). Emissions of methane and carbon dioxide support the concept of the toxic effect and the delay ignition of the decomposing process in RI. In total, CO(2) and CH(4) emissions from RI were recorded to be 30.8 kg and 18.5 g, respectively, where from RII 59.6 kg of CO(2) and 6.4 g of CH(4) were emitted. An effort was made to determine the effect of temperature alone (as an abiotic treating

  15. Agro-industrial waste materials and wastewater sludge for rhizobial inoculant production: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Rebah, F; Prévost, D; Yezza, A; Tyagi, R D

    2007-12-01

    Inoculating legumes with commercial rhizobial inoculants is a common agriculture practice. Generally, inoculants are sold in liquid or in solid forms (mixed with carrier). The production of inoculants involves a step in which a high number of cells are produced, followed by the product formulation. This process is largely governed by the cost related to the medium used for rhizobial growth and by the availability of a carrier source (peat) for production of solid inoculant. Some industrial and agricultural by-products (e.g. cheese whey, malt sprouts) contain growth factors such as nitrogen and carbon, which can support growth of rhizobia. Other agro-industrial wastes (e.g. plant compost, filtermud, fly-ash) can be used as a carrier for rhizobial inoculant. More recently, wastewater sludge, a worldwide recyclable waste, has shown good potential for inoculant production as a growth medium and as a carrier (dehydrated sludge). Sludge usually contains nutrient elements at concentrations sufficient to sustain rhizobial growth and heavy metals are usually below the recommended level. In some cases, growth conditions can be optimized by a sludge pre-treatment or by the addition of nutrients. Inoculants produced in wastewater sludge are efficient for nodulation and nitrogen fixation with legumes as compared to standard inoculants. This new approach described in this review offers a safe environmental alternative for both waste treatment/disposal and inoculant production.

  16. Extraction of consortium of hydrolytic enzymes from waste activated sludge using ultrasonication and stirring with surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbazhagan, Sethupathy; Palani, Sivashanmugam

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, the consortium of hydrolytic enzymes namely protease, α-amylase, lipase, cellulase and α-glucosidase were extracted from sludge flocs of municipal returned waste activated sludge (MRWAS) and different proportion of mixed sludge namely (MRWAS) and pulp and paper sludge using ultrasonication and stirring with TX100 (Triton X100) and AOT (Dioctyl sodium sulphosuccinate). Ultrasonication with specific energy of 27,027kJ/kg TS with duration 10min was optimized to get maximum activity of enzymes. Mixed sludge with ratio (55:75) had yielded more enzymes activity than the municipal returned waste activated sludge. Further, enzymes extraction efficiency by stirring using TX100, AOT and ultrasonication combined with TX00 and AOT methods were investigated in an optimized mixed sludge ratio (55:75) with varying dosage and stirring or sonication time. In stirring method, the optimum dosage and time of (1% v/v, 60min) and (2% v/v, 180min) respectively were obtained for TX100 and AOT. In ultrasonication method, the optimum dosage of TX100 (1% v/v) and AOT (2% v/v) were obtained at an optimized specific energy of 27,027kJ/kg for 10min. Among the extraction methods, ultrasonication combined with TX100 method exhibited maximum activity of protease, α-amylase, cellulase, lipase and α-glucosidase and these were predicted to be respectively 43.6, 54.4, 34.7, 23, 12.5Units/g VSS. It was concluded that ultrasonication combined with TX100 method is more suitable as it requires a short time and minimum dosage adequate to extract maximum activity of consortium enzymes from sludge flocs, which is essential for the enzymes to be recovered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Production and recovery process of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) from waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Kalyani; Suresh Kumar, M; Chakrabarti, T

    2007-07-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is bacterial storage polyester, currently receiving much attention because of its biodegradable potential. Production of microbial polymers is expensive due to supplementary carbon source and downstream processing cost. The present study aimed at reducing the fermentation carbon source cost by using waste activated sludge and wastewater, and evaluating the use of proper solvent for the recovery of PHB from activated sludge to minimize the downstream cost. To improve the recovery process efficiency, different strategies for the extraction and recovery of the polymer from the waste activated sludge were applied. The maximum solubility of PHB (80%) was observed in chloroform, and precipitation with methanol (95%) was observed. Impurities interference in the PHB recovery process was also studied. By using these optimized recovery processes with optimized C:N ratio 10, the maximum product recovery was observed to be 62.3% (w/w). The results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  18. REMOVING SLUDGE HEELS FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE TANKS BY OXALIC ACID DISSOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, M; David Herman, D; Fernando Fondeur, F; John Pareizs, J; Michael Hay, M; Bruce Wiersma, B; Kim Crapse, K; Thomas Peters, T; Samuel Fink, S; Donald Thaxton, D

    2009-03-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will remove sludge as part of waste tank closure operations. Typically the bulk sludge is removed by mixing it with supernate to produce a slurry, and transporting the slurry to a downstream tank for processing. Experience shows that a residual heel may remain in the tank that cannot be removed by this conventional technique. In the past, SRS used oxalic acid solutions to disperse or dissolve the sludge heel to complete the waste removal. To better understand the actual conditions of oxalic acid cleaning of waste from carbon steel tanks, the authors developed and conducted an experimental program to determine its effectiveness in dissolving sludge, the hydrogen generation rate, the generation rate of other gases, the carbon steel corrosion rate, the impact of mixing on chemical cleaning, the impact of temperature, and the types of precipitates formed during the neutralization process. The test samples included actual SRS sludge and simulated SRS sludge. The authors performed the simulated waste tests at 25, 50, and 75 C by adding 8 wt % oxalic acid to the sludge over seven days. They conducted the actual waste tests at 50 and 75 C by adding 8 wt % oxalic acid to the sludge as a single batch. Following the testing, SRS conducted chemical cleaning with oxalic acid in two waste tanks. In Tank 5F, the oxalic acid (8 wt %) addition occurred over seven days, followed by inhibited water to ensure the tank contained enough liquid to operate the mixer pumps. The tank temperature during oxalic acid addition and dissolution was approximately 45 C. The authors analyzed samples from the chemical cleaning process and compared it with test data. The conclusions from the work are: (1) Oxalic acid addition proved effective in dissolving sludge heels in the simulant demonstration, the actual waste demonstration, and in SRS Tank 5F. (2) The oxalic acid dissolved {approx} 100% of the uranium, {approx} 100% of the iron, and {approx} 40% of the manganese

  19. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Uranium Metal with Water in K Basin Sludge and Sludge Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2011-06-08

    Prior laboratory testing identified sodium nitrate and nitrite to be the most promising agents to minimize hydrogen generation from uranium metal aqueous corrosion in Hanford Site K Basin sludge. Of the two, nitrate was determined to be better because of higher chemical capacity, lower toxicity, more reliable efficacy, and fewer side reactions than nitrite. The present lab tests were run to determine if nitrate’s beneficial effects to lower H2 generation in simulated and genuine sludge continued for simulated sludge mixed with agents to immobilize water to help meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance drainable liquid criterion. Tests were run at ~60°C, 80°C, and 95°C using near spherical high-purity uranium metal beads and simulated sludge to emulate uranium-rich KW containerized sludge currently residing in engineered containers KW-210 and KW-220. Immobilization agents tested were Portland cement (PC), a commercial blend of PC with sepiolite clay (Aquaset II H), granulated sepiolite clay (Aquaset II G), and sepiolite clay powder (Aquaset II). In all cases except tests with Aquaset II G, the simulated sludge was mixed intimately with the immobilization agent before testing commenced. For the granulated Aquaset II G clay was added to the top of the settled sludge/solution mixture according to manufacturer application directions. The gas volumes and compositions, uranium metal corrosion mass losses, and nitrite, ammonia, and hydroxide concentrations in the interstitial solutions were measured. Uranium metal corrosion rates were compared with rates forecast from the known uranium metal anoxic water corrosion rate law. The ratios of the forecast to the observed rates were calculated to find the corrosion rate attenuation factors. Hydrogen quantities also were measured and compared with quantities expected based on non-attenuated H2 generation at the full forecast anoxic corrosion rate to arrive at H2 attenuation factors. The uranium metal

  20. Mesophilic and thermophilic alkaline fermentation of waste activated sludge for hydrogen production: Focusing on homoacetogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wan, Jingjing; Jing, Yuhang; Zhang, Shicheng

    2016-01-01

    The present study compared the mesophilic and thermophilic alkaline fermentation of waste activated sludge (WAS) for hydrogen production with focus on homoacetogenesis, which mediated the consumption of H2 and CO2 for acetate production. Batch experiments showed that hydrogen yield of WAS increased...

  1. Sludge batch 9 follow-on actual-waste testing for the nitric-glycolic flowsheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, J. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Crawford, C. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pareizs, J. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Williams, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-03-23

    An actual-waste Sludge Batch 9 qualification run with the nitric-glycolic flowsheet (SC-18) was performed in FY16. In order to supplement the knowledge base for the nitric-glycolic flowsheet, additional testing was performed on the product slurries, condensates, and intermediate samples from run SC-18.

  2. Nutrient release, recovery and removal from waste sludge of a biological nutrient removal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Zheng, Shu-Jian; Pei, Li-Ying; Ke, Li; Peng, Dang-Cong; Xia, Si-Qing

    2014-01-01

    The uncontrolled release of nutrients from waste sludge results in nitrogen and phosphorus overloading in wastewater treatment plants when supernatant is returned to the inlet. A controlled release, recovery and removal of nutrient from the waste sludge of a Biological Nutrient Removal system (BNR) are investigated. Results showed that the supernatant was of high mineral salt, high electrical conductivity and poor biodegradability, in addition to high nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations after the waste sludge was hydrolysed through sodium dodecyl sulphate addition. Subsequently, over 91.8% of phosphorus and 10.5% of nitrogen in the supernatants were extracted by the crystallization method under the conditions of 9.5 pH and 400 rpm. The precipitate was mainly struvite according to X-ray diffraction and morphological examination. A multistage anoxic-oxic Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR) was then adopted to remove the residual carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in the supernatant. The MBBR exhibited good performance in simultaneously removing carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus under a short aeration time, which accounted for 31.25% of a cycle. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that nitrifiers presented mainly in floc, although higher extracellular polymeric substance content, especially DNA, appeared in the biofilm. Thus, a combination of hydrolysis and precipitation, followed by the MBBR, can complete the nutrient release from the waste sludge of a BNR system, recovers nutrients from the hydrolysed liquor and removes nutrients from leftovers effectively.

  3. Biodegradation kinetics of tobacco-waste leachate by activated sludge in a sequencing batch reactor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vukovic, M; Cosic, I; Kucic, D; Kopcic, N; Briski, F

    2012-01-01

    .... In this work, biodegradation of the organic fraction in tobacco waste leachate was studied. Experiments were carried out in a sequencing batch reactor at initial concentrations of activated sludge of 3.03 and 5.95 g [L.sup.-1...

  4. Biotechnology of intensive aerobic conversion of sewage sludge and food waste into fertilizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.-Y.; Stabnikova, O.; Show, K.-Y.; Ding, H.-B.; Tay, S.T.-L.; Ivanov, V.; Tay, J.-H.

    2003-07-01

    Biotechnology for intensive aerobic bioconversion of sewage sludge and food waste into fertilizer was developed. The wastes were treated in a closed reactor under controlled aeration, stirring, pH, and temperature at 60{sup o}C, after addition of starter bacterial culture Bacillus thermoamylovorans. The biodegradation of sewage sludge was studied by decrease of volatile solids (VS), content of organic carbon and autofluorescence of coenzyme F{sub 420}. The degradation of anaerobic biomass was faster than biodegradation of total organic matter. The best fertilizer was obtained when sewage sludge was thermally pre-treated, mixed with food waste, chalk, and artificial bulking agent. The content of volatile solid and the content of organic carbon decreased at 24.8% and 13.5% of total solids, respectively, during ten days of bioconversion. The fertilizer was a powder with moisture content of 5%. It was stable, and not toxic for the germination of plant seeds. Addition of 1.0 to 1.5% of this fertilizer to the subsoil increased the growth of different plants tested by 113 to 164 %. The biotechnology can be applied in larger scale for the recycling of sewage sludge and food wastes in Singapore. (author)

  5. Effect of addition of sewage sludge and coal sludge on bioavailability of selected metals in the waste from the zinc and lead industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobik-Szołtysek, Jolanta; Wystalska, Katarzyna; Grobelak, Anna

    2017-07-01

    This study evaluated the content of bioavailable forms of selected heavy metals present in the waste from Zn and Pb processing that can potentially have an effect on the observed difficulties in reclamation of landfills with this waste. The particular focus of the study was on iron because its potential excess or deficiency may be one of the causes of the failure in biological reclamation. The study confirmed that despite high content of total iron in waste (mean value of 200.975gkg-1), this metal is present in the forms not available to plants (mean: 0.00009gkg-1). The study attempted to increase its potential bioavailability through preparation of the mixtures of this waste with additions in the form of sewage sludge and coal sludge in different proportions. Combination of waste with 10% of coal sludge and sewage sludge using the contents of 10%, 20% and 30% increased the amounts of bioavailable iron forms to the level defined as sufficient for adequate plant growth. The Lepidum sativum test was used to evaluate phytotoxicity of waste and the mixtures prepared based on this waste. The results did not show unambiguously that the presence of heavy metals in the waste had a negative effect on the growth of test plant roots. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Co-fermentation of sewage sludge and organic waste; CO-Vergaerung von Klaerschlamm und Bioabfaellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmelz, K.G. [Emschergenossenschaft und Lippeverband, Essen (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    The processes taking place in sewage sludge digestion and organic waste fermentation are identical. It therefore seems obvious to treat organic waste and sewage sludge jointly. In contrast to organic waste fermentation plants to be newly erected, co-fermentation permits making use of anaerobic treatment systems that are already installed at sewage treatment plants. At these plants, in principle only the sections responsible for acceptance and conditioning of organic waste need to be retrofitted. Apart from the possibility to treat organic waste very inexpensively, the co-fermentation process offers a number of other advantages. For this reason, the Emschergenossenschaft and Lippeverband carried out extensive semi-technical scale tests in co-fermentation of organic waste and sewage sludge. (orig.) [German] Die ablaufenden biologischen Prozesse sind bei der Klaerschlammfaulung und der Bioabfallvergaerung gleich. Es liegt daher nahe, Bioabfaelle und Klaerschlaemme gemeinsam zu behandeln. Gegenueber neu zu errichtenden Bioabfall-Vergaerungsanlagen kann bei der Co-Vergaerung auf die bereits installierte Anaerobtechnik auf den Klaeranlagen zurueckgegriffen werden. Dort muss im wesentlichen nur der Annahme- und Aufbereitungsbereich fuer die Bioabfaelle nachgeruestet werden. Das Verfahren der Co-Vergaerung bietet ausser einer sehr kostenguenstigen Behandlungsmoeglichkeit fuer Bioabfaelle eine Reihe weiterer Vorteile. Aus diesem Grund wurden bei Emschergenossenschaft und Lippeverband umfangreiche halbtechnische Versuche zur Co-Vergaerung von Bioabfaellen und Klaerschlamm durchgefuehrt. (orig.)

  7. Sludge as dioxins suppressant in hospital waste incineration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, M.; Li, X.; Yang, J.; Chen, T.; Lu, S.; Buekens, A.G.; Olie, K.; Yan, J.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen containing compounds such as ammonia, urea and amines can effectively inhibit the formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). Sewage sludge accumulates both sulfur and nitrogen during wastewater treatment so it could be used to reduce PCDD/Fs formation.

  8. Issues related to waste sewage sludge drying under superheated steam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamawand Ihsan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sewage sludge was dried in a rotary drum dryer under superheated steam. Particle size and moisture content were shown to have significant influences on sticking and agglomeration of the materials. Pouring partially dried sludge (70–80% moisture content, wet basis directly into the screw feeder of the drum dryer resulted in a significant sticking to the surface of the drum and the final particle size of the product was greater than 100 mm in diameter. The moisture content of this product was slightly less than its initial value. To overcome this issue, the sludge was mixed with lignite at variety ratios and then chopped before being introduced to the feeding screw. It was found that mixing the sludge with lignite and then sieving the chopped materials through a four millimetre mesh sieve was the key to solve this issue. This technique significantly reduced both stickiness and agglomeration of the material. Also, this enabled for a significant reduction in moisture content of the final product.

  9. Microbial community related to lysozyme digestion process for boosting waste activated sludge biodegradability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xiao-Dong; He, Jun-Guo; Qiu, Wei; Tang, Jian; Liu, Tian-Tian

    2015-01-01

    Waste activated sludge from a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor was used to investigate the potential relation of microbial community with lysozyme digestion process for sludge solubilization. The results showed the microbial community shifted conspicuously as sludge suffered lysozyme digestion. Soluble protein and polysaccharide kept an increasing trend in solution followed with succession of microbial community. The rise of lysozyme dosage augmented the dissimilarity among communities in various digested sludge. A negative relationship presented between community diversity and lysozyme digestion process under various lysozyme/TS from 0 to 240min (correlation coefficient R(2) exceeded 0.9). Pareto-Lorenz curves demonstrated that microbial community tended to be even with sludge disintegration process by lysozyme. Finally, with diversity (H) decrease and community distribution getting even, the SCOD/TCOD increased steadily in solution which suggested the sludge with high community diversity and uneven population distribution might have tremendous potential for improving their biodegradability by lysozyme digestion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Enhancing dewaterability of waste activated sludge by combined oxidative conditioning process with zero-valent iron and peroxymonosulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xu; Jin, Wenbiao; Chen, Hongyi; Chen, Chuan; Han, Songfang; Tu, Renjie; Wei, Wei; Gao, Shu-Hong; Xie, Guo-Jun; Wang, Qilin

    2017-11-01

    The enhancement of sludge dewaterability is of great importance for facilitating the sludge disposal during the operation of wastewater treatment plants. In this study, a novel oxidative conditioning approach was applied to enhance the dewaterability of waste activated sludge by the combination of zero-valent iron (ZVI) and peroxymonosulfate (PMS). It was found that the dewaterability of sludge was significantly improved after the addition of ZVI (0-4 g/g TSS) (TSS: total suspended solids) and PMS (0-1 g/g TSS). The optimal addition amount of ZVI and PMS was 0.25 g/g TSS and 0.1 g/g TSS, respectively, under which the capillary suction time of the sludge was reduced by approximately 50%. The decomposition of sludge flocs could contribute to the improved sludge dewaterability. Economic analysis demonstrated that the proposed conditioning process with ZVI and PMS was more economical than the ZVI + peroxydisulfate and the traditional Fenton conditioning processes.

  11. The influence of amendment material on biosolid composting of sludge from a waste-water treatment plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Torres Lozada

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic composting employing manual turning was evaluated by using the sludge produced by EMCALI EICE ESP's Cañaverlejo wastewater treatment plant (PTAR-C. Compost (in 1,0 ton piles consisted of sludge, a fixed proportion of bulking agent (10% and amendment material. Sugarcane waste and solid organic (marketplace waste were evaluated as amendment material using 20/80 and 40/60 weight/weight (amendment/sludge ratios. Incorporating the amendment material improved the compost, being reflected in a faster start for the thermophilic phase, higher temperatures beign maintained (>55°C and better C/N ratio obtained in the compost in all treatments compared to the pile which had no amendment added to it. Incorporating the bulking agent improved sludge manageability during composting; the best combination was 54% sludge + 10% sugacane bagasse + 36% liquid sugarcane waste.

  12. OPERATIONAL CHALLENGES IN MIXING AND TRANSFER OF HIGH YIELD STRESS SLUDGE WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, T.; Bhatt, P.

    2009-12-07

    The ability to mobilize and transport non-Newtonian waste is essential to advance the closure of highly radioactive storage tanks. Recent waste removal operations from Tank 12H at the Savannah River Site (SRS) encountered sludge mixtures with a yield stress too high to pump. The waste removal equipment for Tank 12H was designed to mobilize and transport a diluted slurry mixture through an underground 550m long (1800 ft) 0.075m diameter (3 inch) pipeline. The transfer pump was positioned in a well casing submerged in the sludge slurry. The design allowed for mobilized sludge to enter the pump suction while keeping out larger tank debris. Data from a similar tank with known rheological properties were used to size the equipment. However, after installation and startup, field data from Tank 12H confirmed the yield stress of the slurry to exceed 40 Pa, whereas the system is designed for 10 Pa. A revision to the removal strategy was required, which involved metered dilution, blending, and mixing to ensure effective and safe transfer performance. The strategy resulted in the removal of over 255,000 kgs of insoluble solids with four discrete transfer evolutions for a total transfer volume of 2400 m{sup 3} (634,000 gallons) of sludge slurry.

  13. Codigestion of olive oil mill wastewaters with manure, household waste or sewage sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, I.; Ahring, B.K.

    1997-01-01

    Combined anaerobic digestion of oil mill effluent (OME) together with manure, household waste (HHW) or sewage sludge was investigated. In batch experiments it was shown that OME could be degraded into biogas when codigested with manure. In codigestion with HHW or sewage sludge, OME dilution....... An OME utilization of approx. 55%, and lipid reduction of 73% was reached in codigestion with HHW (50:50 and 75:25 OME to HHW ratios). The results showed that the high buffering capacity contained in manure, together with the content of several essential nutrients, make it possible to degrade OME without...

  14. Treatment of the oily waste sludges through thermal plasma in absence of oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda J, G.; Pacheco S, J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares. Laboratorio de Aplicaciones de Plasmas Termicos. Apdo. Postal 18-1027. C.P. 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    The thermal plasma process in absence of oxygen for the degradation of oily waste sludges was evaluated. These residues are commonly generated in the petrochemical industry and are considered hazardous wastes according to the present environmental regulations. The process was operated using difference residence times and the characteristics of the gaseous by products and residual soils were determined. The efficiency of organic matter degradation was 99.99%. The attained volume reduction, under the best conditions was 95.5%. The residual soils were composed of carbon and clays. The residual gases have low molecular weight. The resulting final wastes were non-hazardous and could be disposed of in landfills. (Author)

  15. Phase chemistry and radionuclide retention of high level radioactive waste tank sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUMHANSL,JAMES L.; BRADY,PATRICK V.; ZHANG,PENGCHU; ARTHUR,SARA E.; HUTCHERSON,SHEILA K.; LIU,J.; QIAN,M.; ANDERSON,HOWARD L.

    2000-05-19

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of high level nuclear waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Washington and Savannah River, South Carolina. These tanks will eventually be emptied and decommissioned. This will leave a residue of sludge adhering to the interior tank surfaces that may contaminate groundwaters with radionuclides and RCRA metals. Experimentation on such sludges is both dangerous and prohibitively expensive so there is a great advantage to developing artificial sludges. The US DOE Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) has funded a program to investigate the feasibility of developing such materials. The following text reports on the success of this program, and suggests that much of the radioisotope inventory left in a tank will not move out into the surrounding environment. Ultimately, such studies may play a significant role in developing safe and cost effective tank closure strategies.

  16. Recovery of Organic and Amino Acids from Sludge and Fish Waste in Sub Critical Water Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Faisal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of organic and amino acid production from the treatment of sludge and fish waste using water at sub critical conditions was investigated. The results indicated that at sub-critical conditions, where the ion product of water went through a maximum, the formation of organic acids was favorable. The presence of oxidant favored formation of acetic and formic acid. Other organic acids of significant amount were propionic, succinic and lactic acids. Depending on the type of wastes, formation of other organic acids was also possible. Knowing the organic acids obtained by hydrolysis and oxidation in sub-critical water of various wastes are useful in designing of applicable waste treatment process, complete degradation of organic wastes into volatile carbon and water, and also on the viewpoint of resource recovery. The production of lactic acid was discussed as well. The results indicated that temperature of 573 K, with the absence of oxidant, yield of lactic acid from fish waste was higher than sewage sludge. The maximum yield of total amino acids (137 mg/g-dry fish from waste fish entrails was obtained at subcritical condition (T = 523 K, P = 4 MPa at reaction time of 60 min by using the batch reactor. The amino acids obtained in this study were mainly alanine and glycine. Keywords:  organic acids, amino acids, sub-critical water, hydrothermal, resources recovery

  17. Actual Waste Demonstration of the Nitric-Glycolic Flowsheet for Sludge Batch 9 Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newell, J. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pareizs, J. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Martino, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Reboul, S. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Coleman, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Johnson, F. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    For each sludge batch that is processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performs qualification testing to demonstrate that the sludge batch is processable. Testing performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory has shown glycolic acid to be effective in replacing the function of formic acid in the DWPF chemical process. The nitric-glycolic flowsheet reduces mercury, significantly lowers the catalytic generation of hydrogen and ammonia which could allow purge reduction in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT), stabilizes the pH and chemistry in the SRAT and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), allows for effective rheology adjustment, and is favorable with respect to melter flammability. In order to implement the new flowsheet, SRAT and SME cycles, designated SC-18, were performed using a Sludge Batch (SB) 9 slurry blended from SB8 Tank 40H and Tank 51H samples. The SRAT cycle involved adding nitric and glycolic acids to the sludge, refluxing to steam strip mercury, and dewatering to a targeted solids concentration. Data collected during the SRAT cycle included offgas analyses, process temperatures, heat transfer, and pH measurements. The SME cycle demonstrated the addition of glass frit and the replication of six canister decontamination additions. The demonstration concluded with dewatering to a targeted solids concentration. Data collected during the SME cycle included offgas analyses, process temperatures, heat transfer, and pH measurements. Slurry and condensate samples were collected for subsequent analysis

  18. Effects of alkali types on waste activated sludge (WAS) fermentation and microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoling; Peng, Yongzhen; Li, Baikun; Wu, Changyong; Zhang, Liang; Zhao, Yaqian

    2017-11-01

    The effects of two alkali agents, NaOH and Ca(OH)2, on enhancing waste activated sludge (WAS) fermentation and short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) accumulation were studied in semi-continuous stirred tank reactors (semi-CSTR) at different sludge retention time (SRT) (2-10 d). The optimum SRT for SCFAs accumulation of NaOH and Ca(OH)2 adding system was 8 d and 10 d, respectively. Results showed that the average organics yields including soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD), protein, and carbohydrate in the NaOH system were as almost twice as that in the Ca(OH)2 system. For Ca(OH)2 system, sludge hydrolysis and protein acidification efficiencies were negatively affected by Ca2+ precipitation, which was revealed by the decrease of Ca2+ concentration, the rise of zeta potential and better sludge dewaterability in Ca(OH)2 system. In addition, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were the main microbial functional groups in both types of alkali systems. NaOH system obtained higher microbial quantities which led to better acidification. For application, however, Ca(OH)2 was more economically feasible owning to its lower price and better dewaterability of residual sludge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of ozonation on disinfection and microbial activity in waste activated sludge for land application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Kyu-Hong; Maeng, Sung Kyu; Hong, Jun-Seok; Lim, Byung-Ran

    2003-07-01

    Effects of ozonation on microbial biomass activity and community structure in waste activated sludges from various treatment plants were investigated. The densities of viable cells and microbial community structure in the sludges treated with ozone at 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 gO{sub 3}/gDS were measured on the basis of the respiratory quinone profile and LIVE/DEAD Backlight(TM). The results from the bacterial concentration and quinone profiles of the waste activated sludge showed that respiratory activities of microorganisms were detected at the ozone dose of 0.4 gO{sub 3}/gDS. However, fecal coliform, fecal streptococcus and Salmonella sp. in the ozonized sludge were not detected. This result implies that some microorganisms might be more tolerant to ozonation than the pathogenic indicators. The pathogens reduction requirements for Class A biosolids were still met by the ozonation at 0.4 gO{sub 3}/gDS.

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTINIDES IN SIMULATED ALKALINE TANK WASTE SLUDGES AND LEACHATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Kenneth L.

    2008-11-20

    In this project, both the fundamental chemistry of actinides in alkaline solutions (relevant to those present in Hanford-style waste storage tanks), and their dissolution from sludge simulants (and interactions with supernatants) have been investigated under representative sludge leaching procedures. The leaching protocols were designed to go beyond conventional alkaline sludge leaching limits, including the application of acidic leachants, oxidants and complexing agents. The simulant leaching studies confirm in most cases the basic premise that actinides will remain in the sludge during leaching with 2-3 M NaOH caustic leach solutions. However, they also confirm significant chances for increased mobility of actinides under oxidative leaching conditions. Thermodynamic data generated improves the general level of experiemental information available to predict actinide speciation in leach solutions. Additional information indicates that improved Al removal can be achieved with even dilute acid leaching and that acidic Al(NO3)3 solutions can be decontaminated of co-mobilized actinides using conventional separations methods. Both complexing agents and acidic leaching solutions have significant potential to improve the effectiveness of conventional alkaline leaching protocols. The prime objective of this program was to provide adequate insight into actinide behavior under these conditions to enable prudent decision making as tank waste treatment protocols develop.

  1. Improving efficiency of transport fuels production by thermal hydrolysis of waste activated sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulshin, Igor

    2017-10-01

    The article deals with issues of transport biofuels. Transport biofuels are an important element of a system of energy security. Moreover, as part of a system it is inextricably linked to the urban, rural or industrial infrastructure. The paper discusses methods of increasing the yield of biogas from anaerobic digesters at wastewater treatment plants. The thermal hydrolysis method was considered. The main advantages and drawbacks of this method were analyzed. The experimental biomass (from SNDOD-bioreactor) and high-organic substrate have been previously studied by respirometry methods. A biomethane potential of the investigated organic substrate has high rates because of substrate composition (the readily biodegradable substrate in the total composition takes about 85%). Waste activated sludge from SNDOD-bioreactor can be used for biofuel producing with high efficiency especially with pre-treatment like a thermal hydrolysis. Further studies have to consider the possibility of withdrawing inhibitors from waste activated sludge.

  2. Reuse of waste beer yeast sludge for biosorptive decolorization of reactive blue 49 from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baoe; Guo, Xiu

    2011-06-01

    Reactive blue 49 was removed from aqueous solution by biosorption using powder waste sludge composed of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from the beer-brewing industry. The effect of initial pH, temperature and the biosorption thermodynamics, equilibrium, kinetics was investigated in this study. It was found that the biosorption capacity was at maximum at initial pH 3, that the effect of temperature on biosorption of reactive blue 49 was only slight in relation to the large biosorption capacity (25°C, 361 mg g(-1)) according as the biosorption capacity decreased only 43 mg g(-1) at the temperature increased from 25 to 50°C. The biosorption was spontaneous, exothermic in nature and the dye molecules movements decreased slightly in random at the solid/liquid interface during the biosorption of dye on biosorbents. The biosorption equilibrium data could be described by Freundich isotherm model. The biosorption rates were found to be consistent with a pseudo-second-order kinetics model. The functional group interaction analysis between waste beer yeast sludge and reactive blue 49 by the aid of Fourier transform infrared (abbr. FTIR) spectroscopy indicated that amino components involved in protein participated in the biosorption process, which may be achieved by the mutual electrostatic adsorption process between the positively charged amino groups in waste beer yeast sludge with negatively charged sulfonic groups in reactive blue 49.

  3. Utilization of molasses spentwash for production of bioplastics by waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khardenavis, Anshuman A; Vaidya, Atul N; Kumar, M Suresh; Chakrabarti, Tapan

    2009-09-01

    Present study describes the treatment of molasses spentwash and its use as a potential low cost substrate for production of biopolymer polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) by waste activated sludge. Fluorescence microscopy revealed the presence of PHB granules in sludge biomass which was further confirmed by fourier transform-infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR) and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The processing of molasses spentwash was carried out for attaining different ratios of carbon and nitrogen (C:N). Highest chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and PHB accumulation of 60% and 31% respectively was achieved with raw molasses spentwash containing inorganic nitrogen (C:N ratio=28) followed by COD removal of 52% and PHB accumulation of 28% for filtered molasses containing inorganic nitrogen (C:N ratio=29). PHB production yield (Y(p/s)) was highest (0.184 g g(-1) COD consumed) for deproteinized spentwash supplemented with nitrogen. In contrast, the substrate consumption and product formation were higher in case of raw spentwash. Though COD removal was lowest from deproteinized spentwash, evaluation of kinetic parameters suggested higher rates of conversion of available carbon to biomass and PHB. Thus the process provided dual benefit of conversion of two wastes viz. waste activated sludge and molasses spentwash into value-added product-PHB.

  4. Spectroscopic characterization of digestates obtained from sludge mixed to increasing amounts of fruit and vegetable wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, Maria Rosaria; Cavallo, Ornella; Malerba, Anna Daniela; Di Maria, Francesco; Ricci, Anna; Gigliotti, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) represents an efficient waste-treatment technology during which microorganisms break down biodegradable material in absence of oxygen yielding a biogas containing methane. The aim of this work was to investigate the transformations occurring in the organic matter during the co-digestion of waste mixed sludge (WMS) with an increasing amount of fruit and vegetable wastes (FVW) in a pilot scale apparatus reproducing a full-scale digester in an existing wastewater treatment plant. Samples comprised: sludge, FVW, sludge mixed with 10-20-30-40% FVW. Ingestates and digestates were analyzed by means of emission fluorescence spectroscopy and FTIR associated to Fourier self deconvolution (FSD) of spectra. With increasing the amount of FVW from 10% to 20% at which percentage biogas production reached the maximum value, FTIR spectra and FSD traces of digestates exhibited a decrease of intensity of peaks assigned to polysaccharides and aliphatics and an increase of peak assigned to aromatics as a result of the biodegradation of rapidly degradable materials and concentration of aromatic recalcitrant compounds. Digestates with 30 and 40% FVW exhibited a relative increase of intensity of peaks assigned to aliphatics likely as a result of the increasing amount of rapidly degradable materials and the consequent reduction of the hydraulic retention time. This may cause inhibition of methanogenesis and accumulation of volatile fatty acids. The highest emission fluorescence intensity was observed for the digestate with 20% FVW confirming the concentration of aromatic recalcitrant compounds in the substrate obtained at the highest biogas production.

  5. Co-digestion of food and garden waste with mixed sludge from wastewater treatment in continuously stirred tank reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitamo, Temesgen Mathewos; Boldrin, Alessio; Boe, Kanokwan

    2016-01-01

    Co-digestions of urban organic waste were conducted to investigate the effect of the mixing ratio between sludge, food waste, grass clippings and green waste at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs). Compared to the digestion of 100% sludge, the methane yield increased by 48% and 35%, when co......-digesting sludge with food waste, grass clippings and garden waste with a corresponding % VS of 10:67.5:15.75:6.75 (R1) and 10:45:31.5:13.5 (R2), respectively. The methane yield remained constant at around 425 and 385 NmL CH4/g VS in R1 and R2, respectively, when the reactors were operated at HRTs of 15, 20 and 30...

  6. A novel approach for phosphorus recovery and no wasted sludge in enhanced biological phosphorus removal process with external COD addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Cheng-Wang; Ma, Yun-Jie; Zhang, Fang; Lu, Yong-Ze; Zeng, Raymond J

    2014-01-01

    In enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process, phosphorus (P) in wastewater is removed via wasted sludge without actual recovery. A novel approach to realize phosphorus recovery with special external chemical oxygen demand (COD) addition in EBPR process was proposed. During the new operating approach period, it was found that (1) no phosphorus was detected in the effluent; (2) with an external addition of 10 % of influent COD amount, 79 % phosphorus in the wastewater influent was recovered; (3) without wasted sludge, the MLVSS concentration in the system increased from 2,010 to 3,400 mg/L and kept stable after day 11 during 24-day operating period. This demonstrates that the novel approach is feasible to realize phosphorus recovery with no wasted sludge discharge in EBPR process. Furthermore, this approach decouples P removal and sludge age, which may enhance the application of membrane bioreactor for P removal.

  7. Biological hydrogen production by anaerobic digestion of food waste and sewage sludge treated using various pretreatment technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungjin; Choi, Kwangkeun; Kim, Jong-Oh; Chung, Jinwook

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to enhance the efficiency of anaerobic co-digestion with sewage sludge using pretreatment technologies and food waste. We studied the effects of various pretreatment methods (thermal, chemical, ultrasonic, and their combination) on hydrogen production and the characteristics of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) using sewage sludge alone and a mixture of sewage sludge and food waste. The pretreatment combination of alkalization and ultrasonication performed best, effecting a high solubilization rate and high hydrogen production (13.8 mL H2/g VSSconsumed). At a food waste:pretreated sewage sludge ratio of 2:1 in the mixture, the peak hydrogen production value was 5.0 L H2/L/d. As the production of hydrogen increased, propionate levels fell but butyrate concentrations rose gradually.

  8. Effect of Municipal Solid Waste Compost and Sewage Sludge on yield and Yield Components of Black Cumin (Nigella sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Akbarnejad

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to investigate the effect of municipal solid waste compost (MSWC and sewage sludge (SS on yield and yield components of black cumin (Nigella sativa L. an experiment was conducted in greenhouse of Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. Municipal solid waste compost at 0, 15, 30 ton/ha (C0, C15 and C30 and sewage sludge at 0, 15, 30 ton/ha (S0, S15 and S30 were used in a factorial experiment based on completely randomized design with three replications. Results showed that municipal solid waste compost and sewage sludge and their interaction effects had significant effects on plant height, number of capsule per plant, number of seeds per capsule, number of seeds per plant, seed yield, biomass and 1000 seed weight. Increasing of sewage sludge amount from 15 to 30 ton/ha increased all measured parameters. But with increasing of municipal solid waste compost from 15 to 30 ton/ha, plant height, number of capsule per plant, number of seeds per capsule, number of seeds per plant, seed yield, biomass and 1000 seed weight were decreased. Interaction effects of municipal solid waste compost and sewage sludge showed that yield and yield components in all treatments were increased with the exception of treatment that contained 30 ton/ha municipal solid waste and 0 ton/ha sewage sludge (C30S0. Use of high amounts of municipal solid waste compost (>15 ton/ha had a detrimental effect on yield and yield components of black cumin. Keywords: Nigella sativa, Municipal solid waste compost, Sewage sludge, Yield and yield components

  9. Comparison of vermicompost characteristics produced from sewage sludge of wood and paper industry and household solid wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amouei, A I; Yousefi, Z; Khosravi, T

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the potential of produced compost from the sludge of wastewater treatment plant using earthworms and compare it with the vermicompost produced from household solid waste. In the current study, three treatments with the same conditions in terms of organic wastes type were prepared to produce vermicompost from household solid waste and sewage sludges using earthworms. The standard methods were used to determine the physical and chemical parameters in the different produced vermicomposts. The mean of C/N in the household solid waste, raw biological and chemical sludges was 32, 22.5, and 26.5, respectively. These levels were 16.5, 14.5, and 15 in the vermicomposts. The mean of nitrogen and phosphorus percentages in the vermicompost of solid waste, biological and chemical sludges was 2.2%, 2.6%, 2.3% and 0.72%, 0.54%, and 0.56%, respectively. The mean percentages of organic matters in the initial substrates and vermicomposts of solid waste, biological and chemical sludges were 97.2%, 90%, 80.5% and 65.8%, 67.8% and 63% respectively. The concentrations of heavy metals decreased in all vermicomposts. The EC levels in solid waste, biological and chemical sludges were 1459, 1041, and 1487 μs/cm, respectively. These levels were 544, 385 and 635 μs/cm in the produced compost. Eisenia fetida can convert household solid waste, and biological and chemical sludges produced from wastewater treatment plant into a high-quality and acceptable compost.

  10. Cultivation of phagotrophic algae with waste activated sludge as a fast approach to reclaim waste organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cong; Xiao, Suo; Ju, Lu-Kwang

    2016-03-15

    Substantial energy is reserved in waste activated sludge (WAS) organics but much of it is difficult to recover because the solid organics require long time to solubilize. In this work we introduced the new approach of recovering WAS organics into the biomass of phagotrophic algae. Phagotrophic algae have the unique ability to grow by ingesting insoluble organic particles including microbial cells. This phagotrophic ability renders the solubilization of WAS organics unnecessary and makes this approach remarkably fast. The approach consists of two stages: a short anaerobic digestion treatment followed by the algal growth on treated WAS. The short anaerobic digestion was exploited to release discrete bacteria from WAS flocs. Phagotrophic algae could then grow rapidly with the released bacteria as well as the solubilized nutrients in the treated WAS. The results showed that WAS organics could be quickly consumed by phagotrophic algae. Among all studied conditions the highest WAS volatile solids (VS) reduction was achieved with 72 h anaerobic digestion and 24 h algal growth. In this optimal process, 28% of WAS VS was reduced, and 41% and 20% of the reduced VS were converted into algal biomass and lipids, respectively. In comparison, only 18% WAS VS were reduced after the same time of aerobic digestion without algae addition. Through this approach, the amount of WAS organics requiring further treatment for final disposal is significantly reduced. With the production of significant amounts of algal biomass and lipids, WAS treatment is expected to be more economical and sustainable in material recycling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Separation of oily sludge and glycerol from biodiesel processing waste by coagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao-guang Xie1,

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Raw waste glycerol is a by-product of biodiesel production from transesterification, which is high in salt, and has a highpH value (more than 9.6. The purpose of this research is to reduce the water pollution from waste glycerol by using acoagulation process and discussing the possibility of waste glycerol reuse. The commercial coagulant (2% by weight, whichwas composed by cationic polyamine (PA 6% and poly-aluminium chloride (PACl 94% (w/w, was used as coagulant totreat waste glycerol. The results showed that after acidification and coagulation process, most of the chemical oxygen demand(COD, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5, total suspended solids (TSS, and oily sludge (such as fatty acid, methyl ester,methanol and soap in raw waste glycerol were removed, except glycerol. The removal efficiencies of COD, BOD5, TSS, soapand methanol were 96.2%, 93.3%, 98.1%, 100%, and 85.8%, respectively, but the removal efficiency of glycerol was only65.4%. There was still a certain amount of glycerol (about 147.5g/L in the solution, which is separated from oily sludge.

  12. Analysis on carbon dioxide emission reduction during the anaerobic synergetic digestion technology of sludge and kitchen waste: Taking kitchen waste synergetic digestion project in Zhenjiang as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qia; Dai, Xiaohu

    2017-11-01

    With the popularization of municipal sewage treatment facilities, the improvement of sewage treatment efficiency and the deepening degree of sewage treatment, the sludge production of sewage plant has been sharply increased. Carbon emission during the process of municipal sewage treatment and disposal has become one of the important sources of greenhouse gases that cause greenhouse effect. How to reduce carbon dioxide emissions during sewage treatment and disposal process is of great significance for reducing air pollution. Kitchen waste and excess sludge, as two important organic wastes, once uses anaerobic synergetic digestion technology in the treatment process can on the one hand, avoid instability of sludge individual anaerobic digestion, improve sludge degradation rate and marsh gas production rate, and on the other hand, help increase the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions to a great extent. The paper uses material balance method, analyzes and calculates the carbon dioxide emissions from kitchen waste and sludge disposed by the anaerobic synergetic digestion technology, compares the anaerobic synergetic digestion technology with traditional sludge sanitary landfill technology and works out the carbon dioxide emission reductions after synergetic digestion. It takes the kitchen waste and sludge synergetic digestion engineering project of Zhenjiang city in Jiangsu province as an example, makes material balance analysis using concrete data and works out the carbon dioxide daily emission reductions. The paper analyzes the actual situation of emission reduction by comparing the data, and found that the synergetic digestion of kitchen waste and sludge can effectively reduce the carbon dioxide emission, and the reduction is obvious especially compared with that of sludge sanitary landfill, which has a certain effect on whether to promote the use of the technology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Understanding the impact of cationic polyacrylamide on anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongbo; Liu, Xuran; Zeng, Guangming; Zhao, Jianwei; Liu, Yiwen; Wang, Qilin; Chen, Fei; Li, Xiaoming; Yang, Qi

    2018-03-01

    Previous investigations showed that cationic polyacrylamide (cPAM), a flocculant widely used in wastewater pretreatment and waste activated sludge dewatering, deteriorated methane production during anaerobic digestion of sludge. However, details of how cPAM affects methane production are poorly understood, hindering deep control of sludge anaerobic digestion systems. In this study, the mechanisms of cPAM affecting sludge anaerobic digestion were investigated in batch and long-term tests using either real sludge or synthetic wastewaters as the digestion substrates. Experimental results showed that the presence of cPAM not only slowed the process of anaerobic digestion but also decreased methane yield. The maximal methane yield decreased from 139.1 to 86.7 mL/g of volatile suspended solids (i.e., 1861.5 to 1187.0 mL/L) with the cPAM level increasing from 0 to 12 g/kg of total suspended solids (i.e., 0-236.7 mg/L), whereas the corresponding digestion time increased from 22 to 26 d. Mechanism explorations revealed that the addition of cPAM significantly restrained the sludge solubilization, hydrolysis, acidogenesis, and methanogenesis processes. It was found that ∼46% of cAPM was degraded in the anaerobic digestion, and the degradation products significantly affected methane production. Although the theoretically biochemical methane potential of cPAM is higher than that of protein and carbohydrate, only 6.7% of the degraded cPAM was transformed to the final product, methane. Acrylamide, acrylic acid, and polyacrylic acid were found to be the main degradation metabolites, and their amount accounted for ∼50% of the degraded cPAM. Further investigations showed that polyacrylic acid inhibited all the solubilization, hydrolysis, acidogenesis, and methanogenesis processes while acrylamide and acrylic acid inhibited the methanogenesis significantly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Enhanced high-solids anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge by the addition of scrap iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaobin; Feng, Yinghong; Yu, Qilin; Xu, Zibin; Quan, Xie

    2014-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge usually requires pretreatment procedure to improve the bioavailability of sludge, which involves considerable energy and high expenditures. This study proposes a cost-effective method for enhanced anaerobic digestion of sludge without a pretreatment by directly adding iron into the digester. The results showed that addition of Fe(0) powder could enhance 14.46% methane yield, and Fe scrap (clean scrap) could further enhance methane yield (improving rate 21.28%) because the scrap has better mass transfer efficiency with sludge and liquid than Fe(0) powder. The scrap of Fe with rust (rusty scrap) could induce microbial Fe(III) reduction, which resulted in achieving the highest methane yield (improving rate 29.51%), and the reduction rate of volatile suspended solids (VSS) was also highest (48.27%) among Fe powder, clean scrap and rusty scrap. PCR-DGGE proved that the addition of rusty scrap could enhance diversity of acetobacteria and enrich iron-reducing bacteria to enhance degradation of complex substrates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of combined composting and vermicomposting of waste sludge on arsenic fate and bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maňáková, Blanka; Kuta, Jan; Svobodová, Markéta; Hofman, Jakub

    2014-09-15

    Composting and vermicomposting are traditional processes for the treatment of sludge. During these processes, the humification of organic matter has a significant effect on the physicochemical form and distribution of heavy metals. In this study, industrial sludge (groundwater treatment waste) contaminated by arsenic (396 ± 1 mg kg(-1)) was used. Such sludge poses a significant challenge with respect to effective treatment. Composting, vermicomposting (with Eisenia fetida), and the combined approach of composting and vermicomposting were performed to determine the evolution of arsenic speciation, mobility and bioavailability. The composting/vermicomposting was done with sludge, horse manure, and grass in the ratios of 3:6:1. A solution of 0.1M NH4COOCH3 was used as a single extraction solvent for determination of the mobile arsenic pool and targeted arsenic species (As(III), As(V), monomethylarsenic acid - MMA(V), dimethylarsenic acid - DMA(V)). The analysis of arsenic in the extracts was carried out by means of HPLC-ICP-MS spectrometry. In addition, the earthworm species E. fetida was used for bioaccumulation tests that followed the compost and vermicompost processes. The obtained results indicate a reduction in arsenic mobility and bioavailability in all matured composts and vermicomposts. The combined process exhibited a greater effect than compost or vermicompost alone. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Enhanced anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge of low organic content in a novel digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J; Jiang, Y; Cao, Z P; Li, Z H; Hu, Y Y; Li, H Z; Zuo, J E; Wang, K J

    2015-01-01

    A novel digester, termed an internal circulation anaerobic digester (ICAD), was developed to intensify sludge digestion. It consists of reaction zone, settling zone, thickening zone, riser and downcomer. Internal circulation in the digester is intensified by backflow biogas. The mesophilic ICAD treating thermal pretreated waste activated sludge with volatile suspended solids (VSS)/suspended solids (SS) of 0.45-0.49 was conducted in this study to reduce and stabilize the low organic content sludge. The results showed that the VSS removal rate and biogas rate reached 46.0% and 0.72 m(3)/kg VSS(fed) at hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 15 days. VSS/SS and soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) of the effluent sludge ranged from 0.39 to 0.41 and 274 mg/L to 473 mg/L, respectively, under various HRTs from 10 to 27 days. The degradation ability of ICAD derived from the improved mass transfer by internal circulation and long solid retention time at short HRT is compared with continuous stirred tank reactor.

  17. Testing of the Defense Waste Processing Facility Cold Chemical Dissolution Method in Sludge Batch 9 Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pareizs, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Coleman, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Young, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Brown, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-05-10

    For each sludge batch that is processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) tests the applicability of the digestion methods used by the DWPF Laboratory for elemental analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt samples and SRAT Product process control samples. DWPF SRAT samples are typically dissolved using a method referred to as the DWPF Cold Chemical or Cold Chem Method (CC), (see DWPF Procedure SW4- 15.201). Testing indicates that the CC method produced mixed results. The CC method did not result in complete dissolution of either the SRAT Receipt or SRAT Product with some fine, dark solids remaining. However, elemental analyses did not reveal extreme biases for the major elements in the sludge when compared with analyses obtained following dissolution by hot aqua regia (AR) or sodium peroxide fusion (PF) methods. The CC elemental analyses agreed with the AR and PF methods well enough that it should be adequate for routine process control analyses in the DWPF after much more extensive side-by-side tests of the CC method and the PF method are performed on the first 10 SRAT cycles of the Sludge Batch 9 (SB9) campaign. The DWPF Laboratory should continue with their plans for further tests of the CC method during these 10 SRAT cycles.

  18. Effect of nonylphenol on volatile fatty acids accumulation during anaerobic fermentation of waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xu; Wang, Xiao; Xie, Jing; Feng, Leiyu; Yan, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Qi

    2016-11-15

    Most of the reported studies on anaerobic fermentation of sludge focused on the influences of operating conditions, pretreatment methods, and its characteristics, and little attention was paid to those of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) which widespreadly appeared in sludge. In this study, the effect of nonylphenol, a typical POPs in waste activated sludge (WAS), on anaerobic fermentation for volatile fatty acids (VFAs) accumulation was investigated. The concentration of VFAs during WAS anaerobic fermentation was found to be affected positively from 2856 mg COD/L in the control (without NP) to 5620 mg COD/L with NP of 200 mg/kg dry sludge. Mechanism exploration exhibited that the main reason for the enhanced VFAs accumulation in the presence of NP was that more acetic acid was generated during the acidification of WAS, which was increased by almost three times (3790 versus 1310 mg COD/L). In WAS fermentation systems, the abundance of anaerobic functional microorganisms was advantageous to the accumulation of acetic acid. Further investigation by the pure acetogen revealed that both the viability and activity of Proteiniphilum acetatigenes were improved by NP during anaerobic fermentation, resulting in more production of acetic acid and showing good agreement with that in the real WAS fermentation systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A novel rotation generator of hydrodynamic cavitation for waste-activated sludge disintegration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkovšek, Martin; Mlakar, Matej; Levstek, Marjetka; Stražar, Marjeta; Širok, Brane; Dular, Matevž

    2015-09-01

    The disintegration of raw sludge is very important for enhancement of the biogas production in anaerobic digestion process as it provides easily degradable substrate for microorganisms to perform maximum sludge treatment efficiency and stable digestion of sludge at lower costs. In the present study the disintegration was studied by using a novel rotation generator of hydrodynamic cavitation (RGHC). At the first stage the analysis of hydrodynamics of the RGHC were made with tap water, where the cavitation extent and aggressiveness was evaluated. At the second stage RGHC was used as a tool for pretreatment of a waste-activated sludge (WAS), collected from wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). In case of WAS the disintegration rate was measured, where the soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) and soluble Kjeldahl nitrogen were monitored and microbiological pictures were taken. The SCOD increased from initial 45 mg/L up to 602 mg/L and 12.7% more biogas has been produced by 20 passes through RGHC. The results were obtained on a pilot bioreactor plant, volume of 400 L. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Bioconversion of Waste Fiber Sludge to Bacterial Nanocellulose and Use for Reinforcement of CTMP Paper Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genqiang Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Utilization of bacterial nanocellulose (BNC for large-scale applications is restricted by low productivity in static cultures and by the high cost of the medium. Fiber sludge, a waste stream from pulp and paper mills, was enzymatically hydrolyzed to sugar, which was used for the production of BNC by the submerged cultivation of Komagataeibacter xylinus. Compared with a synthetic glucose-based medium, the productivity of purified BNC from the fiber sludge hydrolysate using shake-flasks was enhanced from 0.11 to 0.17 g/(L × d, although the average viscometric degree of polymerization (DPv decreased from 6760 to 6050. The cultivation conditions used in stirred-tank reactors (STRs, including the stirring speed, the airflow, and the pH, were also investigated. Using STRs, the BNC productivity in fiber-sludge medium was increased to 0.32 g/(L × d and the DPv was increased to 6650. BNC produced from the fiber sludge hydrolysate was used as an additive in papermaking based on the chemithermomechanical pulp (CTMP of birch. The introduction of BNC resulted in a significant enhancement of the mechanical strength of the paper sheets. With 10% (w/w BNC in the CTMP/BNC mixture, the tear resistance was enhanced by 140%. SEM images showed that the BNC cross-linked and covered the surface of the CTMP fibers, resulting in enhanced mechanical strength.

  1. Microalgae Cultivation on Anaerobic Digestate of Municipal Wastewater, Sewage Sludge and Agro-Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuliani, Luca; Frison, Nicola; Jelic, Aleksandra; Fatone, Francesco; Bolzonella, David; Ballottari, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae are fast-growing photosynthetic organisms which have the potential to be exploited as an alternative source of liquid fuels to meet growing global energy demand. The cultivation of microalgae, however, still needs to be improved in order to reduce the cost of the biomass produced. Among the major costs encountered for algal cultivation are the costs for nutrients such as CO2, nitrogen and phosphorous. In this work, therefore, different microalgal strains were cultivated using as nutrient sources three different anaerobic digestates deriving from municipal wastewater, sewage sludge or agro-waste treatment plants. In particular, anaerobic digestates deriving from agro-waste or sewage sludge treatment induced a more than 300% increase in lipid production per volume in Chlorella vulgaris cultures grown in a closed photobioreactor, and a strong increase in carotenoid accumulation in different microalgae species. Conversely, a digestate originating from a pilot scale anaerobic upflow sludge blanket (UASB) was used to increase biomass production when added to an artificial nutrient-supplemented medium. The results herein demonstrate the possibility of improving biomass accumulation or lipid production using different anaerobic digestates. PMID:27735859

  2. Microalgae Cultivation on Anaerobic Digestate of Municipal Wastewater, Sewage Sludge and Agro-Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuliani, Luca; Frison, Nicola; Jelic, Aleksandra; Fatone, Francesco; Bolzonella, David; Ballottari, Matteo

    2016-10-10

    Microalgae are fast-growing photosynthetic organisms which have the potential to be exploited as an alternative source of liquid fuels to meet growing global energy demand. The cultivation of microalgae, however, still needs to be improved in order to reduce the cost of the biomass produced. Among the major costs encountered for algal cultivation are the costs for nutrients such as CO₂, nitrogen and phosphorous. In this work, therefore, different microalgal strains were cultivated using as nutrient sources three different anaerobic digestates deriving from municipal wastewater, sewage sludge or agro-waste treatment plants. In particular, anaerobic digestates deriving from agro-waste or sewage sludge treatment induced a more than 300% increase in lipid production per volume in Chlorella vulgaris cultures grown in a closed photobioreactor, and a strong increase in carotenoid accumulation in different microalgae species. Conversely, a digestate originating from a pilot scale anaerobic upflow sludge blanket (UASB) was used to increase biomass production when added to an artificial nutrient-supplemented medium. The results herein demonstrate the possibility of improving biomass accumulation or lipid production using different anaerobic digestates.

  3. Investigation of waste biomass co-pyrolysis with petroleum sludge using a response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guangji; Li, Jianbing; Zhang, Xinying; Li, Yubao

    2017-05-01

    The treatment of waste biomass (sawdust) through co-pyrolysis with refinery oily sludge was carried out in a fixed-bed reactor. Response surface method was applied to evaluate the main and interaction effects of three experimental factors (sawdust percentage in feedstock, temperature, and heating rate) on pyrolysis oil and char yields. It was found that the oil and char yields increased with sawdust percentage in feedstock. The interaction between heating rate and sawdust percentage as well as between heating rate and temperature was significant on the pyrolysis oil yield. The higher heating value of oil originated from sawdust during co-pyrolysis at a sawdust/oily sludge ratio of 3:1 increased by 5 MJ/kg as compared to that during sawdust pyrolysis alone, indicating a synergistic effect of co-pyrolysis. As a result, petroleum sludge can be used as an effective additive in the pyrolysis of waste biomass for improving its energy recovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Anaerobic Codigestion of Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant Sludge with Food Waste: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubayeda Zahan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the codigestion of food manufacturing and processing wastes (FW with sewage sludge (SS, that is, municipal wastewater treatment plant primary sludge and waste activated sludge. Bench scale mesophilic anaerobic reactors were fed intermittently with varying ratio of SS and FW and operated at a hydraulic retention time of 20 days and organic loading of 2.0 kg TS/m3·d. The specific biogas production (SBP increased by 25% to 50% with the addition of 1%–5% FW to SS which is significantly higher than the SBP from SS of 284±9.7 mLN/g VS added. Although the TS, VS, and tCOD removal slightly increased, the biogas yield and methane content improved significantly and no inhibitory effects were observed as indicated by the stable pH throughout the experiment. Metal screening of the digestate suggested the biosolids meet the guidelines for use as a soil conditioner. Batch biochemical methane potential tests at different ratios of SS : FW were used to determine the optimum ratio using surface model analysis. The results showed that up to 47-48% FW can be codigested with SS. Overall these results confirm that codigestion has great potential in improving the methane yield of SS.

  5. Microalgae Cultivation on Anaerobic Digestate of Municipal Wastewater, Sewage Sludge and Agro-Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Zuliani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are fast-growing photosynthetic organisms which have the potential to be exploited as an alternative source of liquid fuels to meet growing global energy demand. The cultivation of microalgae, however, still needs to be improved in order to reduce the cost of the biomass produced. Among the major costs encountered for algal cultivation are the costs for nutrients such as CO2, nitrogen and phosphorous. In this work, therefore, different microalgal strains were cultivated using as nutrient sources three different anaerobic digestates deriving from municipal wastewater, sewage sludge or agro-waste treatment plants. In particular, anaerobic digestates deriving from agro-waste or sewage sludge treatment induced a more than 300% increase in lipid production per volume in Chlorella vulgaris cultures grown in a closed photobioreactor, and a strong increase in carotenoid accumulation in different microalgae species. Conversely, a digestate originating from a pilot scale anaerobic upflow sludge blanket (UASB was used to increase biomass production when added to an artificial nutrient-supplemented medium. The results herein demonstrate the possibility of improving biomass accumulation or lipid production using different anaerobic digestates.

  6. The Effect of paper mill waste and sewage sludge amendments on soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Ana; Barriga, Sandra; Guerrero, Francisca; Gascó, Gabriel

    2013-04-01

    In general, Mediterranean soils have low organic matter content, due to the climate characteristics of this region and inadequate land management. Traditionally, organic wastes such as manure are used as amendment in order to improve the soil quality, increasing soil fertility by the accumulation of nitrogen, phosphorus and other plant nutrients in the soil. In the last decade, other anthropogenic organic wastes such as sewage sludge or paper waste materials have been studied as soil amendments to improve physical, chemical and biological properties of soils. The objective of the present work was to study the influence of waste from a paper mill and sewage sludge amendments on soil organic matter. For this reason, soil organic matter evolution was studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), the derivative (dTG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Thermal analytical techniques have the advantage of using full samples without pre-treatments and have been extensively used to study the evolution of organic matter in soils, to evaluate composting process or to study the evolution of organic matter of growing media.

  7. Characterization of the ORNL MVST Waste Tanks After Transfer of Sludge from BVEST, GAAT, and OHF Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, J.M.

    2001-03-23

    Over the last several years most of the sludge and liquid from the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) tanks at ORNL has been transferred and consolidated in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST). The contents of the MVST tanks at the time the sludge samples were collected for this report included the original inventory in the MVSTs along with the sludge and liquid from the Bethel Valley Evaporator Service Tanks (BVEST), Old Hydrofracture (OHF) tanks, and most of the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT). During the spring and summer of 2000 the MVST composite sludge was sampled and characterized to validate the radiochemical content and to ensure regulatory compliance. This report only discusses the analytical characterization of the sludge from the MVST waste tanks (except for W-29 and W-30). The isotopic data presented in this report supports the position that fissile isotopes of uranium ({sup 233}U and {sup 235}U) and plutonium ({sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu) were ''denatured'' as required by the administrative controls stated in the ORNL LLLW waste acceptance criteria (WAC). In general, the MVST sludge was found to be hazardous by RCRA characteristics based on total analysis of chromium, mercury, and lead. Also, the alpha activity due to transuranic isotopes was well above the 100 nCi/g limit for TRU waste. The characteristics of the MVST sludge relative to the WIPP WAC limits for fissile gram equivalent, plutonium equivalent activity, and thermal power from decay heat, were estimated from the data in this report and found to be far below the upper boundary for any of the remote-handled transuranic waste (RH-TRU) requirements for disposal of the waste in WIPP.

  8. Research on jet mixing of settled sludges in nuclear waste tanks at Hanford and other DOE sites: A historical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, M.R.; Onishi, Y.; Shekarriz, R.

    1997-09-01

    Jet mixer pumps will be used in the Hanford Site double-shell tanks to mobilize and mix the settled solids layer (sludge) with the tank supernatant liquid. Predicting the performance of the jet mixer pumps has been the subject of analysis and testing at Hanford and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. One important aspect of mixer pump performance is sludge mobilization. The research that correlates mixer pump design and operation with the extent of sludge mobilization is the subject of this report. Sludge mobilization tests have been conducted in tanks ranging from 1/25-scale (3 ft-diameter) to full scale have been conducted at Hanford and other DOE sites over the past 20 years. These tests are described in Sections 3.0 and 4.0 of this report. The computational modeling of sludge mobilization and mixing that has been performed at Hanford is discussed in Section 5.0.

  9. Behaviour of pathogenic microorganisms and parasites in biogas production from sewage sludge and municipal wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter-Matsui, R.; Seipp, M.

    With a grant from VW-Stiftung a project was investigated by the 'Medizinisches Zentrum fuer Hygiene, Philipps-Universitaet, Marburg' and the 'Faculty of Agriculture, Fayum, University Cairo'. The aim was to modify the biogas process to get an optimal amount of biogas and to kill the pathogen bacteria at the same time. The effect of different materials, for example, plant wastes, sewage sludge, cow dung and town refuse and their various amounts of dry matters (2% - 16%) were tested. Also the bactericidal effects of pH, Lactobacilli and higher temperatures were checked. It was found that only a pasteurisation before the fermentation decontaminate the sludge without declining amounts of biogas. It was also proved that the development of Schistosoma eggs was interrupted by the fermentation process.

  10. ESTERIFICATION OF FATTY ACID FROM PALM OIL WASTE (SLUDGE OIL BY USING ALUM CATALYST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamrin Usman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Esterification of fatty acids from palm oil waste (sludge oil as biodiesel liquid base has been done by using alum [Al2(SO43.14H2O] catalyst. Some reaction variables like reaction time, catalyst quantity, and molar ratio of sample-reactant was applied for optimal reaction. Yield of 94.66% was obtained at reaction condition 65 °C, 5 h, sample-reactant ratio 1:20, and catalyst quantity 3% (w/w. GC-MS analysis request showed that composition of methyl esters biodiesel are methyl caproic (0.67%, methyl lauric (0.21%, methyl miristic (1.96%, methyl palmitic (49.52%, methyl oleic (41.51%, and methyl stearic (6.13%. Physical properties of synthesized product (viscosity, refraction index and density are similar with those of commercial product.   Keywords: alum, biodiesel, esterification, sludge oil

  11. Enhancement of anaerobic digestibility of waste activated sludge using photo-Fenton pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Gan Chin; Isa, Mohamed Hasnain; Lim, Jun-Wei; Ho, Yeek-Chia; Zinatizadeh, Ali Akbar Lorestani

    2017-12-01

    Biological treatments, such as activated sludge process, are common methods to treat municipal and industrial wastewaters. However, they produce huge amounts of waste activated sludge (WAS). The excess sludge treatment and disposal are a challenge for wastewater treatment plants due to economic, environmental, and regulatory factors. In this study, photo-Fenton pretreatment (oxidation using hydrogen peroxide and iron catalyst aided with UV light) was optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) and central composite design (CCD) to determine the effects of three operating parameters (H2O2 dosage, H2O2/Fe2+ molar ratio, and irradiation time) on disintegration and dewaterability of WAS. MLVSS removal, capillary suction time (CST) reduction, sCOD, and EPS were obtained as 70%, 25%, 12,000 mg/L, and 500 mg/L, respectively, at the optimal conditions, i.e., 725 g H2O2/kg TS, H2O2/Fe2+ molar ratio 80, and irradiation time 40 min. Two batch-fed completely mixed mesophilic anaerobic digesters were then operated at 15-day solid retention time (SRT) and 37 ± 0.5 °C to compare the digestibility of untreated and photo-Fenton pretreated sludge in terms of volatile solids (VS) reduction, COD removal, and biogas production at steady-state operations. Photo-Fenton pretreatment followed by anaerobic digestion of WAS was very effective and yielded 75.7% total VS reduction, 81.5% COD removal, and 0.29-0.31 m3/kg VSfed·d biogas production rate, compared to 40.7% total VS solid reduction, 54.7% COD removal, and 0.12-0.17 m3/kg VSfed·d biogas production rate for control. Thus, photo-Fenton can be a useful pretreatment step in sludge management.

  12. Kneader/dryer for sludges of distillation wastes; Secador-amasador para lodos de la clarificacion, lodos de barnices y residuos de la destilacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwenk, W.

    2001-07-01

    The evaporation and indirect drying of industrial and biological sludges requires equipment of heavy mechanical design that is capable to cope with sticky, pasty matter. LIST-DISCOTHERM B y LIST-ORP kneaders/dryers of closed design are able to dry difficult sludges in a single-step continuous operation without recycling of dry product. Drying of sewage sludge, paint sludges and other process wastes including solvent recovery is an important step for an ecologically safe processing of these residuals. (Author)

  13. Dusts, scale, slags, sludges... Not wastes, but sources of profits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koros, Peter J.

    2003-12-01

    Historically, the steel industry has focused on the need for and the many benefits of recycling steel that is discarded either in its own or in its customers’ manufacturing processes, as well as in recovery and reuse of steel scrap that arises after the product has served its intended purpose. In fact, modern steelmaking relies on the use of recycled iron units for at least half of its production. The other side of the story is the fate of the non-steel by-products (e.g., oxide dusts, sludges, scales, slags, spent refractories and the contained “low grade” energy units that are generated as natural adjuncts to iron and steelmaking processes). These valuable by-products often are classified as “wastes” and are discarded to landfills, at significant cost, although in reality they offer significant potential for cost savings or profit if reintroduced into the industrial arena via well planned programs. Examples of such instances will be presented, including energy credit issues, in the hope of pointing the way for future expansion of benefits from these opportunities. Preparing for a challenge and honor such as the Howe Memorial Lecture, one has to stand in awe of the accomplishments of the predecessor we honor in this forum. He worked in the early days of our industry without the benefits of the many technological improvements he and his successors brought to play as the years went by. John Stubbles, in his Howe Memorial Lecture in 1997,[1] presented a masterful and entertaining biography of Howe and his very active and prolific life. Perhaps the most telling quotation he attributed to Howe is very pertinent to the topic we will address presently: “Metallurgy lives by profit, not logic,” to which I would like to add a comment that bears on the topic of this lecture from the 1991 Howe lecturer, my friend and mentor Bill Dennis, “Where there is muck, there is money.” There are numerous examples of “one hand washes the other” in this business; that

  14. Cone Penetrometer Shear Strength Measurements of Sludge Waste in Tanks 241-AN-101 and 241-AN-106

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2014-03-06

    This document presents the resulting shear strength profiles for sludge waste in Tanks 241-AN-101 and 241-AN-106, as determined with a full-flow cone penetrometer. Full-flow penetrometer measurements indicate shear strength profiles that increase roughly uniformly with depth. For Tank 241-AN-101, the undrained shear strength was calculated to range from 500 Pa near the sludge surface to roughly 3,300 Pa at 15 inches above the tank bottom. For 241-AN-106, the undrained shear strength was calculated to range from 500 Pa near the sludge surface to roughly 5,000 Pa at 15 inches above the tank bottom.

  15. Bio-Gas production from municipal sludge waste using anaerobic membrane bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. H.; Lee, S.

    2009-07-01

    A laboratory scale anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) system for the bio-methane gas production was operated for 60 days with municipal sludge wastes as a sole carbon source. The AnMRR system utilized the external cross-flow membrane module and was equipped with on-line data acquisition which enables continuous monitoring of the performance of both bioreactor and membrane through the analyses of pH, temperature, gas production; permeate flow rate, and transmembrane pressure (TMP). Such a configuration also provides an efficient tool to study rapid variations of monitoring membrane pressure (TMP). (Author)

  16. Batch Fermentative Biohydrogen Production Process Using Immobilized Anaerobic Sludge from Organic Solid Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick T. Sekoai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the potential of organic solid waste for biohydrogen production using immobilized anaerobic sludge. Biohydrogen was produced under batch mode at process conditions of 7.9, 30.3 °C and 90 h for pH, temperature and fermentation time, respectively. A maximum biohydrogen fraction of 48.67%, which corresponded to a biohydrogen yield of 215.39 mL H2/g Total Volatile Solids (TVS, was achieved. Therefore, the utilization of immobilized cells could pave the way for a large-scale biohydrogen production process.

  17. Batch Fermentative Biohydrogen Production Process Using Immobilized Anaerobic Sludge from Organic Solid Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick T. Sekoai; Kelvin O. Yoro; Michael O. Daramola

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the potential of organic solid waste for biohydrogen production using immobilized anaerobic sludge. Biohydrogen was produced under batch mode at process conditions of 7.9, 30.3 °C and 90 h for pH, temperature and fermentation time, respectively. A maximum biohydrogen fraction of 48.67%, which corresponded to a biohydrogen yield of 215.39 mL H2/g Total Volatile Solids (TVS), was achieved. Therefore, the utilization of immobilized cells could pave the way for a large-scale b...

  18. Mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of municipal solid waste and sewage sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aghdam, Ehsan Fathi; Kinnunen, V.; Rintala, Jukka A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents mesophilic anaerobic digestion (AD) of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), biowaste (BW), sewage sludge (SS), and co-digestion of BW and SS. Average methane yields of 386 ± 54, 385 ± 82, 198 ± 14, and 318 ± 59 L CH4/kg volatile solids (VS) were obtained for OFMSW...... and SS respectively in batch experiments at 35 °C. Methane potential of source-separated BW was 12% higher than methane yield observed for mechanically treated OFMSW, which can be interpreted as a positive effect of source-separation on methane potential....

  19. Sequencing biological acidification of waste-activated sludge aiming to optimize phosphorus dissolution and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilayn, Felipe; Braak, Etienne; Piveteau, Simon; Daumer, Marie-Line

    2017-06-01

    Phosphorus (P) recovery in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) as pure crystals such as struvite (MgNH4PO4.6H2O), potassium struvite (KMgPO4.6H2O) and calcium phosphates (e.g. Ca3(PO4)2) is an already feasible technique that permits the production of green and marketable fertilizers and the reduction of operational costs. Commercial crystallizers can recovery more than 90% of soluble P. However, most of the P in WWTP sludge is unavailable for the processes (not dissolved). P solubilization and separation are thus the limiting steps in P-crystallization. With an innovative two-step sequencing acidification strategy, the current study has aimed to improve biological P solubilization on waste-activated sludge (WAS) from a full-scale plant. In the first step (P-release), low charges of organic waste were used as co-substrates of WAS pre-fermentation, seeking to produce volatile fatty acids to feed the P-release by Polyphosphate-accumulating organisms, while keeping its optimal metabolic pH (6-7). In this phase, milk serum, WWTP grease, urban organic waste and collective restaurant waste were individually applied as co-substrates. In the second step (P-dissolution), pH 4 was aimed at as it allows the dissolution of the most common precipitated species of P. Biological acidification was performed by white sugar addition, as a carbohydrate-rich organic waste model, which was compared to chemical acidification by HCl (12M) addition. With short retention times (48-96 h) and without inoculum application, all experiences succeeded on P solubilization (37-55% of soluble P), principally when carbohydrate-rich co-substrates were applied. Concentrations from 270 to 450 mg [Formula: see text] were achieved. [Formula: see text].

  20. Effect of citric acid induced deflocculation on the ultrasonic pretreatment efficiency of dairy waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayathri, T; Kavitha, S; Adish Kumar, S; Kaliappan, S; Yeom, Ick Tae; Rajesh Banu, J

    2015-01-01

    In this investigation, the application of citric acid was explored for the removal of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) from waste activated sludge (WAS), followed by ultrasonic pretreatment, which enhanced the subsequent anaerobic biodegradability. EPS was removed with 0.05g/g SS of citric acid. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) solubilization and suspended solids (SS) reduction that occurred for specific energy input of 171.9kJ/kg TS, in deflocculated (EPS removed and ultrasonically pretreated) sludges were found to be 22.70% and 20.28% and was comparatively higher, than the flocculated (with EPS and ultrasonically pretreated). The biogas yield potential of flocculated and deflocculated sludges (specific energy input - 171.9kJ/kgTS) was found to be 0.212L/(gVS) and 0.435L/(gVS), respectively. Accordingly, the deflocculation and ultrasonic pretreatment improved the anaerobic biodegradability efficiently. Thus, this chemo mediated sonic pretreatment is an effective method for enhancing biodegradability and improving clean energy generation from WAS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of the co-gasification of sewage sludge and food wastes and cost-benefit analysis of gasification- and incineration-based waste treatment schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Siming; Wang, Wei; Dai, Yanjun; Tong, Yen Wah; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-10-01

    The compositions of food wastes and their co-gasification producer gas were compared with the existing data of sewage sludge. Results showed that food wastes are more favorable than sewage sludge for co-gasification based on residue generation and energy output. Two decentralized gasification-based schemes were proposed to dispose of the sewage sludge and food wastes in Singapore. Monte Carlo simulation-based cost-benefit analysis was conducted to compare the proposed schemes with the existing incineration-based scheme. It was found that the gasification-based schemes are financially superior to the incineration-based scheme based on the data of net present value (NPV), benefit-cost ratio (BCR), and internal rate of return (IRR). Sensitivity analysis was conducted to suggest effective measures to improve the economics of the schemes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Defense Waste Processing Facility Simulant Chemical Processing Cell Studies for Sludge Batch 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Tara E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, J. David [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Woodham, Wesley H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-10

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received a technical task request from Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Saltstone Engineering to perform simulant tests to support the qualification of Sludge Batch 9 (SB9) and to develop the flowsheet for SB9 in the DWPF. These efforts pertained to the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). CPC experiments were performed using SB9 simulant (SB9A) to qualify SB9 for sludge-only and coupled processing using the nitric-formic flowsheet in the DWPF. Two simulant batches were prepared, one representing SB8 Tank 40H and another representing SB9 Tank 51H. The simulant used for SB9 qualification testing was prepared by blending the SB8 Tank 40H and SB9 Tank 51H simulants. The blended simulant is referred to as SB9A. Eleven CPC experiments were run with an acid stoichiometry ranging between 105% and 145% of the Koopman minimum acid equation (KMA), which is equivalent to 109.7% and 151.5% of the Hsu minimum acid factor. Three runs were performed in the 1L laboratory scale setup, whereas the remainder were in the 4L laboratory scale setup. Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were performed on nine of the eleven. The other two were SRAT cycles only. One coupled flowsheet and one extended run were performed for SRAT and SME processing. Samples of the condensate, sludge, and off-gas were taken to monitor the chemistry of the CPC experiments.

  3. XRF and leaching characterization of waste glasses derived from wastewater treatment sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragsdale, Jr, Robert G. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Purpose of this study was to investigate use of XRF (x-ray fluorescence spectrometry) as a near real-time method to determine melter glass compositions. A range of glasses derived from wastewater treatment sludges associated with DOE sites was prepared. They were analyzed by XRF and wet chemistry digestion with atomic absorption/inductively coupled emission spectrometry. Results indicated good correlation between these two methods. A rapid sample preparation and analysis technique was developed and demonstrated by acquiring a sample from a pilot-scale simulated waste glass melter and analyzing it by XRF within one hour. From the results, XRF shows excellent potential as a process control tool for waste glass vitrification. Glasses prepared for this study were further analyzed for durability by toxicity characteristic leaching procedure and product consistency test and results are presented.

  4. Leachability of Heavy Metals from Lightweight Aggregates Made with Sewage Sludge and Municipal Solid Waste Incineration Fly Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Na

    2015-01-01

    Lightweight aggregate (LWA) production with sewage sludge and municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash is an effective approach for waste disposal. This study investigated the stability of heavy metals in LWA made from sewage sludge and MSWI fly ash. Leaching tests were conducted to find out the effects of MSWI fly ash/sewage sludge (MSWI FA/SS) ratio, sintering temperature and sintering time. It was found that with the increase of MSWI FA/SS ratio, leaching rates of all heavy metals firstly decreased and then increased, indicating the optimal ratio of MSWI fly ash/sewage sludge was 2:8. With the increase of sintering temperature and sintering time, the heavy metal solidifying efficiencies were strongly enhanced by crystallization and chemical incorporations within the aluminosilicate or silicate frameworks during the sintering process. However, taking cost-savings and lower energy consumption into account, 1100 °C and 8 min were selected as the optimal parameters for LWA sample- containing sludge production. Furthermore, heavy metal leaching concentrations under these optimal LWA production parameters were found to be in the range of China’s regulatory requirements. It is concluded that heavy metals can be properly stabilized in LWA samples containing sludge and cannot be easily released into the environment again to cause secondary pollution. PMID:25961800

  5. Hydrogen and methane production by co-digestion of waste activated sludge and food waste in the two-stage fermentation process: substrate conversion and energy yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyuan; Li, Ruying; Ji, Min; Han, Li

    2013-10-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to produce hydrogen and methane from waste activated sludge and food waste by two-stage mesophilic fermentation. Hydrogen and methane production, energy yield, soluble organic matters, volatile solid removal efficiency and carbon footprint were investigated during two-stage digestion at various food waste proportions. The highest energy yield reached 14.0 kJ/g-VS at the food waste proportion of 85%, with hydrogen and methane yields of 106.4 ml-H2/g-VS and 353.5 ml-CH4/g-VS respectively. The dominant VFA composition was butyrate for co-digestion and sole food waste fermentation, whereas acetate was dominate in VFA for sole waste activated sludge fermentation. The VS removal efficiencies of co-digestion were 10-77% higher than that of waste activated sludge fermentation. Only 0.1-3.2% of the COD in feedstock was converted into hydrogen, and 14.1-40.9% to methane, with the highest value of 40.9% in methane achieved at food waste proportion of 85%. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Heavy Metals Removal from Sewage Sludge and Municipal Solid Waste (MSW by Co-Composting Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Babaee Darzi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: One of the most important pollutants in drinking water, air and soils is heavy metals. It is very harmful for humans and other live organisms. The purpose of this study was the usage of a co-composting process for removal of heavy metals from municipal solid waste and sewage sludge. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was a conducted sewage sludge and municipal solid waste. For collection of samples from urban solid waste composting and wastewater treatment plant, a 200 mL polyethylene bottles was used, samples after acidification were stored in a dark place at 4°C temperature until the metals analysis the heavy metals values remaining in the samples was measured by graphite furnace absorption spectrometer method (Varian, SpectrAA 240, Australia. In this study, we used SPSS version 16 for data processing; and they were also analyzed by descriptive statistics. Results: Result of this study showed that values of C/N in the first, second and third stage compost were 31.7, 27.3 and 41.8, respectively. Based on the result of this study the value of removal of Cd with 9.8 mg kg-1 in first stage and Cr, Cu and Zn with 89, 21 and 87.6 mg kg-1 in third stage were highest treatment. Conclusion: Our results show that co-composting process between many treatment processes having to be cost effective for heavy metal removal from solid waste and wastewater treatment.

  7. Continuous liquid fermentation of pretreated waste activated sludge for high rate volatile fatty acids production and online nutrients recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lihui; Liu, He; Zheng, Zhiyong; Ma, Huijun; Yang, Meng; Liu, Hongbo

    2017-11-04

    Raw sludge was pretreated, and the separated sludge liquid was used as substrate in a continuous operated up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor to produce volatile fatty acids (VFAs). The highest VFA productivity of continuous fermentation with sludge liquid at an organic loading rate (OLR) of 10.0 kg COD/m3/d was about 5.0-fold and 4.0-fold higher than batch and semi-continuous fermentation with pretreated sludge slurry, respectively. Moreover, the liquid fermentation with an OLR of 10.0 kg COD/m3/d consumed the least energy, which was about 10.57% and 12.12% of batch and semi-continuous sludge fermentation, respectively. When combined with online nitrogen and phosphorus recovery, VFA production further increased by 20.67% and struvite recovery efficiency reached 1.98  ±  0.28 g/g PO43-. The process showed high VFA production, low energy consumption and good nutrients recovery by continuous liquid anaerobic fermentation, significantly increasing the economic potential of VFA production from waste activated sludge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A novel conditioning process for enhancing dewaterability of waste activated sludge by combination of zero-valent iron and persulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xu; Wang, Qilin; Jiang, Guangming; Liu, Peng; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-06-01

    Improvement of sludge dewaterability is crucial for reducing the costs of sludge disposal in wastewater treatment plants. This study presents a novel conditioning method for improving waste activated sludge dewaterability by combination of persulfate and zero-valent iron. The combination of zero-valent iron (0-30g/L) and persulfate (0-6g/L) under neutral pH substantially enhanced the sludge dewaterability due to the advanced oxidization reactions. The highest enhancement of sludge dewaterability was achieved at 4g persulfate/L and 15g zero-valent iron/L, with which the capillary suction time was reduced by over 50%. The release of soluble chemical oxygen demand during the conditioning process implied the decomposition of sludge structure and microorganisms, which facilitated the improvement of dewaterability due to the release of bound water that was included in sludge structure and microorganism. Economic analysis showed that the proposed conditioning process with persulfate and ZVI is more economically favorable for improving WAS dewaterability than classical Fenton reagent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Potential and optimization of two-phase anaerobic digestion of oil refinery waste activated sludge and microbial community study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinghong; Liang, Ying; Zhao, Peng; Li, Qing X.; Guo, Shaohui; Chen, Chunmao

    2016-12-01

    Oil refinery waste activated sludge produced from oil wastewater biological treatment is a major industrial sludge. Two-phase anaerobic digestion of oil refinery waste activated sludge was studied for the first time. Thermal pretreatment under 170 °C is effective on sludge solubilization. At the optimum hydrolytic-acidogenic condition which was pH of 6.5, temperature of 55 °C and HRT of 2 days, 2754 mg/L volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were produced and acetic acid and butyric acid were the key components. Comparative studies of single-phase and two-phase anaerobic digestion in terms of organic removal, biogas production and methane concentration were conducted. The cumulative methane production and soluble COD (SCOD) removal efficiency in the two-phase system were 228 mL/g COD added and 77.8%, respectively, which were 1.6 and 2.1 times higher than those in single-phase anaerobic digestion. Such improved performance is attributed to intensification of dominant microbial population in separated reactors. Caloramator, Ureibacillus, Dechloromonas, Petrobacter, and T78 played important roles in hydrolytic-acidification and oil-organics degradation. Syntrophic bacteria in the family Porphyromonadaceae and the genus Anaerobranca provide acetate for methanogen. The results demonstrated the potential and operating condition of two-phase anaerobic digestion in treatment of oil refinery waste activated sludge.

  10. Influence of feeding mixture composition in batch anaerobic co-digestion of stabilized municipal sludge and waste from dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trulli, Ettore; Torretta, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Waste anaerobic co-digestion applications are particularly useful in Southern Mediterranean areas where large quantities of agricultural waste materials and waste from agro-industries are produced. This waste can be added to urban waste together with the sludge produced by wastewater treatment processes, which, when combined, guarantee the supply of organic matrixes for treatment throughout the year. The implementation of facilities to service vast areas of the agricultural economy and which are heterogeneous in terms of production can provide a good solution. We present an experimental investigation into the anaerobic co-digestion of municipal sludge and bio-waste produced in the Mediterranean area. We conducted anaerobic treatability tests, with measures of biogas production and pH of the mixture in digestion. Our main aims were to identify an optimal mix of substrates for the production of biogas, and to analyse the influence on the composition of biogas and the variation in pH values of the substrates. This analysis was conducted considering the variation of the input, in particular due to the addition of waste acids, such as biological sewage sludge.

  11. A new biological process for short-chain fatty acid generation from waste activated sludge improved by Clostridiales enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Fu, Xiang; Dai, Xiaohu; Chen, Yinguang; Dai, Lingling

    2016-12-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), the carbon source of biological nutrient removal, can be produced by waste activated sludge (WAS) anaerobic fermentation. To get more SCFAs from sludge, most studies in literature focused on the mechanical process control or the structure of microbial community; little attention has been paid to the key microorganisms and their function related to SCFA generation. In this study, a different sludge pretreated method, i.e., pretreating sludge by proteinase K for 2 days followed by pretreating at pH 10 for 4 days, is reported, by which the proportion of Clostridiales was increased and SCFA generation was enhanced. First, the effects of different proteinase K concentrations and initial pH on sludge hydrolysis and SCFA generation were investigated. The optimal conditions showed the highest SCFA generation (352.91 mg COD per gram of volatile suspended solids), which was 2.89-fold of the blank (un-pretreated). Further, the new biological pretreatment process led to the conversion of other SCFAs to acetic acid. Acetic acid accounted for 60.8 % of total SCFAs with the new biological pretreatment process compared with 44.9 % in the blank test. Then, the investigation on the key microorganisms related to SCFA production with 16S rRNA gene clone library and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) indicated that there were much greater active Clostridiales when SCFAs were generated with the proteinase K and pH 10 pretreated sludge. Further, the mechanisms for the optimal conditions significantly enhancing SCFA generation were investigated. It was found that pretreating sludge by proteinase K and pH 10 caused the greatest key enzyme activities, organic consumption, and inhibition of methane generation. Graphical abstract A new biological process for short-chain fatty acid generation from waste activated sludge improved by Clostridiales enhancement.

  12. EFFECTS OF SOIL TREATMENT BY COAL MINING CARBONIFEROUS WASTE SLUDGE IN MAIZE GROWING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Mujačić

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The multifuncional role and importance of organic matter in soil is widely known. It is also known that the organic matter in soil is subjected to microbiological-biochemical processes of transformation, which includes synthesis of humus as well as it’s decomposition -mineralization. Mineralization means transformation-decomposition of organic matter by microbiological processes to mineral products; plant nutrients and water + CO2 as starting and ending component of photosyntesis. Nutrients are partly plant available with fertilizing effect, partly lost from the soil - leaching in ground water, causing it’s eutrophication, but CO2 in atmosphere participates in greenhouse effect. Practically, mineralization means decreasing of organic matter content in soil and soil degradation [1,4]. In natural ecosystems (phytocenoses natural forests and meadows, it is almost a balanced between inflow and consumption of organic matter, while the cultural and anthropogenic soils agrobiocenosis in general, this relationship is disturbed that there is a disproportion between the inflow and loss [1,4]. Therefore, various materials that contains organic material (waste, various flotation, sludge, etc. are often used with more or less success. One of such materials, as well as the potential fertilizer, is carboniferous lake sludge like waste of coal mining sedimented at the bottom of the lake in huge quantities, which is the subject of our reasearch. The research were conducted to determine its fertilizing efects and value for repairing of physical and chemical properties of soil. The research refered to: -- Laboratory analysis of physical and chemical characteristics of the carboniferous sludge samples, -- Analysis of soil of the experimental field -- Research on heavy metals concentration in soil of the experimental farm and in carboniferous sludge, and Research of fertilizing effects of sludge, comparative mineral fertilizer and farmyard manure treatment by

  13. Increased anaerobic production of methane by co-digestion of sludge with microalgal biomass and food waste leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungmin; Kang, Chang-Min

    2015-01-01

    The co-digestion of multiple substrates is a promising method to increase methane production during anaerobic digestion. However, limited reliable data are available on the anaerobic co-digestion of food waste leachate with microalgal biomass. This report evaluated methane production by the anaerobic co-digestion of different mixtures of food waste leachate, algal biomass, and raw sludge. Co-digestion of substrate mixture containing equal amounts of three substrates had higher methane production than anaerobic digestion of individual substrates. This was possibly due to a proliferation of methanogens over the entire digestion period induced by multistage digestion of different substrates with different degrees of degradability. Thus, the co-digestion of food waste, microalgal biomass, and raw sludge appears to be a feasible and efficient method for energy conversion from waste resources. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of coagulant and flocculant addition to an anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor (AnDMBR) treating waste-activated sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, G.; Lopes, Wilton; Zhou, Z.; Guo, H.; de Kreuk, M.K.; Spanjers, H.L.F.M.; van Lier, J.B.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the effects of flocculation aid (FA) addition to an anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor (AnDMBR) (7 L, 35°C) treating waste-activated sludge (WAS). The experiment consisted of three distinct periods. In period 1 (day 1–86), the reactor was operated as a

  15. Two-step upflow anaerobic sludge bed system for sewage treatment under subtropical conditions with posttreatment in waste stabilization ponds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seghezzo, L.; Trupiano, A.P.; Liberal, V.; Todd, P.G.; Figueroa, M.E.; Gutierrez, M.A.; Silva Wilches, Da A.C.; Iribarnegaray, M.; Guerra, R.G.; Arena, A.; Cuevas, C.M.; Zeeman, G.; Lettinga, G.

    2003-01-01

    A pilot-scale sewage treatment system consisting of two upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors followed by five waste stabilization ponds (WSPs) in series was studied under subtropical conditions. The first UASB reactor started up in only 1 mo (stable operation, high chemical oxygen demand

  16. Sampling and analysis of radioactive liquid wastes and sludges in the Melton Valley and evaporator facility storage tanks at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, M.B.; Botts, J.L.; Ceo, R.N.; Ferrada, J.J.; Griest, W.H.; Keller, J.M.; Schenley, R.L.

    1990-09-01

    The sampling and analysis of the radioactive liquid wastes and sludges in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs), as well as two of the evaporator service facility storage tanks at ORNL, are described. Aqueous samples of the supernatant liquid and composite samples of the sludges were analyzed for major constituents, radionuclides, total organic carbon, and metals listed as hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Liquid samples from five tanks and sludge samples from three tanks were analyzed for organic compounds on the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Target Compound List. Estimates were made of the inventory of liquid and sludge phases in the tanks. Descriptions of the sampling and analytical activities and tabulations of the results are included. The report provides data in support of the design of the proposed Waste Handling and Packaging Plant, the Liquid Low-Level Waste Solidification Project, and research and development activities (R D) activities in developing waste management alternatives. 7 refs., 8 figs., 16 tabs.

  17. Production of Controlled Low Strength Material Utilizing Waste Paper Sludge Ash and Recycled Aggregate Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azmi A. N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the best method to make the concrete industry more sustainable was using the waste materials to replace the natural resources. Currently waste paper sludge is a major economic and environmental problem in this country. In this research, the alternative method is to dwindle the usage of natural resources and the usage of cement in the construction. This method is to replace the usage of cement with the waste paper sludge ash (WPSA and to use the recycle aggregate collected from the construction is used. The WPSA has ingredient likely cement such as self-cementation but for a low strength. The research was conducted at heavy laboratory UITM Pulau Pinang. Meanwhile, the WPSA is collected at MNI Industries at Mentakab, Pahang. The recycle aggregate is a separated half, which were fine aggregate and the coarse aggregate with the specific size. In this research, the ratio is divided into two (2 which is 1:1 and 1:2 for the aggregate and difference percentage levels of WPSA. The percentage levels of WPSA that use in this research are 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, and 60%. A total of 36 cubes were prepared. Aim of this research is to develop a simple design approach for the mixture proportioning of WPSA and recycle concrete aggregate (RCA within the concrete and to assess the effect of concrete mix with different percentage of WPSA and RCA ratio on the properties. It is found that the best design mix that achieves control low strength material (CLSM is on 30% of WPSA with the ratio 1:2 on day 28 of compression test.

  18. Anaerobic co-digestion of food waste and chemically enhanced primary-treated sludge under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obulisamy, Parthiba Karthikeyan; Chakraborty, Debkumar; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2016-12-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of food waste with primary sewage sludge is beneficial for urban centers, while the optimized conditions reported in the literature are not locally suitable for Hong Kong. Therefore, the present study was aimed to develop an optimized mixing ratio of food waste to chemically enhanced primary-treated sewer sludge (CEPT) for co-digestion using batch tests under mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions. The mixing ratios of 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 2:1 and 3:1 (v v(-1)) of food waste to CEPT sludge was tested under the following conditions: temperature - 35°C and 55°C; pH - not regulated; agitation - 150 rpm and time - 20 days. The thermophilic incubations led a good hydrolysis rate and 2-12-fold higher enzyme activities than in mesophilic incubations for different mixing ratios. While the acidogenesis were found retarded that leading to 'sour and stuck' digestion for all mixing ratio of food waste to CEPT sludge from thermophilic incubations. The measured zeta potential was most favourable (-5 to -16.8 mV) for methane production under thermophilic incubations; however the CH4 recovery was less than that in mesophilic incubations. The results suggested that the quick hydrolysis and subsequent acid accumulation under thermophilic incubation lead to inhibited methanogenesis at the early stage than in mesophilic systems. It is concluded that buffer addition is therefore required for any mixing ratio of food waste to CEPT sludge for improved CH4 recovery for both mesophilic and thermophilic operations.

  19. Leachates from solid wastes: chemical and eco(geno)toxicological differences between leachates obtained from fresh and stabilized industrial organic sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiochetta, Claudete G; Goetten, Luís C; Almeida, Sônia M; Quaranta, Gaetana; Cotelle, Sylvie; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2014-01-01

    The chemical and ecotoxicological characteristics of fresh and stabilized industrial organic sludge leachates were compared to obtain information regarding how the stabilization process can influence the ecotoxic potential of this industrial waste, which could be used for the amendment of degraded soil. Physicochemical analysis of the sludge leachates, as well as a battery of eco(geno)toxicity tests on bacteria, algae, daphnids, and higher plants (including Vicia faba genotoxicity test) and the determination of hydrolytic enzyme activity, was performed according to standard methods. The chemical comparison of the two types of leachate showed that the samples obtained from stabilized sludge had a lower organic content and higher metal content than leachates of the fresh sludge. The eco(geno)toxicological results obtained with aquatic organisms showed that the stabilized sludge leachate was more toxic than the fresh sludge leachate, both originating from the same industrial organic sludge sample. Nevertheless, phytotoxicity tests carried out with a reference peat soil irrigated with stabilized sludge leachate showed the same toxicity as the fresh sludge leachate. In the case of the industrial solid organic sludge studied, stabilization through a biodegradation process promoted a higher metal mobility/bioavailability/eco(geno)toxicity in the stabilized sludge leachate compared to the fresh sludge leachate.

  20. Zero-valent iron enhanced methanogenic activity in anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge after heat and alkali pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaobin; Feng, Yinghong; Quan, Xie

    2015-04-01

    Heat or alkali pretreatment is the effective method to improve hydrolysis of waste sludge and then enhance anaerobic sludge digestion. However the pretreatment may inactivate the methanogens in the sludge. In the present work, zero-valent iron (ZVI) was used to enhance the methanogenic activity in anaerobic sludge digester under two methanogens-suppressing conditions, i.e. heat-pretreatment and alkali condition respectively. With the addition of ZVI, the lag time of methane production was shortened, and the methane yield increased by 91.5% compared to the control group. The consumption of VFA was accelerated by ZVI, especially for acetate, indicating that the acetoclastic methanogenesis was enhanced. In the alkali-condition experiment, the hydrogen produced decreased from 27.6 to 18.8 mL when increasing the ZVI dosage from 0 to 10 g/L. Correspondingly, the methane yield increased from 1.9 to 32.2 mL, which meant that the H2-utilizing methanogenes was enriched. These results suggested that the addition of ZVI into anaerobic digestion of sludge after pretreated by the heat or alkali process could efficiently recover the methanogenic activity and increase the methane production and sludge reduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Bioleaching of fly ash from municipal solid waste incinerator using sewage sludge and pig manure as culture media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shun-gui; Chang, Ming; Hu, Pei; Ni, Jin-ren

    2005-11-01

    A mixed culture of Acidihiobacillus ferrooaidans and Acidihiobacillus thiooxidans was used to leach heavy metals from municipal solid waste incineration fly ash (MSWI fly ash). This study explored the possibility of using sewage sludge or pig manure as nutrients for supporting the growth of the leaching bacteria and allowing metal solubilization like a synthetic mineral medium. In contrast to pig manure, there is a high ability for acidification of the fly ash and solubilization of toxic metals using sewage sludge at the same content. After 15 d of bioleaching, the following removal efficiencies were obtained for the treatment with the addition of 1% sewage sludge: Cd 88.1%; Zn 78.7%; Cu 69.6%, whereas their removal efficiencies for the treatment with the addition of 1% pig manure were 82.4%, 73.5% and 60.0%, respectively. Results demonstrate that the inhibition by sewage sludge DOM is much more significant than by pig manure DOM at the same concentration level. The dissolved organic carbon in excess of 400 and 150 mg/L was inhibitory to the bacterial growth using sludge DOM and manure DOM, respectively. Compared with sewage sludge, pig manure contained a higher fraction of DOM with molecular size <1000, which led to its higher toxicity.

  2. Evaluation of the microbial cell structure damages in alkaline pretreatment of waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Benyi; Liu, Cao; Liu, Junxin; Guo, Xuesong

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the damages of microbial cell structures, as well as the relationships between these damages and the release of cellular organic matter in the pretreatment of waste activated sludge (WAS) by using alkaline pretreatment as model. In the alkaline pretreatment of WAS, the most damage of bound extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), cell walls, cell membranes, and cell nuclei occurred at pH 11.5-12.0 (46.2%), pH 11.0-11.5 (27.3%), pH 9.0-10.0 (34.2%), and pH 11.5-12.0 (44.4%), respectively. The damage percentages of these cell structures in the pH stabilization stage were low because most of the damages occurred when the pH increased. The structural integrities of sludge microorganisms were all damaged in the pH increase stage. The damages of EPS, cell walls, and cell membranes were significantly correlated with the release of cellular organic matter, and these damages were necessary to release the cellular matter in WAS. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Removal of 226Ra and 228Ra from TENORM sludge waste using surfactants solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attallah, M F; Hamed, Mostafa M; El Afifi, E M; Aly, H F

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of using surfactants as extracting agent for the removal of radium species from TENORM sludge produced from petroleum industry is evaluated. In this investigation cationic and nonionic surfactants were used as extracting agents for the removal of radium radionuclides from the sludge waste. Two surfactants namely cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and Triton X-100 (TX100) were investigated as the extracting agents. Different parameters affecting the removal of both (226)Ra and (228)Ra by the two surfactants as well as their admixture were studied by the batch technique. These parameters include effect of shaking time, surfactants concentration and temperature as well as the effect of surfactants admixture. It was found that, higher solution temperature improves the removal efficiency of radium species. Combined extraction of nonionic and cationic surfactants produces synergistic effect in removal both (226)Ra and (228)Ra, where the removals reached 84% and 80% for (226)Ra and (228)Ra, respectively, were obtained using surfactants admixture. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Radioactivity in Oily Sludge and Produced Waste Water from Oil: Environmental Concerns and Potential Remedial Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avin E. Pillay

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Produced water separated from oil is usually returned to the environment and could permeate through the water table. If such water is contaminated with radioactive substances, it could create a definite threat to the water supply, especially in arid regions where ground water and overhead streams are sources of potable water. Low-level radioactive contamination of oily sludge is equally hazardous and also leads to detrimental pollution of water resources. We investigated the distribution of 226Ra, 40K and 228Ac in produced waste water and oily sludge and found abnormal levels of radioactivity. A total of 90 ground wastewater samples were collected from different sites for a period of one year. The presence of these radionuclides was identified by their characteristic gamma rays. The detection system consisted of a high-purity germanium detector. Our results show that about 20% of the samples exhibited 20–60 Bq/L radioactivity and ~6% of the samples exceeded 60 Bq/L. Roughly 70% of the experimental samples fell in the range of 2–20 Bq/L, which still exceeded the maximum admissible drinking-water limit 0.2 Bq/L.

  5. Development of a carbonate crust on alkaline nuclear waste sludge at the Hanford site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Jason S; Reynolds, Jacob G; Ely, Tom M; Cooke, Gary A

    2018-01-15

    Hard crusts on aging plutonium production waste have hindered the remediation of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington, USA. In this study, samples were analyzed to determine the cause of a hard crust that developed on the highly radioactive sludge during 20 years of inactivity in one of the underground tanks (tank 241-C-105). Samples recently taken from the crust were compared with those acquired before the crust appeared. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that aluminum and uranium phases at the surface had converted from (hydr)oxides (gibbsite and clarkeite) into carbonates (dawsonite and cejkaite) and identified trona as the cementing phase, a bicarbonate that formed at the expense of thermonatrite. Since trona is more stable at lower pH values than thermonatrite, the pH of the surface decreased over time, suggesting that CO 2 from the atmosphere lowered the pH. Thus, a likely cause of crust formation was the absorption of CO 2 from the air, leading to a reduction of the pH and carbonation of the waste surface. The results presented here help establish a model for how nuclear process waste can age and can be used to aid future remediation and retrieval activities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Co-digestion of food and garden waste with mixed sludge from wastewater treatment in continuously stirred tank reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitamo, T; Boldrin, A; Boe, K; Angelidaki, I; Scheutz, C

    2016-04-01

    Co-digestions of urban organic waste were conducted to investigate the effect of the mixing ratio between sludge, food waste, grass clippings and green waste at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs). Compared to the digestion of 100% sludge, the methane yield increased by 48% and 35%, when co-digesting sludge with food waste, grass clippings and garden waste with a corresponding %VS of 10:67.5:15.75:6.75 (R1) and 10:45:31.5:13.5 (R2), respectively. The methane yield remained constant at around 425 and 385 NmL CH4/g VS in R1 and R2, respectively, when the reactors were operated at HRTs of 15, 20 and 30 days. However, the methane yield dropped significantly to 356 (R1) and 315 (R2) NmL CH4/g VS when reducing the HRT to 10 days, indicating that the process was stressed. Since the methane production rate improved significantly with decreasing HRT, the trade-off between yield and productivity was obtained at 15 days HRT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Microbial electrolysis contribution to anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge, leading to accelerated methane production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wenzong; Cai, Weiwei; Guo, Zechong

    2016-01-01

    Methane production rate (MPR) in waste activated sludge (WAS) digestion processes is typically limitedby the initial steps of complex organic matter degradation, leading to a limited MPR due to sludgefermentation speed of solid particles. In this study, a novel microbial electrolysis AD reactor (ME......-AD) wasused to accelerate methane production for energy recovery from WAS. Carbon bioconversion wasaccelerated by ME producing H2 at the cathode. MPR was enhanced to 91.8 gCH4/m3 reactor/d in themicrobial electrolysis ME-AD reactor, thus improving the rate by 3 times compared to control conditions (30.6 gCH4......-AD reactor allowed to significantly enhance carbon degradation and methaneproduction from WAS....

  8. Lipid production for biofuels from hydrolyzate of waste activated sludge by heterotrophic Chlorella protothecoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Qinxue; Chen, Zhiqiang; Li, Pengfei; Duan, Ran; Ren, Nanqi

    2013-09-01

    Microalga Chlorella protothecoides can accumulate high proportion of lipids during the heterotrophic growth with glucose as the carbon source. However, its commercial application is restricted due to the high cost of the carbon source. In this study, the wasted activated sludge (WAS) was hydrolyzed after ultrasonic pre-treatment and the hydrolyzate obtained was used as an alternative carbon source for algal biomass and biodiesel production. The results indicate that C. protothecoides can proliferate in the WAS hydrolyzate and accumulate biolipid. The final lipid content of the culture fed with the hydrolyzate was 21.5±1.44% (weight percent) after 156 h cultivation in flasks and the maximum biomass obtained was 0.5 g L(-1). Acetic acid and isovaleric acid were favorable carbon sources for cell growth. The soluble microbial products (SMP) presents in the hydrolyzate can also be used as a carbon source for cell growth. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Alternative fuel production by catalytic hydroliquefaction of solid municipal wastes, primary sludges and microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, F; Maupin, I; Lemée, L; Lavoie, J-M; Lemberton, J-L; Pouilloux, Y; Pinard, L

    2013-08-01

    An alternative fuel production was investigated through catalytic hydroliquefaction of three different carbonaceous sources: solid municipal wastes (MW), primary sludges (PS), and microalgae (MA). The reaction was carried out under hydrogen pressure, at different temperatures (330, 380 and 450°C), with a Raney nickel catalyst and two different hydrogen donor solvents: a "fossil solvent" (tetralin) and a "green solvent" (2-methyl-hydro-furan). The feeds analyses (TDA-TGA, ICP-AES, lipids quantification) showed that MW and PS had similar characteristics and physico-chemical properties, but different from those of MA. The hydroliquefaction of these feeds allowed to obtain high oil yields, with a significant energetic value, similar to that of a bio-petroleum. 2-methyl-hydro-furan was more efficient than tetralin for the treatment of the strongly bio-degraded biomasses MW and PS, while better results were obtained with tetralin in the case of MA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Microbial electrolysis contribution to anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge, leading to accelerated methane production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wenzong; Cai, Weiwei; Guo, Zechong

    2016-01-01

    Methane production rate (MPR) in waste activated sludge (WAS) digestion processes is typically limitedby the initial steps of complex organic matter degradation, leading to a limited MPR due to sludgefermentation speed of solid particles. In this study, a novel microbial electrolysis AD reactor (ME......-AD) wasused to accelerate methane production for energy recovery from WAS. Carbon bioconversion wasaccelerated by ME producing H2 at the cathode. MPR was enhanced to 91.8 gCH4/m3 reactor/d in themicrobial electrolysis ME-AD reactor, thus improving the rate by 3 times compared to control conditions (30.6 gCH4....../m3 reactor/d in AD). The methane production yield reached 116.2 mg/g VSS in the ME-ADreactor. According to balance calculation on electron transfer and methane yield, the increasedmethane production was mostly dependent on electron contribution through the ME system. Thus, theuse of the novel ME...

  11. Polychlorinated biphenyl concentration changes in sewage sludge and organic municipal waste mixtures during composting and anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebielska, Izabela; Sidełko, Robert

    2015-05-01

    We determined the changes in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations in a mixture of sewage sludge and the organic fraction of municipal waste during composting and during anaerobic digestion. The processes were carried out on a laboratory scale. The PCBs were analyzed in the waste samples using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We evaluated the rates at which the PCB concentrations decreased during composting and during anaerobic digestion and compared the PCB degradation kinetics during these processes. The most important conclusion of this work is that anaerobic digestion is much more effective than composting at removing PCBs from a mixture of sewage sludge and the organic fraction of municipal waste. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tobacco waste/industrial sludge based desulfurization adsorbents: effect of phase interactions during pyrolysis on surface activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seredych, Mykola; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2007-05-15

    Industrial waste derived adsorbents were obtained by pyrolysis of tobacco waste with either metal sludge or waste oil sludge from a shipyard. The materials were used as media to remove hydrogen sulfide at room temperature in the presence of moisture. The initial and exhausted adsorbents after the breakthrough tests were characterized using sorption of nitrogen, thermal analysis, XRD, elemental analysis, and surface pH measurements. It was found that mixing tobacco and industrial sludges results in a strong synergy, enhancing the catalytic properties of adsorbents. This synergy is observed in both surface chemistry and porosity. During pyrolysis, new mineral phases are formed as a result of solid-state reactions between the components of the sludges. They are highly dispersed on the surface of mesopores. A high volume of these pores is a result of activation of the carbon phase in the composite by alkaline earth metals and also by the release of water from the decomposition of an inorganic phase that is in the predominant quantity. A high temperature of pyrolysis is beneficial for the adsorbents due to the enhanced activation of the carbonaceous phase and the chemical stabilization of the inorganic phase. Samples obtained at low temperatures are sensitive to water, which deactivates their catalytic centers.

  13. Evaluation of anaerobic digestion processes for short sludge-age waste activated sludge combined with anammox treatment of digestate liquor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Huoqing; Batstone, Damien; Keller, Jurg

    2016-01-01

    The need to reduce energy input and enhance energy recovery from wastewater is driving renewed interest in high-rate activated sludge treatment (i.e. short hydraulic and solids retention times (HRT and SRT, respectively)). This process generates short SRT activated sludge stream, which should be highly degradable. However, the evaluation of anaerobic digestion of short SRT sludge has been limited. This paper assesses anaerobic digestion of short SRT sludge digestion derived from meat processing wastewater under thermophilic and mesophilic conditions. The thermophilic digestion system (55°C) achieved 60 and 68% volatile solids destruction at 8 day and 10 day HRT, respectively, compared with 50% in the mesophilic digestion system (35°C, 10 day HRT). The digestion effluents from the thermophilic (8-10 day HRT) and mesophilic systems were stable, as assessed by residual methane potentials. The ammonia rich sludge dewatering liquor was effectively treated by a batch anammox process, which exhibited comparable nitrogen removal rate as the tests using a control synthetic ammonia solution, indicating that the dewatering liquor did not have inhibiting/toxic effects on the anammox activity.

  14. Burning mill sludge in a fluidized-bed incinerator and waste-heat-recovery system; Ten years of successful operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickull, O. (Metsa Serla, Oy (FI)); Lehtonen, O. (Tampella Ltd., Tampere (FI)); Mullen, J. (Tampella Keeler, Williamsport, PA (US))

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on burning mill sludge in a fluidized-bed incinerator and waste-heat-recovery system. In the late 1970s, the Lielahti sulfite mill of G.A. Serlachius Corp. (now Metsa Serla Oy) began investigating alternative methods of sludge disposal. The mill had an annual capacity of 100,000 tons of bleached pulp, generated 80,000 tons of by-product lignin sulfonates, and specialized in dissolving pulps. Because of the end product's high quality requirements, the mill had a low pulp yield and high losses in the form of both dissolved and suspended solids.

  15. Microbiological characterization and specific methanogenic activity of anaerobe sludges used in urban solid waste treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Claudia Johanna Sandoval; Mendoza, Marisol Vergara; de Arango, Mariela Carreño; Monroy, Edgar Fernando Castillo

    2009-02-01

    This study presents the microbiological characterization of the anaerobic sludge used in a two-stage anaerobic reactor for the treatment of organic fraction of urban solid waste (OFUSW). This treatment is one alternative for reducing solid waste in landfills at the same time producing a biogas (CH(4) and CO(2)) and an effluent that can be used as biofertilizer. The system was inoculated with sludge from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) (Río Frío Plant in Bucaramanga-Colombia) and a methanogenic anaerobic digester for the treatment of pig manure (Mesa de los Santos in Santander). Bacterial populations were evaluated by counting groups related to oxygen sensitivity, while metabolic groups were determined by most probable number (MPN) technique. Specific methanogenic activity (SMA) for acetate, formate, methanol and ethanol substrates was also determined. In the acidogenic reactor (R1), volatile fatty acids (VFA) reached values of 25,000 mg L(-1) and a concentration of CO(2) of 90%. In this reactor, the fermentative population was predominant (10(5)-10(6)MPN mL(-1)). The acetogenic population was (10(5)MPN mL(-1)) and the sulphate-reducing population was (10(4)-10(5)MPN mL(-1)). In the methanogenic reactor (R2), levels of CH(4) (70%) were higher than CO(2) (25%), whereas the VFA values were lower than 4000 mg L(-1). Substrate competition between sulphate-reducing (10(4)-10(5)MPN mL(-1)) and methanogenic bacteria (10(5)MPN mL(-1)) was not detected. From the SMA results obtained, acetoclastic (2.39 g COD-CH(4)g(-1)VSS(-1)day(-1)) and hydrogenophilic (0.94 g COD-CH(4)g(-1)VSS(-1)day(-1)) transformations as possible metabolic pathways used by methanogenic bacteria is suggested from the SMA results obtained. Methanotrix sp., Methanosarcina sp., Methanoccocus sp. and Methanobacterium sp. were identified.

  16. Co-combustion of sewage sludge and energy-rich waste fuels or forest fuels; Sameldning av roetslam och energirika avfallsbraenslen eller skogsbraenslen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linder, Kristina [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2003-10-01

    In this report literature on incineration of sewage sludge is summarises. In Sweden there is a yearly production of about 0,24 million-ton dry sewage sludge of which 50% is deposited. Recent changes in legislation will restrict and later prohibit the dumping of sewage sludge. Alternative methods for handling the material have not yet been found. In other parts of Europe the problem has been solved by incineration. Sludge incineration can be performed in several ways depending of the pretreatment. The sludge can be raw or digested, dewatered or dried. The sludge can be burnt as single fuel or in mixtures with other fuels. Focus in this work has been on co-combustion with biofuel or waste, as it will make use of existing plants. Digested sludge is also of major interest as 70% of the Swedish sludge is digested. The report describes the situation both in Sweden and in the rest of Europe. Sludge has a varying quality depending on origin and treatment, which affects the combustion properties. Ash and moisture contents differ from other fuels. The heating value of sewage sludge is approximately 20 MJ/kg per dry combustible matter and the amount of organic is around 70%. Compared to forest residue and demolition wood, sludge contains high levels of nitrogen and sulphur, which will cause emissions. The nitrogen level is about 10 times higher and the sulphur level 25 to 50 times higher. Sulphur, in combination with alkali metals, can cause deposit problems in boilers. However, sludge contains low levels of alkali. In the experimental investigation leaching of digested sludge showed low values on water conductivity which indicates a low concentration of sintering ash species in the sludge. A comparison of the aerodynamic properties of dried digested sludge and wood chips from energy coppice showed that sludge has a lower fraction of fines. This indicates that the sewage sludge is not likely to be carried over in the furnace but rather to stay in the fuel and ash bed on the

  17. pH neutralization of the by-product sludge waste water generated from waste concrete recycling process using the carbon mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Sangwoo; Shin, Hee-young; Bang, Jun Hwan; Ahn, Ji-Whan

    2017-04-01

    About 44 Mt/year of waste concrete is generated in South Korea. More than 95% of this waste concrete is recycled. In the process of regenerating and recycling pulmonary concrete, sludge mixed with fine powder generated during repeated pulverization process and water used for washing the surface and water used for impurity separation occurs. In this way, the solid matter contained in the sludge as a by-product is about 40% of the waste concrete that was input. Due to the cement component embedded in the concrete, the sludge supernatant is very strong alkaline (pH about 12). And it is necessary to neutralization for comply with environmental standards. In this study, carbon mineralization method was applied as a method to neutralize the pH of highly alkaline waste water to under pH 8.5, which is the water quality standard of discharged water. CO2 gas (purity 99%, flow rate 10ml/min.) was injected and reacted with the waste water (Ca concentration about 750mg/L) from which solid matter was removed. As a result of the experiment, the pH converged to about 6.5 within 50 minutes of reaction. The precipitate showed high whiteness. XRD and SEM analysis showed that it was high purity CaCO3. For the application to industry, it is needed further study using lower concentration CO2 gas (about 14%) which generated from power plant.

  18. Recovering metals from sewage sludge, waste incineration residues and similar substances with hyperaccumulative plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisser, Johannes; Gattringer, Heinz; Iordanopoulos-Kisser, Monika

    2015-04-01

    Sewage sludges as well as ashes from waste incineration plants are known accumulation sinks of many elements that are either important nutrients for biological organisms (phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, etc.) or valuable metals when considered on their own in pure form (nickel, chrome, zinc, etc.); they are also serious pollutants when they occur in wild mixtures at localized anthropogenic end- of-stream points. Austria and many other countries have to import up to 90% of the material inputs of metals from abroad. These primary resources are becoming more expensive as they become more scarce and remaining deposits more difficult to mine, which is a serious concern for industrialized nations. Basic economic and strategic reasoning demands an increase in recycling activities and waste minimization. Technologies to recover metals in a reasonable and economically relevant manner from very diffuse sources are practically non-existent or require large amounts of energy and chemicals, which pose environmental risks. On the other hand agriculture uses large volumes of mineral fertilizers, which are often sourced from mines as well, and thus are also subject to the same principle of finiteness and potential shortage in supply. These converted biological nutrients are taken up by crops and through the food chain and human consumption end up in sewage systems and in wastewater treatment plants in great quantities. The metabolized nutrients mostly do not return to agriculture, but due to contamination with heavy metals are diverted to be used as construction aggregates or are thermally treated and end up rather uselessly in landfills. The project BIO-ORE aimed to explore new pathways to concentrate metals from diluted sources such as sewage sludge and wastewater by using highly efficient biological absorption and transport mechanisms. These enzymatic systems from plants work with very little energy input. The process is called bioaccumulation and can be most effectively

  19. DETERMINATION OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE MODEL ASDM PARAMETERS FOR WASTE WATER TREATMENT PLANT OPERATING IN THE SEQUENTIAL–FLOW TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Zdebik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for calibration of activated sludge model with the use of computer program BioWin. Computer scheme has been developed on the basis of waste water treatment plant operating in the sequential – flow technology. For calibration of the activated sludge model data of influent and treated effluent from the existing object were used. As a result of conducted analysis was a change in biokinetic model and kinetic parameters parameters of wastewater treatment facilities. The presented method of study of the selected parameters impact on the activated sludge biokinetic model (including autotrophs maximum growth rate, the share of organic slurry in suspension general operational, efficiency secondary settling tanks can be used for conducting simulation studies of other treatment plants.

  20. Pilot tests of microbe-soil combined treatment of waste drilling sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lirong Chen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbe-soil combined treatment is a newly developed technology in view of the defects of the curing process and waste drilling mud slag properties. In particular, 0.3%–0.5% bioremediation reagents were fully mixed with the waste drilling sludge according to its wet and dry degree, and 1.5 folds to twice weight of more finely ground soil was added in the mix, which was covered by soil of 5–15 cm thick and thereby grasses or greeneries were planted on the soil. The process was successfully applied to some fields of Well Danqian 001-8, Well Lianhua 000-X8, etc. After three months of such treatment, the main indexes of the drilling solid waste such as the degradation of COD and the oil-degrading ratio reached more than 90%, the index of leaching solution met the requirement of the first grade in the national “Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard”; heavy metal ion concentration in soil did not change significantly with the indicators meeting the requirement of the third grade in the national “Soil Environmental Quality Standard” (Dry Land; and no harmful effects of heavy metals have ever been found on the planted grasses and greeneries. In conclusion, with this microbe-soil technology, the soil property will recover its background values without any other chemical additives, realizing the ecological restoration and reuse of land covered by wellsite wastes, so it is in line with the energy-saving and environmentally-friendly treatment way.

  1. Anaerobic stabilization of waste activated sludge at different temperatures and solid retention times: Evaluation by sludge reduction, soluble chemical oxygen demand release and dehydration capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiyao; Peng, Yongzhen; He, Yuelan; Wang, Shuying; Guo, Siyu; Li, Lukai

    2017-03-01

    Anaerobic treatment is the most widely used method of waste activated sludge (WAS) stabilization. Using a semi-continuous stirring tank with condensed WAS, we investigated effects of decreasing the solid retention time (SRT) from 32days to 6.4days on sludge reduction, soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) release and dehydration capability, along with anaerobic digestion operated at medium temperature (MT-AD) or anaerobic digestion operated at room temperature (RT-AD). Results showed that effects of temperature on SCOD release were greater at SRT of 32d and 6.4d. When SRT was less than 8d, total solids (TS), volatile solids (VS) and capillary suction time (CST) did not change significantly. CST was lowest at SRT of 10.7days, indicating best condition for sludge dehydration. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the most optimum SRT was higher than 10.7d both in MT-AD or RT-AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Carbon capture and biogas enhancement by carbon dioxide enrichment of anaerobic digesters treating sewage sludge or food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajón Fernández, Y; Soares, A; Villa, R; Vale, P; Cartmell, E

    2014-05-01

    The increasing concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere and the stringent greenhouse gases (GHG) reduction targets, require the development of CO2 sequestration technologies applicable for the waste and wastewater sector. This study addressed the reduction of CO2 emissions and enhancement of biogas production associated with CO2 enrichment of anaerobic digesters (ADs). The benefits of CO2 enrichment were examined by injecting CO2 at 0, 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 M fractions into batch ADs treating food waste or sewage sludge. Daily specific methane (CH4) production increased 11-16% for food waste and 96-138% for sewage sludge over the first 24h. Potential CO2 reductions of 8-34% for sewage sludge and 3-11% for food waste were estimated. The capacity of ADs to utilise additional CO2 was demonstrated, which could provide a potential solution for onsite sequestration of CO2 streams while enhancing renewable energy production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. C-tank transfers: Transuranic sludge removal from the C-1, C-2, and W-23 waste storage tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahl, T.L.; Lay, A.C.; Taylor, S.A.; Moore, J.W.

    1999-05-01

    Two fluidic pulse jet mixing systems were used to successfully mobilize remote-handled transuranic sludge for retrieval from three 50,000-gal horizontal waste storage tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The results of this operation indicate that the pulse jet system should be considered for mixing and bulk retrieval of sludges in other vertical and horizontal waste tanks at ORNL and at other U.S. Department of Energy sites.

  4. Effect of humic acids with different characteristics on fermentative short-chain fatty acids production from waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kun; Chen, Yinguang; Xiao, Naidong; Zheng, Xiong; Li, Mu

    2015-04-21

    Recently, the use of waste activated sludge to bioproduce short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) has attracted much attention as the sludge-derived SCFA can be used as a preferred carbon source to drive biological nutrient removal or biopolymer (polyhydroxyalkanoates) synthesis. Although large number of humic acid (HA) has been reported in sludge, the influence of HA on SCFA production has never been documented. This study investigated the effects on sludge-derived SCFA production of two commercially available humic acids (referred to as SHHA and SAHA purchased respectively from Shanghai Reagent Company and Sigma-Aldrich) that differ in chemical structure, hydrophobicity, surfactant properties, and degree of aromaticity. It was found that SHHA remarkably enhanced SCFA production (1.7-3.5 folds), while SAHA had no obvious effect. Mechanisms study revealed that all four steps (solubilization, hydrolysis, acidification, and methanogenesis) involved in sludge fermentation were unaffected by SAHA. However, SHHA remarkably improved the solubilization of sludge protein and carbohydrate and the activity of hydrolysis enzymes (protease and α-glucosidase) owing to its greater hydrophobicity and protection of enzyme activity. SHHA also enhanced the acidification step by accelerating the bioreactions of glyceradehyde-3P → d-glycerate 1,3-diphosphate, and pyruvate → acetyl-CoA due to its abundant quinone groups which served as electron acceptor. Further investigation showed that SHHA negatively influenced the activity of acetoclastic methanogens for its competition for electrons and inhibition on the reaction of acetyl-CoA → 5-methyl-THMPT, which caused less SCFA being consumed. All these observations were in correspondence with SHHA significantly enhancing the production of sludge derived SCFA.

  5. EFFECT OF THERMAL PRETREATMENT ON THE SOLUBILIZATION OF ORGANIC MATTERS IN A MIXTURE OF PRIMARY AND WASTE ACTIVATED SLUDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Aboulfoth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased demand for advanced techniques in anaerobic digestion over the last few years has led to the employment of various pre-treatment methods prior to anaerobic digestion to increase gas production. These pre-treatment methods alter the physical and chemical properties of sludge in order to make it more readily degradable by anaerobic digestion. Although the thermal pre-treatment presents high energy consumption, the main part of this energy to heat can be recovered from the biogas produced in the anaerobic process. In this research a mixture of primary and waste activated sludge was thermally pretreated at 100, 125, 150, 175 and 200o C in order to determine the effect of thermal pretreatment on improving the solubilization of sludge by increasing the soluble organic fraction (expressed as soluble COD and VFA. Experimental results proved that the solubilization ratio of sludge is depends on the treatment time and the applied temperature and the optimal temperature ranged between 175 and 200o C. The COD solubilization ratio (at 175o C increased from 11.2% to 15.1% and 25.1% when the time of treatment increased from 60 min to 120 and 240 min respectively. The experimental data could be fitted to obtain an empirical model (Known as the enzyme-kinetic equation relating the COD solubilization ratio of sludge and VFA concentration to the applied temperature and the heating time.

  6. Evaluation of the functional activity of activated sludge from local waste water treatment plant in the Arctic region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Il'inskiy V. V.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers characteristics of the activated sludge in the local wastewater treatment plant (LWTP and its ability to purify fully domestic sewage water in the Far North. Biochemical process of destruction of organic pollutants is influenced by a microbial complex functioning in aeration tanks. Taking into account climatic conditions of the region where the organic matter degradation processes are slowed, and lack of control over the operation, efficiency and occupational safety of LWTPs, it seems to be important to study the physiological characteristics of the bacteria used in bioremediation, and their ability to maximize the purifying domestic sewage in the Arctic region. Undue intervention in the biosphere systems leads to disruption of the balance of internal and external ecosystems communications. The goal of research is studying structural determination and functioning of activated sludge bacteriocenosis of LWTP TOPAS-5 (GK "Topol-ECO" in certain physical and chemical conditions of the habitat, and establishing completeness of cleaning process in this treatment plant. The paper considers the structure (quantitative and qualitative composition and function of LWTP activated sludge bacteriocenosis functioning in the Arctic region. The estimation of the activated sludge of full waste water treatment process of the LWTP has been given. The research's results have allowed to identify and determine the bacterial count of physiological groups of microorganisms purified domestic sewage; to isolate from activated sludge the bioflocculant-producing microorganisms' on the experimental medium; to evaluate efficiency of LWTP work in the Arctic region

  7. Comparison of ozone and thermal hydrolysis combined with anaerobic digestion for municipal and pharmaceutical waste sludge with tetracycline resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Jin; Yao, Hong; Wang, Hui; Ren, Jia; Yu, Xiaohua

    2016-08-01

    Biosolids from wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) are environmental reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes, which attract great concerns on their efficient treatments. Anaerobic digestion (AD) is widely used for sewage sludge treatment but its effectiveness is limited due to the slow hydrolysis. Ozone and thermal hydrolysis pre-treatment were employed to improve AD efficiency and reduce antibiotic-resistant genes in municipal and pharmaceutical waste sludge (MWS and PWS, respectively) in this study. Sludge solubilization achieved 15.75-25.09% and 14.85-33.92% after ozone and thermal hydrolysis, respectively. Both pre-treatments improved cumulative methane production and the enhancements were greater on PWS than MWS. Five tetracycline-resistant genes (tet(A), tet(G), tet(Q), tet(W), tet(X)) and one mobile element (intI1) were qPCR to assess pre-treatments. AD of pre-treated sludge reduced more tet genes than raw sludge for both ozonation and thermal hydrolysis in PWS and MWS. Thermal hydrolysis pre-treatment was more efficient than ozone for reduction after AD. Results of this study help support management options for reducing the spread of antibiotic resistance from biosolids. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Co-digestion of the hydromechanically separated organic fraction of municipal solid waste with sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the anaerobic digestion of the hydromechanically sorted organic fraction of municipal solid wastes (HS-OFMSW) co-digested with sewage sludge (SS). Eight laboratory-scale experiments were conducted under semi-continuous conditions at 15 and 20 days of solids retention time (SRT). The biogas yield from the waste reached 309 to 315 dm(3)/kgVS and 320 to 361 dm(3)/kgVS under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions, respectively. The addition of SS to HS-OFMSW (1:1 by weight) improved the C/N balance of the mixture, and the production of biogas through anaerobic mesophilic digestion increased to 494 dm(3)/kgVS, which corresponded to 316 dm(3)CH4/kgVS. However, when SS and HS-OFMSW were treated under thermophilic conditions, methanogenesis was inhibited by volatile fatty acids and free ammonia, which concentrations reached 5744 gCH3COOH/m(3) and 1009 gNH3/m(3), respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Conversion of Agricultural Wastes to Biogas using as Inoculum Cattle Manure and Activated Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simina Neo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural wastes represent a large unexploited energy potential that could be converted into biogas by anaerobic digestion. In the present study there has been analysed the way in which agricultural wastes are converted into biogas by using as inoculum cattle manure as compared with activated sludge. To carry out this experiment on small scale there have been designed 5 batch bottles. For the batch process all substrate was put into the bottles at start. The biogas process was initiated after closing the bottles, and the biogas was collected during the process until the biogas production ended. During the 33 days of experiment the batch bottles were held at constant temperature (370C in a water bath. The biomass used in the experiment was wheat straw and corn stalks. Before being used in the experiment the biomass was milled using a kitchen mixer. After that the biomass was subjected to a combination of thermal and chemical pretreatments. The volume of biogas produces was measured every seven days during the experiment period. The biogas production measurements were done by using a BlueSens measuring equipment.

  10. Enhancing the anaerobic digestion potential of dairy waste activated sludge by two step sono-alkalization pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, R Uma; Kumar, S Adish; Kaliappan, S; Yeom, Ick-Tae; Banu, J Rajesh

    2014-05-01

    High efficiency resource recovery from dairy waste activated sludge (WAS) has been a focus of attention. An investigation into the influence of two step sono-alkalization pretreatment (using different alkaline agents, pH and sonic reaction times) on sludge reduction potential in a semi-continuous anaerobic reactor was performed for the first time in literature. Firstly, effect of sludge pretreatment was evaluated by COD solubilization, suspended solids reduction and biogas production. At optimized condition (4172 kJ/kg TS of supplied energy for NaOH - pH 10), COD solubilization, suspended solids reduction and biogas production was 59%, 46% and 80% higher than control. In order to clearly describe the hydrolysis of waste activated sludge during sono-alkalization pretreatment by a two step process, concentrations of ribonucleic acid (RNA) and bound extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) were also measured. Secondly, semi-continuous process performance was studied in a lab-scale semi-continuous anaerobic reactor (5L), with 4 L working volume. With three operated SRTs, the SRT of 15 d was found to be most appropriate for economic operation of the reactor. Combining pretreatment with anaerobic digestion led to 58% and 62% of suspended solids and volatile solids reduction, respectively, with an improvement of 83% in biogas production. Thus, two step sono-alkalization pretreatment laid the basis in enhancing the anaerobic digestion potential of dairy WAS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Improve biogas production from low-organic-content sludge through high-solids anaerobic co-digestion with food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuanyang; Li, Huan; Zhang, Yuyao; Liu, Can

    2016-11-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of sewage sludge and food waste was tested at two different total solid (TS) concentrations. In the low-solids group with TS 4.8%, the biogas production increased linearly as the ratio of food waste in substrate increased from 0 to 100%, but no synergetic effect was found between the two substrates. Moreover, the additive food waste resulted in the accumulation of volatile fatty acids and decelerated biogas production. Thus, the blend ratio of food waste should be lower than 50%. While in the high-solids group with TS 14%, the weak alkaline environment with pH 7.5-8.5 avoided excessive acidification but high concentration of free ammonia was a potential risk. However, good synergetic effect was found between the two substrates because the added food waste improved mass transfer in sludge cake. Thus, 50% was recommended as the optimum ratio of food waste in substrate because of the best synergetic effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Study on Influence to Waste Water Treatment Plant’s Sludge by Low-carbon Catalytic Combustion Furnace of Natural Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren TianQi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There are two parts in this experiment. One of is about the concentration of Variation of exhaust gas while heating sludge of waste water treatment plant. The other one is about introduce the problems of the traditional incineration processes of sludge of waste water treatment as compared between the sludge heated by natural gas catalytic combustion furnace and the tradition’s. We can see that natural gas low-carbon catalytic combustion furnace realize the near-zero emission of contaminates.

  13. Presence of helminth eggs in sewage sludge from waste water plants; Presencia de huevos de helmintos en lodos procedentes de la depuracion de aguas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez Muro, J. L.; Garcia Orenes, F.; Nieto Asensio, N.; Bonora, I. B.; Morenilla Martinez, J. J.

    2003-07-01

    Land application of sewage sludge is a usual practice in wide areas of the Comunidad Valencia, due the low organic contents and nutrients of the soils, and the sewage sludge is a suitable material to use os organic amendment of soils. However the use of sewage sludge involves a very detailed characterization of sewage, to avoid sanitary hazards as the presence of helminth eggs and its high resistant to most of the treatment used to stabilize sewage sludge. The aim of this work was determine the parasitic contamination of helminths found in sewage sludge, stabilized by anaerobic digestion, from two waste water plants of Alicante (Alcoy y Benidorm) destined to agricultural land. Also it was studies the evolution of helminth eggs content of a sewage sludge subjected to composting process. (Author) 12 refs.

  14. Theoretical methane production generated by the co-digestion of organic fraction municipal solid waste and biological sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielfa, A; Cano, R; Fdz-Polanco, M

    2015-03-01

    The co-digestion of two problematic and available wastes, namely Organic Fraction Municipal Solid Waste (OFMSW) and biological sludge, was carried out in this work. Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) tests are a useful tool for determining the best substrate and co-digestion configurations, however there are some methodologies destined to save costs and time from this process by using the theoretical final methane potential of a substrate from its organic composition. Besides there are some models capable not only of reproducing the methane curve behavior, but also of predicting final methane productions from the first days of experimentation. Methodologies based in the elemental composition for the determination of theoretical production fit better with the experimental results and behavior, nevertheless the Gompertz model was capable of predicting the final productivity within the 7th day of experiment, selecting at the same time the co-digestion of 80% OFMSW and 20% Biological sludge as the optimum.

  15. Theoretical methane production generated by the co-digestion of organic fraction municipal solid waste and biological sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nielfa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The co-digestion of two problematic and available wastes, namely Organic Fraction Municipal Solid Waste (OFMSW and biological sludge, was carried out in this work. Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP tests are a useful tool for determining the best substrate and co-digestion configurations, however there are some methodologies destined to save costs and time from this process by using the theoretical final methane potential of a substrate from its organic composition. Besides there are some models capable not only of reproducing the methane curve behavior, but also of predicting final methane productions from the first days of experimentation. Methodologies based in the elemental composition for the determination of theoretical production fit better with the experimental results and behavior, nevertheless the Gompertz model was capable of predicting the final productivity within the 7th day of experiment, selecting at the same time the co-digestion of 80% OFMSW and 20% Biological sludge as the optimum.

  16. Microbial network for waste activated sludge cascade utilization in an integrated system of microbial electrolysis and anaerobic fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wenzong; He, Zhangwei; Yang, Chunxue

    2016-01-01

    in an integrated system of microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) and anaerobic digestion (AD) for waste activated sludge (WAS). Microbial communities in integrated system would build a thorough energetic and metabolic interaction network regarding fermentation communities and electrode respiring communities...... and Parabacteroides, which showed a delayed contribution to the extracellular electron transport leading to a slow cascade utilization of WAS. Conclusions: Efficient pretreatment could supply more short-chain fatty acids and higher conductivities in the fermentative liquid, which facilitated mass transfer in anodic...

  17. Start-Up of an Anaerobic Dynamic Membrane Digester for Waste Activated Sludge Digestion: Temporal Variations in Microbial Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Hongguang; Wang, Qiaoying; Wang, Zhiwei; Sahinkaya, Erkan; Li, Yongli; Ma, Jinxing; Wu, Zhichao

    2014-01-01

    An anaerobic dynamic membrane digester (ADMD) was developed to digest waste sludge, and pyrosequencing was used to analyze the variations of the bacterial and archaeal communities during the start-up. Results showed that bacterial community richness decreased and then increased over time, while bacterial diversity remained almost the same during the start-up. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the major phyla. At the class level, Betaproteobacteria was the most abundant at the end of start...

  18. Post-anaerobic digestion thermal hydrolysis of sewage sludge and food waste: Effect on methane yields, dewaterability and solids reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Kine; Kjørlaug, Oda; Higgins, Matthew J; Linjordet, Roar; Horn, Svein J

    2018-01-04

    Post-anaerobic digestion (PAD) treatment technologies have been suggested for anaerobic digestion (AD) to improve process efficiency and assure hygenization of organic waste. Because AD reduces the amount of organic waste, PAD can be applied to a much smaller volume of waste compared to pre-digestion treatment, thereby improving efficiency. In this study, dewatered digestate cakes from two different AD plants were thermally hydrolyzed and dewatered, and the liquid fraction was recirculated to a semi-continuous AD reactor. The thermal hydrolysis was more efficient in relation to methane yields and extent of dewaterability for the cake from a plant treating waste activated sludge, than the cake from a plant treating source separated food waste (SSFW). Temperatures above 165 °C yielded the best results. Post-treatment improved volumetric methane yields by 7% and the COD-reduction increased from 68% to 74% in a mesophilic (37 °C) semi-continuous system despite lowering the solid retention time (from 17 to 14 days) compared to a conventional system with pre-treatment of feed substrates at 70 °C. Results from thermogravimetric analysis showed an expected increase in maximum TS content of dewatered digestate cake from 34% up to 46% for the SSFW digestate cake, and from 17% up to 43% in the sludge digestate cake, after the PAD thermal hydrolysis process (PAD-THP). The increased dewatering alone accounts for a reduction in wet mass of cake leaving the plant of 60% in the case of sludge digestate cake. Additionaly, the increased VS-reduction will contribute to further reduce the mass of wet cake. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Feasibility study of green wastes composting with digested and dewatering sludge from municipal wastewater treatment plant in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neamat Jaafarzadeh Haghighi Fard

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Composting as a waste management technology is becoming more widespread. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and to find the most effective composting process for the ratio of green waste, digested and dewatered sludge from Chonibieh wastewater treatment plant in the west region of Ahvaz. Methods: The composting time was 23 days and the evaluated parameters in this period of the study were organic carbon, total nitrogen, phosphorus, carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N, moisture content and pH. The C/N ratio was maintained at 30 with weight:weight ratio of 1:1, 1:2, 1:3 (digested and dewatered sludge to green waste. Results: It was observed that vessel R3 produced higher quality of compost with final total nitrogen (1.28%, final total phosphorus (0.71%, final total organic carbon (TOC (25.78% and C/N (20.65% within the 23 days of composting. While vessel R1 produced higher final total nitrogen and total phosphorus with lower amount of total coliform indicating suitable quality of composting. Therefore, the results showed that the characteristics of dewatered sludge mixed with green waste proportion of green waste significantly influenced the compost quality and process dynamics. The results also showed that the quality of final products in all the conditions was in agreement with Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS and World Health Organization (WHO guidelines. However, the moisture content ratios were lower than the mentioned guidelines. With regards to microbial quality, all three ratios were in agreement with US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA and Iranian guidelines. Conclusion: It is suggested that the final product of composting can be safely used in farmland and green space.

  20. Impact of the addition of a nitrifying activated sludge on ammonia oxidation during composting of residual household wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Y; Dabert, P; Le Roux, S; Mognol, J; De Macedo, F J; De Guardia, A

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the nitrogen-microbial community dynamics during composting of a mixture of nitrifying waste activated sludge (WAS) and fine organic fraction of residual household waste (RHW). To examine whether the addition of nitrifying sludge could promote ammonia oxidation and reduce ammonia emissions. The fine organic fraction of RHW was mixed with the WAS and homogenized. The mixture and each waste alone were loaded in aerobic cells under controlled conditions, respectively. Both nitrogen and microbial community dynamics were monitored during 50 days of composting. The ammonia oxidizers were quantified and identified in the sludge and compost. The changes in ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) concentrations corresponded to the ammonia oxidation rates calculated from nitrogen balance. The addition of WAS did not efficiently reduce ammonia emissions because the Nitrosomonas oligotropha-like AOB introduced declined during the active stage of composting. Ammonia oxidation was probably limited by the intense heterotrophic activities at the active stage. Nitrosomonas europaea/eutropha and Nitrosomonas nitrosa-like AOB were established only during the maturation stage. They were the main contributors to ammonia oxidation during composting. The mixing of nitrifying WAS with the RHW during the early stages of composting does not promote ammonia oxidation nor reduce ammonia emissions because of limiting biologic factors during the active stage of composting. The mixing of activated sludge with RHW before composting is a common practice on composting plants. This study proved the limitation of this practice to reduce ammonia emissions during composting via bioaugmentation of ammonia-oxidizing organisms. It correlated successfully the ammonia oxidation rate with different groups of ammonia oxidizers and explains the fail of promoting ammonia oxidation during the early stages of composting. It suggests Nit. europaea/eutropha and Nit. nitrosa-like AOB were the main

  1. Assessment of biogas production in Argentina from co-digestion of sludge and municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morero, Betzabet; Vicentin, Rocio; Campanella, Enrique A

    2017-03-01

    In Argentina, there is an important potential to utilize organic waste to generate bioenergy. This work analyzes the environmental impacts and the energetic and economic requirements of the biogas produced by digesting the sewage sludge (SS) produced in a wastewater treatment plant in a medium city in Argentina. The SS is co-digested with the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), and the basis of this study is the life cycle assessment (LCA). The LCA is performed according to ISO 14040-44 using the SimaPro simulator. First, the transport of the raw materials to the biogas plant was defined. Then, the co-digestion and the biogas treatment for final use were evaluated. The co-digestion was improved with glycerol, and the generation of biogas was estimated using the GPS-X software. Two alternatives for the end use of biogas were considered: combined heat and power (CHP) and biomethane generation. For the first, H 2 S and water vapor were removed from the raw biogas stream, and for the second, also CO 2 was removed. The H 2 S removal process was simulated in the SuperPro software by anaerobic biofiltration. The same software was used to simulate the removal of CO 2 absorption-desorption with water as solvent. Finally, the environmental impacts related to the end use of biogas (CHP and biomethane) were evaluated. The environmental, energetic and economic analyses showed that the co-digestion of SS and OFMSW has great potential for reducing the environmental impacts and increasing the economic and energetic value of the substances via the production of biomethane, electricity and, potentially, fertilizer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Batch anaerobic co-digestion of waste activated sludge and microalgae (Chlorella sorokiniana) at mesophilic temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán, Carolina; Jeison, David; Fermoso, Fernando G; Borja, Rafael

    2016-08-23

    The microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana are used as co-substrate for waste activated sludge (WAS) anaerobic digestion. The specific objective of this research was to evaluate the feasibility of improving methane production from anaerobic digestion of WAS in co-digestion with this microalga, based on an optimized mixture percentage. Thus, the anaerobic co-digestion of both substrates aims to overcome the drawbacks of the anaerobic digestion of single WAS, simultaneously improving its management. Different co-digestion mixtures (0% WAS-100% microalgae; 25% WAS-75% microalgae; 50% WAS-50% microalgae; 75% WAS-25% microalgae; 100% WAS-0% microalgae) were studied. The highest methane yield (442 mL CH4/g VS) was obtained for the mixture with 75% WAS and 25% microalgae. This value was 22% and 39% higher than that obtained in the anaerobic digestion of the sole substrates WAS and microalgae, respectively, as well as 16% and 25% higher than those obtained for the co-digestion mixtures with 25% WAS and 75% microalgae and 50% WAS and 50% microalgae, respectively. The kinetic constant of the process increased 42%, 42% and 12%, respectively, for the mixtures with 25%, 50% and 75% of WAS compared to the substrate without WAS. Anaerobic digestion of WAS, together with C. sorokiniana, has been clearly improved by ensuring its viability, suitability and efficiency.

  3. Optimized culture condition for enhancing lytic performance of waste activated sludge by Geobacillus sp. G1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunxue; Zhou, Aijuan; Hou, Yanan; Zhang, Xu; Guo, Zechong; Wang, Aijie; Liu, Wenzong

    2014-01-01

    Hydrolysis is known as the rate-limiting step during waste activated sludge (WAS) digestion. The optimization of the culture conditions of Geobacillus sp. G1 for enhancing WAS hydrolysis was conducted in this study with uniform design and response surface methodology. Taking the lysis rate of Escherichia coli as the response, the Plackett-Burman design was used to screen the most important variables. Experimental results showed that the maximum predicted lysis rate of E. coli was 50.9% for 4 h treatment time with concentrations of skim milk, NaCl and NH4SO4 at 10.78, 4.36 and 11.28 g/L, respectively. The optimized dosage ratio of Geobacillus sp. G1 to WAS was 35%:65% (VG1:VWAS). Under this condition, soluble protein was increased to 695 mg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/L, which was 5.0 times higher than that obtained in the control (140 mg COD/L). The corresponding protease activity reached 1.1 Eu/mL. Scanning electron microscopy showed that abundant cells were apparently lysed with treatment of Geobacillus sp. G1.

  4. Basic Data Report -- Defense Waste Processing Facility Sludge Plant, Savannah River Plant 200-S Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amerine, D.B.

    1982-09-01

    This Basic Data Report for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)--Sludge Plant was prepared to supplement the Technical Data Summary. Jointly, the two reports were intended to form the basis for the design and construction of the DWPF. To the extent that conflicting information may appear, the Basic Data Report takes precedence over the Technical Data Summary. It describes project objectives and design requirements. Pertinent data on the geology, hydrology, and climate of the site are included. Functions and requirements of the major structures are described to provide guidance in the design of the facilities. Revision 9 of the Basic Data Report was prepared to eliminate inconsistencies between the Technical Data Summary, Basic Data Report and Scopes of Work which were used to prepare the September, 1982 updated CAB. Concurrently, pertinent data (material balance, curie balance, etc.) have also been placed in the Basic Data Report. It is intended that these balances be used as a basis for the continuing design of the DWPF even though minor revisions may be made in these balances in future revisions to the Technical Data Summary.

  5. SONO-OXIDATIVE PRE-TREATMENT OF WASTE ACTIVATED SLUDGE BEFORE ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Şahinkaya

    Full Text Available Abstract The effects of sonication, potassium ferrate (K2FeO4 oxidation and their simultaneous combination (called "sono-oxidative pre-treatment" on chemical properties and anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS were investigated and compared comprehensively. Based on chemical parameters, the optimum operating conditions were found to be 0.3 g K2FeO4/g total solids (TS dosage for 2-h individual K2FeO4 oxidation, 0.50 W/mL ultrasonic power density for 10-min individual sonication and, lastly, the combination of 2.5-min sonication at 0.75 W/mL ultrasonic power density with 2-h chemical oxidation at 0.3 g K2FeO4/g TS dosage for sono-oxidative pre-treatment. The disintegration efficiencies of these methods under the optimized conditions were in the following descending order: 37.8% for sono-oxidative pre-treatment > 26.3% for sonication > 13.1% for K2FeO4 oxidation. The influences of these methods on anaerobic biodegradability were tested with the biochemical methane potential assay. It was seen that the cumulative methane production increased by 9.2% in the K2FeO4 oxidation reactor, 15.8% in the sonicated reactor and 18.6% in the reactor with sono-oxidative pre-treatment, compared to the control (untreated reactor.

  6. Effects of treatment time and temperature on the DC corona pretreatment performance of waste activated sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, GAO; Ning, ZHAO; Yongdi, DENG; Minghang, WANG; Boxue, DU

    2018-02-01

    In order to improve the anaerobic digestion efficiency of waste activated sludge (WAS), a pretreatment procedure should be carried out so as to disrupt the microbial cell structure, thus releasing intracellular organic matters. In this paper, a corona discharge triggered by a DC voltage was employed to pre-treat WAS for various time periods under different temperatures. The magnitude of the DC voltage was 4 kV at both negative and positive polarities. The changes in the soluble chemical oxygen demand, phosphorus and nitrogen content, and pH value within the WAS were utilized to estimate the pretreatment performance of the DC corona. It was found that with increasing treatment time, the pretreatment efficiency tends to be reduced. With increased temperature, the pretreatment efficiency appears to be better. It is suggested that the oxidative species and the active particles generated in the corona discharge play an important role in disrupting the microbial cell structure, which is dependent upon the treatment time and the temperature.

  7. Examination of Uranium(VI) Leaching During Ligand Promoted Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, Brian; Powell, Brian A.; Rao, Linfeng; Nash, Kenneth. L.

    2008-06-10

    The dissolution of synthetic boehmite (?-AlOOH) by 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) was examined in a series of batch adsorption/dissolution experiments. Additionally, the leaching behavior of {sup 233}U(VI) from boehmite was examined as a function of pH and HEDPA concentration. The results are discussed in terms of sludge washing procedures that may be utilized during underground tank waste remediation. In the pH range 4 to 10, complexation of Al(III) by HEDPA significantly enhanced dissolution of boehmite. This phenomenon was especially pronounced in the neutral pH region where the solubility of aluminum, in the absence of complexants, is limited by the formation of sparsely soluble aluminum hydroxides. At pH higher than 10, dissolution of synthetic boehmite was inhibited by HEDPA, likely due to sorption of Al(III):HEDPA complexes. Addition of HEDPA to equilibrated U(VI)-synthetic boehmite suspensions yielded an increase in the aqueous phase uranium concentration. Partitioning of uranium between the solid and aqueous phase is described in terms of U(VI):HEDPA speciation and dissolution of the boehmite solid phase.

  8. Composting of bio-waste, aerobic and anaerobic sludges--effect of feedstock on the process and quality of compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himanen, Marina; Hänninen, Kari

    2011-02-01

    In-vessel composting of three stocks with originally different degree of organic matter degradation was conducted for: (1) kitchen source-separated bio-waste (BW), (2) aerobic (AS) as well as (3) anaerobic sludges (AnS) from municipal wastewater treatment plant. Composting experiment lasted over a year. The highest activity of the process was in the BW compost. It was implied by the highest temperature, CO(2) release, ammonification and nitrification, intensive accumulation and removal of low-weight carboxylic acids (water- and NaOH-extractable). Between the sludges higher mineralization and CO2 release was in AnS, while ammonification and nitrification were higher in AS compost; no significant difference between sludge composts was noticed for dynamics of pH, conductivity, concentrations of LWCA, and some nutrient compounds and heavy metals. Nitrogen content of the final compost increased in BW, but decreased in AS and AnS. Phytotoxicity of Lepidium sativum was eliminated faster in sludge composts compared to BW compost. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Removal of Cu(II) and Cd(II) from aqueous solution by seafood processing waste sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S M; Davis, A P

    2001-02-01

    Dried waste slurry generated in seafood processing factories has been shown to be an effective adsorbent for the removal of heavy metals from dilute solutions. Characterization of the sludge surface with scanning electron microscope and X-ray microanalyzer were carried out to evaluate the components on the sludge surface that are related to the adsorption of metal ions. Aluminum and calcium, as well as organic carbon are distributed on the surface of sludge. Alkalimetric titration was used to characterize the surface acidity of the sludge sample. The surface acidity constants, pKa1s and pKa2s, were 5.80 and 9.55, respectively. Batch as well as dynamic adsorption studies were conducted with 10(-5) to 5 x 10(-3) M Cu(II) and Cd(II). A surface complexation model with the diffuse layer model successfully predicted Cu(II) and Cd(II) removals in single metal solutions. Predictions of sorption in binary-adsorbate systems based on single-adsorbate data fits represented competitive sorption data reasonably well over a wide range of conditions. The breakthrough capacity found from column studies was different for each metal ion and the data reflect the order of metal affinity for the adsorbent material very well.

  10. Improving dewaterability of waste activated sludge by combined conditioning with zero-valent iron and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xu; Wang, Qilin; Jiang, Guangming; Zhang, Xiwang; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2014-12-01

    Improvement of sludge dewaterability is crucial for reducing the costs of sludge disposal in wastewater treatment plants. This study presents a novel method based on combined conditioning with zero-valent iron (ZVI) and hydrogen peroxide (HP) at pH 2.0 to improve dewaterability of a full-scale waste activated sludge (WAS). The combination of ZVI (0-750mg/L) and HP (0-750mg/L) at pH 2.0 substantially improved the WAS dewaterability due to Fenton-like reactions. The highest improvement in WAS dewaterability was attained at 500mg ZVI/L and 250mg HP/L, when the capillary suction time of the WAS was reduced by approximately 50%. Particle size distribution indicated that the sludge flocs were decomposed after conditioning. Economic analysis showed that combined conditioning with ZVI and HP was a more economically favorable method for improving WAS dewaterability than the classical Fenton reaction based method initiated by ferrous salts and HP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Polyhydroxyalkanoates in waste activated sludge enhances anaerobic methane production through improving biochemical methane potential instead of hydrolysis rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qilin; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Chang; Xie, Guo-Jun; Zhou, Xu; Qian, Jin; Yang, Guojing; Zeng, Guangming; Liu, Yiqi; Wang, Dongbo

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic sludge digestion is the main technology for sludge reduction and stabilization prior to sludge disposal. Nevertheless, methane production from anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) is often restricted by the poor biochemical methane potential and slow hydrolysis rate of WAS. This work systematically investigated the effect of PHA levels of WAS on anaerobic methane production, using both experimental and mathematical modeling approaches. Biochemical methane potential tests showed that methane production increased with increased PHA levels in WAS. Model-based analysis suggested that the PHA-based method enhanced methane production by improving biochemical methane potential of WAS, with the highest enhancement being around 40% (from 192 to 274 L CH4/kg VS added; VS: volatile solid) when the PHA levels increased from 21 to 143 mg/g VS. In contrast, the hydrolysis rate (approximately 0.10 d-1) was not significantly affected by the PHA levels. Economic analysis suggested that the PHA-based method could save $1.2/PE/y (PE: population equivalent) in a typical wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The PHA-based method can be easily integrated into the current WWTP to enhance methane production, thereby providing a strong support to the on-going paradigm shift in wastewater management from pollutant removal to resource recovery.

  12. MEASUREMENT AND CALCULATION OF RADIONUCLIDE ACTIVITIES IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE FOR ACCEPTANCE OF DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS IN A FEDERAL REPOSITORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C; David Diprete, D; Ned Bibler, N

    2008-12-31

    This paper describes the results of the analyses of High Level Waste (HLW) sludge slurry samples and of the calculations necessary to decay the radionuclides to meet the reporting requirement in the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) [1]. The concentrations of 45 radionuclides were measured. The results of these analyses provide input for radioactive decay calculations used to project the radionuclide inventory at the specified index years, 2015 and 3115. This information is necessary to complete the Production Records at Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so that the final glass product resulting from Macrobatch 5 (MB5) can eventually be submitted to a Federal Repository. Five of the necessary input radionuclides for the decay calculations could not be measured directly due to their low concentrations and/or analytical interferences. These isotopes are Nb-93m, Pd-107, Cd-113m, Cs-135, and Cm-248. Methods for calculating these species from concentrations of appropriate other radionuclides will be discussed. Also the average age of the MB5 HLW had to be calculated from decay of Sr-90 in order to predict the initial concentration of Nb-93m. As a result of the measurements and calculations, thirty-one WAPS reportable radioactive isotopes were identified for MB5. The total activity of MB5 sludge solids will decrease from 1.6E+04 {micro}Ci (1 {micro}Ci = 3.7E+04 Bq) per gram of total solids in 2008 to 2.3E+01 {micro}Ci per gram of total solids in 3115, a decrease of approximately 700 fold. Finally, evidence will be given for the low observed concentrations of the radionuclides Tc-99, I-129, and Sm-151 in the HLW sludges. These radionuclides were reduced in the MB5 sludge slurry to a fraction of their expected production levels due to SRS processing conditions.

  13. Recycling of spent catalyst and waste sludge from industry to substitute raw materials in the preparation of Portland cement clinker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kae-Long Lin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the feasibility of using waste limestone sludge, waste stone sludge, iron oxide sludge, and spent catalyst as raw materials in the production of eco-cement. The compressive strength development of the Eco Cement-A (ECO-A paste was similar to that of ordinary Portland cement (OPC pastes. The compressive strength development of the ECO-B paste was higher than that of OPC pastes. In addition, the C2S (Ca2SiO4, C2S and C3S (Ca3SiO5 minerals in the eco-cement paste were continuously utilized to hydrate the Ca(OH2 and calcium silicate hydrates gel (Ca6Si3O12·H2O, C–S–H throughout the curing time. When ECO-C clinker contained 8% spent catalyst, the C3S mineral content decreased and C3A (3 CaO·Al2O3 content increased, thereby causing the structure to weaken and compressive strength to decrease. The results showed that the developed eco-cement with 4% spent catalyst possessed compressive strength properties similar to those of OPC pastes.

  14. Stimulating short-chain fatty acids production from waste activated sludge by nano zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jingyang; Feng, Leiyu; Chen, Yinguang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hong; Xiao, Naidong; Wang, Dongbo

    2014-10-10

    An efficient and green strategy, i.e. adding nano zero-valent iron into anaerobic fermentation systems to remarkably stimulate the accumulation of short-chain fatty acids from waste activated sludge via accelerating the solubilization and hydrolysis processes has been developed. In the presence of nano zero-valent iron, not only the short-chain fatty acids production was significantly improved, but also the fermentation time for maximal short-chain fatty acids was shortened compared with those in the absence of nano zero-valent iron. Mechanism investigations showed that the solubilization of sludge, hydrolysis of solubilized substances and acidification of hydrolyzed products were all enhanced by addition of nano zero-valent iron. Also, the general microbial activity of anaerobes and relative activities of key enzymes with hydrolysis and acidification of organic matters were improved than those in the control. 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing analysis suggested that the abundance of bacteria responsible for waste activated sludge hydrolysis and short-chain fatty acids production was greatly enhanced due to nano zero-valent iron addition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Concentrations and environmental fate of Ra in cation-exchange regeneration brine waste disposed to septic tanks and accumulation in sludge, New Jersey Coastal Plain, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Zoltan; Jacobsen, Eric; Kraemer, Thomas F; Parsa, Bahman

    2008-06-01

    Concentrations of Ra in liquid and solid wastes generated from 15 softeners treating domestic well waters from New Jersey Coastal Plain aquifers (where combined Ra ((226)Ra plus (228)Ra) concentrations commonly exceed 0.185 Bq L(-1)) were determined. Softeners, when maintained, reduced combined Ra about 10-fold (septic-tank effluents receiving brine waste were less than in the untreated ground waters. The maximum combined Ra concentration in aquifer sands (40.7 Bq kg(-1) dry weight) was less than that in sludge from the septic tanks (range, 84-363 Bq kg(-1)), indicating Ra accumulation in sludge from effluent. The combined Ra concentration in sludge from the homeowners' septic systems falls within the range reported for sludge samples from publicly owned treatment works within the region.

  16. [Using Excess Activated Sludge Treated 4-Chlorophenol Contained Waste Water to Cultivate Chlorella vulgaris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Chen, Xiu-rong; Yan, Long; He, Yi-xuan; Shi, Zhen-dong

    2015-04-01

    Using different rations of sludge extracts and supernate from 4-Chlorophenol (4-CP) simulated wastewater's excess sludge after centrifugation to cultivate the Chlorella vulgaris to achieve the goal of excess sludge utilization together with chlorella cultivating. The experiments were performed in 500 mL flasks with different rations of sludge extracts & BG-11 and supernate & BG-11 in a light growth chamber respectively. Number of algal cells, Chlorophyll, enzyme activity, oil and water total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), total organic carbon (TOC), toxicity index were investigated. Result showed that the nutrition supplies and toxicity in the excess sludge were removed efficiently via Chlorella vulgaris, the removal rates of TN and TP were at least 40% and 90% respectively; After 10 days cultivation, the density growth of 50% sludge extracts was 20 times higher of the beginning while its chlorophyll content was lower than that of the blank group. Sludge extracts could promote the proliferation of algae, but were not conducive to the synthesis of chlorophyll. The quantity of SOD in per cell showed Chlorella vulgaris gave a positive response via stimulation from toxicant in sludge extracts and supernate. The best time for collecting chlorella vulgaris was the fifth day of cultivation, taking neutral oil accumulation as the evaluating indicator for its utilization combined with the removal of supplies and toxicity.

  17. Effect of ultrasonic and ozone pre-treatments on pharmaceutical waste activated sludge's solubilisation, reduction, anaerobic biodegradability and acute biological toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Jin; Yao, Hong; Wang, Hui; Shan, Dan; Jiang, Yichen; Ma, Lanqianya; Yu, Xiaohua

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasonic and ozone pre-treatment technologies were employed in this study to improve the anaerobic digestion efficiency of pharmaceutical waste activated sludge. The sludge solubilisation achieved 30.01% (150,000 kJ/kg TS) and 28.10% (0.1g O3/g TS) after ultrasonic treatment and ozone treatment. The anaerobic biodegradability after ultrasonic treatment was higher compared to ozonation due to the higher cumulative methane volume observed after 6 days (249 ml vs 190 ml). The ozonated sludge released the highest concentration of Cu(2+) into the liquid phase (6.640 mg L(-1)) compared to 0.530 mg/L for untreated sludge and 0.991 mg/L for sonicated sludge. The acute toxicity test measured by luminescent bacteria showed that anaerobic digestion could degrade toxic compounds and result in a reduction in toxicity. The main mechanism of action led to some differences in the treated sludge exhibiting higher potential for methane production from pharmaceutical waste sludge with ultrasonic treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. VERIFICATION OF THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY PROCESS DIGESTION METHOD FOR THE SLUDGE BATCH 6 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Click, D.; Jones, M.; Edwards, T.

    2010-06-09

    For each sludge batch that is processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) confirms applicability of the digestion method to be used by the DWPF lab for elemental analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipt samples and SRAT product process control samples.1 DWPF SRAT samples are typically dissolved using a room temperature HF-HNO3 acid dissolution (i.e., DWPF Cold Chem (CC) Method, see DWPF Procedure SW4-15.201) and then analyzed by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES). In addition to the CC method confirmation, the DWPF lab's mercury (Hg) digestion method was also evaluated for applicability to SB6 (see DWPF procedure 'Mercury System Operating Manual', Manual: SW4-15.204. Section 6.1, Revision 5, Effective date: 12-04-03). This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from performing the Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium Peroxide/Hydroxide Fusion (PF) and DWPF Cold Chem (CC) method digestion of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) SRAT Receipt and SB6 SRAT Product samples. For validation of the DWPF lab's Hg method, only SRAT receipt material was used and compared to AR digestion results. The SB6 SRAT Receipt and SB6 SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constitutes the SB6 Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5), to form the SB6 Blend composition. In addition to the 16 elements currently measured by the DWPF, this report includes Hg and thorium (Th) data (Th comprising {approx}2.5 - 3 Wt% of the total solids in SRAT Receipt and SRAT Product, respectively) and provides specific details of ICP-AES analysis of Th. Thorium was found to interfere with the U 367.007 nm emission line, and an inter-element correction (IEC) had to be applied to U

  19. Artemia salina as a new index for assessment of acute cytotoxicity during co-composting of sewage sludge and lignocellulose waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Fels, Loubna; Hafidi, Mohamed; Ouhdouch, Yedir

    2016-04-01

    Considering the necessity to constantly monitor the safety of use of sewage sludge, we have focused on evaluating the toxicity of raw sludge and sludge treated by co-composting with date palm waste using an in vitro assessment of cytotoxicity based on Artemia salina larvae as a simple new sensitive and reliable routine test. The efficiency of co-composting in decreasing sludge toxicity was evaluated in terms of cytotoxicity abatement reaching 100% by the second month of composting for mixture A (1/3 sludge+2/3 date palm waste) and the third month for mixture B (1/2 sludge+1/2 date palm waste). Cytotoxicity abatement was confirmed by the increase of germination index, which reached over 100% with positive correlation for lettuce (R(2)=0.81 and 0.86) and for turnip (R(2)=0.87 and 0.74) for mixtures A and B respectively. A strong correlation between the proposed cytotoxicity test and the evolution of regulatory physical-chemical approaches was found, (R(2)=0.88 and 0.89) for NH4(+)/NO3(-) and (R(2)=0.80 and 0.88) for C/N respectively for mixture A and B. These findings allow the inexpensive bioassay reported to be used as a highly sensitive test to determine the cytotoxicity and maturity of composts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Optimizing vermistabilization of waste activated sludge using vermicompost as bulking material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hait, Subrata; Tare, Vinod

    2011-03-01

    An integrated composting-vermicomposting system has been developed for stabilization of waste activated sludge (WAS) using matured vermicompost as bulking material and Eisenia fetida as earthworm species. Composting was considered as the main processing unit and vermicomposting as polishing unit. The integrated system was optimized by successive recycling and mixing of bulking material with WAS during composting and examining the effects of environmental condition (i.e. temperature: 10-30°C and relative humidity: 50 and 90%) and stocking density (0-5 kg/m(2)) on vermicomposting. The composting stage resulted in sufficient enrichment of bulking material with organic matter after 20 cycles of recycling and mixing with WAS and produced materials acceptable for vermicomposting. Vermicomposting of composted material caused significant reduction in pH, volatile solids (VS), specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR), total carbon (TC), total organic carbon (TOC), C/N ratio and pathogens and a substantial increase in electrical conductivity (EC), total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorous (TP). The environmental conditions (i.e. temperature: 10-30°C and relative humidity: 50 and 90%) and stocking density (0-5 kg/m(2)) have profound effects on vermicomposting. Temperature of 20°C with high humidity is the best suited environmental condition for vermicomposting employing E. fetida. The favorable stocking density range for vermiculture is 0.5-2.0 kg/m(2) (optimum: 0.5 kg/m(2)) and for vermicomposting is 2.0-4.0 kg/m(2) (optimum: 3.0 kg/m(2)), respectively. The integrated composting-vermicomposting system potentially stabilizes and converts the hazardous WAS into quality organic manure for agronomic applications without any adverse effects. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hazardous sludge wastes of petrochemical industries in the developing countries[Held jointly with the 4. Canadian organic residuals and biosolids managment conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaheri, M. [Abadan Petrochemical Company, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghaheri, S. [Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Surface waters and agricultural fields are becoming more and more polluted as a result of waste sludges from wastewater treatment plants such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and organo-chlor compounds. In developing countries, environmental development is not parallel to industrial development and most industrial wastewater treatment plants in these countries are producing very harmful sludges. This paper discussed the management of hazardous wastes in Iran and the use of harmful chemical compounds that are being produced the country. The progress that has been made on hazardous waste management practices was also discussed with reference to waste management methods. It was noted that there are no comprehensive hazardous waste treatment and disposal facilities in Iran although many larger scale industries have installed their individual waste treatment facilities to treat hazardous wastes. It was concluded that the responsibility for proper and safe disposal of toxic and hazardous wastes requires the cooperation of government, industry and the general public in developing countries. In addition, it was recommended that the following facilities should be considered and/or supplied by the government due to the low public awareness and lack of public interest: land treatment facilities such as sludge farms; off-site recovery facilities; off-site treatment facilities such as plasma-energy incinerators requiring a high budget; off-site storage facilities including the premises of transport contractors; and, secure landfills designated for the disposal of scheduled wastes.

  2. Small hazardous waste generators in developing countries: use of stabilization/solidification process as an economic tool for metal wastewater treatment and appropriate sludge disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marcos A R; Mater, Luciana; Souza-Sierra, Maria M; Corrêa, Albertina X R; Sperb, Rafael; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2007-08-25

    The aim of this study was to propose a profitable destination for an industrial sludge that can cover the wastewater treatment costs of small waste generators. Optimized stabilization/solidification technology was used to treat hazardous waste from an electroplating industry that is currently released untreated to the environment. The stabilized/solidified (S/S) waste product was used as a raw material to build concrete blocks, to be sold as pavement blocks or used in roadbeds and/or parking lots. The quality of the blocks containing a mixture of cement, lime, clay and waste was evaluated by means of leaching and solubility tests according to the current Brazilian waste regulations. Results showed very low metal leachability and solubility of the block constituents, indicating a low environmental impact. Concerning economic benefits from the S/S process and reuse of the resultant product, the cost of untreated heavy metal-containing sludge disposal to landfill is usually on the order of US$ 150-200 per tonne of waste, while 1tonne of concrete roadbed blocks (with 25% of S/S waste constitution) has a value of around US$ 100. The results of this work showed that the cement, clay and lime-based process of stabilization/solidification of hazardous waste sludge is sufficiently effective and economically viable to stimulate the treatment of wastewater from small industrial waste generators.

  3. Pilot-scale waste activated sludge alkaline fermentation, fermentation liquid separation, and application of fermentation liquid to improve biological nutrient removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Chen, Hong; Hu, Lanfang; Yu, Lei; Chen, Yinguang; Gu, Guowei

    2011-03-01

    The use of sludge fermentative short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) as an additional carbon source of biological nutrient removal (BNR) has drawn much attention recently as it can reuse sludge organics, reduce waste activated sludge production, and improve BNR performance. Our previous laboratory study had shown that the SCFA production was significantly enhanced by controlling sludge fermentation at pH 10 with NaOH. This paper focused on a pilot-scale study of alkaline fermentation of waste activated sludge, separation of the fermentation liquid from the alkaline fermentation system, and application of the fermentation liquid to improve municipal biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal. NaOH and Ca(OH)(2) were used respectively to adjust the alkaline fermentation pH, and their effects on sludge fermentation and fermentation liquid separation were compared. The results showed that the use of Ca(OH)(2) had almost the same effect on SCFA production improvement and sludge volatile suspended solids reduction as that of NaOH, but it exhibited better sludge dewatering, lower chemical costs, and higher fermentation liquid recovery efficiency. When the fermentation liquids, adjusted with Ca(OH)(2) and NaOH respectively, were added continuously to an anaerobic-anoxic-aerobic municipal wastewater BNR system, both the nitrogen and phosphorus removals, compared with the control, were improved to the same levels. This was attributed to the increase of not only influent COD but also denitrifying phosphorus removal capability. It seems that the use of Ca(OH)(2) to control sludge fermentation at pH 10 for efficiently producing a carbon source for BNR is feasible.

  4. Innovative combination of electrolysis and Fe(II)-activated persulfate oxidation for improving the dewaterability of waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Guang-Yin; Lu, Xue-Qin; Li, Yu-You; Zhao, You-Cai

    2013-05-01

    The feasibility of electrolysis integrated with Fe(II)-activated persulfate (S2O8(2-)) oxidation to improve waste activated sludge (WAS) dewaterability was evaluated. The physicochemical properties (sludge volume (SV), total suspended solids (TSS) and volatile suspended solids (VSS)) and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), including slime EPS, loosely bound EPS (LB-EPS) and tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS) were characterized to identify their exact roles in sludge dewatering. While dewaterability negatively corresponded to LB-EPS, TB-EPS, protein (PN) and polysaccharide (PS) in LB-EPS and TB-EPS, it was independent of SV, TSS, VSS, slime EPS and PN/PS. Further study through scanning electron microscope (SEM) verified the entrapment of bacterial cells by TB-EPS, protecting them against electrolysis disruption. Comparatively, electrolysis integrated with S2O8(2-)/Fe(II) oxidation was able to effectively disrupt the protective barrier and crack the entrapped cells, releasing the water inside EPS and cells. Therefore, the destruction of both TB-EPS and cells is the fundamental reason for the enhanced dewaterability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sustainable polysaccharide-based biomaterial recovered from waste aerobic granular sludge as a surface coating material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Y. M.; Nierop, K.G.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/182329895; Girbal-Neuhauser, E.; Adriaanse, M.; van Loosdrecht, M. C M

    To evaluate the possibility of utilizing polysaccharide-based biomaterial recovered from aerobic granular sludge as a coating material, the morphology, molecular weight distribution and chemical composition of the recovered biomaterial were investigated by atomic force microscopy, size exclusion

  6. Sustainable polysaccharide-based biomaterial recovered from waste aerobic granular sludge as a surface coating material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Y.M.; Nierop, K.G.J.; Girbal-Neuhauser, E.; Adriaanse, M.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the possibility of utilizing polysaccharide-based biomaterial recovered from aerobic granular sludge as a coating material, the morphology, molecular weight distribution and chemical composition of the recovered biomaterial were investigated by atomic force microscopy, size exclusion

  7. INTEGRATED WASTE WATER TREATMENT ACCOMPANIED BY MINIMAL GENERATION OF EXCESSIVE ACTIVATED SLUDGE OR SEDIMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makisha Nikolay Alekseevich

    2012-12-01

    ments held. A combination of aerobic and anaerobic processes helps provide the proper quality of integrated biological treatment. Chambers of the aeration reactor are also equipped with the polymer feed of various compositions. Sludge treatment that is also strongly needed was performed by means of aerobic stabilization accompanied by ejecting aeration. The experiment findings demonstrate its substantial effect in terms of both components, including sewage and sludge treatment.

  8. Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge. Part 1. Model calculations and cost benefit analysis for Esbjerg West waste water treatment plant, Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OEstergaard, N. (Eurotec West A/S (DK)); Thomsen, Anne Belinda; Thygesen, Anders; Bangsoe Nielsen, H. (Risoe National Laboratory, DTU (DK)); Rasmussen, Soeren (SamRas (DK))

    2007-09-15

    The project 'Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge' investigates the possibilities of utilizing selective hydrolysis of sludge at waste water treatment plants to increase the production of biogas based power and heat, and at the same time reduce power consumption for handling and treatment of nitrogen and sludge as well as for disposal of the sludge. The selective hydrolysis system is based on the fact that an anaerobic digestion before a hydrolysis treatment increases the hydrolysis efficiency, as the production of volatile organic components, which might inhibit the hydrolysis efficiency, are not produced to the same extent as may be the case for a hydrolysis made on un-digested material. Furthermore it is possible to separate ammonia from the sludge without using chemicals; it has, however, proven difficult to treat wastewater sludge, as the sludge seems to be difficult to treat in the laboratory using simple equipment. Esbjerg Wastewater Treatment Plant West, Denmark, is used as model plant for the calculations of the benefits using selective hydrolysis of sludge as if established at the existing sludge digester system. The plant is a traditional build plant based on the activated sludge concept in addition to traditional digester technology. The plant treats combined household and factory wastewater with a considerable amount of the wastewater received from the industries. During the project period Esbjerg Treatment Plant West went through considerable process changes, thus the results presented in this report are based on historical plant characteristics and may be viewed as conservative relative to what actually may be obtainable. (BA)

  9. Sequential chemical treatment of radium species in TENORM waste sludge produced from oil and natural gas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Afifi, E M; Awwad, N S; Hilal, M A

    2009-01-30

    This paper is dedicated to the treatment of sludge occurring in frame of the Egyptian produced from oil and gas production. The activity levels of three radium isotopes: Ra-226 (of U-series), Ra-228 and Ra-224 (of Th-series) in the solid TENORM waste (sludge) were first evaluated and followed by a sequential treatment for all radium species (fractions) presented in TENORM. The sequential treatment was carried out based on two approaches 'A' and 'B' using different chemical solutions. The results obtained indicate that the activity levels of all radium isotopes (Ra-226, Ra-228 and Ra-224) of the environmental interest in the TENORM waste sludge were elevated with regard to exemption levels established by IAEA [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), International basic safety standards for the protection against ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources. GOV/2715/Vienna, 1994]. Each approach of the sequential treatment was performed through four steps using different chemical solutions to reduce the activity concentration of radium in a large extent. Most of the leached radium was found as an oxidizable Ra species. The actual removal % leached using approach B was relatively efficient compared to A. It is observed that the actual removal percentages (%) of Ra-226, Ra-228 and Ra-224 using approach A are 78+/-2.8, 64.8+/-4.1 and 76.4+/-5.2%, respectively. Whereas in approach A, the overall removal % of Ra-226, Ra-228 and Ra-228 was increased to approximately 91+/-3.5, 87+/-4.1 and 90+/-6.2%, respectively.

  10. Volatile Fatty Acids Production from Codigestion of Food Waste and Sewage Sludge Based on β-Cyclodextrins and Alkaline Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Volatile fatty acids (VFAs are preferred valuable resources, which can be produced from anaerobic digestion process. This study presents a novel technology using β-cyclodextrins (β-CD pretreatment integrated alkaline method to enhance VFAs production from codigestion of food waste and sewage sludge. Experiment results showed that optimized ratio of food waste to sewage sludge was 3 : 2 because it provided adequate organic substance and seed microorganisms. Based on this optimized ratio, the integrated treatment of alkaline pH 10 and β-CD addition (0.2 g/g TS performed the best enhancement on VFAs production, and the maximum VFAs production was 8631.7 mg/L which was 6.13, 1.38, and 1.57 times higher than that of control, initial pH 10, and 0.2 g β-CD/g TS treatment, respectively. Furthermore, the hydrolysis rate of protein and polysaccharides was greatly improved in integration treatment, which was 1.18–3.45 times higher than that of other tests. Though the VFAs production and hydrolysis of polymeric organics were highly enhanced, the primary bacterial communities with different treatments did not show substantial differences.

  11. Towards a sustainable paradigm of waste-to-energy process: Enhanced anaerobic digestion of sludge with woody biochar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yanwen; Linville, Jessica L.; Ignacio-de Leon, Patricia Anne A.; Schoene, Robin P.; Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem

    2016-11-01

    This study presents an integrated waste-to-energy process, using two waste streams, sludge generated from the municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and biochar generated from the biomass gasification systems, to produce fungible biomethane and nutrient-rich digestate with fertilizer value. Two woody biochar, namely pinewood (PBC) and white oak biochar (WOBC) were used as additives during anaerobic digestion (AD) of WWTP sludge to enhance methane production at mesophilic and thermophilic temperatures. The PBC and WOBC have porous structure, large surface area and desirable chemical properties to be used as AD amendment material to sequester CO2 from biogas in the digester. The biochar-amended digesters achieved average methane content in biogas of up to 92.3% and 79.0%, corresponding to CO2 sequestration by up to 66.2% and 32.4% during mesophilic and thermophilic AD, respectively. Biochar addition enhanced process stability by increasing the alkalinity, but inhibitory effects were observed at high dosage. It also alleviated free ammonia inhibition by up to 10.5%. The biochar-amended digesters generated digestate rich in macro- and micronutrients including K (up to 300 m/L), Ca (up to 750 mg/L), Mg (up to 1800 mg/L) and Fe (up to 390 mg/L), making biochar-amended digestate a potential alternative used as agricultural lime fertilizer.

  12. Volatile Fatty Acids Production from Codigestion of Food Waste and Sewage Sludge Based on β-Cyclodextrins and Alkaline Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue; Liu, Xiang; Chen, Si; Liu, Guangmin; Wu, Shuyan; Wan, Chunli

    2016-01-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) are preferred valuable resources, which can be produced from anaerobic digestion process. This study presents a novel technology using β-cyclodextrins (β-CD) pretreatment integrated alkaline method to enhance VFAs production from codigestion of food waste and sewage sludge. Experiment results showed that optimized ratio of food waste to sewage sludge was 3 : 2 because it provided adequate organic substance and seed microorganisms. Based on this optimized ratio, the integrated treatment of alkaline pH 10 and β-CD addition (0.2 g/g TS) performed the best enhancement on VFAs production, and the maximum VFAs production was 8631.7 mg/L which was 6.13, 1.38, and 1.57 times higher than that of control, initial pH 10, and 0.2 g β-CD/g TS treatment, respectively. Furthermore, the hydrolysis rate of protein and polysaccharides was greatly improved in integration treatment, which was 1.18-3.45 times higher than that of other tests. Though the VFAs production and hydrolysis of polymeric organics were highly enhanced, the primary bacterial communities with different treatments did not show substantial differences.

  13. Microwave and ultrasound pre-treatments influence microbial community structure and digester performance in anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerholm, Maria; Crauwels, Sam; Van Geel, Maarten; Dewil, Raf; Lievens, Bart; Appels, Lise

    2016-06-01

    Comparative analyses of bacterial and archaeal community structures and dynamics in three biogas digesters during start-up and subsequent operation using microwaved, ultrasonicated or untreated waste activated sludge were performed based on 454 pyrosequencing datasets of part of 16S ribosomal RNA sequences and quantitative PCR. The pre-treatment increased the solubility, and thus the availability of the substrate for microbial degradation and significantly affected the succession of the anaerobic community structure over the course of the digestion. Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were the dominant phyla in all digesters throughout operation. Proteobacteria decreased in relative abundance from 23-26 % to 11-13 % in association with enhanced substrate availability. Negative correlations between relative abundance of Alpha-, Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria and the substrate availability and/or biogas production were disclosed in statistical analyses. Clostridiales was the dominant order in Firmicutes, and Clostridiales, Clostridia and Firmicutes relative abundance and richness were shown to positively correlate with substrate availability and biogas generation. Methanogenic communities had a fairly restricted structure, highly dominated by Methanosaeta and Methanobrevibacter phylotypes. A gradual decline in Methanobrevibacter and increased representation of Methanosaeta concilii over time were particularly apparent in the digester receiving untreated waste activated sludge, whereas more diversified archaeal communities were maintained in the pre-treatment digesters. The quantitative PCR analyses revealed a methanogenic community distribution that coincided with the 454 pyrosequencing data.

  14. Fate and effect of linuron and metribuzin on the co-composting of green waste and sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountoulakis, M S; Makridis, L; Pirounaki, E K; Chroni, C; Kyriacou, A; Lasaridi, K; Manios, T

    2010-01-01

    The fate and effect of the herbicides linuron and metribuzin on the co-composting of sewage sludge and green waste were addressed in this work. The experiments were conducted in metal cubic containers of 1.0m(3) volume simulating a windrow composting system. A mixture of sludge and green waste was prepared at a ratio of 1:5 v/v. The mixture was split in four equal parts and the two herbicides were added, using a pressure sprayer, as sole or mixed pollutant in each of the three mixtures. The forth mixture was composted without any addition of herbicide, to serve as control. Temperature, physicochemical characteristics, herbicide concentration, carbon dioxide emission, methane emission and microbiological parameters were measured either daily or every time the mixtures were turned, for a period of 80 days. Both herbicides' concentration decreased significantly resulting in removal efficiencies of 99.1-99.7% and 95.8-96.0% for linuron and metribuzin, respectively. Incubation of microbiologically inactive mixtures at a temperature schedule following the spontaneous temperature evolution in the composters resulted in very little (1-11%) decomposition for both herbicides. Comparison of the variation of physicochemical parameters and microbial populations during composting indicated that both herbicides did not affect the composting process.

  15. Ceramicrete stabilization of radioactive-salt-containing liquid waste and sludge water. Final CRADA report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehst, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-08-04

    It was found that the Ceramicrete Specimens incorporated the Streams 1 and 2 sludges with the adjusted loading about 41.6 and 31.6%, respectively, have a high solidity. The visible cracks in the matrix materials and around the anionite AV-17 granules included could not obtain. The granules mentioned above fixed by Ceramicrete matrix very strongly. Consequently, we can conclude that irradiation of Ceramecrete matrix, goes from the high radioactive elements, not result the structural degradation. Based on the chemical analysis of specimens No.462 and No.461 used it was shown that these matrix included the formation elements (P, K, Mg, O), but in the different samples their correlations are different. These ratios of the content of elements included are about {+-} 10%. This information shows a great homogeneity of matrix prepared. In the list of the elements founded, expect the matrix formation elements, we detected also Ca and Si (from the wollastonite - the necessary for Ceramicrete compound); Na, Al, S, O, Cl, Fe, Ni also have been detected in the Specimen No.642 from the waste forms: NaCl, Al(OH){sub 3}, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Fe(OH){sub 3}, nickel ferrocyanide and Ni(NO{sub 3})2. The unintelligible results also were found from analysis of an AV-17 granules, in which we obtain the great amount of K. The X-ray radiographs of the Ceramicrete specimens with loading 41.4 % of Stream 1 and 31.6% of Stream 2, respectively showed that the realization of the advance technology, created at GEOHKI, leads to formation of excellent ceramic matrix with high amount of radioactive streams up to 40% and more. Really, during the interaction with start compounds MgO and KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} with the present of H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} and Wollastonite this process run with high speed under the controlled regimes. That fact that the Ceramicrete matrix with 30-40% of Streams 1 and 2 have a crystalline form, not amorphous matter, allows to permit that these matrix should be very stable, reliable

  16. Antifoam Degradation Products in Off Gas and Condensate of Sludge Batch 9 Simulant Nitric-Formic Flowsheet Testing for the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-04-14

    Ten chemical processing cell (CPC) experiments were performed using simulant to evaluate Sludge Batch 9 for sludge-only and coupled processing using the nitric-formic flowsheet in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were performed on eight of the ten. The other two were SRAT cycles only. Samples of the condensate, sludge, and off gas were taken to monitor the chemistry of the CPC experiments. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has previously shown antifoam decomposes to form flammable organic products, (hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO), trimethylsilanol (TMS), and propanal), that are present in the vapor phase and condensate of the CPC vessels. To minimize antifoam degradation product formation, a new antifoam addition strategy was implemented at SRNL and DWPF to add antifoam undiluted.

  17. Comparative evaluation of wastewater-treatment microbial fuel cells in terms of organics removal, waste-sludge production, and electricity generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Yusuke; Miyahara, Morio; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2017-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that exploit living microbes for electricity generation coupled to organics degradation. MFCs are expected to be applied to energy-saving wastewater treatment (WWT) as alternatives to activated-sludge reactors (ASRs). Although extensive laboratory studies have been performed to develop technologies for WWT-MFCs, limited information is available for comparative evaluation of MFCs and ASRs in terms of organics removal and waste-sludge production. In the present study, laboratory WWT experiments were performed using cassette-electrode MFCs and ASRs that were continuously supplied either with artificial domestic wastewater (ADW) containing starch and peptone or with artificial industrial wastewater (AIW) containing methanol as the major organic matter. We found that these two types of WWT reactors achieved similar organics-removal efficiencies, namely, over 93% based on chemical oxygen demands for the ADW treatment and over 97% for the AIW treatment. Sludge was routinely removed from these reactors and quantified, showing that amounts of waste sludge produced in MFCs were approximately one-third or less compared to those in ASRs. During WWT, MFCs continuously generated electricity with Coulombic efficiencies of 20% or more. In reference to ASRs, MFCs are demonstrated to be attractive WWT facilities in terms of stable organics removal and low waste-sludge production. Along with the unnecessity of electric power for aeration and the generation of power during WWT, the results obtained in the present study suggest that MFCs enable substantial energy saving during WWT.

  18. Problematic issues of air protection during thermal processes related to the energetic uses of sewage sludge and other waste. Case study: Co-combustion in peaking power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hroncová, Emília; Ladomerský, Juraj; Musil, Juraj

    2017-08-19

    Currently, it is necessary to deal with issues related to the emissions as there is a constantly increasing interest in combusting sludge from sewage treatment plants in the boilers for wood. An analysis of the energetic importance of the combustion of sewage sludge has already been carried out, but the effects of various treatments of the sludge are not always clear, e.g. composting and subsequent combustion to the air pollution. Investments in other thermal processes of energetic utilisation of sewage sludge and organic waste are not always successfully implemented. The objective of this paper is to point out some problematic cases for acceptance of thermal processes related to energetic use of waste in terms of the air protection. The other aim is to mention the experience with solutions of such issues in Slovakia. There are mentioned first results of the operational validation experiments during the energy generation in circulating fluidized bed boiler in peaking power plant (Power 110MW) with the addition of the so-called alternative fuel based on wood and sewage sludge to the main fuel - black coal (anthracite). And there has already been achieved the highest share of 12.4%w. (dry matter) of sewage sludge in form of compost in blend with black coal, which is technologically viable. Moreover analyzed the problems of the authorization and operation of the co-combustion of sewage sludge and of combustion of products of various kinds of pyrolysis waste - pyrolysis gas and pyrolysis oil are analyzed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. CHEMICALLY BONDED CEMENTS FROM BOILER ASH AND SLUDGE WASTES. PHASE II REPORT, SEPT.1998-JULY 1999.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA,T.YAGER,K.A.BLANKENHORN,D.(KEYSPAN R AND D INITIATIVE)

    1999-08-01

    Based upon the previous Phase I research program aimed at looking for ways of recycling the KeySpan-generated wastes, such as waste water treatment sludge (WWTS) and bottom ash (BA), into the potentially useful cementitious materials called chemically bonded cement (CBC) materials, the emphasis of this Phase II program done at Brookhaven National Laboratory, in a period of September 1998 through July 1999, was directed towards the two major subjects: One was to assess the technical feasibility of WWTS-based CBC material for use as Pb-exchange adsorbent (PEA) which remediates Pb-contaminated soils in the field; and the other was related to the establishment of the optimum-packaging storage system of dry BA-based CBC components that make it a promising matrix material for the steam-cured concrete products containing sand and coarse aggregate. To achieve the goal of the first subject, a small-scale field demonstration test was carried out. Using the PEA material consisting of 30 wt% WWTS, 13 wt% Type I cement and 57 wt% water, the PES slurry was prepared using a rotary shear concrete mixer, and then poured on the Pb-contaminated soil. The PEA-to-soil ratio by weight was a factor of 2.0. The placed PEA slurry was blended with soil using hand mixing tools such as claws and shovels. The wettability of soils with the PEA was very good, thereby facilitating the soil-PEA mix procedures. A very promising result was obtained from this field test; in fact, the mount of Pb leached out from the 25-day-aged PEA-treated soil specimen was only 0.74 mg/l, meeting the requirement for EPA safe regulation of < 5 mg/l. In contrast, a large amount (26.4 mg/l) of Pb was detected from the untreated soil of the same age. Thus, this finding demonstrated that the WWTS-based CBC has a potential for use as PEA material. Regarding the second subject, the dry-packed storage system consisting of 68.7 wt% BA, 13.0 wt% calcium aluminate cement (CAC), 13.0 wt% Type I portland cement and 5.3 wt

  20. Impact of Brewery Waste Sludge on Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench Productivity and Soil Fertility in Harari Regional State, Eastern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nano Alemu Daba

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted on farmers' field in sofi district of Harari Regional State during 2013/2014 main cropping season, eastern Ethiopia, to investigate the impact of brewery sludge on sorghum production and soil fertility. The treatments comprised seven levels of brewery sludges (0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0, 12.5 and 15.0 t ha-1 and NP inorganic fertilizer at recommended rate, arranged in randomized complete block design with four replications. Application of brewery sludge at 15 t ha-1 significantly increased the yield and biomass yield of sorghum by 79 and 85% over control and by 57 and 67% over NP application, respectively. There was no effect of brewery sludge application on heavy metals concentrations in soil after crop harvest, compared to international standard tolerable level. Co and Se levels were high in the control as well as in the soils treated with brewery sludge indicating the already high concentration of these heavy metals in the soils of the area. Plots, which received higher brewery sludge application, resulted in decreased or less percentage of grain nitrogen content showing the independence of grain protein content on lower brewery sludge level. The nitrogen uptake by sorghum grain, straw and the total was maximum (52.68, 44.25 and 79.03 kg ha-1, respectively with the application of brewery waste sludge at 10 and 15 t ha-1 which were significantly higher than the other brewery sludge and NP mineral fertilizer applications.

  1. [Effect of ultrasonic energy on the characteristics of waste activated sludge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xin; Deng, Jin-Chuan; Li, Bi-Qing; Luo, Gang; Lei, Heng-Yi

    2011-10-01

    Seven ultrasonic energy levels ranging from 0 to 26 000 kJ x kg(-1) were used to disintegrate excess sludge to investigate the changes in physical characteristics. The results indicated that the ultrasonication process destroys floc structure, facilitates the transfer of matter into the aqueous phase, and breaks up cell walls, which facilitated the improvement of settleability and biodegradability. Low ultrasonic energies could improve the settleability and supernatant turbidity. When the energy of 1 000 kJ x kg(-1) was applied into the sludge, the maximal settling velocity of sludge at 45 min was increased by 18.58% and the supernatant turbidity at 24 h was decreased by 43.52%, compared to the control. However, high ultrasonic energies deteriorated the characteristics. The maximal settling velocity was reduced by 37.03% and the supernatant turbidity was increased by 10 times in comparison to the control when the energy dose of 26 000 kJ x kg(-1) was applied. With the increases in ultrasonic energies, the particle size was significantly decreased, the soluble solids increased and the floc clusters dispersed. These changes in sludge characteristics were directly dependent upon the amount of ultrasonic energy applied. Furthermore, these characteristics correlated significantly to the ultrasonic energy. 1000 kJ x kg(-1) was the optimal energy that improved the settleability and the supernatant turbidity, and that destructed the floc structure of sludge. On the other hand, particle size was an important factor affecting sludge settleability and supernatant turbidity. The optimal values led to best settleability and turbidity.

  2. The re-use of Waste-Activated Sludge as part of a "zero-sludge" strategy for wastewater treatments in the pulp and paper industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluža, Leon; Suštaršič, Matej; Rutar, Vera; Zupančič, Gregor D

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of introducing the thermo-alkali hydrolysis of Waste-Activated Sludge (WAS) was investigated, in order to enable the use of its solid residue as a raw material in cardboard production and the use of its liquid portion for anaerobic digestion in an UASB reactor. The evaluation of the hydrolysis at pH>12 and T=70°C showed that the microbe cells were disrupted with more than 90% efficiency in less than 2h. The solid portion was hygienised, therefore making it possible to integrate it into the cardboard production as a raw material for less demanding cardboards. Up to 6% addition of the liquid portion of hydrolysed WAS to wastewater decreased the specific biogas production in a pilot-scale UASB from 0.236 to 0.212 m(3)/kg(COD), while the efficiency of the COD removal decreased from 80.4% to 76.5%. These values still guarantee an adequate treatment of the wastewater and an increased biogas production by 16%. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Exploring alternatives to reduce economical costs associated with FNA pre-treatment of waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedi, S; Icaran, P; Yuan, Z; Pijuan, M

    2017-11-01

    Recent studies have shown the effectiveness of Free Nitrous Acid (FNA) pre-treatment in enhancing sludge biodegradability and improving its methane production potential. FNA is regarded as an environmental friendly pre-treatment which can be easily applied when a source of nitrite is present in wastewater treatment plants. However, when nitrite is not available and needs to be purchased, this treatment can become less attractive due to the costs associated to nitrite. In order to overcome this possible limitation, two different strategies to optimize the use of nitrite during FNA treatment were investigated: i) Recovering NO2(-) after the pre-treatment is completed; and ii) Concentrating the sludge before FNA pre-treatment. Results show that recovering NO2(-) from the pre-treated sludge is not suitable due to the loss of soluble organic matter present in the supernatant after the pre-treatment. However, concentrating the sludge before the pre-treatment seems a good strategy to optimize the use of nitrite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Waste management in the meat processing industry: Conversion of paunch and DAF sludge into solid fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamawand, Ihsan; Pittaway, Pam; Lewis, Larry; Chakrabarty, Sayan; Caldwell, Justin; Eberhard, Jochen; Chakraborty, Arpita

    2017-02-01

    This article addresses the novel dewatering process of immersion-frying of paunch and dissolved air flotation (DAF) sludge to produce high energy pellets. Literature have been analysed to address the feasibility of replacing conventional boiler fuel at meat processing facilities with high energy paunch-DAF sludge pellets (capsules). The value proposition of pelleting and frying this mixture into energy pellets is based on a Cost-Benefit Analysis (CBA). The CBA is based on information derived from the literature and consultation with the Australian Meat Processing Industry. The calorific properties of a mixture of paunch cake solids and DAF sludge were predicted from literature and industry consultation to validate the product. This study shows that the concept of pelletizing and frying paunch is economically feasible. The complete frying and dewatering of the paunch and DAF sludge mixture produces pellets with energy content per kilogram equivalent to coal. The estimated cost of this new product is half the price of coal and the payback period is estimated to be between 1.8 and 3.2years. Further research is required for proof of concept, and to identify the technical challenges associated with integrating this technology into existing meat processing plants. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effectiveness of phosphate removal during anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge by dosing iron(III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiang; Wang, Jue; Chen, Bing; Wang, Yu; Liu, Jiaqi; Liu, Lubo

    2017-05-15

    Phosphate-Fe(II) precipitation induced by Fe(III) reduction during the anaerobic digestion of excess activated sludge was investigated for the removal of phosphorus and its possible recovery. The experiments were conducted with three Fe(III) sources at 35 °C and 55 °C. The results show that ferrihydrite-Fe(III) was effectively reduced during the anaerobic sludge digestion by 63% and 96% under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions, respectively. Whereas FeCl3-Fe(III) was only mesophilically reducible and the reduction of hematite-Fe(III) was unnoticeable at either temperature. Efficient precipitation of vivianite was not observed although high saturation index values, e.g., >14 (activity reduction not considered), had been reached. This reveals the complexity of vivianite precipitation in anaerobic digestion systems; for example, Fe(II) complexation and organic interference could not be ignored. With ferrihydrite amendments at a Fe/TP of 1.5, methane production from sludge digestion was reduced by 35.1% at 35 °C, and was unaffected when the digestion temperature went up to 55 °C. But, acidic FeCl3 severely inhibited the methane production and consequently the sludge biomass degradation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Impacts of microwave pretreatments on the semi-continuous anaerobic digestion of dairy waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uma Rani, R; Adish Kumar, S; Kaliappan, S; Yeom, Icktae; Rajesh Banu, J

    2013-05-01

    Microwave (MW) irradiation is one of the new and possible methods used for pretreating the sludge. Following its use in different fields, this MW irradiation method has proved to be more appropriate in the field of environmental research. In this paper, we focused on the effects of MW irradiation at different intensities on solubilization, biodegradation and anaerobic digestion of sludge from the dairy sludge. The changes in the soluble fractions of the organic matter, the biogas yield, the methane content in the biogas were used as control parameters for evaluating the efficiency of the MW pretreatment. Additionally, the energetic efficiency was also examined. In terms of an energetic aspect, the most economical pretreatment of sludge was at 70% intensity for 12 min irradiation time. At this, COD solubilization, SS reduction and biogas production were found to be 18.6%, 14% and 35% higher than the control, respectively. Not only the increase in biogas production was investigated, excluding protein and carbohydrate hydrolysis was also performed successfully by this microwave pretreatment even at low irradiation energy input. Also, experiments were carried out in semi continuous anaerobic digesters, with 3.5L working volume. Combining microwave pretreatment with anaerobic digestion led to 67%, 64% and 57% of SS reduction, VS reduction and biogas production higher than the control, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of dry sludge from waste water treatment plants as an additive in prefabricated concrete brick

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagüe, A.

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Dry sludge from the Sabadell Water Treatment Plant was used to prepare prefabricated concrete bricks. After characterising the sludge and the manufacturing process used to make the bricks, we define the conditions of addition of the sludges in the manufacture. Reference samples not containing sludge and samples containing 2 % of dry sludge by cement weight were prepared. The variation in density, porosity, absorption coefficient and compressive strength of the bricks with the presence of sludge was determined over time. Leaching of the bricks was determined according to the NEN 7345 standard. In most cases the addition of sludge produces a decrease in porosity and absorption coefficients and an increase in compressive strength, so one could expect these bricks to have greater durability. As regards leaching pollutants in the bricks, they are below the limit of the Dutch NEN standard for construction materials and thus can be classified as inert material.

    El estudio ha consistido en la utilización de lodo seco de origen biológico de la depuradora de aguas residuales de Sabadell (Riu Sec, como adición en la preparación de adoquines de hormigón prefabricado. Después de caracterizar los lodos y el proceso de fabricación de los adoquines que utilizaremos, definimos las condiciones de adición de los lodos en esta fabricación. Se prepararon muestras de referencia, sin adición, y muestras con el 2 % de lodo seco sobrepeso de cemento. Se determinaron cómo variaban en el tiempo, con la presencia de lodos: la densidad, la porosidad y el coeficiente de absorción, y la resistencia mecánica a compresión de los adoquines. También se determinó la lixiviación que estas piezas presentaban de acuerdo a la norma NEN 7345. La adición de lodos produce, en la mayoría de los casos, una disminución de las porosidades y de los coeficientes de absorción y un aumento en las resistencias mecánicas, por lo que cabe esperar una mayor

  8. Enhancement in hydrogen production by thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste and sewage sludge--optimization of treatment conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Vinay Kumar; Angériz Campoy, Rubén; Álvarez-Gallego, C J; Romero García, L I

    2014-07-01

    Batch dry-thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion (55°C) of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and sewage sludge (SS) for hydrogen production was studied under several sludge combinations (primary sludge, PS; waste activated sludge, WAS; and mixed sludge, MS), TS concentrations (10-25%) and mixing ratios of OFMSW and SS (1:1, 2.5:1, 5:1, 10:1). The co-digestion of OFMSW and SS showed a 70% improvement in hydrogen production rate over the OFMSW fermentation only. The co-digestion of OFMSW with MS showed 47% and 115% higher hydrogen production potential as compared with OFMSW+PS and OFMSW+WAS, respectively. The maximum hydrogen yield of 51 mL H2/g VS consumed was observed at TS concentration of 20% and OFMSW to MS mixing ratio of 5:1, respectively. The acetic and butyric acids were the main acids in VFAs evolution; however, the higher butyric acid evolution indicated that the H2 fermentation was butyrate type fermentation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Composting sewage sludge amended with different sawdust proportions and textures and organic waste of food industry--assessment of quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammari, Tarek G; Al-Omari, Qusai; Abbassi, Bassim E

    2012-01-01

    The quality of compost made from dewatered sewage sludge, sawdust (SD) and organic wastes of a potato-processing industry (OW), in terms of chemical and biological properties, was assessed. Mixtures of the sludge, SD and OW were composted for 57 days in insulated containers at two C:N ratios (approximately 30 : 1 and approximately 20 : 1) and SD textures (coarse- and fine-textured SD). The parameters monitored over this period were pH, electrical conductivity (EC), C:N ratio, CO2 evolution and two spectrophotometric ratios (Q2/6 and Q2/4). All the studied parameters were in general similarly influenced by initial C:N ratio and texture of SD except for EC, Q2/6 and Q2/4. At high C:N ratio of both textures, the EC of the final products increased but were less than those of low C:N ratio of both textures. Thus, final product can be used alone as growth medium without the need for grinding or blending with other materials. The spectrophotometric ratios (Q2/6 and Q2/4) dramatically decreased two weeks after composting and then slightly increased at the end of composting process. However, coarse-textured SD at the low C:N ratio and fine-textured SD at both C:N ratios resulted in lower Q2/6 and Q2/4 ratios, reflecting a better degree of aromatic condensation and organic matter humification. Considering these parameters, co-composting sludge with fine-textured SD and OW at high initial C:N ratio would represent the best compromise.

  10. Treating municipal solid waste leachate in a pilot scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor under tropical temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Alizadeh Shooshtari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The objective of this study was to investigate an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB reactor efficiency in treating municipal landfill leachate, under tropical temperature. Materials and Methods: A 30-liter pilot-scale UASB reactor was used to treat the municipal solid waste leachate, under tropical temperature, for 230 days. The reactor was inoculated with 10 liters of anaerobic sludge from an anaerobic digester, in an agro industry′s wastewater treatment plant. The Volatile Suspended Solids (VSS of sludge were 65 g/L, with volatile suspended solids to suspended solids (VSS/SS ratio of 0.74. The reactor was operated in mesophilic (34 - 39°C temperature. Results: After reaching a stable operation, the reactor was exposed to raw leachate, with mean chemical oxygen demand (COD concentrations of 35 g/L. The leachate was diluted to 9 - 10 g/L at Organic Loading Rates (OLRs of 2, 6, 12, 15 g COD/L.d and decreased again to 12 g COD/L.d, resulting in 45, 76, 84, 68, and 79% removal efficiency and increased again to 87% removal efficiency for COD, at Hydraulic Retention Times (HRTs of 6, 1.6, 0.83, and 0.67 days, respectively, in the UASB. In the reactor used in this study, the heavy metals were removed by adsorption on biomass, and the maximum removal rate was 68% for Zinc (Zn. Conclusions: It was concluded that the optimum OLR for diluted leachate up to 10 g COD/l, was 12 g COD/L.d at an HRT of 0.67 day (16 hours.

  11. VERIFICATION OF THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY'S (DWPF) PROCESS DIGESTION METHOD FOR THE SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION SAMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Click, D.; Edwards, T.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

    2011-03-14

    For each sludge batch that is processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performs confirmation of the applicability of the digestion method to be used by the DWPF lab for elemental analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipt samples and SRAT product process control samples. DWPF SRAT samples are typically dissolved using a room temperature HF-HNO{sub 3} acid dissolution (i.e., DWPF Cold Chem Method, see DWPF Procedure SW4-15.201) and then analyzed by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from performing the Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium peroxide/Hydroxide Fusion (PF) and DWPF Cold Chem (CC) method digestions of Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples. The SB7a SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constituates the SB7a Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), to form the Sb7a Blend composition.

  12. Ash and sludge covering of mine waste. Benefits and/or risks using ash and sludge for covering of mine waste; Askor och roetslam som taeckskikt foer gruvavfall. Foerdelar och/eller risker med att anvaenda aska och slam som taeckskikt foer gruvavfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeckstroem, Mattias; Johansson, Inger [Oerebro Univ. (Sweden). Man-Technology-Environment Research Centre

    2004-01-01

    One of the main sources for metal pollution in Sweden is mine waste. One way to decrease the leaching of metals from mine waste areas is covering which decreases the formation of acid drainage. There is a shortage of appropriate materials to use for covering, and excavation of till and clay from the environment might cause damages on the landscape. Previous studies have demonstrated that sludge and ashes are suitable materials for covering of waste deposits. When covering mine waste with ash and sludge various positive effects would arise, since the production of drainage water decreases as well as the pH increases due to the high buffer-capacity of the ash. In Ervalla outside Oerebro an area with mine waste has been covered with ash and sludge. This area gives a unique possibility to study benefits and/or risks with the covering of mine waste with ash and sludge. This report is a summary of the first phase of the project and the focus has been on characterisation of the material that has been used for covering. Also a monitoring program for the area has started. Preliminary findings indicate that that the covering decreases the leaching of some metals whereas the leaching of some metals increases. A decrease in the concentration of iron, nickel, cobalt and lead was observed and an increase was observed for arsenic, barium, chromium and copper.

  13. Characterization of methane production and microbial community shifts during waste activated sludge degradation in microbial electrolysis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui; Zhou, Aijuan; Jia, Jianna; Liang, Qing; Liu, Qian; Xing, Defeng; Ren, Nanqi

    2015-01-01

    Microbial electrolysis cell (MECs) were investigated as a promising technology to manage waste activated sludge (WAS) reduction and bio-methane generation. The effect of WAS concentration on the MECs performance was discussed. At the optimal concentration of 15gCOD/L, maximum methane yield of MECs fed with alkaline pretreated WAS (A-WAS) were achieved with the value of 77.13±2.52LCH4/kg-COD on Day 3, which had been improved by 1.5-fold compared with MECs fed with raw WAS (R-WAS), while that was negligible in open circuit controls. Efficient sludge reduction was also obtained in terms of TCOD, total protein, TSS and VSS removal. Pyrosequencing revealed the dominance of exoelectrogen Geobacter and hydrogen-producing bacteria Petrimonas in MECs fed with WAS. Methanocorpusculum with the capacity of methane generation using CO2 and H2 also showed overwhelming dominance (96.01%). The large proportions of Petrimonas and Methanocorpusculum indicated the occurrence of hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis in our methane-producing MECs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The role of zero valent iron on the fate of tetracycline resistance genes and class 1 integrons during thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of waste sludge and kitchen waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Pin; Gu, Chaochao; Wei, Xin; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hong; Jia, Hanzhong; Liu, Zhenhong; Xue, Gang; Ma, Chunyan

    2017-03-15

    Activated sludge has been identified as a potential significant source of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) to the environment. Anaerobic digestion is extensively used for sludge stabilization and resource recovery, and represents a crucial process for controlling the dissemination of ARGs prior to land application of digested sludge. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of zero valent iron (Fe 0 ) on the attenuation of seven representative tetracycline resistance genes (tet, tet(A), tet(C), tet(G), tet(M), tet(O), tet(W), and tet(X)), and the integrase gene intI1 during thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of waste sludge and kitchen waste. Significant decrease (P genes was observed at Fe 0 dosage of 5 g/L, whereas no significant differences (P > 0.05) were found for all gene targets between digesters with Fe 0 dosages of 5 and 60 g/L. A first-order kinetic model favorably described the trends in concentrations of tet and intI1 gene targets during thermophilic anaerobic digestion with or without Fe 0 . Notably, tet genes encoding different resistance mechanisms behaved distinctly in anaerobic digesters, although addition of Fe 0 could enhance their reduction. The overall results of this research suggest that thermophilic anaerobic digestion with Fe 0 can be a potential alternative technology for the attenuation of tet and intI1 genes in waste sludge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Principles and potential of the anaerobic digestion of waste-activated sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appels, Lise; Degreve, Jan [Department of Chemical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, W. De Croylaan 46, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Baeyens, Jan [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Dewil, Raf [Department of Chemical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, W. De Croylaan 46, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Department of Chemical Engineering, Associated Faculty of Technology and Biosciences, Campus De Nayer, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Jan De Nayerlaan 5, B-2860 Sint-Katelijne-Waver (Belgium)

    2008-12-15

    When treating municipal wastewater, the disposal of sludge is a problem of growing importance, representing up to 50% of the current operating costs of a wastewater treatment plant. Although different disposal routes are possible, anaerobic digestion plays an important role for its abilities to further transform organic matter into biogas (60-70 vol% of methane, CH{sub 4}), as thereby it also reduces the amount of final sludge solids for disposal whilst destroying most of the pathogens present in the sludge and limiting odour problems associated with residual putrescible matter. Anaerobic digestion thus optimises WWTP costs, its environmental footprint and is considered a major and essential part of a modern WWTP. The potential of using the biogas as energy source has long been widely recognised and current techniques are being developed to upgrade quality and to enhance energy use. The present paper extensively reviews the principles of anaerobic digestion, the process parameters and their interaction, the design methods, the biogas utilisation, the possible problems and potential pro-active cures, and the recent developments to reduce the impact of the problems. After having reviewed the basic principles and techniques of the anaerobic digestion process, modelling concepts will be assessed to delineate the dominant parameters. Hydrolysis is recognised as rate-limiting step in the complex digestion process. The microbiology of anaerobic digestion is complex and delicate, involving several bacterial groups, each of them having their own optimum working conditions. As will be shown, these groups are sensitive to and possibly inhibited by several process parameters such as pH, alkalinity, concentration of free ammonia, hydrogen, sodium, potassium, heavy metals, volatile fatty acids and others. To accelerate the digestion and enhance the production of biogas, various pre-treatments can be used to improve the rate-limiting hydrolysis. These treatments include

  16. Start-Up of an Anaerobic Dynamic Membrane Digester for Waste Activated Sludge Digestion: Temporal Variations in Microbial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongguang; Wang, Qiaoying; Wang, Zhiwei; Sahinkaya, Erkan; Li, Yongli; Ma, Jinxing; Wu, Zhichao

    2014-01-01

    An anaerobic dynamic membrane digester (ADMD) was developed to digest waste sludge, and pyrosequencing was used to analyze the variations of the bacterial and archaeal communities during the start-up. Results showed that bacterial community richness decreased and then increased over time, while bacterial diversity remained almost the same during the start-up. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the major phyla. At the class level, Betaproteobacteria was the most abundant at the end of start-up, followed by Sphingobacteria. In the archaeal community, richness and diversity peaked at the end of the start-up stage. Principle component and cluster analyses demonstrated that archaeal consortia experienced a distinct shift and became stable after day 38. Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales were the two predominant orders. Further investigations indicated that Methanolinea and Methanosaeta were responsible for methane production in the ADMD system. Hydrogenotrophic pathways might prevail over acetoclastic means for methanogenesis during the start-up, supported by specific methanogenic activity tests. PMID:24695488

  17. Start-up of an anaerobic dynamic membrane digester for waste activated sludge digestion: temporal variations in microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongguang; Wang, Qiaoying; Wang, Zhiwei; Sahinkaya, Erkan; Li, Yongli; Ma, Jinxing; Wu, Zhichao

    2014-01-01

    An anaerobic dynamic membrane digester (ADMD) was developed to digest waste sludge, and pyrosequencing was used to analyze the variations of the bacterial and archaeal communities during the start-up. Results showed that bacterial community richness decreased and then increased over time, while bacterial diversity remained almost the same during the start-up. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the major phyla. At the class level, Betaproteobacteria was the most abundant at the end of start-up, followed by Sphingobacteria. In the archaeal community, richness and diversity peaked at the end of the start-up stage. Principle component and cluster analyses demonstrated that archaeal consortia experienced a distinct shift and became stable after day 38. Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales were the two predominant orders. Further investigations indicated that Methanolinea and Methanosaeta were responsible for methane production in the ADMD system. Hydrogenotrophic pathways might prevail over acetoclastic means for methanogenesis during the start-up, supported by specific methanogenic activity tests.

  18. Occurrence State and Molecular Structure Analysis of Extracellular Proteins with Implications on the Dewaterability of Waste-Activated Sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Boran; Ni, Bing-Jie; Horvat, Kristine; Song, Liyan; Chai, Xiaoli; Dai, Xiaohu; Mahajan, Devinder

    2017-08-15

    The occurrence state and molecular structure of extracellular proteins were analyzed to reveal the influencing factors on the water-holding capacities of protein-like substances in waste-activated sludge (WAS). The gelation process of extracellular proteins verified that advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) for WAS dewaterability improvement eliminated the water affinity of extracellular proteins and prevented these macromolecules from forming stable colloidal aggregates. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation proteomics identified that most of the extracellular proteins were originally derived from the intracellular part and the proteins originally located in the extracellular part were mainly membrane-associated. The main mechanism of extracellular protein transformation during AOPs could be represented by the damage of the membrane or related external encapsulating structure and the release of intracellular substances. For the selected representative extracellular proteins, the strong correlation (R 2 > 0.97, p proteins on the interstitial water removal from WAS.

  19. Microbial network for waste activated sludge cascade utilization in an integrated system of microbial electrolysis and anaerobic fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wenzong; He, Zhangwei; Yang, Chunxue

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bioelectrochemical systems have been considered a promising novel technology that shows an enhanced energy recovery, as well as generation of value-added products. A number of recent studies suggested that an enhancement of carbon conversion and biogas production can be achieved...... in an integrated system of microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) and anaerobic digestion (AD) for waste activated sludge (WAS). Microbial communities in integrated system would build a thorough energetic and metabolic interaction network regarding fermentation communities and electrode respiring communities...... investigated the interaction of fermentation communities and electrode respiring communities in an integrated system of WAS fermentation and MEC for hydrogen recovery. A high energy recovery was achieved in the MECs feeding WAS fermentation liquid through alkaline pretreatment. Some anaerobes belonging...

  20. Methanosarcinaceae and Acetate-Oxidizing Pathways Dominate in High-Rate Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion of Waste-Activated Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Dang P.; Jensen, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the process of high-rate, high-temperature methanogenesis to enable very-high-volume loading during anaerobic digestion of waste-activated sludge. Reducing the hydraulic retention time (HRT) from 15 to 20 days in mesophilic digestion down to 3 days was achievable at a thermophilic temperature (55°C) with stable digester performance and methanogenic activity. A volatile solids (VS) destruction efficiency of 33 to 35% was achieved on waste-activated sludge, comparable to that obtained via mesophilic processes with low organic acid levels (<200 mg/liter chemical oxygen demand [COD]). Methane yield (VS basis) was 150 to 180 liters of CH4/kg of VSadded. According to 16S rRNA pyrotag sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), the methanogenic community was dominated by members of the Methanosarcinaceae, which have a high level of metabolic capability, including acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Loss of function at an HRT of 2 days was accompanied by a loss of the methanogens, according to pyrotag sequencing. The two acetate conversion pathways, namely, acetoclastic methanogenesis and syntrophic acetate oxidation, were quantified by stable carbon isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The results showed that the majority of methane was generated by nonacetoclastic pathways, both in the reactors and in off-line batch tests, confirming that syntrophic acetate oxidation is a key pathway at elevated temperatures. The proportion of methane due to acetate cleavage increased later in the batch, and it is likely that stable oxidation in the continuous reactor was maintained by application of the consistently low retention time. PMID:23956388

  1. New mechanistically based model for predicting reduction of biosolids waste by ozonation of return activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isazadeh, Siavash; Feng, Min; Urbina Rivas, Luis Enrique; Frigon, Dominic

    2014-04-15

    Two pilot-scale activated sludge reactors were operated for 98 days to provide the necessary data to develop and validate a new mathematical model predicting the reduction of biosolids production by ozonation of the return activated sludge (RAS). Three ozone doses were tested during the study. In addition to the pilot-scale study, laboratory-scale experiments were conducted with mixed liquor suspended solids and with pure cultures to parameterize the biomass inactivation process during exposure to ozone. The experiments revealed that biomass inactivation occurred even at the lowest doses, but that it was not associated with extensive COD solubilization. For validation, the model was used to simulate the temporal dynamics of the pilot-scale operational data. Increasing the description accuracy of the inactivation process improved the precision of the model in predicting the operational data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Model development and evaluation of methane potential from anaerobic co-digestion of municipal wastewater sludge and un-dewatered grease trap waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcinkaya, Sedat; Malina, Joseph F

    2015-06-01

    The performance of anaerobic co-digestion of municipal wastewater sludge with un-dewatered grease trap waste was assessed using modified biochemical methane potential tests under mesophilic conditions (35°C). Methane potentials, process inhibition and chemical behavior of the process were analyzed at different grease trap waste feed ratios on volatile solids basis. Nonlinear regression analyses of first order reaction and modified Gompertz equations were performed to assist in interpretation of the experimental results. Methane potential of un-dewatered grease trap waste was measured as 606 mL CH4/g VS(added), while methane potential of municipal wastewater sludge was only 223 mL CH4/g VS(added). The results indicated that anaerobic digestion of grease trap waste without dewatering yields less methane potential than concentrated/dewatered grease trap waste because of high wastewater content of un-dewatered grease trap waste. However, anaerobic co-digestion of municipal wastewater sludge and grease trap waste still yields over two times more methane potential and approximately 10% more volatile solids reduction than digestion of municipal wastewater sludge alone. The anaerobic co-digestion process inhibitions were reported at 70% and greater concentrated/dewatered grease trap waste additions on volatile solids basis in previous studies; however, no inhibition was observed at 100% un-dewatered grease trap waste digestion in the present study. These results indicate that anaerobic co-digestion of un-dewatered grease trap waste may reduce the inhibition risk compared to anaerobic co-digestion of concentrated/dewatered grease trap waste. In addition, a mathematical model was developed in this study for the first time to describe the relationship between grease trap waste feed ratio on volatile solids basis and resulting methane potential. Experimental data from the current study as well as previous biochemical methane potential studies were successfully fit to this

  3. Achieving waste to energy through sewage sludge gasification using hot slags: syngas production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongqi; Nakano, Jinichiro; Liu, Lili; Wang, Xidong; Zhang, Zuotai

    2015-01-01

    To relieve the environmental issues of sewage sludge (SS) disposal and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission in China, we proposed an integrated method for the first time to simultaneously deal with these two problems. The hot slags below 920 °C could act as a good heat carrier for sludge gasification and the increasing CO2 concentration in CO2/O2 atmospheres enhanced the production of CO and H2 at 400–800 °C. Three stages of syngas release were clearly identified by Gaussian fittings, i.e., volatile release, char transformation and fixed carbon reaction. Additionally, the effect of sulfur retention of slags and the synergy effect of the stabilization of toxic elements in the solid residuals were discovered in this study. Furthermore, a novel prototype of multiple industrial and urban systems was put forward, in which the produced CO + H2 could be utilized for direct reduced iron (DRI) production and the solid residuals of sludge ash and glassy slags would be applied as cementitious materials. For a steel plant with an annual production of crude steel of 10 million tons in China, the total annual energy saving and GHG emission reduction achieved are 3.31*105 tons of standard coal and 1.74*106 tons of CO2, respectively. PMID:26074060

  4. Effect of NaOH on the vitrification process of waste Ni-Cr sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, I-Cheng [Department of Safety Health and Environmental Engineering, Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology, 89 Wenhwa 1st St., Rende Shiang, Tainan County 71703, Taiwan (China); Wang, Ya-Fen [Department of Bioenvironmental Engineering and R and D Center of Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 320, Taiwan (China); Chang, Cheng-Ping [Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Council of Labor Affairs, Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chih-Ta [Department of Safety Health and Environmental Engineering, Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology, 89 Wenhwa 1st St., Rende Shiang, Tainan County 71703, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Yi-Ming, E-mail: yiming@mail.hwai.edu.tw [Department of Safety Health and Environmental Engineering, Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology, 89 Wenhwa 1st St., Rende Shiang, Tainan County 71703, Taiwan (China)

    2011-01-30

    This study investigated the effect of NaOH on the vitrification of electroplating sludge. Ni, the major metal in the electroplating sludge, is the target for recovery in the vitrification. Sludge and encapsulation materials (dolomite, limestone, and cullet) were mixed and various amounts of NaOH were added to serve as a glass modifier and a flux. A vitrification process at 1450 deg. C separated the molten specimens into slag and ingot. The composition, crystalline characteristics, and leaching characteristics of samples were measured. The results indicate that the recovery of Ni is optimal with a 10% NaOH mass ratio; the recoveries of Fe, Cr, Zn, Cu, and Mn all exhibited similar trends. The results of the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) show that leaching characteristics of the slag meet the requirements of regulation in Taiwan. In addition, a semi-quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the main crystalline phase of slag changed from Ca{sub 3}(Si{sub 3}O{sub 9}) to Na{sub 4}Ca{sub 4}(Si{sub 6}O{sub 18}) with a NaOH mass ratio of over 15%, because the Ca{sup 2+} ions were replaced with Na{sup +} ions during the vitrification process. Na{sub 4}Ca{sub 4}(Si{sub 6}O{sub 18}), a complex mineral which hinders the mobility of metals, accounts for the decrease of metal recovery.

  5. Preliminary study of acrylamide monomer decomposition during methane fermentation of dairy waste sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroczek, Ewelina; Konieczny, Piotr; Lewicki, Andrzej; Waśkiewicz, Agnieszka; Dach, Jacek

    2016-07-01

    Polyacrylamide (PAM) used in sludge dewatering exists widely in high-solid anaerobic digestion. Acrylamide is registered in the list of chemicals demonstrating toxic, carcinogenic and mutagenic properties. Therefore, it is reasonable to ask about the mobility of such residual substances in the environment. The study was carried out to assess the impact of the mesophilic (39±1°C) and thermophilic (54±1°C) fermentation process on the level of acrylamide monomer (AMD) content in the dairy sludge. The material was analysed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for quantification of AMD. The results indicate that the process of methane fermentation continues regardless of the temperature effects on the degradation of AMD in dairy sludge. The degree of reduction of acrylamide monomer for thermophilic fermentation is 100%, while for mesophilic fermentation it is 91%. In practice, this means that biogas technology eliminates the risk of AMD migration to plant tissue. Moreover, it should be stressed that 90% of cumulative biogas and methane production was reached one week earlier under thermophilic conditions - the dynamics of the methanisation process were over 20% faster. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Characterization and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hubler, Timothy L.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Peterson, Reid A.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2008-07-10

    This report describes processing and analysis results of boehmite waste type (Group 5) and insoluble high Cr waste type (Group 6). The sample selection, compositing, subdivision, physical and chemical characterization are described. Extensive batch leach testing was conducted to define kinetics and leach factors of selected analytes as functions of NaOH concentration and temperature. Testing supports issue M-12 resolution for the Waste Treatment Plant.

  7. Separation of oily sludge and glycerol from biodiesel processing waste by coagulation

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao-guang Xie1,; Wirach Taweepreda 2,; Charongpun Musikavong1*; Chaisri Suksaroj 1*

    2011-01-01

    Raw waste glycerol is a by-product of biodiesel production from transesterification, which is high in salt, and has a highpH value (more than 9.6). The purpose of this research is to reduce the water pollution from waste glycerol by using acoagulation process and discussing the possibility of waste glycerol reuse. The commercial coagulant (2% by weight), whichwas composed by cationic polyamine (PA) 6% and poly-aluminium chloride (PACl) 94% (w/w), was used as coagulant totreat waste glycerol. ...

  8. Biohydrogen Production from Co-Digestion of High Carbohydrate Containing Food Waste and Combined Primary and Secondary Sewage Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Arain

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, FW (Food Waste and SS (Sewage Sludge were co-digested for biohydrogen production. After characterization both FW and SS were found as better option forbiohydrogen production. FW was rich in carbohydrate containing specially rice, which was added as more than 50% and easily hydrolyzable waste. FW is considered as an auxiliary substrate for biohydrogen production and high availability of carbohydrate in FW makes it an important substrate for the production of biohydrogen. On the contrary, SS was rich in protein and has a high pH buffering capacity, which makes it appropriate for codigestion. Adequate supplementation of inorganic salts, the addition of hydrogen producing inoculums, protein enrichment and pH buffering capacity of SS and carbohydrate content in FW increases the hydrogen production potential. Various experiments were performed by considering different mixing ratios like 90:10, 80:20, 70:30, 60:40 and 50:50 of FW and SS. The 50:50 and 90:10 mixing ratio of FW and SS were found as best among all other co-digested ratios. The maximum specific hydrogenyield 106.7 mL/gVS added was obtained at a waste composition of 50:50 followed by 92.35 mL/gVSadded from 90:10 of FW to SS. The optimum pH and temperature for operating this process werein the range of 5.5-6.5 and 35°C. The production of clean energy and waste utilization in anaerobic co-digestion process makes biohydrogen generation a promising and novel approach to fulfilling the increasing energy needs as a substitute for fossil fuels.

  9. Pilot-scale anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biomass waste and waste activated sludge in China: Effect of organic loading rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xiao, E-mail: liuxiao07@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang Wei; Shi Yunchun; Zheng Lei [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Gao Xingbao [Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Qiao Wei [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China); Zhou Yingjun [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nisikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-digestion of municipal biomass waste (MBW) and waste activated sludge (WAS) was examined on a pilot-scale reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer System performance and stability under OLR of 1.2, 2.4, 3.6, 4.8, 6.0 and 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} were analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A maximum methane production rate of 2.94 m{sup 3} (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} was achieved at OLR of 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} and HRT of 15d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With the increasing OLRs, pH values, VS removal rate and methane concentration decreased and VFA increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The changing of biogas production rate can be a practical approach to monitor and control anaerobic digestion system. - Abstract: The effects of organic loading rate on the performance and stability of anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biomass waste (MBW) and waste activated sludge (WAS) were investigated on a pilot-scale reactor. The results showed that stable operation was achieved with organic loading rates (OLR) of 1.2-8.0 kg volatile solid (VS) (m{sup 3} d){sup -1}, with VS reduction rates of 61.7-69.9%, and volumetric biogas production of 0.89-5.28 m{sup 3} (m{sup 3} d){sup -1}. A maximum methane production rate of 2.94 m{sup 3} (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} was achieved at OLR of 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} and hydraulic retention time of 15 days. With increasing OLRs, the anaerobic reactor showed a decrease in VS removal rate, average pH value and methane concentration, and a increase of volatile fatty acid concentration. By monitoring the biogas production rate (BPR), the anaerobic digestion system has a higher acidification risk under an OLR of 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1}. This result remarks the possibility of relating bioreactor performance with BPR in order to better understand and monitor anaerobic digestion process.

  10. New process controls in the co-fermentation of organic waste and municipal sewage sludge; Neue Verfahrensfuehrungen bei der Co-Vergaerung von Bioabfaellen und kommunalen Klaerschlaemmen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaepers, D.; Schierholt, M.; Buer, T.; Risse, H. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (DE). Inst. fuer Siedlungswasserwirtschaft (ISA)

    1999-07-01

    For the co-fermentation of organic waste and sewage sludge in digester towers at municipal sewage treatment plant, mainly single-stage processes have so far been studied or are in use in part. Within the framework of a project sponsored by the foundation Oswald-Schulze-Stiftung, the use of a two-stage mode of operation (thermophilic/mesophilic) for co-fermenting organic waste and sewage sludge was investigated. By adding organic waste to the digester content, biogas production per reactor volume was more than doubled in comparison with exclusive sewage sludge fermentation. Because of the thermophilic stage for the conditioning of organic waste, specific biogas yield for an organic load of 1.5 kg organic dry residue TR/m{sup 3*}d was slightly enhanced in comparison with single-stage co-fermentation. (orig.) [German] Zur Co-Vergaerung von Bioabfaellen und Klaerschlamm in Faultuermen kommunaler Klaeranlagen werden bislang hauptsaechlich einstufige Verfahren untersucht und teilweise eingesetzt. Im Rahmen eines von der Oswald-Schulze-Stiftung gefoerderten Projektes wurde der Einsatz einer 2-stufigen Betriebsweise (thermophil/mesophil) bei der Co-Vergaerung von Bioabfaellen und Klaerschlamm untersucht. Die Biogasproduktion pro Reaktorvolumen konnte durch die Zugabe von Bioabfall in die Faulbehaelter gegenueber der reinen Klaerschlammfaulung mehr als verdoppelt werden. Durch die thermophile Stufe zur Vorbehandlung der Bioabfaelle konnte die spezifische Biogasausbeute bei einer organischen Raumbelastung von 1,5 kg o TR/m{sup 3*}d gegenueber der 1-stufigen Co-Vergaerung leicht erhoeht werden. (orig.)

  11. Enhancement of anaerobic digestion efficiency of wastewater sludge and olive waste: Synergistic effect of co-digestion and ultrasonic/microwave sludge pre-treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagöz, B Aylin; Yenigün, Orhan; Erdinçler, Ayşen

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the effect of ultrasonic and microwave pre-treatment on biogas production from the anaerobic co-digestion of olive pomace and wastewater sludges. It was found that co-digestion of wastewater sludge with olive pomace yielded around 0.21 L CH4/g VS added, whereas the maximum methane yields from the mono-digestion of olive pomace and un-pretreated wastewater sludges were 0.18 and 0.16L CH4/g VS added. In the same way, compared to mono-digestion of these substrates, co-digestion increased methane production by 17-31%. The microwave and ultrasonic pre-treatments applied to sludge samples prior to co-digestion process led to further increase in the methane production by 52% and 24%, respectively, compared to co-digestion with un-pretreated wastewater sludge. The highest biogas and methane yields were obtained from the co-digestion of 30 min microwave pre-treated wastewater sludges and olive pomace to be 0.46 L/g VS added and 0.32 L CH4/g VS added, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of titanium dioxide mediated dairy waste activated sludge deflocculation on the efficiency of bacterial disintegration and cost of sludge management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godvin Sharmila, V; Kavitha, S; Rajashankar, K; Yeom, Ick Tae; Rajesh Banu, J

    2015-12-01

    This investigation explores the influence of titanium dioxide (TiO2) in deflocculating (removal of extracellular polymeric substance - EPS) the sludge and subsequent biomass disintegration by bacterial pretreatment. The EPS removed at an optimized TiO2 dosage of 0.03g/g of SS of TiO2 and a solar radiation exposure time of 15min to enhance the subsequent bacterial disintegration. The outcomes of the bacterial pretreatment reveal SS reduction and COD solubilization for the deflocculated (EPS removed and bacterially pretreated) sludge was observed to be 22.8% and 22.9% which was comparatively greater than flocculated (raw sludge inoculated with bacteria) and control (raw) sludge. The higher methane production potential of about 0.43(gCOD/gVSS) was obtained in deflocculated sludge than the flocculated (0.20gCOD/gVSS) and control (0.073gCOD/gVSS). Economic assessment of this study provides a net profit of about 131.9USD/Ton in deflocculated sludge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes and mobile genetic elements in enterococci and genomic DNA during anaerobic digestion of pharmaceutical waste sludge with different pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Juan; Lu, XueTing; Zhang, JunYa; Sui, Qianwen; Wang, Rui; Chen, Meixue; Wei, Yuansong

    2017-07-01

    Pharmaceutical waste sludge harbors large amounts of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and mobile genetic elements (MGEs), and it is necessary to study the reduction of ARGs and MGEs during sludge treatment. Therefore, the antibiotic resistance phenotypes and genotypes of enterococci, and the ARGs and MGEs in genomic DNA were investigated during anaerobic digestion (AD) with microwave (MW), thermal hydrolysis (TH) and ozone pretreatment. Results showed that sludge pretreatment increased the occurrence of the resistance phenotypes and genotypes of enterococci. During AD, the resistance of enterococci to macrolides decreased, except for in the MW-pretreated sludge. Horizontal gene transfer and co-occurrence of ermB and tetM in enterococci resulted in increased tetracycline resistance of enterococci throughout the sludge treatment. MGEs such as intI1, ISCR1 and Tn916/1545 had a significant effect on the distribution of ARGs. AD with pretreatment, especially TH pretreatment, resulted in greater ARGs and MGEs reduction and improved methane production. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Composting of waste paint sludge containing melamine resin and the compost's effect on vegetable growth and soil water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yongqiang; Chen, Liming; Gao, Lihong; Michel, Frederick C; Keener, Harold M; Klingman, Michael; Dick, Warren A

    2012-12-01

    Melamine resin (MR) is introduced to the environment from many industrial effluents, including waste paint sludge (WPS) from the automobile industry. Melamine resin contains a high nitrogen (N) content and is a potential N source during composting. In this study, two carbon sources, waste paper (WP) and plant residue (PR), were used to study their effects on composting of WPS. Additional work tested the WPS-composts effects on plant growth and soil water quality. After 84 days of composting, 85% and 54% of the initial MR was degraded in WP- and PR-composts, respectively. The limiting factor was that the MR created clumps during composting so that decomposition was slowed. Compared to the untreated control, both WP- and PR-composts increased growth of cucumber (Cucumis sativus), radish (Raphanus sativus) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa). Concentrations of trace elements in plants and soil water did not rise to a level that would preclude WPS-composts from being used as a soil amendment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Biomethane Production as an Alternative Bioenergy Source from Codigesters Treating Municipal Sludge and Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Evren Ersahin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy recovery potential of a mesophilic co-digester treating OFMSW and primary sludge at an integrated biomethanization plant was investigated based on feasibility study results. Since landfilling is still the main solid waste disposal method in Turkey, land scarcity will become one of the most important obstacles. Restrictions for biodegradable waste disposal to sanitary landfills in EU Landfill Directive and uncontrolled long-term contamination with gas emissions and leachate necessitate alternative management strategies due to rapid increase in MSW production. Moreover, since energy contribution from renewable resources will be required more in the future with increasing oil prices and dwindling supplies of conventional energy sources, the significance of biogas as a renewable fuel has been increased in the last decade. Results indicated that almost 93% of annual total cost can be recovered if 100% renewable energy subsidy is implemented. Besides, considering the potential revenue when replacing transport fuels, about 26 heavy good vehicles or 549 cars may be powered per year by the biogas produced from the proposed biomethanization plant (PE = 100,000; XPS = 61 g TS/PE⋅day; XSS-OFMSW=50 g TS/PE⋅day.

  16. Zero Valent Iron Significantly Enhances Methane Production from Waste Activated Sludge by Improving Biochemical Methane Potential Rather Than Hydrolysis Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiwen; Wang, Qilin; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion has been widely applied for waste activated sludge (WAS) treatment. However, methane production from anaerobic digestion of WAS is usually limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and/or poor biochemical methane potential of WAS. This work systematically studied the effects of three different types of zero valent iron (i.e., iron powder, clean scrap and rusty scrap) on methane production from WAS in anaerobic digestion, by using both experimental and mathematical approaches. The results demonstrated that both the clean and the rusty iron scrap were more effective than the iron powder for improving methane production from WAS. Model-based analysis showed that ZVI addition significantly enhanced methane production from WAS through improving the biochemical methane potential of WAS rather than its hydrolysis rate. Economic analysis indicated that the ZVI-based technology for enhancing methane production from WAS is economically attractive, particularly considering that iron scrap can be freely acquired from industrial waste. Based on these results, the ZVI-based anaerobic digestion process of this work could be easily integrated with the conventional chemical phosphorus removal process in wastewater treatment plant to form a cost-effective and environment-friendly approach, enabling maximum resource recovery/reuse while achieving enhanced methane production in wastewater treatment system.

  17. Effect of municipal solid waste compost and sewage sludge on yield and heavy metal accumulation in soil and black cumin (Nigella sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Akbarnejad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of municipal solid waste (MSw compost and sewage sludge (SS on yield and concentration of heavy metals in soil and black cumin (Nigella sativa L. an experiment with MSW compost at 0, 15, 30 t.ha-1 (C0, C15 and C30 and sewage sludge at 0, 15, 30 t.ha-1 (S0, S15 and S30 in a factorial experiment based on completely randomized design with three replications was conducted in greenhouse of Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran. Results showed that MSW compost and SS had significant effects on plant dry matter. Increasing the amounts of SS increased dry matter of plant. But increasing MSW compost from 15 to 30 t.ha-1 was decreased in dry matter. The Effect of MSW compost and SS on concentration of heavy metals (Ni and Pb in plant except Cd was significant. Addition of MSW compost and sewage sludge increased availability of Pb, Ni and Cd in soil. But effect of MSW compost and sewage sludge on Cd availability was not significant. Results showed that the amounts of Ni exceed the standard limits in dry matter. Therefore in use of organic wastes for medicinal plants we should be careful..

  18. The influences of inoculants from municipal sludge and solid waste on compost stability, maturity and enzyme activities during chicken manure composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuyan; Li, Jijin; Yuan, Jing; Li, Guoxue; Zang, Bing; Li, Yangyang

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of inoculants on compost stability, maturity and enzyme activities during composting of chicken manure and cornstalk. Two microbial inoculants (originated from aerobic municipal sludge and municipal solid waste, respectively) were used in composting at the rate of 0.3% of initial raw materials (wet weight). No microbial inoculums were added to the control. The experiment was conducted under aerobic conditions for 53 days. The results show that enzyme activity is an important index to comprehensively evaluate the composting stability and maturity. Microbes originated from sludge works best in terms of composting stability and maturity (C:N ratio decreased from 15.5 to 10, and germination index increased to 109%). Microbial inoculums originated from sludge and municipal solid waste extended the time of thermophilic phase for 11 and 7 days, respectively. Microbial inoculums originated from sludge and MSW significantly increased the average of catalase activity (by 15.0% and 12.1%, respectively), urease activity (by 21.5% and 12.2%, respectively) and cellulase activity (by 32.1% and 26.1%, respectively) during composting.

  19. Filtration and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Geeting, John GH; Hallen, Richard T.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-02-20

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP-RPP-WTP-467, eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste-testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on filtration/leaching tests performed on two of the eight waste composite samples and follow-on parametric tests to support aluminum leaching results from those tests.

  20. Effects of sludge recirculation rate and mixing time on performance of a prototype single-stage anaerobic digester for conversion of food wastes to biogas and energy recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanatamskul, Chavalit; Saleart, Tawinan

    2016-04-01

    Food wastes have been recognized as the largest waste stream and accounts for 39.25 % of total municipal solid waste in Thailand. Chulalongkorn University has participated in the program of in situ energy recovery from food wastes under the Ministry of Energy (MOE), Thailand. This research aims to develop a prototype single-stage anaerobic digestion system for biogas production and energy recovery from food wastes inside Chulalongkorn University. Here, the effects of sludge recirculation rate and mixing time were investigated as the main key parameters for the system design and operation. From the results obtained in this study, it was found that the sludge recirculation rate of 100 % and the mixing time of 60 min per day were the most suitable design parameters to achieve high efficiencies in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total solids (TS), and total volatile solid (TVS) removal and also biogas production by this prototype anaerobic digester. The obtained biogas production was found to be 0.71 m(3)/kg COD and the composition of methane was 61.6 %. Moreover, the efficiencies of COD removal were as high as 82.9 % and TVS removal could reach 83.9 % at the optimal condition. Therefore, the developed prototype single-stage anaerobic digester can be highly promising for university canteen application to recover energy from food wastes via biogas production.

  1. A novel approach of anaerobic co-digestion between organic fraction of food waste and waste sludge from municipal wastewater treatment plant: Effect of mixing ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nga, Dinh Thi; Ngoc, Tran Thi Minh; Van Ty, Nguyen; Thuan, Van Tan

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of mixing ratio of co-anaerobic digestion between dewatered waste sludge from municipal wastewater treatment plant (DS) and organic fraction of food waste (FW). The experiment was carried out in 3L reactors for 16 days at ambient temperature. Four mixing ratios of DW and FW was investigated including 100 % DS : 0 % FW (Run S100); 75% DS : 25 % FW (Run S75); 50% DS : 50% FW (Run S50); and 25% DS : 75% FW (Run S25) in term of VS concentration. As a result, the Run S50 achieved best performance among the four funs indicated in biogas accumulation of 32.48 L biogas and methane yield of 358.9 400ml CH4/g VS removal after 16 days operation at ambient temperature. Biogas accumulation of Run S25 was higher than that of Run S75. Run S100 produced the lowest of biogas of all runs. It is concluded that co-anaerobic digestion of different organic sources could enhance the performance of methane fermentation.

  2. Co-composting of gelatin industry sludge combined with organic fraction of municipal solid waste and poultry waste employing zeolite mixed with enriched nitrifying bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Mukesh Kumar; Pandey, Akhilesh Kumar; Bundela, Pushpendra Singh; Wong, Jonathan W C; Li, Ronghua; Zhang, Zengqiang

    2016-08-01

    This work illustrates the co-composting of gelatin industry sludge (GIS) combined with organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and poultry waste (PW) employing 10% zeolite mixed with enriched nitrifying bacteria consortium (ENBC). Five piles of GIS were prepared mixed with OFMSW and PW at 2:1:0.5, 4:1:0.5, 6:1:0.5 and 8:1:0.5 and without GIS 0:1:0.5 (dry weight basis) served as control, while 10% zeolite mixed with ENBC was inoculated in all piles and composted for 42days. The Pile-4 with GIS, OFMSW and PW ratio 6:1:0.5 and 10% zeolite+ENBC were drastically reduced the nitrogen loss and enhance the mineralization rate as compare to other piles. The co-amendment of 6% GIS effectively buffered the pH between ∼7.5 to 8.0 and shortened the compost maturity period, while lower concentration of GIS was comparatively delayed the early decomposition. Therefore, our results suggested that suitability of 10% zeolite+ENBC with initial feedstock ratio 6:1:0.5 as the best formulation for the composting of GIS into value-added stable product. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of temperature and organic loading rate on the performance and microbial community of anaerobic co-digestion of waste activated sludge and food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Chengliu; Yang, Zhaohui; Huang, Jing; Wang, Huiling; Xu, Haiyin; Wang, Like

    2014-06-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of waste activated sludge and food waste was investigated semi-continuously using continuously stirred tank reactors. Results showed that the performance of co-digestion system was distinctly influenced by temperature and organic loading rate (OLR) in terms of gas production rate (GPR), methane yield, volatile solids (VS) removal efficiency and the system stability. The highest GPR at 55 °C was 1.6 and 1.3 times higher than that at 35 and 45 °C with the OLR of 1 g VSL(-1)d(-1), and the corresponding average CH₄ yields were 0.40, 0.26 and 0.30 L CH₄ g(-1)VSadded, respectively. The thermophilic system exhibited the best load bearing capacity at extremely high OLR of 7 g VSL(-1)d(-1), while the mesophilic system showed the best process stability at low OLRs (< 5 g VSL(-1)d(-1)). Temperature had a more remarkable effect on the richness and diversity of microbial populations than the OLR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Treatment of the biodegradable fraction of used disposable diapers by co-digestion with waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrijos, M; Sousbie, P; Rouez, M; Lemunier, M; Lessard, Y; Galtier, L; Simao, A; Steyer, J P

    2014-03-01

    The results presented in this paper are part of a project aimed at designing an original solution for the treatment of used disposable diapers permitting the recycling of materials and the recovery of energy. Diapers must be collected separately at source and transported to an industrial facility to undergo special treatment which makes it possible to separate plastics and to recover a biodegradable fraction (BFD) made up mainly of cellulose. The methane yield of BFD was measured and found to be 280 ml CH4/g VSfed on average. 150 kg of dry BFD can be retrieved from the treatment of one ton of used disposable diapers, representing an energy potential of about 400 kW h of total energy or 130 kW h of electricity. As the treatment process for used diapers requires very high volumes of water, the setting up of the diaper treatment facility at a wastewater treatment plant already equipped with an anaerobic digester offers the advantages of optimizing water use as well as its further treatment and, also, the anaerobic digestion of BFD. The lab-scale experiments in a SBR showed that BFD co-digestion with sewage sludge (38% BFD and 62% waste activated sludge on volatile solids basis) was feasible. However, special attention should be paid to problems that might arise from the addition of BFD to a digester treating WAS such as insufficient mixing or floating particles leading to the accumulation of untreated solids in the digester. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhancement of biogas production from food waste and sewage sludge - Environmental and economic life cycle performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Ola; Bisaillon, Mattias; Haraldsson, Mårten; Sundberg, Johan

    2016-06-15

    Management of municipal solid waste is an efficient method to increase resource efficiency, as well as to replace fossil fuels with renewable energy sources due to that (1) waste to a large extent is renewable as it consists of food waste, paper, wood etc. and (2) when energy and materials are recovered from waste treatment, fossil fuels can be substituted. In this paper results from a comprehensive system study of future biological treatment of readily degradable waste in two Swedish regions are presented. Different collection and separation systems for food waste in households have been applied as well as technical improvements of the biogas process as to reduce environmental impact. The results show that central sorting of a mixed fraction into recyclables, combustibles, biowaste and inert is a competitive option compared to source separation. Use of pellets is beneficial compared to direct spreading as fertiliser. Fuel pellets seem to be the most favourable option, which to a large extent depends on the circumstances in the energy system. Separation and utilisation of nitrogen in the wet part of the digestion residue is made possible with a number of technologies which decreases environmental impact drastically, however to a substantial cost in some cases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A new reactor concept for sludge reduction using aquatic worms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elissen, H.J.H.; Hendrickx, T.L.G.; Temmink, B.G.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2006-01-01

    Biological waste water treatment results in the production of waste sludge. The final treatment option in The Netherlands for this waste sludge is usually incineration. A biological approach to reduce the amount of waste sludge is through predation by aquatic worms. In this paper we test the

  7. Utilization of Paper Sludge Wastes for Treatment of Wastewater from Food Processing Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohru Suzuki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The food processing industries usually produced large amount of wastewater containing fine and small particles. It takes long time for complete settlement of the fine and small particles in the wastewater. The coagulation method appears to become one of the useful treatments. New inorganic coagulant named “Agoclean‒P” has been developed from paper sludge ash. The treatment by coagulation and flocculation were carried out for the wastewater from three different food processing industries namely soup, tofu, and natto. “Hi‒Biah‒System”, which is an in‒situ solidification system, was used for the continuous treatment of wastewater. The parameters for the water quality were pH, five‒day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5, chemical oxygen demand (COD, total suspended solids (TSS, total nitrogen (TN and total phosphorus (TP. These parameters after the treatment became much lower values relative to those obtained before the treatment.

  8. Evaluation of waste activated sludge as a coagulant aid for the treatment of industrial wastewater containing mixed surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriwiriyarat, Tongchai; Jangkorn, Siriprapha

    2009-04-01

    Wastewater generated by the industry manufacturing detergents and various kinds of consumer products normally contains very high contents of mixed surfactants, organic matters expressed as chemical oxygen demand (COD), and phosphates that must be treated prior to discharge to the aquatic environment. In this study, jar-test experiments were conducted to evaluate the waste activated sludge (WAS) as a coagulation aid in the coagulation-flocculation process with ferric chloride or aluminum sulfate as a coagulant for the treatment of wastewater collected from the aforementioned industry. The WAS was selected because of its adsorption capability of anionic surfactants and its availability from the wastage stream of biological wastewater treatment process. The effective dosages of both coagulants with and without the WAS additions were determined in this study. Without the WAS addition, the concentrations of 800 mg/L aluminum sulfate at the optimum pH value of 8 and 2208 mg/L ferric chloride at the optimum pH value of 12 were the optimum chemical dosages. It appears that aluminum sulfate was more effective than ferric chloride based on the chemical dosage and removal efficiency. The turbidity, suspended particles, anionic surfactants, COD, and phosphates removal efficiencies of aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride under the optimum dosage were 95.6, 88.2, 78.4, 73.5, 47.3% and 98.8, 92.0, 72.7, 67.5, 53.1%, respectively. The addition of 200 mg/L WAS was sufficient to reduce the optimum dosages of both chemicals by 200 mg/L. The cationic surfactant existing in the wastewater worked as a flocculating agent leading to the flocculation of waste activated sludge resulting in the enmeshment of the suspended particles and colloids on which the COD, anionic surfactants, and phosphates were adsorbed. However, the substances removal efficiencies of ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate were slightly enhanced and reduced, respectively. It is possibly explained that the settling time

  9. Effects of additional fermented food wastes on nitrogen removal enhancement and sludge characteristics in a sequential batch reactor for wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongmei; Wang, Xiaochang C; Cheng, Zhe; Li, Yuyou; Tang, Jialing

    2016-07-01

    In order to enhance nitrogen removal from domestic wastewater with a carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio as low as 2.2:1, external carbon source was prepared by short-term fermentation of food wastes and its effect was evaluated by experiments using sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). The addition of fermented food wastes, with carbohydrate (42.8 %) and organic acids (24.6 %) as the main organic carbon components, could enhance the total nitrogen (TN) removal by about 25 % in contrast to the 20 % brought about by the addition of sodium acetate when the C/N ratio was equally adjusted to 6.6:1. The fermented food waste addition resulted in more efficient denitrification in the first anoxic stage of the SBR operation cycle than sodium acetate. In order to characterize the metabolic potential of microorganisms by utilizing different carbon sources, Biolog-ECO tests were conducted with activated sludge samples from the SBRs. As a result, in comparison with sodium acetate, the sludge sample by fermented food waste addition showed a greater average well color development (AWCD590), better utilization level of common carbon sources, and higher microbial diversity indexes. As a multi-organic mixture, fermented food wastes seem to be superior over mono-organic chemicals as an external carbon source.

  10. Anaerobic co-digestion of biodiesel waste glycerin with municipal wastewater sludge: microbial community structure dynamics and reactor performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razaviarani, Vahid; Buchanan, Ian D

    2015-04-01

    Two 10 L completely mixed reactors operating at 37°C and 20 days SRT were used to evaluate the relationships between reactor performance and microbial community dynamics during anaerobic co-digestion of biodiesel waste glycerin (BWG) with municipal wastewater sludge (MWS). The addition of up to 1.35% (v/v) BWG to reactor feeds yielded increased VS and COD removal together with enhanced the biogas production and methane yield. This represented 50% of the MWS feed COD. Pyrosequencing analysis showed Methanosaeta (acetoclastic) and Methanomicrobium (hydrogenotrophic) to be the methanogenic genera present in greatest diversity during stable reactor operation. Methanosaeta sequences predominated at the lowest BWG loading while those of Methanomicrobium were present in greatest abundance at the higher BWG loadings. Genus Candidatus cloacamonas was present in the greatest number of bacterial sequences at all loadings. Alkalinity, pH, biogas production and methane yield declined and VFA concentrations (especially propionate) increased during the highest BWG loading. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Affects Acetic Acid Production during Anaerobic Fermentation of Waste Activated Sludge by Altering Activity and Viability of Acetogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jingyang; Chen, Yinguang; Feng, Leiyu

    2016-07-05

    Till now, almost all the studies on anaerobic fermentation of waste activated sludge (WAS) for bioproducts generation focused on the influences of operating conditions, pretreatment methods and sludge characteristics, and few considered those of widespread persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in sludge, for example, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Herein, phenanthrene, which was a typical PAH and widespread in WAS, was selected as a model compound to investigate its effect on WAS anaerobic fermentation for short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) accumulation. Experimental results showed that the concentration of SCFAs derived from WAS was increased in the presence of phenanthrene during anaerobic fermentation. The yield of acetic acid which was the predominant SCFA in the fermentation reactor with the concentration of 100 mg/kg dry sludge was 1.8 fold of that in the control. Mechanism exploration revealed that the present phenanthrene mainly affected the acidification process of anaerobic fermentation and caused the shift of the microbial community to benefit the accumulation of acetic acid. Further investigation showed that both the activities of key enzymes (phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase) involved in acetic acid production and the quantities of their corresponding encoding genes were enhanced in the presence of phenanthrene. Viability tests by determining the adenosine 5'-triphosphate content and membrane potential confirmed that the acetogens were more viable in anaerobic fermentation systems with phenanthrene, which resulted in the increased production of acetic acid.

  12. Continuous H2 and CH4 production from high-solid food waste in the two-stage thermophilic fermentation process with the recirculation of digester sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Yeol; Ebie, Yoshitaka; Xu, Kai-Qin; Li, Yu-You; Inamori, Yuhei

    2010-01-01

    A thermophilic two-stage fermentation process using 10% total solids (TS) food waste was tested at varying organic loading rates (OLRs). The system was configured to produce H(2) and CH(4) in conjugation with the chemical oxygen demand (COD), nitrogen removal, and adjustment of the pH by returning sludge as an alkali buffer from the sludge storage tank for denitrification. The pH in the H(2) fermentation reactor was maintained in the range of 5.4-5.7 using sludge recirculation (Q(r)/Q(i) ratio 1). The average H(2) (11.1l-H(2) l(-1)-fed d(-1)) and CH(4) (47.4l-CH(4) l(-1)-fed d(-1)) production rates were achieved at OLRs of 39 (H(2) fermentation reactor) and 4.16 gCOD l(-1)d(-1) (CH(4) fermentation reactor), respectively. These results suggest that long-term stability of the continuous two-stage process can be successfully achieved by recirculation of high-alkalinity sludge of 6.7-7.5 g l(-1) as CaCO(3), without any added external chemical buffer.

  13. Comparing the influence of low power ultrasonic and microwave pre-treatments on the solubilisation and semi-continuous anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtmeyers, Sofie; Degrève, Jan; Willems, Kris; Dewil, Raf; Appels, Lise

    2014-11-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a well-known technique for the recovery of energy from waste sludge. Pre-treatment methods are useful tools to improve the biodegradability of the sludge and to enhance the digestion efficiency. In this study, an ultrasound (US) and a microwave (MW) pre-treatment were compared in a long-term digestion experiment, using 3 small pilot scale semi-continuous digesters (SRT=20 days). A specific energy of 96 kJ/kg sludge was applied, hence enabling to compare the effectiveness of both pre-treatment methods towards sludge solubilisation and biogas production enhancement. Total and volatile solids (TS and VS), COD, carbohydrates and proteins were monitored throughout the digestion experiment. It was seen that US was most effective in COD solubilisation. The average biogas increment was 20% for the microwave pre-treatment and 27% for the ultrasonic pre-treatment. However, this additional biogas production did not outweigh the energy consumed by the pre-treatment, leading to a negative energy balance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of deflocculation on the efficiency of disperser induced dairy waste activated sludge disintegration and treatment cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, T Poornima; Ebenezer, A Vimala; Kumar, S Adish; Kaliappan, S; Banu, J Rajesh

    2014-09-01

    Excess sludge disintegration by energy intensive processes like mechanical pretreatment is considered to be high in cost. In this study, an attempt has been made to disintegrate excess sludge by disperser in a cost effective manner by deflocculating the sludge using sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) at a concentration of 0.04 g/g SS. The disperser pretreatment was effective at a specific energy input of 5013 kJ/kg TS where deflocculated sludge showed higher chemical oxygen demand solubilisation and suspended solids reduction of 26% and 22.9% than flocculated sludge and was found to be 18.8% and 18.6% for former and latter respectively. Higher accumulation of volatile fatty acid (700 mg/L) in deflocculated sludge indicates better hydrolysis of sludge by proposed method. The anaerobic biodegradability resulted in higher biogas production potential of 0.522 L/(g VS) for deflocculated sludge. Cost analysis of the study showed 43% net energy saving in deflocculated sludge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dry anaerobic co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal waste with paperboard mill sludge and gelatin solid waste for enhancement of hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsamadony, M; Tawfik, A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the bio-H2 production via dry anaerobic co-fermentation of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) with protein and calcium-rich substrates such as gelatin solid waste (GSW) and paperboard mill sludge (PMS). Co-fermentation of OFMSW/GSW/PMS significantly enhanced the H2 production (HP) and H2 yield (HY). The maximum HP of 1082.5±91.4 mL and HY of 144.9±9.8 mL/gVSremoved were achieved at a volumetric ratio of 70% OFMSW:20% GSW:10% PMS. COD, carbohydrate, protein and lipids conversion efficiencies were 60.9±4.4%, 71.4±3.5%, 22.6±2.3% and 20.5±1.8% respectively. Co-fermentation process reduced the particle size distribution which is favorably utilized by hydrogen producing bacteria. The mean particle size diameters for feedstock and the digestate were 939.3 and 115.2μm, respectively with reduction value of 8.15-fold in the mixtures. The volumetric H2 production increased from 4.5±0.3 to 7.2±0.6 L(H2)/L(substrate) at increasing Ca(+2) concentrations from 1.8±0.1 to 6.3±0.5 g/L respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Microbial population dynamics in urban organic waste anaerobic co-digestion with mixed sludge during a change in feedstock composition and different hydraulic retention times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitamo, Temesgen; Treu, Laura; Boldrin, Alessio; Sartori, Cristina; Angelidaki, Irini; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2017-07-01

    Microbial communities play an essential role in the biochemical pathways of anaerobic digestion processes. The correlations between microorganisms' relative abundance and anaerobic digestion process parameters were investigated, by considering the effect of different feedstock compositions and hydraulic retention times (HRTs). Shifts in microbial diversity and changes in microbial community richness were observed by changing feedstock composition from mono-digestion of mixed sludge to co-digestion of food waste, grass clippings and garden waste with mixed sludge at HRT of 30, 20, 15 and 10 days. Syntrophic acetate oxidation along with hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, mediated by Methanothermobacter, was found to be the most prevalent methane formation pathway, with the only exception of 10 days' HRT, in which Methanosarcina was the most dominant archaea. Significantly, the degradation of complex organic polymers was found to be the most active process, performed by members of S1 (Thermotogales), Thermonema and Lactobacillus in a reactor fed with a high share of food waste. Conversely, Thermacetogenium, Anaerobaculum, Ruminococcaceae, Porphyromonadaceae and the lignocellulosic-degrading Clostridium were the significantly more abundant bacteria in the reactor fed with an increased share of lignocellulosic biomass in the form of grass clippings and garden waste. Finally, microbes belonging to Coprothermobacter, Syntrophomonas and Clostridium were correlated significantly with the specific methane yield obtained in both reactors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Rhodococcus lactis sp. nov., an actinobacterium isolated from sludge of a dairy waste treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pradip Kumar; Kumari, Annu; Chawla, Niharika; Pinnaka, Anil Kumar; Korpole, Suresh

    2015-11-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, non-motile and aerobic bacterium, designated strain DW151BT, was isolated from a sludge sample of a dairy industry effluent treatment plant. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of strain DW151BT placed it within the genus Rhodococcus. It displayed significant similarity with recognized species of the genus: Rhodococcus pyridinivorans PDB9T (98.8 %), Rhodococcus gordoniae W 4937T (98.6 %), Rhodococcus rhodochrous DSM 43241T (98.5 %) and Rhodococcus artemisiae YIM 65754T (97.5 %). However, strain DW151BT differed from phylogenetically closely related species in various phenotypic properties. The cellular polar lipid profile consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylinositol (PI) as major lipids, MK-8(H2) was the major menaquinone and meso-diaminopimelic acid was the cell-wall peptidoglycan. The fatty acid profile consisted of C16 : 0, C18 : 1cis9 and C16 : 1cis9 as main components. The presence of C16 : 0 and diphosphatidylglycerol as major fatty acid and polar lipid, respectively, was in accordance with chemotaxonomic markers of the genus Rhodococcus. The DNA G+C content of strain DW151BT was 69.9 mol%, a value within the limits reported for the members of this genus. Furthermore, strain DW151BT showed low similarity at the whole genome level in DNA-DNA hybridization experiments with phylogenetically closely related strains. Considering the low similarity at the genome level and differences in phenotypic properties, strain DW151BT is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Rhodococcus, for which the name Rhodococcus lactis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DW151BT ( = MTCC 12279T = DSM 45625T).

  18. SOLIDIFICATION OF THE HANFORD LAW WASTE STREAM PRODUCED AS A RESULT OF NEAR-TANK CONTINUOUS SLUDGE LEACHING AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE RECOVERY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reigel, M.; Johnson, F.; Crawford, C.; Jantzen, C.

    2011-09-20

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP), is responsible for the remediation and stabilization of the Hanford Site tank farms, including 53 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wasted waste contained in 177 underground tanks. The plan calls for all waste retrieved from the tanks to be transferred to the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The WTP will consist of three primary facilities including pretreatment facilities for Low Activity Waste (LAW) to remove aluminum, chromium and other solids and radioisotopes that are undesirable in the High Level Waste (HLW) stream. Removal of aluminum from HLW sludge can be accomplished through continuous sludge leaching of the aluminum from the HLW sludge as sodium aluminate; however, this process will introduce a significant amount of sodium hydroxide into the waste stream and consequently will increase the volume of waste to be dispositioned. A sodium recovery process is needed to remove the sodium hydroxide and recycle it back to the aluminum dissolution process. The resulting LAW waste stream has a high concentration of aluminum and sodium and will require alternative immobilization methods. Five waste forms were evaluated for immobilization of LAW at Hanford after the sodium recovery process. The waste forms considered for these two waste streams include low temperature processes (Saltstone/Cast stone and geopolymers), intermediate temperature processes (steam reforming and phosphate glasses) and high temperature processes (vitrification). These immobilization methods and the waste forms produced were evaluated for (1) compliance with the Performance Assessment (PA) requirements for disposal at the IDF, (2) waste form volume (waste loading), and (3) compatibility with the tank farms and systems. The iron phosphate glasses tested using the product consistency test had normalized release rates lower than the waste form requirements although the CCC glasses had higher release rates than the

  19. Sludge dewatering in a decanter centrifuge aided by cationic flocculant Praestol 855BS and essential oil of waste orange peels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalczyk Anna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the study the comparative analysis of test results of drainage of municipal wastewater sludge was conducted with the use of flocculant Praestol 855BS and the mixture of flocculant Praestol 855BS 50% + orange essential oil 50%, as the reagents supporting this process. It was also attempted to reduce unpleasant smells exuding from the drained sludge.

  20. Verification Of The Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF) Process Digestion Methods For The Sludge Batch 8 Qualification Sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Click, D. R.; Edwards, T. B.; Wiedenman, B. J.; Brown, L. W.

    2013-03-18

    This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from inductively coupled plasma – atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis of Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium Peroxide/Sodium Hydroxide Fusion Dissolution (PF) and Cold Chem (CC) method digestions and Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption analysis of Hg digestions from the DWPF Hg digestion method of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt and SB8 SRAT Product samples. The SB8 SRAT Receipt and SB8 SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constitutes the SB8 Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), to form the SB8 Blend composition.

  1. Ash and sludge covering of mine waste - Final report. Benefits and/or risks using ash and sludge for covering of weathered mine waste; Aska och roetslam som taet- och taeckskikt foer vittrat gruvavfall - Slutrapport. Foerdelar och/eller risker med att anvaenda aska och slam som taet- och taeckskikt foer vittrat gruvavfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeckstroem, Mattias; Karlsson, Ulrika [Oerebro Univ. (Sweden). Man-Technology-Environment Research Centre

    2006-02-15

    One of the main sources for metal pollution in Sweden is mine waste. One way to decrease the leaching of metals from mine waste areas are covering which decreases the volume of acid drainage. There is a shortage of appropriate materials to use for covering and excavation of till and clay from the environment might cause damages on the landscape. Previous studies have demonstrated that sludge and ashes are suitable materials for covering of waste deposits. When covering mine waste with ash and sludge various positive effects would arise, since the production of drainage water decreases as well as the pH increases due to the high buffer capacity of the ash. In Ervalla outside Oerebro an area with mine waste (tailings) has been covered with ash and sludge. This area gives a unique possibility to study benefits and/or risks with the covering of mine waste with ash and sludge. Unfortunately, the covering was not, from the start, carried out in a way that made it possible to evaluate the data. For instance, data about the surface and groundwater quality prior to the covering is lacking. Sulphidic minerals are also very common in the area, giving rise to acidic groundwater from other parts of the area, which haven't been remediated. This report is a final report where all phases are presented (phase 1 and 2). Focus in phase 1 has been on characterization of the material that has been used for covering and initiation of a monitoring program. In phase 2 focus has been on evaluation of monitoring data and the pros and cons of the deposit regarding the environment. Preliminary findings indicate that that the covering increases the leaching of some metals whereas the leaching of some metals decreases. An increase was observed for pH, calcium, potassium, sodium, arsenic, barium, chromium and copper. A decrease in the concentration of iron, nickel, cobalt, lead and zinc was observed. Other benefits with the remediation is also discussed (increased plant growth and an area

  2. The influence of decreased hydraulic retention time on the performance and stability of co-digestion of sewage sludge with grease trap sludge and organic fraction of municipal waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosser, Anna

    2017-12-01

    The effect of hydraulic retention time ranging from 12 to 20 d on process performance and stability was investigated in two anaerobic completely stirred tank reactors with a working liquid volume equal to 6 litres. The reactors were fed with mixtures containing (on volatile solids basis): 40% of sewage sludge, 30% of organic fraction of municipal waste and 30% of grease trap sludge. The change of hydraulic retention time did not significantly affect process stability. However, methane yields as well as volatile solids removal decreased from 0.54 to 0.47 l per kg of added volatile solids and 65% to 60% respectively, with the decrease of hydraulic retention time. Despite the fact that the best process performance was achieved for hydraulic retention time of 20 days, the obtained results showed that it is also possible to carry out the co-digestion process at shorter hydraulic retention times with good results. Furthermore, gas production rate as well as biogas production at the shortest hydraulic retention time were approximately 46% higher in comparison to results obtained at the longest hydraulic retention time. In this context, the proposed solution seems to be an interesting option, because it provides an unique opportunity for wastewater treatment plants to improve their profitability by enhancing energy recovery from sludge as well as full utilisation of the existing infrastructure and hence creates a new potential place for alternative treatment of organic industrial waste such as: fat-rich materials or food waste. However, implementation of the solution at wastewater treatment plants is still a big challenge and needs studies including identification of optimal digesting conditions, information about substrate pumping, inhibition thresholds and processing properties. Additionally, due to the characteristics of both co-substrates their introduction to the full-scale digester should be carefully planned due to a potential risk of overloading of the digester

  3. Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Bismuth Phosphate Sludge (Group 1) and Bismuth Phosphate Saltcake (Group 2) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.

    2009-02-19

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.() The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—bismuth phosphate sludge (Group 1) and bismuth phosphate saltcake (Group 2)—are the subjects of this report. The Group 1 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus and was implicitly assumed to be present as BiPO4 (however, results presented here indicate that the phosphate in Group 1 is actually present as amorphous iron(III) phosphate). The Group 2 waste was also anticipated to be high in phosphorus, but because of the relatively low bismuth content and higher aluminum content, it was anticipated that the Group 2 waste would contain a mixture of gibbsite, sodium phosphate, and aluminum phosphate. Thus, the focus of the Group 1 testing was on determining the behavior of P removal during caustic leaching, and the focus of the Group 2 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  4. What could the entire cornstover contribute to the enhancement of waste activated sludge acidification? Performance assessment and microbial community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Aijuan; Zhang, Jiaguang; Wen, Kaili; Liu, Zhihong; Wang, Guoying; Liu, Wenzong; Wang, Aijie; Yue, Xiuping

    2016-01-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) production from waste activated sludge (WAS) digestion is constrained by unbalanced nutrient composition (low carbon-to-nitrogen ratio). Characteristics conditioning by extra carbon sources, normally in the mixture of raw solid, has been reported to be an efficient approach to enhance WAS acidification. However, little attention has been paid to the contributions of other adjustment forms. Moreover, the corresponding ecological estimation has not been investigated yet. In this study, the feasibility of corn stover (CS) conditioning with three adjustment forms [pretreated straw (S), hydrolysate (H) and hydrolysate + straw (HS)] in improving VFAs production from WAS was demonstrated. It was observed that the highest VFAs yield was achieved in H co-digesting test (574 mg COD/g VSS), while it was only 392 mg COD/g VSS for WAS digesting alone. VFAs composition was strongly adjustment form-dependent, as more acetic (HAc) and propionic (HPr) acids were generated in CS_HS and S, respectively. High-throughput sequencing analysis illustrated that acid (especially HAc)-producing characteristic genera (Bacteroides, Proteiniclasticum and Fluviicola) and HPr-producing characteristic genera (Mangroviflexus and Paludibacter) were detected by CS_HS and S conditioning, respectively. Corn stover conditioning greatly upgraded the WAS acidification performance, especially for the CS_H adjustment form, and the VFAs yield gained was considerably larger than that previously reported. CS adjustment forms played an important role in structuring the innate microbial community in WAS. Canonical correlation analysis illustrated that characteristic genera, with better hydrolysis and acidification abilities, could be enriched by the feedstocks with certain content of cellulose, hemicellulose or their saccharification hydrolysates. Moreover, ecological estimation revealed that, as far as the entire CS (including S and H) per acre was concerned, the capacity of WAS

  5. Enhanced hydrogen production from waste activated sludge by cascade utilization of organic matter in microbial electrolysis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Xing, Defeng; Liu, Bingfeng; Ren, Nanqi

    2012-03-15

    Fermentative hydrogen production from waste activated sludge (WAS) has low H2 yield because WAS contains limited amounts of carbohydrate suitable for use by hydrogen-producing bacteria. Here, augmentation of hydrogen production from WAS by microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) was implemented. H2 yields of 3.89±0.39 mg-H2/g-DS (5.67±0.61 mg-H2/g-VSS) from raw WAS and 6.78±0.94 mg-H2/g-DS (15.08±1.41 mg-H2/g-VSS) from alkaline-pretreated WAS were obtained in the two-chamber MECs (TMECs). This was several times higher than yields obtained previously by fermentation. Single-chamber MECs (SMECs) with low internal resistance showed a H2 production rate that 13 times that of TMECs with similar H2 yield when alkaline-pretreated WAS was used. However, methanogenesis was detected after several batch cycles. A yield balance calculation revealed that carbohydrates were not the only substrates for electrohydrogenesis. Protein and its acidification products, such as volatile fatty acids are also responsible for a portion of H2 generation in MEC. Characterization of WAS in TMECs by three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy with parallel factor analysis indicated that electrohydrogenesis reacted on the extracellular polymeric substances and intracellular substances of WAS. Cascade utilization of organic matter in MECs increased hydrogen production from WAS. MECs showed high hydrogen yield from WAS, fewer H2 sinks, and insensitivity to temperature. Optimizing MEC configurations and operation conditions and improving the pretreatment processes of WAS are necessary before practical application can take place on a large scale. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The dissolution kinetics of industrial brine sludge wastes from a chlor-alkali industry as a sorbent for wet flue gas desulphurisation (FGD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masilela, N; Lerotholi, L; Seodigeng, T; Rutto, H

    2017-01-27

    The disposal of industrial brine sludge waste (IBSW) in chlor-alkali plants can be avoided by utilization of IBSW as a sorbent in wet flue gas desulphurization. The shrinking core model was used to determine the dissolution kinetics of IBSW which is a vital step in wet FGD. The effect of solid to liquid ratio (m/v), temperature, pH, particle size and stirring speed on the conversion and dissolution rate constant are determined. The conversion and dissolution rate constant decreases as the pH, particle size and solid to liquid ratio is increased and increases as the temperature, concentration of acid and stirring speed is increased. The sorbents before and after dissolution were characterized using X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). An activation energy of 7.195 kJ/mol was obtained and the product layer diffusion model was found to be the rate controlling step. The use of industrial brine sludge waste as an alternative sorbent in wet flue gas desulphurisation can reduce the amounts industrial wastes disposed in landfills. This study has proved that the sorbent can contain up to 91 % calcium carbonate and trace amounts of sulphate, magnesium, e.tc. This can be used as new sorbent to reduce the amount of sulphur dioxide in the atmosphere and the by-product gypsum can be used in construction, as plaster ingredient, fertilizer and for soil conditioning. Therefore the sorbent has both economic and environmental benefits.

  7. Process optimization of biogas production at Nemščak biogas plant by pre-treatment of the substrate and combining with waste sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Žitek, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to increase the amount of biogas produced by pre-treatment of the substrate and combining with waste sludge. For anaerobic digestion of different substrates, we used a pilot reactor to determine the biogas potential at Nemščak biogas plant. The pilot reactor was built in 2009 for the purpose of testing new substrates in the process of biogas production. The pilot reactor has a working volume of 2000 litres; there is a gas tank above it with the volume of 500 litr...

  8. Coagulant Recovery from Waterworks Sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Keeley, James

    2014-01-01

    Coagulation is a ubiquitous process in the treatment of raw surface water for eventual potable use. Despite its capabilities, the sheer scale of its use is manifested in the volumes of chemicals it demands and waste sludge it produces. Recovering and reusing the chemical activity of the coagulant sludge in water treatment is a logical solution but this practice has been restricted by the presence of contaminants within the sludge. This thesis has investigated methods that ca...

  9. Concentration of medically used radionuclides in activated sludge at the megalopolis waste water treatment plants and estimation for the effective dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Takashi; Okano, Yasuhiro; Sugiura, Shiroharu; Inokoshi, Yukio [Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Research Inst. (Japan)

    1998-06-01

    The concentrations of medically used radionuclides in activated sludge samples were measured for 10 waste water treatment plants (WWTP) in Tokyo from October 1983 to March 1994. The nuclides {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 67}Ga, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I, {sup 131}I and {sup 201}Tl, among others, could be detected, but these concentration levels were lower than the legal concentration limits in Japan. The excess activated sludge is usually incinerated at WWTP; then the resulting ash is transported for reclamation in Tokyo Bay. Internal and/or external exposure doses were evaluated for the following cases: The dose of the public attributed to radioactive iodine and {sup 201}Tl, which were released from the incinerator by burning sludge; The dose of the workers during the process of transport and reclamation of the ash. As a result, the effective doses were sufficiently lower than the dose limit 1 mSv/y. The decay of the radionuclides were calculated over a period of curing of the landfill. It was found that the radionuclides had decayed out to approximately one nuclide. The effective dose of the public can therefore be ignored. Moreover, it was clarified that the effective dose of the public resulting from {sup 99m}Tc is negligibly low in value at the present time. (author)

  10. Microbial Insight into a Pilot-Scale Enhanced Two-Stage High-Solid Anaerobic Digestion System Treating Waste Activated Sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Cao, Zhiping; Hu, Yuying; Wang, Xiaolu; Wang, Guangqi; Zuo, Jiane; Wang, Kaijun; Qian, Yi

    2017-11-30

    High solid anaerobic digestion (HSAD) is a rapidly developed anaerobic digestion technique for treating municipal sludge, and has been widely used in Europe and Asia. Recently, the enhanced HSAD process with thermal treatment showed its advantages in both methane production and VS reduction. However, the understanding of the microbial community is still poor. This study investigated microbial communities in a pilot enhanced two-stage HSAD system that degraded waste activated sludge at 9% solid content. The system employed process "thermal pre-treatment (TPT) at 70 °C, thermophilic anaerobic digestion (TAD), and mesophilic anaerobic digestion (MAD)". Hydrogenotrophic methanogens Methanothermobacter spp. dominated the system with relative abundance up to about 100% in both TAD and MAD. Syntrophic acetate oxidation (SAO) bacteria were discovered in TAD, and they converted acetate into H₂ and CO₂ to support hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. The microbial composition and conversion route of this system are derived from the high solid content and protein content in raw sludge, as well as the operational conditions. This study could facilitate the understanding of the enhanced HSAD process, and is of academic and industrial importance.

  11. Water-quality data for two surface coal mines reclaimed with alkaline waste or urban sewage sludge, Clarion County, Pennsylvania, May 1983 through November 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugas, D.L.; Cravotta, C.A.; Saad, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    Water-quality and other hydrologic data for two surface coal mines in Clarion County, Pa., were collected during 1983-89 as part of studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources. Water samples were collected from streams, seeps, monitor wells, and lysimeters on a monthly basis to evaluate changes in water quality resulting from the addition of alkaline waste or urban sewage sludge to the reclaimed mine-spoil surface. The mines are about 3.5 miles apart and were mined for bituminous coal of the upper and lower Clarion seams of the Allegheny Group of Pennsylvanian age. The coal had high sulfur (greater than 2 weight percent) concentrations. Acidic mine drainage is present at both mines. At one mine, about 8 years after mining was completed, large quantities (greater than 400 tons per acre) of alkaline waste consisting of limestone and lime-kiln flue dust were applied on two 2.5-acre plots within the 65-acre mine area. Water-quality data for the alkaline-addition plots and surrounding area were collected for 1 year before and 3 years after application of the alkaline additives (May 1983-July 1987). Data collected for the alkaline-addition study include ground-water level, surface-water discharge rate, temperature, specific conductance, pH, and concentrations of alkalinity, acidity, sulfate, iron (total and ferrous), manganese, aluminum, calcium, and magnesium. At the other mine, about 3.5 years after mining was completed, urban sewage sludge was applied over 60 acres within the 150-acre mine area. Waterquality data for the sludge-addition study were collected for 3.5 years after the application of the sludge (June 1986-December 1989). Data collected for the sludge-addition study include the above constituents plus dissolved oxygen, redox potential (Eh), and concentrations of dissolved solids, phosphorus, nitrogen species, sulfide, chloride, silica, sodium, potassium, cyanide, arsenic, barium

  12. Free nitrous acid serving as a pretreatment method for alkaline fermentation to enhance short-chain fatty acid production from waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianwei; Wang, Dongbo; Li, Xiaoming; Yang, Qi; Chen, Hongbo; Zhong, Yu; Zeng, Guangming

    2015-07-01

    Alkaline condition (especially pH 10) has been demonstrated to be a promising method for short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production from waste activated sludge anaerobic fermentation, because it can effectively inhibit the activities of methanogens. However, due to the limit of sludge solubilization rate, long fermentation time is required but SCFA yield is still limited. This paper reports a new pretreatment method for alkaline fermentation, i.e., using free nitrous acid (FNA) to pretreat sludge for 2 d, by which the fermentation time is remarkably shortened and meanwhile the SCFA production is significantly enhanced. Experimental results showed the highest SCFA production of 370.1 mg COD/g VSS (volatile suspended solids) was achieved at 1.54 mg FNA/L pretreatment integration with 2 d of pH 10 fermentation, which was 4.7- and 1.5-fold of that in the blank (uncontrolled) and sole pH 10 systems, respectively. The total time of this integration system was only 4 d, whereas the corresponding time was 15 d in the blank and 8 d in the sole pH 10 systems. The mechanism study showed that compared with pH 10, FNA pretreatment accelerated disruption of both extracellular polymeric substances and cell envelope. After FNA pretreatment, pH 10 treatment (1 d) caused 38.0% higher substrate solubilization than the sole FNA, which indicated that FNA integration with pH 10 could cause positive synergy on sludge solubilization. It was also observed that this integration method benefited hydrolysis and acidification processes. Therefore, more SCFA was produced, but less fermentation time was required in the integrated system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Overall strategy and program plan for management of radioactively contaminated liquid wastes and transuranic sludges at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeese, L.E.; Berry, J.B.; Butterworth, G.E. III; Collins, E.D.; Monk, T.H.; Patton, B.D.; Snider, J.W.

    1988-12-01

    The use of hydrofracture was terminated after 1984, and LW concentrate has been accumulated and stored since that time. Currently, the volume of stored LW concentrate is near the safe fill limit for the 11 storage tanks in the active LW system, and significant operational constraints are being experienced. The tanks that provide the storage capacity of the active LW system contain significant volumes of TRU sludges that have been designated remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) wastes because of associated quantities of other radioisotopes, including /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs. Thirty-three additional tanks, which are inactive, also contain significant volumes of TRU waste and radioactive LW. A lack of adequate storage volume for LW jeopardizes ORNL's ability to ensure continued conduct of research and development (RandD) activities that generate LW because an unexpected operational incident could quickly deplete the remaining storage volume. Accordingly, a planning team comprised of staff members from the ORNL Nuclear and Chemical Waste Programs (NCWP) was created for developing recommended actions to be taken for management of LW. A program plan is presented which outlines work required for the development of a disposal method for each of the likely future waste streams associated with LW management and the disposal of the bulk of the resulting solid waste on the ORR. 8 refs., 20 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. Electrodialysis Treatment of Industrial Waste Waters That Generaters Little Sludge; Tratamiento de aguas residuales industriales por electrodialisis, tecnica que genera pocos lodos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savastoma Mariel, C. [Universidad de Cantabria. Santander (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Electrodialysis with bipolar membranes is reviewed as a separation technique and details are shown. The method is used in several process applications but its adoption looks particularly attractive in the treatment of waste water streams consisting primarily of diluted residual salts and electrolytes. It is argued that the main advantage shown by the technology compared to the classical treatment consisting of adding lime to neutralize the waste waters resides in tis avoiding the generation of voluminous sludges thus permitting savings in the management and disposal of the mud. Other interesting applications are those operations where generating acidity and/or alkalinity with addition of no extra chemicals is desirable, such as the regeneration of ion exchange resins. (Author) 34 refs.

  15. Removal of phenolic endocrine disrupting compounds from waste activated sludge using UV, H2O2, and UV/H2O2 oxidation processes: effects of reaction conditions and sludge matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ai; Li, Yongmei

    2014-09-15

    Removal of six phenolic endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) (estrone, 17β-estradiol, 17α-ethinylestradiol, estriol, bisphenol A, and 4-nonylphenols) from waste activated sludge (WAS) was investigated using ultraviolet light (UV), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and the combined UV/H2O2 processes. Effects of initial EDC concentration, H2O2 dosage, and pH value were investigated. Particularly, the effects of 11 metal ions and humic acid (HA) contained in a sludge matrix on EDC degradation were evaluated. A pseudo-first-order kinetic model was used to describe the EDC degradation during UV, H2O2, and UV/H2O2 treatments of WAS. The results showed that the degradation of the 6 EDCs during all the three oxidation processes fitted well with pseudo-first-order kinetics. Compared with the sole UV irradiation or H2O2 oxidation process, UV/H2O2 treatment was much more effective for both EDC degradation and WAS solubilization. Under their optimal conditions, the EDC degradation rate constants during UV/H2O2 oxidation were 45-197 times greater than those during UV irradiation and 11-53 times greater than those during H2O2 oxidation. High dosage of H2O2 and low pH were favorable for the degradation of EDCs. Under the conditions of pH = 3, UV wavelength = 253.7 nm, UV fluence rate = 0.069 mW cm(-2), and H2O2 dosage = 0.5 mol L(-1), the removal efficiencies of E1, E2, EE2, E3, BPA, and NP in 2 min were 97%, 92%, 95%, 94%, 89%, and 67%, respectively. The hydroxyl radical (OH) was proved to take the most important role for the removal of EDCs. Metal ions in sludge could facilitate the removal of EDCs during UV/H2O2 oxidation. Fe, Ag, and Cu ions had more obvious effects compared with other metal ions. The overall role of HA was dependent on the balance between its competition as organics and its catalysis/photosensitization effects. These indicate that the sludge matrix plays an important role in the degradation of EDCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Field study and theoretical evidence for the profiles and underlying mechanisms of PCDD/F formation in cement kilns co-incinerating municipal solid waste and sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuyang; Zhan, Jiayu; Liu, Guorui; Ren, Zhiyuan; Zheng, Minghui; Jin, Rong; Yang, Lili; Wang, Mei; Jiang, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Xian

    2017-03-01

    A field study and theoretical calculations on the profile and formation mechanism of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) from two cement kilns co-incinerating municipal solid waste and sewage sludge were performed, and the PCDFs were mainly focused. The back-end areas of the cement kilns were identified to be the major sites of PCDD/F formation according to their distributions in particulate samples from different process stages. The proportions of tetra- to hexa-chlorinated dibenzofurans (∑Cl4-6CDFs) at the kiln back-end areas were in the range of 50-80% of the total PCDD/Fs in mass concentrations and 62-87% in toxic equivalent concentrations. These results indicated that ∑Cl4-6CDFs are the dominant homologs that should be the focus for reducing PCDD/F emissions in cement kilns that co-incinerate municipal solid waste and sewage sludge. It is speculated that the low contents of oxygen and copper compounds, as well as the alkaline conditions, may contribute to the dominance of ∑Cl4-6CDFs in the PCDD/Fs formed. Chlorination was assumed to be the mechanism of formation of PCDFs. The results from model predictions and thermodynamic calculations used to test this assumption were consistent with the PCDF profiles observed from the field study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Boosting biogas production from sewage sludge by adding small amount of agro-industrial by-products and food waste residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maragkaki, A E; Fountoulakis, M; Kyriakou, A; Lasaridi, K; Manios, T

    2018-01-01

    In Greece, in many cities, wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) operate their own anaerobic digestion (AD) facility in order to treat sewage sludge rather than achieve optimum biogas production. Nowadays, there is a growing interest regarding the addition of other co-substrates in these existing facilities in order to increase gas yield from the biomass. This practice may be possible by adding small amount of co-substrates which will not affect significantly in the designed hydraulic retention time. Nonetheless, the lack of experimental data regarding this option is a serious obstacle. In this study, the effect of co-digestion sewage sludge, with small amount of agro-industrial by-products and food wastes is examined in lab-scale experiments. Specifically, co-digestion of SS and food waste (FW), grape residues (GR), crude glycerol (CG), cheese whey (CW) and sheep manure (SM), in a small ratio of 5-10% (v/v) was investigated. The effect of agro-industrial by-products and food waste residues on biogas production was investigated using one 1L and three 3L lab-scale reactors under mesophilic conditions at a 24-day hydraulic retention time. The biogas production rate reached 223, 259, 406, 572, 682 and 1751 mlbiogas/lreactor/d for 100% SS, 5% SM & 95% SS, 10% CW & 90% SS, 5% FW & 95% SS, 5% FW & 5% CG & 90% SS and 5% CG & 95% SS respectively. Depending on the co-digestion material, the average removal of total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) ranged between 20% (5% SM & 95% SS) and 76% (5% FW & 5% CG & 90% SS). Reduction in the volatile solids ranged between 26% (5% SM & 95% SS) and 62% (5% FW & 5% CG & 90% SS) for organic loading rates between 0.8kgVSm -3 d -1 and 2.0kgVSm -3 d -1 . Moreover, co-digestion improved biogas production from 14% (5% SM & 95% SS) to 674% (5% CG & 95% SS). This work suggests that WWTPs in Greece can increase biogas production by adding other wastes to the sewage sludge without affecting the operation of existing digesters and without requiring

  18. Sludge from paper mill effluent treatment as raw material to produce carbon adsorbents: An alternative waste management strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaria, Guilaine; Silva, Carla Patrícia; Ferreira, Catarina I A; Otero, Marta; Calisto, Vânia

    2017-03-01

    Pulp and paper industry produces massive amounts of sludge from wastewater treatment, which constitute an enormous environmental challenge. A possible management option is the conversion of sludge into carbon-based adsorbents to be applied in water remediation. For such utilization it is important to investigate if sludge is a consistent raw material originating reproducible final materials (either over time or from different manufacturing processes), which is the main goal of this work. For that purpose, different primary (PS) and biological sludge (BS) batches from two factories with different operation modes were sampled and subjected to pyrolysis (P materials) and to pyrolysis followed by acid washing (PW materials). All the materials were characterized by proximate analysis, total organic carbon (TOC) and inorganic carbon (IC), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and N2 adsorption isotherms (specific surface area (SBET)and porosity determination). Sludge from the two factories proved to have distinct physicochemical properties, mainly in what concerns IC. After pyrolysis, the washing step was essential to reduce IC and to considerably increase SBET, yet with high impact in the final production yield. Among the materials here produced, PW materials from PS were those having the highest SBET values (387-488 m2 g-1). Overall, it was found that precursors from different factories might originate final materials with distinct characteristics, being essential to take into account this source of variability when considering paper mill sludge as a raw material. Nevertheless, for PS, low variability was found between batches, which points out to the reliability of such residues to be used as precursors of carbon adsorbents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of organic loading rate on dark fermentative hydrogen production in the continuous stirred tank reactor and continuous mixed immobilized sludge reactor from waste pastry hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei; Hu, Yunyi; Li, Shiyi; Nie, Qiulin; Zhao, Hongting; Tang, Junhong

    2016-12-01

    Waste pastry (6%, w/v) was hydrolyzed by the produced glucoamylase and protease to obtain the glucose (19.8g/L) and free amino nitrogen (179mg/L) solution. Then, the effect of organic loading rate (OLR) (8-40kgCOD/(m3d)) on dark fermentative hydrogen production in the continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and continuous mixed immobilized sludge reactor (CMISR) from waste pastry hydrolysate was investigated and compared. The maximum hydrogen production rate of CSTR (277.76mL/(hL)) and CMISR (320.2mL/(hL)) were achieved at OLR of 24kgCOD/(m3d) and 32kgCOD/(m3d), respectively. Carbon recovery ranged from 75.2-84.1% in the CSTR and CMISR with the balance assumed to be converted to biomass. One gram waste pastry could produce 0.33g (1.83mmol) glucose which could be further converted to 79.24mL (3.54mmol) hydrogen in the CMISR or 91.66mL (4.09mmol) hydrogen in the CSTR. This is the first study which reports dark fermentative hydrogen production from waste pastry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Aquatic worm reactor for improved sludge processing and resource recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, T.L.G.

    2009-01-01

    Municipal waste water treatment is mainly achieved by biological processes. These processes produce huge volumes of waste sludge (up 1.5 million m3/year in the Netherlands). Further processing of the waste sludge involves transportation, thickening and incineration. A decrease in the amount of waste

  1. K basins sludge removal sludge pretreatment system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, H.L.

    1997-06-12

    The Spent Nuclear Fuels Program is in the process of planning activities to remove spent nuclear fuel and other materials from the 100-K Basins as a remediation effort for clean closure. The 105 K- East and K-West Basins store spent fuel, sludge, and debris. Sludge has accumulated in the 1 00 K Basins as a result of fuel oxidation and a slight amount of general debris being deposited, by settling, in the basin water. The ultimate intent in removing the sludge and fuel is to eliminate the environmental risk posed by storing fuel at the K Basins. The task for this project is to disposition specific constituents of sludge (metallic fuel) to produce a product stream through a pretreatment process that will meet the requirements, including a final particle size acceptable to the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). The purpose of this task is to develop a preconceptual design package for the K Basin sludge pretreatment system. The process equipment/system is at a preconceptual stage, as shown in sketch ES-SNF-01 , while a more refined process system and material/energy balances are ongoing (all sketches are shown in Appendix C). Thus, the overall process and 0535 associated equipment have been conservatively selected and sized, respectively, to establish the cost basis and equipment layout as shown in sketches ES- SNF-02 through 08.

  2. Anaerobic treatment of complex wastewater and waste activated sludge - Appl. of an upflow anaerobic solid removal (UASR).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeman, G.; Sanders, W.T.M.; Wang, K.Y.; Lettinga, G.

    1997-01-01

    The application of one phase anaerobic wastewater systems for the treatment of complex wastewaters containing high amounts of suspended solids or lipids is usually limited by accumulation of these compounds in the sludge bed. This accumulation reduces the solid retention time and methanogenic

  3. Zinc Regime in the Sewage Sludge-Soil-Plant System of a City Waste Water Treatment Pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacatusu Radu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The sewage sludge from wastewater treatment plant of Iasi, a city with 300,000 inhabitants, for domestic and industrial origin, was stored in a mud pond arranged on an area of 18,920 m2. Chemical analyzes of the sludge showed that, of all the chemical elements determined, only Zn is found at pollutant level (5739 mg∙kg-1, i.e. almost 30 times more than the maximum allowable limit for Zn in soil and 45 times more than the Zn content of the soil on which the mud pond has been set. Over time, the content of Zn in the mud pond, but also from soil to which it has been placed, has become upper the normal content of the surrounding soil up to a depth of 260 cm. On the other hand, the vegetation installed on sewage sludge in the process of mineralization, composed predominantly of Phragmites, Rumex, Chenopodium, and Aster species had accumulated in roots, stems and leaves Zn quantities equivalent to 1463 mg Kg-1, 3988 mg Kg-1, 1463 mg Kg-1, respectively, 1120 mg∙Kg-1. The plants in question represents the natural means of phytoremediation, and sewage sludge as such may constitute a fertilizer material for soils in the area, on which Zn deficiency in maize has been recorded. In addition, the ash resulted from the incineration of plants loaded with zinc may constitute, in its turn, a good material for fertilizing of the soils that are deficient in zinc.

  4. Inhibitory effect of high calcium concentration on municipal solid waste leachate treatment by the activated sludge process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yi; He, Pin Jing; Pu, Hong Xia; Lü, Fan; Shao, Li Ming; Zhang, Hua

    2017-05-01

    This research focused on the inhibitory effects of Ca on the aerobic biological treatment of landfill leachate containing extremely high Ca concentrations. When the Ca concentration in leachate to be treated was more than 4500 mg l-1, the total organic carbon removal rate was significantly reduced and the processing time to achieve the same removal efficiency was 1.4 times that in the control treatment without added Ca. In contrast, the total nitrogen and ammonia nitrogen (NH4+-N) removal efficiencies were positively related to the Ca concentration, increasing from 65.2% to 81.2% and from 69.2% to 83.7%, respectively, when the dosage of added Ca increased from zero to 8000 mg l-1. During aerobic treatment, the reductions of solution Ca concentration were in the range of 1003-2274 mg l-1 and were matched with increases in the Ca content in the residual sludge. The inhibition threshold of Ca in the leachate treated by the activated sludge process appeared to be 4500 mg l-1, which could be realized by controlling the influent Ca concentration and using an appropriate sludge return ratio in the activated sludge process.

  5. Simultaneous addition of zero-valent iron and activated carbon on enhanced mesophilic anaerobic digestion of waste-activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tongyu; Qin, Yujie; Cao, Yan; Han, Bin; Ren, Junyi

    2017-10-01

    The performance of biogas generation and sludge degradation was studied under different zero-valent iron/activated carbon (ZVI/AC) ratios in detail in mesophilic anaerobic digestion of sludge. A good enhancement of methane production was obtained at the 10:1 ZVI/AC ratio, and the cumulative methane production was 132.1 mL/g VS, 37.6% higher than the blank. The methane content at the 10:1 ZVI/AC ratio reached 68.8%, which was higher than the blank (55.2%) and the sludge-added AC alone (59.6%). For sludge degradation, the removal efficiencies of total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD), proteins, and polysaccharides were all the highest at the 10:1 ZVI/AC ratio. The concentration of available phosphorus (AP) decreased after anaerobic digestion process. On the other hand, the concentrations of available nitrogen (AN) and available potassium (AK) increased after the anaerobic digestion process and showed a gradually decreasing trend with increasing ZVI/AC ratio. The concentrations of AN and AK were 2303.1-4200.3 and 274.7-388.3 mg/kg, showing a potential for land utilization.

  6. Vitrification and Product Testing of C-104 and AZ-102 Pretreated Sludge Mixed with Flowsheet Quantities of Secondary Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Gary L.; Bates, Derrick J.; Goles, Ronald W.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Lettau, Ralph C.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Smith, Harry D.; Urie, Michael W.; Wagner, Jerome J.

    2001-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) has acquired Hanford tank waste treatment services at a demonstration scale. The River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) team is responsible for producing an immobilized (vitrified) high-level waste (IHLW) waste form. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, hereafter referred to as PNNL, has been contracted to produce and test a vitrified IHLW waste form from two Envelope D high-level waste (HLW) samples previously supplied to the RPP-WTP project by DOE.

  7. PCDD/F in sewage sludges from two waste water treatment facilities in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza Pereira, M. de [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi (Brazil). Dept. de Geoquimica - Instituto de Quimica; Kuch, B. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Siedlungswasserbau, Wasserguete- und Abfallwirtschaft, Abt. Hydrochemie, Fakultaet fuer Bauingenieur- und Vermessungswesen

    2004-09-15

    In Brazil, up to now, there is no specific legislation regarding the maximum equivalent concentration levels of organochlorine compounds in especial polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDF) in sewage sludge/biocompost considered for agricultural use or final deposition in soils. Besides the great risk heavy metals pose to humans and environment, PCDD/PCDF are types of persistent environmental contaminants with enhanced toxicity and carcinogenic and bioaccumulating properties. To PCDD/F, the human exposure is primarily attributed to background contamination caused by diffuse contamination of these pollutants coming from different sources and subsequently biomagnification through the trophic chain. As alternative paths of the diffuse contamination with PCDD/F, the transport of these substances by air deposition, by residual waters from household, industrial processes as well as by laundry of products treated with contaminated chemicals and the microbial activity on chlorophenols are listed. Possible transference pathways of these compounds to humans would be both the uptake via contaminated crops and grazing livestock, coming from sludge-amended soils 11. Concerning PCDD/F, a tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 1-4 pg I-TEQ/kg/day is recommended, according to the WHO/EURO standard guidelines, which would be exceeded if a persons diet came solely from land treated with sewage sludge containing high concentrations of PCDD/F. This work shows the results of a first study about the heavy metal, PCDD/PCDF content of sewage sludge coming from both an urban and a semi-agricultural area in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in comparison to results found in the region of Baden-Wuerttenberg, south Germany. The potential toxicity and probably sources related to these contaminants in Brazilian sewage sludge was also investigated.

  8. Plant-soil interactions of sludge-borne heavy metals and the effect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drinie

    2001-01-01

    Jan 1, 2001 ... anaerobic digested sludge and thickened waste-activated domestic sludge) ... digestion used to digest sediments, sludges, and soil samples. This .... Sand. Loam. Clay. South African sludge guidelines when the metal concentrations in sludges are expressed as total metal content (EPA method 3050), and.

  9. Decreased PCDD/F formation when co-firing a waste fuel and biomass in a CFB boiler by addition of sulphates or municipal sewage sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Åmand, Lars-Erik [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Energy and Environment, Gothenburg (Sweden); Kassman, Håkan, E-mail: hakan.kassman@vattenfall.com [Vattenfall Research and Development AB, Nyköping (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: • Two strategies to reduce PCDD/F formation when co-firing solid recovered fuel (SRF) and biomass. • They were co-combustion with municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and addition of ammonium sulphate. • PCDD/Fs were significantly reduced for a biomass rich in chlorine when adding ammonium sulphate. • MSS had a suppressing effect on PCDD/F formation during co-combustion with SRF. • A link is presented between gaseous alkali chlorides, chlorine in deposits and PCDD/F formation. - Abstract: Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) are formed during waste incineration and in waste-to-energy boilers. Incomplete combustion, too short residence times at low combustion temperatures (<700 °C), incineration of electronic waste and plastic waste containing chlorine are all factors influencing the formation of PCDD/Fs in boilers. The impact of chlorine and catalysing metals (such as copper and iron) in the fuel on PCDD/F formation was studied in a 12 MW{sub th} circulating fluidised bed (CFB) boiler. The PCDD/F concentrations in the raw gas after the convection pass of the boiler and in the fly ashes were compared. The fuel types were a so-called clean biomass with low content of chlorine, biomass with enhanced content of chlorine from supply of PVC, and solid recovered fuel (SRF) which is a waste fuel containing higher concentrations of both chlorine, and catalysing metals. The PCDD/F formation increased for the biomass with enhanced chlorine content and it was significantly reduced in the raw gas as well as in the fly ashes by injection of ammonium sulphate. A link, the alkali chloride track, is demonstrated between the level of alkali chlorides in the gas phase, the chlorine content in the deposits in the convection pass and finally the PCDD/F formation. The formation of PCDD/Fs was also significantly reduced during co-combustion of SRF with municipal sewage sludge (MSS) compared to when SRF was fired without MSS

  10. Effect of hydraulic retention time and sludge recirculation on greenhouse gas emission and related microbial communities in two-stage membrane bioreactor treating solid waste leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuansawan, Nararatchporn; Boonnorat, Jarungwit; Chiemchaisri, Wilai; Chiemchaisri, Chart

    2016-06-01

    Methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions and responsible microorganisms during the treatment of municipal solid waste leachate in two-stage membrane bioreactor (MBR) was investigated. The MBR system, consisting of anaerobic and aerobic stages, were operated at hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 5 and 2.5days in each reactor under the presence and absence of sludge recirculation. Organic and nitrogen removals were more than 80% under all operating conditions during which CH4 emission were found highest under no sludge recirculation condition at HRT of 5days. An increase in hydraulic loading resulted in a reduction in CH4 emission from anaerobic reactor but an increase from the aerobic reactor. N2O emission rates were found relatively constant from anaerobic and aerobic reactors under different operating conditions. Diversity of CH4 and N2O producing microorganisms were found decreasing when hydraulic loading rate to the reactors was increased. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Distribution of tetracycline resistance genes in anaerobic treatment of waste sludge: The role of pH in regulating tetracycline resistant bacteria and horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haining; Chen, Yinguang; Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Wan, Rui; Yang, Shouye

    2016-10-01

    Although pH value has been widely regarded as an important factor that affects resource recovery of waste sludge, the potential influence of diverse pHs on the distribution of tetracycline resistance genes (TRGs) during sludge anaerobic treatment is largely unknown. Here we reported that in the range of pH 4-10, 0.58-1.18 log unit increase of target TRGs was observed at pH 4, compared with that at pH 7, while 0.70-1.31 log unit further removal were obtained at pH 10. Mechanism study revealed that varied pHs not only altered the community structures of tetracycline resistant bacteria (TRB), but also changed their relative abundances, benefitting the propagation (acidic pHs) or attenuation (alkaline pHs) of TRB. Further investigation indicated that the amount and gene-possessing abilities of key genetic vectors for horizontal TRGs transfer were greatly promoted at acidic pHs but restricted under alkaline conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of hydrothermal pre-treatment (HTP) on poultry slaughterhouse waste (PSW) sludge for the enhancement of the solubilization, physical properties, and biogas production through anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seyong; Yoon, Young-Man; Han, Seong Kuk; Kim, Daegi; Kim, Ho

    2017-06-01

    This study is an assessment of the hydrothermal pre-treatment (HTP) of poultry slaughterhouse waste (PSW) sludge for the enhancement of the solubilization, physical properties, and biogas production through anaerobic digestion. This assessment was carried out to ascertain the optimal HTP temperature. The solubilization and physical properties efficacy was investigated by capillary suction time (CST), time to filter (TTF), and particle size. In addition, the anaerobic digestion was investigated through biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests and subsequent statistical analysis using the modified Gompertz model. HTP was found to have improved the solubilization of the PSW sludge with increasing HTP temperature. In addition, the results of the CST, TTF, and particle size decreased with increasing HTP temperature. These results of the assessment that was conducted in this study confirm that the HTP process indeed modifies the physical properties of PSWs to enhance the solubilization of organic solids. Nevertheless, the results of the BMP tests and the modified Gompertz model analysis show that the optimal HTP temperature of PSWs for anaerobic digestion is 190°C. These findings show that to achieve high conversion efficiency, an accurately designed pre-treatment step must be included in the overall anaerobic digestion process for wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Decreased PCDD/F formation when co-firing a waste fuel and biomass in a CFB boiler by addition of sulphates or municipal sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åmand, Lars-Erik; Kassman, Håkan

    2013-08-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) are formed during waste incineration and in waste-to-energy boilers. Incomplete combustion, too short residence times at low combustion temperatures (boilers. The impact of chlorine and catalysing metals (such as copper and iron) in the fuel on PCDD/F formation was studied in a 12 MW(th) circulating fluidised bed (CFB) boiler. The PCDD/F concentrations in the raw gas after the convection pass of the boiler and in the fly ashes were compared. The fuel types were a so-called clean biomass with low content of chlorine, biomass with enhanced content of chlorine from supply of PVC, and solid recovered fuel (SRF) which is a waste fuel containing higher concentrations of both chlorine, and catalysing metals. The PCDD/F formation increased for the biomass with enhanced chlorine content and it was significantly reduced in the raw gas as well as in the fly ashes by injection of ammonium sulphate. A link, the alkali chloride track, is demonstrated between the level of alkali chlorides in the gas phase, the chlorine content in the deposits in the convection pass and finally the PCDD/F formation. The formation of PCDD/Fs was also significantly reduced during co-combustion of SRF with municipal sewage sludge (MSS) compared to when SRF was fired without MSS as additional fuel. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. K Basins sludge removal temporary sludge storage tank system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mclean, M.A.

    1997-06-12

    Shipment of sludge from the K Basins to a disposal site is now targeted for August 2000. The current path forward for sludge disposal is shipment to Tank AW-105 in the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). Significant issues of the feasibility of this path exist primarily due to criticality concerns and the presence of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) in the sludge at levels that trigger regulation under the Toxic Substance Control Act. Introduction of PCBs into the TWRS processes could potentially involve significant design and operational impacts to both the Spent Nuclear Fuel and TWRS projects if technical and regulatory issues related to PCB treatment cannot be satisfactorily resolved. Concerns of meeting the TWRS acceptance criteria have evolved such that new storage tanks for the K Basins sludge may be the best option for storage prior to vitrification of the sludge. A reconunendation for the final disposition of the sludge is scheduled for June 30, 1997. To support this decision process, this project was developed. This project provides a preconceptual design package including preconceptual designs and cost estimates for the temporary sludge storage tanks. Development of cost estimates for the design and construction of sludge storage systems is required to help evaluate a recommendation for the final disposition of the K Basin sludge.

  15. Biliary sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, C W; Sekijima, J H; Lee, S P

    1999-02-16

    Biliary sludge was first described with the advent of ultrasonography in the 1970s. It is defined as a mixture of particulate matter and bile that occurs when solutes in bile precipitate. Its composition varies, but cholesterol monohydrate crystals, calcium bilirubinate, and other calcium salts are the most common components. The clinical course of biliary sludge varies, and complete resolution, a waxing and waning course, and progression to gallstones are all possible outcomes. Biliary sludge may cause complications, including biliary colic, acute pancreatitis, and acute cholecystitis. Clinical conditions and events associated with the formation of biliary sludge include rapid weight loss, pregnancy, ceftriaxone therapy, octreotide therapy, and bone marrow or solid organ transplantation. Sludge may be diagnosed on ultrasonography or bile microscopy, and the optimal diagnostic method depends on the clinical setting. This paper proposes a protocol for the microscopic diagnosis of sludge. There are no proven methods for the prevention of sludge formation, even in high-risk patients, and patients should not be routinely monitored for the development of sludge. Asymptomatic patients with sludge can be managed expectantly. If patients with sludge develop symptoms or complications, cholecystectomy should be considered as the definitive therapy. Further studies of the pathogenesis, natural history, and clinical associations of biliary sludge will be essential to our understanding of gallstones and other biliary tract abnormalities.

  16. USE OF AN EQUILIBRIUM MODEL TO FORECAST DISSOLUTION EFFECTIVENESS, SAFETY IMPACTS, AND DOWNSTREAM PROCESSABILITY FROM OXALIC ACID AIDED SLUDGE REMOVAL IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS 1-15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KETUSKY, EDWARD

    2005-10-31

    This thesis details a graduate research effort written to fulfill the Magister of Technologiae in Chemical Engineering requirements at the University of South Africa. The research evaluates the ability of equilibrium based software to forecast dissolution, evaluate safety impacts, and determine downstream processability changes associated with using oxalic acid solutions to dissolve sludge heels in Savannah River Site High Level Waste (HLW) Tanks 1-15. First, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Coupled with a model, a material balance determines the fate of hypothetical worst-case sludge in the treatment and neutralization tanks during each chemical adjustment. Although sludge is dissolved, after neutralization more is created within HLW. An energy balance determines overpressurization and overheating to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen may overwhelm the purge ventilation. Limiting the heel volume treated/acid added and processing the solids through vitrification is preferred and should not significantly increase the number of glass canisters.

  17. Management post-treatment of sewage plant sludge. The UE directives affect its re-use and encourage waste-to-energy recovery; Gestion y postratamientos de fangos de EDAR. Las directivas de la UE condicionan su reutilizacion e inducen a la valoracion energetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, X.

    2004-07-01

    As the number of urban waste-water treatment plants increases, so does the amount of sludge generated and this sludge must be treated so that it can be finally disposed of as a by-product or waste. This article examines and classifies the various different post-treatment techniques and processes for sludge, including the most recent, especially in regard to its use in energy production. It also looks at the major conditions laid downs by European Union (EU) legislation and points out that long-term planning of sludge waste management is required, as the choice of a particular treatment process, which generally involves a large capital outlay, must take into consideration the legal, technical and financial aspects based on a forecasts of how they are likely to perform over time in order to guarantee its future viability. Characterisation of biodegradation in waste water from the canning industry in sequencing batch reactors. (Author) 23 refs.

  18. Boosting methane generation by co-digestion of sludge with fruit and vegetable waste: Internal environment of digester and methanogenic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maria, Francesco; Barratta, Martino

    2015-09-01

    The effects of anaerobic co-digestion of waste-mixed sludge with fruit and vegetable waste (FVW) on the methane generation of a mesophilic digester was investigated. Organic loading rates (OLR) were 1.46kgVS/m(3)day, 2.1kgVS/m(3)day and 2.8kgVS/m(3)day. Increase in the OLR due to FVW co-digestion caused modification of the internal environment of the digester, mainly in terms of N-NH4 (mg/L). Corresponding microbial populations were investigated by metagenomic high-throughput sequencing. Maximum specific bio-methane generation of 435 NLCH4 per kgVS feed was achieved for an OLR of 2.1kgVS/m(3)day, which corresponded to a biomethane generation per kgVS removed of about 1700 NLCH4. In these conditions the methanogenic pathway was dominated by aceticlastic Methanosaeta and hydrogenotrophic/aceticlastic Methanoscarcinae. Ammonia concentration in the digester resulted a key parameter for enhancing syntrophic acetate oxidation, enabling a balanced aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic/aceticlastic methanogenic pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of organic loading rate on the stability, operational parameters and performance of a secondary upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactor treating piggery waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, E; Borja, R; Travieso, L; Martín, A; Colmenarejo, M F

    2005-02-01

    A study of anaerobic digestion of piggery wastewater was carried out in a laboratory-scale sludge bed reactor as a secondary treatment. The effect of organic volumetric loading rates (BV) in the range of 1.0-8.1 g TCOD/ld on the process performance was evaluated. The best results were obtained at BV equal to or lower than 4 g TCOD/ld. At higher BV values, the removal efficiency of the process decreased suddenly. A linear relationship was found between the effluent SCOD and the TVFA/alkalinity ratio (P). A relationship was found among the different operational variables (BV , removal efficiency, effluent soluble COD, soluble COD removal rate (R), retention factor (phi), specific microbial growth rate (mu), methane production rate per volume of reactor and per volume of waste treated--QM and qM, respectively) and the corresponding regression equations were obtained. An increase of BV determined a decrease of removal efficiency, phi and qM and an increase of effluent soluble COD, mu, R and QM. The value of the maximum specific microbial growth rate (muM) determined through the equation that correlated BV and mu was found to be 0.19 d(-1). This value was of the same magnitude as those reported in other works of anaerobic digestion of piggery waste.

  20. Culture-independent analyses reveal novel Anaerolineaceae as abundant primary fermenters in anaerobic digesters treating waste activated sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlroy, Simon Jon; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Dueholm, Morten Simonsen

    2017-01-01

    primary and surplus sludge from wastewater treatment plants, yet are known only by their 16S rRNA gene sequence. This study applied metagenomics to obtain a complete circular genome (2.57 Mbp) from a representative of the A6 taxon. Preliminary annotation of the genome indicates these organisms...... to be anaerobic chemoorganoheterotrophs with a fermentative metabolism. Given their observed abundance, they are likely important primary fermenters in digester systems. Application of fluorescence in situ hybridisation probes designed in this study revealed their morphology to be short filaments present within...

  1. Combined treatment of alkaline and disperser for improving solubilization and anaerobic biodegradability of dairy waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uma Rani, R; Kaliappan, S; Adish Kumar, S; Rajesh Banu, J

    2012-12-01

    An investigation into the influence of combined alkaline and disperser pretreatment on sludge disintegration was studied. The effects of four variables, alkalines (NaOH, KOH, Ca(OH)(2)), treatment time (15-180 min), pH (8-11) and rpm (4000-24,000) were investigated. The effect of sludge pretreatment was evaluated by COD solubilization, suspended solids reduction and biogas production. The best performances, in terms of COD solubilization, SS reduction and biogas production, were the ones that occurred for specific energy input of 4544 kJ kg(-1) TS for NaOH at pH10, were found to be 24%, 23.3% and 76%, higher than the control, respectively. Not only the increase in biogas production was investigated, excluding protein hydrolysis was also performed successfully by this combined pretreatment even at low specific energy input. Thus, this chemo-mechanical is an effective method for enhancement of biodegradability and it laid the basis to produce higher biogas quantities, to improve clean energy generation from WAS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Substitution of peat for municipal solid waste- and sewage sludge-based composts in nursery growing media: effects on growth and nutrition of the native shrub Pistacia lentiscus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostos, J C; López-Garrido, R; Murillo, J M; López, R

    2008-04-01

    In this study, the effect of a partial substitution of peat for compost on the growth and nutrition of a native shrub (Pistacia lentiscus L.) was tested. Composts were prepared from pruning and municipal solid wastes or pruning waste and sewage sludge. For preparing growing media each compost was added at a rate of 40%, fresh pine bark at 20% or 40% and peat at 20%, 40% or 60%. Aqueous extracts from the substrates did not impair germination of cress (germination bioassay). In relation to plants growing in peat-based substrate (used as a control), plants of the compost-based substrates reached better growth and nutrition, especially when using the sewage sludge-based compost, and the P uptake was notably enhanced. The concentrations of trace elements were far lower than the ranges considered phytotoxic for vascular plants. Detrimental effect derived from using fresh pine bark was not observed.

  3. Optimization of magnetic field-assisted ultrasonication for the disintegration of waste activated sludge using Box-Behnken design with response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Su; Deng, Feng; Huang, Si-Qi; Liu, Shu-Yang; Ai, Le-Xian; She, Pu-Ying

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated for the first time the feasibility of using a magnetic field for sludge disintegration. Approximately 41.01% disintegration degree (DD) was reached after 30min at 180mT magnetic field intensity upon separate magnetic field treatment. Protein and polysaccharide contents significantly increased. This test was optimized using a Box-Behnken design (BBD) with response surface methodology (RSM) to fit the multiple equation of the DD. The maximum DD was 43.75% and the protein and polysaccharide contents increased to 56.71 and 119.44mg/L, respectively, when the magnetic field strength was 119.69mT, reaction time was 30.49min, and pH was 9.82 in the optimization experiment. We then analyzed the effects of ultrasound alone. We are the first to combine magnetic field with ultrasound to disintegrate waste-activated sludge (WAS). The optimum effect was obtained with the application of ultrasound alone at 45kHz frequency, with a DD of about 58.09%. By contrast, 62.62% DD was reached in combined magnetic field and ultrasound treatment. This combined test was also optimized using BBD with RSM to fit the multiple equation of DD. The maximum DD of 64.59% was achieved when the magnetic field intensity was 197.87mT, ultrasonic frequency was 42.28kHz, reaction time was 33.96min, and pH was 8.90. These results were consistent with those of particle size and electron microscopy analyses. This research proved that a magnetic field can effectively disintegrate WAS and can be combined with other physical techniques such as ultrasound for optimal results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Co-composting of municipal solid waste mixed with matured sewage sludge: The relationship between N2O emissions and denitrifying gene abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Rongxing; Sun, Yingjie; Li, Weihua; Ma, Qiang; Chai, Xiaoli

    2017-12-01

    Aerobic composting is an alternative measure to the disposal of municipal solid waste (MSW). However, it produces nitrous oxide (N 2 O), a highly potent greenhouse via microbial nitrification and denitrification. In this study, the effects of matured sewage sludge (MSS) amendment on N 2 O emissions and the inter-relationships between N 2 O emissions and the abundance of denitrifying bacteria were investigated during aerobic composting of MSW. The results demonstrated that MSW composting with MSS amendments (C1, and C2, with a MSW to MSS ratio of 2:1 and 4:1, (v/v), respectively) significantly increased N 2 O emissions during the initial stage, yet contributed to the mitigation of N 2 O emissions during the cooling and maturation stage. MSS amended composting emitted a total of 18.4%-25.7% less N 2 O than the control treatment without MSS amendment (CK). Matured sewage sludge amendment also significantly altered the abundance of denitrifying bacteria. The quantification of denitrifying functional genes revealed that the N 2 O emission rate had a significant positive correlation with the abundance of the nirS, nirK genes in both treatments with MSS amendment. The nosZ/(nirS + nirK) ratio could be a good indicator for predicting N 2 O emissions. The higher N 2 O emission rate during the initial stage of composting mixed with MSS was characterized by lower nosZ/(nirS + nirK) ratios, compared to CK treatment. Higher ratios of nosZ/(nirS + nirK) were measured during the cooling and maturation stage in treatments with MSS which resulted in a reduction of the N 2 O emissions. These results demonstrated that MSS amendment could be a valid strategy for mitigating N 2 O emissions during MSW composting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Combatting bulking sludge with ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuensch, B.; Heine, W.; Neis, U. [Technische Univ. Hamburg-Harburg, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering

    2002-07-01

    Bulking and floating sludge cause great problems in many waste water treatment plants with biological nutrient removal. The purification as well as the sludge digestion process can be affected. These problems are due to the interlaced structure of filamentous microorganisms, which have an impact on the sludge's settling behaviour. Foam is able to build up a stable layer, which does not settle in the secondary clarifier. Foam in digestion causes a reduction of the degree of stabilisation and of the biogas production. We use low-frequency ultrasound to combat filamentous organisms in bulking sludge. Low-frequency ultrasound is suitable to create high local shear stresses, which are capable of breaking the filamentous structures of the sludge. After preliminary lab-scale tests now a full-scale new ultrasound equipment is operating at Reinfeld sewage treatment plant, Germany. The objective of this study is to explore the best ultrasound configuration to destroy the filamentous structure of bulking and foaming sludge in a substainable way. Later this study will also look into the effects of ultrasound treated bulking sludge on the anaerobic digestion process. Up to now results show that the settling behaviour of bulking sludge is improved. The minimal ultrasound energy input for destruction of bulking structure was determined. (orig.)

  6. Oily Sludge Biodetoxification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    bio- contactors , 5 membrane reactors, and activated sludge systems have been developed to maximize bacterial contact with the waste and reduce...with a membrane filter that has enabled them to use all of the treated wastewater for plant cooling. xiv 1 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1.1...other activities. To increase the throughput of the filtration unit, the original membranes were replaced with a polysulfone blend spiral wound

  7. Burning sewage sludge in cement kilns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obrist, A.

    1987-03-01

    Full-scale industrial trial burning of sewage sludge in cement kilns in Switzerland is reported. Tests with dried sludge, kiln operation, chimney emissions, clinker and cement are discussed, and possibilities open to Swiss cement industry, and significance within the overall scope of waste disposal are outlined.

  8. Anaerobic co-digestion of municipal food waste and sewage sludge: A comparative life cycle assessment in the context of a waste service provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Joel; Othman, Maazuza; Crossin, Enda; Burn, Stewart

    2017-01-01

    This study used life cycle assessment to evaluate the environmental impact of anaerobic co-digestion (AcoD) and compared it against the current waste management system in two case study areas. Results indicated AcoD to have less environmental impact for all categories modelled excluding human toxicity, despite the need to collect and pre-treat food waste separately. Uncertainty modelling confirmed that AcoD has a 100% likelihood of a smaller global warming potential, and for acidification, eutrophication and fossil fuel depletion AcoD carried a greater than 85% confidence of inducing a lesser impact than the current waste service. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The removal of lead and nickel from the composted municipal waste and sewage sludge using nanoscale zero-valent iron fixed on quartz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemzadeh, Parisa; Bostani, Amir

    2017-11-01

    Reducing the concentration of heavy metals including lead (Pb) and nickel (Ni) in organic contaminants such as municipal wastes and sewage sludge is of health and environmental importance. Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles can effectively remove heavy metals from contaminated aqueous and solid media. It was accordingly hypothesized that it is possible to recycle and detoxify organic waste materials containing heavy metals using NZVI and NZVI fixed on quartz (QNZVI). The objective was to investigate the effects of NZVI type, concentration (2% and 5%) and contact time on the removal of Pb and Ni from raw compost, compost fermented with beet molasses, and leachate using a factorial design. The results indicated the significant reduction of DTPA- Pb and DTPA-Ni concentration, in all the organic compounds treated with NZVI and QNZVI (P= 0.01), compared with control. Increased concentration of NZVI in all treatments, increased the rate of DTPA-Pb and DTPA-Ni (P= 0.01) at 113.1% and 180% for Pb (NZVI at 2% and 5%), and at 16.3% and 23.3% for Ni, irrespective of the NZVI type. The reducing trend of extractable Pb and Ni in all the organic compounds was the same, quick reduction at the beginning, followed by a negligible rate. The highest reduction rates for Pb (at one hour) and Ni (at 672h) were equal to 72.93% and 23.27%, respectively. NZVI at 2% was more efficient than NZVI at 5%. There were not any significant differences between NZVI and QNZVI on the removal of Pb and Ni from the organic contaminants. It is possible to immobilize and reduce the concentration of heavy metals such as Pb and Ni in organic contaminants using NZVI, which is affected by NZVI properties, concentration, and contact time, as well as by organic contaminant type. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. New criteria to determine the destabilization of the acidogenic anaerobic co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) with mixed sludge (MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeriz-Campoy, R; Fdez-Güelfo, L A; Tyagi, Vinay Kumar; Álvarez-Gallego, C J; Romero-García, L I

    2017-06-12

    Effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) on bio-hydrogen production from co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and mixed sludge (MS) in dry thermophilic conditions (55°C and 20% total solids) was investigated. A decreasing sequence of six HRTs, from 2.9 to 0.8-days, was performed to evaluate the stability of the system and the influence of HRT on the organic matter solubilization, the daily hydrogen production (HP) and the specific hydrogen production (SHP). Best results were obtained operating at 1.2-days HRT: HP of 3.67L H2/Lreactor/day, SHP of 33.8mL H2/gVSadded and hydrogen percentage in biogas of 52.4%. However, HRTs lower than 1.2-days induce failure in the system due to an unbalance of the hydrolytic phase. This fact was corroborated through the evaluation of two indirect parameters, "non-solubilized carbon" (NSC) and "acidogenic substrate as carbon" (ASC), and the relationships of NSC/TOC and ASC/TOC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of pulp and paper sludge and food waste for methane production in a fed-batch basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yunqin; Wang, Dehan; Liang, Jiajin; Li, Guangpeng

    2012-12-01

    Co-digestion of pulp and paper sludge (PPS) and food waste (FW) in a batch-fed digestion system was conducted on a laboratory scale. Three reactors named A1, A2, and A3 were tested. PPS and FW mixed at different mass ratios of 1:3, 1:1, and 3:1, respectively, were loaded in the reactors. Bioconversion at high efficiency was obtained in the system. The accumulative methane yield of each reactor was 144mLg(-1)VSfed (A1), 256 mL g(-1) VSfed (A2), and 123 mL g(-1)VSfed (A3). The soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies reached 73.2% (Al), 93.9% (A2), and 79.6% (A3). A pH in the range 5.8-8.4 was obtained in the three reactors without adjustment due to the high buffer capacity of the mixing feedstock. No toxicity inhibitions of volatile fatty acids and NH3-N occurred in reactor A2. This study showed that it was good for co-digestion of PPS and FW in a mass ratio of 1:1 for methane production, which resulted in higher methane yield, a greater buffer capacity, a higher organics removal efficiency, and a more stable process.

  12. Thermophilic anaerobic digestion of coffee grounds with and without waste activated sludge as co-substrate using a submerged AnMBR: system amendments and membrane performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Wei; Takayanagi, Kazuyuki; Shofie, Mohammad; Niu, Qigui; Yu, Han Qing; Li, Yu-You

    2013-12-01

    Coffee grounds are deemed to be difficult for degradation by thermophilic anaerobic process. In this research, a 7 L AnMBR accepting coffee grounds was operated for 82 days and failed with pH dropping to 6.6. The deficiency of micronutrients in the reactor was identified. The system was recovered by supplying micronutrient, pH adjustment and influent ceasing for 22 days. In the subsequent 160 days of co-digestion experiment, waste activated sludge (15% in the mixture) was mixed into coffee grounds. The COD conversion efficiency of 67.4% was achieved under OLR of 11.1 kg-COD/m(3) d and HRT of 20 days. Tannins was identified affecting protein degradation by a batch experiment. Quantitative supplements of NH4HCO3 (0.12 g-N/g-TSin) were effective to maintain alkalinity and pH. The solid concentration in the AnMBR reached 75 g/L, but it did not significantly affect membrane filtration under a flux of 5.1 L/m(2) h. Soluble carbohydrate, lipid and protein were partially retained by the membrane. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification and biotransformation of aliphatic hydrocarbons during co-composting of sewage sludge-Date Palm waste using Pyrolysis-GC/MS technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Fels, Loubna; Lemee, Laurent; Ambles, André; Hafidi, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    The behavior of aliphatic hydrocarbons during co-composting of sewage sludge activated with palm tree waste was studied for 6 months using Py-GC/MS. The main aliphatic compounds represented as doublet alkenes/alkanes can be classified into three groups. The first group consists of 11 alkenes (undecene, tridecene, pentadecene, hexadecene, heptadecene, octadecene, nonadecene, eicosene, uncosene, docosene, tricosene) and 15 alkanes (heptane, octane, nonane, decane, undecane, dodecane, tetradecane, pentadecane, heptadecane, octadecane, nonadecane, eicosane, uncosane, docosane, and tricosane), which remain stable during the co-composting process. The stability of these compounds is related to their recalcitrance behavior. The second group consists of five alkenes (heptene, octene, nonene, decene, dodecene) and tridecane as a single alkane that decreases during co-composting. The decrease in these compounds is the combined result of their metabolism and their conversion into other compounds. The third group is constituted with tetradecene and hexadecane that increase during composting, which could be explained by accumulation of these compounds, which are released by the partial breakdown of the substrate. As a result, these molecules are incorporated or adsorbed in the structure of humic substances.

  14. Influence of fermentation liquid from waste activated sludge on anoxic/oxic- membrane bioreactor performance: Nitrogen removal, membrane fouling and microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaomeng; Zhou, Zhen; Mei, Xiaojie; Ma, Yan; Xie, Zhenfang

    2017-12-02

    In order to investigate effects of waste activated sludge (WAS) fermentation liquid on anoxic/oxic- membrane bioreactor (A/O-MBR), two A/O-MBRs with and without WAS fermentation liquid addition were operated in parallel. Results show that addition of WAS fermentation liquid clearly improved denitrification efficiency without deterioration of nitrification, while severe membrane fouling occurred. WAS fermentation liquid resulted in an elevated production of proteins and humic acids in bound extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) and release of organic matter with high MW fractions in soluble microbial product (SMP) and loosely bound EPS (LB-EPS). Measurement of deposition rate and fluid structure confirmed increased fouling potential of SMP and LB-EPS. γ-Proteobacteria and Ferruginibacter, which can secrete and export EPS, were also found to be abundant in the MBR with WAS fermentation liquid. It is implied that when WAS fermentation liquid was applied, some operational steps to control membrane fouling should be employed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. AUTOIGNICION 3-D EN DEPOSITOS DE LODOS PROVENIENTES DE TRATAMIENTOS DE AGUAS RESIDUALES 3D SELF IGNITION IN SEWAGE SLUDGE WASTE WATER TREAMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Moraga B

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Se estudia el transporte de calor y de oxígeno por difusión en pilas de compostajes provenientes de tratamiento de aguas municipales. El modelo 3-D transiente incluye la generación de calor originada por microorganismos y por la descomposición de la celulosa. El sistema de ecuaciones acopladas de difusión de calor y materia se resuelve con el método de volúmenes finitos. Los resultados predicen la variación en el tiempo de la distribución de temperatura y oxígeno. El análisis de los resultados permite proponer un nuevo sistema para el almacenamiento de lodos con el fin de evitar su autoignición.Heat and oxygen transport by diffusion in sewage sludge piles obtained from water treatment is studied. The 3D unsteady mathematical model incorporates the heat generated by microorganisms and by cellulose decomposition. The coupled heat and mass diffusion equations system of partial differential equations is solved by the finite volume method. The results obtained allow predicting the time history of temperature and oxygen concentration distributions. Results analysis suggests a new way to build the solid waste compost piles.

  16. Effects of ultrasonic-assisted thermophilic bacteria pretreatment on hydrolysis, acidification, and microbial communities in waste-activated sludge fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunxue; Zhou, Aijuan; He, Zhangwei; Jiang, Lei; Guo, Zechong; Wang, Aijie; Liu, Wenzong

    2015-06-01

    A novel pretreatment method combining ultrasonic with thermophilic bacteria (Geobacillus sp. G1) was employed to pretreat waste-activated sludge (WAS) for enhancing the WAS hydrolysis and subsequent volatile fatty acids (VFAs) production. The soluble protein and carbohydrate were mostly released from intracellular ultrasonic-assisted Geobacillus sp. G1 pretreatment, and accumulated to 917 ± 70 and 772 ± 89 mg COD/L, respectively, which were 2.53- and 2.62-fold higher than that obtained in control test. Excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy revealed the highest fluorescence intensity (FI) of protein-like substances, indicating the synergistic effect of ultrasonic and Geobacillus sp. G1 pretreatments on WAS hydrolysis. The maximum VFAs accumulation was 4437 ± 15 mg COD/L obtained in ultrasonic-assisted Geobacillus sp. G1 pretreatment test. High-throughput pyrosequencing analysis investigated that the microbial communities were substantial determined by the pretreatment used. The hydrolysis enhancement was caused by an increase in extracellular enzymes, which was produced by one of dominant species Caloramator sp. The positive effect was well explained to the enhancement of WAS hydrolysis and final VFAs accumulation.

  17. H2O2 induced cost effective microwave disintegration of dairy waste activated sludge in acidic environment for efficient biomethane generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswari, A Parvathy; Kavitha, S; Banu, J Rajesh; Karthikeyan, O Parthiba; Yeom, Ick-Tae

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to improve the biomethane potential of dairy waste activated sludge (WAS) by H2O2-acidic pH induced microwave disintegration (HAMW-D) pretreatment approach. The results of HAMW-D compared with the microwave disintegration (MW-D) alone for energy and economic factors. In the two phase disintegration process, the H2O2 concentration of about 0.5mg/g SS under acid pH of 5 was found to be optimum for effective dissociation of Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS) matrix. A higher liquefaction of about 46.6% was achieved in HAMW-D when compared to that of MW-D (30%). It subsequently improved the methane yield of about 250mL/g VS in HAMW-D, which was 9.6% higher than MW-D. A net profit of about 49€/ton was achieved for HAMW-D, therefore it is highly recommended for WAS pretreatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The impact of silver nanoparticles on the co-composting of sewage sludge and agricultural waste: Evolutions of organic matter and nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lihua; Zeng, Guangming; Dong, Haoran; Chen, Yaoning; Zhang, Jiachao; Yan, Ming; Zhu, Yuan; Yuan, Yujie; Xie, Yankai; Huang, Zhenzhen

    2017-04-01

    This study evaluated the influence of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on evolutions of organic matter and nitrogen during co-composting of sewage sludge and agricultural waste. Two co-composting piles were conducted, one was treated without AgNPs (pile 1) and the other with AgNPs (pile 2). Results showed that the AgNPs affected the quality of final composts. Less organic matter (OM) losses were determined in pile 2 (57.96%) than pile 1 (61.66%). 27.22% and 30.1% of the initial total organic matter (TOC) was decomposed in pile 1 and pile 2, respectively. The final water soluble carbon (WSC) concentration in pile 2 was 23559.27mg/kg DW compost which was significantly lower than pile 1 (25642.75mg/kg DW compost). Changes of different forms of nitrogen in the two piles showed that AgNPs could reduce the losses of TN but increase the losses of mineral N. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Structural and functional properties of organic matters in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and dissolved organic matters (DOM) after heat pretreatment with waste sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Guo, Liang; Li, Qianqian; Zhao, Yangguo; Gao, Mengchun; She, Zonglian; Wang, Guangce

    2016-11-01

    The effects of heat pretreatment on waste sludge hydrolysis were investigated in this study. Heat pretreatment was conducted at 65°C, 80°C, 100°C and 121°C for 5min, 10min, 15min, 20min, 25min and 30min. Not only analyzed the changes of SCOD (Soluble chemical oxygen demand), carbohydrate and protein, but also evaluated the structural and functional properties of organics in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and dissolved organic matters (DOM) by using three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3D-EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy with fluorescence regional integration (FRI) analysis. The SCOD in DOM increased with pretreated temperatures. The optimal heat hydrolysis temperature and time were selected by further studying the biodegradable and non-biodegradable components. After treated at 80°C for 25min, the fluorescence intensity and percent fluorescence response (Pi,n) of easily biodegradable soluble microbial by-product substance were higher than others, and little non-biodegradable fulvic acid-like substance was accumulated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Study of the Utilization of Palm Fruit Sludge for Food Preparations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the study, palm fruit sludge was recovered and used in human food preparation. The sludge was obtained from palm fruit waste liquid through filtration and dewatering. The wet sludge was dried at 50°C, milled into powder and sieved to obtain the dry powder. Proximate analysis of the dry sludge showed that it contained ...

  1. Removal of heavy metals from sewage sludge by extraction with organic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veeken, A.H.M.; Hamelers, H.V.M.

    1999-01-01

    Waste water treatment in activated sludge plants results in the production of large amounts of surplus sludge. After composting the sludge can be reused as fertiliser and soil conditioner in agriculture. Compared to landfilling and incineration, utilisation of sludge-compost is a more sustainable

  2. Co-digestion of sewage sludge and sterilized solid slaughterhouse waste: methane production efficiency and process limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitk, Peep; Kaparaju, Prasad; Palatsi, Jordi; Affes, Rim; Vilu, Raivo

    2013-04-01

    The rendering product of Category 2 and 3 Animal By-Products is known as sterilized mass (SM) and it is mainly composed of fat and proteins, making it interesting substrate for anaerobic digestion. Batch and semi-continuous laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of SM addition in co-digestion with sewage sludge on methane production and possible process limitations. Results showed that SM addition in the feed mixture up to 5% (w/w), corresponding to 68.1% of the organic loading, increased methane production 5.7 times, without any indication of process inhibition. Further increase of SM addition at 7.5% (w/w) caused methane production decrease and volatile solids removal reduction, that was mainly related to remarkably increased free ammonia concentration in the digester of 596.5±68.6 gNH3 L(-1). Sterilized mass addition of 10% (w/w) caused intensive foaming, LCFA accumulation of 9172±701.2 mgCOD-LCFA g(-1) sample and termination of the experiment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Properties of Calcium Acetate Manufactured with Etching Waste Solution and Limestone Sludge as a Cementitious High-Early-Strength Admixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deuck-Mo Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is one of the most widely used construction materials. There are several methods available to improve its performance, with one of them being the use of high-early-strength admixtures (HESAs. Typical HESAs include calcium nitrate, calcium chloride, and calcium formate (CF. Industrial by-products, such as acetic acid and lime stone sludge (LSS, can be used together to produce calcium acetate (CA, which can subsequently be used as a cementitious HESA. In this study, calcium carbonate and LSS were mixed with cement in weight ratios of 1 : 1, 1 : 1.5, and 1 : 2, and the properties of the as-produced CA were evaluated. CA and CF were mixed with cement in different weight ratios (0, 1, 2, and 3 wt% to obtain CA- and CF-mortars, respectively. The flow behavior, setting time, pH, and compressive strength of these mortars were evaluated, and their X-ray diffraction patterns were also analyzed. It was found that as the CF content in the CF-mortar increased, the initial strength of the mortar also increased. However, it impaired its long-term strength. On the other hand, when 1% CA was mixed with cement, satisfactory early and long-term strengths were achieved. Thus, CA, which is obtained from industrial by-products, can be an effective HESA.

  4. Culture-Independent Analyses Reveal Novel Anaerolineaceae as Abundant Primary Fermenters in Anaerobic Digesters Treating Waste Activated Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J. McIlroy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion for biogas production is reliant on the tightly coupled synergistic activities of complex microbial consortia. Members of the uncultured A6 phylotype, within the phylum Chloroflexi, are among the most abundant genus-level-taxa of mesophilic anaerobic digester systems treating primary and surplus sludge from wastewater treatment plants, yet are known only by their 16S rRNA gene sequence. This study applied metagenomics to obtain a complete circular genome (2.57 Mbp from a representative of the A6 taxon. Preliminary annotation of the genome indicates these organisms to be anaerobic chemoorganoheterotrophs with a fermentative metabolism. Given their observed abundance, they are likely important primary fermenters in digester systems. Application of fluorescence in situ hybridisation probes designed in this study revealed their morphology to be short filaments present within the flocs. The A6 were sometimes co-located with the filamentous Archaea Methanosaeta spp. suggesting potential undetermined synergistic relationships. Based on its genome sequence and morphology we propose the species name Brevefilum fermentans gen. nov. sp. nov.

  5. Stabilisation of sewage sludge and vinasse bio-wastes by vermicomposting with rabbit manure using Eisenia fetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, María José; Soriano, María Desamparados; Ingelmo, Florencio; Llinares, Josep

    2013-06-01

    Changes in the chemical characteristics and biological parameters of Eisenia fetida were assessed by VER using (CO+VE) rabbit manure (Vo) spiked with sewage sludge (SS) or vinasse (V). Seven mixtures were used: Vo, control; Vo+SS at 10%, 30%, and 50% (SS1, SS2, and SS3); Vo+V at 10%, 30%, and 50% (V1, V2, and V3). SS vermicomposts had higher humus, nutrient and total metal contents, but less soluble salts (EC) than V vermicomposts. The number and weight of worms were higher in Vo, followed by SS, at decreasing doses. V3 showed the smallest number and size. The EC of the initial mixtures explained reduced weight, whereas EC and avP2O5 accounted for lower numbers. Vermicomposting is an efficient biowaste recycling technology, but the total amount and composition of soluble salts in food influence the quality of end products and are of primary importance for biological parameters of worms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Agricultural use of treated waste water and sludge. Final report on the PIA-9-5 Project (Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, Autonomous Government of Andalusia); Uso agricola de agua residuales depuradas y lodos. Informe final sobre el proyecto PIA-9-5 (Consejeria de Agricultura y Pesca, Junta de Andalucia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olalla Mercade, L.; Diaz Diez, M.; Pozuelo Garcia, J. M.; Lillo Roldan, E.

    2004-07-01

    This article presents the results of the work carried out at the CIFA-Malaga on the agricultural use of treated waste water and the sludge from waste treatment processes. The latest data are reported from the systematic sampling of treated waste water (secondary effluent) and treatment sludge in certain treatment plants on the coast of Malaga. The physicochemical analytical data obtained from the regenerated waste water suggest that there may be ceratin salinity problems (mainly due to chlorides). There may also be problems with relatively high boron content and possibly with N and P content. The concentration of heavy metals did not generally present any immediate problems, but it must be monitored. When using sludge, it is recommended that it be mixed with organic matter and composted to facilitate its application to the soil, as this a more complex matter and must be subject to greater control. (Author) 7 refs.

  7. Gravity Drainage of Activated Sludge on Reed Beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard; Dominiak, Dominik Marek; Keiding, Kristian

    from the wastewater treatment plant to the red beds may destroy the sludge structure and thereby reduces the dewaterability of sludge. Both the mechanical stress during pumping and anaerobic microbial activity affects the sludge quality. The quality of the sludge can be improved if I) the drying reed......Activated sludge is a by-product from waste water treatment plants, and the water content in the sludge is high (> 90%). Among several methods to remove the water, sludge drying reed beds are often used to dewater the sludge by drainage. There is, however, no well-defined criterion for design...... beds are placed close to the wastewater treatment plant, II) anaerobic condition is avoid e.g. by adding calcium nitrate, and III) the sludge structure is rebuild before it is poured on the reed bed e.g. by adding calcium carbonate...

  8. Sewage sludge as a biomass energy source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Kolat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The major part of the dry matter content of sewage sludge consists of nontoxic organic compounds, in general a combination of primary sludge and secondary microbiological sludge. The sludge also contains a substantive amount of inorganic material and a small amount of toxic components. There are many sludge-management options in which production of energy is one of the key treatment steps. The most important options are anaerobic digestion, co-digestion, incineration in combination with energy recovery and co-incineration in coal-fired power plants. The goal of our applied research is to verify, if the sludge from waste water treatment plants may be used as a biomass energy source in respect of the EU legislation, which would comply with emission limits or the proposal of energy process optimizing the preparation of coal/sludge mixture for combustion in the existing fluid bed boilers in the Czech Republic. The paper discusses the questions of thermal usage of mechanically drained stabilized sewage sludge from the waste water treatment plants in the boiler with circulated fluid layer. The paper describes methods of thermal analysis of coal, sewage sludge and its mixtures, mud transport to the circulating fluidised bed boiler, effects on efficiency, operational reliability of the combustion equipment, emissions and solid combustion residues.

  9. Progress and perspectives of sludge ozonation as a powerful pretreatment method for minimization of excess sludge production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Libing; Yan, Sangtian; Xing, Xin-Hui; Sun, Xulin; Jurcik, Benjamin

    2009-04-01

    The treatment and disposal of excess sludge represents a bottleneck in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) worldwide, due to environmental, economic, social and legal factors. The ideal solution to the problem of sludge disposal is to combine sludge reduction with the removal of pollution at the source. This paper presents an overview of the potential of ozonation in sludge reduction. The full-scale application of ozonation in excess sludge reduction is presented. Improvements in the biodegradability of the ozonated sludge were confirmed. The introduction of ozonation into activated sludge did not significantly influence effluent quality but improved the settling properties of the sludge. An operation with a suitable sludge wasting ratio seems to be necessary to prevent accumulation of inorganic and inert particles for long-term operation. Sludge ozonation to reduce excess sludge production may be economical in WWTP which have high sludge disposal costs and operational problems such as sludge foaming and bulking. The recommended ozone dose ranges from 0.03 to 0.05 g O(3)/g TSS, which is appropriate to achieve a balance between sludge reduction efficiency and cost. An effort to design and optimize an economic sludge reduction process is necessary.

  10. K Basin sludge dissolution engineering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westra, A.G.

    1998-08-28

    The purpose of this engineering study is to investigate the available technology related to dissolution of the K Basin sludge in nitric acid. The conclusion of this study along with laboratory and hot cell tests with actual sludge samples will provide the basis for beginning conceptual design of the sludge dissolver. The K Basin sludge contains uranium oxides, fragments of metallic U, and some U hydride as well as ferric oxyhydroxide, aluminum oxides and hydroxides, windblown sand that infiltrated the basin enclosure, ion exchange resin, and miscellaneous materials. The decision has been made to dispose of this sludge separate from the fuel elements stored in the basins. The sludge will be conditioned so that it meets Tank Waste Remediation System waste acceptance criteria and can be sent to one of the underground storage tanks. Sludge conditioning will be done by dissolving the fuel constituents in nitric acid, separating the insoluble material, adding neutron absorbers for criticality safety, and then reacting the solution with caustic to co-precipitate the uranium and plutonium. There will be five distinct feed streams to the sludge conditioning process two from the K East (KE) Basin and three from the K West (KW) Basin. The composition of the floor and pit sludges which contain more iron oxides and sand than uranium is much different than the canister sludges which are composed of mostly uranium oxides. The sludge conditioning equipment will be designed to process all of the sludge streams, but some of the operating parameters will be adjusted as necessary to handle the different sludge stream compositions. The volume of chemical additions and the amount of undissolved solids will be much different for floor and pit sludge than for canister sludge. Dissolution of uranium metal and uranium dioxide has been studied quite thoroughly and much information is available. Both uranium metal and uranium dioxide have been dissolved on a large scale in nuclear fuel

  11. Application and optimization of electric field-assisted ultrasonication for disintegration of waste activated sludge using response surface methodology with a Box-Behnken design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyung-Won; Hwang, Min-Jin; Cha, Min-Jung; Ahn, Kyu-Hong

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, an electric field is applied in order to disintegrate waste activated sludge (WAS). As a preliminary step, feasibility tests are investigated using different applied voltages of 10-100V for 60min. As the applied voltage increases, the disintegration degrees (DD) are gradually enhanced, and thereby the soluble N, P, and carbohydrate concentrations increase simultaneously due to the WAS decomposition. Subsequently, an optimization process is conducted using a response surface methodology with a Box-Behnken design (BBD). The total solid concentration, applied voltage, and reaction time are selected as independent variables, while the DD is selected as the response variable. The overall results demonstrate that the BBD with an experimental design can be used effectively in the optimization of the electric field treatment of WAS. In the confirmation test, a DD of 10.26±0.14% is recorded, which corresponds to 99.1% of the predicted response value under the statistically optimized conditions. Finally, the statistic optimization of the combined treatment (electric field+ultrasonication) demonstrated that even though this method is limited to highly disintegrated WAS when it is applied individually, a high DD of 47.28±0.20% was recorded where the TS concentration was 6780mg/l, the strength of ultrasonication was 8.0W, the applied voltage was 68.4V, and the reaction time was 44min. E-SEM images clearly revealed that the application of the electric field is a significant alternative method for the combined treatment of WAS. This study was the first attempt to increase disintegration using the electric field for a combined treatment with ultrasonication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Enhancing the quantity and quality of short-chain fatty acids production from waste activated sludge using CaO2 as an additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongmei; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Ai; Wang, Lin

    2015-10-15

    The effect of calcium peroxide (CaO2) addition on anaerobic fermentation of waste activated sludge (WAS) was investigated. The lab-scale experiments were conducted at 35 °C with CaO2 doses ranging from 0.05 to 0.3 g/g VSS. The performances of hydrolysis and acidification of WAS were significantly enhanced by CaO2 addition, whereas the production of methane was inhibited. Maximum total short-chain fatty acids (TSCFA) production (284 mg COD/g VSS) occurred at a CaO2 dose of 0.2 g/g VSS and fermentation time of 7 d, which was 3.9 times higher than the control tests. Further, CaO2 addition led to the conversion of other SCFAs to acetic acid. Acetic acid comprised 60.2% of TSCFA with the addition of 0.2 g CaO2/g VSS compared with 45.1% in the control tests. The mechanism of improved SCFAs generation was analyzed from the view of both chemical and biological effects. Chemical effect facilitated the disintegration of WAS, and improved the activities of both hydrolytic enzymes and acid-forming enzymes. Illumina MiSeq sequencing analysis revealed that bacteria within phylum Firmicutes increased significantly due to CaO2 addition, which played an important role in the hydrolysis and acidification of WAS. In addition, CaO2 oxidized most refractory organic contaminants, which were difficult to biodegrade under the ordinary anaerobic condition. Hydroxyl radicals were the most abundant reactive oxygen species released by CaO2, which played a key role in the removal of refractory organic compounds. We developed a promising technology to produce a valuable carbon source from WAS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A first screening and risk assessment of pharmaceuticals and additives in personal care products in waste water, sludge, recipient water and sediment from Faroe Islands, Iceland and Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Sandra; Remberger, Mikael; Kaj, Lennart; Schlabach, Martin; Jörundsdóttir, Hrönn Ó; Vester, Jette; Arnórsson, Mímir; Mortensen, Inge; Schwartson, Richard; Dam, Maria

    2016-08-15

    A screening of a broad range of pharmaceuticals and additives in personal care products (PPCPs) in sub-arctic locations of the Faroe Islands (FO), Iceland (IS) and Greenland (GL) was conducted. In total 36 pharmaceuticals including some metabolites, and seven additives in personal care products were investigated in influent and effluent waters as well as sludge of waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) and in water and sediment of recipients. Concentrations and distribution patterns for PPCPs discharged via sewage lines (SLs) to the marine environment were assessed. Of the 36 pharmaceuticals or metabolites analysed 33 were found close to or above the limit of detection (LOD) in all or a part of the samples. All of the seven investigated additives in personal care products were detected above the LOD. Some of the analysed PPCPs occurred in every or almost every sample. Among these were diclofenac, ibuprofen, lidocaine, naproxen, metformin, citalopram, venlafaxine, amiloride, furosemide, metoprolol, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and cetrimonium salt (ATAC-C16). Additionally, the study encompasses ecotoxicological risk assessment of 2/3 of the analysed PPCPs in recipient and diluted effluent waters. For candesartan only a small margin to levels with inacceptable risks was observed in diluted effluent waters at two locations (FO). Chronical risks for aquatic organisms staying and/or living around WWTP effluent pipe-outlets were indicated for 17β-estradiol and estriol in the three countries. Additives in PCPs were found to pose the largest risk to the aquatic environment. The surfactants CAPB and ATAC-C16 were found in concentrations resulting in risk factors up to 375 for CAPB and 165 for ATAC-C16 in recipients for diluted effluents from Iggia, Nuuk (GL) and Torshavn (FO) respectively. These results demonstrates a potentially high ecological risk stemming from discharge of surfactants as used in household and industrial detergents as well as additives in personal care

  14. Evolution of organic matter fractions after application of co-compost of sewage sludge with pruning waste to four Mediterranean agricultural soils. A soil microcosm experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Lomas, A L; Delgado, G; Párraga, J; Delgado, R; Almendros, G; Aranda, V

    2010-10-01

    The effect of co-compost application from sewage sludge and pruning waste, on quality and quantity of soil organic carbon (SOC) in four Mediterranean agricultural soils (South Spain), was studied in soil microcosm conditions. Control soil samples (no co-compost addition) and soils treated with co-composts to a rate equivalent of 140 Mg ha(-1) were incubated for 90 days at two temperatures: 5 and 35 degrees C. The significances of incubation temperature and the addition of co-compost, on the evolution of the different fractions of SOC, were studied using a 2(3) factorial design. The co-compost amendment increased the amounts of humic fractions: humic acids (HA) (1.9 times), fulvic acids (FA) (3.3 times), humin (1.5 times), as well as the free organic matter (1.4 times) and free lipids (21.8 times). Incubation of the soils enhanced its biological activity mainly in the amended soils and at 35 degrees C, leading to progressive SOC mineralization and humification, concomitant to the preferential accumulation of HA. The incubation results show large differences depending on temperature and soil types. This fact allows us to select suitable organic amendment for the soil when a rapid increase in nutrients through mineralization is preferred, or in cases intending the stabilization and preservation of the SOC through a process of humification. In soils with HA of more than 5 E(4)/E(6) ratio, the incubation temperature increased rates of mineralization and humification, whereas lower temperatures limited the extent of both processes. In these soils the addition of co-compost in spring or summer is the most recommendable. In soils with HA of lower E(4)/E(6) ratio (compost. The results suggest that proper recommendations for optimum organic matter evolution after soil amendment is possible after considering a small set of characteristics of soil and the corresponding soil organic matter fractions, in particular HA. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of municipal solid waste- and sewage sludge-compost-based growing media on the yield and heavy metal content of four lettuce cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattullo, Concetta Eliana; Mininni, Carlo; Parente, Angelo; Montesano, Francesco Fabiano; Allegretta, Ignazio; Terzano, Roberto

    2017-11-01

    Compost has been recently suggested as an alternative to peat for the preparation of growing substrates in soilless cultivation systems. However, some physico-chemical properties of compost may reduce plant performance and endanger the quality of productions, in particular for possible heavy metal accumulation in edible parts. This study aims at evaluating the suitability of a municipal solid waste compost (MSWC) and a sewage sludge compost (SSC) as components of growing media for the soilless cultivation of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.). Heavy metal content of SSC complied with legislation limits but, in MSWC, it exceeded (Cu, Pb) or was very close (Cd, Zn) to safe limits. A greenhouse experiment was carried out by cultivating four lettuce cultivars ("Maximus," "Murai," "Patagonia," and "Aleppo") in pots containing a mixture of MSWC and perlite (MSWC + P), SSC and perlite (SSC + P), or peat and perlite (peat + P), the latter used as control. Plant biometric parameters measured after 72 days of growth revealed that the yield of plants cultivated on SSC + P was similar to control plants, independently of the cultivar. Conversely, MSWC + P suppressed in general the biomass production, especially for Murai and Patagonia cultivars. Compared to peat + P, both compost-based substrates reduced the leaf accumulation of heavy metals, with a major effect in Maximus plants. The levels of Cd and Pb in the edible part were always below the safe limits imposed by European regulation. Therefore, risks of heavy metal intake in food chain associated with the replacement of peat with compost in the growing media are negligible, even when a compost with a significant amount of heavy metals is used. Besides compost quality monitoring, also an appropriate varietal choice is crucial to obtain good yields and safe products.

  16. Fiscal year 1994 1/25-scale sludge mobilization testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, M.R.; Gates, C.M.; Hymas, C.R.; Sprecher, M.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Morter, N.J. [Associated Western Universities, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Northwest Div.

    1995-07-01

    There are 28 one-million-gallon double-shell radioactive waste tanks on the Hanford Reservation in southeastern Washington State. The waste in these tanks was generated during processing of nuclear materials. Solids-laden slurries were placed into many of the tanks. Over time, the waste solids have settled to form a layer of sludge in the bottom of these tanks. The sludge layer thickness varies from tank to tank with some having only a few centimeters or no sludge up to some tanks which have about 4.5 m (15 ft) of sludge. It is planned that the waste will be removed from these tanks as part of the overall Hanford site cleanup efforts. Jet mixer pumps are to be placed into the tanks to stir up (mobilize) the sludge and form a uniform slurry suitable for pumping to downstream processing facilities. These mixer pumps use powerful jets of tank fluid directed horizontally out of two, diametrically opposed nozzles near the tank bottom. These fluid jets impinge upon the sludge and stir it up. The amount of sludge mobilized by the mixer pump jets depends not only on the jet properties, but also on the ability of the sludge to resist the jets. It is the goal of the work described in this document to develop the ability to predict how much sludge will be mobilized by the mixer pumps based on the size and velocity of the mixer pump jets and the physical and chemical properties of the tank sludge.

  17. Depth-resolved microbial community analyses in the anaerobic co-digester of dewatered sewage sludge with food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui; Yang, Zhao-Hui; Zheng, Yue; Zhang, Hai-Bo; Liu, Jian-Bo; Xiong, Wei-Ping; Zhang, Yan-Ru; Ahmad, Kito

    2017-11-01

    This study evaluated the impacts of FW addition on co-digestion in terms of microbial community. Anaerobic co-digestion (AcoD) reactors were conducted at gradually increased addition of food waste (FW) from 0 to 4kg-VSm-3d-1 for 220days. Although no markable acidification was found at an OLR of 4kg-VSm-3d-1, the unhealthy operation was observed in aspect of an inhibited methane yield (185mLg-1VSadded), which was restricted by 40% when compared with its peak value. Deterioration of digestion process was timely indicated by the dramatic decrease of archaeal population and microbial biodiversity. Furthermore, the cooperation network showed a considerable number of rare species (<1%) were strongly correlated with methane production, which were frequently overlooked due to the limits of detecting resolution or analysis methods before. Advances in the analysis of sensitive microbial community enable us to detect the early disturbances in AcoD reactors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Removal of ammonium and heavy metals by cost-effective zeolite synthesized from waste quartz sand and calcium fluoride sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Lin, Bing; Hong, Junming; Chang, Chang-Tang

    2017-02-01

    This study focuses on the effectiveness of zeolite (10% CF-Z [0.5]) hydrothermally synthesized from waste quartz sand and calcium fluoride (CF) for ammonium ion and heavy metal removal. Zeolite was characterized through powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, micromeritics N2 adsorption/desorption analysis, and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The effects of CF addition, Si/Al ratio, initial ammonium concentration, solution pH, and temperature on the adsorption of ammonium on 10% CF-Z (0.5) were further examined. Results showed that 10% CF-Z (0.5) was a single-phase zeolite A with cubic-shaped crystals and 10% CF-Z (0.5) efficiently adsorbs ammonium and heavy metals. For instance, 91% ammonium (10 mg L-1) and 93% lead (10 mg L-1) are removed. The adsorption isotherm, kinetics, and thermodynamics of ammonium adsorption on 10% CF-Z (0.5) were also theoretically analyzed. The adsorption isotherm of ammonium and lead on 10% CF-Z (0.5) in single systems indicated that Freundlich model provides the best fit for the equilibrium data, whereas pseudo-second-order model best describes the adsorption kinetics. The adsorption degree of ions on 10% CF-Z (0.5) in mixed systems exhibits the following pattern: lead > ammonium > cadmium > chromium.

  19. Co-combustion of automotive shredder residue (ASR) and sewage sludge with a mixture of industrial and household waste in an 20MW fluidized bed combustor; Samfoerbraenning av bilfluff, roetslam och avfall i en 20 MW fluidbaeddpanna - Studier av braenslesammansaettningens paaverkan paa belaeggningsbildning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskilsson, David; Johansson, Andreas; Johansson, Linda; Wikstroem-Blomqvist, Evalena

    2007-07-01

    In order to prevent a further increased use of resources and to decrease the environmental impact from landfills, organic wastes are today diverted towards material and energy recovery. This creates a waste market with an increasing number of waste fractions that needs to be treated properly. As an example, in Sweden it has recently been prohibited to landfill source separated combustible waste (2002) and organic waste (2005). Wastes as automotive shredder residue (ASR) and sewage sludge can no longer be landfilled and needs to be either material or energy recovered, which challenge the waste treatment sector. This work investigates the effects of ASR and sewage sludge co-combustion in a 20 MW Energy-from-Waste plant (bubbling fluidised bed). The long term objective of the work is to increase the fuel flexibility, the boiler availability and the power production. This report focus on boiler operation and combustion performance in terms of agglomeration, deposit rates and emissions. In addition to the tests with ASR and sewage sludge, repeated measurements were performed during normal load as a reference. The results show that the co-combusted fractions of ASR and sewage sludge, which on mass basis constituted 6 % and 15 % respectively, did not increase the risk for agglomeration or deposits on heat-exchanging surfaces. Instead, compared to the two reference cases, the deposit rates decreased when sewage sludge was added. Only minor variation in the emissions was seen between the different cases. The levels of I-TEQs were far below the legislated values in all cases

  20. The use of sewage sludges from waste water treatment plants for re-vegetation of sanitary landfills; Aplicacion de lodos de depuradora procedentes de aguas residuales urbanas en la revegetacion de vertederos de RSU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, F. I.; Camarero, J. G.; Morenilla Martinez, J. J.; Bernacer Bonora, I.; Herrero Chamorro, O.; Amores Blasco, S.; Fernandez, C.; Codoner, M. A.

    1999-08-01

    The use of forest soil for re vegetating sealed urban landfills is a practice leading to economic and environmental problems. Recently, it has been demonstrated a suitable technique for minimizing soil needs in re-vegetation of closed urban landfill in which, the layer of fertile soil usually added for plants to settle and develop in such degraded substrate is replaced by a layer of the degraded soil amended with anaerobic sewage sludge. In this work we expose the phases and the design for the implementation of a pilot project for the re-vegetation with this procedure of a closed landfill of municipal solid wastes managed by GIRSA, in a collaborative research between CIDE (CSIC-UVEG-GV), Entidad Publica de Saneamiento de Aguas Residuales de la Comunidad Valenciana and DAM, S.L. The closed landfill has a surface of 2,6 ha and its re-vegetation will be carried out by introducing native plants (annuals, bush and trees) after incorporation into the degrades soil of the anaerobic sewage sludge at the single dose of 60 tn/ha. Twelve plots of 20 m by 8 m will be employed to a quarterly research of the effects on the soil and on the introduced vegetation of three doses (0,60, 120 tn/ha) of the anaerobic sewage sludge. (Author) 17 refs.

  1. Bioindicators in the activated sludge reactors in the Guadalete Waste Water Plant; Bioindicadores en los reactores de fangos activados en la EDAR Guadalete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narbona Valle, E. M.; Isac Oria, L.; Lebrato Mtnez, J.; Martinez, A. [Universidad Politecnica . Sevilla (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    The bioindication, the technique based on the microscopic observations on the activated sludge, is a useful tool to control the biologic depuration process. The affectivity of this technique can be shown through its application in the study of a stable activated sludge process, which doesn't show strong changes in its operational parameters. Some of the observed microorganisms will be used like indicators of the state of the process and the quality of the effluent. (Author) 10 refs.

  2. Chemical and biochemical characterization of sewage sludges from wastes treatment plant in Burgos (Spain); Caracterizacion quimica y bioqumica de lodos de depuradora de aguas residuales de Burgos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro Gonzalez, M.; Saiz Orcajo, R. M.; Puente Miguel, G.; Carcedo Gonzalez, S. [Universidad de Burgos. Burgos (Spain)

    1998-12-31

    A study was carried out in order to evaluate the degree of heavy metals and potential of phosphohidrolitic, cellulotic and amidasic capacity of sewage sludges from Burgos wastewater treatment plant. The aim of the present paper is to look at the possibilities of using sewage sludge as an element in soil regeneration and maintaining green areas and the conditions governing its use on agricultural land. (Author) 15 refs.

  3. Wastewater and sludge management and research in Oman: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffar Abdul Khaliq, Suaad; Ahmed, Mushtaque; Al-Wardy, Malik; Al-Busaidi, Ahmed; Choudri, B S

    2017-03-01

    It is well recognized that management of wastewater and sludge is a critical environmental issue in many countries. Wastewater treatment and sludge production take place under different technical, economic, and social contexts, thus requiring different approaches and involving different solutions. In most cases, a regular and environmentally safe wastewater treatment and associated sludge management requires the development of realistic and enforceable regulations, as well as treatment systems appropriate to local circumstances. The main objective of this paper is to provide useful information about the current wastewater and sludge treatment, management, regulations, and research in Oman. Based on the review and discussion, the wastewater treatment and sludge management in Oman has been evolving over the years. Further, the land application of sewage sludge should encourage revision of existing standards, regulations, and policies for the management and beneficial use of sewage sludge in Oman. Wastewater treatment and sludge management in Oman have been evolving over the years. Sludge utilization has been a challenge due to its association with human waste. Therefore, composting of sewage sludge is the best option in agriculture activities. Sludge and wastewater utilization can add up positively in the economic aspects of the country in terms of creating jobs and improving annual income rate. The number of research projects done on wastewater reuse and other ongoing ones related to the land application of sewage sludge should encourage revision of existing standards, regulations, and policies for the management and beneficial use of sewage sludge in Oman.

  4. The waste management concept of the Wupper administration union as based on the Wuppertal-Buchenhofen sewage sludge combustion plant; Abfallwirtschaftskonzept des Wupperverbandes auf der Basis der Klaerschlammverbrennungsanlage Wuppertal-Buchenhofen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Londong, J.; Rueck, A.

    1996-02-01

    The Wupper administration union takes care of sewage treatment for the towns, communities and industrial members of the entire catchment area of the Wupper. As the disposal of sludge in the long run remains an open issue for many sewage treatment plants, the government in Duesseldorf, under section 5a of the waste management act of North-Rhine-Westphalia (LAbfG), required district governments, towns constituting an administrative district in their own right, and water management unions on 4 June 1992 to set up practicable waste management concepts demonstrating that their sludge disposal will be secure for a period of ten years. The Wupper administration union submitted this plan at the end of 1992, within the period allowed.- In spring 1973, the union had decided to erect a combustion plant ``for the environmentally friendly disposal of sewage treatment sludge, material trapped in screening chambers and sand catchers, and waste oil``.- The plant, as it was planned more than ten years ago, safeguards sludge disposal for the Wupper administration union also in the future. At present, environmental pollution is still caused by the transport of sludge to the plant. In the area of the administration union or the surrounding districts, no thermal sludge processing plants exist that are fit to be included in the Wupper union`s waste management concept in terms of capacity, technology, or licensing standard. If combustion plants are erected in the future in a sufficient number and distribution, it is reasonable to expect a minimization of transport capacities, for instance by means of compensation contracts.- Disposal of the residual products accruing from combustion will be secure once the landfill at the Buchenhofen sewage treatment plant has been enlarged, as planned. Moreover, the Wupper administration union is making efforts to establish the ash as an industrial product in the market. (orig./ABI) [Deutsch] Der Wupperverband betreibt im gesamten Einzugsgebiet der

  5. EU policy on sewage sludge utilization and perspectives on new approaches of sludge management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mininni, G; Blanch, A R; Lucena, F; Berselli, S

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents the current sewage sludge legislation in Europe and expected developments regarding the coming directives on the application of the "End-of-waste" criteria and on fertilizers. Discussion on sludge production and processing is also included. The Directive 86/278 has regulated the use in agriculture of residual sludge from domestic and urban wastewater. After 1986, this directive was transposed in the different member state legislation and currently the national limit values on heavy metals, some organic micropollutants and pathogens are placed in a rather wide range. This seems the inevitable consequence of different attitudes towards sludge management practices in the member states. The discussion by the European Joint Research Center (JRC) in Seville regarding application of end-of-waste criteria for compost and digestate has produced a final document (IPTS 2014) where sludge was excluded from the organic wastes admitted for producing an end-of-waste compost. Sludge processing in Europe seems addressed to different goals: sludge minimization, full stabilization and hygienization by thermal hydrolysis processes before anaerobic digestion, and on-site incineration by fluidized bed furnace. Thermophilic anaerobic digestion was applied with success on the Prague WWTP with a preliminary lysimeter centrifugation. Coming techniques, like wet oxidation and pyrolysis, are applied only on very few plants.

  6. Co-combustion of sewage sludge and residues from shredder. New waste management concept for the town of Zurich; Mitverbrennung von Klaerschlamm und Shredderabfall. Neue Organisation in der Stadt Zuerich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemann, M.F. [ERZ Entsorgung und Recycling Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1999-07-01

    The new waste and sewage management concept of Zurich, Switzerland is presented. Zurich`s four incinerators were faced with fuel problems as the waste volume decreased, so that alternative fuels had to be tested. Tests were made with residue from shredder and with sewage sludge from the communal sewage system. [Deutsch] Der vorliegende Artikel gibt eine kurze Darstellung der neuen Organisation fuer die Entsorgung von `Muell und Abwasser` in der Stadt Zuerich in der Schweiz. Der Bereich Abfallentsorgung hat aufgrund des Baus einer 4. Verbrennungslinie Ende der 80er Jahre und gleichzeitigen Rueckgangs der Abfallmengen mit finanziellen Problemen zu kaempfen, weshalb alternative Brennstoffe gesucht werden. Ziel ist es, dadurch die Auslastung der vier Verbrennungslinien, aber auch den Eigenversorgungsgrad mit Fernwaerme zu erhoehen. Es wurden Verbrennungsversuche mit RESH (residue from shredder) und mit Kommunalklaerschlamm aus der eigenen Abwasserreinigungsanlage durchgefuehrt. (orig.)

  7. HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM SLUDGE SAMPLE BOTTLES CAUSED BY RADIOLYSIS AND CHEMISTRY WITH CONCETNRATION DETERMINATION IN A STANDARD WASTE BOX (SWB) OR DRUM FOR TRANSPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RILEY DL; BRIDGES AE; EDWARDS WS

    2010-03-30

    A volume of 600 mL of sludge, in 4.1 L sample bottles (Appendix 7.6), will be placed in either a Super Pig (Ref. 1) or Piglet (Ref. 2, 3) based on shielding requirements (Ref. 4). Two Super Pigs will be placed in a Standard Waste Box (SWB, Ref. 5), as their weight exceeds the capacity of a drum; two Piglets will be placed in a 55-gallon drum (shown in Appendix 7.2). The generation of hydrogen gas through oxidation/corrosion of uranium metal by its reaction with water will be determined and combined with the hydrogen produced by radiolysis. The hydrogen concentration in the 55-gallon drum and SWB will be calculated to show that the lower flammability limit of 5% hydrogen is not reached. The inner layers (i.e., sample bottle, bag and shielded pig) in the SWB and drum will be evaluated to assure no pressurization occurs as the hydrogen vents from the inner containers (e.g., shielded pigs, etc.). The reaction of uranium metal with anoxic liquid water is highly exothermic; the heat of reaction will be combined with the source term decay heat, calculated from Radcalc, to show that the drum and SWB package heat load limits are satisfied. This analysis does five things: (1) Estimates the H{sub 2} generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water; (2) Estimates the H{sub 2} generation from radiolysis (using Radcalc 4.1); (3) Combines both H{sub 2} generation amounts, from Items 1 and 2, and determines the percent concentration of H{sub 2} in the interior of an SWB with two Super Pigs, and the interior of a 55-gallon drum with two Piglets; (4) From the combined gas generation rate, shows that the pressure at internal layers is minimal; and (5) Calculates the maximum thermal load of the package, both from radioactive decay of the source and daughter products as calculated/reported by Radcalc 4.1, and from the exothermic reaction of uranium metal with water.

  8. Operation of an aquatic worm reactor suitable for sludge reduction at large scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, T.L.G.; Elissen, H.J.H.; Temmink, B.G.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of domestic waste water results in the production of waste sludge, which requires costly further processing. A biological method to reduce the amount of waste sludge and its volume is treatment in an aquatic worm reactor. The potential of such a worm reactor with the oligochaete

  9. Influence of Cadmium(II Ions and Brewery Sludge on Metallothionein Level in Earthworms (Eisenia fetida – Bio- transforming of Toxic Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Kizek

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Metallothioneins belong to a group of intracellular, high molecular andcysteine-rich proteins whose content in an organism increase with increasing concentrationof a heavy metal. The aim of this work was to apply the electrochemical analysis for theanalysis of metallothioneins in earthworms exposed to cadmium ions and brewery sludge.Here we utilized adsorptive transfer technique coupled with differential pulse voltammetryBrdicka reaction to determine metallothionein in different biological samples. By meansthis very sensitive technique it was possible to analyze metallothionein in concentrationsbelow 1 μmol.l-1 with the standard deviation of 4-5%. We found out that the average MTlevel in the non-treated earthworms oscillated between 19 and 48 μmol.l-1. When weanalysed samples of earthworms treated by cadmium, we observed that the MT contentincreased with the exposition length and increase dose of cadmium ions. Finally, weattempted to study and compare the toxicity of the raw sludge and its leach by using ofearthworms. The raw brewery sludge caused the death of the earthworms quickly.Earthworms held in the presence of leach from brewery sludge increased their weight of147 % of their original weight because they ingested the nutrients from the sludge. Themetallothionein level changes markedly with increasing time of exposition and applieddose of toxic compound. It clearly follows from the obtained results that the MT synthesisis insufficient in the first hours of the exposition and increases after more than 24 h.

  10. Laboratory development of sludge washing and alkaline leaching processes: Test plan for FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapko, B.M.; Lumetta, G.J.

    1994-07-01

    The US Department of Energy plans to vitrify (as borosilicate glass) the large volumes of high-level radioactive wastes at the Hanford site. To reduce costs, pretreatment processes will be used to reduce the volume of borosilicate glass required for disposal. Several options are being considered for the pretreatment processes: (1) sludge washing with water or dilute hydroxide: designed to remove most of the Na from the sludge, thus significantly reducing the volume of waste to be vitrified; (2) sludge washing plus caustic leaching and/or metathesis (alkaline sludge leaching): designed to dissolve large quantities of certain nonradioactive elements, such as Al, Cr and P, thus reducing the volume of waste even more; (3) sludge washing, sludge dissolution, and separation of radionuclides from the dissolved sludge solutions (advanced processing): designed to remove all radionuclides for concentration into a minimum waste volume. This report describes a test plan for work that will be performed in FY 1994 under the Sludge Washing and Caustic Leaching Studies Task (WBS 0402) of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Pretreatment Project. The objectives of the work described here are to determine the effects of sludge washing and alkaline leaching on sludge composition and the physical properties of the washed sludge and to evaluate alkaline leaching methods for their impact on the volume of borosilicate glass required to dispose of certain Hanford tank sludges.

  11. K Basin sludge treatment process description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westra, A.G.

    1998-08-28

    The K East (KE) and K West (KW) fuel storage basins at the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site contain sludge on the floor, in pits, and inside fuel storage canisters. The major sources of the sludge are corrosion of the fuel elements and steel structures in the basin, sand intrusion from outside the buildings, and degradation of the structural concrete that forms the basins. The decision has been made to dispose of this sludge separate from the fuel elements stored in the basins. The sludge will be treated so that it meets Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) acceptance criteria and can be sent to one of the double-shell waste tanks. The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office accepted a recommendation by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc., to chemically treat the sludge. Sludge treatment will be done by dissolving the fuel constituents in nitric acid, separating the insoluble material, adding neutron absorbers for criticality safety, and reacting the solution with caustic to co-precipitate the uranium and plutonium. A truck will transport the resulting slurry to an underground storage tank (most likely tank 241-AW-105). The undissolved solids will be treated to reduce the transuranic (TRU) and content, stabilized in grout, and transferred to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) for disposal. This document describes a process for dissolving the sludge to produce waste streams that meet the TWRS acceptance criteria for disposal to an underground waste tank and the ERDF acceptance criteria for disposal of solid waste. The process described is based on a series of engineering studies and laboratory tests outlined in the testing strategy document (Flament 1998).

  12. Sustainability of Domestic Sewage Sludge Disposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Bruna Rizzardini

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Activated sludge is now one of the most widely used biological processes for the treatment of wastewaters from medium to large populations. It produces high amounts of sewage sludge that can be managed and perceived in two main ways: as a waste it is discharged in landfill, as a fertilizer it is disposed in agriculture with direct application to soil or subjected to anaerobic digestion and composting. Other solutions, such as incineration or production of concrete, bricks and asphalt play a secondary role in terms of their degree of diffusion. The agronomical value of domestic sewage sludge is a proved question, which may be hidden by the presence of several pollutants such as heavy metals, organic compounds and pathogens. In this way, the sustainability of sewage sludge agricultural disposal requires a value judgment based on knowledge and evaluation of the level of pollution of both sewage sludge and soil. The article analyzed a typical Italian case study, a water management system of small communities, applying the criteria of evaluation of the last official document of European Union about sewage sludge land application, the “Working Document on Sludge (3rd draft, 2000”. The report brought out good sewage sludge from small wastewater treatment plants and soils quality suggesting a sustainable application.

  13. Impact of sludge deposition on biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzetti, Sergio; van der Spoel, David

    2015-11-01

    Sludge deposition in the environment is carried out in several countries. It encompasses the dispersion of treated or untreated sludge in forests, marsh lands, open waters as well as estuarine systems resulting in the gradual accumulation of toxins and persistent organic compounds in the environment. Studies on the life cycle of compounds from sludge deposition and the consequences of deposition are few. Most reports focus rather on treatment-methods and approaches, legislative aspects as well as analytical evaluations of the chemical profiles of sludge. This paper reviews recent as well as some older studies on sludge deposition in forests and other ecosystems. From the literature covered it can be concluded that sludge deposition induces two detrimental effects on the environment: (1) raising of the levels of persistent toxins in soil, vegetation and wild life and (2) slow and long-termed biodiversity-reduction through the fertilizing nutrient pollution operating on the vegetation. Since recent studies show that eutrophication of the environment is a major threat to global biodiversity supplying additional nutrients through sludge-based fertilization seems imprudent. Toxins that accumulate in the vegetation are transferred to feeding herbivores and their predators, resulting in a reduced long-term survival chance of exposed species. We briefly review current legislation for sludge deposition and suggest alternative routes to handling this difficult class of waste.

  14. Compostagem aeróbia conjugada de lodo de tanque séptico e resíduos sólidos vegetais Conjugated aerobic composting of septic tank sludge and vegetable solid waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Gustavo da Silva

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available O lodo sanitário, principal subproduto do tratamento de esgotos, constitui um dos maiores problemas ambientais urbanos da atualidade. Em meio a este contexto, objetivou-se nesse estudo avaliar o processo da compostagem conjugada de lodo de tanque séptico (LS e resíduos sólidos vegetais (RV e determinar a importância da temperatura para o processo de sanitização do substrato tratado. O experimento, inteiramente casualizado com três tratamentos e três repetições, consistiu de nove reatores aeróbios com 100 litros de capacidade. Os resíduos foram utilizados nas seguintes proporções - T1: 100% RV; T2: 5% LS + 95% RV; T3: 10% LS + 90% RV. A compostagem aeróbia conjugada mostrou ser uma alternativa viável para destruição de ovos de helminto e estabilização dos resíduos, sendo fundamentais para tal, a temperatura, o pH e as relações ecológicas presentes nos reatores.The sanitary sludge, principal byproduct of sewage treatment, constitutes one of the major municipal environmental problems of the present time. The present study was aimed to evaluate the composting of septic tank sludge (SS and vegetable solid waste (VW and to determine the importance of the temperature for the process of sanitization of the treated substrate. The experiment, entirely randomized with three treatments and three repetitions, constituted of nine aerobic reactors with 100 L capacity. The proportions of the wastes utilized were T1: 100%VW; T2: 5%SS + 95%VW; T3: 10%SS + 90%VW. The conjugated composting showed to be a feasible alternative for destruction of helminth eggs and stabilization of the wastes. The temperature, pH and ecological relations present in the reactors were fundamental for this purpose.

  15. Communal sewage sludge treatement against the background of the new European Sewage Sludge Treatment Regulations; Kommunale Klaerschlammbehandlung vor dem Hintergrund der neuen Europaeischen Klaerschlammrichtlinien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The following issues were discussed at the Darmstadt conference: The European Sewage Sludge Treatment Regulation, hygienisation of sewage sludge, waste water purification without excess sludge production, stabilisation of sewage sludge, dewatering and disposal by combustion or utilisation as an agricultural fertilizer. [German] Themen des Darmstaedter Seminars Abwassertechnik waren: Europaeische Klaerschlammrichtlinie, Klaerschlammhygienisierung, Abwasserreinigung ohne Anfall von Ueberschussschlamm, Klaerschlammstabilisierung, Entwaesserung und Entsorgung durch Verbrennung oder in der Landwirtschaft. (UKE)

  16. Solidification of low-volume power plant sludges. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, N.E.; Halverson, M.A.; Mercer, B.M.

    1981-12-01

    A literature review was conducted to obtain information on the status of hazardous waste solidification technology and application of this technology to low-volume power plant waste sludges. Because of scarcity of sludge composition data, anticipated major components were identified primarily by chemical reactions that are known to occur during treatment of specific wastewaters. Chemical and physical properties of these sludges were critically analyzed for compatibility with several types of commercially available solidification processes. The study pointed out the need for additional information on the nature of these sludges, especially leaching characteristics and the presence of substances that will interfere with solidification processes. Laboratory studies were recommended for evaluation of solidification process which have the greatest potential for converting hazardous low-volume sludges to non-hazardous waste forms.

  17. Hydrogen generation during melter feed preparation of Tank 42 sludge and salt washed loaded CST in the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, W.E.

    1999-12-08

    The main objective of these scoping tests was to measure the rate of hydrogen generation in a series of experiments designed to duplicate the expected SRAT and SME processing conditions in laboratory scale vessels. This document details the testing performed to determine the maximum hydrogen generation expected with a coupled flowsheet of sludge, loaded CST [crystalline silicotitanate], and frit.

  18. Environmental Risk Implications of Metals in Sludges from Waste Water Treatment Plants: The Discovery of Vast Stores of Metal-Containing Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tou, Feiyun; Yang, Yi; Feng, Jingnan; Niu, Zuoshun; Pan, Hui; Qin, Yukun; Guo, Xingpan; Meng, Xiangzhou; Liu, Min; Hochella, Michael F

    2017-05-02

    Nanoparticle (NP) assessment in sludge materials, although of growing importance in eco- and biotoxicity studies, is commonly overlooked and, at best, understudied. In the present study, sewage sludge samples from across the mega-city of Shanghai, China were investigated for the first time using a sequential extraction method coupled with single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SP-ICP-MS) to quantify the abundance of metal-containing NPs in the extraction fractions and transmission electron microscopy to specifically identify the nanophases present. In general, most sludges observed showed high concentrations of Cr, Cu, Cd, Ni, Zn, and Pb, exceeding the maximum permitted values in the national application standard of acid soil in China. NPs in these sludges contribute little to the volume and mass but account for about half of the total particle number. Based on electron microscopy techniques, various NPs were further identified, including Ti-, Fe-, Zn-, Sn-, and Pb-containing NPs. All NPs, ignored by traditional metal risk evaluation methods, were observed at a concentration of 107 -1011 particles/g within the bioavailable fraction of metals. These results indicate the underestimate or misestimation in evaluating the environmental risks of metals based on traditional sequential extraction methods. A new approach for the environmental risk assessment of metals, including NPs, is urgently needed.

  19. Effect of deflocculation on photo induced thin layer titanium dioxide disintegration of dairy waste activated sludge for cost and energy efficient methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharmila, V Godvin; Dhanalakshmi, P; Rajesh Banu, J; Kavitha, S; Gunasekaran, M

    2017-11-01

    In the present study, the deflocculated sludge was disintegrated through thin layer immobilized titanium dioxide (TiO2) as photocatalyst under solar irradiation. The deflocculation of sludge was carried out by 0.05g/g SS of sodium citrate aiming to facilitate more surface area for subsequent TiO2 mediated disintegration. The proposed mode of disintegration was investigated by varying TiO2 dosage, pH and time. The maximum COD solubilization of 18.4% was obtained in the optimum 0.4g/L of TiO2 dosage with 5.5 pH and exposure time of 40min. Anaerobic assay of disintegrated samples confirms the role of deflocculation as methane yield was found to be higher in deflocculated (235.6mL/gVS) than the flocculated sludge (146.8mL/gVS). Moreover, the proposed method (Net cost for control - Net cost for deflocculation) saves sludge management cost of about $132 with 53.8% of suspended solids (SS) reduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Speciation of mercury in sludge solids: washed sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Lourie, A. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-10-24

    The objective of this applied research task was to study the type and concentration of mercury compounds found within the contaminated Savannah River Site Liquid Waste System (SRS LWS). A method of selective sequential extraction (SSE), developed by Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences1,2 and adapted by SRNL, utilizes an extraction procedure divided into seven separate tests for different species of mercury. In the SRNL’s modified procedure four of these tests were applied to a washed sample of high level radioactive waste sludge.

  1. Pre-treatment of tannery sludge for sustainable landfilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, Luca; Cossu, Raffaello

    2016-06-01

    The wastewater produced during tanning activities are commonly conveyed to centralised industrial wastewater treatment plants. Sludge from physical-chemical treatments (i.e. primary sedimentation) and waste activated sludge from biological treatment units are called tannery sludge. Tannery sludge is a solid waste that needs to be carefully managed and its disposal represents one of the major problems in tannery industry. Conventional treatment and disposal of tannery sludge are based mainly on incineration and landfilling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a pre-treatment process composed of aerobic stabilisation, compaction and drying, for a sustainable landfilling of tannery sludge. The process produced a reduction of volume, mass and biodegradability of treated sludge. Results also demonstrated a reduced leachability of organic and inorganic compounds from treated sludge. The pre-treatment process could allow to extend landfill life time due to lower amounts of tannery sludge to be disposed off, minimise long terms landfill emissions and obtain a state of carbon sink for tannery sludge landfilling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Market Feasibility of Faecal Sludge and Municipal Solid Waste-Based Compost as Measured by Farmers’ Willingness-to-Pay for Product Attributes: Evidence from Kampala, Uganda

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    George K Danso; Miriam Otoo; William Ekere; Stanley Ddungu; Ganesha Madurangi

    2017-01-01

    There is a great potential to close the nutrient recycling loop, support a ‘circular economy’ and improve cost recovery within the waste sector and to create viable businesses via the conversion of waste to organic fertilizers...

  3. Preliminary trial on degradation of waste activated sludge and simultaneous hydrogen production in a newly-developed solar photocatalytic reactor with AgX/TiO2-coated glass tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunguang; Lei, Zhongfang; Yang, Yingnan; Zhang, Zhenya

    2013-09-15

    A solar fluidized tubular photocatalytic reactor (SFTPR) with simple and efficient light collector was developed to degrade waste activated sludge (WAS) and simultaneously produce hydrogen. The photocatalyst was a TiO2 film doped by silver and silver compounds (AgX). The synthesized photocatalyst, AgX/TiO2, exhibited higher photocatalytic activity than TiO2 (99.5% and 30.6% of methyl orange removal, respectively). The installation of light collector could increase light intensity by 26%. For WAS treatment using the SFTPR, 69.1% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and 7866.7 μmol H2/l-sludge of hydrogen production were achieved after solar photocatalysis for 72 h. The SFTPR could be a promising photocatalysis reactor to effectively degrade WAS with simultaneous hydrogen production. The results can also provide a useful base and reference for the application of photocatalysis on WAS degradation in practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Application of urban waste water sludge in revegetation of sanitary landfills; Aplicacion de lodos de depuradora procedentes de aguas residuales urbanas en la revegetacion de vertederos de RSU (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingelmo Sanchez, F.; Garcia Camarero, J.; Morenilla Martinez, J. J.; Bernacer Bonora, I.; Herrero Chamorro, O.; Amores Blasco, S.

    2000-07-01

    The use of forest soil for re vegetating sealed urban landfills is a practice leading to economic and environmental problems. Recently, it has been demonstrated a suitable technique for minimizing soil needs in the re-vegetation of a closed urban landfill which, the layer of fertile soil usually added for plants to settle and develop in such degraded substrate is replaced by a layer of the degraded soil amended with urban anaerobic sewage sludges. In this work we expose the firsts results of a pilot project for the re-vegetation with this procedure of a closed landfill of municipal solid wastes managed by the company Gestion Integral de Residuos in a collaborative research among the Centro de Investigaciones sobre Desertificacion, the Entidad Publica de Saneamiento de Aguas Residuales de la Comunidad Valenciana and the company Depuracion de Aguas del Mediterraneo. The closed landfill has a surface of 2,6 ha and its re-vegetation will be carried out by introducing native plants (annuals, busch and trees) after incorporation into the degraded soil of the anaerobic sewage sludge at the single dose of 60 tn/ha. (Author) 3 refs.

  5. Sludge composting of waste water treatment plant. Compost plant of Vila-Seca (Tarragona); Compostaje de lodos procedentes de la depuracion de aguas residuales. Planta de compostaje de Vila- Seca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marza Brillas, J.

    1995-12-01

    Composting is a very effective process in waste treatment. Very good results are obtained in mass and volume loss, moisture reduction, organic matter establization as well as making possible agricultural uses for the final product. Some parameters as nutrients (C/N ratio), pH, temperature and oxygen content are pointed as the most important for the process. Some composting systems are mentioned but finally tunnel system is shown as the best. Its great advantage is that measurements from main parameters are given continuously to the control computer, so process optimization is done at the moment. The Vila-Seca sludge composting plant is described. This plant can treat 30.000 tones/year from three water treatment plants. The expected 50% on organic matter reduction and 70% on dry matter content has been achieved after only 3 months since its starting up. Finally, in september 1995 will start the construction of another sludge composting plant were the same technology, belonging to GICOM and represented by G.T.R. in Spain, will be installed.

  6. Recycling of stone cutting sludge in formulations of bricks and terrazzo tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zboon, Kamel; Tahat, Montasser; Abu-Hamatteh, Ziad S H; Al-Harahsheh, Mohammad S

    2010-06-01

    This study examines the possibility for enhancing the use of stone cutting sludge waste in the production of building bricks and terrazzo tiles, which would reduce both the environmental impact and the production costs. Stone cutting wastes in the form of sludge is currently generated at several factories in Jordan. At the Samara factory, incorporation of the sludge in the batch formulations of bricks and terrazzo tiles was examined. The physicochemical and mineralogical characteristics of the sludge were analyzed to identify the major components. Results indicated that the sludge generated from stone cutting could be used in producing concrete bricks. Mixtures of aggregates with added amounts of sludge were used successfully to produce non-load bearing bricks. Sludge was also used to produce terrazzo tiles and the results indicate that the transverse strength, water absorption and tile measurements, for all the taken samples, comply with Jordanian standards. The transverse strength decreased while water absorption increased as the sludge ratio increased.

  7. Vitrification as an alternative to landfilling of tannery sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celary, Piotr; Sobik-Szołtysek, Jolanta

    2014-12-01

    Due to high content of heavy metals such as chromium, tannery sewage sludge is a material which is difficult to be biologically treated as it is in the case of organic waste. Consequently, a common practice in managing tannery sewage sludge is landfilling. This poses a potential threat to both soil and water environments and it additionally generates costs of construction of landfills that meet specific environment protection requirements. Vitrification of this kind of sewage sludge with the addition of mineral wastes can represent an alternative to landfilling. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of obtaining an environmentally safe product by means of vitrification of tannery sewage sludge from a flotation wastewater treatment process and chemical precipitation in order to address the upcoming issue of dealing with sewage sludge from the tannery industry which will be prohibited to be landfilled in Poland after 2016. The focus was set on determining mixtures of tannery sewage sludge with additives which would result in the lowest possible heavy metal leaching levels and highest hardness rating of the products obtained from their vitrification. The plasma vitrification process was carried out for mixtures with various amounts of additives depending on the type of sewage sludge used. Only the materials of waste character were used as additives. One finding of the study was an optimum content of mineral additives in vitrified mixture of 30% v/v waste molding sands with 20% v/v carbonate flotation waste from the zinc and lead industry for the formulations with flotation sewage sludge, and 45% v/v and 5% v/v, respectively, for precipitation sewage sludge. These combinations allowed for obtaining products with negligible heavy metal leaching levels and hardness similar to commercial glass, which suggests they could be potentially used as construction aggregate substitutes. Incineration of sewage sludge before the vitrification process lead to

  8. Growth, yield and fruit quality of pepper plants amended with two sanitized sewage sludges

    OpenAIRE

    Pascual Elizalde, Inmaculada; Azcona, Iñaki; Aguirreolea, Jone; Morales Iribas, Fermín; Corpas, Francisco Javier; Palma, José Manuel; Rellán-Álvarez, Rubén; Sánchez-Díaz, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Organic wastes such as sewage sludge have been successfully used to increase crop productivity of horticultural soils. Nevertheless, considerations of the impact of sludges on vegetable and fruit quality have received little attention. Therefore, the objective of the present work was to investigate the impact of two sanitized sewage sludges, autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion (ATAD) and compost sludge, on the growth, yield, and fruit quality of pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Pi...

  9. Sludge Treatment and Extraction Technology Development: Results of FY 1993 studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, G.J.; Wagner, M.J.; Barrington, R.J.; Rapko, B.M.; Carlson, C.D.

    1994-03-01

    This report describes experimental results from work conducted in FY 1993 under the Sludge Treatment and Extraction Technology Development Task of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Pretreatment Technology Development Project at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Experiments were conducted in the following six general areas: (1) sludge washing, (2) sludge leaching, (3) sludge dissolution, (4) actinide separation by solvent extraction and extraction chromatography, (5) Sr separation by solvent extraction, and (6) extraction of Cs from acidic solution.

  10. Bio THELYS: A new sludge reduction process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauzy, Julien; Cretenot, Didier; Patria, Lucie; Fernandes, Paulo; Sauvegrain, Patrick; Levasseur, Jean-Pierre

    2003-07-01

    New technologies for reducing the sludge production of municipal or industrial WWTP have been appeared during the last few years. One of these innovative processes, Bio THELYS, consists in enhancing the biodegradability of sludge by a stage of thermal hydrolysis. The hydrolysed sludge could then be sent upstream to a biological step either aerobic or anaerobic. The objective is to increase the global mineralisation of the pollution entering the WWTP in order to decrease the waste leaving it, i.e. mainly the sludge. A 2500 population equivalent prototype was installed on a WWTP, in Champagne - France. Thermal hydrolysis is carried out under a temperature of 150-185{sup o}C, a pressure of 10-15 bar with an hydraulic retention time of 30-60 minutes. Thermal hydrolysis is implemented on a secondary recycling loop on the biological basin. Trials started in 1999 and are still on operation. A close monitoring of the WWTP was set up focusing especially on sludge characteristics, treated water quality, yield of sludge production reduction and plant operation. Bio THELYS could achieve a reduction in sludge production up to 70% on the plant. (author)

  11. Process for the biological purification of waste water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1992-01-01

    Process for the biological purification of waste water by the activated sludge method, the waste water being mixed with recirculated sludge and being subjected to an anaerobic treatment, before the waste water thus treated is alternately subjected to anoxic and aerobic treatments and the waste...... water thus treated is led into a clarification zone for settling sludge, which sludge is recirculated in order to be mixed with the crude waste water. As a result, a simultaneous reduction of the content both of nitrogen and phosphorus of the waste water is achieved....

  12. Performance of paper mill sludges as landfill capping material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moo-Young, H.K. Jr. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States); Zimmie, T.F. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The high cost of waste containment has sparked interest in low cost and effective strategies of containing wastes. Paper mill sludges have been effectively used as the impermeable barrier in landfill covers. Since paper mill sludges are viewed as a waste material, the sludge is given to the landfill owner at little or no cost. Thus, when a clay soil is not locally available to use as the impermeable barrier in a cover system, paper sludge barriers can save $20,000 to $50,000 per acre in construction costs. This study looks at the utilization and performance of blended and primary paper sludge as landfill capping material. To determine the effectiveness of paper sludge as an impermeable barrier layer, test pads were constructed to simulate a typical landfill cover with paper sludge and clay as the impermeable barrier and were monitored for infiltration rates for five years. Long-term hydraulic conductivity values estimated from the leachate generation rates of the test pads indicate that paper sludge provides an acceptable hydraulic barrier.

  13. Stabilization of Mercury in High pH Tank Sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, R.; Barton, J.

    2003-02-24

    DOE complex contains many tank sludges contaminated with mercury. The high pH of these tank sludges typically fails to stabilize the mercury, resulting in these radioactive wastes also being characteristically hazardous or mixed waste. The traditional treatment for soluble inorganic mercury species is precipitation as insoluble mercuric sulfide. Sulfide treatment and a commercial mercury-stabilizing product were tested on surrogate sludges at various alkaline pH values. Neither the sulfide nor the commercial product stabilized the mercury sufficiently at the high pH of the tank sludges to pass the Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP) treatment standards of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The commercial product also failed to stabilize the mercury in samples of the actual tank sludges.

  14. Characterization program in the framework of the national sewage sludge plan in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Lopez, M. J.

    2009-07-01

    Sewage Sludge is the waste originated from the process of treatment of waste water. Due to the physical-chemical processes involved in the treatment, the sludge tends to concentrate heavy metals and poorly biodegradable trace organic compounds as well as potentially pathogenic organisms (viruses, bacteria, etc.). However, sludge is rich in nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous and contains valuable organic matter that is useful when soils are depleted or subject to erosion. (Author)

  15. Biodegradation of total petroleum hydrocarbons from acidic sludge produced by re-refinery industries of waste oil using in-vessel composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Alireza; Nabizadeh, Ramin; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Nasseri, Simin; Dehghani, Mohammad Hadi; Nazmara, Shahrokh; Yaghmaeian, Kamyar

    2017-01-01

    In Iran, re-refinery industry has been developed many years ago based on the acid-clay treatment. Acidic sludge with high concentration of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) is the final products of some facilities. In this study removal of TPH by aerated in-vessel composting was investigated. In order to microorganisms seeding and nutrient providing, urban immature compost was added as an amendment to acidic sludge. The ratios of acidic sludge (AS) to compost were, 1:0 (as control), 1:5, 1:8, 1:10, 1:15, 1:20, 1:30, 1:40, 1:50, 1:75 and 1:100 (as dry basis) at a C: N: P ratio of 100:5:1 and 45-65% moisture content for 70 days. The removal efficiency in all reactors was more than 48%. The highest and lowest TPH removal was observed in 1:5 (71.56%) and 1:100 (48.53%) mixing ratios, respectively. The results of the control reactors showed that biological treatment was the main mechanism for TPH removal. Experimental data was fitted second order kinetic model (R(2) > 0.8006). Degradation of TPH in 1:5 mixing ratio (k2 = 0.0038 gmg (-1)d(-1); half-life = 3.08d) was nearly three times faster than 1:100 mixing ratio (k2 = 0.0238; half-life = 8.96d). The results of the control reactors showed that biological treatment was the main mechanism for TPH removal. The results of this study revealed in-vessel composting with immature urban compost as the amendment maybe recommended as an effective method for TPH remediation.

  16. 76 FR 16534 - Hazardous Waste Management System Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 261 Hazardous Waste Management System Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste...,'' to exclude (or delist) on a one-time basis from the lists of hazardous waste, a certain solid waste... the petitioned waste is ] not hazardous waste. This exclusion applies to 148 cubic yards of sludge...

  17. Performance of an active sludge plant dealing with acid waste. Comportamiento de una planta de fangos activos frente a vertidos acidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corral Monforte, A. (Servicio Territorial de Sanidad Bienestar Scocial de la Junta de Castilla y Leon, Avila (Spain)); Costa Perez, C.; Martin Sanchez, J.L. (Departamento Ingenieria Quimica y Textil, Facultad de Quimicas, universidad de Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain))

    1994-01-01

    The influence of an acid influent in an activated sludge lab plant for the treatment of synthetic sewage water was experimentally studied, the different acids used for to adjust the acidity were H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] (pH=4,56 and pH=2,61). Experimental results show an adaptation of the system for pH[sub 4],5 for the two acids, with a weak decrease in the depurative efficiency, and the total lost of the biomass active properties for pH=2,5 showing a higher effect for HCL, probably due to germicide characteristics of chloride anion.

  18. International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasanbeigi, Ali [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lu, Hongyou [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Williams, Christopher [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Price, Lynn [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe international best practices for pre-processing and coprocessing of MSW and sewage sludge in cement plants, for the benefit of countries that wish to develop co-processing capacity. The report is divided into three main sections. Section 2 describes the fundamentals of co-processing, Section 3 describes exemplary international regulatory and institutional frameworks for co-processing, and Section 4 describes international best practices related to the technological aspects of co-processing.

  19. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RUTHERFORD WW; GEUTHER WJ; STRANKMAN MR; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER DD; BLACK DM; POTTMEYER JA

    2009-04-29

    The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is

  20. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 5 QUALIFICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Damon Click, D; Dan Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Amanda Billings, A; Ned Bibler, N

    2008-11-10

    Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) is predominantly a combination of H-modified (HM) sludge from Tank 11 that underwent aluminum dissolution in late 2007 to reduce the total mass of sludge solids and aluminum being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Purex sludge transferred from Tank 7. Following aluminum dissolution, the addition of Tank 7 sludge and excess Pu to Tank 51, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) a 3-L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB5 qualification. SB5 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of a Pu/Be stream from H Canyon), DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass chemical durability evaluation. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernatant) and concentration (decanting of supernatant) of the Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF CPC simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. This includes a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid is added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and remove mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit is added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters for the CPC processing were based on work with a non radioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and Product Consistency Test (PCT) evaluation of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the initial slurry samples and samples after each phase of CPC processing. This work is controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) , and analyses are guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R

  1. Extracellular Polymers in Granular Sludge from Different Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jens Ejbye; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1994-01-01

    lysis. ECP contents of 41 to 92 mg · g−1 volatile suspended solids of granules were found depending on the type of granular sludge examined. The content of polysaccharides, protein and lipids in the extracted ECP was quantified. Furthermore, the different methyl esters of the lipids were determined...... of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor from a sugar-containing waste-water to a synthetic waste-water containing acetate, propionate and butyrate resulted in a decrease in both the protein and polysaccharide content and an increase in the lipid content of the extracellular material. Furthermore...

  2. The management of waste water treatment plant sludge in Vic (Catalonia, Spain); Tratamiento de fangos de etap: La gestion en Vic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletas Anglada, R.

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to set out the steps taken by Aguas de Vic, to solve the problems deriving from the production of sludge as a result of the decanting and filtering of treated water at the Miralter Drinking Water Treatment Plant. This plant treats water from the rivers Ges and Ter to make it potable, after which it is fed into the water supply of the town of Vic and the surrounding district. First the treatment process is briefly described, the production analysed and the sludge generated by the plant characterised. This is followed by a summary of the currently applicable statutory regulations and a detailed description of the solution adopted on the basis of the statistical data obtained from an analysis of the plant's performance. Finally, a breakdown is provided of the investments made in setting up the installations described. The increased cost per cubic metre of treated water is explained as a consequence of this investment and the running costs of operating these installations. (Author)

  3. A novel method for recovery of acidic sludge of used-motor oil reprocessing industries to bitumen using bentonite and SBS

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Jonidi Jafari; malek hassanpour; Mitra Gholam; Mehdi Farzadkia

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acidic sludge is a by-product from used motor oil reprocessing industries, which thousand tons of this sludge are disposed into the environment as a hazardous waste material daily. The acidic sludge contains unsaturated compounds that are polar and asphaltene. The bitumen under certain conditions is produced from mixing of bentonite, polymer styrene – butadiene – styrene (SBS), and acidic sludge. Context and purpose: The objective of this study was the recovery of acidic sludge...

  4. Wastewater sludge - the challenges. What are the potentials of utilising the resources in sludge?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroiss, Helmut

    2003-07-01

    The actual best practice of urban water management has developed during the last 200 years and consists of: safe and reliable drinking water supply, sewerage to prevent hygienic problems and flooding in the settlements, mechanical -biological waste water treatment for receiving water protection. The hygienic and environmental goals of the urban water system have to be attained with a minimum of costs. Most of the drinking water supplied is used for the transport of pollution originating from human metabolism, washing and cleaning. Waste water contains all the substances which enter human metabolism as food, beverages, pharmaceuticals, a great variety of household chemicals and the substances discharged from trade and industry to the sewer system. Rain water is already contaminated by air pollution when it reaches the soil or other surfaces. Whatever material the rainwater gets into contact can be found in the waste water. As a consequence the composition of the waste water is a mirror of our civilisation and of human and urban metabolism. Waste water treatment results in two products which are closely related in their chemical composition: (1) treated waste water to be discharged to the receiving water, (2) wastewater sludge to be treated and disposed or (re)used without creating new (environmental) problems. All the compounds entering the waste water which are not completely degraded can be found in both products. The transfer coefficients between water and sludge differ widely and depend on physical and chemical equilibriums. The potentially hazardous compounds in the effluent and in the sludge belong to these compounds. Source control therefore is necessary for water protection and at the same time for low concentrations of potentially hazardous compounds in the sludge. It is also clear that improved biological treatment efficiency (longer sludge age) also results in lower loads of organic pollutants in the sludge, while physical-chemical treatment steps result

  5. Sludge reduction by aquatic worms in wastewater treatment : with emphasis on the potential application of Lumbriculus variegatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elissen, H.J.H.

    2007-01-01

    In wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), large amounts of biological waste sludge are produced. In the Netherlands, the application of this sludge in agriculture or disposal in landfills is no longer allowed, mainly because of its high heavy metal content. The sludge therefore generally is

  6. Review on innovative techniques in oil sludge bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Abdullah M. El; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Eqab, Eqab Sanoosi

    2017-10-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon waste is produced in worldwide refineries in significant amount. In Libya, approximately 10,000 tons of oil sludge is generated in oil refineries (hydrocarbon waste mixtures) annually. Insufficient treatment of those wastes can threaten the human health and safety as well as our environment. One of the major challenges faced by petroleum refineries is the safe disposal of oil sludge generated during the cleaning and refining process stages of crude storage facilities. This paper reviews the hydrocarbon sludge characteristics and conventional methods for remediation of oil hydrocarbon from sludge. This study intensively focuses on earlier literature to describe the recently selected innovation technology in oily hydrocarbon sludge bioremediation process. Conventional characterization parameters or measurable factors can be gathered in chemical, physical, and biological parameters: (1) Chemical parameters are consequently necessary in the case of utilization of topsoil environment when they become relevant to the presence of nutrients and toxic compounds; (2) Physical parameters provide general data on sludge process and hand ability; (3) Biological parameters provide data on microbial activity and organic matter presence, which will be used to evaluate the safety of the facilities. The objective of this research is to promote the bioremediating oil sludge feasibility from Marsa El Hariga Terminal and Refinery (Tobruk).

  7. Phosphorus Recovery from Ashes of Sewage Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornel, Peter; Schaum, Peter

    2003-07-01

    About 90% of the incoming phosphorus load of waste water is eliminated by waste water treatment and transferred into the sewage sludge. Considerable amounts of sewage sludge can not be used agriculturally but are incinerated. Thus the ash from mono sludge incineration plants contains significant amounts of phosphorus (up to 25% P{sub 2}O{sub 5}) and could be used as raw material in fertilizer industry. The ash is hygienically harmless and free of organic substances. The ratio of phosphorus to heavy metals is basically the same as in the sewage sludge. The first step in separating phosphorus from heavy metals is to dissolve phosphorus by extraction. The most promising way seems to be the release of phosphorus with acids or bases. With 1 m sulphuric acid it is possible to release phosphorus completely. By use of acid most of the heavy metals dissolve, too. With caustic soda as solvent, only 30-40% of the phosphorus can be dissolved but the eluate is almost free of heavy metals. The amount of phosphorus which can be released with caustic soda, depends on the applied precipitant (Al or Fe salts) for phosphorus elimination at the waste water treatment. (author)

  8. Stabilization of tannery sludge by co-treatment with aluminum anodizing sludge and phytotoxicity of end-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantazopoulou, E; Zebiliadou, O; Mitrakas, M; Zouboulis, A

    2017-03-01

    A global demand for efficient re-utilization of produced solid wastes, which is based on the principles of re-use and recycling, results to a circular economy, where one industry's waste becomes another's raw material and it can be used in a more efficient and sustainable way. In this study, the influence of a by-product addition, such as aluminum anodizing sludge, on tannery waste (air-dried sludge) stabilization was examined. The chemical characterization of tannery waste leachate, using the EN 12457-2 standard leaching test, reveals that tannery waste cannot be accepted even in landfills for hazardous wastes, according to the EU Decision 2003/33/EC. The stabilization of tannery waste was studied applying different ratios of tannery waste and aluminum anodizing sludge, i.e. 50:50, 60:40, 70:30 and 80:20 ratios respectively. Subsequently, the stabilization rate of the qualified as optimum homogenized mixture of 50:50 ratio was also tested during time (7, 15 and 30days). Moreover, this stabilized product was subjected to phytotoxicity tests using the Lepidium sativum, Sinapis alba and Sorghum saccharatum seeds. The experimental results showed that aluminum anodizing sludge managed to stabilize effectively chromium and organic content of tannery waste, which are the most problematic parameters influencing its subsequent disposal. As a result, tannery waste stabilized with the addition of aluminum anodizing sludge at 50:50 ratio can be accepted in non-hazardous waste landfills, as chromium and dissolved organic carbon concentrations in the respective leachate are below the relevant regulation limits, while the stabilized waste shows decreased phytotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Vitrification as an alternative to landfilling of tannery sewage sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celary, Piotr, E-mail: pcelary@is.pcz.czest.pl; Sobik-Szołtysek, Jolanta, E-mail: jszoltysek@is.pcz.czest.pl

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • The possibility of vitrification of tannery sewage sludge was investigated. • Glass cullet was substituted with different wastes of mineral character. • Component ratio in the processed mixtures was optimized. • Environmental safety of the acquired vitrificates was verified. • An alternative management approach of usually landfilled waste was presented. - Abstract: Due to high content of heavy metals such as chromium, tannery sewage sludge is a material which is difficult to be biologically treated as it is in the case of organic waste. Consequently, a common practice in managing tannery sewage sludge is landfilling. This poses a potential threat to both soil and water environments and it additionally generates costs of construction of landfills that meet specific environment protection requirements. Vitrification of this kind of sewage sludge with the addition of mineral wastes can represent an alternative to landfilling. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of obtaining an environmentally safe product by means of vitrification of tannery sewage sludge from a flotation wastewater treatment process and chemical precipitation in order to address the upcoming issue of dealing with sewage sludge from the tannery industry which will be prohibited to be landfilled in Poland after 2016. The focus was set on determining mixtures of tannery sewage sludge with additives which would result in the lowest possible heavy metal leaching levels and highest hardness rating of the products obtained from their vitrification. The plasma vitrification process was carried out for mixtures with various amounts of additives depending on the type of sewage sludge used. Only the materials of waste character were used as additives. One finding of the study was an optimum content of mineral additives in vitrified mixture of 30% v/v waste molding sands with 20% v/v carbonate flotation waste from the zinc and lead industry for the formulations with

  10. INTEC SBW Solid Sludge Surrogate Recipe and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maio, Vince; Janikowski, Stuart; Johnson, Jim; Maio, Vince; Pao, Jenn-Hai

    2004-06-01

    A nonhazardous INTEC tank farm sludge surrogate that incorporated metathesis reactions to generate solids from solutions of known elements present in the radioactive INTEC tank farm sodium-bearing waste sludges was formulated. Elemental analyses, physical property analyses, and filtration testing were performed on waste surrogate and tank farm waste samples, and the results were compared. For testing physical systems associated with moving the tank farm solids, the surrogate described in this report is the best currently available choice. No other available surrogate exhibits the noted similarities in behavior to the sludges. The chemical morphology, particle size distribution, and settling and flow characteristics of the surrogate were similar to those exhibited by the waste sludges. Nonetheless, there is a difference in chemical makeup of the surrogate and the tank farm waste. If a chemical treatment process were to be evaluated for final treatment and disposition of the waste sludges, the surrogate synthesis process would likely require modification to yield a surrogate with a closer matching chemical composition.

  11. Environmental application of gamma technology: Update on the Canadian sludge irradiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinwood, Jean F.; Fraser, Frank M.

    1993-10-01

    Waste treatment and disposal technologies have recently been subjected to increasing public and regulatory scrutiny. Concern for the environment and a heightened awareness of potential health hazards that could result from insufficient or inappropriate waste handling methods have combined to push waste generators in their search for new treatment alternatives. Gamma technology can offer a new option for the treatment of potentially infectious wastes, including municipal sewage sludge. Sewage sludge contains beneficial plant nutrients and a high organic component that make it ideal as a soil conditioning agent or fertilizer bulking material. It also carries potentially infectious microorganisms which limit opportunities for beneficial recycling of sludges. Gamma irradiation-disinfection of these sludges offers a reliable, fast and efficient method for safe sludge recycling. Nordion International's Market Development Division was created in 1987 as part of a broad corporate reorganization. It was given an exclusive mandate to develop new applications of gamma irradiation technology and markets for these new applications. Nordion has since explored and developed opportunities in food irradiation, pharmaceutical/cosmetic products irradiation, biomedical waste sterilization, airline waste disinfection, and sludge disinfection for recycling. This paper focuses on the last of these -a proposed sludge recycling facility that incorporates a cobalt 60 sludge irradiator.

  12. Grout and Glass Performance in Support of Stabilization/Solidification of the MVST Tank Sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilliam, T.M.; Spence, R.D.

    1998-11-01

    Wastewater at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is collected, evaporated, and stored in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) pending treatment for disposal. The waste separates into two phases: sludge and supematant. Some of the supematant from these tanks has been decanted, solidified into a grout, and stored for disposal as a solid low-level waste. The sludges in the tank bottoms have been accumulating ,for several years. Some of the sludges contain a high amount of gamma activity (e.g., `37CS concentration range of 0.01 3-11 MBq/g) and contain enough transuranic (TRU) radioisotopes to be classified as TRU wastes. Some Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metal concentrations are high enough in the available total constituent analysis for the MVST sludge to be classified as RCRA hazardous; therefore, these sludges are presumed to be mixed TRU waste.

  13. Waste statistics 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    Reports to the ISAG (Information System for Waste and Recycling) for 2001 cover 402 Danish waste treatment plants owned by 295 enterprises. The total waste generation in 2001 amounted to 12,768,000 tonnes, which is 2% less than in 2000. Reductions are primarily due to the fact that sludge for mineralization is included with a dry matter content of 20% compared to 1,5% in previous statistics. This means that sludge amounts have been reduced by 808,886 tonnes. The overall rate of recycling amounted to 63%, which is 1% less than the overall recycling target of 64% for 2004. Since sludge has a high recycling rate, the reduction in sludge amounts of 808,886 tonnes has also caused the total recycling rate to fall. Waste amounts incinerated accounted for 25%, which is 1% more than the overall target of 24% for incineration in 2004. Waste going to landfill amounted to 10%, which is better than the overall landfill target for 2004 of a maximum of 12% for landfilling. Targets for treatment of waste from the different sectors, however, are still not complied with, since too little waste from households and the service sector is recycled, and too much waste from industry is led to landfill. (BA)

  14. Urban solid waste in the production of Lafoensia pacari seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    Abreu, Alan H. M. de; Marzola, Leticia B.; Melo, Lucas A. de; Leles, Paulo S. dos S.; Abel, Elton L. S.; Alonso, Jorge M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study aimed to verify the potential of urban solid wastes as substrate for production of seedlings of Lafoensia pacari. Five treatments were tested, four with solid wastes and one standard substrate, namely: sewage sludge from Alegria Wastewater Treatment Plant (WTP); sewage sludge from Ilha do Governador WTP; sewage sludge from Sarapuí WTP; domestic garbage compost (Fertlurb); and a commercial substrate made of biostabilized pine bark (standard substrate). The wastes received 2...

  15. Thermophilic two-phase anaerobic digestion of source-sorted organic fraction of municipal solid waste for bio-hythane production: effect of recirculation sludge on process stability and microbiology over a long-term pilot-scale experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, A; Zanetti, L; Micolucci, F; Cavinato, C

    2014-01-01

    A two-stage thermophilic anaerobic digestion process for the concurrent production of hydrogen and methane through the treatment of the source-sorted organic fraction of municipal solid waste was carried out over a long-term pilot scale experience. Two continuously stirred tank reactors were operated for about 1 year. The results showed that stable production of bio-hythane without inoculum treatment could be obtained. The pH of the dark fermentation reactor was maintained in the optimal range for hydrogen-producing bacteria activity through sludge recirculation from a methanogenic reactor. An average specific bio-hythane production of 0.65 m(3) per kg of volatile solids fed was achieved when the recirculation flow was controlled through an evaporation unit in order to avoid inhibition problems for both microbial communities. Microbial analysis indicated that dominant bacterial species in the dark fermentation reactor are related to the Lactobacillus family, while the population of the methanogenic reactor was mainly composed of Defluviitoga tunisiensis. The archaeal community of the methanogenic reactor shifted, moving from Methanothermobacter-like to Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales, the latter found also in the dark fermentation reactor when a considerable methane production was detected.

  16. Sulfate addition as an effective method to improve methane fermentation performance and propionate degradation in thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of coffee grounds, milk and waste activated sludge with AnMBR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Li, Yu-You; Qiao, Wei; Wang, Xiaochang; Takayanagi, Kazuyuki

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of sulfate on propionate degradation and higher organic loading rate (OLR) achievement in a thermophilic AnMBR for 373days using coffee grounds, milk and waste activated sludge (WAS) as the co-substrate. Without the addition of sulfate, the anaerobic system failed at an OLR of 14.6g-COD/L/d, with propionate accumulating to above 2.23g-COD/L, and recovery by an alkalinity supplement was not successful. After sulfate was added into substrates at a COD/SO4(2-) ratio of 200:1 to 350:1, biogas production increased proportionally with OLR increasing from 4.06 to 15.2g-COD/L/d. Propionic acid was maintained at less than 100mg-COD/L due to the effective conversion of propionic acid to methane after the sulfate supplement was added. The long-term stable performance of the AnMBR indicated that adding sulfate was beneficial for the degradation of propionate and achieving a higher OLR under the thermophilic condition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Sludge application and monitoring program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, 1986--1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunderson, C.A.; Larsen, I.L.; Boston, H.L.; Bradburn, D.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Van Miegroet, H. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Forest Resources; Morris, J.L. [Jaycor, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Walzer, A.E. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Central Environmental Compliance; Adler, T.C. [Bechtel National, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Huq, M. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Municipal sewage sludge has been applied to forests and pastures on the Oak Ridge Reservation since 1983 as a method of both disposal and beneficial reuse. Application was carried out under Tennessee permits issued to the city of Oak Ridge for land disposal of sewage sludge. In conjunction with these applications, information has been collected concerning sludge quantity and characteristics, soil parameters, soil water constituents, groundwater quality, surface runoff water quality, and various chemical constituents in vegetation on application sites. This information provides (1) a record of sludge application on the DOE reservations and (2) documentation of changes in soil parameters following sludge application. The information also provides a basis for evaluating the implications of the land application of municipal sewage sludge for soil and water quality and for evaluating the fate of sludge constituents when sludge is either sprayed or injected on pasture sites or surface applied in forested sites. This report covers in detail sludge applications conducted from 1986 through 1993, with some data from the period between 1983 and 1986. Anaerobically digested liquid sludge (2% to 4% solids) from the city of Oak Ridge had a relatively high nitrogen content (8% dry weight) and average to low concentrations of potentially problematic metals, compared with typical municipal sludges. Few potentially hazardous organic chemicals were detected in the sludge, and when found, these were at very low concentrations. Oak Ridge sludge is somewhat unique in that it contains radionuclides ({sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 131}I, uranium isotopes, {sup 90}Sr, and occasionally {sup 99}Tc) at concentrations much higher than typical municipal sludges. Land application of sewage sludge can dilute or destroy problematic sludge constituents while improving soil fertility. Correct management has made these sludge applications a model of environmentally responsible waste management.

  18. Analysis of petroleum oily sludge producing in petroleum field of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Cicero de Souza; Lima, Regineide Oliveira; Silva, Edjane Fabiula Buriti da; Castro, Kesia Kelly Vieira de; Chiavone Filho, Osvaldo; Araujo, Antonio Souza de [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), RN (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    In exploration and production of petroleum is generated solid waste different and components other. The petroleum oily sludge is a complex mix of components different (water, oil and solid). The petroleum oily sludge generally has other residues and is formed during production and operations, transport, storage and petroleum refining (atmospheric residue, vacuum residue and catalytic cracking residue). However, according to its origin, the compositions can be found quite varied for sludge. Observing the process steps production and refining is possible to locate its main sources and percentage contributions in terms of waste generation. The elemental analysis was performed with oily sludge from region and it showed different composition. For carbon element and hydrogen, small differences was observed, but for was observed greater differences for Oxygen element. The sludge has different inorganic and organic composition. The sludge from oil water separator (OWS) 2 showed a greater amount of oil (94.88%), this may indicate a residue of aggregate high for petroleum industry. In analysis of Saturates, Aromatics, Resins and Asphaltenes (SARA), the sludge from unloading showed amount high of saturates. The inorganic material separated from sludge was characterized and sludge from OWS 2 had high amount sulfur (41.57%). The sludge analyzed showed organic components high values, so it can be treated and reprocessed in process units petroleum industry. The analysis thermal degradation had a better setting for treated oily sludge. (author)

  19. Coproduction of hydrogen and methane via anaerobic fermentation of cornstalk waste in continuous stirred tank reactor integrated with up-flow anaerobic sludge bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xi-Yu; Li, Qian; Liu, Chun-Zhao

    2012-06-01

    A 10 L continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system was developed for a two-stage hydrogen fermentation process with an integrated alkaline treatment. The maximum hydrogen production rate reached 218.5 mL/L h at a cornstalk concentration of 30 g/L, and the total hydrogen yield and volumetric hydrogen production rate reached 58.0 mL/g-cornstalk and 0.55-0.57 L/L d, respectively. A 10 L up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) was used for continuous methane fermentation of the effluents obtained from the two-stage hydrogen fermentation. At the optimal organic loading rate of 15.0 g-COD/Ld, the COD removal efficiency and volumetric biogas production rate reached 83.3% and 4.6L/Ld, respectively. Total methane yield reached 200.9 mL/g-cornstalk in anaerobic fermentation with the effluents and alkaline hydrolysate. As a result, the total energy recovery by coproduction of hydrogen and methane with anaerobic fermentation of cornstalk reached 67.1%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A study of paint sludge deactivation by pyrolysis reactions

    OpenAIRE

    L.A.R. Muniz; Costa, A. R. [UNESP; E. Steffani; Zattera,A.J.; Hofsetz, K; K. Bossardi; Valentini, L.

    2003-01-01

    The production of large quantities of paint sludge is a serious environmental problem. This work evaluates the use of pyrolysis reaction as a process for deactivating paint sludge that generates a combustible gas phase, a solvent liquid phase and an inert solid phase. These wastes were classified into three types: water-based solvent (latex resin) and solvents based on their resins (alkyd and polyurethane). An electrically heated stainless steel batch reactor with a capacity of 579 mL and a m...

  1. Karakteristik Briket Arang dari Sludge dengan Penambahan Arang Tempurung Kelapa

    OpenAIRE

    Gultom, Juliana Frisca

    2011-01-01

    Sludge is solid wasted from pulp and paper industries as a potential material for the manufacture of briquetted charcoal. The purpose of this study is to examine the characteristic of briquetted charcoal from sludge and the optimalize of physical and mechanichal properties when the add of the coconut shell. The add of the coconut shell is variated from 10%, 15%, 20% and 25% based on the weight of briquetted charcoal. Carbonization process on coconut shell was using simple kiln and frying meth...

  2. Characteristics of waste waters and sludges production in the industrial meat; Caracteristicas de las aguas residuales y produccion de fango en el sector carnico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafuente, C.; Bermudez de Castro, S. [Universidad Antonio Nebrija (Spain); Rodriguez, M. E. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain)

    1999-07-01

    Within the agricultural industries, the meat industrial sector is considered one of the most important generators of waste water whose depuration is not difficult of carrying out. It is necessary describe the productive process of a company of the sector in order to determine where and what type of residuals is generated, as well as make a proposal of measuring preventive in order to improve the quality of the water. (Author) 40 refs.

  3. Grout and glass performance in support of stabilization/solidification of ORNL tank sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, R.D.; Mattus, C.H.; Mattus, A.J.

    1998-09-01

    Wastewater at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is collected, evaporated, and stored in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) and Bethel Valley Evaporator Storage Tanks (BVEST) pending treatment for disposal. In addition, some sludges and supernatants also requiring treatment remain in two inactive tank systems: the gunite and associated tanks (GAAT) and the old hydrofracture (OHF) tank. The waste consists of two phases: sludge and supernatant. The sludges contain a high amount of radioactivity, and some are classified as TRU sludges. Some Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metal concentrations are high enough to be defined as RCRA hazardous; therefore, these sludges are presumed to be mixed TRU waste. Grouting and vitrification are currently two likely stabilization/solidification alternatives for mixed wastes. Grouting has been used to stabilize/solidify hazardous and low-level radioactive waste for decades. Vitrification has been developed as a high-level radioactive alternative for decades and has been under development recently as an alternative disposal technology for mixed waste. The objective of this project is to define an envelope, or operating window, for grout and glass formulations for ORNL tank sludges. Formulations will be defined for the average composition of each of the major tank farms (BVEST/MVST, GAAT, and OHF) and for an overall average composition of all tank farms. This objective is to be accomplished using surrogates of the tank sludges with hot testing of actual tank sludges to check the efficacy of the surrogates.

  4. SLUDGE RETRIEVAL FROM HANFORD K WEST BASIN SETTLER TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ERPENBECK EG; LESHIKAR GA

    2011-01-13

    In 2010, an innovative, remotely operated retrieval system was deployed to successfully retrieve over 99.7% of the radioactive sludge from ten submerged tanks in Hanford's K-West Basin. As part of K-West Basin cleanup, the accumulated sludge needed to be removed from the 0.5 meter diameter by 5 meter long settler tanks and transferred approximately 45 meters to an underwater container for sampling and waste treatment. The abrasive, dense, non-homogeneous sludge was the product of the washing process of corroded nuclear fuel. It consists of small (less than 600 micron) particles of uranium metal, uranium oxide, and various other constituents, potentially agglomerated or cohesive after 10 years of storage. The Settler Tank Retrieval System (STRS) was developed to access, mobilize and pump out the sludge from each tank using a standardized process of retrieval head insertion, periodic high pressure water spray, retraction, and continuous pumping of the sludge. Blind operations were guided by monitoring flow rate, radiation levels in the sludge stream, and solids concentration. The technology developed and employed in the STRS can potentially be adapted to similar problematic waste tanks or pipes that must be remotely accessed to achieve mobilization and retrieval of the sludge within.

  5. Dispersed plug flow model for upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactors with focus on granular sludge dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyuzhnyi, Sergey V; Fedorovich, Vyacheslav V; Lens, Piet

    2006-03-01

    A new approach to model upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB)-reactors, referred to as a one-dimensional dispersed plug flow model, was developed. This model focusses on the granular sludge dynamics along the reactor height, based on the balance between dispersion, sedimentation and convection using one-dimensional (with regard to reactor height) equations. A universal description of both the fluid hydrodynamics and granular sludge dynamics was elaborated by applying known physical laws and empirical relations derived from experimental observations. In addition, the developed model includes: (1) multiple-reaction stoichiometry, (2) microbial growth kinetics, (3) equilibrium chemistry in the liquid phase, (4) major solid-liquid-gas interactions, and (5) material balances for dissolved and solid components along the reactor height. The integrated model has been validated with a set of experimental data on the start-up, operation performance, sludge dynamics, and solute intermediate concentration profiles of a UASB reactor treating cheese whey [Yan et al. (1989) Biol Wastes 27:289-305; Yan et al. (1993) Biotechnol Bioeng 41:700-706]. A sensitivity analysis of the model, performed with regard to the seed sludge characteristics and the key model parameters, showed that the output of the dispersed plug flow model was most influenced by the sludge settleability characteristics and the growth properties (especially mu(m)) of both protein-degrading bacteria and acetotrophic methanogens.

  6. Sludge Washing and Demonstration of the DWPF Nitric/Formic Flowsheet in the SRNL Shielded Cells for Sludge Batch 9 Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pareizs, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Martino, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Crawford, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Johnson, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-11-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to qualify the next batch of sludgeSludge Batch 9 (SB9). Current practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge to Tank 51 from other tanks. The sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current Defense Waste Process Facility (DWPF) feed tank. Prior to sludge transfer from Tank 51 to Tank 40, the Tank 51 sludge must be qualified. SRNL qualifies the sludge in multiple steps. First, a Tank 51 sample is received, then characterized, washed, and again characterized. SRNL then demonstrates the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet with the sludge. The final step of qualification involves chemical durability measurements of glass fabricated in the DWPF CPC demonstrations. In past sludge batches, SRNL had completed the DWPF demonstration with Tank 51 sludge. For SB9, SRNL has been requested to process a blend of Tank 51 and Tank 40 at a targeted ratio of 44% Tank 51 and 56% Tank 40 on an insoluble solids basis.

  7. Hydrothermal Testing of K Basin Sludge and N Reactor Fuel at Sludge Treatment Project Operating Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2007-03-30

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed for the U. S. DOE by Fluor Hanford (FH), was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from K Basin sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The STP process uses high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. Under nominal process conditions, the sludge will be heated in pressurized water at 185°C for as long as 72 hours to assure the complete reaction (corrosion) of up to 0.25-inch diameter uranium metal pieces. Under contract to FH, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted bench-scale testing of the STP hydrothermal process in November and December 2006. Five tests (~50 ml each) were conducted in sealed, un-agitated reaction vessels under the hydrothermal conditions (e.g., 7 to 72 h at 185°C) of the STP corrosion process using radioactive sludge samples collected from the K East Basin and particles/coupons of N Reactor fuel also taken from the K Basins. The tests were designed to evaluate and understand the chemical changes that may be occurring and the effects that any changes would have on sludge rheological properties. The tests were not designed to evaluate engineering aspects of the process. The hydrothermal treatment affected the chemical and physical properties of the sludge. In each test, significant uranium compound phase changes were identified, resulting from dehydration and chemical reduction reactions. Physical properties of the sludge were significantly altered from their initial, as-settled sludge values, including, shear strength, settled density, weight percent water, and gas retention.

  8. Utilization of Brine Sludge in Nonstructural Building Components: A Sustainable Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mridul Garg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The characterization and influence of brine sludge on the properties of cement-fly ash-sludge binders are presented. The reaction products formed during the hydration of binder provide an interlocking framework to physically encapsulate the waste particles and are responsible for the development of strength. The utilization of brine sludge in making paver blocks and bricks and the effect of sludge concentration on the engineering properties of these products are also discussed. These results clearly exhibited that brine sludge up to 35 and 25% can safely be utilized for making paver blocks and bricks, respectively. The leachability studies confirm that the metals ions and impurities in the sludge are substantially fixed in the matrix and do not readily leach from there. The utilization of brine sludge in construction materials could serve as an alternative solution to disposal and reduce pollution.

  9. Ex-situ bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sewage sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jens Ejbye; Larsen, S.B.; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov

    2008-01-01

    . Primary and mixed (primary: secondary sludge = 1:3) sewage sludges were collected from a waste water treatment plant (WWTP) and degraded under mesophilic anaerobic conditions. The primary and mixed sludge produced separately from this digestion was used for three bioaugmentation batch experiments: firstly......Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are naturally occurring organic compounds. As a result of anthropogenic activities, PAH concentration has increased in the environment considerably. PAH are regarded as environmental pollutants because they have toxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic effects...

  10. Effect of process variables on the production of Polyhydroxyalkanoates by activated sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Mokhtarani Nader; Ganjidoust Hossein; Vasheghani Farahani Ebrahim

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Polyhydroxyalkanoates are known to be temporarily stored by microorganisms in activated sludge, especially in anaerobic-aerobic processes. Due to the problems resulted from the disposals of plastic wastes and excess sludge of wastewater treatment plants, the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates by treating activated sludge and determining the effect of process variables were the main issues of this paper. In this research, an anaerobic-aerobic sequencing batch reactor was used to make...

  11. Enhancing faecal sludge management in peri-urban areas of Lusaka through faecal sludge valorisation: challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tembo, J. M.; Nyirenda, E.; Nyambe, I.

    2017-03-01

    Lusaka, the capital city of Zambia, has two million inhabitants with 70% residing in peri-urban areas. Ninety (90) % of this population employ pit latrines for excretion generating approximately 22,680 tons of faecal sludge per annum. This sludge is inadequately managed hence of the generated amount, over 60% remains within the residential environment thereby compromising both the environment and public health. To foster a solution to this problem, a study was commissioned to assess faecal sludge valorisation potential and how it would impact on Faecal Sludge Management. The study evaluated policy, institutional and regulatory frameworks, sanitation practices including latrine construction and usage aspects and also characterised the faecal sludge for selected parameters relevant to valorisation. Four peri-urban areas were adopted as study sites. Policy issues together with existing institutional and regulatory frameworks were assessed through literature review. Sanitation practices were evaluated through physical observations, focus group discussions, interviews and questionnaire administration. Faecal sludge characterisation was through sampling and analysis. It was observed that there are policy gaps in fostering faecal sludge valorisation. Sanitation practices and latrines construction also do not favour valorisation. The quality of the raw sludge has potential for valorisation though again, some parameters like solid waste content require drastic changes in sanitation practices in order not to compromise the reuse potential of the sludge. It was concluded that if faecal sludge management is to be enhanced through valorisation, there is need to have policies promoting pit latrine faecal sludge reuse and strengthened regulatory and institutional frameworks in this respect.

  12. EFFECTS OF SEWAGE SLUDGE AND SEWAGE SLUDGE COMPOST AMENDMENT ON SOIL PROPERTIES AND Zea mays L. PLANTS (HEAVY METALS, QUALITY AND PRODUCTIVITY)

    OpenAIRE

    Rocío VACA

    2011-01-01

    The use of organic wastes in agriculture can improve the soil's productive capacity, and physical and chemical characteristics. This study evaluated the effects of sewage sludge, sewage sludge compost and inorganic fertilizer applications on nickel, copper and zinc contents in soil and corn grains (Zea mays L); maize productivity, and grain nutritional quality. Sewage sludge and sewage sludge compost at 18 Mg ha¿1 and a mineral fertilizer (N-P-K) with a formulation of 150-75-30 were applied. ...

  13. Beneficial reuse of precast concrete industry sludge to produce alkaline stabilized biosolids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, C; Seth, R; Biswas, N

    2008-01-01

    The precast concrete industry generates waste called concrete sludge during routine mixer tank washing. It is highly alkaline and hazardous, and typically disposed of by landfilling. This study examined the stabilization of municipal sewage sludge using concrete sludge as an alkaline agent. Sewage sludge was amended with 10 to 40% of concrete sludge by wet weight, and 10 and 20% of lime by dry weight of the sludge mix. Mixes containing 30 and 40% of concrete sludge with 20% lime fulfilled the primary requirements of Category 1 and 2 (Canada) biosolids of maintaining a pH of 12 for at least 72 hours. The heavy metals were below Category 1 regulatory limits. The 40% concrete sludge mix was incubated at 52 degrees C for 12 of the 72 hours to achieve the Category 1 and 2 regulations of less than 1000 fecal coliform/g solids. The nutrient content of the biosolids was 8.2, 10 and 0.6 g/kg of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium respectively. It can be used as a top soil or augmented with potassium for use as fertilizer. The study demonstrates that concrete sludge waste can be beneficially reused to produce biosolids, providing a long-term sustainable waste management solution for the concrete industry.

  14. Risk assessments of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) during sludge application in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jun

    2018-02-01

    Due to increasingly less space in municipal environment, waste management has become an urgent issue worldwide. As one of common municipal waste, sewage sludge from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) contains abundant nutrients, some of which can be quite essential for plant growth. In consideration of nutrient recycling and energy saving, sludge application has been frequently promoted in many countries across the world. However, even after several sludge stabilization procedures, sewage sludge may still contain a large variety of toxic pollutants, especially some emerging organic contaminants (EOCs). Applied in various household products and plastic industries as additives, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been constantly detected in sewage sludge samples from several cities in China since 2005, as well as some biosolid samples after sludge stabilization processes, suggesting their strong persistence and wide occurrence. During sludge application onto farmland soils, PBDEs may desorb from sludge particles and get attached by soil organic matter (SOM), followed by plant root uptake and translocation to aboveground tissues. In this study, data about current pollution of PBDEs in sewage sludge samples from China was reviewed, and the potential risks during sludge application was comprehensively assessed.

  15. Low intensity surplus activated sludge pretreatment before anaerobic digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suschka Jan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sewage sludge (municipal, or industrial treatment is still a problem in so far that it is not satisfactorily resolved in terms of cost and final disposal. Two common forms of sludge disposal are possible; the first being direct disposal on land (including agriculture and the second being incineration (ash production, although neither of these methods are universally applied. Simplifying the issue, direct sludge disposal on land is seldom applied for sanitary and environmental reasons, while incineration is not popular for financial (high costs reasons. Very often medium and large wastewater treatment plants apply anaerobic digestion for sludge hygiene principles, reducing the amount to be disposed and for biogas (energy production. With the progress in sewage biological treatment aiming at nutrient removal, primary sludge has been omitted in the working processes and only surplus activated sludge requires handling. Anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS is more difficult due to the presence of microorganisms, the decomposition of which requires a relatively long time for hydrolysis. In order to upgrade the hydrolysis effects, several different pre-treatment processes have already been developed and introduced. The additional pre-treatment processes applied are aimed at residual sludge bulk mass minimization, shortening of the anaerobic digestion process or higher biogas production, and therefore require additional energy. The water-energy-waste Nexus (treads of of the benefits and operational difficulties, including energy costs are discussed in this paper. The intensity of pre-treatment processes to upgrade the microorganism’s hydrolysis has crucial implications. Here a low intensity pre-treatment process, alkalisation and hydrodynamic disintegration - hybrid process - were presented in order to achieve sufficient effects of WAS anaerobic digestion. A sludge digestion efficiency increase expressed as 45% biogas additional

  16. Respirometry in activated sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjers, H.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the study was (1) to develop a respiration meter capable of continuously measuring, using different procedures, the oxygen uptake rate of activated sludge and (2) to expand knowledge about respiration related characteristics of wastewater and activated sludge.

    A

  17. Activated Sludge Rheology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios; Horn, Willi; Helmus, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Rheological behaviour is an important fluid property that severely impacts its flow behaviour and many aspects related to this. In the case of activated sludge, the apparent viscosity has an influence on e.g. pumping, hydrodynamics, mass transfer rates, sludge-water separation (settling and filtr...

  18. Performance of metal compound on thermolysis and electrolysis on sugar industries waste water treatment: COD and color removal with sludge analysis (batch-experiment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Omprakash

    2017-10-01

    The sugar cane industry is one of the most water demanding industries. Sugar industries consume and generate excess amount of water. The generated water contains organic compounds, which would cause pollution. The aim of this research work is to study the effectiveness of metal compound for treatment of sugar industry waste water by thermolysis and electrolysis process. The result shows ferrous metal catalyst shows 80 and 85 % chemical oxygen demand and color removal at pH 6, optimum mass loading 4 kg/m3, treatment temperature 85 °C and treatment time 9 h. When ferrous material was used as electrode, maximum 81 % chemical oxygen demand and 84 % color removal at pH 6, current density 156 Am-2, treatment time 120 min and anode consumption 0.7 g for 1.5 L wastewater were obtained.

  19. Activated sludge model No. 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gujer, W.; Henze, M.; Mino, T.

    1999-01-01

    The Activated Sludge Model No. 3 (ASM3) can predict oxygen consumption, sludge production, nitrification and denitrification of activated sludge systems. It relates to the Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1) and corrects for some defects of ASM I. In addition to ASM1, ASM3 includes storage...

  20. [Improvement of municipal sewage sludge dewaterability by bioleaching: a pilot-scale study with a continuous plug flow reaction model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fen-Wu; Zhou, Li-Xiang; Zhou, Jun; Jiang, Feng

    2011-10-01

    A plug-flow bio-reactor of 700 L working volume for sludge bioleaching was used in this study. The reactor was operationally divided into six sections along the direction of the sludge movement. Ten duration of continuous operation of sludge bioleaching with Acidibacillus spp. and 1.2 m3 x h(-1) aeration amount was conducted. In this system, sludge retention time was 2.5 d, and the added amount of microbial nutritional substance was 4 g x L(-1). During sludge bioleaching, the dynamic changes of pH, dewaterability (specific resistance to filtration, SRF) of sewage sludge in different sections, the moisture content and moisture evaporation rate of dewatered bioleached sludge cake obtained by chamber filter press were investigated. The results showed that the SRF of sludge significantly decreased from initial 1.50 x 10(13) m x kg(-1) to the final 0.34 x 10(13) m x kg(-1). The wasted bioleached sludge was collected and dewatered by chamber filter press under the following pressures as 0.3 MPa for 4 h (2 h for feeding sludge, 2 h for holding pressure), 3 h (1.5 h for feeding sludge, 1.5 h for holding pressure), 2 h (1 h for feeding sludge, 1 h for holding pressure), and 1 h (0.5 h for feeding sludge, 0.5 h for holding pressure). Correspondingly, the moisture of dewatered sludge was reduced to 57.9%, 59.2%, 59.6%, and 63.4% of initial moisture, respectively. Moreover, the moisture content of bioleached sludge cake was reduced to about 45% and less than 10% if the cake was placed at 25 degrees C for 15 h and 96 h, respectively. Obviously, sludge bioleaching followed by sludge dewatering using chamber filter press is a promising attractive approach for sludge half-dryness treatment in engineering application.

  1. Mineralization of nitrogen from pelletized sewage sludge - a laboratory incubation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattiez, Anne-Laure

    2000-07-01

    Nitrogen limits the productivity of most ecosystems, but can also cause environmental problems. With the increasing amount of sludge generated by better wastewater treatment, land application of pelletized sludge appears as a combined solution to waste disposal and plant nitrogen nutrition issues. Six types of sludge pellets/granules, containing different mixtures of sludge, ash and/or lime have been inoculated and incubated for 8 weeks at 20 deg C in the dark, to study N net mineralisation rates. Laboratory results showed no indication of general differences between sludge/ash and sludge/lime mixtures, with respect to N mineralisation and nitrification, but some differences between Umeaa pellets and GaevIe granules were discernible. The higher net N mineralisation rates in pellets appeared to be related to sludge properties. On the contrary pellets had a low level of nitrification, which might be explained by preliminary heat treatment of the sludge and the seemingly slow recolonization of nitrifiers. It is also believed that considerable amounts of N were lost, and that the major route for these losses was ammonia volatilisation. From an economical point of view, sludge pelletisation appears to be the most cost-effective means of disposal. It transforms sludge into a valuable, odourless and storable fertiliser or heat source. Some income could even be expected. The benefits obtained from an increased tree growth could justify forest fertilisation with pelletized sludge, but further research is needed to determine more precisely the possible growth increment and the consequences on the environment.

  2. Biological Composition of Sewage Sludge in the Aspect of Threats to the Natural Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bień January

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the prerequisites for sustainable development is integrated waste management, including sewage sludge. Besides its good fertilization properties, sewage sludge, which is an inevitable by-product of sewage treatment, accumulates toxic chemical substances and dangerous pathogenic and toxicogenic organisms. Uncontrolled introduction of sewage sludge into soil might pose a serious threat to food chain and natural soil microflora. This in effect might disturb the ecological balance in a particular ecosystem. This study presents author’s own investigations of the sanitary conditions of sewage sludge and the conditions after the processes of aerobic and anaerobic stabilization. The investigated sewage sludge originated from a municipal wastewater treatment plant. The sewage sludge samples were transferred onto proliferation and diagnostic media. The results of the analysis obtained in this study confirmed that sewage sludge is a material which is rich in microorganisms, including pathogenic bacterial species such as: Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. Mycological tests demonstrated that sewage sludge is a material which is conducive to proliferation of yeast-like and mould-like fungi, among which both pathogenic and toxinogenic species can be present. Quantitative analysis of the investigated sewage sludge demonstrated that the processes of stabilization reduce the content of microorganisms but they do not guarantee product safety in sanitary terms. A huge variability and variety of biological composition points to the need for further research in the field of sanitary characteristics of sewage sludge and survival rate in microorganisms from different types of sewage sludge.

  3. Development of Alkaline Oxidative Dissolution Methods for Chromium (III) Compounds Present in Hanford Site Tank Sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NN Krot; VP Shilov; AM Fedoseev; NA Budantseva; MV Nikonov; AB Yusov; AYu Garnov; IA Charushnikova; VP Perminov; LN Astafurova; TS Lapitskaya; VI Makarenkov

    1999-07-02

    The high-level radioactive waste sludge in the underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site contains various chromium(III)solid phases. Dissolution and removal of chromium from tank waste sludges is desirable prior to high-level waste vitrification because increased volume is required to incorporate the residual chromium. Unfortunately, dissolution of chromium from the sludge to form Cr(OH){sub 4}{sup {minus}} through treatment with heated NaOH solution (also used to dissolve aluminum phases and metathesize phosphates to sodium salts) generally has been unsuccessful in tests with both simulated and genuine Hanford waste sludges. Oxidative dissolution of the Cr(III) compounds to form soluble chromate has been proposed as an alternative chromium solid phase dissolution method and results of limited prior testing have been reported.

  4. Peculiarities of a Glass-Sludge Mixture Subjected to Low-Temperature Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abigail Parra Parra; Marina Vlasova; Pedro Antonio Márquez Aguilar; Tamara Tomila

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the specific features offormation of a composite material consisting of a mixture of low-melting ground glass and waste active sludge, which is used for sewage purification, have been considered...

  5. Application of Sludges and Wastewaters on Agricultural Land: A Planning and Educational Guide, MCD-35. Research Bulletin 1090.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezek, Bernard D., Ed.; Miller, Robert H., Ed.

    This report addresses the application of agricultural processing wastes, industrial and municipal wastes on agricultural land as both a waste management and resource recovery and reuse practice. The document emphasizes the treatment and beneficial utilization of sludge and wastewater as opposed to waste disposal. These objectives are achieved…

  6. Comparison of bioindicator eukaryotes of activated sludge biocenoses on two water-treatment plants: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achmadulina Farida Y.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Activated sludge biocenoses were compared on waste-water treatment plants in the city of Kazan, Russian Federation and the city of Teplice, Czech Republic. Based on Palia-Kovnatski index, Acanthamoeba in Kazan, Epistylis in Teplice, and Acanthamoeba and Centropyxis were dominant genera in both plants. The major subdominant generas identified were Arcella, Opercularia and Aspidisca. This indicates high nitrification ability, high water purification potential and matured activated sludge. Chemical composition of the waste-water was identified as the main factor determining the sludge biocenoses diversity. Higher sludge biodiversity (Shannon, Margalef, and Sorensen indexes was found in Kazan corresponding to more concentrated inflow water.

  7. Sludge processing and storage facilities in the Bages region (Catalonia Spain); Instalaciones de transformacion y almacenaje de fangos del Bages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carruza Perz, T.; Tomas i Puig, R.; Sana i Vilaseca, J.; More Ramos, J.C.

    1996-03-01

    The increasing number of waste water treatment plants means that there is a growing need to find solutions for the by-products they generate, particularly sludge. This article describes the sludge processing facilities of the Manresa-Sant Joan de Vilatorrada waste water treatment system. They are designed to convert the dehydrated sludge into easily handled products for use on the land in farming, gardening or other applications. The sludge is transformed by a composting process which is regulated to suit the particular end-use required. The values of the key characteristics of the treated products and their evolution during the process are presented an discussed. (Author)

  8. From agricultural use of sewage sludge to nutrient extraction: A soil science outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchmann, Holger; Börjesson, Gunnar; Kätterer, Thomas; Cohen, Yariv

    2017-03-01

    The composition of municipal wastewater and sewage sludge reflects the use and proliferation of elements and contaminants within society. In Sweden, official statistics show that concentrations of toxic metals in municipal sewage sludge have steadily decreased, by up to 90 %, since the 1970s, due to environmental programmes and statutory limits on metals in sludge and soil. Results from long-term field experiments show that reduced metal pollution during repeated sewage sludge application has reversed negative trends in soil biology. Despite this Swedish success story, organic waste recycling from Swedish towns and cities to arable land is still limited to only about 20 % of the total amount produced. Resistance among industries and consumers to products grown on land treated with sewage sludge may not always be scientifically grounded; however, there are rational obstacles to application of sewage sludge to land based on its inherent properties rather than its content of pollutants. We argue that application of urban organic wastes to soil is an efficient form of recycling for small municipalities, but that organic waste treatment from large cities requires other solutions. The large volumes of sewage sludge collected in towns and cities are not equitably distributed back to arable land because of the following: (i) The high water and low nutrient content in sewage sludge make long-distance transportation too expensive; and (ii) the low plant availability of nutrients in sewage sludge results in small yield increases even after many years of repeated sludge addition. Therefore, nutrient extraction from urban wastes instead of direct organic waste recycling is a possible way forward. The trend for increased combustion of urban wastes will make ash a key waste type in future. Combustion not only concentrates the nutrients in the ash but also leads to metal enrichment; hence, direct application of the ash to land is most often not possible. However, inorganic

  9. A systematic study of the gaseous emissions from biosolids composting: raw sludge versus anaerobically digested sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulini-Duran, Caterina; Artola, Adriana; Font, Xavier; Sánchez, Antoni

    2013-11-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) and ammonia, that contribute to odor pollution, and methane and nitrous oxide, with an important greenhouse effect, are compounds present in gaseous emission from waste treatment installations, including composting plants. In this work, gaseous emissions from the composting of raw (RS) and anaerobically digested sludge (ADS) have been investigated and compared at pilot scale aiming to provide emission factors and to identify the different VOC families present. CH4 and N2O emissions were higher in ADS composting (0.73 and 0.55 kg Mg(-1) sludge, respectively) than in RS composting (0.01 kg Mg(-1) sludge for both CH4 and N2O). NH3 and VOCs emitted were higher during the RS composting process (19.37 and 0.21 kg Mg(-1) sludge, respectively) than in ADS composting (0.16 and 0.04 kg Mg(-1) sludge). Significant differences were found in the VOC compositions emitted in ADS and RS composting, being more diverse in RS than ADS composting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Petroleum sludge treatment and reuse for cement production as setting retarder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeslina, A. K.; Ali, B.

    2017-05-01

    Petroleum sludge is a dangerous waste that needs to be treated to avoid any contamination of soil and groundwater due to its disposal. As an attempt to treat this waste, it has been incorporated into cement production as substitution for gypsum. As results, 5% of petroleum sludge has shown effective results and could play the same role of gypsum in delaying the flash setting of cement clinker.

  11. Energy and Resource Recovery from Sludge. State of Science Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalogo, Y.; Monteith, H. [Hydromantis Inc., Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    There is general consensus among sanitary engineering professionals that municipal wastewater and wastewater sludge is not a 'waste', but a potential source of valuable resources. The subject is a major interest to the members of the Global Water Research Coalition (GWRC). The GWRC is therefore preparing a strategic research plan related to energy and resource recovery from wastewater sludge. The initial focus of the strategy will be on sewage sludge as water reuse aspects have been part of earlier studies. The plan will define new research orientations for deeper investigation. The current state of science (SoS) Report was prepared as the preliminary phase of GWRC's future strategic research plan on energy and resource recovery from sludge.

  12. Research on Treatment Technology and Device of Oily Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. Q.; Shui, F. S.; Li, Q. F.

    2017-12-01

    Oily sludge is a solid oily waste, which is produced during the process of oil exploitation, transportation, refining and treatment of oily sewage. It contains a great number of hazardous substance, and is difficult to handle with. To solve the problem of waste resources of oil sludge with high oil content and usually not easy to aggregate during the preparation of profile control agent, a new oily sludge treatment device was developed. This device consists of heat supply unit, flush and filter unit, oil removal unit and dehydration unit. It can effectively clean and filter out the waste from oily sludge, recycle the oil resources and reduce the water content of the residue. In the process of operation, the water and chemical agent are recycled in the device, eventually producing little sewage. The device is small, easy to move and has high degree of automation control. The experimental application shows that the oil removal rate of the oily sludge is up to 70%, and the higher the oil content rate the better the treatment.

  13. Plant Response to Salmon Wastes and Sewage Sludge Used as Organic Fertilizer on Two Degraded Soils Under Greenhouse Conditions Respuesta de Plantas a la Fertilización Orgánica con Residuos de Salmonicultura y Lodos Municipales en Dos Suelos Degradados Bajo Condiciones de Invernadero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Celis

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The potential toxicity of urban sewage and farmed salmon sludge, as well as their fertilizer potential, was evaluated by a battery of tests carried out with lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. and annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam. cv. Winter Star. Wastes were evaluated in a Patagonian soil (Andic cryofluvent and a granitic soil (Ultic Palexeralf. The treatments were municipal sewage sludge (MSS, salmon ground-farming waste (PSW and salmon lake-farming waste (LSW at different rates: 25, 50, 75, 100 and 150 t ha-1. Bioassays in lettuce were conducted for germination index (GI, radicle and hypocotyl structure length. Test in ryegrass were conducted for aboveground biomass yield. The phytotoxicological results from Patagonian soil showed significant differences (P ≤ 0.05 among sludge, where the highest values for GI, radicle and hypocotyl length were for LSW, followed by PSW. Results from granitic soil showed no significant differences among sludge added. In both soils, MSS treatment at application rate of 150 t ha-1 presented the smallest radicle length, not showing development of the hypocotyl structure. Biomass data indicated that MSS, PSW and LSW sludge can be applied at 25 to 150 t ha-1 on Patagonian soil and only LSW sludge on granitic soil. However, its addition should be complemented with N and K inorganic fertilizer to increase pasture yield. MSS and PSW sludge applied at 150 t ha-1 was clearly detrimental for crop yield, especially when applied to granitic soil.En este estudio se evaluó el potencial tóxico y fertilizante de lodos urbanos y biosólidos residuales de salmonicultura, usando para ello lechuga (Lactuca sativa L. y ballica anual (Lolium multiflorum Lam. cv. Winter Star. Estos biosólidos fueron adicionados en mezclas a un suelo patagónico (Andic cryofluvent y a un suelo granítico (Ultic Palexeralf. Los tratamientos fueron lodo municipal (MSS, biosólido de salmonicultura en tierra (PSW y biosólido de salmonicultura lacustre

  14. Characterization study on secondary sewage sludge for replacement in building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Sarani, Noor Amira; Aziz, Nurul Sazwana A.; Hamdan, Rafidah; Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al Bakri

    2017-09-01

    Recently, environmental issues continually increased since expanded in industrial development and grown in population. Regarding to this activity, it will cause lack management of waste such as solid waste from wastewater treatment plant called sewage sludge. This research presents the characteristic study of sewage sludge, regardless of whether it is appropriate or not to be applied as building materials. The sewage sludge samples were collected from secondary treatment at Senggarang and Perwira under Indah Water Konsortium (IWK) treatment plant. Raw materials were tested with X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) in order to determine the composition of sewage sludge and heavy metal concentration contains in sewage sludge. From the study, it was found that sewage sludge contained high amount of Silica Oxide (SiO2) with 13.6%, Sulphur Trioxide (SO3) with 12.64% and Iron Oxide (Fe2O3) with 8.7% which is similar in clay. In addition, sewage sludge also high in Iron (Fe) with 276.2 mg/L followed by Zinc (Zn) with concentration 45.41 mg/L which sewage sludge cannot be directly disposed to landfill. Results from this study demonstrated that sewage sludge has high possibility to be reused as alternative building materials such as bricks and have compatible chemical composition with clay.

  15. Sludge application and monitoring program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, 1986 through 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunderson, C.A.; Boston, H.L.; Van Miegroet, H., Morris, J.L.; Larsen, I.L.; Walzer, A.E.; Adler, T.C.; Bradburn, D.M.; Huq, M.

    1995-08-01

    Municipal sewage sludge has been applied to forests and pastures on the DOE (U.S. Department of Energy) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) since 1983 as a method of both disposal and beneficial reuse. Application was carried out under State of Tennessee permits issued to the City of Oak Ridge for land disposal of. sewage sludge. In conjunction with these applications, information has been collected concerning sludge quantity and characteristics, soil parameters, soil water constituents, groundwater quality, surface runoff water quality, and various chemical constituents in vegetation on application sites. This information provides (1) a record of sludge application on the DOE ORR, and (2) documentation of changes in soil parameters following sludge application. The information also provides a basis for evaluating the implications of the land application of municipal sewage sludge for soil and water quality and for evaluating the fate of sludge constituents when sludge is either sprayed onto or injected into pasture sites or applied to the surface of forested sites. This report covers in detail sludge applications conducted from 1986 through 1993, with some data from the period between 1983 and 1986. Land application has been recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as a desirable alternative for disposal of ORR waste. Municipal sewage sludge is in many ways similar to dilute animal manure fertilizer, but it also contains metals, organic chemicals, human pathogens, and other constituents reflective of inputs into the municipal sewage treatment plant. When applied to land, nutrients in the sludge improve soil fertility, and minerals and organic matter in the sludge improve soil structure. Under optimal conditions, metals are immobilized, and organic chemicals and pathogens are immobilized or destroyed. If the sludge is not managed effectively, however, sludge constituents have the potential to affect human health and the environment.

  16. The sustainable utilization of malting industry wastewater biological treatment sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilenko, T. A.; Svintsov, A. V.; Chernysh, I. V.

    2018-01-01

    The article deals with the research of using the sludge from malting industry wastewater’s biological treatment and the calcium carbonate slurry as organo-mineral fertilizing additives. The sludge, generated as a result of industrial wastewater biological treatment, is subject to dumping at solid domestic waste landfills, which has a negative impact on the environment, though its properties and composition allow using it as an organic fertilizer. The physical and chemical properties of both wastes have been studied; the recommendations concerning the optimum composition of soil mix, containing the above-mentioned components, have been provided. The phytotoxic effect on the germination capacity and sprouts of cress (Lepidium sativum), barley (Hordéum vulgáre) and oats (Avena sativa) in soil mixes has been determined. The heavy metals and arsenic contents in the sludge does not exceed the allowable level; it is also free of pathogenic flora and helminthes.

  17. Sludge treatment studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beahm, E.C.; Weber, C.F.; Dillow, T.A.; Bush, S.A.; Lee, S.Y.; Hunt, R.D.

    1997-06-01

    Solid formation in filtered leachates and wash solutions was seen in five of the six sludges treated by Enhanced Sludge Washing. Solid formation in process solutions takes a variety of forms: very fine particles, larger particulate solids, solids floating in solution like egg whites, gels, crystals, and coatings on sample containers. A gel-like material that formed in a filtered leachate from Enhanced Sludge Washing of Hanford T-104 sludge was identified as natrophosphate, Na{sub 7}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}F{center_dot}19H{sub 2}O. A particulate material that formed in a filtered caustic leachate from Hanford SX-113 sludge contained sodium and silicon. This could be any of a host of sodium silicates in the NaOH-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system. Acidic treatment of Hanford B-202 sludge with 1 M, 3 M, and 6 M HNO{sub 3} sequential leaching resulted in complete dissolution at 75 C, but not at ambient temperature. This treatment resulted in the formation of solids in filtered leachates. Analyses of the solids revealed that a gel material contained silica with some potassium, calcium, iron, and manganese. Two phases were embedded in the gel. One was barium sulfate. The other could not be identified, but it was determined that the only metal it contained was bismuth.