WorldWideScience

Sample records for waste gases originating

  1. Dry additives-reduction catalysts for flue waste gases originating from the combustion of solid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    Hard coal is the basic energy generating raw material in Poland. In 1990, 60% of electricity and thermal energy was totally obtained from it. It means that 100 million tons of coal were burned. The second position is held by lignite - generating 38% of electricity and heat (67.3 million tons). It is to be underlined that coal combustion is particularly noxious to the environment. The coal composition appreciably influences the volume of pollution emitted in the air. The contents of incombustible mineral parts - ashes - oscillates from 2 to 30%; only 0.02 comes from plants that had once originated coal and cannot be separated in any way. All the rest, viz. the so-called external mineral substance enters the fuel while being won. The most indesirable hard coal ingredient is sulfur whose level depends on coal sorts and its origin. The worse the fuel quality, the more sulfur it contains. In the utilization process of this fuel, its combustible part is burnt: therefore, sulfur dioxide is produced. At the present coal consumption, the SO{sub 2} emission reaches the level of 3.2 million per year. The intensifies the pressure on working out new coal utilization technologies, improving old and developing of pollution limiting methods. Research is also directed towards such an adaptation of technologies in order that individual users may also make use thereof (household furnaces) as their share in the pollution emission is considerable.

  2. Process of radioactive waste gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiser, H.; Schwarz, H.; Schroter, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    A method is described in which the radiation level of waste gases from nuclear power plants containing both activation and fission gases is controlled at or below limits permitted by applicable standards by passing such gases, prior to release to the atmosphere, through an adsorptive delay path including a body of activated carbon having the relation to the throughput and character of such gases. (U.S.)

  3. Origins of geothermal gases at Yellowstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Bergfeld, Deborah; Evans, William C.; Hunt, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Gas emissions at the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field (YPVF) reflect open-system mixing of gas species originating from diverse rock types, magmas, and crustal fluids, all combined in varying proportions at different thermal areas. Gases are not necessarily in chemical equilibrium with the waters through which they vent, especially in acid sulfate terrain where bubbles stream through stagnant acid water. Gases in adjacent thermal areas often can be differentiated by isotopic and gas ratios, and cannot be tied to one another solely by shallow processes such as boiling-induced fractionation of a parent liquid. Instead, they inherit unique gas ratios (e.g., CH4/He) from the dominant rock reservoirs where they originate, some of which underlie the Quaternary volcanic rocks. Steam/gas ratios (essentially H2O/CO2) of Yellowstone fumaroles correlate with Ar/He and N2/CO2, strongly suggesting that H2O/CO2 is controlled by addition of steam boiled from water rich in atmospheric gases. Moreover, H2O/CO2 varies systematically with geographic location, such that boiling is more enhanced in some areas than others. The δ13C and 3He/CO2 of gases reflect a dominant mantle origin for CO2 in Yellowstone gas. The mantle signature is most evident at Mud Volcano, which hosts gases with the lowest H2O/CO2, lowest CH4 concentrations and highest He isotope ratios (~16Ra), consistent with either a young subsurface intrusion or less input of crustal and meteoric gas than any other location at Yellowstone. Across the YPVF, He isotope ratios (3He/4He) inversely vary with He concentrations, and reflect varied amounts of long- stored, radiogenic He added to the magmatic endmember within the crust. Similarly, addition of CH4 from organic-rich sediments is common in the eastern thermal areas at Yellowstone. Overall, Yellowstone gases reflect addition of deep, high-temperature magmatic gas (CO2-rich), lower-temperatures crustal gases (4He- and CH4-bearing), and those gases (N2, Ne, Ar) added

  4. Fate of Gases generated from Nuclear Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasulu, M.; Francis, A. J. [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Francis, A. J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York (United States)

    2013-05-15

    The backfill materials such as cement, bentonite or crushed rock are used as engineered barriers against groundwater infiltration and radionuclide transport. Gas generation from radioactive wastes is attributed to radiolysis, corrosion of metals, and degradation of organic materials. Corrosion of steel drums and biodegradation of organic materials in L/ILW can generate gas which causes pressure build up and has the potential to compromise the integrity of waste containers and release the radionuclides and other contaminants into the environment. Performance assessment therefore requires a detailed understanding of the source and fate of gas generation and transport within the disposal system. Here we review the sources and fate of various type of gases generated from nuclear wastes and repositories. Studies on modeling of the fate and transport of repository gases primarily deal with hydrogen and CO{sub 2}. Although hydrogen and carbon dioxide are the major gases of concern, microbial transformations of these gases in the subterranean environments could be significant. Metabolism of hydrogen along with the carbon dioxide results in the formation of methane, low molecular weight organic compounds and cell biomass and thus could affect the total inventory in a repository environment. Modeling studies should take into consideration of both the gas generation and consumption processes over the long-term.

  5. Purification of burned gases of domestic wastes; Moderna purificacion de gases quemados de las basuras domesticas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, J.; Buttman, P.; Johansson, T.

    1997-09-01

    The author presents the technology to reduce the emission from the burned gases purification of domestic wastes combustion. The technology was demonstrated in Hobec, Denmark, and developed in Germany. (Author)

  6. Desulfurization of waste gases of the incinerator after petroleum refining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samesova, D.; Ladomersky, J.

    2001-01-01

    Desulfurization of waste gases of the incinerator after petroleum refining was developed. Mixing of wastes with lime (10% of additive of total volume of waste) was proved before introduction into incinerator. Concentrations of CO, CO 2 , O 2 , NO 2 , SO 2 and temperature of combustion products were measured by automatic analyser

  7. Simultaneous treatment of SO2 containing stack gases and waste water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poradek, J. C.; Collins, D. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A process for simultaneously removing sulfur dioxide from stack gases and the like and purifying waste water such as derived from domestic sewage is described. A portion of the gas stream and a portion of the waste water, the latter containing dissolved iron and having an acidic pH, are contacted in a closed loop gas-liquid scrubbing zone to effect absorption of the sulfur dioxide into the waste water. A second portion of the gas stream and a second portion of the waste water are controlled in an open loop gas-liquid scrubbing zone. The second portion of the waste water contains a lesser amount of iron than the first portion of the waste water. Contacting in the openloop scrubbing zone is sufficient to acidify the waste water which is then treated to remove solids originally present.

  8. Solubilities of gases in simulated Tank 241-SY-101 wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norton, J.D.; Pederson, L.R.

    1995-09-01

    Oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, methane, and nitrous oxide solubilities were evaluated as a function of temperature in SYl-SIM-93B, a homogeneous simulated waste mixture containing sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate, sodium aluminate, and sodium carbonate, the principal inorganic constituents of the wastes in Tank 241-SY-101. Ammonia solubility data for this simulated waste was obtained as a function of temperature in an earlier study. The choice of a homogeneous waste mixture in this study has the advantage of eliminating complications associated with a changing electrolyte concentration as a function of temperature that would be encountered with a slurry simulant. Dissolution is one of the means by which gases may be retained in Hanford Site wastes. While models are available to estimate gas solubilities in electrolyte solutions, few data are in existence that pertain to highly concentrated, multicomponent electrolytes such as those stored in Hanford Site waste tanks

  9. Management of exposure to waste anesthetic gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Francis Duval

    2010-04-01

    Anesthetic agents were developed in the 1700s, and nitrous oxide was first used in 1884. Research on the effects of waste anesthetic gas exposure started appearing in the literature in 1967. Short-term exposure causes lethargy and fatigue, and long-term exposure may be linked to spontaneous abortion, congenital abnormalities, infertility, premature births, cancer, and renal and hepatic disease. Today, perioperative staff members are exposed to trace amounts of waste anesthetic gas, and although this exposure cannot be eliminated, it can be controlled. Health care facilities are required to develop, implement, measure, and control practices to reduce anesthetic gas exposure to the lowest practical level. Exposure levels must be measured every six months and maintained at less than 25 parts per million for nitrous oxide and 2 parts per million for halogenated agents to be compliant with Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards. Copyright 2010 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Distribution of gases in the unsaturated zone at a low-level radioactive-waste disposal site near Sheffield, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striegl, Robert G.

    1988-01-01

    The unsaturated zone is a medium that provides pneumatic communication for the movement of gases from wastes buried in landfills to the atmosphere, biota, and groundwater. Gases in unsaturated glacial and eolian deposits near a waste-disposal trench at the low-level radioactive-waste disposal site near Sheffield, Bureau County, Illinois, were identified, and the spatial and temporal distributions of the partial pressures of those gases were determined for the period January 1984 through January 1986. Methods for the collection and analyses of the gases are described, as are geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the unsaturated zone that affect gas transport. The identified gases, which are of natural and of waste origin, include nitrogen, oxygen, and argon, carbon dioxide, methane, propane, butane, tritiated water vapor, 14carbon dioxide, and 222 radon. Concentrations of methane and 14carbon dioxide originated at the waste, as shown by partial-pressure gradients of the gases; 14carbon dioxide partial pressures exceeded natural background partial pressures by factors greater than 1 million at some locations. Variations in partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide were seasonal among piezometers because of increased root and soil-microbe respiration during summer. Variations in methane and 14carbon dioxide partial pressures were apparently related to discrete releases from waste sources at unpredictable intervals of time. No greater than background partial pressures for tritiated water vapor or 222 radon were measured. (USGS)

  11. Aerobic Food Waste Composting: Measurement of Green House Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, J.

    2016-12-01

    Greenhouse gases (GHGs) are a major cause of global warming. While food waste composting can reduce the amount of waste being sent to traditional landfills, it also produces GHGs during the process. The objective of this research is to evaluate the GHGs emitted from an aerobic food composting machine, which is used in ISF. The Independent Schools Foundation Academy is a private independent school in Hong Kong with approximately 1500 students. Each academic year, the school produces 27 metric tons of food waste. In November 2013, the school installed a food waste composting system. Over the past 3 years, various improvements, such as installing a bio-filter to reduce the smell of the compost, have been made to the composting process. Meanwhile the compost is used by the primary students, as part of their experiential learning curriculum and organic farming projects. The composting process employs two machines: the Dehydra and A900 Rocket. The Dehydra reduces the mass of the food waste by separating the ground food waste and excessive water. The A900 Rocket, a composter made by Tidy Planet, processes food waste into compost in 14 days. This machine runs in an aerobic process, in which oxygen is used as an input gas and gases, such as carbon dioxide, are released. Carbon Dioxide is one of the greenhouse gases (GHGs). This research focuses on GHGs that are emitted from the A900 Rocket. The data is collected by the Gasmet DX 4015, a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) multi gas analyser. This equipment measures the concentration (ppm) of different GHGs, including N2O, CO2, CH4, NH3 and CO.

  12. The technology available for more efficient combustion of waste gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrows, J.

    1999-01-01

    Alternative combustion technologies for open flare systems are discussed, stressing their advantages and limitations while meeting the fundamental requirements of personnel and plant safety, high destruction efficiencies, environmental parameters and industrial reliability. The use of BACT (Best Available Control Technologies) is dependent on the destruction efficiency of waste gas defined by regulatory agencies or industrial leaders. Enclosed vapour combustors and high destruction efficiency thermal oxidation are two of the technologies which result in more efficient combustion of waste gases. There are several conditions that should be considered when choosing combustion equipment for the disposal of waste gas. These include volatile organic compounds content, lower heating value, the composition of the waste gas, the specified combustion efficiency, design flow rates, smokeless operation, operating conditions, ground level radiation, SO 2 dispersion, environmental and social expectations, and economic limitation. 10 figs

  13. Low carbon fuel and chemical production from waste gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, S.; Liew, F.M.; Daniell, J.; Koepke, M. [LanzaTech, Ltd., Auckland (New Zealand)

    2012-07-01

    LanzaTech has developed a gas fermentation platform for the production of alter native transport fuels and commodity chemicals from carbon monoxide, hydrogen and carbon dioxide containing gases. LanzaTech technology uses these gases in place of sugars as the carbon and energy source for fermentation thereby allowing a broad spectrum of resources to be considered as an input for product synthesis. At the core of the Lanzatech process is a proprietary microbe capable of using gases as the only carbon and energy input for product synthesis. To harness this capability for the manufacture of a diverse range of commercially valuable products, the company has developed a robust synthetic biology platform to enable a variety of novel molecules to be synthesised via gas fermentation. LanzaTech initially focused on the fermentation of industrial waste gases for fuel ethanol production. The company has been operating pilot plant that uses direct feeds of steel making off gas for ethanol production for over 24 months. This platform technology has been further successfully demonstrated using a broad range of gas inputs including gasified biomass and reformed natural gas. LanzaTech has developed the fermentation, engineering and control systems necessary to efficiently convert gases to valuable products. A precommercial demonstration scale unit processing steel mill waste gases was commissioned in China during the 2{sup nd} quarter of 2012. Subsequent scale-up of this facility is projected for the 2013 and will represent the first world scale non-food based low carbon ethanol project. More recently LanzaTech has developed proprietary microbial catalysts capable of converting carbon dioxide in the presence of hydrogen directly to value added chemicals, where-in CO{sub 2} is the sole source of carbon for product synthesis. Integrating the LanzaTech technology into a number of industrial facilities, such as steel mills, oil refineries and other industries that emit Carbon bearing

  14. Desulfurization of chemical waste gases and flue gases with economic utilization of air pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, K.; Wischnewski, W.

    1983-09-01

    The technological state of recovery of sulfur dioxide from waste and flue gases in the GDR is discussed. Two examples of plants are presented: a pyrosulfuric acid plant in Coswig, recovering sulfur dioxide from gases by absorption with sodium hydroxide, followed by catalytic oxidation to sulfur trioxide, and a plant for waste sulfuric acid recovery from paraffin refining, where the diluted waste acid is sprayed into a furnace and recovered by an ammonium-sulfite-bisulfite solution from the combustion gas (with 4 to 10% sulfur dioxide content). Investment and operation costs as well as profits of both plants are given. Methods employed for power plant flue gas desulfurization in major industrial countries are further assessed: about 90% of these methods uses wet flue gas scrubbing with lime. In the USA flue gas from 25,000 MW of power plant capacity is desulfurized. In the USSR, a 35,000 m/sup 3//h trial plant at Severo-Donetzk is operating using lime, alkali and magnesite. At the 150 MW Dorogobush power plant in the USSR a desulfurization plant using a cyclic ammonia process is under construction.

  15. Measurements of waste tank passive ventilation rates using tracer gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Sklarew, D.S.; Evans, J.C.; Remund, K.M.

    1997-09-01

    This report presents the results of ventilation rate studies of eight passively ventilated high-level radioactive waste tanks using tracer gases. Head space ventilation rates were determined for Tanks A-101, AX-102, AX-103, BY-105, C-107, S-102, U-103, and U-105 using sulfur hexafluoride (SF 6 ) and/or helium (He) as tracer gases. Passive ventilation rates are needed for the resolution of several key safety issues. These safety issues are associated with the rates of flammable gas production and ventilation, the rates at which organic salt-nitrate salt mixtures dry out, and the estimation of organic solvent waste surface areas. This tracer gas study involves injecting a tracer gas into the tank headspace and measuring its concentration at different times to establish the rate at which the tracer is removed by ventilation. Tracer gas injection and sample collection were performed by SGN Eurisys Service Corporation and/or Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation, Characterization Project Operations. Headspace samples were analyzed for He and SF 6 by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The tracer gas method was first demonstrated on Tank S-102. Tests were conducted on Tank S-102 to verify that the tracer gas was uniformly distributed throughout the tank headspace before baseline samples were collected, and that mixing was sufficiently vigorous to maintain an approximately uniform distribution of tracer gas in the headspace during the course of the study. Headspace samples, collected from a location about 4 in away from the injection point and 15, 30, and 60 minutes after the injection of He and SF 6 , indicated that both tracer gases were rapidly mixed. The samples were found to have the same concentration of tracer gases after 1 hour as after 24 hours, suggesting that mixing of the tracer gas was essentially complete within 1 hour

  16. Import of combustible waste and its impact on emissions of climate gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haraldsson, Maarten; Sundberg, Johan (Profu, Moelndal (Sweden))

    2010-07-01

    Import of combustible waste for waste incineration in Sweden has increased over the last decade and prognosis show that importation will increase even further in the future. The reason for the projected increase is that many new incineration facilities are being built and several of those plan to use a portion of imported combustible waste as fuel. From an environmental perspective import of waste is controversial and some argue that the import short be restricted. Because of this controversial aspect it is essential to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the environmental impacts of the importation of combustible waste to Swedish incineration facilities. This project is a study of the impact of the import of combustible waste on climate emissions. This is a system analysis study which included both direct as well as indirect emissions from the activity of importation of combustible waste. Direct emissions occur from the incineration of waste while indirect emissions occur in systems that interact with the incineration facility. These systems are: transport of waste, alternative waste treatment, alternative electricity production and alternative heat production in the district heating system which the incineration facility is connected with. From the perspective of a system analysis the import of combustible waste to incineration leads to the following consequences regarding emissions of climate gases: - The imported waste is used as fuel in the incineration facility which generates heat and electricity. During the combustion process climate gases are being emitted - As the combustible waste is being imported it has to be transported from the country of origin to the incineration facility. The vehicle used for the transport is emitting climate gases - By importing combustible waste an alternative treatment method in the country of origin is avoided by that country. Emissions from the alternative treatment method are thereby avoided - Import of combustible waste

  17. Emission of Gases during Composting of Solid Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dajana Kučić

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Composting is a biochemical process converting organic components into stable compost with release of heat, water, CO2 and NH3. The objective of this work was to determine the amount of CO2 and NH3 in the exhaust gases during composting of tobacco waste (TW and mixture of tobacco and grape waste (TGW. The cumulative evolved CO2 during 21 days of composting of TW and TGW, per mass of volatile matter, was 94.01 g kg−1 and 208.18 g kg−1, respectively, and cumulative evolved NH3 during composting of TW and TGW, per mass of volatile matter, was 504.81 mg kg−1 and 122.45 mg kg−1, respectively.

  18. Catalytic dry reforming of waste plastics from different waste treatment plants for production of synthesis gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Juniza Md; Williams, Paul T

    2016-12-01

    Catalytic dry reforming of mixed waste plastics, from a range of different municipal, commercial and industrial sources, were processed in a two-stage fixed bed reactor. Pyrolysis of the plastics took place in the first stage and dry (CO 2 ) reforming of the evolved pyrolysis gases took place in the second stage in the presence of Ni/Al 2 O 3 and Ni-Co/Al 2 O 3 catalysts in order to improve the production of syngas from the dry reforming process. The results showed that the highest amount of syngas yield was obtained from the dry reforming of plastic waste from the agricultural industry with the Ni/Al 2 O 3 catalyst, producing 153.67mmol syngas g -1 waste . The addition of cobalt metal as a promoter to the Ni/Al 2 O 3 catalyst did not have a major influence on syngas yield. Overall, the catalytic-dry reforming of waste plastics from various waste treatment plants showed great potential towards the production of synthesis gases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Utilization of the waste gases from a petroleum refinery as fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Contreras, Jose Francisco

    2012-01-01

    The fuels waste gases that are burned in a flare stack were proposed as an alternative for its utilization. The current operation of the flare stack system of a petroleum refinery was analyzed. The historical information of the equipment and original design of the same was used. From the calculations that were performed, it is expected that the delivered heat for the flare gases approaching to 65 MJ/M 3 , so it would be an effective fuel for be used in furnaces and boilers. A new flare stack system and a system for recovery of the waste gases of process is proposed. The new flare stack system must have a liquid separator of 2,3 meters of diameter, a length of 6,4 meters and a capacity of 26,1 cubic meters. The velocity of the gas to the exit of the separator has been of 80,7 m/s. The liquid hydrocarbon flow that has exited the separator has been of 71 m 3 /h, with a speed of 0,91 m/s and a pump of 2,75 HP is required. The liquid seal of flare stack systems must have a minimum height of 1,05 m. The gas recovery system to burn in the flare stack should be located between the liquid separator and liquid seal of the flare stack systems. For an average consumption of 150 m 3 /h of fuel gas for furnaces and boilers, the gas recovery system must have with a compressor of 4,75 HP, a liquid separator of 50 m 3 and a pump of 2,50 HP. The gas recovery system has had with an absorber of 7 plates for washing of the stream acid gas with MEA, at 40 degrees celsius and an pressure of operating of 67 kPa, and a flow of 55,88 kg/h at amine solution. The flare gas flow has been recommended to be analyzed chemically, as well as the measurement of the flow of gas streams plant consumption and gases flare. A technical-economic feasibility study of the process should be realized. (author) [es

  20. Method of start-up operation of a liquefaction and distillation apparatus for processing waste gases containing radioactive rare gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Masakazu; Tani, Akira; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; An, Bunzai; Kanazawa, Toshio.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To enable reduction of cooling time, simplification of maintenance, and release of cooling gas outside system. Structure: In starting of the liquefaction and distillation apparatus, liquid nitrogen is introduced into the tower bottom of a rectification tower from a liquid nitrogen tank through a liquid nitrogen supply line to vaporize the liquid nitrogen with help of heat entered from outside and a heater. The vaporized nitrogen gas moves up while cooling the interior of the rectification tower and is guided by a vacuum pump from the top of tower toward the purifying gas line and low temperature heat exchanger and disharging into atmosphere. When the interior of the apparatus is sufficiently cooled in a manner as described above, the liquid nitrogen supply line is closed, the liquid nitrogen is fed to a condenser, and the waste gases containing the radioactive rare gases from the raw exhaust supply line are introduced into the rectification tower for entry of normal operation. (Kamimura, M.)

  1. Greenhouse gases emission from municipal waste management: The role of separate collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrò, Paolo S

    2009-07-01

    The municipal solid waste management significantly contributes to the emission in the atmosphere of greenhouse gases (e.g. CO(2), CH(4), N(2)O) and therefore the management process from collection to treatment and disposal has to be optimized in order to reduce these emissions. In this paper, starting from the average composition of undifferentiated municipal solid waste in Italy, the effect of separate collection on greenhouse gases emissions from municipal waste management has been assessed. Different combinations of separate collection scenarios and disposal options (i.e. landfilling and incineration) have been considered. The effect of energy recovery from waste both in landfills and incinerators has also been addressed. The results outline how a separate collection approach can have a significant effect on the emission of greenhouse gases and how wise municipal solid waste management, implying the adoption of Best Available Technologies (i.e. biogas recovery and exploitation system in landfills and energy recovery system in Waste to Energy plants), can not only significantly reduce greenhouse gases emissions but, in certain cases, can also make the overall process a carbon sink. Moreover it has been shown that separate collection of plastic is a major issue when dealing with global warming relevant emissions from municipal solid waste management.

  2. The evolution of carbon-14 and tritium containing gases in a radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jefferies, N.L.

    1990-04-01

    The principal processes which well lead to the formation of gases in a repository containing low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste have been identified as corrosion, microbiological activity and radiolysis. The largest contribution to gas production is from hydrogen, generated from anaerobic corrosion of metallic components of the waste. Substitution of the active isotopes carbon-14 and hydrogen-3 (tritium) into the bulk gases, H 2 CO 2 and CH 4 may result in a radiological hazard to man. The purpose of this paper is to assess the mechanisms by which C-14 and tritium in solid low- and intermediate-level wastes are partitioned into gases reduced by corrosion and microbial processes. (author)

  3. Heat exchangers and recuperators for high temperature waste gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, H.

    General considerations on high temperature waste heat recovery are presented. Internal heat recovery through combustion air preheating and external heat recovery are addressed. Heat transfer and pressure drop in heat exchanger design are discussed.

  4. High temperature abatement of acid gases from waste incineration. Part I: experimental tests in full scale plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biganzoli, Laura; Racanella, Gaia; Rigamonti, Lucia; Marras, Roberto; Grosso, Mario

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, several waste-to-energy plants in Italy have experienced an increase of the concentration of acid gases (HCl, SO2 and HF) in the raw gas. This is likely an indirect effect of the progressive decrease of the amount of treated municipal waste, which is partially replaced by commercial waste. The latter is characterised by a higher variability of its chemical composition because of the different origins, with possible increase of the load of halogen elements such as chlorine (Cl) and fluorine (F), as well as of sulphur (S). A new dolomitic sorbent was then tested in four waste-to-energy plants during standard operation as a pre-cleaning stage, to be directly injected at high temperature in the combustion chamber. For a sorbent injection of about 6 kg per tonne of waste, the decrease of acid gases concentration downstream the boiler was in the range of 7-37% (mean 23%) for HCl, 34-95% (mean 71%) for SO2 and 39-80% (mean 63%) for HF. This pre-abatement of acid gases allowed to decrease the feeding rate of the traditional low temperature sorbent (sodium bicarbonate in all four plants) by about 30%. Furthermore, it was observed by the plant operators that the sorbent helps to keep the boiler surfaces cleaner, with a possible reduction of the fouling phenomena and a consequent increase of the specific energy production. A preliminary quantitative estimate was carried out in one of the four plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Catalytic quality improvement of waste polyolefin originated fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tóth O.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The demand for alternative fuels having low greenhouse gases emission is continuously growing worldwide. Therefore it is preferred to produce new, waste originated components. One option is the recycling of plastic waste with cracking. The produced hydrocarbon fraction is not suitable for fuels thus it is important to improve its quality. The aim of our experimental work was to study the quality improvement of this cracked fraction (PPCGO and crude oil based middle distillates (different composition with co-processing. Our goal was to produce high quality diesel fuel blending components. We studied the effect of process parameters on the quality of products. Ni (2.3% Mo (11.0% P (2.3%/Al2O3 catalyst was used. During the experiments we studied the hydrogenation of olefins, saturation of aromatics and desulphurization. The hydrogenation of olefins was practically complete at 300°C. It took place at significantly higher speed than the desulphurization reactions. In case of light gas oil feedstock the products had significantly lower sulphur contents; below 10 mg/kg already at 340°C. We determined that the cracked fraction had beneficial effect on the performance properties of the products. In case of all feedstock combinations, we found process parameters which can be used to produce high-quality diesel fuel blending components on the tested catalyst.

  6. Process for separation of inert fission gases for waste gas of a reprocessing plant for nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnez, H.

    1980-01-01

    The inert fission gases Kr and Xe released in the resolver and other waste gases are taken to an acid regeneration plant. Part of the inert fission gases is separated by compression, cooling and filtering and deposited. The other part flows back to the resolver as flushing gas so that a flushing gas circuit is formed, which prevents explosive gas mixtures occurring. (DG) [de

  7. Detection and removal of fluorine in the waste gases of a steel smelter and measuring air quality in its surroundings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graue, G; Nagel, H

    1968-01-01

    Plant damage in the Duisburg area was attributed to the action of fluoride supposedly originating in industrial waste gases, particularly of steel smelters. Air quality measurements were taken near a large steel smelter for a period of three years. After eliminating errors the total concentration of fluoride in the course of 3 years was established as between 2 and 6 mg/m/sup 2/ per day. Clearly, no free fluorine is emitted by steel smelters, although gaseous fluoride compounds can occur. Downstream from metallurgical furnaces, particularly where brown smoke is emitted, this fluoride is almost completely adsorbed by the dust. Ores and other raw materials in steel smelters are liable to contain fluorides, usually in the form of fluorite. Only a small proportion of this is liberated on the sintering band. However, since the sintering waste gases are acid, less fluoride is adsorbed by dust at this point and separated during dust collection. The use of desulfurization units downstream of the sintering bands could solve this problem. If, for the time being, nothing is done in this direction, it is because the fluoride contents of these gases do not play a significant role, due to the height of the stacks in use. This is supported by the results of extensive air purity measurements in the Duisburg region, in which fluoride levels between 1 and 3 ..mu..g were found per m/sup 3/ STP of air.

  8. 40 CFR 60.33b - Emission guidelines for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. 60.33b Section 60.33b Protection of Environment... Constructed on or Before September 20, 1994 § 60.33b Emission guidelines for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. (a) The emission limits for municipal waste combustor metals...

  9. Water-immiscible solvents for the biological treatment of waste gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cesario, M.T.

    1997-01-01

    In conventional biological systems for the treatment of waste gases, contaminants are transferred directly to the aqueous phase and then converted by the micro-organisms. When poorly water-soluble pollutants are to be removed, biological degradation is often limited by the slow transport

  10. Biofiltration of BTEX waste gases / by Johannes Mattheus Strauss

    OpenAIRE

    Strauss, Johannes Mattheus

    2003-01-01

    A comparison of biofilter performance under different temperature conditions is of particular importance for the application and commercialization of biofiltration technology due to the fact that many waste gas streams are at elevated temperatures. The efficacy of higher temperature biofiltration reactors, therefore, has important practical and cost implications as it directly impacts on the need and cost for gas cooling prior to biofiltration treatment. In this study the perfo...

  11. Flaring versus thermal incineration of waste gases in the oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolarski, G.M.

    1999-01-01

    The efficient combustion of waste gases at oil processing plants, battery or well sites is discussed. Several problem situations are examined, field test results are reviewed, and custom design systems are explained including modifications to systems to conserve fuel. It is shown that combustion of waste gases in fuel efficient thermal incinerators is a practical means of disposal, particularly for sour or toxic gas of low heating value. These gases contain noxious compounds that may cause odours or adverse health effects. Results of a field tests of a portable in-situ incinerator show that compared to flaring (to oxide waste gas), incineration is a more efficient form of waste management. Emission tests also prove the superior performance of incineration. The feasibility of incinerating oil storage tank vapours was also demonstrated. Tests were also conducted with a fuel-efficient Glycol Still Off-Gas Incinerator which was developed to control toxic waste emissions. Glycol dehydration removes water vapour from natural gas. The key compounds that are removed by glycol are aromatic hydrocarbons or BTEX compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene), and sulphur compounds. The main design considerations for any incinerator are temperature, turbulence and residence time. An incinerator exit temperature of 760 degrees C is generally needed to reduce sulphur compounds. 2 refs., 8 tabs., 7 figs

  12. Emission of greenhouse gases from waste incineration in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kum-Lok; Choi, Sang-Min; Kim, Moon-Kyung; Heo, Jong-Bae; Zoh, Kyung-Duk

    2017-07-01

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission factors previously reported from various waste incineration plants have shown significant variations according to country-specific, plant-specific, and operational conditions. The purpose of this study is to estimate GHG emissions and emission factors at nine incineration facilities in Korea by measuring the GHG concentrations in the flue gas samples. The selected incineration plants had different operation systems (i.e., stoker, fluidized bed, moving grate, rotary kiln, and kiln & stoker), and different nitrogen oxide (NO x ) removal systems (i.e., selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)) to treat municipal solid waste (MSW), commercial solid waste (CSW), and specified waste (SW). The total mean emission factors for A and B facilities for MSW incineration were found to be 134 ± 17 kg CO 2 ton -1 , 88 ± 36 g CH 4 ton -1 , and 69 ± 16 g N 2 O ton -1 , while those for CSW incineration were 22.56 g CH 4 ton -1 and 259.76 g N 2 O ton -1 , and for SW incineration emission factors were 2959 kg CO 2 ton -1 , 43.44 g CH 4 ton -1 and 401.21 g N 2 O ton -1 , respectively. Total emissions calculated using annual incineration for MSW were 3587 ton CO 2 -eq yr -1 for A facility and 11,082 ton CO 2 -eq yr -1 for B facility, while those of IPCC default values were 13,167 ton CO 2- eq yr -1 for A facility and 32,916 ton CO 2- eq yr -1 , indicating that the emissions of IPCC default values were estimated higher than those of the plant-specific emission factors. The emission of CSW for C facility was 1403 ton CO 2 -eq yr -1 , while those of SW for D to I facilities was 28,830 ton CO 2 -eq yr -1 . The sensitivity analysis using a Monte Carlo simulation for GHG emission factors in MSW showed that the GHG concentrations have a greater impact than the incineration amount and flow rate of flue gas. For MSW incineration plants using the same stoker type in operation, the estimated emissions and

  13. Greenhouse gases accounting and reporting for waste management - A South African perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, Elena; Trois, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates how greenhouse gases are accounted and reported in the waste sector in South Africa. Developing countries (including South Africa) do not have binding emission reduction targets, but many of them publish different greenhouse gas emissions data which have been accounted and reported in different ways. Results show that for South Africa, inventories at national and municipal level are the most important tools in the process of accounting and reporting greenhouse gases from waste. For the development of these inventories international initiatives were important catalysts at national and municipal levels, and assisted in developing local expertise, resulting in increased output quality. However, discrepancies in the methodology used to account greenhouse gases from waste between inventories still remain a concern. This is a challenging issue for developing countries, especially African ones, since higher accuracy methods are more data intensive. Analysis of the South African inventories shows that results from the recent inventories can not be compared with older ones due to the use of different accounting methodologies. More recently the use of Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) procedures in Africa, geared towards direct measurements of greenhouse gases from landfill sites, has increased and resulted in an improvement of the quality of greenhouse gas inventories at municipal level.

  14. Removal of ethylene oxide from waste gases by absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsenijević Zorana Lj.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene oxide (EtO is an organic compound, which is used as starting material in the production of polymers and as sterilizing agent for thermolabile materials. Although ethylene oxide is not common as an organic pollutant, its removal from numerous emission sources (e.g. ethylene oxide production plants or food and pharmaceutical sterilizing units is of the crucial importance because of its mutagenic, teratogenic and cancerogenic effect on human health. The objective of this paper is the experimental investigation of ethylene oxide (EtO absorption in diluted aqueous solution of sulfuric acid in order to evaluate the applicability of this procedure as well as to obtain project parameters for industrial plant realization. It was found that absorption is suitable as the fist step in the purification treatment of high EtO concentrations in the emission gases. According to the literature data, the basic parameter that defines the scrubber efficiency is the contact time, i.e. the ratio of packing height in scrubber and velocity of gas mixture. To investigate the characteristics of wet treatment in a broad range of contact time, part of experimental studies were conducted in the system with two and with three scrubbers in series. The obtained experimental results show that the high degree of EtO removal can be achieved (>98% when the contact time is sufficiently long (about 25 s. The process is effective until the concentration of formed glycol in the solution reaches value of about 20%. The process is safe and there is no danger of ignition and explosion of air and EtO mixture, although at the entrance to the scrubber EtO concentrations are significantly above the lower explosive limit.

  15. Greenhouse gases and solid waste management systems: Understanding the relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, K.; Smith, P.A.

    1999-07-01

    In one of the first applications of life cycle analysis at the state level, the Minnesota Office of Environmental Assistance has assessed the resource conservation benefits and greenhouse gas impacts of the state's municipal solid waste (MSW) system. Using a life cycle inventory, the Phase 1 work estimated the resource conservation benefits of Minnesota's 1996 MSW reduction and management strategies. It compared the production processes used to obtain useful products from MSW with alternative production processes using virgin materials. The Phase 2 work, conducted under a grant from the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), focused specifically on measuring the greenhouse gas implications of reduction, recycling, and management from 1991--1996. This phase expanded the analysis to included life cycle assessment and improvement. The work will be used in Minnesota's MSW policy and program development efforts, as well as in climate change mitigation planning.

  16. Process engineering design of pathological waste incinerator with an integrated combustion gases treatment unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaban, A F

    2007-06-25

    Management of medical wastes generated at different hospitals in Egypt is considered a highly serious problem. The sources and quantities of regulated medical wastes have been thoroughly surveyed and estimated (75t/day from governmental hospitals in Cairo). From the collected data it was concluded that the most appropriate incinerator capacity is 150kg/h. The objective of this work is to develop the process engineering design of an integrated unit, which is technically and economically capable for incinerating medical wastes and treatment of combustion gases. Such unit consists of (i) an incineration unit (INC-1) having an operating temperature of 1100 degrees C at 300% excess air, (ii) combustion-gases cooler (HE-1) generating 35m(3)/h hot water at 75 degrees C, (iii) dust filter (DF-1) capable of reducing particulates to 10-20mg/Nm(3), (iv) gas scrubbers (GS-1,2) for removing acidic gases, (v) a multi-tube fixed bed catalytic converter (CC-1) to maintain the level of dioxins and furans below 0.1ng/Nm(3), and (vi) an induced-draft suction fan system (SF-1) that can handle 6500Nm(3)/h at 250 degrees C. The residence time of combustion gases in the ignition, mixing and combustion chambers was found to be 2s, 0.25s and 0.75s, respectively. This will ensure both thorough homogenization of combustion gases and complete destruction of harmful constituents of the refuse. The adequate engineering design of individual process equipment results in competitive fixed and operating investments. The incineration unit has proved its high operating efficiency through the measurements of different pollutant-levels vented to the open atmosphere, which was found to be in conformity with the maximum allowable limits as specified in the law number 4/1994 issued by the Egyptian Environmental Affairs Agency (EEAA) and the European standards.

  17. Poisoning of bees with fluorine-containing industrial waste gases in Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurizio, A; Staub, M

    1956-01-01

    Mass poisoning of bees in the vicinity of Swiss Al factories was traced to high quantities of F in the waste gases. Plants and pollen in the vicinity contained 10-214 and 0.9-2.8 mg. % F resp., and collected rain water contained 0.1-10.4 mg. F/sg. dm. The dead bees each contained an av. of 15 ..gamma.. F.

  18. Overview of the Flammability of Gases Generated in Hanford Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, L.A.; Huckaby, J.L.; Bryan, S.A.; Johnson, G.D.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents an overview of what is known about the flammability of the gases generated and retained in Hanford waste tanks in terms of the gas composition, the flammability and detonability limits of the gas constituents, and the availability of ignition sources. The intrinsic flammability (or nonflammability) of waste gas mixtures is one major determinant of whether a flammable region develops in the tank headspace; other factors are the rate, surface area, volume of the release, and the tank ventilation rate, which are not covered in this report

  19. Overview of the Flammability of Gases Generated in Hanford Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Huckaby, James L.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Johnson, Gerald D.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents an overview of what is known about the flammability of the gases generated and retained in Hanford waste tanks in terms of the gas composition, flammability and detonability limits of the gas constituents, and availability of ignition sources. The intrinsic flammability (or non-flammability) of waste gas mixtures is one major determinant of whether a flammable region develops in the tank headspace; other factors are the rate, surface area, and volume of the release and the tank ventilation rate, which are not covered in this report

  20. Greenhouse gases emissions from waste management practices using Life Cycle Inventory model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T.-C.; Lin, C.-F.

    2008-01-01

    When exploring the correlation between municipal solid waste management and green house gas emission, the volume and physical composition of the waste matter must be taken into account. Due to differences in local environments and lifestyles the quantity and composition of waste often vary. This leads to differences in waste treatment methods and causes different volumes of greenhouse gases (GHGs), highlighting the need for local research. In this study the Life Cycle Inventory method was used with global warming indicator GHGs as the variables. By quantifying the data and adopting a region-based approach, this created a model of household MSWM in Taipei City, a metropolitan region in Taiwan. To allow analysis and comparison a compensatory system was then added to expand the system boundary. The results of the analysis indicated that out of all the solid waste management sub-models for a function unit, recycling was the most effective method for reducing GHG emissions while using kitchen food waste as swine feeding resulted in the most GHG emissions. As for the impact of waste collection vehicles on emissions, if the efficiency of transportation could be improved and energy consumption reduced, this will help solid waste management to achieve its goal of reducing GHG emissions

  1. Greenhouse gases emissions from waste management practices using Life Cycle Inventory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsao-Chou; Lin, Cheng-Fang

    2008-06-30

    When exploring the correlation between municipal solid waste management and green house gas emission, the volume and physical composition of the waste matter must be taken into account. Due to differences in local environments and lifestyles the quantity and composition of waste often vary. This leads to differences in waste treatment methods and causes different volumes of greenhouse gases (GHGs), highlighting the need for local research. In this study the Life Cycle Inventory method was used with global warming indicator GHGs as the variables. By quantifying the data and adopting a region-based approach, this created a model of household MSWM in Taipei City, a metropolitan region in Taiwan. To allow analysis and comparison a compensatory system was then added to expand the system boundary. The results of the analysis indicated that out of all the solid waste management sub-models for a function unit, recycling was the most effective method for reducing GHG emissions while using kitchen food waste as swine feeding resulted in the most GHG emissions. As for the impact of waste collection vehicles on emissions, if the efficiency of transportation could be improved and energy consumption reduced, this will help solid waste management to achieve its goal of reducing GHG emissions.

  2. Use of zeolites for the removal of volatile sulfur compounds from industrial waste gases and from natural gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudzik,; Z,; Bilska, M

    1974-12-01

    The use of zeolites for the removal of sulfur dioxide from industrial waste gases and for the removal of hydrogen sulfide and volatile mercaptans from the natural gas or synthetic gas manufactured from coal is discussed. The effectiveness and cost of zeolite methods are superior to that of other methods. The best sorption properties with respect to sulfur dioxide are observed in faujasites and erionites. The molecular sieve 13X (a sodium form of low-silicon faujasite) is the most effective sorbent of hydrogen sulfide, produced commercially on a large scale. This zeolite is also a very effective catalyst for simultaneous oxygenation of hydrogen sulfide. The reaction with oxygen can begin at temperatures as low as -80/sup 0/C. The effectiveness of zeolite reactors is enhanced by the presence of oxygen in the gas being purified, and is hindered by the presence of water or water vapor. The extraordinary catalytic activity of sodium faujasites is due to free donors, and sulfur and oxygen ion donors at their surface. A zeolite reactor is also economical.

  3. 40 CFR 62.14103 - Emission limits for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. 62.14103 Section 62.14103 Protection of... combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. (a) The emission limits for municipal waste combustor metals are specified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(3) of this section. (1) The owner or...

  4. Cleaning of stack gases from combustion of low level radioactive waste in Studsvik, Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haard, E.

    1979-01-01

    The plant for combustion of low-level radioactive waste at Studsvik, Sweden, is described. The waste that is treated comes from nuclear power plants, industry, hospitals and universities. It is estimated to be about 270 ton/year in a few years time. The waste consists of plast, cloth, wood, paper, rubber, biological material and unburnable components such as glass and metals. The bags with waste may have a maximum surface dose rate of 10 mrem/h. For 5 % of the bags the maximum dose rate may be 100 mrem/h. During the combustion, samples of the stack gases are collected. The release of radioactivity is reported to the Swedish authorities. During 1978 three different stack gas cleaning systems, wet cleaning, electrostatic filters and textile filters were investigated. The wet cleaning gave a radioactive sludge which was difficult to take care of. In the electrostatic filters it was difficult to change components due to radioactivity. Therefore the textile filters were chosen. A textile filter will be installed during 1979. The cleaning capacity of the filter is expected to be 90 % and will decrease the collective doses from stack gases with 6.7 manrem/year. The cost is estimated to 450 000 Sw kr/year (100 000 US dollar). (K.K.)

  5. Abatement of waste gases and water during the processes of semiconductor fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Rui-mei; Liang, Jun-wu

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the methods and equipment for abating waste gases and water produced during the manufacture of semiconductor materials and devices. Three separating methods and equipment are used to control three different groups of electronic wastes. The first group includes arsine and phosphine emitted during the processes of semiconductor materials manufacture. The abatement procedure for this group of pollutants consists of adding iodates, cupric and manganese salts to a multiple shower tower (MST) structure. The second group includes pollutants containing arsenic, phosphorus, HF, HCl, NO2, and SO3 emitted during the manufacture of semiconductor materials and devices. The abatement procedure involves mixing oxidants and bases in an oval column with a separator in the middle. The third group consists of the ions of As, P and heavy metals contained in the waste water. The abatement procedure includes adding CaCO3 and ferric salts in a flocculation-sedimentation compact device equipment. Test results showed that all waste gases and water after the abatement procedures presented in this article passed the discharge standards set by the State Environmental Protection Administration of China.

  6. European trends in greenhouse gases emissions from integrated solid waste management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrò, Paolo S; Gori, Manuela; Lubello, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The European Union (EU) has 28 member states, each with very different characteristics (e.g. surface, population density, per capita gross domestic product, per capita municipal solid waste (MSW) production, MSW composition, MSW management options). In this paper several integrated waste management scenarios representative of the European situation have been generated and analysed in order to evaluate possible trends in the net emission of greenhouse gases and in the required landfill volume. The results demonstrate that an integrated system with a high level of separate collection, efficient energy recovery in waste-to-energy plants and very limited landfill disposal is the most effective according to the indices adopted. Moreover, it is evident that a fully integrated system can make MSW management a carbon sink with a potentiality of up to approximately 40 Mt CO2eq year(-1).

  7. System catalytic neutralization control of combustion engines waste gases in mining technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshunov, G. I.; Solnitsev, R. I.

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents the problems solution of the atmospheric air pollution with the exhaust gases of the internal combustion engines, used in mining technologies. Such engines are used in excavators, bulldozers, dump trucks, diesel locomotives in loading and unloading processes and during transportation of minerals. NOx, CO, CH emissions as the waste gases occur during engine operation, the concentration of which must be reduced to the standard limits. The various methods and means are used for the problem solution, one of which is neutralization based on platinum catalysts. A mathematical model of a controlled catalytic neutralization system is proposed. The simulation results confirm the increase in efficiency at start-up and low engine load and the increase in the catalyst lifetime.

  8. Simultaneous Waste Heat and Water Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gases for Advanced Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dexin [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2016-12-31

    This final report presents the results of a two-year technology development project carried out by a team of participants sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this project is to develop a membrane-based technology to recover both water and low grade heat from power plant flue gases. Part of the recovered high-purity water and energy can be used directly to replace plant boiler makeup water as well as improving its efficiency, and the remaining part of the recovered water can be used for Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD), cooling tower water makeup or other plant uses. This advanced version Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) with lower capital and operating costs can be applied to existing plants economically and can maximize waste heat and water recovery from future Advanced Energy System flue gases with CO2 capture in consideration, which will have higher moisture content that favors the TMC to achieve higher efficiency.

  9. Control of Effluent Gases from Solid Waste Processing using Impregnated Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Fisher, John; Wignarajah, Kanapathipillai

    2005-01-01

    One of the major problems associated with solid waste processing technologies is effluent contaminants that are released in gaseous forms from the processes. This is a concern in both biological as well as physicochemical solid waste processing. Carbon dioxide (CO2), the major gas released, does not present a serious problem and there are currently in place a number of flight-qualified technologies for CO2 removal. However, a number of other gases, in particular NOx, SO2, NH3, and various hydrocarbons (e.g. CH4) do present health hazards to the crew members in space habitats. In the present configuration of solid waste processing in the International Space Station (ISS), some of these gases are removed by the Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS), demands a major resupply. Reduction of the resupply can be effective by using catalyst impregnated carbon nanotubes. For example, NO decomposition to N2 and O2 is thermodynamically favored. Data showing decomposition of NO on metal impregnated carbon nanotubes is presented. Comparisons are made of the existing TCCS systems with the carbon nanotube based technology for removing NOx based on mass/energy penalties.

  10. Greenhouse gases, radiative forcing, global warming potential and waste management – an introduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter; Gentil, Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    forcing (RF) and global warming potential (GWP). This paper provides a general introduction of the factors that define a GHG and explains the scientific background for estimating RF and GWP, thereby exposing the lay reader to a brief overview of the methods for calculating the effects of GHGs on climate......Management of post-consumer solid waste contributes to emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) representing about 3% of global anthropogenic GHG emissions. Most GHG reporting initiatives around the world utilize two metrics proposed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC): radiative...

  11. Efficient fully controlled up-to-date equipment for catalytic treatment of waste gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvorak, Radek; Stulir, Roman; Cagas, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes research and development of a new unit for catalytic destruction of waste gases polluted mainly by volatile organic compounds (VOC), halogenated organic compounds (HOC) or carbon monoxide. Novel equipment has considerable advantages compared with commonly used arrangement (combustion chamber (catalytic reactor)-pipeline-heat exchanger). It is very compact and light and has the combustion chamber, catalytic reactor and heat exchanger integrated into one unit. Maximum utilizing heat losses in the combustion chamber and catalytic reactor is achieved. During the development of this unit experience from tests of previously developed equipment used for thermal treatment of waste gases was used, as well as from experimental studies of catalytic disposal of various VOC carried out in the newly built experimental unit. During the development calculation methods were created allowing design modifications of this unit for real industrial applications. The newly developed unit can be used in various branches of industry such as paint shops, refining plants, sewage treatment plants, food processing industry, pharmaceutical industry, but also in companies processing and transporting crude-oil or natural gas, etc

  12. Incineration/vitrification of radioactive wastes and combustion of pyrolysis gases in thermal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girold, Ch.

    1997-03-01

    Two thermal plasma processes used for incineration of radioactive technological wastes (cellulose, plastics, rubber...) have been investigated. First, the different types of radioactive wastes are presented, with a special attention to those which may benefit from a high temperature thermal treatment. The most significant thermal plasma processes, suitable for this goal, are described. Then, the author deals with the post-combustion, in an oxygen plasma jet reactor, of gases from burnable radioactive waste pyrolysis. An experimental planning method as been used to evaluate the combustion performances in the reactor, with a wide range of gas composition and running parameters such as oxygen excess and electrical power. The results of a modeling of kinetics, based on 116 chemicals reactions between 25 species, are compared with experimental values. Finally, an oxygen plasma reactor where the arc is transferred on a basalt melt is experimented. The efficiency of the combustion and the homogeneity of the glass are discussed. The volatility of some glass elements and tracers added to the wastes is also approached in two different ways: by post-trial material balance and by an optical emission spectroscopic method. The author built a diagnostic method that allows the following versus time of the metallic vapours above the melt. (author)

  13. The Origin and Time Dependence of the Amount and Composition of Non-Constituent Gases Present in Crystal Growth Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palosz, Witold

    1998-01-01

    Presence of different, non-constituent gases may be a critical factor in crystal growth systems. In Physical Vapor Transport processes the cras(es) can be used intentionally (to prevent excessively high, unstable growth conditions), or can evolve unintentionally during the course of the process (which may lead to undesired reduction in the -rowth rate). In melt growth, particularly under low gravity conditions (reduced hydrostatic pressure) the gas present in the system may contribute to formation of voids in the growing crystals and even to a separation of the crystal and the liquid phase [1]. On the other hand, some amount of gas may facilitate 'contactless' crystal growth particularly under reduced gravity conditions [2 - 6]. Different non-constituent gases may be present in growth ampoules, and their amount and composition may change during the crystallization process. Some gases can appear even in empty ampoules sealed originally under high vacuum: they may diffuse in from the outside, and/or desorb from the ampoule walls. Residual gases can also be generated by the source materials: even very high purity commercial elements and compounds may contain trace amounts of impurities, particularly oxides. The oxides may have low volatilities themselves but their reaction with other species, particularly carbon and hydrogen, may produce volatile compounds like water or carbon oxides. The non-constituent gases, either added initially to the system or evolved during the material processing, may diffuse out of the ampoule during the course of the experiment. Gases present outside (e.g. as a protective atmosphere or thermal conductor) may diffuse into the ampoule. In either case the growth conditions and the quality of the crystals may be affected. The problem is of a particular importance in sealed systems where the amount of the gases cannot be directly controlled. Therefore a reasonable knowledge and understanding of the origin, composition, magnitude, and change with

  14. Origin and Evolution of Reactive and Noble Gases Dissolved in Matrix Pore Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichinger, F. [Hydroisotop GmbH, Schweitenkirchen (Germany); Rock-Water Interaction, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Waber, H. N. [Rock-Water Interaction, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Smellie, J. A.T. [Conterra AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-07-15

    Reactive and noble gases dissolved in matrix pore water of low permeable crystalline bedrock were successfully extracted and characterized for the first time based on drillcore samples from the Olkiluoto investigation site (SW Finland). Interaction between matrix pore water and fracture groundwater occurs predominately by diffusion. Changes in the chemical and isotopic composition of gases dissolved in fracture groundwater are transmitted and preserved in the pore water. Absolute concentrations, their ratios and the stable carbon isotope signature of hydrocarbon gases dissolved in pore water give valuable indications about the evolution of these gases in the nearby flowing fracture groundwaters. Inert noble gases dissolved in matrix pore water and their isotopes combined with their in situ production and accumulation rates deliver information about the residence time of pore water. (author)

  15. SBRC-Nottingham: sustainable routes to platform chemicals from C1 waste gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbidge, Alan; Minton, Nigel P

    2016-06-15

    Synthetic Biology Research Centre (SBRC)-Nottingham (www.sbrc-nottingham.ac.uk) was one of the first three U.K. university-based SBRCs to be funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) as part of the recommendations made in the U.K.'s Synthetic Biology Roadmap. It was established in 2014 and builds on the pioneering work of the Clostridia Research Group (CRG) who have previously developed a range of gene tools for the modification of clostridial genomes. The SBRC is primarily focussed on the conversion of single carbon waste gases into platform chemicals with a particular emphasis on the use of the aerobic chassis Cupriavidus necator. © 2016 The Author(s).

  16. Emerging catalytic technologies related to the denoxing of waste gases from thermal power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busca, G.

    2002-01-01

    The emerging catalytic technologies related to the DeNOxing of waste gases from thermal power stations are briefly discussed. In the case of the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO x with hydrocarbons new zeolite-based or metal oxide catalytic systems are under development, whose stability and performances approach more and more those needed for a commercial process. The processes for the low temperature Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO x with ammonia are apparently promising allowing a possible application in a tail-end process configuration, at least after a total abatement of SO x . The processes of combined abatement of NO x and dioxins are already applied industrially. Also the Selective Oxidation of ammonia slip to nitrogen is already proposed as commercial process. In both last cases, however, few information is available in the open literature [it

  17. Control of Effluent Gases from Solid Waste Processing Using Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John; Cinke, Martin; Wignarajab, Kanapathipillai

    2005-01-01

    One of the major problems associated with solid waste processing technologies is the release of effluent gases and contaminants that are in gaseous formed from the processes. A number of other gases, in particular NO(x), SO2, NH3, Hydrocarbons (e.g. CH4) do present hazards to the crew in space habitats. Reduction of mass, power, volume and resupply can be achieved by using catalyst impregnated carbon nanotubes as compared to other catalytic systems. The development and characterization of an innovative approach for the control and elimination of gaseous toxins using single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) promise superior performance over conventional approaches. This is due to the ability to direct the selective uptake of gaseous species based on their controllable pore size, high adsorptive capacity and the effectiveness of carbon nanotubes as catalyst supports for gaseous conversion. For example, SWNTs have high adsorptive capacity for NO and the adsorbed NO can be decomposed to N2 and O2 . Experimental results showing the decomposition of NO on metal impregnated carbon nanotubes is presented. Equivalent System Mass (ESM) comparisons are made of the existing TCCS systems with the carbon nanotube technology for removing NO(x). The potential for methane decomposition using carbon nanotubes catalysts is also discussed.

  18. Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Phase 2, technology development, annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1995-07-01

    Oil refineries discharge large volumes of H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} from cracking, coking, and hydrotreating operations. This program seeks to develop a biological process for converting these waste gases into ethanol, which can be blended with gasoline to reduce emissions. Production of ethanol from all 194 US refineries would save 450 billion BTU annually, would reduce crude oil imports by 110 million barrels/year and emissions by 19 million tons/year. Phase II efforts has yielded at least 3 cultures (Clostridium ljungdahlii, Isolate O-52, Isolate C-01) which are able to produce commercially viable concentrations of ethanol from CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2} in petroleum waste gas. Single continuous stirred tank reactor studies have shown that 15-20 g/L of ethanol can be produced, with less than 5 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Culture and reactor optimization in Phase III should yield even higher ethanol concentrations and minimal acetic acid. Product recovery studies showed that ethanol is best recovered in a multi-step process involving solvent extraction/distillation to azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation, or direct distillation to the azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation. Projections show that the ethanol facility for a typical refinery would require an investment of about $30 million, which would be returned in less than 2 years.

  19. Development and test of a Stirling engine driven by waste gases for the micro-CHP system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tie; Tang Dawei; Li Zhigang; Du Jinglong; Zhou Tian; Jia Yu

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, micro-CHP systems are attracting world attention. As one kind of external heating engines, Stirling engines could be applied to the micro-CHP systems driven by solar, biogas, mid-high temperature waste gases and many other heat sources. The development of a Stirling engine driven by mid-high temperature waste gases is presented first. The thermodynamic design method, the key parameters of the designed Stirling engine and its combustion chamber adapted for waste gases are described in detail. Then the performance test of the Stirling engine is carried out. During the test, the temperature of the heater head is monitored by thermocouples, and the pressure of the working fluid helium in the Stirling engine is monitored by pressure sensors. The relationships among the output shaft power, torque and speed are studied, and the pressure losses of the working fluid in the heat exchanger system are also analyzed. The test results demonstrate that the output shaft power could reach 3476 W at 1248 RPM, which is in good agreement with the predicted value of 3901 W at 1500 RPM. The test results confirm the fact that Stirling engines driven by mid-high temperature waste gases are able to achieve a valuable output power for engineering application. - Highlights: ► A β-type Stirling engine whose output power could reach about 3.5 kW is developed by ourselves. ► Waste gases are used as the heat source to drive the Stirling engine. ► Test on the relationship among the power, torque, and speed are presented. ► The pressure changing process of the working fluid in the heat exchanger system during the test is recorded and analyzed.

  20. Special file: non conventional gases at the origin of the gas financial bubble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the development the non-conventional gas market. For instance, these gases (shale gas, tight gas, coal bed methane or CBM) already represent more than a half of domestic production in the United States, and they may therefore disturb the world market and worsen the overproduction situation. Because of them, liquefied natural gas projects tend to be stopped. The involved technologies are briefly evoked, as well as their profitability

  1. Transport of gases through concrete barriers. Task 3: characterization of radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, A.W.; Atkinson, A.; Claisse, P.A.

    1993-01-01

    The performance of the cementitious materials within a radioactive waste repository as a physical barrier to the migration of radionuclides depends on the maintenance of the integrity of the barrier. Potentially, this can be compromised by physical damage to the barrier caused by pressurization as gas is generated within the repository. The maintenance of chemical homogeneity within the material used for backfilling the repository may also be compromised as a consequence of gas pressurization through the formation of additional cracks and the reaction of cementitious materials with gases such as carbon dioxide. Consequently, the migration of gas within repository construction materials may be a significant parameter in both the design of a repository and the provision of a safety-case for disposal. The migration of hydrogen, helium, methane, argon and carbon dioxide has been studied for materials selected to be typical of repository structural concretes and grouts that are being considered for backfilling and waste encapsulation. The apparent permeability of these materials to gas has been shown to be dependent on gas type and average pressure in the structural concrete due to the effects of Knudsen flow at pressures of the order of 100 kPa. This is not observed in the grouts due to the significantly greater pore size. The permeability coefficients of the grouts are several orders of magnitude greater than those of the concrete. Gas migration is strongly influenced by the degree of water saturation of the materials. The presence of interfaces within the materials results in an increase in permeability at higher degrees of water saturation. A simple model has been developed to simulate the effects of gas pressurization. The tangential hoop stress at the surface of a void is calculated and comparison with the expected tensile strength of the materials is used to assess the potential for cracking. The backfill grouts seem to have sufficient permeability to disperse

  2. Biological elimination of volatile, organic compounds from waste gases in a biofilter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, G.; Chabot, J.C.; Caron, J.J.; Heitz, M. [Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Genie Chimique

    1998-01-01

    A great deal of research has been directed towards the problem of reduction and control of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The aim of this research is to find a process that is both efficient and inexpensive in comparison with traditional air treatment technologies. The biofilter used, a one stage system, 2 m in height, is an aerobic system for waste gases containing VOC`s using the degradation properties of microbial flora (assorted cultures of Bacillus, Micrococcus, Acinetobacter and yeast). In this process, polluted gas diffuses across a filter bed into which a microbial culture has previously been introduced. Peat is the medium of choice for inoculation with microorganisms because of its adsorption and absorption properties, ability to retain moisture, and buffering capacity. Furthermore, the peat utilized is spherical in shape; thus, it is possible to avoid problems related to compacting. The objective of this study was to eliminate VOCs emitted from a rotogravure process. The team was able to achieve promising results from biofiltration of two types of VOCs (a mixed solvent containing isopropyl acetate and 1-nitropropane, and the solvent: 1-nitropropane). The results obtained indicate that the elimination of nitropropane and the mixed solvent in the biofilter are considered to follow zero-order kinetics with reaction rate limitation and diffusion rate limitation, respectively. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  3. [Occupational hazards, DNA damage, and oxidative stress on exposure to waste anesthetic gases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucio, Lorena M C; Braz, Mariana G; do Nascimento Junior, Paulo; Braz, José Reinaldo C; Braz, Leandro G

    The waste anesthetic gases (WAGs) present in the ambient air of operating rooms (OR), are associated with various occupational hazards. This paper intends to discuss occupational exposure to WAGs and its impact on exposed professionals, with emphasis on genetic damage and oxidative stress. Despite the emergence of safer inhaled anesthetics, occupational exposure to WAGs remains a current concern. Factors related to anesthetic techniques and anesthesia workstations, in addition to the absence of a scavenging system in the OR, contribute to anesthetic pollution. In order to minimize the health risks of exposed professionals, several countries have recommended legislation with maximum exposure limits. However, developing countries still require measurement of WAGs and regulation for occupational exposure to WAGs. WAGs are capable of inducing damage to the genetic material, such as DNA damage assessed using the comet assay and increased frequency of micronucleus in professionals with long-term exposure. Oxidative stress is also associated with WAGs exposure, as it induces lipid peroxidation, oxidative damage in DNA, and impairment of the antioxidant defense system in exposed professionals. The occupational hazards related to WAGs including genotoxicity, mutagenicity and oxidative stress, stand as a public health issue and must be acknowledged by exposed personnel and responsible authorities, especially in developing countries. Thus, it is urgent to stablish maximum safe limits of concentration of WAGs in ORs and educational practices and protocols for exposed professionals. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. The waste originating from nuclear energy peaceful applications and its management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Jair Albo Marques de

    1997-05-01

    This work presents the waste originating from nuclear energy and its management. It approaches the following main topics: nature and classification of the wastes; security requirements to the waste management; state of the art related to the wastes derivates of the uses of the nuclear energy; wastes in the fuel cycle; wastes of the industrial, medical and research and development applications; costs of the waste management

  5. High temperature abatement of acid gases from waste incineration. Part II: Comparative life cycle assessment study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biganzoli, Laura; Racanella, Gaia; Marras, Roberto; Rigamonti, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The performances of a new dolomitic sorbent, named Depurcal®MG, to be directly injected at high temperature in the combustion chamber of Waste-To-Energy (WTE) plants as a preliminary stage of deacidification, were experimentally tested during full-scale commercial operation. Results of the experimentations were promising, and have been extensively described in Biganzoli et al. (2014). This paper reports the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) study performed to compare the traditional operation of the plants, based on the sole sodium bicarbonate feeding at low temperature, with the new one, where the dolomitic sorbent is injected at high temperature. In the latter the sodium bicarbonate is still used, but at lower rate because of the decreased load of acid gases entering the flue gas treatment line. The major goal of the LCA was to make sure that a burden shifting was not taking place somewhere in the life cycle stages, as it might be the case when a new material is used in substitution of another one. According to the comparative approach, only the processes which differ between the two operational modes were included in the system boundaries. They are the production of the two reactants and the treatment of the corresponding solid residues arising from the neutralisation of acid gases. The additional CO2 emission at the stack of the WTE plant due to the activation of the sodium bicarbonate was also included in the calculation. Data used in the modelling of the foreground system are primary, derived from the experimental tests described in Biganzoli et al. (2014) and from the dolomitic sorbent production plant. The results of the LCA show minor changes in the potential impacts between the two operational modes of the plants. These differences are for 8 impact categories in favour of the new operational mode based on the addition of the dolomitic sorbent, and for 7 impact categories in favour of the traditional operation. A final evaluation was conducted on the potential

  6. High temperature abatement of acid gases from waste incineration. Part II: Comparative life cycle assessment study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biganzoli, Laura, E-mail: laura.biganzoli@mail.polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Racanella, Gaia [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Marras, Roberto [Unicalce S.p.A., R and D Department, Via Tonio da Belledo 30, 23900 Lecco (Italy); Rigamonti, Lucia [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Two scenarios of acid gases removal in WTE plants were compared in an LCA study. • A detailed inventory based on primary data has been reported for the production of the new dolomitic sorbent. • Results show that the comparison between the two scenarios does not show systematic differences. • The potential impacts are reduced only if there is an increase in the energy efficiency of the WTE plant. - Abstract: The performances of a new dolomitic sorbent, named Depurcal®MG, to be directly injected at high temperature in the combustion chamber of Waste-To-Energy (WTE) plants as a preliminary stage of deacidification, were experimentally tested during full-scale commercial operation. Results of the experimentations were promising, and have been extensively described in Biganzoli et al. (2014). This paper reports the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) study performed to compare the traditional operation of the plants, based on the sole sodium bicarbonate feeding at low temperature, with the new one, where the dolomitic sorbent is injected at high temperature. In the latter the sodium bicarbonate is still used, but at lower rate because of the decreased load of acid gases entering the flue gas treatment line. The major goal of the LCA was to make sure that a burden shifting was not taking place somewhere in the life cycle stages, as it might be the case when a new material is used in substitution of another one. According to the comparative approach, only the processes which differ between the two operational modes were included in the system boundaries. They are the production of the two reactants and the treatment of the corresponding solid residues arising from the neutralisation of acid gases. The additional CO{sub 2} emission at the stack of the WTE plant due to the activation of the sodium bicarbonate was also included in the calculation. Data used in the modelling of the foreground system are primary, derived from the experimental tests described in

  7. The SiBI connector: a new medical device to facilitate preoxygenation and reduce waste anesthetic gases during inhaled induction with sevoflurane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colas, M J; Tétrault, J P; Dumais, L; Truong, P; Claprood, Y; Martin, R

    2000-12-01

    The SiBI connector is a new medical device used for vital capacity inhaled induction with sevoflurane. It allows efficient preoxygenation of patients and reduces waste anesthetic gases in the operation room during induction.

  8. Action plan for response to abnormal conditions in Hanford high level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks containing flammable gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, D.J.

    1994-03-01

    Radioactive liquid waste tends to produce hydrogen as a result of the interaction of gamma radiation and water. In tanks containing organic chelating agents, additional hydrogen gas as well as nitrous oxide and ammonia can be produced by thermal and radiolytic decomposition of these organics. Several high-level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks, located underground at the Hanford Site, contain waste that retains the gases produced in them until large quantities are released rapidly to the tank vapor space. Tanks filled to near capacity have relatively little vapor space; therefore, if the waste suddenly releases a large amount of hydrogen and nitrous oxide, a flammable gas mixture may result. The most notable waste tank with a flammable gas problem is tank 241-SY-101. Waste in this tank has occasionally released enough flammable gas to burn if an ignition source had been present inside of the tank. Several other waste tanks exhibit similar behavior to a lesser magnitude. Administrative controls have been developed to assure that these Flammable Gas Watch List tanks are safely maintained. Responses have also been developed for off-normal conditions which might develop in these tanks. In addition, scientific and engineering studies are underway to further understand and mitigate the behavior of the Flammable Gas Watch List tanks

  9. Plant for the production of activated carbon and electric power from the gases originated in gasification processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganan, J.; Turegano, J.P.; Calama, G.; Roman, S.; Al-Kassir, A.

    2006-01-01

    The development of the countries involves a high energy demand; however, the energetic resources used by the moment are not renewable. Events like the energetic crisis of 1973, the continuous geopolitic clashes in energetic resource-rich areas, and the global environmental deterioration as a consequence of the industrial activity taking place in last century, make obvious the need of searching new sources of energy [1]. One of these sources is the obtainment of energy from biomass exploitation. The use of this raw material involves advantages in the emission of low quantities of contaminants to the atmosphere and its renewable character. Until now, the main drawback of this source is its lack of viability when trying to obtain electric power from biomass, due to the use of systems composed of a boiler and a steam turbine (which offer low operative flexibility), which are not rentable in such a competitive market as it is, currently, the energetic one. Nowadays, the use of internal combustion engines, combined with biomass gasifiers, allows rapid connection-disconnection of the plant (aproximately of five minutes), which confers a big flexibility to the system and, as a consequence, a better exploitation of the plant in maximum energetic consumption hours. It also has the advantage of establishing a co-generation system since the gases are generated at a high temperature, 800 o C [2]. With this view, the aim of this work has focused in the re-design of a gasification plant for the production of activated carbons, from biomassic residues, for the energetic exploitation of the combustible gases produced during the pyrolytic process (H 2 , CO, CH 4 , C 2 H 2 , C 2 H 4 , C 2 H 6 ), since these gases are currently burnt in a torch in the plant. The idea of designing the activated carbon production plant arose from the need of managing the biomass residues (olive wastes) generated by the firm Euroliva-Azeites e Oleos Alimentares SA, located in Alto Alentejo, in the city

  10. Plant for the production of activated carbon and electric power from the gases originated in gasification processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganan, J.; Turegano, J.P.; Calama, G. [Area de Engenharia. Escola Superior de Tecnologia e Gestao. Instituto Politecnico de Portalegre, Lugar da Abadesa, Apartado 148, 7301 Portalegre Codex (Portugal); Roman, S.; Al-Kassir, A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Energetica, Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz, 06071 (Spain)

    2006-01-15

    The development of the countries involves a high energy demand; however, the energetic resources used by the moment are not renewable. Events like the energetic crisis of 1973, the continuous geopolitic clashes in energetic resource-rich areas, and the global environmental deterioration as a consequence of the industrial activity taking place in last century, make obvious the need of searching new sources of energy [1]. One of these sources is the obtainment of energy from biomass exploitation. The use of this raw material involves advantages in the emission of low quantities of contaminants to the atmosphere and its renewable character. Until now, the main drawback of this source is its lack of viability when trying to obtain electric power from biomass, due to the use of systems composed of a boiler and a steam turbine (which offer low operative flexibility), which are not rentable in such a competitive market as it is, currently, the energetic one. Nowadays, the use of internal combustion engines, combined with biomass gasifiers, allows rapid connection-disconnection of the plant (aproximately of five minutes), which confers a big flexibility to the system and, as a consequence, a better exploitation of the plant in maximum energetic consumption hours. It also has the advantage of establishing a co-generation system since the gases are generated at a high temperature, 800 {sup o}C [2]. With this view, the aim of this work has focused in the re-design of a gasification plant for the production of activated carbons, from biomassic residues, for the energetic exploitation of the combustible gases produced during the pyrolytic process (H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}), since these gases are currently burnt in a torch in the plant. The idea of designing the activated carbon production plant arose from the need of managing the biomass residues (olive wastes) generated by the firm Euroliva-Azeites e Oleos Alimentares SA

  11. Migration of gases around a cell containing high-activity vitrified wastes during the operational phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoch, A.; Wendling, J.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Andra is studying the Callovo-Oxfordian mud-stones, located at a depth of approximately 500 m beneath the borders of the Meuse and the Haute-Marne Departements, in order to assess the feasibility of constructing a repository for radioactive waste in this low-permeability geological formation. Several categories of waste are being considered for disposal in the geological repository. Of these, the high-activity, long-lived vitrified wastes (known as 'Waste C') are strongly exothermic and will be stored in cells that are about 40 m long, with a single access aperture from an access gallery. The cell wall will be supported by a steel lining. During the reversible operational phase (lasting at least 100 years), and as long as the access galleries are ventilated, the corrosion of the steel lining by oxygen in air will be important. It is necessary to determine the thickness of the lining corroded during this phase in order to be able to design the lining with an appropriate initial thickness to maintain integrity. In addition, at the end of the cell farthest from the ventilated access gallery, it is possible that the oxygen concentration will be so low that corrosion occurs under reducing (anaerobic) conditions. This chemical reaction produces hydrogen gas, which will migrate towards the access gallery. To maintain operational safety, it is necessary to define the hydrogen concentration within the cell and within the access gallery in order to evaluate the fire and/or explosion hazards (the hydrogen-oxygen mixture is highly flammable and/or explosive at certain concentrations). The objectives of this study were to estimate for the reversible operational phase (i.e. for 100 years): - The thickness of the steel lining required to ensure mechanical integrity. - Transfer rates (advection and / or diffusion) and gas concentrations (oxygen, hydrogen and water vapour) at all points in the annular void between the

  12. The airborne mass spectrometer AIMS – Part 2: Measurements of trace gases with stratospheric or tropospheric origin in the UTLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Jurkat

    2016-04-01

    an isotopically labeled 34SO2 standard. In addition, we report on trace gas measurements of HONO, which is sensitive to the reaction with SF5−. The detection limit for the various trace gases is in the low 10 pptv range at a 1 s time resolution with an overall uncertainty of the measurement of the order of 20 %. AIMS has been integrated and successfully operated on the DLR research aircraft Falcon and HALO (High Altitude LOng range research aircraft. As an example, measurements conducted during the TACTS/ESMVal (Transport and Composition of the LMS/UT and Earth System Model Validation mission with HALO in 2012 are presented, focusing on a classification of tropospheric and stratospheric influences in the UTLS region. The combination of AIMS measurements with other measurement techniques yields a comprehensive picture of the sulfur, chlorine and reactive nitrogen oxide budget in the UTLS. The different trace gases measured with AIMS exhibit the potential to gain a better understanding of the trace gas origin and variability at and near the tropopause.

  13. Isotopic dependences of the dielectric strength of gases: new observations, classification, and possible origins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; Rodrigo, H.; Marode, E.; Bastien, F.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper we report: (1) the finding that the CH 4 /CD 4 nonuniform field behavior is polarity dependent (i.e., the V/sub s/ of CD 4 is lower than the V/sub s/ of CH 4 for negative polarity which is just the opposite of that observed for positive polarity); (2) discuss the origins of the observed isotope effects and predict new isotopic dependences of V/sub s/; and (3) report results on the V/sub s/ of H 2 S and D 2 S for negative polarity which confirm their predicted isotopic behavior

  14. Combined distiller waste utilisation and combustion gases desulphurisation method. The case study of soda-ash industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasikowski, Tomasz; Buczkowski, Roman; Cichosz, Marcin; Lemanowska, Eliza [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolas Copernicus University, ul. Gagarina 7, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2007-09-15

    In this paper, a concept of technology that can be helpful for lowering the negative influence of the synthetic (based on the Solvay process) soda ash plant on the natural environment is presented. We describe the desulphurisation of combustion gases from the factory's power plant, which is based on their absorption in the overflow of distiller waste. The excess of lime milk, which is added in the process of ammonia regeneration from filter liquor, results in a strong alkalinity of distiller waste. The high pH of distiller waste favours absorption of acidic combustion gases. The laboratory-scale tests showed about 80% efficiency of the desulphurisation process. The suspension samples we obtained consist mainly of CaCO{sub 3}. We suggest using the obtained solid phase as an adsorbent-insert in Fluidised Bed Combustion technology (FBC). Based on raw material prices, production costs, and average sell prices of the product, economic analysis of innovation was executed. Profits from employing the method presented come mainly from reduction of environmental fees. The sensitivity analysis of cost showed that the application of the desulphurisation process causes cost reduction in soda-ash production accounting for EUR 150 thousand per year (excluding depreciation) in Poland, and EUR 11,700 thousand per year (excluding depreciation) in Sweden. It has been found that the latter value is similar to the positive environmental impact of this innovation expressed in monetary units (EUR 10,350 thousand per year, excluding depreciation). (author)

  15. Program plan for evaluation and remediation of the generation and release of flammable gases in Hanford Site waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.D.

    1991-08-01

    This program plan describes the activities being conducted for the resolution of the flammable gas problem that is associated with 23 high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The classification of the wastes in all of these tanks is not final and some wastes may not be high-level wastes. However, until the characterization and classification is complete, all the tanks are treated as if they contain high-level waste. Of the 23 tanks, Tank 241-SY-101 (referred to as Tank 101-SY) has exhibited significant episodic releases of flammable gases (hydrogen and nitrous oxide) for the past 10 years. The major near-term focus of this program is for the understanding and stabilization of this tank. An understanding of the mechanism for gas generation and the processes for the episodic release will be obtained through sampling of the tank contents, laboratory studies, and modeling of the tank behavior. Additional information will be obtained through new and upgraded instrumentation for the tank. A number of remediation, or stabilization, concepts will be evaluated for near-term (2 to 3 years) applications to Tank 101-SY. Detailed safety assessments are required for all activities that will occur in the tank (sampling, removal of equipment, and addition of new instruments). This program plan presents a discussion of each task, provides schedules for near-term activities, and gives a summary of the expected work for fiscal years 1991, 1992, and 1993. 16 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs

  16. Program plan for evaluation and remediation of the generation and release of flammable gases in Hanford Site waste tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.D. (comp.)

    1991-08-01

    This program plan describes the activities being conducted for the resolution of the flammable gas problem that is associated with 23 high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The classification of the wastes in all of these tanks is not final and some wastes may not be high-level wastes. However, until the characterization and classification is complete, all the tanks are treated as if they contain high-level waste. Of the 23 tanks, Tank 241-SY-101 (referred to as Tank 101-SY) has exhibited significant episodic releases of flammable gases (hydrogen and nitrous oxide) for the past 10 years. The major near-term focus of this program is for the understanding and stabilization of this tank. An understanding of the mechanism for gas generation and the processes for the episodic release will be obtained through sampling of the tank contents, laboratory studies, and modeling of the tank behavior. Additional information will be obtained through new and upgraded instrumentation for the tank. A number of remediation, or stabilization, concepts will be evaluated for near-term (2 to 3 years) applications to Tank 101-SY. Detailed safety assessments are required for all activities that will occur in the tank (sampling, removal of equipment, and addition of new instruments). This program plan presents a discussion of each task, provides schedules for near-term activities, and gives a summary of the expected work for fiscal years 1991, 1992, and 1993. 16 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. Biofiltration of composting gases using different municipal solid waste-pruning residue composts: monitoring by using an electronic nose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, R; Cabeza, I O; Giráldez, I; Díaz, M J

    2011-09-01

    The concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during the composting of kitchen waste and pruning residues, and the abatement of VOCs by different compost biofilters was studied. VOCs removal efficiencies greater than 90% were obtained using composts of municipal solid waste (MSW) or MSW-pruning residue as biofilter material. An electronic nose identified qualitative differences among the biofilter output gases at very low concentrations of VOCs. These differences were related to compost constituents, compost particle size (2-7 or 7-20mm), and a combination of both factors. The total concentration of VOCs determined by a photoionization analyser and inferred from electronic nose data sets were correlated over an ample range of concentrations of VOCs, showing that these techniques could be specially adapted for the monitoring of these processes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Origin and mobility of hydrocarbon gases in alkaline plutons : the example of the Khibina complex, NW Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treloar, P.J.; Beeskow, B.; Rankin, A.H. [Kingston Univ., Kingston upon Thames (United Kingdom). School of Earth Sciences; Potter, J. [Western Ontario Univ., London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Earth Science; Nivin, V. [Geological Inst., Apatity (Russian Federation). Kola Science Centre

    2006-07-01

    The origin and distribution of abiogenic hydrocarbon gases (HCGs) was discussed with particular reference to HCGs in the Khibina pluton which are dominated by methane (CH{sub 4}) with minor amounts of higher hydrocarbons and hydrogen (H{sub 2}). Although isotopic data and hydrocarbon species ratios point to an abiogenic source, they do not distinguish between primary magmatic hydrocarbons and those generated by late magmatic re-speciation or post-magmatic Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. Some rock textures suggest limited CH{sub 4} production by FT synthesis, but the presence of primary, syn-magmatic CH{sub 4}-rich fluid inclusions, and the absence of primary and secondary carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) rich inclusions, suggest a dominantly early magmatic origin for the HCGs. The permeability and porosity in the Khibina pluton can be constrained by the distribution and geometry of fluid inclusion planes (FIPs) and open cracks (OCs), as well as by the magnitude and pathways of fluid flow. Orientation data for FIPs and OCs, obtained from oriented thin sections, revealed a range of orientations in sub-parallel arrays, suggesting continual re-activation of old fracture systems. The extensive occurrence of OCs and sealed FIPs points to long lived porosities and permeabilities with large fluid fluxes integrated over time. FIP and OC density values were found to be consistent with gas release patterns characterized by spontaneous release during mining of large volumes of HCG stored in a network of interconnected, sealed microfractures and fluid inclusion planes that unzip during stress. It was determined that the HCGs have a primary magmatic origin although there is local evidence for limited post-magmatic FT synthesis. Long term continuous gas migration has occurred within the complex through an interconnected set of fractures. FIPs represent aliquots of gas sealed during open system migration. It was concluded that the complex contains a potentially economically viable

  19. Impact of oxy-fuel combustion gases on mercury retention in activated carbons from a macroalgae waste: effect of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Anton, M A; Ferrera-Lorenzo, N; Fuente, E; Díaz-Somoano, M; Suarez-Ruíz, I; Martínez-Tarazona, M R; Ruiz, B

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the different sorption behaviors of mercury species on activated carbons in the oxy-fuel combustion of coal and the effect of high quantities of water vapor on the retention process. The work evaluates the interactions between the mercury species and a series of activated carbons prepared from a macroalgae waste (algae meal) from the agar-agar industry in oxy-combustion atmospheres, focussing on the role that the high concentration of water in the flue gases plays in mercury retention. Two novel aspects are considered in this work (i) the impact of oxy-combustion gases on the retention of mercury by activated carbons and (ii) the performance of activated carbons prepared from biomass algae wastes for this application. The results obtained at laboratory scale indicate that the effect of the chemical and textural characteristics of the activated carbons on mercury capture is not as important as that of reactive gases, such as the SOx and water vapor present in the flue gas. Mercury retention was found to be much lower in the oxy-combustion atmosphere than in the O2+N2 (12.6% O2) atmosphere. However, the oxidation of elemental mercury (Hg0) to form oxidized mercury (Hg2+) amounted to 60%, resulting in an enhancement of mercury retention in the flue gas desulfurization units and a reduction in the amalgamation of Hg0 in the CO2 compression unit. This result is of considerable importance for the development of technologies based on activated carbon sorbents for mercury control in oxy-combustion processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Incineration and co-combustion of waste: accounting of greenhouse gases and global warming contributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas; Møller, Jacob; Fruergaard, Thilde

    2009-01-01

    Important greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to waste incineration and co-combustion of waste were identified and considered relative to critical aspects such as: the contents of biogenic and fossil carbon, N2O emissions, fuel and material consumptions at the plants, energy recovery, and soli...

  1. Food waste volume and origin: Case studies in the Finnish food service sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvennoinen, Kirsi; Heikkilä, Lotta; Katajajuuri, Juha-Matti; Reinikainen, Anu

    2015-12-01

    We carried out a project to map the volume and composition of food waste in the Finnish food service sector. The amount, type and origin of avoidable food waste were investigated in 51 food service outlets, including schools, day-care centres, workplace canteens, petrol stations, restaurants and diners. Food service outlet personnel kept diaries and weighed the food produced and wasted during a one-week or one-day period. For weighing and sorting, the food waste was divided into two categories: originally edible (OE) food waste was separated from originally inedible (OIE) waste, such as vegetable peelings, bones and coffee grounds. In addition, food waste (OE) was divided into three categories in accordance with its origins: kitchen waste, service waste and customer leftovers. According to the results, about 20% of all food handled and prepared in the sector was wasted. The findings also suggest that the main drivers of wasted food are buffet services and overproduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Materials and wastes from power generation of nuclear origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dessus, Benjamin; Guillemette, Andre; Laponche, Bernard; Zerbib, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    In most countries, spent nuclear fuel is directly stored in pools and constitute the bulk of highly radioactive waste. In France, reprocessing separates spent fuel into three categories: uranium, plutonium, minor actinides and fission products. Hence, a vast amount of very diverse radioactive materials are stored in various sites and conditions, under two denominations: 'nuclear materials' (which can be or are partly recycled) and 'radioactive waste' which should be permanently disposed of. The production of highly radioactive and long-lived waste raise legitimate questions on the use of nuclear energy for power production and many people think that it's a sufficient reason for giving up this technique. Concerning existing radioactive waste, the alternative to deep disposal should be: a) dry storage of spent fuel and other existing waste in protected sites (bunkers or hills), and b) more active research on the possibilities to reduce both radioactivity and the lifetime of radioactive waste. (authors)

  3. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic evidence for the origin of combustible gases in water-supply wells in north-central Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Révész, K. M.; Breen, K.J.; Baldassare, A.J.; Burruss, R.C.

    2010-01-01

    The origin of the combustible gases in groundwater from glacial-outwash and fractured-bedrock aquifers was investigated in northern Tioga County, Pennsylvania. Thermogenic methane (CH4) and ethane (C2H6) and microbial CH4 were found. Microbial CH4 is from natural in situ processes in the shale bedrock and occurs chiefly in the bedrock aquifer. The δ13C values of CH4 and C2H6 for the majority of thermogenic gases from water wells either matched or were between values for the samples of non-native storage-field gas from injection wells and the samples of gas from storage-field observation wells. Traces of C2H6 with microbial CH4 and a range of C and H isotopic compositions of CH4 indicate gases of different origins are mixing in sub-surface pathways; gas mixtures are present in groundwater. Pathways for gas migration and a specific source of the gases were not identified. Processes responsible for the presence of microbial gases in groundwater could be elucidated with further geochemical study.

  4. Municipal wastes and landfield gases utilization - renewable resource of energy and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuburovic, M.; Jovovic, A.

    2002-01-01

    Urbanization and industrialization, have been fundamental causes of environmental pollution (of water, air and land) which the cities were unable to handle. There is already enough evidence of the fact that the role of technology in environmental matters is moving in two important directions: sustainable development, dealing primary with global problems, and preventive technology, designed to reduce the environmental effects of processes, operations, and products. Treatment plants for industrial and municipal wastes, emission controls for incinerators, and safe landfills for waste disposal were developed to control air, water, and land pollution. Now, this 'end-of-pipe' treatment technologies are still the way of environmental protection philosophy, particularly in the developing countries. New environmental standards demand more and more rigorous preventive environmental protection technologies, therefore further development of industrial production requires the rational use of natural sources of raw materials and energy. Production and the use of goods with the minimum municipal and industrial wastes and the development of recycling technology provided closed cycle of materials. Main principles for the development and exploitation of the technology with the minimum or without waste materials and energy are: the use of renewable sources of material and energy, maximum use of waste materials and waste energy, waste minimisation and reduction of energy losses in the production, development of new industrial processes operating with minimum material and energy losses in products exploitation period and after that, and the responsible use of natural sources, products and energy in the field of industry and consumption. (author)

  5. Method to separate fission noble gases from gaseous wastes of a reprocessing plant for nuclear fuel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnez, H.

    1977-01-01

    In order to avoid the high cost expenditure in the separation of fission noble gases from waste gas of the head end, the following economical method is suggested: The fission noble gases released in the solvent - after grinding and burn-up of the nuclear fuel elements and dissolving in HNO 3 - are purified in a known method and collected in an equalizing tank. From here, the fission noble gas quantity necessary as washing gas is recycled into the solvent, so that a part of the fission noble gas quantity flows in a circuit. The quantity of fission noble gas not required for the above is separated from the circuit, compressed and put into a storage container from where it can be put into gas flashs or be recycled in the gas circuit where necessary. Furthermore, the method involves that to separate krypton, the filtered fission noble gas is compressed, cooled and rectified, whereby the krypton mixture taken from the rectification column is stored under high pressure and the gas part containing xenon, occuring as liquid, is at least partly fed back to the solvent. (HPH) [de

  6. Experimental study on the detection of free fluids and gases in waste packages by acoustic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenblaetter, J.; Schaefer, P.; Weib, R.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the project was to evaluate the potential and the limits of various nondestructive methods for testing the contents of 200-litre drums filled with radioactive waste. The following test problems were to be studied: 1. Detection of free water on the surface of the waste matrix (concrete); 2. Determination of the waste matrix level; 3. Determination of internal gas pressure. The following methods were found to be suitable: For Test problem 1: Measurement of Lamb wave attenuation, Acoustic impedance measurement (AIM) and Analysis of swash sound; For Test problem 2: Acoustic impedance measurement (AIM) and Measurement of Lamb wave attenuation; For Test problem 3: A method of pressure compensation and Analysis of cover resonances after striking the cover. It was not possible, however, to detect the concrete level by localisation of friction points using acoustic emission methods. 53 figs

  7. Online elemental analysis of process gases with ICP-OES: A case study on waste wood combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellinger, Marco; Wochele, Joerg; Biollaz, Serge M.A.; Ludwig, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Simultaneous measurements of 23 elements in process gases of a waste wood combustor. ► Mobile ICP spectrometer allows measurements of high quality at industrial plants. ► Continuous online measurements with high temporal resolution. ► Linear correlations among element concentrations in the raw flue gas were detected. ► Novel sampling and calibration methods for ICP-OES analysis of process gases. - Abstract: A mobile sampling and measurement system for the analysis of gaseous and liquid samples in the field was developed. An inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES), which is built into a van, was used as detector. The analytical system was calibrated with liquid and/or gaseous standards. It was shown that identical mass flows of either gaseous or liquid standards resulted in identical ICP-OES signal intensities. In a field measurement campaign trace and minor elements in the raw flue gas of a waste wood combustor were monitored. Sampling was performed with a highly transport efficient liquid quench system, which allowed to observe temporal variations in the elemental process gas composition. After a change in feedstock an immediate change of the element concentrations in the flue gas was detected. A comparison of the average element concentrations during the combustion of the two feedstocks showed a high reproducibility for matrix elements that are expected to be present in similar concentrations. On the other hand elements that showed strong differences in their concentration in the feedstock were also represented by a higher concentration in the flue gas. Following the temporal variations of different elements revealed strong correlations between a number of elements, such as chlorine with sodium, potassium and zinc, as well as arsenic with lead, and calcium with strontium.

  8. Development of a Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation Method to Produce Feedstock Gases from Waste Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulis, Michael J.; Guerrero-Medina, Karen J.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2012-01-01

    Given the high cost of space launch, the repurposing of biological and plastic wastes to reduce the need for logistical support during long distance and long duration space missions has long been recognized as a high priority. Described in this paper are the preliminary efforts to develop a wet air oxidation system in order to produce fuels from waste polymers. Preliminary results of partial oxidation in near supercritical water conditions are presented. Inherent corrosion and salt precipitation are discussed as system design issues for a thorough assessment of a second generation wet air oxidation system. This work is currently being supported by the In-Situ Resource Utilization Project.

  9. 40 CFR 60.54a - Standard for municipal waste combustor acid gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for Municipal Waste Combustors for Which Construction is Commenced After December 20, 1989 and on or... weight or volume) or 30 parts per million by volume, corrected to 7 percent oxygen (dry basis), whichever... by volume, corrected to 7 percent oxygen (dry basis), whichever is less stringent. ...

  10. Landfilling of waste: accounting of greenhouse gases and global warming contributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfredi, Simone; Tonini, Davide; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2009-01-01

    Accounting of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from waste landfilling is summarized with the focus on processes and technical data for a number of different landfilling technologies: open dump (which was included as the worst-case-scenario), conventional landfills with flares and with energy recove...

  11. Collection, transfer and transport of waste: accounting of greenhouse gases and global warming contribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eisted, Rasmus; Larsen, Anna Warberg; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2009-01-01

    ) emissions were quantified. The emission factors were assigned a global warming potential (GWP) and aggregated into global warming factors (GWFs), which express the potential contribution to global warming from collection, transport and transfer of 1 tonne of wet waste. Six examples involving collection...

  12. Presentation of different possibilities for the cleaning of exhaust gases from waste incinerators; Darstellung verschiedener Moeglichkeiten zur Reinigung von Abgasen aus Abfallverbrennungsanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, Christian [LAB GmbH, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2013-03-01

    This contribution describes different methods of purification of exhaust gases from waste incinerators. The following technical procedures are considered: dry sorption procedure, quasi-dry procedure, wet scrubbing procedure, hybrid procedure. Subsequently, the author of this contribution reports on criteria for the selection of exhaust gas cleaning systems.

  13. [Comparison of waste anesthetic gases in operating rooms with or without an scavenging system in a Brazilian University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz, Leandro Gobbo; Braz, José Reinaldo Cerqueira; Cavalcante, Guilherme Aparecido Silva; Souza, Kátina Meneghetti; Lucio, Lorena Mendes de Carvalho; Braz, Mariana Gobbo

    Occupational exposure to waste anesthetic gases in operating room (OR) without active scavenging system has been associated with adverse health effects. Thus, this study aimed to compare the trace concentrations of the inhaled anesthetics isoflurane and sevoflurane in OR with and without central scavenging system. Waste concentrations of isoflurane and sevoflurane were measured by infrared analyzer at different locations (near the respiratory area of the assistant nurse and anesthesiologist and near the anesthesia station) and at two times (30 and 120minutes after the start of surgery) in both OR types. All isoflurane and sevoflurane concentrations in unscavenged OR were higher than the US recommended limit (2 parts per million), regardless of the location and time evaluated. In scavenged OR, the average concentrations of isoflurane were within the limit of exposure, except for the measurements near the anesthesia station, regardless of the measurement times. For sevoflurane, concentrations exceeded the limit value at all measurement locations and at both times. The exposure to both anesthetics exceeded the international limit in unscavenged OR. In scavenged OR, the concentrations of sevoflurane, and to a lesser extent those of isoflurane, exceeded the recommended limit value. Thus, the OR scavenging system analyzed in the present study decreased the anesthetic concentrations, although not to the internationally recommended values. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Feasibility study of a granular bed prefilter for purifying combustion gases from a solid radioactive waste incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girod, M.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of incineration is to minimize the volumes of radioactive waste to be stored. Cleaning combustion gases from these incinerators requires prefilters to protect the very high efficiency filters (known by the French acronym THE). These prefilters should make it possible to recover products such as plutonium while at the same time presenting a very limited source of secondary waste. This document sets out the feasibility study for a granular bed prefilter. This bed should be made of a material which is itself combustible so that it can be recycled in the incinerator to minimize production of secondary waste. During an initial stage, a design study of a demonstration device was carried out using a calculation code constructed on the basis of existing physical models, and which makes it possible to forecast the performance of the support. This theoretical approach has been correlated against experimental results from the validation test. During a second stage, the study dealt with the selection of the material from which the bed was made as well as quantification of the release of radiation during incineration of the plutonium contamined material. In this way, the very low transfer of radioactivity into the gaseous phase was demonstrated. Finally, during a third stage, a study of the change in efficiency and the loss of charge of a granular bed filter was carried out during industrial operation using an incinerator. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that the granular bed represents a viable solution for prefiltering at 200 deg C. Research might develop along a different path and involve using the granular bed as a high temperature filter at 500 to 600 deg C

  15. Assessment of plastic packaging waste : material origin, methods, properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijsterburg, B.J.; Goossens, J.G.P.

    2014-01-01

    The global plastics production has increased annually and a substantial part is used for packaging (in Europe 39%). Most plastic packages are discarded after a relatively short service life and the resulting plastic packaging waste is subsequently landfilled, incinerated or recycled. Laws of several

  16. Bacterial degradation of styrene in waste gases using a peat filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, M.; Reittu, A. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Wright, A. von; Suihko, M.L. [VTT Biotechnology and Food Research (Finland); Martikainen, P.J. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Sciences]|[National Public Health Inst., Lab. of Environmental Microbiology, Kuopio (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    A biofiltration process was developed for styrene-containing off-gases using peat as filter material. The average styrene reduction ratio after 190 days of operation was 70% (max. 98%) and the mean styrene elimination capacity was 12 g m{sup -3} h{sup -1} (max. 30 g m{sup -3} h{sup -1}). Efficient styrene degradation required addition of nutrients to the peat, adjustment of the pH to a neutral level and efficient control of the humidity. Maintenance of the water balance was easier in a down-flow than in an up-flow process, the former consequently resulting in much better filtration efficiency. The optimum operation temperature was around 23 C, but the styrene removal was still satisfactory at 12 C. Seven different bacterial isolates belonging to the genera Tsukamurella, Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas, Xanthomonas and an unidentified genus in the {gamma} group of the Proteobacteria isolated from the microflora of active peat filter material were capable of styrene degradation. The isolates differed in their capacity to decompose styrene to carbon dioxide and assimilate it to biomass. No toxic intermediate degradation products of styrene were detected in the filter outlet gas or in growing cultures of isolated bacteria. The use of these isolates in industrial biofilters is beneficial at low styrene concentrations and is safe from both the environmental and public health points of view. (orig.)

  17. Bacterial degradation of styrene in waste gases using a peat filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, M; Reittu, A; von Wright, A; Martikainen, P J; Suihko, M L

    1997-12-01

    A biofiltration process was developed for styrene-containing off-gases using peat as filter material. The average styrene reduction ratio after 190 days of operation was 70% (max. 98%) and the mean styrene elimination capacity was 12 g m-3 h-1 (max. 30 g m-3 h-1). Efficient styrene degradation required addition of nutrients to the peat, adjustment of the pH to a neutral level and efficient control of the humidity. Maintenance of the water balance was easier in a down-flow than in an up-flow process, the former consequently resulting in much better filtration efficiency. The optimum operation temperature was around 23 degrees C, but the styrene removal was still satisfactory at 12 degrees C. Seven different bacterial isolates belonging to the genera Tsukamurella, Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas, Xanthomonas and an unidentified genus in the gamma group of the Proteobacteria isolated from the microflora of active peat filter material were capable of styrene degradation. The isolates differed in their capacity to decompose styrene to carbon dioxide and assimilate it to biomass. No toxic intermediate degradation products of styrene were detected in the filter outlet gas or in growing cultures of isolated bacteria. The use of these isolates in industrial biofilters is beneficial at low styrene concentrations and is safe from both the environmental and public health points of view.

  18. Corrosivity of hot flue gases in the fluidized bed combustion of recovered waste wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enestam, S.

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, recovered waste wood has become a fuel of interest due to its green energy benefits and low price compared to virgin wood-based fuels. However, waste wood is often contaminated with paint, plastic, and metal components, producing concentrations of heavy metals such as zinc and lead, chlorine, sodium, and sometimes sulphur that are elevated relative to those in virgin wood. In several cases, boilers burning waste wood have experienced increased fouling and corrosion of furnace walls, superheaters, and economizers, problems associated with chlorine, zinc, lead, and alkali metals in the deposits. The location of the deposits and the corrosion as well as the composition of the deposits vary with the fuel composition, boiler design, combustion parameters, flue gas temperature, and material temperature. Experience gained from the operation of biofuel and waste boilers shows that corrosion damage can be reduced, or even avoided, by the selection of optimum materials or for heat exchanger surfaces, by the use of fuel mixtures or additives that decrease the corrosivity of the combustion environment, by the placement of superheaters in a less corrosive environment, and by adjusting the steam parameters. Finding the right solutions for boilers burning RWW requires a thorough understanding of the whole process, including the fuel fed into the boiler, the combustion atmosphere, the corrosivity of the flue gas and the deposits, and the corrosion resistance of different boiler materials under the prevailing conditions. The objective of this work was to shed more light on the combustion environment in bubbling fluidized bed boilers burning RWW and thus increase knowledge about the corrosivity of zinc- and lead-rich deposits formed during the combustion of RWW, with the final goal of developing a corrosion prediction tool for use in the design of boilers for RWW combustion. With such a tool, it would be possible to optimize boiler design and material selection with

  19. Analysis of small cyclones efficiency for primary treatment of incineration gases of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halasz, M.R.T.; Massarani, G.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop an efficient gas treatment system, especially small diameter cyclones. The high efficiency justifies the interest in the application in radioactive wastes incinerators because it reduces the amount of radioactive ashes of other gas cleaning steps. The first stage of this work is to establish some promising configurations of high efficiency cyclones through modeling (neural networks). After construction of the equipment , the operation conditions of each small diameter cyclone were obtained and the viability of adaptation of a Post-cyclone (PoC) was also evaluated to increase the efficiency. The results show the effectiveness of the small diameter cyclone PoC set. The efficiency in optimized conditions can be higher than 98% for fine materials (D 50 s = 3,5 g/cm 3 ). (author)

  20. Demonstration of high temperature thermoelectric waste heat recovery from exhaust gases of a combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trottmann, Matthias; Weidenkaff, Anke; Populoh, Sascha; Brunko, Oliver; Veziridis, Angelika; Bach, Christian; Cabalzar, Urs [Empa, Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    The energy efficiency of passenger cars becomes increasingly important due to a growing awareness in terms of climate change and shortages of resources associated with rising fuel prices. In addition to the efforts towards the optimization of the engine's internal efficiency, waste heat recovery is the main objective. In this respect, thermoelectric (TE) devices seem to be suited as heat recuperation systems. Thermoelectric generators allow for direct transformation of thermal into electrical energy. In order to thoroughly investigate this type of recovery system a TE demonstrator was mounted on the muffler of a VW Touran and tested. The waste heat of the exhaust gas was converted into electricity with a conversion rate of {proportional_to}. 3.5%. The limiting factor was the low thermal stability of the commercial modules used in this pre-study to elaborate reference values. Thermoelectric modules based on sustainable and temperature-stable materials are being developed to improve the measured values. A thermoelectric test generator with perovskite-type oxide modules was constructed confirm the function and stability at elevated temperatures. Despite all the advantages of this material class, the TE performance is still to be improved. A quantitative measure of a material's TE performance is the temperature-independent Figure of Merit ZT. ZT increases with decreasing thermal and increasing electrical conductivity. An approach to thermal conductivity reduction is nanostructuring of the material. The Ultrasonic Spray Combustion (USC) technique allows to produce powders with a grain size on the nanoscale and was tested in this study. (orig.)

  1. Removal potential of toxic 2378-substituted PCDD/F from incinerator flue gases by waste-derived activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajizadeh, Yaghoub; Onwudili, Jude A; Williams, Paul T

    2011-06-01

    The application of activated carbons has become a commonly used emission control protocol for the removal or adsorption of persistent organic pollutants from the flue gas streams of waste incinerators. In this study, the 2378-substituted PCDD/F removal efficiency of three types of activated carbons derived from the pyrolysis of refuse derived fuel, textile waste and scrap tyre was investigated and compared with that of a commercial carbon. Experiments were carried out in a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor under a simulated flue gas at 275°C with a reaction period of four days. The PCDD/F in the solid matrices and exhaust gas, were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. In the absence of activated carbon adsorbent, there was a significant increase in the concentration of toxic PCDD/F produced in the reacted flyash, reaching up to 6.6 times higher than in the raw flyash. In addition, there was a substantial release of PCDD/F into the gas phase, which was found in the flue gas trapping system. By application of the different commercial, refuse derived fuel, textile and tyre activated carbons the total PCDD/F toxic equivalent removal efficiencies in the exhaust gas stream were 58%, 57%, 64% and 52%, respectively. In general, the removal of the PCDDs was much higher with an average of 85% compared to PCDFs at 41%. Analysis of the reacted activated carbons showed that there was some formation of PCDD/F, for instance, a total of 60.6 μg I-TEQ kg(-1) toxic PCDD/F was formed in the refuse derived fuel activated carbon compared to 34 μg I-TEQ kg(-1) in the commercial activated carbon. The activated carbons derived from the pyrolysis of waste, therefore, showed good potential as a control material for PCDD/F emissions in waste incinerator flue gases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic variations of natural gases in the southeast Columbus basin offshore southeastern Trinidad, West Indies - clues to origin and maturity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norville, Giselle A.; Dawe, Richard A.

    2007-01-01

    Natural gas can have two distinct origins, biogenic and thermogenic sources. This paper investigates the types and maturities of natural gas present in the SE Columbus basin, offshore Trinidad. The chemical composition and the isotope ratios of C and H were determined for approximately 100 samples of natural gas from eight areas within the SE Columbus basin. These compositions and isotopic data are interpreted to identify the origins of gas (biogenic, thermogenic) and maturity. The data showed that the gases in the SE Columbus basin are of both biogenic and thermogenic origin with a trend of mainly thermogenic to mixed to biogenic when moving from SW to NE across the basin. This trend suggests differential burial of the source rock. The presence of mixed gas indicates there was migration of gas in the basin resulting in deeper thermogenic gas mixing with shallow biogenic gas

  3. The comparison of fossil carbon fraction and greenhouse gas emissions through an analysis of exhaust gases from urban solid waste incineration facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungjin; Kang, Seongmin; Lee, Jeongwoo; Lee, Seehyung; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Jeon, Eui-Chan

    2016-10-01

    In this study, in order to understand accurate calculation of greenhouse gas emissions of urban solid waste incineration facilities, which are major waste incineration facilities, and problems likely to occur at this time, emissions were calculated by classifying calculation methods into 3 types. For the comparison of calculation methods, the waste characteristics ratio, dry substance content by waste characteristics, carbon content in dry substance, and (12)C content were analyzed; and in particular, CO2 concentration in incineration gases and (12)C content were analyzed together. In this study, 3 types of calculation methods were made through the assay value, and by using each calculation method, emissions of urban solid waste incineration facilities were calculated then compared. As a result of comparison, with Calculation Method A, which used the default value as presented in the IPCC guidelines, greenhouse gas emissions were calculated for the urban solid waste incineration facilities A and B at 244.43 ton CO2/day and 322.09 ton CO2/day, respectively. Hence, it showed a lot of difference from Calculation Methods B and C, which used the assay value of this study. It is determined that this was because the default value as presented in IPCC, as the world average value, could not reflect the characteristics of urban solid waste incineration facilities. Calculation Method B indicated 163.31 ton CO2/day and 230.34 ton CO2/day respectively for the urban solid waste incineration facilities A and B; also, Calculation Method C indicated 151.79 ton CO2/day and 218.99 ton CO2/day, respectively. This study intends to compare greenhouse gas emissions calculated using (12)C content default value provided by the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) with greenhouse gas emissions calculated using (12)C content and waste assay value that can reflect the characteristics of the target urban solid waste incineration facilities. Also, the concentration and (12)C content

  4. Analysis of potential for reducing emissions of greenhouse gases in municipal solid waste in Brazil, in the state and city of Rio de Janeiro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loureiro, S.M.; Rovere, E.L.L.; Mahler, C.F.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We constructed future scenarios of emissions of greenhouse gases in waste. ► Was used the IPCC methodology for calculating emission inventories. ► We calculated the costs of abatement for emissions reduction in landfill waste. ► The results were compared to Brazil, state and city of Rio de Janeiro. ► The higher the environmental passive, the greater the possibility of use of biogas. - Abstract: This paper examines potential changes in solid waste policies for the reduction in GHG for the country of Brazil and one of its major states and cities, Rio de Janeiro, from 2005 to 2030. To examine these policy options, trends in solid waste quantities and associated GHG emissions are derived. Three alternative policy scenarios are evaluated in terms of effectiveness, technology, and economics and conclusions posited regarding optimal strategies for Brazil to implement. These scenarios are been building on the guidelines for national inventories of GHG emissions (IPCC, 2006) and adapted to Brazilian states and municipalities’ boundaries. Based on the results, it is possible to say that the potential revenue from products of solid waste management is more than sufficient to transform the current scenario in this country into one of financial and environmental gains, where the negative impacts of climate change have created a huge opportunity to expand infrastructure for waste management

  5. Gases in molten salts

    CERN Document Server

    Tomkins, RPT

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains tabulated collections and critical evaluations of original data for the solubility of gases in molten salts, gathered from chemical literature through to the end of 1989. Within the volume, material is arranged according to the individual gas. The gases include hydrogen halides, inert gases, oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, water vapor and halogens. The molten salts consist of single salts, binary mixtures and multicomponent systems. Included also, is a special section on the solubility of gases in molten silicate systems, focussing on slags and fluxes.

  6. Partitioning and recovery of neptunium from high level waste streams of PUREX origin using 30% TBP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, J.N.; Murali, M.S.; Balarama Krishna, M.V.; Iyer, R.H.; Chitnis, R.R.; Wattal, P.K.; Theyyunni, T.K.; Ramanujam, A.; Dhami, P.S.; Gopalakrishnan, V.

    1995-01-01

    237 Np is one of the longest-lived nuclides among the actinides present in the high level waste solutions of reprocessing origin. Its separation, recovery and transmutation can reduce the problem of long term storage of the vitrified waste to a great extent. With this objective, the present work was initiated to study the extraction of neptunium into TBP under the conditions relevant to high level waste, along with uranium and plutonium by oxidising it to hexavalent state using potassium dichromate and subsequently recovering it by selective stripping. Three types of simulated HLW solutions namely sulphate bearing (SB), with an acidity of ∼ 0.3 M and non-sulphate wastes originating from the reprocessing of fuels from pressurised heavy water reactor (PHWR) and fast breeder reactor (FBR) with acidities of 3.0 M HNO 3 were employed in these studies. The extraction of U(VI), Np(VI) and Pu(VI) was very high for PHWR- and FBR-HLW solutions, whereas for the SB-HLW solution, these values were less but reasonably high. Quantitative recovery of neptunium and plutonium was achieved using a stripping solution containing 0.1 M H 2 O 2 and 0.01 M ascorbic acid at an acidity of 2.0 M. Since, cerium present in the waste solutions is expected to undergo oxidation in presence of K 2 Cr 2 O 7 , its extraction behaviour was also studied under similar conditions. Based on the results, a scheme was formulated for the recovery of neptunium along with plutonium and was successfully applied to actual high level waste solution originating from the reprocessing of research reactor fuels. (author). 19 refs., 2 figs., 17 tabs

  7. Method for rendering harmless sulfur dioxide-carrying gases and sulfur-carrying waste water from pyrolysis of oil shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aspegren, O E.A.; Eklund, A J

    1951-03-15

    A method is described for rendering harmless sulfur dioxide-carrying gases, which are formed in processes for the manufacture of solid, liquid, or gaseous products by pyrolysis of oil shale, and thereby to extract valuable products, characterized in that the sulfur dioxide-carrying gases are washed with a solution or sludge obtained by leaching wholly or partly burned-out residues from the pyrolysis.

  8. Comparison of waste anesthetic gases in operating rooms with or without an scavenging system in a Brazilian University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Gobbo Braz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Occupational exposure to waste anesthetic gases in operating room without active scavenging system has been associated with adverse health effects. Thus, this study aimed to compare the trace concentrations of the inhalational anesthetics isoflurane and sevoflurane in operating room with and without central scavenging system. Method: Waste concentrations of isoflurane and sevoflurane were measured by infrared analyzer at different locations (near the respiratory area of the assistant nurse and anesthesiologist and near the anesthesia station and at two times (30 and 120 min after the start of surgery in both operating room types. Results: All isoflurane and sevoflurane concentrations in unscavenged operating room were higher than the US recommended limit (2 parts per million, regardless of the location and time evaluated. In scavenged operating room, the average concentrations of isoflurane were within the limit of exposure, except for the measurements near the anesthesia station, regardless of the measurement times. For sevoflurane, concentrations exceeded the limit value at all measurement locations and at both times. Conclusions: The exposure to both anesthetics exceeded the international limit in unscavenged operating room. In scavenged operating room, the concentrations of sevoflurane, and to a lesser extent those of isoflurane, exceeded the recommended limit value. Thus, the operating room scavenging system analyzed in the present study decreased the anesthetic concentrations, although not to the internationally recommended values. Resumo: Justificativa e objetivos: A exposição ocupacional aos resíduos de gases anestésicos em salas de operação (SO sem sistema ativo de exaustão tem sido associada a efeitos adversos à saúde. Assim, o objetivo do estudo foi comparar os resíduos dos anestésicos inalatórios isoflurano e sevoflurano em SO com e sem sistema de exaustão. Método: Concentrações residuais

  9. LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE AND RECYCLABLE ORIGIN OF HOUSEHOLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Raquel da Silva Sottoriva

    2011-09-01

    environment. Studies have shown that household waste in Parana rose by 89% between 1990 and 2005, the emission of greenhouse gases (GHG emissions, ranging from 42 to 79.64 GgCH4 GgCH4. The increase was attributed to the population growth and the disposal of waste to dumps and landfills. Of the total waste, 60% would be likely to compost and 20% being recycled. It is concluded that the problem of solid, recycling and disposal waste must be analyzed from the choice of raw material, production process and product, as well as waste, effluents and emissions generated.

  10. Low-level radioactive waste disposal operations worldwide, with special reference to organic compounds in leachates and gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rushbrook, P.E.; McGahan, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes are defined and ground disposal practices worldwide are discussed. The organic content of low-level wastes is tabulated and the organic composition of leachates and gaseous emissions from low-level wastes in the U.K. and U.S.A. are discussed. The radionuclide content of these leachates is tabulated. (U.K.)

  11. Characterization of off-gases from a small-scale, joule-heated ceramic melter for nuclear waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woolsey, G.B.; Wilhite, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper confirmed with actual nuclear waste the thermodynamic predictions of the fate of some of the semivolatiles in off-gas. Ruthenium behaves erratically and it is postulated that it migrates as a finely divided solid, rather than as a volatile oxide. Provisions for handling these waste off-gasses will be incorporated in the design of facilities for vitrifying SRP waste

  12. Energy use and recovery in waste management and implications for accounting of greenhouse gases and global warming contributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Thilde; Astrup, Thomas; Ekvall, T.

    2009-01-01

    The energy system plays an essential role in accounting of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from waste management systems and waste technologies. This paper focuses on energy use and energy recovery in waste management and outlines how these aspects should be addressed consistently in a GHG perspec...

  13. Noble Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podosek, F. A.

    2003-12-01

    Earth and the rest of the inner solar were made by collecting the solids, to the rather efficient exclusion of the gases. In this grand separation the noble gases, because they are noble, were partitioned strongly into the gas phase. The resultant generalization is that the noble gases are very scarce in the materials of the inner solar system, whence their common synonym "rare gases."This scarcity is probably the most important single feature to remember about noble-gas cosmochemistry. As illustration of the absolute quantities, for example, a meteorite that contains xenon at a concentration of order 10 -10 cm3STP g -1 (4×10-15 mol g-1) would be considered relatively rich in xenon. Yet this is only 0.6 ppt (part per trillion, fractional abundance 10-12) by mass. In most circumstances, an element would be considered efficiently excluded from some sample if its abundance, relative to cosmic proportions to some convenient reference element, were depleted by "several" orders of magnitude. But a noble gas would be considered to be present in quite high concentration if it were depleted by only four or five orders of magnitude (in the example above, 10-10 cm3STP g-1 of xenon corresponds to depletion by seven orders of magnitude), and one not uncommonly encounters noble-gas depletion of more than 10 orders of magnitude.The second most important feature to note about noble-gas cosmochemistry is that while a good deal of the attention given to noble gases really is about chemistry, traditionally a good deal of attention is also devoted to nuclear phenomena, much more so than for most other elements. This feature is a corollary of the first feature noted above, namely scarcity. A variety of nuclear transmutation processes - decay of natural radionuclides and energetic particle reactions - lead to the production of new nuclei that are often new elements. Most commonly, the quantity of new nuclei originating in nuclear transmutation is very small compared to the quantity already

  14. Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovard, Pierre

    The origin of the wastes (power stations, reprocessing, fission products) is determined and the control ensuring the innocuity with respect to man, public acceptance, availability, economics and cost are examined [fr

  15. Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Production of Hydrogen Use of Hydrogen Greenhouse Gases Basics | | Did you know? Without naturally occurring greenhouse gases, the earth would be too cold to support life as we know it. Without the greenhouse effect, ...

  16. Biodegradation of chlorinated unsaturated hydrocarbons in relation to biological waste-gas treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmans, S.

    1993-01-01

    The original goal of the research described in this thesis was to develop a biological process for the removal of vinyl chloride from waste gases. The gaseous and carcinogenic vinyl chloride is used to produce the plastic polyvinyl chloride (PVC). During this production process waste gases

  17. Self-Flammability of Gases Generated by Hanford Tank Waste and the Potential of Nitrogen Inerting to Eliminate Flammability Safety Concerns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-12

    Through radiolytic and thermolytic reactions, Hanford tank wastes generate and retain a variety of gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, methane (and other hydrocarbons), ammonia, and nitrogen. This gas generation can be expected to continue during processing in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The generation rates in the WTP will change from those for the in-situ tank waste because of different process temperatures, different dose rates produced by in-process changes in the proportions of solid and liquid, and dilution of the waste liquid. The flammability of the generated gas that is continuously released, and of any retained gas that might be released into a vessel headspace in quantity due to a spontaneous release, depends on the concentrations not only of the fuel gases—primarily hydrogen (H2), methane, other hydrocarbons, and ammonia—but of the oxidizer nitrous oxide (N2O). As a result of high concentrations of N2O, some gas mixtures are “self-flammable” (i.e., ignition can occur when no air is present because N2O provides the only oxidizer needed). Self-flammability could potentially reduce the effectiveness of using a nitrogen (N2) purge in the headspace as a flammability control, if its effects are not accounted for. A given amount of inertant gas (N2) can accommodate only a certain amount of a generated self-flammable gas before the mixture with inertant gas becomes flammable.

  18. Treatment options of low level liquid waste of ETP origin by synthetic zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, I.J.; Jain, Savita; Sathi Sasidharan, N.; Deshingkar, D.S.

    2001-08-01

    Mixture of synthetic zeolites, AR1, 4A and 13X of Indian origin were tested in a single fixed bed column operation for the treatment of low level liquid waste received at Effluents Treatment Plant (ETP) Trombay, under dynamic conditions. The mixed bed of zeolites was highly effective in decontaminating thousands of bed volumes of waste stream from radio cesium, radio strontium and gross beta gamma activity. High volume reduction factors, upwards of 10,000 are available in this process compared to less than 100 available with chemical precipitation process, currently followed. Containment of entrapped activity in zeolite bed was studied by solidifying them in Portland cement matrix as stable waste form. Incorporation of minerals like vermiculite as minor additive for improving the leaching characteristics of the final waste form was evaluated. Zeolite incorporated cement blocks were subjected to leach tests in distilled water for over 200 days to assess the incremental and cumulative leach rates of individual activity components. Leachability index of radio cesium and strontium were computed, which indicated the suitability of the matrix for safe shallow land burial. (author)

  19. The waste originating from nuclear energy peaceful applications and its management; Os rejeitos provenientes de aplicacoes pacificas da energia nuclear e o seu gerenciamento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Jair Albo Marques de [E-mail: jairalbo at ax.apc.org (Brazil)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    This work presents the waste originating from nuclear energy and its management. It approaches the following main topics: nature and classification of the wastes; security requirements to the waste management; state of the art related to the wastes derivates of the uses of the nuclear energy; wastes in the fuel cycle; wastes of the industrial, medical and research and development applications; costs of the waste management.

  20. Process for cleaning waste gases of a reprocessing plant for irradiated nuclear fuels and device to carry out the process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrich, E.; Leuchtmann, D.; Weinlaender, W.

    1983-01-01

    The dissolver and shears waste gas consists mainly of inert transport gas with aerosols, NO x , I, ruthenium tetroxide and tritiated steam. THE AEROSOL SEPARATION x recombination and iodine absorption is done in a floor column with nitric acid as the washing liquid. Due to the nitrogen oxide washing, waste gas free of iodine and ruthenium tetroxide is formed. The further treatment of the iodine therefore does not have to take place in the flow of waste gas, but can be carried out in a shunt flow. (DG) [de

  1. Gases in uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.J.; Pacer, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    Interest continues to grow in the use of helium and radon detection as a uranium exploration tool because, in many instances, these radiogenic gases are the only indicators of deeply buried mineralization. The origin of these gases, their migration in the ground, the type of samples and measurement techniques are discussed. Case histories of comparative tests conducted on known uranium deposits at three geologically diverse sites in the United States of America are also presented. (author)

  2. Electronegative gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.

    1981-01-01

    Recent knowledge on electronegative gases essential for the effective control of the number densities of free electrons in electrically stressed gases is highlighted. This knowledge aided the discovery of new gas dielectrics and the tailoring of gas dielectric mixtures. The role of electron attachment in the choice of unitary gas dielectrics or electronegative components in dielectric gas mixtures, and the role of electron scattering at low energies in the choice of buffer gases for such mixtures is outlined

  3. Origin and Processes Highlighted By Noble Gases Geochemistry of Submarine Gas Emissions from Seeps at the Aquitaine Shelf (Bay of Biscay):

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battani, A.; Ruffine, L.; Donval, J. P.; Bignon, L.; Pujol, M.; Levaché, D.

    2014-12-01

    Noble gases are widely used as tracers to both determine fluid origin and identify transfer processes governing fluid flow in natural systems. This work presents the preliminary results and interpretations from submarine gas samples collected during the GAZCOGNE2 cruise (2013). The seepage activity and the spatial distribution of the widespread emission sites encountered at this area are described by (Dupré et al. 2014). Gas composition shows that methane is the dominant species compared to the C2+. The associated δ13C and δD signatures point to a biogenic origin- through CO2 reduction- of the gas. Helium concentrations are very low, ranging from 0.1 and 2.3 ppm, indicating a low residence time of the fluids in the subsurface. However, the resulting helium isotopic ratios are mostly crustal fingerprinted (around 0.02). The R/Ra values sometimes exhibit higher value of 0.2, indicative either an ASW (air saturated water) value, or the fingerprint of ancient mantle helium, the later in agreement with the geological structural context of the Parentis Basin. Most of the samples exhibit a mixing between ASW and air, probably by excess air addition to the initial ASW concentration. The elemental Ne/Ar ratio is remarkably constant for the totality of the samples, with a value typical of ASW (0.2). This result implies that the migrating gas phase is "stripping" the original water matrix from its noble gas content, as described by Gillfillian et al., 2008. This further indicates that an intermediate reservoir of biogenic gas should be present at depth. The GAZCOGNE study is co-funded by TOTAL and IFREMER as part of the PAMELA (Passive Margin Exploration Laboratories) scientific project. References: Dupré, S., L. Berger, N. Le Bouffant, C. Scalabrin, and J. F. Bourillet (2014), Fluid emissions at the Aquitaine Shelf (Bay of Biscay, France): a biogenic origin or the expression of hydrocarbon leakage?, Continental Shelf Research, doi:10.1016/j.csr.2014.07.004. Gilfillan S

  4. Determination of permeability to gases of concrete used as repository for radioactive wastes; Determinacao da permeabilidade a gas em concreto usado em repositorios para rejeitos radioativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, Eloisa Tamie

    1994-12-31

    Concrete is widely used in final radioactive waste repository construction and must have well defined characteristics. The permeability is a property that allows to evaluate the durability of concrete which guarantee the protection of the surroundings. Durable concretes have low permeability which reduces liquids intrusion into the repository and decreases the probability of leaching of soluble radioactive compounds and gases escapes to the human habitat. This work includes: the construction of a camera to measure the permeability coefficient of hydraulic products, by using gaseous nitrogen as a permeation fluid; determination of characteristics of material used in concrete compositions; and tests in concretes with different compositions in which ordinary Portland cement and blast-furnace cement were used. (author). 61 refs., 33 figs., 16 tabs.

  5. Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also produced by human activities. Some, such as industrial gases, are exclusively human made. What are the types ... Carbon dioxide (CO2) Methane (CH4) Nitrous oxide (N2O) Industrial gases: Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6 Nitrogen ...

  6. 40 CFR 60.52b - Standards for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Large Municipal Waste Combustors for Which Construction is Commenced... section. (i) For affected facilities that commenced construction, modification, or reconstruction after September 20, 1994, and on or before December 19, 2005, the emission limit is 24 milligrams per dry standard...

  7. Levels of brominated diphenylether, dibenzo-P-dioxin, and dibenzofuran in flue gases of a municipal waste combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to the extensive use of brominated flame retardants (BFRs), including brominated diphenylether (BDE) formulations, for various domestic and industrial applications, the presence of brominated chemicals in the waste stream is to be expected for decades. As much as 40% to 50% o...

  8. Global emissions of trace gases, particulate matter, and hazardous air pollutants from open burning of domestic waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    The open burning of waste, whether at individual residences, businesses, or dump sites, is a large source of air pollutants. These emissions, however, are not included in many current emission inventories used in chemistry and climate modeling applications. This paper presents th...

  9. Origin of natural waters and gases within the Upper Carboniferous coal-bearing and autochthonous Miocene strata in South-Western part of the Upper Silesian Coal Basin, Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotarba, Maciej J.; Pluta, Irena

    2009-01-01

    The molecular and stable isotope compositions of coalbed gases from the Upper Carboniferous strata and natural gases accumulated within the autochthonous Upper Miocene Skawina Formation of the Debowiec-Simoradz gas deposit were determined, as well as the chemical and stable isotope compositions of waters from the Skawina Formation and waters at the top of the Upper Carboniferous strata of the Kaczyce Ridge (the abandoned 'Morcinek' coal mine) in the South-Western part of the Upper Silesian Coal Basin. Two genetic types of natural gases within the Upper Carboniferous coal-bearing strata were identified: thermogenic (CH 4 , small amounts of higher gaseous hydrocarbons, and CO 2 ) and microbial (CH 4 , very small amounts of ethane, and CO 2 ). Thermogenic gases were generated during the bituminous stage of coalification and completed at the end of the Variscan orogeny. Degassing (desorption) of thermogenic gases began at the end of late Carboniferous until the late Miocene time-period and extended to the present-day. This process took place in the Upper Carboniferous strata up to a depth of about 550 m under the sealing Upper Miocene cover. A primary accumulation zone of indigenous, thermogenic gases is present below the degassing zone. Up to 200 m depth from the top of the Upper Carboniferous strata, within the weathered complex, an accumulation zone of secondary, microbial gas occurs. Waters within these strata are mainly of meteoric origin of the infiltration period just before the last sea transgression in the late Miocene and partly of marine origin having migrated from the Upper Miocene strata. Then, both methanogenic archaebacteria and their nutrients were transported by meteoric water into the near-surface Carboniferous strata where the generated microbial CH 4 saturated coal seams. Waters within the Miocene strata of the Debowiec-Simoradz and Zablocie are of marine origin, and natural gases accumulated within autochthonous Miocene strata of the Debowiec

  10. Emission of greenhouse gases from home aerobic composting, anaerobic digestion and vermicomposting of household wastes in Brisbane (Australia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yiu C; Sinha, Rajiv K; Weijin Wang

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from three different home waste treatment methods in Brisbane, Australia. Gas samples were taken monthly from 34 backyard composting bins from January to April 2009. Averaged over the study period, the aerobic composting bins released lower amounts of CH(4) (2.2 mg m(- 2) h(-1)) than the anaerobic digestion bins (9.5 mg m(-2) h(-1)) and the vermicomposting bins (4.8 mg m(-2) h( -1)). The vermicomposting bins had lower N(2)O emission rates (1.2 mg m(-2) h(- 1)) than the others (1.5-1.6 mg m(-2) h( -1)). Total GHG emissions including both N(2)O and CH(4) were 463, 504 and 694 mg CO(2)-e m(- 2) h(-1) for vermicomposting, aerobic composting and anaerobic digestion, respectively, with N(2)O contributing >80% in the total budget. The GHG emissions varied substantially with time and were regulated by temperature, moisture content and the waste properties, indicating the potential to mitigate GHG emission through proper management of the composting systems. In comparison with other mainstream municipal waste management options including centralized composting and anaerobic digestion facilities, landfilling and incineration, home composting has the potential to reduce GHG emissions through both lower on-site emissions and the minimal need for transportation and processing. On account of the lower cost, the present results suggest that home composting provides an effective and feasible supplementary waste management method to a centralized facility in particular for cities with lower population density such as the Australian cities.

  11. Characterization of Discharge Areas of Radionuclides Originating From Nuclear Waste Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, L.; Xu, S.; Worman, A.

    2009-05-01

    significant amounts of radionuclides are limited. To limit the radiological dose assessment, analyses should be focused to and more detailed in such landscape areas in which doses are expected to be high. Due to the similarities among deep groundwater discharge areas, one can make site-specific analyses of those areas, which have a broad applicability for migration of radionuclides originating from a nuclear waste repository.

  12. Natural radionuclides in coal and waste material originating from coal fired power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marovic, Gordana; Franic, Zdenko; Sencar, Jasminka; Petrinec, Branko; Bituh, Tomislav; Kovac, Jadranka

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents long-term investigations of natural radioactivity in coal, used for power production in the coal-fired power plant (CFPP) situated on the Adriatic coast, and resulting slag and ash. Activity concentrations of 40 K, 232 Th, 226 Ra and 238 U in used coal and resulting waste material have been measured for 25 years. As expected, it was demonstrated that the content of radionuclides in deposited bottom and filter ash material are closely related with radionuclide activity concentrations and mineral matter fraction in used coals. The external hazard index has been calculated and discussed for the slag and ash depository. During the first decade of operation of the CFPP has been used domestic coal produced in nearby area characterized by higher background radiation compared with the rest of Croatia. Therefore, the coal itself had relatively high 226 Ra and 238 U activity concentrations while potassium and thorium content was very low, 40 K activity concentrations being 2-9% and those of 232 Th 1-3% of total activity. As, in addition, the sulphur concentrations in coal were very high use of domestic coal was gradually abandoned till it was completely substituted by imported coal originated from various sources and of low natural radioactivity. Upon this, activity concentrations of uranium series radionuclides in deposited waste materials decreased significantly. Consequently, waste material i.e., slag and ash, generated in the last several years of coal fired power plant operation could be readily used in cement industry and as additive to other building materials, without any special restrictions according to the Croatian regulations dealing with building materials and European directives. (author)

  13. Characterisation of discharge areas of radionuclides originating from nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklund, L.; Woerman, A.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we investigate if there are certain landscape elements that will generally act as discharge areas for radio-nuclides leaking from a subsurface deposit of nuclear waste. We also characterize the typical properties that distinguish these areas from others. Understanding the processes controlling the clustering of discharge to certain areas is an additional topic of study. Landscape topography is the most important driving force for groundwater flow. Because groundwater is the main transporting agent for migrating radio-nuclides, the topography will determine the flow paths of leaking radionuclides. How topography and heterogeneities in the subsurface affect the discharge distribution of the radionuclides is the main scope of this study. An analytical and a numerical model are used. Conclusions are: Our results suggest that the varieties of landscape elements which have potential for receiving significant amounts of radio-nuclides are limited. To save recourses, the surficial radiological assessments should therefore be focused in these areas. Furthermore, the discharge areas of groundwater from repository depth have defining characteristics that distinguish them from discharge areas of shallower groundwater flow cells. Due to the similarities within deep groundwater discharge areas, one can make site-specific analyses of those areas, which have a broad applicability for migration of radio-nuclides originating from a nuclear waste repository (author)(tk)

  14. Origin,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur de Vargas Giorgi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This essay tightens the “origin” concept, its manifestation through puzzles and their relationship to techniques of reproduction. Contrary to the hegemonic critique of aesthetic and cultural objects – critique that, settled on the appearance and notions of identity, tradition, canon, etc., undervalues the reproductions of "originals" –, the aim is to deliver these objects from formal hierarchization dispositives, that is, release them of what is ideal and positively imposed, so that the reproducibility is potentiated as producer of singularities, of apparitions. The effort is to keep the undecided character of puzzles (bodies, texts, images in which the origin is manifest, so that the logic of the spectacle is reverted into sense opening, instance in which the aesthetic becomes a “performance” before contemporary complexity. With the reproducibility, an origin survives in passage: continually restored, but incomplete, present in trace, in absence.

  15. Irritant gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenbelt, J

    Acute inhalation injury can result from the use of household cleaning agents (e.g. chlorine, ammonia), industrial or combustion gases (e.g. sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides) or bioterrorism. The severity of the injury is to a great extent determined by the circumstances of exposure. If exposure was

  16. Evaluation of the potentialities to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions resulting from various treatments of municipal solid wastes (MSW) in moist tropical climates: application to Yaounde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngnikam, Emmanuel; Tanawa, Emile; Rousseaux, Patrick; Riedacker, Arthur; Gourdon, Rémy

    2002-12-01

    The authors here analyse the emission of greenhouse gases (GHG) resulting from the various treatment of municipal solid waste found in the town of Yaounde. Four management systems have been taken as the basis for analyses. System 1 is the traditional collection and landfill disposal, while in system 2 the hiogas produced in the landfill is recuperated to produce electricity. In systems 3 and 4, in addition to the collection, we have introduced a centralised composting or biogas plant before the landfilling disposal of refuse. A Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) of the four systems was made; this enable us to quantify the flux of matter and of energy, consumed or produced by the systems. Following this, only the greenhouse effect was taken into account to evaluate the ecological consequences of the MSW management systems. The method used to evaluate this impact takes into consideration on the one hand, GHG emissions or avoided emission following the substitution of fuel with methane recovered from landfills or produced in the digesters, and on the other hand, sequestrated carbon in the soil following the regular deposit of compost. Landfilling without recuperation of methane is the most emitting solution for greenhouse gas: it leads to the emission of 1.7 ton of carbon dioxide equivalent (tCO2E) per ton of household waste. Composting and methanisation allow one to have a comparable level of emission reduction, either respectively 1.8 and 2 tCO2E/t of MSW. In order to reduce the emission of GHG in the waste management systems, it is advisable to avoid first of all the emissions of methane coming from the landfills. System 2 seems to be a solution that would reduce the emissions of GHG at low cost (2.2 to 4 $/tCO2E). System 2 is calculated as the most effective at the environmental and economic level in the context of Yaounde. Therefore traditional collection, landfill disposal and biogas recuperation to produce electricity is preferable in moist tropical climates.

  17. Origin, quantities produced and ways of conditioning of special wastes in regional collection points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neider, R.

    1983-01-01

    Radioactive substances to be collected at regional collecting points are mostly related to the radionuclides H-3, Ra-226 and Th-232. These special wastes form a particular group of wastes including such solid wastes which do not contain volatile radionuclides yet cannot, for other reasons, be conditioned in accordance with the old Asse qualifications. (orig./DG) [de

  18. Waste processing air cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriskovich, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    Waste processing and preparing waste to support waste processing relies heavily on ventilation. Ventilation is used at the Hanford Site on the waste storage tanks to provide confinement, cooling, and removal of flammable gases

  19. Industrial gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, D.; Jackson, D.; Coeyman, M.

    1993-01-01

    Industrial gas companies have fought hard to boost sales and hold margins in the tough economic climate, and investments are well down from their 1989-'91 peak. But 'our industry is still very strong long term' says Alain Joly, CEO of industry leader L'Air Liquide (AL). By 1994, if a European and Japanese recovery follows through on one in the U.S., 'we could see major [investment] commitments starting again,' he says. 'Noncryogenic production technology is lowering the cost of gas-making possible new applications, oxygen is getting plenty of attention in the environmental area, and hydrogen also fits into the environmental thrust,' says Bob Lovett, executive v.p./gases and equipment with Air Products ampersand Chemicals (AP). Through the 1990's, 'Industrial gases could grow even faster than in the past decade,' he says. Virtually a new generation of new gases applications should become reality by the mid-1990s, says John Campbell, of industry consultants J.R. Campbell ampersand Associates (Lexington, MA). Big new oxygen volumes will be required for powder coal injection in blast furnaces-boosting a steel mill's requirement as much as 40% and coal gasification/combined cycle (CGCC). Increased oil refinery hydroprocessing needs promise hydrogen requirements

  20. Safety analysis of the Chernobyl accident origin decontamination waste burials in Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skurat, V.V.; Shiryaeva, N.M.; Myshkina, N.K.; Gvozdev, A.A.; Serebryanyj, G.Z.; Golikova, N.B.

    2002-01-01

    Potential dangerous of the decontamination waste burials was estimated by means of the generalized multicompartmental model. Characteristics of 24 the most large and unfavorable decontamination waste burials are shown and an estimate of their safety is given. The burial effect zones were determined (100-300 m). A reliability of the forecasting estimate of potential dangerous radioactive contamination of ground waters near the burials was checked on example of the Dudichi decontamination waste burial

  1. Generation and release of radioactive gases in LLW disposal facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, M.S. [Harvard School Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Simonson, S.A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The atmospheric release of radioactive gases from a generic engineered LLW disposal facility and its radiological impacts were examined. To quantify the generation of radioactive gases, detailed characterization of source inventory for carbon-14, tritium, iodine-129, krypton-85, and radon-222, was performed in terms of their activity concentrations; their distribution within different waste classes, waste forms and containers; and their subsequent availability for release in volatile or gaseous form. The generation of gases was investigated for the processes of microbial activity, radiolysis, and corrosion of waste containers and metallic components in wastes. The release of radionuclides within these gases to the atmosphere was analyzed under the influence of atmospheric pressure changes.

  2. Radioactive wastes: origin, classification and medium and long dated industrial management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavie, J.M.; Faussat, A.; Pradel, J.

    1982-01-01

    Virtually all the radioactive waste is produced by the fuel cycle, the remainder comes from radioelements used in industry, in medicine, teaching and research. They are classified into low, medium and high activity. The aim of the control is to ensure the protection of individuals and the public against radiological hazards and to safeguard the environment. The production, control, treatment and storage of mining wastes and those produced by the fuel cycle are examined [fr

  3. Origin and evolution of the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management programmatic environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strider, P.; Huizenga, D.

    1993-01-01

    Prior to November 1989, the diverse environmental restoration and waste management activities of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) were the responsibility of the various line organizations, which had the primary missions of weapons production, research, and related departmental activities. At that time, Secretary of Energy Admiral James Watkins saw the need to establish the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), which consolidated those activities under a single management structure

  4. Fuel gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    This paper gives a brief presentation of the context, perspectives of production, specificities, and the conditions required for the development of NGV (Natural Gas for Vehicle) and LPG-f (Liquefied Petroleum Gas fuel) alternative fuels. After an historical presentation of 80 years of LPG evolution in vehicle fuels, a first part describes the economical and environmental advantages of gaseous alternative fuels (cleaner combustion, longer engines life, reduced noise pollution, greater natural gas reserves, lower political-economical petroleum dependence..). The second part gives a comparative cost and environmental evaluation between the available alternative fuels: bio-fuels, electric power and fuel gases, taking into account the processes and constraints involved in the production of these fuels. (J.S.)

  5. A novel approach to scavenging anesthetic gases in rodent surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Jeffrey C; Krageschmidt, Dale A; Blanco, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory animal procedures using gas anesthetics may amass elevated waste gas concentrations in operating rooms if controls are not implemented for capturing and removing the vapors. Area sampling using an infrared analyzer indicated isoflurane concentrations likely to exceed occupational exposure guidelines. Our study showed environmental concentrations of oxygen as high as 40% and isoflurane concentrations >100 ppm when no controls or merely passive controls were utilized. These extraneous isoflurane emissions were determined to be originating from the pre-procedural induction process as well as the gas delivery nose cone. A novel waste gas collection cylinder was designed to enclose the gas delivery nose cone and animal head during the administration of anesthetic gases. The vented cylinder utilized a house vacuum to remove the waste anesthetic gases from the surgical field. A commercially available induction chamber designed to be actively and externally exhausted was used to lower concentrations during the induction process. With implementation of local exhaust ventilation controls, waste anesthetic gas concentrations decreased to below recommended occupational exposure levels. In vitro (sham) testing compared favorably to in vivo measurements validating the reduction capability of active ventilation during rodent anesthetic administration. In vivo isoflurane reductions for the induction chamber emissions, the operating room, and the surgeon's breathing zone were 95%, 60%, and 53%, respectively. The same measurements for an in vitro procedure were 98%, 84%, and 87%, respectively.

  6. Trace gases and other potential perturbations to global climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W.; Wuebbles, D.J.; Washington, W.M.; Isaacs, R.G.; Molnar, G.

    1986-01-01

    We review the various natural and anthropogenic factors that may affect the climate. The purpose is to summarize our understanding of these factors and their potential future climatic effects so that CO 2 -induced climate change can be viewed in a proper context. The factors we discuss include trace gases, anthropogenic and volcanic aerosols, variation of solar constant, change of surface characteristics, and releases of waste heat. We discuss the origins of the various natural and anthropogenic perturbations, the physical and chemical processes and their interactions, model sensitivity calculations, and model projections of their potential future climatic effects. The discussions center on trace gases because of their potentially large climatic effects. It appears that the increases of atmospheric trace gases of other kinds in addition to CO 2 could have important climatic effects. The model calculations suggest that the combined effect of these other trace gases, and the associated change of atmospheric ozone and water vapor distributions, could potentially warm the climate by an amount comparable in magnitude to the effect of doubling the CO 2 . Aerosols of anthropogenic origins may have substantial effects on regional climate, while the volcanic aerosols may have an effect on large-scale climate for up to a few years after injection. Changes of surface characteristics and releases of waste heat may also have substantial effects on the regional climate, but these effects are most likely to be small when compared with the effect of CO 2 increase. Changes of solar constant could have an effect on the global scale, but the time scale is much longer. There is much more that needs to be learned with regard to the above mentioned natural and anthropogenic factors that may affect the climate. A brief summary of those needs is presented

  7. Literature survey: methods for the removal of iodine species from off-gases and liquid waste streams of nuclear power and nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, with emphasis on solid sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holladay, D.W.

    1979-01-01

    Emphasis was focused on the operating parameters that most strongly affected the optimization of the processes used to treat actual process or feed streams which simulated actual compositions occurring at nuclear facilities. These parameters included gas superficial velocity, temperature, types of organic and inorganic contaminants, relative humidity, iodine feed-gas concentration, iodine species, column design (for both acid-scrub and solid sorbent-based processes), sorbent particle size, run time, intense radiation (solid sorbents only), and scrub-acid concentration. The most promising acid-scrub process for removal of iodine species from off-gases appears to be Iodox. The most promising solid sorbent for removal of iodine species from off-gases is the West German Ag-KTB--AgNO 3 -impregnated amorphous silicic acid. The tandem silver mordenite--lead mordenite sorbent system is also quite attractive. Only a limited number of processes have thus far been studied for removal of iodine species from low-level liquid waste streams. The most extensive successful operating experience has been obtained with anion exchange resins utilized at nuclear power reactors. Bench-scale engineering tests have indicated that the best process for removal of all types of iodine species from liquid waste streams may be treatment on a packed bed containing a mixture of sorbents with affinity for both elemental and anionic species of iodine. 154 references, 7 figures, 21 tables

  8. Putting NIMBY in perspective: The cultural origins of public response to hazardous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, P.H. III; Lilie, S.A.; Vittes, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    The study of public response to the siting of hazardous waste treatment facilities has found a natural home in the literature on localized reaction, the so-called NIMBY (not in my backyard) syndrome. This concern for dealing with NIMBY in practical terms has fallen short in two respects. First, NIMBY has become isolated from two other basic responses: generalized acceptance (open-quotes Yes, in my backyardclose quotes or YIMBY) and generated opposition (open-quotes Not in anybody's backyardclose quotes or NAMBY). Second, too narrow a focus on NIMBY neglects a potentially revealing explanatory analogy: the parallel between the controversy over hazardous waste facilities and other technical controversies, such as the decades-old debate over nuclear power. In this paper, we review three theories that have been developed to explain general attitudes toward risk-bearing technologies. Using data from a statewide random sample, we then look to see if variables that figure prominently in these theories help shape the NIMBY, YIMBY or NAMBY responses to hazardous waste facilities

  9. Pyrolysis and catalytic pyrolysis as a recycling method of waste CDs originating from polycarbonate and HIPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonakou, E.V. [Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kalogiannis, K.G.; Stephanidis, S.D. [Chemical Process Engineering Research Institute, 57001 Thermi, Thessaloniki (Greece); Triantafyllidis, K.S. [Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Chemical Process Engineering Research Institute, 57001 Thermi, Thessaloniki (Greece); Lappas, A.A. [Chemical Process Engineering Research Institute, 57001 Thermi, Thessaloniki (Greece); Achilias, D.S., E-mail: axilias@chem.auth.gr [Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Thermal and catalytic pyrolysis is a powerful method for recycling of WEEEs. • Liquid products obtained from the pyrolysis of PC or HIPS found in waste CDs are very different. • Mainly phenols are obtained from pyrolysis PC based wastes while aromatics from HIPS. • Use of MgO catalyst increases the amount of phenols from CD recycling compared to ZSM-5. • Use of MgO or ZSM-5 catalysts reduces the amount of styrene recovered from HIPS. - Abstract: Pyrolysis appears to be a promising recycling process since it could convert the disposed polymers to hydrocarbon based fuels or various useful chemicals. In the current study, two model polymers found in WEEEs, namely polycarbonate (PC) and high impact polystyrene (HIPS) and their counterparts found in waste commercial Compact Discs (CDs) were pyrolysed in a bench scale reactor. Both, thermal pyrolysis and pyrolysis in the presence of two catalytic materials (basic MgO and acidic ZSM-5 zeolite) was performed for all four types of polymers. Results have shown significant recovery of the monomers and valuable chemicals (phenols in the case of PC and aromatic hydrocarbons in the case of HIPS), while catalysts seem to decrease the selectivity towards the monomers and enhance the selectivity towards other desirable compounds.

  10. Application of banana peels waste as adsorbents for the removal of CO2, NO, NOx, and SO2 gases from motorcycle emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viena, V.; Elvitriana; Wardani, S.

    2018-03-01

    The aims of the study were to investigate the application of banana peels as adsorbent for the removal of CO, NO, NOx and SO2 gases from motorcycles emissions. The effect of differents thermal activation on the characteristics of banana peels adsorbent (BPA) such as moisture content, ash content, volatile matter and fixed carbon has been studied using proximate analysis. The study of Iodine adsorption capacity of BPA was obtained at 952 mg/g adsorbent. Structure and morphology of BPA were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that BPA could significantly adsorbed the CO and SO2 gases emissions from motorcycles, but not applicable for NO, NOx gases. After 10 minutes of flue gas analysis at idle mode using BPA adsorption tube, CO gas could be totally removed, from initial 19618 ppm to 0 ppm, while SO2 gas could also be totally removed from 24523 ppm to 0 ppm. SEM test showed that temperature of activation had significant effect on the size of pores of BPA formed. BPA was suitable for application in removing CO and SO2 gases emissions from motorcycles and it helps to reduce the green house gas effects of fossil fuel to the environment.

  11. Incineration/vitrification of radioactive wastes and combustion of pyrolysis gases in thermal plasmas; Incineration/vitrification de dechets radioactifs et combustion de gaz de pyrolyse en plasma d`arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girold, Ch. [CEA de la Vallee du Rhone, Departement de Retraitement des Dechets et du Demantelemnet, 30 - Marcoule (France)]|[Limoges Univ., 87 (France)

    1997-03-01

    Two thermal plasma processes used for incineration of radioactive technological wastes (cellulose, plastics, rubber...) have been investigated. First, the different types of radioactive wastes are presented, with a special attention to those which may benefit from a high temperature thermal treatment. The most significant thermal plasma processes, suitable for this goal, are described. Then, the author deals with the post-combustion, in an oxygen plasma jet reactor, of gases from burnable radioactive waste pyrolysis. An experimental planning method as been used to evaluate the combustion performances in the reactor, with a wide range of gas composition and running parameters such as oxygen excess and electrical power. The results of a modeling of kinetics, based on 116 chemicals reactions between 25 species, are compared with experimental values. Finally, an oxygen plasma reactor where the arc is transferred on a basalt melt is experimented. The efficiency of the combustion and the homogeneity of the glass are discussed. The volatility of some glass elements and tracers added to the wastes is also approached in two different ways: by post-trial material balance and by an optical emission spectroscopic method. The author built a diagnostic method that allows the following versus time of the metallic vapours above the melt. (author) 51 refs.

  12. Dissolved gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaton, T.H.E.

    1981-01-01

    The concentrations of gaseous nitrogen, argon, oxygen and helium dissolved in groundwater are often different from their concentrations in rain and surface waters. These differences reflect changes in the gas content occurring after rain or surface water, having infiltrated into the ground, become isolated from equilibrium contact with the atmosphere. A study of these changes can give insight into the origin and subsequent subsurface history of groundwater. Nitrogen and argon concentrations for many groundwaters in southern Africa indicate that excess air is added to water during infiltration. The amount of excess air is believed to reflect the physical structure of the unsaturated zone and the climate of the recharge area. Since nitrogen and argon are essentially conservative in many aquifer environments in South Africa, their concentrations can be used in distinguishing grondwaters of different recharge origins. In some areas the high helium content of the groundwater suggests that much of the helium is derived through migration from a source outside (e.g. below) the aquifer itself. Radiogenic helium concentrations nevertheless show, in two artesian aquifers, a close linear relationship to the radiocarbon age of the groundwater. This indicates a uniformity in the factors responsible for the accumulation of helium, and suggests that in these circumstances helium data can be used to give information on the age of very old groundwater. In some groundwater dissolved oxygen concentrations are found to decrease with increasing groundwater age. Whilst the rate of decrease may be very different for different aquifers, the field measurement of oxygen may be useful in preliminary surveys directed toward the location of recharge areas

  13. FARM-PRODUCED ENERGY OF AGRICULTURAL WASTE ORIGIN IMPROVES ITS PROFITABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol Węglarzy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The most important tasks of Polish agriculture in 2014-2020 perspective will include maintaining food quality and safety, and orientation toward the part of the production of renewable energy, especially using biomass. Processing of biomass in anaerobic methane fermentation of agricultural biogas solves the problem of waste storage, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, especially high concentrations of methane, coming from the fermentation of slowly stored biomass. The economic aspect explains the popularity of biogas works; it is related to diversification of agricultural production through the introduction of a qualitatively new production of green energy from biogas, which significantly affects the profitability of agricultural production and will be an alternative for some companies, or large farms as a source of additional income and energy security. Energy generated in small biogas plants can fully protect the energy needs of a small farm releasing it from external sources and generating savings. For installations larger surplus may provide an additional source of farms’ income.

  14. Considerations over the effects caused by a heat recovery system for exhaust gases, adapted to gas turbines originally designed for the operation in a simple cycle; Consideraciones sobre los efectos causados por un sistema de recuperacion de calor de gases de escape, adaptado a turbinas de gas disenadas originalmente para operar bajo un ciclo simple

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuesta Escobar, Cesar A [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1994-12-31

    This article sets out the considerations on what a heat recovery system from exhaust gases, to already installed and in operation gas turbines, and that were not originally designed to operate with this system, can cause. The potential effects are set forth on the control systems, on the combustion chambers, and in the gas turbine blades, utilized for natural gas pumping or power generation in land installations or in offshore platforms in trying to adapt to them a regenerative cycle or a heating system. Observed effects, fundamentally in the flame stability loop, flow velocity, thermal intensity coefficient, air/fuel relationships and mass flow. Also are presented the consequences that primary production system would suffer, mainly due to the natural gas pumping reduction, the space availability, the fuel consumption, and the maximum amount of heat susceptible to be recovered, comparing the requirements of this in the system. [Espanol] En este articulo se plantean las consideraciones sobre lo que puede provocar un sistema de recuperacion de calor de gases de escape adaptado a turbinas de gas ya instaladas, operando y que no fueron disenadas originalmente para operar con este sistema. Se plantean los probables efectos en los sistemas de control, en las camaras de combustion y en los empaletados de las turbinas de gas usadas para bombeo de gas natural o generacion electrica en instalaciones de tierra o plataformas marinas, al tratar de adaptarseles un ciclo regenerativo o un sistema para calentamiento. Efectos observados, fundamentalmente, en el LOOP de estabilidad de flama, velocidad del flujo, coeficiente de intensidad termica, relaciones aire-combustible y flujo masico. Tambien se presentan las consecuencias que sufriria el sistema primario de produccion debido, principalmente, a la reduccion del bombeo de gas natural, a la disponibilidad de espacio, al consumo de combustible y a la cantidad maxima de calor susceptible de recuperarse, comparada con los

  15. Process for the decontamination of waste gases of a reprocessing plant for spent fuel and/or fertile material and installation for its realisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrich, E.; Leuchtmann, D.; Weinlaender, W.

    1979-01-01

    The recombination bottom column consists of a lower parallel-flow column and an upper counterflow column in which tritiated water vapour, aerosols, nitric oxides, iodine, ruthenium tetroxide, and 14 CO 2 are removed from the waste gas. By means of a nitric oxide washing, a waste gas practically free of iodine and ruthenium tetroxide is produced, and the iodine is led to the counterflow column for futher treatment. (DG) 891 HP/DG 892 MBE [de

  16. Characterization of PM2.5 particles originating from a modern waste incineration plant by factor analysis of chemical data, mass and black carbon in ambient aerosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aboh, J. K.; Henriksson, Dag; Laursen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    are subject to restrictions are well below the allowed limits as stated by Swedish and European standards. The aim of the present work is to study the particle pollutants with emphasis on PM2.5 in the ambient air and to identify the specific contribution from the new incineration plant. Many different sources...... contribute to PM2.5 in urban air. Thus, the general problem is to characterise and identify the particle pollution, which can be attributed to gases and/or particles emitted by the waste incineration plant. For this reason aerosol samples, PM2.5, were collected and analyzed for concentrations of twenty...

  17. Origin and evolution of cup-shaped structures on leached nuclear waste containment glass surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, C.; Villa, F.; Chambaudet, A.; Vernaz, E.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional surface microanalysis system equipped with a sensitive topographical probe was used to quantify the evolution of cup-shaped structures formed by aqueous leaching of nuclear waste containment glass. A model of the dissolution phenomenon provides satisfactory correlation between calculated and measured cup radius and depth. Dissolution cups form from cracks on the initially cut glass surface. Large cracks control the phenomenon by forming the largest cups, which gradually absorb smaller ones. The evolution of the size and shape of the dissolution cups was described by a model that assumes a constant dissolution rate on the surface, diminishing with crack depth. The best fit with the experimental data was obtained with a dissolution rate one hundred times lower at the bottom of the crack than at the surface. Moreover, it is predictable that all the cups will gradually disappear as they grow larger and flatter over a leaching period of some 2 years, for the glass composition and experimental leaching procedures used in this work

  18. Treatment of radioactive waste water originating from the laundries of contaminated clothing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlik, O.; Friedrich, V.; Reti, Gy.

    1980-01-01

    The technology of purification of low radioactivity, high detergent content waste water from the laundries and shower stalls of the Paks Nuclear Power Station was developed. The technology consists of chemical treatment, clarification, filtration of clarified water, compaction and dehydratation of the slurry. During chemical treatment the concentration of radioactive isotopes is significantly lowered by separating a precipitate containing Cu 2 Fe(CN) 6 , Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 2 and Fe(OH) 3 . The precipitate is compacted into a slurry of 30-40% extract content by continuous operation of countercurrent suspension, sedimentation and a centrifuge, then dehydrated by hot air which serves as a transport medium of the steam, too. After having been filled the container is closed and transported to the burial site. The energy balance of the dryer-evaporator, the decontamination factor of evaporation for 90 Sr, 137 Cs and 131 I and the effect of the parameters of circulating air on the steam capacity were studied. (author)

  19. The geologic structures observed in drillhole DOE-2 and their possible origins: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borns, D.J.

    1987-07-01

    Questions remain as the origins of evaporite deformation within the Salado and Castile formations. Two miles north of the WIPP site, a stacked sequence of depressions was indicated by shallow boreholes. Such structures raise questions regarding the role of dissolution and gravity tectonics at the WIPP site. To investigate these structures, DOE drilled hole DOE-2 north of the WIPP site. At DOE-2, the downward displacement of stratigraphic markers in the Salado confirmed the presence of stacked depressions, which were the primary target of the drilling program. The halitic units between the marker beds were thickened compared to the average section determined from basin-wide drilling. The remaining question is whether dissolution occurred in the underlying Castile and resulted in the deformation of the Salado. Markers in the anhydrite units indicate recumbent structures and thickening of the anhydrite units by folding. As a consequence, the Castile Formation is nearly its average thickness, with the folded thickness of anhydrite compensating for the missing halite. The nearby thickening of halite within the Castile, the absence of relic anhydrite laminae in the attenuated halite units, and the high strain fabric of the remaining halite suggest that dissolution was not the dominant process in the Castile. The favored hypothesis for the Castile structures is salt flow in response to gravity inversion of the anhydrite and halite units of the Castile. 21 refs., 18 figs

  20. Method for storing radioactive rare gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, Atsushi; Nagao, Hiroyuki; Takiguchi, Yukio; Kanazawa, Toshio; Soya, Masataka.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To safely and securely store radioactive rare gases for a long period of time. Structure: The waste gases produced in nuclear power plant are cooled by a cooler and then introduced into a low temperature adsorbing device so that the gases are adsorbed by adsorbents, and then discharged into atmosphere through the purifying gas discharge line. When the radioactive rare gases reach a level of saturation in the amount of adsorption, they are heated and extracted by a suction pump and heated by a heater. The gases are then introduced into an oxygen-impurity removing device and the purified rare gases containing no oxygen and impurities are cooled by a cooler and fed into a gas holder. When the amount of radioactive rare gases stored within the gas holder reaches a given level, they are compressed and sealed by a compressure into a storing cylinder and residual gases in the piping are sucked and recovered into the gas holder, after which the cylinder is removed and stored in a fixed room. (Kamimura, M.)

  1. Characterization of Greenhouse Gases Emissionsfrom Urban Solid Waste in Baja California: A Proposal to Incorporate TechnicalInput into Decision-Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Muñoz Meléndez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available este estudio detalla la estimación de emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero (Gei gene-rados por desechos sólidos urbanos en Bajacalifornia usando el métodoPicc1996.losresultados muestran un aumento de 0.604 Gg/año en el período 1990-2010.la proyecciónde emisiones exhibe un aumento continuo para los siguientes 35 años. Fueron construidossiete escenarios de reducción:130 por ciento de disminución,2biodigestor,3una opciónintegral,4bioventanas,5compostaje,6vermicompostaje, y7biocubierta.los resulta-dos revelaron que es posible planear medidas o combinar estrategias inclusive, identificandocomo mejores los escenarios que incluyen aspectos sociales y opciones tecnológicas.

  2. How the origin of fresh household waste affects its ability to be biodegraded: an assessment using basic tools and its application to the city of Kara in Togo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segbeaya, K N; Feuillade-Cathalifaud, G; Baba, G; Koledzi, E K; Pallier, V; Tchangbedji, G; Matejka, G

    2012-12-01

    Waste biodegradation has been largely investigated in the literature by using conventional tests like the BMP test and the respirometric test, whereas only few studies deal with the use of leaching tests in combination with biological activity measurements. Consequently, this study used an improved leaching test to evaluate the biodegradability of two deposits of fresh household waste from the city of Kara in Togo. The first deposit came from households in neighborhoods located in the outskirts of the city and the second consisted of fresh waste, mainly composed of business waste and household waste, collected in the urban center and aimed at being deposited in the landfill. A physicochemical characterization of the two deposits completed the leaching test. The biological activity was monitored by measuring O(2) consumption and CO(2) production. pH, DOC/OM, VFA/DOC ratios and the SUVA index was measured in the leaching juice to assess both the state of degradation of the waste in the deposits and the ability of the organic matter to be mobilized quickly and to be easily assimilated by microorganisms. The biodegradability of waste from the city of Kara correlated with their origin even though the physical characteristics of the two deposits studied differed greatly. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Waste incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumplmayr, A.; Sammer, G.

    2001-01-01

    Waste incineration can be defined as the thermal conversion processing of solid waste by chemical oxidation. The types of wastes range from solid household waste and infectious hospital waste through to toxic solid, liquid and gaseous chemical wastes. End products include hot incineration gases, composed primarily of nitrogen, carbon dioxide, water vapor and to a smaller extend of non-combustible residue (ash) and air pollutants (e. g. NO x ). Energy can be recovered by heat exchange from the hot incineration gases, thus lowering fossil fuel consumption that in turn can reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. Burning of solid waste can fulfil up to four distinctive objectives (Pera, 2000): 1. Volume reduction: volume reduction of about 90 %, weight reduction of about 70 %; 2. Stabilization of waste: oxidation of organic input; 3. Recovery of energy from waste; 4. Sanitization of waste: destruction of pathogens. Waste incineration is not a means to make waste disappear. It does entail emissions into air as well as water and soil. The generated solid residues are the topic of this task force. Unlike other industrial processes discussed in this platform, waste incineration is not a production process, and is therefore not generating by-products, only residues. Residues that are isolated from e. g. flue gas, are concentrated in another place and form (e. g. air pollution control residues). Hence, there are generally two groups of residues that have to be taken into consideration: residues generated in the actual incineration process and others generated in the flue gas cleaning system. Should waste incineration finally gain public acceptance, it will be necessary to find consistent regulations for both sorts of residues. In some countries waste incineration is seen as the best option for the treatment of waste, whereas in other countries it is seen very negative. (author)

  4. FY 1999 achievement report on the supporting project to form energy/environmental technology verification project - International joint verification research project. Research on the waste-fueled power system using gases emitted from the sanitary landfill in Samarkand city; 1999 nendo Samarkand shi ni okeru umetate gas wo riyoshita gomi hatsuden system no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    In Samarkand city, Uzbekistan, solid waste materials are treated in the sanitary landfill. However, requests were made from the Minister of Communal Services for the construction of power system as a part of the effective waste utilization and the study of the integrated waste collection system enabling the construction of a power system. There is only one waste dumping site in Samarkand city. That started to be used in the beginning of the 1970s. That was planned to be closed in 2000, but is now planned to used till 2005. Therefore, it is urgent to reduce the volume of waste. The incineration of waste is the most suitable for it. In the study of a power system by using waste effectively, it is important to efficiently recover the methane gas emitted from the waste dumping site, to study the adoption of the repowering system using the combustion gas of methane gas for increasing the generated output of waste-fueled power generation facilities, and to heighten the low power generation efficiency. This study includes the survey of the waste discharge amount/composition/heating value, collection of the data on waste collection, and sampling/analysis of gases emitted from the dumping site. The paper reported on the proposals. (NEDO)

  5. In situ vitrification of buried waste: Containment issues and suppression systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luey, J.; Powell, T.D.

    1992-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are developing a remedial action technology for buried waste through the adaptation of the in situ vitrification (ISV) process. The ISV process is a thermal treatment process originally developed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to stabilize soils contaminated with transuranic waste. ISV tests with buried waste forms have demonstrated that the processing of buried waste is more dynamic than the processing of soils. This paper will focus on the issue of containment of the gases released during the processing of buried waste and on engineered suppression systems to alleviate transient events associated with dynamic off-gassing from the ISV melt

  6. [Gases in vitreoretinal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janco, L; Vida, R; Bartos, M; Villémová, K; Izák, M

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the importance and benefits of using gases in vitreoretinal surgery. The gases represent a wide group of substances used in eye surgery for more than 100 years. The role of intraocular gases in vitreoretinal surgery is irreplaceable. Their use is still considered to be the "gold standard". An important step in eye surgery was the introduction of expanding gases--sulfur hexafluoride and perfluorocarbons into routine clinical practice. The most common indications for the use of intraocular gases are: retinal detachment, idiopathic macular hole, complications of vitreoretinal surgery and others. The introduction of intraocular gases into routine clinical practice, along with other modern surgical techniques resulted in significant improvement of postoperative outcomes in a wide range of eye diseases. Understanding the principles of intraocular gases use brings the benefits to the patient and physician as well. Due to their physical and chemical properties they pose far the best and most appropriate variant of intraocular tamponade. Gases also bring some disadvantages, such as difficulties in detailed fundus examination, visual acuity testing, ultrasonographic examination, difficulties in application of intravitreal drugs or reduced possibility of retina laser treatment. The gases significantly change optical system properties of the eye. The use of gases in vitreoretinal surgery has significantly increased success rate of retinal detachment surgery, complicated posterior segment cases, trauma, surgery of the macula and other diseases.

  7. Synergetic effect of pH and biochemical components on bacterial diversity during mesophilic anaerobic fermentation of biomass-origin waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, F; Shao, L M; Bru, V; Godon, J J; He, P J

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the synergetic effect of pH and biochemical components on bacterial community structure during mesophilic anaerobic degradation of solid wastes with different origins, and under acidic or neutral conditions. The bacterial community in 16 samples of solid wastes with different biochemical compositions and origins was evaluated during mesophilic anaerobic degradation at acidic and neutral pH. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) were used to compare the communities. Multivariate analysis of the DGGE and SSCP results revealed that most of the dominant microbes were dependent on the content of easily degradable carbohydrates in the samples. Furthermore, the dominant microbes were divided into two types, those that preferred an acid environment and those that preferred a neutral environment. A shift in pH was found to change their preference for medium substrates. Although most of the substrates with similar origin and biochemical composition had similar microbial diversity during fermentation, some microbes were found only in substrates with specific origins. For example, two microbes were only found in substrate that contained lignocellulose and animal protein without starch. These microbes were related to micro-organisms that are found in swine manure, as well as in other intestinal or oral niches. In addition, the distribution of fermentation products was less sensitive to the changes in pH and biochemical components than the microbial community. Bacterial diversity during anaerobic degradation of organic wastes was affected by both pH and biochemical components; however, pH exerted a greater effect. The results of this study reveal that control of pH may be an effective method to produce a stable bacterial community and relatively similar product distribution during anaerobic digestion of waste, regardless of variation in the waste feedstocks.

  8. Purification technology for flue/off gases using electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Takuji

    2004-01-01

    The present paper describes research and development on purification technology using electron beams for flue/off gases containing pollutants: removal of sulfate oxide and nitrogen oxide from flue gases of coal/oil combustion power plants, decomposition of dioxins in waste incineration flue gas, and decomposition/removal of toxic volatile organic compounds from off gas. (author)

  9. The use of diffusive samplers for collecting organic gaseous constituents in waste gases. Diffusionssammler zur Probenahme von organischen gas- und dampffoermigen Substanzen in Abgasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canela, A.; Gruntz, U.; Muehleisen, H.; Tanner, S. (Sandoz AG, Basel (Switzerland). Umweltschutzlaboratorien)

    1990-01-01

    A relatively simple procedure for sample collection of multicomponent organic emissions is presented. A representative part of the waste gas is taken by means of a sampling probe and flows to the coupled sampling device. The gaseous constituents are collected in several diffusive samplers at the bottom of the device. Influencing parameters such as pressure, temperature, gas velocity etc., which may affect the collection rate and therefore the measured values, were investigated in the laboratory. Depending on the analytical detection limit, the sampling time and the diffusion parameters, the method can be applied for the determination of integrated emission concentrations between 0.1 mg/m{sup 3} and 1 g/m{sup 3}. (orig.).

  10. Extraction with supercritical gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, G M; Wilke, G; Stahl, E

    1980-01-01

    The contents of this book derives from a symposium on the 5th and 6th of June 1978 in the ''Haus der Technik'' in Essen. Contributions were made to separation with supercritical gases, fluid extraction of hops, spices and tobacco, physicochemical principles of extraction, phase equilibria and critical curves of binary ammonia-hydrocarbon mixtures, a quick method for the microanalytical evaluation of the dissolving power of supercritical gases, chromatography with supercritical fluids, the separation of nonvolatile substances by means of compressed gases in countercurrent processes, large-scale industrial plant for extraction with supercritical gases, development and design of plant for high-pressure extraction of natural products.

  11. Handbook of purified gases

    CERN Document Server

    Schoen, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Technical gases are used in almost every field of industry, science and medicine and also as a means of control by government authorities and institutions and are regarded as indispensable means of assistance. In this complete handbook of purified gases the physical foundations of purified gases and mixtures as well as their manufacturing, purification, analysis, storage, handling and transport are presented in a comprehensive way. This important reference work is accompanied with a large number of Data Sheets dedicated to the most important purified gases.  

  12. Isotopic Investigation of the Origin of Nitrate of Waters Outflowing from a Waste Deposit Site Near Scuol (Lower Engadine, South Eastern Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gschwend, M.; Leuenberger, F.; Eichinger, L. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule Zuerich, Geological Institute, Engineering Geology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Balderer, W. [Hydroisotop GmbH, Schweitenkirchen, Germany (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Near the village of Scuol in the Lower Engadine Valley (South Eastern Switzerland) Sot Ruinas, a waste disposal site for domestic and construction refuse, has been in use since the 1960s. It is situated in the vicinity of the Inn River. Over the last years enhanced concentrations of ammonia were found in the outflow of this waste site. But the observed elevated ammonia concentrations could also be a result of natural origin, by inflows of mineral water as observed in the mineral springs of the area. These springs could have acquired their high ammonia content by water-rock interaction with adjacent ultramafic rocks. The isotope analyses were oriented towards the hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen isotopes on the ammonia, nitrate and nitrogen molecules. The effect of the waste on the outflowing water downstream could be proved by isotope ratios based on chemical processes of the nitrogen cycle and an influence of natural spring water was excluded. (author)

  13. Partitioning of actinides from high level waste of PUREX origin using octylphenyl-N,N'-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO)-based supported liquid membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanujam, A.; Dhami, P.S.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Dudwadkar, N.L.; Chitnis, R.R.; Mathur, J.N.

    1999-01-01

    The present studies deal with the application of the supported liquid membrane (SLM) technique for partitioning of actinides from high level waste of PUREX origin. The process uses a solution of octylphenyl-N,N'-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO) in n-dodecane as a carrier with a polytetrafluoroethylene support and a mixture of citric acid, formic acid, and hydrazine hydrate as the receiving phase. The studies involve the investigation of such parameters as carrier concentration in SLM, acidity of the feed, and the feed composition. The studies indicated good transport of actinides like neptunium, americium, and plutonium across the membrane from nitric acid medium. A high concentration of uranium in the feed retards the transport of americium, suggesting the need for prior removal of uranium from the waste. The separation of actinides from uranium-lean simulated samples as well as actual high level waste has been found to be feasible using the above technique

  14. The management of industrial wastes in hydrology; La gestion des dechets industriels en hydrologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elbaz-Seboun, V.

    1998-07-08

    The industrial wastes are made of different kind of wastes: the inert wastes, the banal wastes (municipal wastes), the special wastes containing noxious elements with respect to human health and environment, and the radioactive wastes. Each industry generates its own effluents (sludges from water treatment plants and leachates from rubbish dumps). The main water pollutions are due to the fermentescible organic matters, nitrates and heavy metals from the industrial waste waters. The aim of the public water agencies is to better protect the environment and to give help to the industrialists in the management of their wastes: reduction at the source, selective collection, valorization, transportation and processing. Non-valorizable wastes must be processed: physico-chemical and biological processing (bio-filtering, coagulation-flocculation, membranes and industrial gases), incineration (organic wastes), disposal in class 1 technical burial centres after stabilization (ultimate wastes). Since July 2002, only the ultimate wastes will be disposed off and all class 2 and 3 dumps must have been rehabilitated. This work is divided into 2 parts: part 1 gives a presentation of the different types of industrial wastes and of their management (origin of wastes, effluents, heavy metals, environmental impact, legal aspects, wastes management, valorization). The second part describes the different processes for the treatment of industrial wastes (conventional processes, physico-chemical and biological processes, incineration, tipping, processing of radioactive wastes). (J.S.)

  15. Fluorine poisoning from waste gases and dust emitted by a superphosphate plant: determination of F content from deposits in plants, drinking water, forage, and bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stas, M E

    1941-01-01

    An extensive review is given of the literature on detrimental effects caused by fluorine in plants, animals, and humans, as well as the literature on methods of determining trace amounts of fluorine in water, air, and various other locales. A report is given of an original study of fluorine determination in plants, rainwater, drinking water, plant life consumed by cattle, and the bones of cattle. Results obtained in the immediate vicinity (distances of 100 to 300 m from the fertilizer factory) were compared with control results from other locales. The water, grass, and hay consumed by the cattle contained high amounts of fluorine, and that the bones of cattle that died with the symptoms of fluorine poisoning contained a higher fluorine level than other cattle.

  16. Chemical Equilibrium of Aluminate in Hanford Tank Waste Originating from Tanks 241-AN-105 and 241-AP-108

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoskey, Jacob K. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Cooke, Gary A. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Herting, Daniel L. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-23

    The purposes of the study described in this document follow; Determine or estimate the thermodynamic equilibrium of gibbsite in contact with two real tank waste supernatant liquids through both dissolution of gibbsite (bottom-up approach) and precipitation of aluminum-bearing solids (top-down approach); determine or estimate the thermodynamic equilibrium of a mixture of gibbsite and real tank waste saltcake in contact with real tank waste supernatant liquid through both dissolution of gibbsite and precipitation of aluminum-bearing solids; and characterize the solids present after equilibrium and precipitation of aluminum-bearing solids.

  17. [Emission and control of gases and odorous substances from animal housing and manure depots].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, J

    1992-02-01

    Agricultural animal production in increasingly regarded as a source of gases which are both aggravating and ecologically harmful. An overview of the origin, number and quantity of trace gases emitted from animal housing and from manure stores is presented and possible means of preventing or reducing them are discussed. Of the 136 trace gases in the air of animal houses, odorous substances, ammonia and methane are most relevant to the environment. The role played by the remaining gases is largely unknown. Quantitative information is available for 23 gases. The gases are emitted principally from freshly deposited and stored faeces, from animal feed and from the animals themselves. Future work should determine sources and quantities of the gases emitted from animal housing more precisely and should aim to investigate the potential of these gases to cause damage in man, animals and environment. Odorous substances have an effect on the area immediately surrounding the animal housing. They can lead to considerable aggravation in humans. For years, VDI1 guidelines (3471/72), which prescribe distances between residential buildings and animal housing, have been valuable in preventing odour problems of this kind. Coverings are suitable for outside stores. The intensity of the odour from animal housing waste air increases from cattle through to hens and pigs; it is also further affected by the type of housing, the age of the animals and the purpose for which they are being kept. Methods of cleaning waste air (scrubbers/biofilters) are available for problematic cases. The need for guidelines to limit emissions from individual outside manure stores (lagoons) is recognised. Total ammonia emissions from animal production in the Federal Republic of Germany (up to 1989) are estimated at approximately 300,000 to 600,000 t/year. There is a shortage of satisfactory and precise research on the extent of emissions, in particular on those from naturally ventilated housing. It is

  18. Kinetic theory of gases

    CERN Document Server

    Kauzmann, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Monograph and text supplement for first-year students of physical chemistry focuses chiefly on the molecular basis of important thermodynamic properties of gases, including pressure, temperature, and thermal energy. 1966 edition.

  19. AC BREAKDOWN IN GASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    electron- emission (multipactor) region, and (3) the low-frequency region. The breakdown mechanism in each of these regions is explained. An extensive bibliography on AC breakdown in gases is included.

  20. Reale Gase, tiefe Temperaturen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintze, Joachim

    Wir werden uns in diesem Kapitel zunächst mit der van der Waals'schen Zustandsgleichung befassen. In dieser Gleichung wird versucht, die Abweichungen, die reale Gase vom Verhalten idealer Gase zeigen, durch physikalisch motivierte Korrekturterme zu berücksichtigen. Es zeigt sich, dass die van derWaals-Gleichung geeignet ist, nicht nur die Gasphase, sondern auch die Phänomene bei der Verflüssigung von Gasen und den kritischen Punkt zu beschreiben.

  1. Evaluation of emission of greenhouse gases from soils amended with sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramasivam, S; Fortenberry, Gamola Z; Julius, Afolabi; Sajwan, Kenneth S; Alva, A K

    2008-02-01

    Increase in concentrations of various greenhouse gases and their possible contributions to the global warming are becoming a serious concern. Anthropogenic activities such as cultivation of flooded rice and application of waste materials, such as sewage sludge which are rich in C and N, as soil amendments could contribute to the increase in emission of greenhouse gases such as methane (CH(4)) and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) into the atmosphere. Therefore, evaluation of flux of various greenhouse gases from soils amended with sewage sludge is essential to quantify their release into the atmosphere. Two soils with contrasting properties (Candler fine sand [CFS] from Florida, and Ogeechee loamy sand [OLS] from Savannah, GA) were amended with varying rates (0, 24.7, 49.4, 98.8, and 148.3 Mg ha(-1)) of 2 types of sewage sludge (industrial [ISS] and domestic [DSS] origin. The amended soil samples were incubated in anaerobic condition at field capacity soil water content in static chamber (Qopak bottles). Gas samples were extracted immediately after amending soils and subsequently on a daily basis to evaluate the emission of CH(4), CO(2) and N(2)O. The results showed that emission rates and cumulative emission of all three gases increased with increasing rates of amendments. Cumulative emission of gases during 25-d incubation of soils amended with different types of sewage sludge decreased in the order: CO(2) > N(2)O > CH(4). The emission of gases was greater from the soils amended with DSS as compared to that with ISS. This may indicate the presence of either low C and N content or possible harmful chemicals in the ISS. The emission of gases was greater from the CFS as compared to that from the OLS. Furthermore, the results clearly depicted the inhibitory effect of acetylene in both soils by producing more N(2)O and CH(4) emission compared to the soils that did not receive acetylene at the rate of 1 mL g(-1) soil. Enumeration of microbial population by fluorescein diacetate

  2. How to wrap up radioactive gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, C

    1982-04-01

    Operating nuclear power stations produces not only solid waste. Not so well known - but they should by no means be ignored - are the radioactive gases released during fission which somehow have to be retained and 'packaged'. Gas cylinders, such as those used for oxygen or compressed air, are unsuitable for this purpose. Ingenious chemical tricks have been thought up to press the gas - especially crypton-85 - into plastic material in which it remains captured right down to its molecular structure.

  3. Shale gases, a windfall for France?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonnac, Alain de; Perves, Jean-Pierre

    2013-11-01

    After having recalled the definition and origin of shale gases, the different non conventional gases and their exploitation techniques (hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling) this report examines whether these gases are an opportunity for France. Some characteristics and data of the fossil and gas markets are presented and commented: world primary energy consumption, proved reserves of non conventional gases and their locations, European regions which may possess reserves of shale gases and coal-bed methane, origins of gas imports in France. The second part addresses shale gas deposits and their exploitation: discussion of the influence of the various rock parameters, evolution of production. The third part discusses the exploitation techniques and specific drilling tools. The issue of exploitation safety and security is addressed as well as the associated controversies: about the pollution of underground waters, about the fact that deep drillings result in pollution, about the risks associated with hydraulic fracturing and injections of chemical products, about the hold on ground and site degradation, about water consumption, about pollution due to gas pipeline leakage, about seismic risk, about noise drawbacks, about risks for health, about exploration and production authorization and license, and about air pollution and climate. The last part addresses the French situation and its future: status of the energy bill, recommendations made by a previous government, cancellation of authorizations, etc. Other information are provided in appendix about non conventional hydrocarbons, about shale gas exploitation in the USA, and about the Lacq gas

  4. Partitioning of actinides from high active waste solution of Purex origin counter-current extraction studies using TBP and CMPO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitnis, R.R.; Dhami, P.S.; Gopalkrishnan, V.; Wattal, P.K.; Ramanujam, A.; Murali, M.S.; Mathur, J.N.; Bauri, A.K.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2000-10-01

    A solvent extraction scheme has been formulated for the partitioning of actinides from Purex high level waste (HLW). The scheme is based on the results of earlier studies carried out with simulated waste solutions. In the present studies, the scheme was tested with high active waste (HAW) solution generated during the reprocessing of spent fuel from research reactors using laboratory scale mixer-settlers. The proposed process involved two-step extraction using tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) and octyl (phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamolylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO). In the first step, uranium, neptunium and plutonium were removed from the waste using TBP as extractant. The minor actinides left in the raffinate were extracted using a mixture of CMPO and TBP in the second step. The results showed complete extraction of actinides from the waste solution. Plutonium and neptunium extracted in TBP, were stripped together using a mixture of hydrogen peroxide and ascorbic acid in 2 M nitric acid medium, leaving uranium in the organic phase. Uranium can later be stripped using dilute nitric acid. Actinides extracted in CMPO-TBP phase were stripped using a mixture of formic acid, hydrazine, hydrate and citric acid. The stripping was quantitative in both the stripping runs. An additional extraction step for the preferential recovery of uranium, neptunium and plutonium from the waste solution using TBP is a modification over the conventional Truex process. Selective stripping of neptunium and plutonium from large quantities of uranium. The extraction of uranium using TBP eliminates the possibility of third phase and undesired loading of CMPO-TBP in the following step. Use of citrate-containing strippant allows the recovery of actinides from loaded CMPO-TBP mixture without causing any reflux of the actinides during stripping. The process has been developed with due consideration to minimising the generation of secondary wastes. The proposed strippants are effective even in presence of

  5. Gasification and co-gasification of biomass wastes: Effect of the biomass origin and the gasifier operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapuerta, Magin; Hernandez, Juan J.; Pazo, Amparo; Lopez, Julio [Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales (Edificio Politecnico), Avenida Camilo Jose Cela s/n. 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2008-09-15

    Air gasification of different biomass fuels, including forestry (pinus pinaster pruning) and agricultural (grapevine and olive tree pruning) wastes as well as industry wastes (sawdust and marc of grape), has been carried out in a circulating flow gasifier in order to evaluate the potential of using these types of biomass in the same equipment, thus providing higher operation flexibility and minimizing the effect of seasonal fuel supply variations. The potential of using biomass as an additional supporting fuel in coal fuelled power plants has also been evaluated through tests involving mixtures of biomass and coal-coke, the coke being a typical waste of oil companies. The effect of the main gasifier operating conditions, such as the relative biomass/air ratio and the reaction temperature, has been analysed to establish the conditions allowing higher gasification efficiency, carbon conversion and/or fuel constituents (CO, H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}) concentration and production. Results of the work encourage the combined use of the different biomass fuels without significant modifications in the installation, although agricultural wastes (grapevine and olive pruning) could to lead to more efficient gasification processes. These latter wastes appear as interesting fuels to generate a producer gas to be used in internal combustion engines or gas turbines (high gasification efficiency and gas yield), while sawdust could be a very adequate fuel to produce a H{sub 2}-rich gas (with interest for fuel cells) due to its highest reactivity. The influence of the reaction temperature on the gasification characteristics was not as significant as that of the biomass/air ratio, although the H{sub 2} concentration increased with increasing temperature. (author)

  6. Irradiation technologies used for combustion gases and diluted sulfurous gases decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva Z, Loreto

    1998-01-01

    A brief description of irradiation technology used for ambient decontamination is presented here. The system is adequate fort gas and liquid effluents and solid wastes. In particular, the characteristics and applications of the irradiation done with an electron beam to gas effluent is described, mainly to clean combustion gases and other industrial gases containing sulfur and nitrogen oxides, S O x and N O x , respectively. This technology permits the remove of these contaminants and the acquisition of a solid byproduct, an ammonia sulfate-nitrate, apt for fertilizer applications. (author)

  7. Curiosities of arithmetic gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakas, I.; Bowick, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    Statistical mechanical systems with an exponential density of states are considered. The arithmetic analog of parafermions of arbitrary order is constructed and a formula for boson-parafermion equivalence is obtained using properties of the Riemann zeta function. Interactions (nontrivial mixing) among arithmetic gases using the concept of twisted convolutions are also introduced. Examples of exactly solvable models are discussed in detail

  8. Strongly interacting Fermi gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakr W.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Strongly interacting gases of ultracold fermions have become an amazingly rich test-bed for many-body theories of fermionic matter. Here we present our recent experiments on these systems. Firstly, we discuss high-precision measurements on the thermodynamics of a strongly interacting Fermi gas across the superfluid transition. The onset of superfluidity is directly observed in the compressibility, the chemical potential, the entropy, and the heat capacity. Our measurements provide benchmarks for current many-body theories on strongly interacting fermions. Secondly, we have studied the evolution of fermion pairing from three to two dimensions in these gases, relating to the physics of layered superconductors. In the presence of p-wave interactions, Fermi gases are predicted to display toplogical superfluidity carrying Majorana edge states. Two possible avenues in this direction are discussed, our creation and direct observation of spin-orbit coupling in Fermi gases and the creation of fermionic molecules of 23Na 40K that will feature strong dipolar interactions in their absolute ground state.

  9. Radiation effects in gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Problems in the studies of radiation effects in gases are discussed. By means of ionization- excitation- and electron-capture yields various applications are characterized: ionization detectors, X-ray detectors, radionuclide battery, and radiation-induced chemical gas-phase reactions. Some new results of basic research in respect to the SO 2 oxidation are discussed. (author)

  10. The greenhouse effect gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    This road-map proposes by the Group Total aims to inform the public on the greenhouse effect gases. It presents the greenhouses effect as a key component of the climate system, the impacts of the human activity, the foreseeable consequences of global warming, the Kyoto protocol and Total commitment in the domain. (A.L.B.)

  11. Energy efficiency and greenhouse gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamburg, A.; Martins, A.; Pesur, A.; Roos, I.

    1996-01-01

    Estonia's energy balance for 1990 - 1994 is characterized by the dramatic changes in the economy after regaining independence in 1991. In 1990 - 1993, primary energy supply decreased about 1.9 times. The reasons were a sharp decrease in exports of electric energy and industrial products, a steep increase in fuel prices and the transition from the planned to a market-oriented economy. Over the same period, the total amount of emitted greenhouse gases decreased about 45%. In 1993, the decrease in energy production and consumption stopped, and in 1994, a moderate increase occurred (about 6%), which is a proof stabilizing economy. Oil shale power engineering will remain the prevailing energy resource for the next 20 - 25 years. After stabilization, the use of oil shale will rise in Estonia's economy. Oil shale combustion in power plants will be the greatest source of greenhouse gases emissions in near future. The main problem is to decrease the share of CO 2 emissions from the decomposition of carbonate part of oil shale. This can be done by separating limestone particles from oil shale before its burning by use of circulating fluidized bed combustion technology. Higher efficiency of oil shale power plants facilitates the reduction of CO 2 emissions per generated MWh electricity considerably. The prognoses for the future development of power engineering depend essentially on the environmental requirements. Under the highly restricted development scenario, which includes strict limitations to emissions (CO 2 , SO 2 , thermal waste) and a severe penalty system, the competitiveness of nuclear power will increase. The conceptual steps taken by the Estonian energy management should be in compliance with those of neighboring countries, including the development programs of the other Baltic states

  12. Nature and origin of comets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, J.A.; Jockers, K.

    1983-01-01

    The review examines basic history and morphology, motion, dynamic evolution, physical properties of neutral gaseous matter, vaporization of gases and outflow from the nucleus, chemistry of the coma gases, the comet nucleus, dust particles, solar wind-comet interactions and tail formation and the origin of comets. (U.K.)

  13. Removal of sulfur and nitrogen containing pollutants from discharge gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joubert, James I. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1986-01-01

    Oxides of sulfur and of nitrogen are removed from waste gases by reaction with an unsupported copper oxide powder to form copper sulfate. The resulting copper sulfate is dissolved in water to effect separation from insoluble mineral ash and dried to form solid copper sulfate pentahydrate. This solid sulfate is thermally decomposed to finely divided copper oxide powder with high specific surface area. The copper oxide powder is recycled into contact with the waste gases requiring cleanup. A reducing gas can be introduced to convert the oxide of nitrogen pollutants to nitrogen.

  14. Removal of sulfur and nitrogen containing pollutants from discharge gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joubert, J.I.

    1985-02-08

    Oxides of sulfur and of nitrogen are removed from waste gases by reaction with an unsupported copper oxide powder to form copper sulfate. The resulting copper sulfate is dissolved in water to effect separation from insoluble mineral ash and dried to form solid copper sulfate pentahydrate. This solid sulfate is thermally decomposed to finely divided copper oxide powder with high specific surface area. The copper oxide powder is recycled into contact with the waste gases requiring cleanup. A reducing gas can be introduced to convert the oxide of nitrogen pollutants to nitrogen.

  15. Plant for removing radioactive rare gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Buzai; Kanazawa, Toshio

    1977-01-01

    The outline of the pilot plant to remove and recover radioactive rare gases generated from nuclear power plants, reprocessing installations for nuclear fuel, nuclear research installations, etc. is described below. Among the studies of various processes such as liquefaction and distillation, absorption into solvents, active carbon adsorption, diaphragm method, etc., the liquefaction and distillation process by rectification at low temperature has been positively developed. It is in the stage of practical application for removing rare gases in waste gases from reprocessing and nuclear power plants. This is the process with high safety and excellent rare gas removing capability. Further research and development have been also made for selective adsorption and desorption method at low temperature which is very efficient as there is no release of long life nuclides such as Krypton-85. Rare gases recovered by the above mentioned removal systems must be stored safely for a long time as their half lives are long and specific radioactivities are high. The study has been made continuously on the storage methods including adsorption in cylinders and remotely automatically sealing storing system. (Kobatake, H.)

  16. Biological nutrients removal from the supernatant originating from the anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamis, S; Katsou, E; Di Fabio, S; Bolzonella, D; Fatone, F

    2014-09-01

    This study critically evaluates the biological processes and techniques applied to remove nitrogen and phosphorus from the anaerobic supernatant produced from the treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and from its co-digestion with other biodegradable organic waste (BOW) streams. The wide application of anaerobic digestion for the treatment of several organic waste streams results in the production of high quantities of anaerobic effluents. Such effluents are characterized by high nutrient content, because organic and particulate nitrogen and phosphorus are hydrolyzed in the anaerobic digestion process. Consequently, adequate post-treatment is required in order to comply with the existing land application and discharge legislation in the European Union countries. This may include physicochemical and biological processes, with the latter being more advantageous due to their lower cost. Nitrogen removal is accomplished through the conventional nitrification/denitrification, nitritation/denitritation and the complete autotrophic nitrogen removal process; the latter is accomplished by nitritation coupled with the anoxic ammonium oxidation process. As anaerobic digestion effluents are characterized by low COD/TKN ratio, conventional denitrification/nitrification is not an attractive option; short-cut nitrogen removal processes are more promising. Both suspended and attached growth processes have been employed to treat the anaerobic supernatant. Specifically, the sequencing batch reactor, the membrane bioreactor, the conventional activated sludge and the moving bed biofilm reactor processes have been investigated. Physicochemical phosphorus removal via struvite precipitation has been extensively examined. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal from the anaerobic supernatant can take place through the sequencing anaerobic/aerobic process. More recently, denitrifying phosphorus removal via nitrite or nitrate has been explored. The removal of

  17. Aspects of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutoiu, Dan

    2003-01-01

    The origin and types of radioactive waste, the objective and the fundamental principles of radioactive waste management and the classification of radioactive waste are presented. Problems of the radioactive waste management are analyzed. (authors)

  18. Disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dlouhy, Z.

    1982-01-01

    This book provides information on the origin, characteristics and methods of processing of radioactive wastes, as well as the philosophy and practice of their storage and disposal. Chapters are devoted to the following topics: radioactive wastes, characteristics of radioactive wastes, processing liquid and solid radioactive wastes, processing wastes from spent fuel reprocessing, processing gaseous radioactive wastes, fixation of radioactive concentrates, solidification of high-level radioactive wastes, use of radioactive wastes as raw material, radioactive waste disposal, transport of radioactive wastes and economic problems of radioactive wastes disposal. (C.F.)

  19. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2013-03-24

    Mar 24, 2013 ... which can degrade the hazardous xenobiotic compou baygon from solid waste by .... found in solid waste are bacteria and fungi. These microorganisms ... collected in a clean plastic and air tight container of 500gm capacity.

  20. Fuel gases in Algeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arachiche, B.; Elandaloussi, H.

    1996-01-01

    For a country like Algeria, fuel gases represent an important economical challenge. To answer the increasing energy demand in the transportation sector, the use of fuel gases allows to preserve the petroleum reserves and to create specific industrial structures devoted to LPG-f (liquefied petroleum gas-fuel) and NGV (natural gas for vehicles). This paper presents the energy policy of Algeria, its reserves, production, and exportations of hydrocarbons and the internal rational use of energy sources according to its economic and environmental policy and to its internal needs. The energy consumption of Algeria in the transportation sector represents 2/3 of the petroleum products consumed in the internal market and follows a rapid increase necessary to the socio-economic development of the country. The Algerian experience in fuel gases is analysed according to the results of two successive experimentation periods for the development of NGV before and after 1994, and the resulting transportation and distribution network is described. The development of LPG-f has followed also an experimental phase for the preparation of regulation texts and a first statement of the vehicles conversion to LPG-f is drawn with its perspectives of development according to future market and prices evolutions. (J.S.)

  1. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes sample gases of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for analysis. Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facility's compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document. Participating measurement

  2. Nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-12-01

    The subject is discussed, with special reference to the UK, under the headings: radiation; origins of the waste (mainly from nuclear power programme; gas, liquid, solid; various levels of activity); dealing with waste (methods of processing, storage, disposal); high-active waste (storage, vitrification, study of means of eventual disposal); waste management (UK organisation to manage low and intermediate level waste). (U.K.)

  3. Investigation into the Origin and Character of Surficial Sedimentary Deposits at the Midshore Regional Solid Waste Facility near Easton, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoot, Joseph P.; Newell, Wayne L.; DeJong, Benjamin D.

    2009-01-01

    A temporary exposure at the Midshore Regional Solid Waste Facility near Easton, MD, provided an opportunity to document the characteristics of the complex assemblage of surficial facies in that area. This unusually large cross section allowed interpretation of the changing processes that shaped the landscape in response to climate change through the late Pleistocene. Eight stratigraphic units were recognized: (1) gray, fossiliferous, muddy silt of the marine Miocene Choptank Formation; (2) coarse, crossbedded conglomerate of the late Miocene to Pliocene fluvial Pensauken Formation; (3) bioturbated muddy conglomerate interpreted as deposits of small colluvial fans; (4) pebbly, quartzose sand overlying a planar erosional surface reflecting a marine transgression; (5) irregular pods and lenses of sand and gravel deformed into bowl-shaped folds and faulted, which are interpreted as wind deposits over a semipermanent snow cover (niveo-aeolian deposits); (6) crossbedded sand and conglomerate with abundant mud partings indicating tidal influences on sinuous stream channels; (7) heavily bioturbated silt and sand with abundant root casts and flattened vesicles interpreted as aeolian loess deposits in marshy fens; and (8) pebbly sand and mud with scattered boulders and cobbles that reflect modern infill of the excavation by the operators. Soils formed on units 3, 4, and 7. Superimposed on units 4, 5, and 7 is evidence of deep freezing and permafrost development and subsequent thermokarst development after thawing, which includes large, complexly filled wedge-shaped cracks, deformed bedding and faults, fluid-injection structures, and spherical blobs of sand and mud. Each of the stratigraphic units has irregular distributions and lateral changes. The results of this study provide a unique insight into the geometry of surficial deposits that will help facilitate mapping of units, interpretation of cored intervals, and understanding of ground-penetrating radar profiles. The

  4. Waste gas combustion in a Hanford radioactive waste tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, J.R.; Fujita, R.K.; Spore, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    It has been observed that a high-level radioactive waste tank generates quantities of hydrogen, ammonia, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen that are potentially well within flammability limits. These gases are produced from chemical and nuclear decay reactions in a slurry of radioactive waste materials. Significant amounts of combustible and reactant gases accumulate in the waste over a 110- to 120-d period. The slurry becomes Taylor unstable owing to the buoyancy of the gases trapped in a matrix of sodium nitrate and nitrite salts. As the contents of the tank roll over, the generated waste gases rupture through the waste material surface, allowing the gases to be transported and mixed with air in the cover-gas space in the dome of the tank. An ignition source is postulated in the dome space where the waste gases combust in the presence of air resulting in pressure and temperature loadings on the double-walled waste tank. This analysis is conducted with hydrogen mixing studies HMS, a three-dimensional, time-dependent fluid dynamics code coupled with finite-rate chemical kinetics. The waste tank has a ventilation system designed to maintain a slight negative gage pressure during normal operation. We modeled the ventilation system with the transient reactor analysis code (TRAC), and we coupled these two best-estimate accident analysis computer codes to model the ventilation system response to pressures and temperatures generated by the hydrogen and ammonia combustion

  5. On Classical Ideal Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Chusseau

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We show that the thermodynamics of ideal gases may be derived solely from the Democritean concept of corpuscles moving in vacuum plus a principle of simplicity, namely that these laws are independent of the laws of motion, aside from the law of energy conservation. Only a single corpuscle in contact with a heat bath submitted to a z and t-invariant force is considered. Most of the end results are known but the method appears to be novel. The mathematics being elementary, the present paper should facilitate the understanding of the ideal gas law and of classical thermodynamics even though not-usually-taught concepts are being introduced.

  6. Climate impacts from import of waste fuels; Klimatpaaverkan fraan import av braennbart avfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haraldsson, Maarten; Sundberg, Johan (Profu, Moelndal (Sweden))

    2009-04-15

    Imports of combustible waste has increased in recent years and imported waste has become an increasingly important fuel in the Swedish district heating systems. The projections for the next few years show that the imports can be much higher, partly due to reduced amounts of waste in the wake of economic downturn the world economy, partly because several new incinerators will be put into operation. In a environmental perspective, imports are controversial and it has been proposed that imports should be restricted. This report provides an assessment of the climate impact of importing waste for combustion. The report shows that greenhouse gas emissions due to imports of waste to the Swedish district heating plants in 2007 was reduced by 500 000 tonnes of carbon dioxide. This is equivalent to the emissions from 300 000 Swedes car journeys a year, or 2.5% of the total emission reduction target set by the Government for the non-trading sector until 2020. Imports of wood waste-chips accounts for the largest reduction, but the study shows that imports of other types of waste contribute to a reduction in emissions of greenhouse gases. The reasons for the reduction is that the use of imported waste fuel substitute for other heating and electricity generation, which gives the consequence that emissions are avoided. The largest emission reductions are obtained, however, by the importation of household waste by replacing the alternative waste treatment of the corresponding waste in the country of origin. In the countries from which imports of waste currently takes place there is a lack of treatment capacity for organic waste. The alternative treatment available is primarily deposition. This treatment causes significant emissions of methane, which is a very strong greenhouse gas. The shipment of waste that occur as a result of imports gives a marginal contribution of greenhouse gases, compared against the emission reductions outlined above

  7. Removing radioactive noble gases from nuclear process off-gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lofredo, A.

    1977-01-01

    A system is claimed for separating, concentrating and storing radioactive krypton and xenon in the off-gases from a boiling water reactor, wherein adsorption and cryogenic distillation are both efficiently used for rapid and positive separation and removal of the radioactive noble gases, and for limiting such gases in circulation in the system to low inventory at all times, and wherein the system is self-regulating to eliminate operator options or attention

  8. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium controls on the abundances of clumped isotopologues of methane during thermogenic formation in laboratory experiments: Implications for the chemistry of pyrolysis and the origins of natural gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Yanhua; Douglas, Peter M.J.; Zhang, Shuichang; Stolper, Daniel A.; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Lawson, Michael; Lewan, Michael; Formolo, Michael; Mi, Jingkui; He, Kun; Hu, Guoyi; Eiler, John M.

    2018-01-01

    of methane from an alkyl precursor. Other interpretations are also explored. These findings provide new insights into the chemistry of thermogenic methane generation, and may provide an explanation of the elevated apparent temperatures recorded by the methane clumped-isotope thermometer in some natural gases. However, it remains unknown if the laboratory experiments capture the processes that occur at the longer time and lower temperatures of natural gas formation.

  9. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium controls on the abundances of clumped isotopologues of methane during thermogenic formation in laboratory experiments: Implications for the chemistry of pyrolysis and the origins of natural gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Yanhua; Douglas, Peter M. J.; Zhang, Shuichang; Stolper, Daniel A.; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Lawson, Michael; Lewan, Michael D.; Formolo, Michael; Mi, Jingkui; He, Kun; Hu, Guoyi; Eiler, John M.

    2018-02-01

    precursor. Other interpretations are also explored. These findings provide new insights into the chemistry of thermogenic methane generation, and may provide an explanation of the elevated apparent temperatures recorded by the methane clumped-isotope thermometer in some natural gases. However, it remains unknown if the laboratory experiments capture the processes that occur at the longer time and lower temperatures of natural gas formation.

  10. Human activities affecting trace gases and climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braatz, B.; Ebert, C.

    1990-01-01

    The Earth's climate has been in a constant state of change throughout geologic time due to natural perturbations in the global geobiosphere. However, various human activities have the potential to cause future global warming over a relatively short amount of time. These activities, which affect the Earth's climate by altering the concentrations of trace gases in the atmosphere, include energy consumption, particularly fossil-fuel consumption; industrial processes (production and use of chlorofluorocarbons, halons, and chlorocarbons, landfilling of wastes, and cement manufacture); changes in land use patterns, particularly deforestation and biomass burning; and agricultural practices (waste burning, fertilizer usage, rice production, and animal husbandry). Population growth is an important underlying factor affecting the level of growth in each activity. This paper describes how the human activities listed above contribute to atmospheric change, the current pattern of each activity, and how levels of each activity have changed since the early part of this century

  11. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2013-03-24

    Mar 24, 2013 ... A major goal in microbial ecology is to link s environmental processes. Solid waste degradatio environmental processes mediated by microorganism the current study an attempt has been made to isol which can degrade the hazardous xenobiotic compou baygon from solid waste by both in vitro and.

  12. Radioactive waste gas processing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Kaoru; Minemoto, Masaki; Takezawa, Kazuaki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively separate and remove only hydrogen from hydrogen gas-containing radioactive waste gases produced from nuclear power plants without using large scaled facilities. Constitution: From hydrogen gas-enriched waste gases which contain radioactive rare gases (Kr, Xe) sent from the volume control tank of a chemical volume control system, only the hydrogen is separated in a hydrogen separator using palladium alloy membrane and rare gases are concentrated, volume-decreased and then stored. In this case, an activated carbon adsorption device is connected at its inlet to the radioactive gas outlet of the hydrogen separator and opened at its outlet to external atmosphere. In this system, while only the hydrogen gas permeates through the palladium alloy membrane, other gases are introduced, without permeation, into the activated carbon adsorption device. Then, the radioactive rare gases are decayed by the adsorption on the activated carbon and then released to the external atmosphere. (Furukawa, Y.)

  13. Selective noble gases monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janecka, S.; Jancik, O.; Kapisovsky, V.; Kubik, I.; Sevecka, S.

    1995-01-01

    The monitoring of leak releases from ventilation stack of NPP requires a system by several orders more sensitive then currently used radiometer Kalina, designed to cover the range up to a design-based accident. To reach this goal a noble gases monitor with a germanium detector (MPVG) has been developed. It enables nuclide selective monitoring of current value of volume activity of particular nuclides in ventilation stack and daily releases of noble gases (balancing). MPVG can be viewed as a system build of three levels of subsystem: measuring level; control level; presentation level. Measuring level consists of gamma-spectroscopy system and operational parameters monitoring unit (flow rate, temperature, humidity). Control level provides communication between presentation and measuring level, acquisition of operational parameters and power supply. The presentation level of MPVG enables: 1) the measured data storage in predetermined time intervals; 2) the presentation of measured and evaluated values of radiation characteristics. The monitored radionuclides - default set: argon-41, krypton-85m, krypton-87, krypton-88, krypton-89, xenon-131m, xenon-133, xenon-133m, xenon-135, xenon-135m, xenon-137 and xenon-138. The values of volume activities observed at maximum releases have been approximately ten times higher. In that case in balancing some other nuclides exceed corresponding detection limits: 88 Kr(67; 22) Bq/m 3 ; 85m Kr(17; 7) Bq/m 3 ; 135m Xe(7.1; 0.5) Bq/m 3 ; 138 Xe(5.9; 0.9) Bq/m 3 . (J.K.)

  14. Selective noble gases monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janecka, S; Jancik, O; Kapisovsky, V; Kubik, I; Sevecka, S [Nuclear Power Plants Research Institute, a.s., Trnava (Slovakia)

    1996-12-31

    The monitoring of leak releases from ventilation stack of NPP requires a system by several orders more sensitive then currently used radiometer Kalina, designed to cover the range up to a design-based accident. To reach this goal a noble gases monitor with a germanium detector (MPVG) has been developed. It enables nuclide selective monitoring of current value of volume activity of particular nuclides in ventilation stack and daily releases of noble gases (balancing). MPVG can be viewed as a system build of three levels of subsystem: measuring level; control level; presentation level. Measuring level consists of gamma-spectroscopy system and operational parameters monitoring unit (flow rate, temperature, humidity). Control level provides communication between presentation and measuring level, acquisition of operational parameters and power supply. The presentation level of MPVG enables: 1) the measured data storage in predetermined time intervals; 2) the presentation of measured and evaluated values of radiation characteristics. The monitored radionuclides - default set: argon-41, krypton-85m, krypton-87, krypton-88, krypton-89, xenon-131m, xenon-133, xenon-133m, xenon-135, xenon-135m, xenon-137 and xenon-138. The values of volume activities observed at maximum releases have been approximately ten times higher. In that case in balancing some other nuclides exceed corresponding detection limits: {sup 88}Kr(67; 22) Bq/m{sup 3}; {sup 85m}Kr(17; 7) Bq/m{sup 3}; {sup 135m}Xe(7.1; 0.5) Bq/m{sup 3}; {sup 138}Xe(5.9; 0.9) Bq/m{sup 3}. (J.K.).

  15. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Analysis of Simulated Headspace Gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for headspace gases distributes blind audit samples in a gas matrix for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Participating measurement facilities (i.e., fixed laboratories, mobile analysis systems, and on-line analytical systems) are located across the United States. Each sample distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for transuranic (TRU) waste characterization. The primary documents governing the conduct of the PDP are the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (DOE/CBFO-94-1012) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Analysis Plan (WAP) contained in the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (NM4890139088-TSDF) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The WAP requires participation in the PDP; the PDP must comply with the QAPD and the WAP. This plan implements the general requirements of the QAPD and the applicable requirements of the WAP for the Headspace Gas (HSG) PDP. Participating measurement facilities analyze blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste package headspace gases according to the criteria set by this PDP Plan. Blind audit samples (hereafter referred to as PDP samples) are used as an independent means to assess each measurement facility's compliance with the WAP quality assurance objectives (QAOs). To the extent possible, the concentrations of VOC analytes in the PDP samples encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual TRU waste package headspace gas samples. Analyses of headspace gases are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. These analyses must be performed by measurement facilities that have demonstrated acceptable performance in this PDP. These analyses are referred to as WIPP analyses and the TRU waste package headspace gas samples on which they are performed are referred to as WIPP samples in this document

  16. In situ vitrification of buried waste: Containment issues and suppression systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luey, J.; Powell, T.D.

    1992-01-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are developing a remedial action technology for buried waste through the adaptation of the in situ vitrification (ISV) process. The ISV process is a thermal treatment process originally developed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to stabilize soils contaminated with transuranic waste. ISV tests with buried waste forms have demonstrated that the processing of buried waste is more dynamic than the processing of soils. This paper will focus on the issue of containment of the gases released during the processing of buried waste and on engineered suppression systems to alleviate transient events associated with dynamic off-gassing from the ISV melt. (author)

  17. Quantum gases finite temperature and non-equilibrium dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Szymanska, Marzena; Davis, Matthew; Gardiner, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The 1995 observation of Bose-Einstein condensation in dilute atomic vapours spawned the field of ultracold, degenerate quantum gases. Unprecedented developments in experimental design and precision control have led to quantum gases becoming the preferred playground for designer quantum many-body systems. This self-contained volume provides a broad overview of the principal theoretical techniques applied to non-equilibrium and finite temperature quantum gases. Covering Bose-Einstein condensates, degenerate Fermi gases, and the more recently realised exciton-polariton condensates, it fills a gap by linking between different methods with origins in condensed matter physics, quantum field theory, quantum optics, atomic physics, and statistical mechanics. Thematically organised chapters on different methodologies, contributed by key researchers using a unified notation, provide the first integrated view of the relative merits of individual approaches, aided by pertinent introductory chapters and the guidance of ed...

  18. Laser-aided diagnostics of plasmas and gases

    CERN Document Server

    Muraoka, K

    2000-01-01

    Updated and expanded from the original Japanese edition, Laser-Aided Diagnostics of Gases and Plasmas takes a unique approach in treating laser-aided diagnostics. The book unifies the subject by joining applications instead of describing each application as a totally separate system. In taking this approach, it highlights the relative strengths of each method and shows how they can complement each other in the study of gases and plasmas.The first part of the book presents a general introduction to the laser-aided study of gases and plasmas, including the various principles and hardware needed for each method, while the second part describes the applications of each general system in detail.Beneficial to a wide spectrum of academic and industrial researchers, this book provides a solid examination of the various options and methods available when involved in the analysis and diagnostics of gases and plasmas.

  19. Canonical partition functions: ideal quantum gases, interacting classical gases, and interacting quantum gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chi-Chun; Dai, Wu-Sheng

    2018-02-01

    In statistical mechanics, for a system with a fixed number of particles, e.g. a finite-size system, strictly speaking, the thermodynamic quantity needs to be calculated in the canonical ensemble. Nevertheless, the calculation of the canonical partition function is difficult. In this paper, based on the mathematical theory of the symmetric function, we suggest a method for the calculation of the canonical partition function of ideal quantum gases, including ideal Bose, Fermi, and Gentile gases. Moreover, we express the canonical partition functions of interacting classical and quantum gases given by the classical and quantum cluster expansion methods in terms of the Bell polynomial in mathematics. The virial coefficients of ideal Bose, Fermi, and Gentile gases are calculated from the exact canonical partition function. The virial coefficients of interacting classical and quantum gases are calculated from the canonical partition function by using the expansion of the Bell polynomial, rather than calculated from the grand canonical potential.

  20. Economic Hazardous Gases Management for SOX Removal from Flue Gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaack, S.L.; Mohi, M.A.; Mohamed, S.T.

    1995-01-01

    Hazardous gases emerging from industries accumulate as pollutants in air and falls as acid rains resulting also in water and soil pollution. To minimize environmental pollution, the present process is suggested in order to desulfurize flue gases resulting from burning fuel oil in a 100/MWh steam power plant. The process makes use of the cheap Ca C O 3 powder as the alkaline material to sequistre the sulphur oxide gases. The resulting sulphur compounds, namely calcium sulphate and gypsum have a great market demand as reducing and sulphiting agents in paper industry and as an important building material. About 44000 ton of gypsum could be produced yearly when treating flue gases resulting from a 100 MWh unit burning fuel oil. Feasibility study shows that a great return on investment could be achieved when applying the process. 1 fig

  1. Avalanches in insulating gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhaart, H.F.A.

    1982-01-01

    Avalanches of charged particles in gases are often studied with the ''electrical method'', the measurement of the waveform of the current in the external circuit. In this thesis a substantial improvement of the time resolution of the measuring setup, to be used for the electrical method, is reported. The avalanche is started by an N 2 -laser with a pulse duration of only 0.6 ns. With this laser it is possible to release a high number of primary electrons (some 10 8 ) which makes it possible to obtain sizeable signals, even at low E/p values. With the setup it is possible to analyze current waveforms with a time resolution down to 1.4 ns, determined by both the laser and the measuring system. Furthermore it is possible to distinguish between the current caused by the electrons and the current caused by the ions in the avalanche and to monitor these currents simultaneously. Avalanche currents are measured in N 2 , CO 2 , O 2 , H 2 O, air of varying humidity, SF 6 and SF 6 /N 2 mixtures. Depending on the nature of the gas and the experimental conditions, processes as diffusion, ionization, attachment, detachment, conversion and secondary emission are observed. Values of parameters with which these processes can be described, are derived from an analysis of the current waveforms. For this analysis already published theories and new theories described in this thesis are used. The drift velocity of both the electrons and the ions could be easily determined from measured avalanche currents. Special attention is paid to avalanches in air becasue of the practical importance of air insulation. (Auth.)

  2. Greenhouse gases study in Amazonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amelio, Monica Tais Siqueira

    2006-01-01

    The Amazon plays an important role on the global carbon cycle, as changing as carbon storage, since Amazon Basin is the biggest area of tropical forest, around 50% of global. Natural's process, deforestation, and use land are CO 2 sources. The Amazon forest is a significant source of N 2 O by soil process, and CH 4 by anaerobic process like flooded areas, rice cultures, and others sources. This project is part of the LBA project (Large-Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia), and this project is 'Vertical profiles of carbon dioxide and other trace gas species over the Amazon basin using small aircraft'. Since December 2000 vertical profiles of CO 2 , CH 4 , CO, H 2 , N 2 O and SF 6 have been measured above central Amazonia. The local sampling was over Tapajos National Forest, a primary forest in Para State, where had a CO 2 flux tower and an east impact area with sources like animals, rice cultivation, biomass burning, etc, to compare the influence of an impact area and a preserved area in the profiles. The Reserva Biologica de Cuieiras, at Amazon State, is the other studied place, where there already exists a CO 2 flux tower, and an east preserved area at this State, to compare with the Cuieiras. The sampling has been carried out on vertical profile from 1000 ft up to 12000 ft using a semi-automated sampling package developed at GMD/NOAA and a small aircraft. The analysis uses the MAGICC system (Multiple Analysis of Gases Influence Climate Change) which is installed at the Atmospheric Chemistry Laboratory (LQA) in IPEN (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares). The results showed that all gases studied, except H 2 gas, has been following the global trend. At the Para State, for the studied years, the Amazonian Forest performed as small CO 2 sink. To compare Wet and Dry Seasons, subtracted the Ascension concentration values in the period to remove the global influence. So that, in the 2004 and 2005 wet seasons and 2004 dry season comparison it was

  3. Noble gases solubility in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crovetto, Rosa; Fernandez Prini, Roberto.

    1980-07-01

    The available experimental data of solubility of noble gases in water for temperatures smaller than 330 0 C have been critically surveyed. Due to the unique structure of the solvent, the solubility of noble gases in water decreases with temperature passing through a temperature of minimum solubility which is different for each gas, and then increases at higher temperatures. As aresult of the analysis of the experimental data and of the features of the solute-solvent interaction, a generalized equation is proposed which enables thecalculation of Henry's coefficient at different temperatures for all noble gases. (author) [es

  4. Wastes - Issue 2014. Key figures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusler, Laurence; Moro-Goubely, Anne-Gaelle; Berthoin, Guillaume; Mathery, Christian; Galio, Pierre; Heyberger-Paroisse, Agnes

    2014-06-01

    This publication proposes numerous tables and graphs of data and indicators (and of their evolution) regarding wastes. It addresses waste prevention and production in France (concerned materials, waste production, waste origins, actions and measures for waste prevention, re-use), waste collection (for domestic, industrial wastes, cross-border exchanges, nuclear reactors), waste processing (of dangerous and non dangerous wastes), valorisation processes (sorting, recycling, composting, methanization), waste-based energy production, economy and costs of the waste management activity, and environmental impacts (atmospheric emissions, impact of recycling)

  5. Quotation systems for greenhouse gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trong, Maj Dang

    2000-01-01

    The article surveys recommendations from a Norwegian committee for implementing at a national level, the Kyoto protocol aims for reducing the total emissions of greenhouse gases from the industrial countries through quotation systems

  6. Method of processing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matagi, Yoshihiko; Takahara, Akira; Ootsuka, Katsuyuki.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To avoid the reduction in the atmospheric insulation by preventing the generation of CO 2 , H 2 O, etc. upon irradiation of microwave heat. Method: Radioactive wastes are charged into a hopper, supplied on a conveyor, fed each by a predetermined amount to a microwave furnace and heated by microwaves applied from a microwave guide. Simultaneously, inert gases are supplied from a supply line. The Radioactive wastes to be treated are shielded by the inert gases to prevent the combustion of decomposed gases produced from the wastes upon irradiation of microwave heat to thereby prevent the generation of CO 2 , H 2 , etc., as well as the generated decomposed gases are diluted with the inert gases to decrease the dissociation of the decomposed gases to prevent the reduction in the atmospheric insulation. Since the spent inert gases can be recovered for reuse, the amount of gaseous wastes released to the atmosphere can be decreased and the working life of the high performance air filters can be extended. (Sekiya, K.)

  7. Continuous using of the scaling factors for radionuclide evaluation in the packaged solid wastes originated from the Japanese Nuclear Power Plants since 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The amounts and concentration of the nuclides in the waste packages are estimated by measuring some key nuclides, mostly gamma emitters, from outside of the packages and by applying the scaling factor method (using the relationship between some easy to measure key nuclides and the other difficult to measure nuclides). The solid wastes are classified into two kinds of packages: homogeneous solid wastes made from concentrated liquid wastes and spent fuels solidified with cement asphalt, or plastics and heterogeneous solid wastes made of cutting metals, compacted or fused filters solidified with mortars. Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) established in 2005 is in charge of the confirmation of the inside contents with radionuclide information and compliance with formalities for safety maintenance and control. (S. Ohno)

  8. Greenhouse gases and global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    From previous articles we have learned about the complexities of our environment, its atmosphere and its climate system. we have also learned that climate change and, therefore global warm and cool periods are naturally occurring phenomena. Moreover, all scientific evidence suggests that global warming, are likely to occur again naturally in the future. However, we have not yet considered the role of the rates of climate change in affecting the biosphere. It appears that how quickly the climate changes may be more important than the change itself. In light of this concern, let us now consider the possibility that, is due to human activity. We may over the next century experience global warming at rates and magnitudes unparalleled in recent geologic history. The following questions are answered; What can we learn from past climates? What do we know about global climates over the past 100 years? What causes temperature change? What are the greenhouse gases? How much have concentration of greenhouse gases increased in recent years? Why are increases in concentrations of greenhouse of concern? What is the e nhanced greenhouse effect ? How can human activity impact the global climate? What are some reasons for increased concentrations of greenhouse gases? What are fossil fuel and how do they transform into greenhouse gases? Who are the biggest emitters of greenhouse gases? Why are canada per capita emissions of greenhouse gases relatively high? (Author)

  9. Electron beam processing of combustion flue gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    This report contains the papers presented at the consultants' meeting on electron beam processing of combustion flue gases. The meeting provided an excellent opportunity for exchanging information and reviewing the current status of technology development. Characteristics of the electron beam processing recognized by the meeting are: capability of simultaneous removals of SO 2 and NO x , safe technology and simplicity of control, dry process without waste water to be treated, cost benefit of electron beam processing compared with conventional technology and the conversion of SO 2 and NO x to a by-product that can be used as agricultural fertilizer. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 22 papers in this technical report

  10. Thermal Plasma decomposition of fluoriated greenhouse gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo Seok; Watanabe, Takayuki [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan); Park, Dong Wha [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Fluorinated compounds mainly used in the semiconductor industry are potent greenhouse gases. Recently, thermal plasma gas scrubbers have been gradually replacing conventional burn-wet type gas scrubbers which are based on the combustion of fossil fuels because high conversion efficiency and control of byproduct generation are achievable in chemically reactive high temperature thermal plasma. Chemical equilibrium composition at high temperature and numerical analysis on a complex thermal flow in the thermal plasma decomposition system are used to predict the process of thermal decomposition of fluorinated gas. In order to increase economic feasibility of the thermal plasma decomposition process, increase of thermal efficiency of the plasma torch and enhancement of gas mixing between the thermal plasma jet and waste gas are discussed. In addition, noble thermal plasma systems to be applied in the thermal plasma gas treatment are introduced in the present paper.

  11. The evolution of minor active and toxic gases in repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddle, P.; Rees, J.H.; Davies, A.A.; McGahan, D.J.; Rushbrook, P.E.

    1988-09-01

    This study has considered a number of toxic and active gases which could potentially form in relatively small amounts in a deep repository for radioactive wastes. It has been concluded that many of these would react under repository conditions or be highly soluble in groundwater. The minor amounts of the inert and relatively insoluble gas krypton-85 would dissolve in a small volume of repository water. The wide range of organic gases and vapours that could form in trace amounts has been shortened to a list of 21 by consideration of their toxicity, volatibility and extent of formation at a landfill site for non-radioactive waste. The amounts of the inert and inactive gas helium formed from α-particles and the decay of tritium will have only a very minor effect on the overall rate of gas production. (author)

  12. Dipolar quantum gases of erbium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, A.

    2014-01-01

    . The corresponding elastic cross section predicted by the theory of universal dipolar scattering scales only with the particle's mass and its magnetic moment and is temperature independent. This represents a dramatic difference compared to non-dipolar fermions, which exhibit a rapidly vanishing elastic cross section at lower temperatures. Another distinctive feature of erbium is its spectrum of Feshbach resonances. Using bosonic erbium we observed an enormous density of resonances exceeding that of alkali metals by at least a factor of ten. We statistically analyzed the spectrum in terms of the random matrix theory and demonstrated that the resonances bare a strong correlation to each other. We identify the origin of this correlation in the highly anisotropic van der Waals interaction potential of erbium. This is a phenomenon not previously encountered in ultracold quantum gases. At the many-body level we observed the d-wave collapse of the Bose-Einstein condensate as previously observed in the chromium experiment in Stuttgart. With the dipolar Fermi gas we demonstrated that the Fermi surface deforms into an ellipsoid induced by the action of the dipole-dipole interaction in momentum space. (author) [de

  13. Solidification of Simulated Liquid Effluents Originating From Sodium-Bearing Waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, FY-03 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. V. Raman; A. K. Herbst; B. A. Scholes; S. H. Hinckley; R. D. Colby

    2003-09-01

    In this report, the mechanism and methods of fixation of acidic waste effluents in grout form are explored. From the variations in the pH as a function of total solids addition to acidic waste effluent solutions, the stages of gellation, liquefaction, slurry formation and grout development are quantitatively revealed. Experimental results indicate the completion of these reaction steps to be significant for elimination of bleed liquid and for setting of the grout to a dimensionally stable and hardened solid within a reasonable period of about twenty eight days that is often observed in the cement and concrete industry. The reactions also suggest increases in the waste loading in the direction of decreasing acid molarity. Consequently, 1.0 molar SBW-180 waste is contained in higher quantity than the 2.8 molar SBW-189, given the same grout formulation for both effluents. The variations in the formulations involving components of slag, cement, waste and neutralizing agent are represented in the form of a ternary formulation map. The map in turn graphically reveals the relations among the various formulations and grout properties, and is useful in predicting the potential directions of waste loading in grouts with suitable properties such as slurry viscosity, Vicat hardness, and mechanical strength. A uniform formulation for the fixation of both SBW-180 and SBW-189 has emerged from the development of the formulation map. The boundaries for the processing regime on this map are 100 wt% cement to 50 wt% cement / 50 wt% slag, with waste loadings ranging from 55 wt% to 68 wt%. Within these compositional bounds all the three waste streams SBW-180, SBW-189 and Scrub solution are amenable to solidification. A large cost advantage is envisaged to stem from savings in labor, processing time, and processing methodology by adopting a uniform formulation concept for fixation of compositionally diverse waste streams. The experimental efforts contained in this report constitute the

  14. Radioactive gases monitor system: tritium, radon, noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egey, J.Z.; Matatagui, E.

    2015-01-01

    A system for monitoring the radioactive gases tritium, radon and noble gases is described. We present the description of the sensor and the associated electronics that have been developed to monitor the presence of radioactive gases in air or other gaseous effluents. The system has a high sensitivity and a wide range of operation. The sensor is an ionization chamber, featuring the internal circulation of the gas to monitor and the associated electronics has a resolution better than 10 E-15A (fA). It allows the detection of the individual pulses that are produced during the alpha decay of radon and its daughter elements. The measurement system is made up of a commercial data acquisition system connected to a computer. The acquired data is presented on a graphical display and it is stored for later processing and analysis. We have a system that is of simple construction and versatile. Here we present the experimental results. (authors) [es

  15. Treatment of waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    A method of treating radioactive waste to substantially reduce the volume and which is especially useful in the treatment of material which includes radioactive halogens such as 131 I, is described. A fluidised bed incinerator and calciner are used to reduce all the liquid and combustible solid waste to anhydrous granular solids, all of which is carried by fluidizing gases into an off-gas system designed for their collection. (U.K.)

  16. Evaluation of the generation and release of flammable gases in tank 241-SY-101

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babad, H.; Johnson, G.D.; Lechelt, J.A.; Reynolds, D.A. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)); Pederson, L.R.; Strachan, D.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Meisel, D.; Jonah, C. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Ashby, E.C. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States))

    1991-11-01

    Tank 241-SY-101 is a double shell, high-level waste tank located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. This tank contains about 1 million gallons of waste that was concentrated at the 242-S Evaporator. Shortly after the waste was put in the tank, the waste began to expand because the generation of gases. In 1990 this tank was declared to have an unreviewed safety question because of the periodic release of hydrogen and nitrous oxide. A safety program was established to conduct a characterization of the waste and vented gases and to determine an effective means to prevent the accumulation of flammable gases in the tank dome space and ventilation system. Results of the expanded characterization conducted in fiscal year 1991 are presented. The use of gas chromatographs, mass spectrometers, and hydrogen-specific monitors provided a greater understanding of the vented gases. Additional instrumentation placed in the tank also helped to provide more detailed information on tank temperatures, gas pressure, and gas flow rates. An extensive laboratory study involving the Westinghouse Hanford Company, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and the Georgia Institute of Technology was initiated for the purpose of determining the mechanisms responsible for the generation of various gases. These studies evaluate both radiolytic and thermochemical processes. Results of the first series of experiments are described.

  17. Adsorption of Dissolved Gases (CH4, CO2, H2, Noble Gases) by Water-Saturated Smectite Clay Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourg, I. C.; Gadikota, G.; Dazas, B.

    2016-12-01

    Adsorption of dissolved gases by water-saturated clay minerals plays important roles in a range of fields. For example, gas adsorption in on clay minerals may significantly impact the formation of CH4 hydrates in fine-grained sediments, the behavior of CH4 in shale, CO2 leakage across caprocks of geologic CO2 sequestration sites, H2 leakage across engineered clay barriers of high-level radioactive waste repositories, and noble gas geochemistry reconstructions of hydrocarbon migration in the subsurface. Despite its importance, the adsorption of gases on clay minerals remains poorly understood. For example, some studies have suggested that clay surfaces promote the formation of CH4 hydrates, whereas others indicate that clay surfaces inhibit the formation of CH4 hydrates. Here, we present molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the adsorption of a range of gases (CH4, CO2, H2, noble gases) on clay mineral surfaces. Our results indicate that the affinity of dissolved gases for clay mineral surfaces has a non-monotone dependence on the hydrated radius of the gas molecules. This non-monotone dependence arises from a combination of two effects: the polar nature of certain gas molecules (in particular, CO2) and the templating of interfacial water structure by the clay basal surface, which results in the presence of interfacial water "cages" of optimal size for intermediate-size gas molecules (such as Ne or Ar).

  18. Gases and carbon in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jehn, H.; Fromm, E.; Hoerz, G.

    1978-01-01

    This issue is part of a series of data on 'gases and carbon in metals'. The present survey includes results from papers dealing with gases and carbon in actinides and recommends critically selected data for each element. Firstly data od binary systems are presented, starting with hydrogen and followed by carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and rare gases. Within one metal-metalloid system the data are listed under topics such as solubility limit, dissociation pressure of compunds, vapour pressure of volatile oxides, thermodynamic data, diffusion, transport parameters (effective valence, heat of transport), permeation of gases through metals, gas adsorption and gas desorption kinetics, compound formation, precipitation kinetics, and property changes. Following the data on binary systems, the data of ternary systems are presented, beginning with systems which contain one metal and two gases or one gas and carbon and continuing with systems with two metals and one gas or carbon. Within a ternary system the topics are arranged in the same way as in binary systems. (HB) [de

  19. Preliminary qualitative and quantitative assessment of gases from biodigestion of solid wastes in the landfill of Londrina,Paraná State, Brazil - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v35i1.11453

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luiz Audibert

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Trials conducted in controlled landfillsor dumps are still incipient in Brazil. This paper aimed to qualify and quantify the emission of biogas in the landfill of Londrina, Paraná State. Measurements were performed by three types of tests: static closed chamber for the characterization and quantification of gas leakage by the surface layer, inspection tubes for pressure quantification and qualification of the biogas produced below the surface layer and, finally, measurements in vertical drains to quantify and qualify the biogas. Results for the flow rates of methane gas in the vertical drains ranged from 0 to 190.2 N m 3 h-1, depending on the shape of the drain and to the age of solid waste deposition. The tests with static closed chamberhad results between 1.3 and 30.6 NL h-1 m2, influenced by changes in the age of solid waste deposition, different thicknesses of the surface layer, and excessive rainfall during the tests. With the data of methane gas flow obtained by thestatic closed chambertests and by the biogas drains, it was preliminary quantified the total emission of methane in the landfill of Londrina, Paraná State.  

  20. Electrochemical incineration of wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaba, L.; Hitchens, G. D.; Bockris, J. OM.

    1989-01-01

    The disposal of domestic organic waste in its raw state is a matter of increasing public concern. Earlier, it was regarded as permissible to reject wastes into the apparently infinite sink of the sea but, during the last 20 years, it has become clear that this is environmentally unacceptable. On the other hand, sewage farms and drainage systems for cities and for new housing developments are cumbersome and expensive to build and operate. New technology whereby waste is converted to acceptable chemicals and pollution-free gases at site is desirable. The problems posed by wastes are particularly demanding in space vehicles where it is desirable to utilize treatments that will convert wastes into chemicals that can be recycled. In this situation, the combustion of waste is undesirable due to the inevitable presence of oxides of nitrogen and carbon monoxide in the effluent gases. Here, in particular, electrochemical techniques offer several advantages including the low temperatures which may be used and the absence of any NO and CO in the evolved gases. Work done in this area was restricted to technological papers, and the present report is an attempt to give a more fundamental basis to the early stages of a potentially valuable technology.

  1. Desulphurization of exhaust gases in chemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, K.; Wischnewski, W.

    1981-01-01

    The sulfur content of exhaust gases can be reduced by: desulphurization of fuels; modification of processes; or treatment of resultant gases. In this paper a few selected examples from the chemical industry in the German Democratic Republic are presented. Using modified processes and treating the resultant gases, the sulphuric content of exhaust gases is effectively reduced. Methods to reduce the sulfur content of exhaust gases are described in the field of production of: sulphuric acid; viscose; fertilizers; and paraffin.

  2. Emissions from urban waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacha, J.S.

    1998-01-01

    Indiscriminate emission of gases and fumes from improper storage, transport systems and wastes disposals have polluted the environment especially surface and underground water and air. This has irreversibly affects on the environment some of which can be devastating to life.Some of the potential adverse effects on environment include the ozone depletion, acid rain,soil degradation and climate change

  3. Process for separating radioactive gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Shigeru; Awada, Yoshihisa.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To efficiently and safely separate and recover raw gases such as krypton which requires radioactive attenuation by a long term storage. Structure: A mixture of krypton and xenon is separated by liquefaction from raw gases at a first distillation column, using latent heat of liquid nitrogen. The krypton and xenon mixture separated by liquefaction at the first distillation column is separated into krypton and xenon, by controlling operation pressure of a second distillation column at about 3 - 5 atm., using sensible heat of low temperature nitrogen gas discharged from a top of the first distillation column and a condenser. (Aizawa, K.)

  4. The ideal gases of tachyons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrowczynski, St.

    1984-01-01

    The formalism of statistical mechanics of particles slower than light has been considered from the point of view of the application of this formalism for the description of tachyons. Properties of ideal gases of tachyons have been discussed in detail. After finding general formulae for quantum, Bose and Fermi gases the classical limit has been considered. It has been shown that Bose-Einstein condensation occurs. The tachyon gas of bosons violates the third principle of thermodynamics. Degenerated Fermi gas has been considered and in this case the entropy vanishes at zero temperature. Difficulties of formulating covariant statistical mechanics have been discussed

  5. A microscope for Fermi gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omran, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This thesis reports on a novel quantum gas microscope to investigate many-body systems of fermionic atoms in optical lattices. Single-site resolved imaging of ultracold lattice gases has enabled powerful studies of bosonic quantum many-body systems. The extension of this capability to Fermi gases offers new prospects to studying complex phenomena of strongly correlated systems, for which numerical simulations are often out of reach. Using standard techniques of laser cooling, optical trapping, and evaporative cooling, ultracold Fermi gases of 6 Li are prepared and loaded into a large-scale 2D optical lattice of flexible geometry. The atomic distribution is frozen using a second, short-scaled lattice, where we perform Raman sideband cooling to induce fluorescence on each atom while maintaining its position. Together with high-resolution imaging, the fluorescence signals allow for reconstructing the initial atom distribution with single-site sensitivity and high fidelity. Magnetically driven evaporative cooling in the plane allows for producing degenerate Fermi gases with almost unity filling in the initial lattice, allowing for the first microscopic studies of ultracold gases with clear signatures of Fermi statistics. By preparing an ensemble of spin-polarised Fermi gases, we detect a flattening of the density profile towards the centre of the cloud, which is a characteristic of a band-insulating state. In one set of experiments, we demonstrate that losses of atom pairs on a single lattice site due to light-assisted collisions are circumvented. The oversampling of the second lattice allows for deterministic separation of the atom pairs into different sites. Compressing a high-density sample in a trap before loading into the lattice leads to many double occupancies of atoms populating different bands, which we can image with no evidence for pairwise losses. We therefore gain direct access to the true number statistics on each lattice site. Using this feature, we can

  6. Mercury transformation and speciation in flue gases from anthropogenic emission sources: a critical review

    OpenAIRE

    L. Zhang; S. X. Wang; Q. R. Wu; F. Y. Wang; C.-J. Lin; L. M. Zhang; M. L. Hui; J. M. Hao

    2015-01-01

    Mercury transformation mechanisms and speciation profiles are reviewed for mercury formed in and released from flue gases of coal-fired boilers, non-ferrous metal smelters, cement plants, iron and steel plants, municipal solid waste incinerators, and biomass burning. Mercury in coal, ores and other raw materials is released to flue gases in the form of Hg0 during combustion or smelting in boilers, kilns or furnaces. Decreasing temperature from over 800 °C t...

  7. Original Researc Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAGHAVENDRA

    Practices. Problems. Supervision. Primary School. *Corresponding Author: Asrat Dagnew. E-mail: asratboza@yahoo.com tructional support. The relevant and ... vision is one of indispensable system pment. Supervision is a system of that directly concerned on the aff members in a school or other. Original Research ...

  8. Original Research Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAGHAVENDRA

    language in social interaction( Anto et al., 2012; Tessema et al., 2012). While such ..... 10 items on a five-point Likert scale originally developed by Benard et al. (2007). ..... self-confidence, and hold down their anxiety levels. In this study ...

  9. Global warming description using Daisyworld model with greenhouse gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Susana L D; Savi, Marcelo A; Viola, Flavio M; Leiroz, Albino J K

    2014-11-01

    Daisyworld is an archetypal model of the earth that is able to describe the global regulation that can emerge from the interaction between life and environment. This article proposes a model based on the original Daisyworld considering greenhouse gases emission and absorption, allowing the description of the global warming phenomenon. Global and local analyses are discussed evaluating the influence of greenhouse gases in the planet dynamics. Numerical simulations are carried out showing the general qualitative behavior of the Daisyworld for different scenarios that includes solar luminosity variations and greenhouse gases effect. Nonlinear dynamics perspective is of concern discussing a way that helps the comprehension of the global warming phenomenon. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Performance demonstration program plan for analysis of simulated headspace gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) for analysis of headspace gases will consist of regular distribution and analyses of test standards to evaluate the capability for analyzing VOCs, hydrogen, and methane in the headspace of transuranic (TRU) waste throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Each distribution is termed a PDP cycle. These evaluation cycles will provide an objective measure of the reliability of measurements performed for TRU waste characterization. Laboratory performance will be demonstrated by the successful analysis of blind audit samples of simulated TRU waste drum headspace gases according to the criteria set within the text of this Program Plan. Blind audit samples (hereinafter referred to as PDP samples) will be used as an independent means to assess laboratory performance regarding compliance with the QAPP QAOs. The concentration of analytes in the PDP samples will encompass the range of concentrations anticipated in actual waste characterization gas samples. Analyses which are required by the WIPP to demonstrate compliance with various regulatory requirements and which are included in the PDP must be performed by laboratories which have demonstrated acceptable performance in the PDP

  11. Transport processes in ionized gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kremer, G.M.

    1997-01-01

    Based on kinetic theory of gases and on the combined of Chapman-Enskog and Grad, the laws of Ohm, Fourier and Navier-Stokes are derived for a non-relativistic fully ionized gas. Moreover, the combined method is applied to the BGK model of the relativistic Boltzmann equation and the Ohm's law is derived for a relativistic fully ionized gas. (author)

  12. Stratospheric aerosols and precursor gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Measurements were made of the aerosol size, height and geographical distribution, their composition and optical properties, and their temporal variation with season and following large volcanic eruptions. Sulfur-bearing gases were measured in situ in the stratosphere, and studied of the chemical and physical processes which control gas-to-particle conversion were carried out in the laboratory.

  13. Permeability of cork to gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, David P; Fonseca, Ana L; Pereira, Helen; Teodoro, Orlando M N D

    2011-04-27

    The permeability of gases through uncompressed cork was investigated. More than 100 samples were assessed from different plank qualities to provide a picture of the permeability distribution. A novel technique based on a mass spectrometer leak detector was used to directly measure the helium flow through the central area of small disks 10 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick. The permeability for nitrogen, oxygen, and other gases was measured by the pressure rise technique. Boiled and nonboiled cork samples from different sections were evaluated. An asymmetric frequency distribution ranging 3 orders of magnitude (roughly from 1 to 1000 μmol/(cm·atm·day)) for selected samples without macroscopic defects was found, having a peak below 100 μmol/(cm·atm·day). Correlation was found between density and permeability: higher density samples tend to show lower permeability. However, boiled cork showed a mean lower permeability despite having a lower density. The transport mechanism of gases through cork was also examined. Calculations suggest that gases permeate uncompressed cork mainly through small channels between cells under a molecular flow regime. The diameter of such channels was estimated to be in the range of 100 nm, in agreement with the plasmodesmata size in the cork cell walls.

  14. Mercury transformation and speciation in flue gases from anthropogenic emission sources: a critical review

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Shuxiao; Wu, Qingru; Wang, Fengyang; Lin, Che-Jen; Zhang, Leiming; Hui, Mulin; Yang, Mei; Su, Haitao; Hao, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    Mercury transformation mechanisms and speciation profiles are reviewed for mercury formed in and released from flue gases of coal-fired boilers, non-ferrous metal smelters, cement plants, iron and steel plants, waste incinerators, biomass burning and so on. Mercury in coal, ores, and other raw materials is released to flue gases in the form of Hg0 during combustion or smelting in boilers, kilns or furnaces. Decreasing temperature from over 800 °C to below 300 °C in flue gase...

  15. Radiolytic and thermal generation of gases from Hanford grout samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisel, D.; Jonah, C.D.; Kapoor, S.; Matheson, M.S.; Mulac, W.A.

    1993-10-01

    Gamma irradiation of WHC-supplied samples of grouted Tank 102-AP simulated nonradioactive waste has been carried out at three dose rates, 0.25, 0.63, and 130 krad/hr. The low dose rate corresponds to that in the actual grout vaults; with the high dose rate, doses equivalent to more than 40 years in the grout vault were achieved. An average G(H{sub 2}) = 0.047 molecules/100 eV was found, independent of dose rate. The rate of H2 production decreases above 80 Mrad. For other gases, G(N{sub 2}) = 0.12, G(O{sub 2}) = 0.026, G(N{sub 2}O) = 0.011 and G(CO) = 0.0042 at 130 krad/hr were determined. At lower dose rates, N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} could not be measured because of interference by trapped air. The value of G(H{sub 2}) is higher than expected, suggesting segregation of water from nitrate and nitrite salts in the grout. The total pressure generated by the radiolysis at 130 krad/h has been independently measured, and total amounts of gases generated were calculated from this measurement. Good agreement between this measurement and the sum of all the gases that were independently determined was obtained. Therefore, the individual gas measurements account for most of the major components that are generated by the radiolysis. At 90 {degree}C, H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O were generated at a rate that could be described by exponential formation of each of the gases. Gases measured at the lower temperatures were probably residual trapped gases. An as yet unknown product interfered with oxygen determinations at temperatures above ambient. The thermal results do not affect the radiolytic findings.

  16. Ironing out industrial wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valenti, M.

    1996-01-01

    This article describes a hazardous waste treatment known as the catalytic extraction process, which also stabilizes and reduces low-level radioactive wastes to a fraction of their original volume, easing their disposal. It uses molten iron and other metals to convert hazardous wastes into useful materials

  17. Impact of chronic exposure to gasoline automotive exhaust gases on some bio-markers affecting the hormonal sexual function, the kidney function and blood parameters, in the rat; Impact de l'exposition chronique aux gaz d'echappement d'origine automobile sur certains biomarqueurs touchant la fonction hormonale sexuelle male, la fonction renale et l'hemogramme chez le rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smaoui, M.; Ghorbel, F.; Boujelbene, M.; El Feki, A. [Faculte des Sciences de Sfax, Lab. d' Ecophysiologie Animale (Tunisia); Makni-Ayadi, F. [Faculte de Medecine de Sfax, Lab. de Biochimie (Tunisia)

    2000-09-01

    The automotive exhaust gases constitute an important source of urban pollution. The objective of this study is to explore, in the rat, the effects of repetitive exposure to gasoline automotive exhaust gases on the level variations of serum testosterone, blood lead, bone lead, blood carbon monoxide, on the kidney function and blood parameters. 200 rats inhaling a mixture of air and automotive exhaust gas (10/1, v/v), are distributed in 4 groups treated during 15, 30, 45 and 60 days. They are compared to non treated controls. Our results show a decrease of serum testosterone level. This result is the origin of a masculine sterility already demonstrated in our laboratory. This sterility seems to be reversible because polluted rats regain their sexual activity, 2 months after stopping of the pollutant treatment. An increase of the blood carbon monoxide level with a lead accumulation in blood and in the tail is noticed. Biochemical analyses show that glycaemia, urea, and creatininaemia increase in treated animals. The urinary rate of creatinine decreases. These results indicate kidney deficiency. Our results show also in treated animals an increase of the number of red blood corpuscles, of hematocrit, of the blood level of haemoglobin and of the VGM, and a decrease of the CGMH. The carbon monoxide and the lead detected in blood of the treated animals are the origin of these perturbations. In conclusion, our results show that gasoline automotive exhaust gas induces, in the rat, a decrease of serum testosterone level. The carbon monoxide and the lead present in the exhaust gas, and detected in blood and in the tail of the treated animals, are the origin of sexual, kidney and blood parameters perturbations. (author)

  18. Method for storing radioactive combustible waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbee, H.W.; Lovelace, R.C.

    1973-10-01

    A method is described for preventing pressure buildup in sealed containers which contain radioactively contaminated combustible waste material by adding an oxide getter material to the container so as to chemically bind sorbed water and combustion product gases. (Official Gazette)

  19. Emission and Sink of Greenhouse Gases in Soils of Moscow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozharova, N. V.; Kulachkova, S. A.; Lebed'-Sharlevich, Ya. I.

    2018-03-01

    The first inventory and zoning of the emission and sink of methane and carbon dioxide in the urban structure of greenhouse gases from soils and surface technogenic formations (STFs) (Technosols) on technogenic, recrementogenic, and natural sediments have been performed with consideration for the global warming potential under conditions of different formation rate of these gases, underflooding, and sealing. From gas geochemical criteria and anthropogenic pedogenesis features, the main sources of greenhouse gases, their intensity, and mass emission were revealed. The mass fractions of emissions from the sectors of waste and land use in the inventories of greenhouse gas emissions have been determined. New sources of gas emission have been revealed in the first sector, the emissions from which add tens of percent to the literature and state reports. In the second sector, emissions exceed the available data in 70 times. Estimation criteria based on the degree of manifestation and chemical composition of soil-geochemical anomalies and barrier capacities have been proposed. The sink of greenhouse gases from the atmosphere and the internal (latent) sink of methane in soils and STFs have been determined. Ecological functions of soils and STFs have been shown, and the share of latent methane sink has been calculated. The bacterial oxidation of methane in soils and STFs exceeds its emission to the atmosphere in almost hundred times.

  20. Use of combustible wastes as fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, V.R.; Salamov, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    Achievements of science and technology in creating and using units for combustion of wastes with recovery of heat of the escaping gases has been systematized and generalized. Scales and outlooks are examined for the use of general, industrial and agricultural waste as fuel, composition of the waste, questions of planning and operating units for combustion of solid refuse, settling of waste water and industrial and agricultural waste. Questions are covered for preparing them for combustion use in special units with recovery of heat and at ES, aspects of environmental protection during combustion of waste, cost indicators of the employed methods of recovering the combustible waste.

  1. Waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dworschak, H.; Mannone, F.; Rocco, P.

    1995-01-01

    The presence of tritium in tritium-burning devices to be built for large scale research on thermonuclear fusion poses many problems especially in terms of occupational and environmental safety. One of these problems derives from the production of tritiated wastes in gaseous, liquid and solid forms. All these wastes need to be adequately processed and conditioned to minimize tritium releases to an acceptably low occupational and environmental level and consequently to protect workers and the public against the risks of unacceptable doses from exposure to tritium. Since all experimental thermonuclear fusion devices of the Tokomak type to be built and operated in the near future as well as all experimental activities undertaken in tritium laboratories like ETHEL will generate tritiated wastes, current strategies and practices to be applied for the routine management of these wastes need to be defined. Adequate background information is provided through an exhaustive literature survey. In this frame alternative tritiated waste management options so far investigated or currently applied to this end in Europe, USA and Canada have been assessed. The relevance of tritium in waste containing gamma-emitters, originated by the neutron activation of structural materials is assessed in relation to potential final disposal options. Particular importance has been attached to the tritium retention efficiency achievable by the various waste immobilization options. 19 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  2. Soliton Gases and Generalized Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyon, Benjamin; Yoshimura, Takato; Caux, Jean-Sébastien

    2018-01-01

    We show that the equations of generalized hydrodynamics (GHD), a hydrodynamic theory for integrable quantum systems at the Euler scale, emerge in full generality in a family of classical gases, which generalize the gas of hard rods. In this family, the particles, upon colliding, jump forward or backward by a distance that depends on their velocities, reminiscent of classical soliton scattering. This provides a "molecular dynamics" for GHD: a numerical solver which is efficient, flexible, and which applies to the presence of external force fields. GHD also describes the hydrodynamics of classical soliton gases. We identify the GHD of any quantum model with that of the gas of its solitonlike wave packets, thus providing a remarkable quantum-classical equivalence. The theory is directly applicable, for instance, to integrable quantum chains and to the Lieb-Liniger model realized in cold-atom experiments.

  3. Noble Gases in Lakes and Ground Waters

    OpenAIRE

    Kipfer, Rolf; Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner; Peeters, Frank; Stute, Marvin

    2002-01-01

    In contrast to most other fields of noble gas geochemistry that mostly regard atmospheric noble gases as 'contamination,' air-derived noble gases make up the far largest and hence most important contribution to the noble gas abundance in meteoric waters, such as lakes and ground waters. Atmospheric noble gases enter the meteoric water cycle by gas partitioning during air / water exchange with the atmosphere. In lakes and oceans noble gases are exchanged with the free atmosphere at the surface...

  4. Centrifugal separation of mixture gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, M.S.; Chen, W.N.; Yin, Y.T.

    2008-01-01

    An attempt for single centrifugal separation of mixtures with different molecular formula was presented in this paper. The mixtures of SF 6 and CCl 3 F, and SF 6 and CCl 4 were chosen as the processing gases, which were prepared in three mass ratios, 0.5, 0.8 and 0.2, respectively. The separating characteristics such as the overall separation factors and the variation of cuts were studied. (author)

  5. Membrane methods for separation of radioactive noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekman, I.N.; Bozhenko, E.I.; Ievlev, A.L.; Kazankin, Yu.N.; Nikonov, V.N.; Teplyakov, V.V.; Shvyryaev, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    Using the different ial permeability method at different temperatures (20-120 deg C) transport characteristics of inert gases, N 2 , O 2 , CH 4 , CQ 2 and H 2 as the main components of waste gases in homogeneous films of arylate-siloxane block-copolymer (silar) of different composition, as well as of its components - polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polyarylate, have been measured. Dependences of diffusion and permeability coefficients on inert gas atom dimensions, and solubility coefficient - on strength constant of the Lennard-Jones potential, are analyzed. It is shown that selectivity of silar gas permbility is determined by the properties of siloxane component, and the values of permeability coefficients decrease with the increase of polyarylate block part due to dominating decrease in diffusion coefficients as compared with solubility coefficients

  6. Device for the elimination of noxious components of exhaust gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, A

    1975-04-24

    A device for the removal of noxious components from the exhaust gases of an internal combustion engine is described. It consists of a chemical reactor installed in the tail-pipe. Behind the reactor, in the flow direction of the exhaust gases, there is a catalytic temperature sensor whose electrical output is transmitted to an analyzer which provides a signal if the reactor fails. The temperature sensor is situated directly in the waste gas duct or in a branch of the tail-pipe which is supplied with air. There is also another, catalytically inactive, temperature sensor. A failure is signalled (a) if the chemical reactor has failed, and (b) if there is not enough oxygen in the exhaust gas to keep up a chemical reaction.

  7. Method and apparatus for condensing radioactive rare gases by means of use of ejector and selective adsorption and desorption process including cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Toshio; Tsuda, Koji; Watanabe, Yukio; Miharada, Hassui; Tani, Akira.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To recover rare gases in waste gases at one stage as high density as possible while effectively utilizing adsorption beds. Structure: The waste gases pass through an ejector and are subject to treatment of dehumidification and decarbonization in a pretreatment station, after which the gases enter a first low temperature adsorption bed through a heat exchanger and a first valve. If breaking should occur in the first adsorption bed, the waste gases would be introduced into a second adsorption bed for adsorption treatment. The first adsorption bed, which has completed adsorption, is heated to a regenerative temperature while adsorption is being performed at the second adsorption bed, and degases containing rare gases are recycled through a second and third valves and are mixed into raw waste gases by the action of the ejector. After the above adsorption and desorption have been repeated several times by alternately using the first and second adsorption bed the adsorption bed is heated to a temperature lower than the regenerative temperature to recycle the desorption gases to feed and then heated to the regenerative temperature, and the desorbed rare gases are fed to the succeeding system through a pump. (Yoshihara, H.)

  8. Landfill gases and some effects on vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin B. Flower; Ida A. Leone; Edward F. Gilman; John J. Arthur

    1977-01-01

    Gases moving from refuse landfills through soil were studied in New Jersey. The gases, products of anaerobic decomposition of organic matter in the refuse, caused injury and death of peach trees, ornamentals, and commercial farm crops, and create possible hazards to life and property because of the entrance of combustible gases into residences. Remedial measures are...

  9. Report on a survey in fiscal 1999. Survey on technologies to effectively utilize biologically originated organic wastes, and the scenarios for proliferation thereof; 1999 nendo seibutsu kigen yukihaikibutsu no yuko riyo gijutsu to sono fukyu scenario no chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    With the biologically originated organic wastes (biomass) left unattended in Japan without being given effective measures as the object, effects are presented on contribution to reducing greenhouse effect gas emission and reducing environmental load, and considerations were given on scenarios to proliferate the utilization technologies. These actions were carried out upon identifying the trends inside and outside the country of developing methods and technologies to utilize them effectively as energy sources. Because of the present shortage in support from the policy aspects for regenerative energies themselves, the back-up from energy policy aspect is an urgent necessity by establishing such a law as the 'natural energy utilization promotion law' whose legislation is proposed by citizens. Appropriate useful technologies would have to be introduced into appropriate applications under such legislative support. For the time being, the 'wastes electric power generation' and 'bio-gasification power generation' systems that have been established already will be utilized. Furthermore, methanol and hydrogen will be synthesized from biomass to be used as fuel for fuel cells. Utilization of the cascade type system is advocated that uses substances sequentially from better ones to utilize woody biomass without waste. (NEDO)

  10. Existence of solitary waves in dipolar quantum gases

    KAUST Repository

    Antonelli, Paolo; Sparber, Christof

    2011-01-01

    We study a nonlinear Schrdinger equation arising in the mean field description of dipolar quantum gases. Under the assumption of sufficiently strong dipolar interactions, the existence of standing waves, and hence solitons, is proved together with some of their properties. This gives a rigorous argument for the possible existence of solitary waves in BoseEinstein condensates, which originate solely due to the dipolar interaction between the particles. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Existence of solitary waves in dipolar quantum gases

    KAUST Repository

    Antonelli, Paolo

    2011-02-01

    We study a nonlinear Schrdinger equation arising in the mean field description of dipolar quantum gases. Under the assumption of sufficiently strong dipolar interactions, the existence of standing waves, and hence solitons, is proved together with some of their properties. This gives a rigorous argument for the possible existence of solitary waves in BoseEinstein condensates, which originate solely due to the dipolar interaction between the particles. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Gas generation phenomena in radioactive waste transportation packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigrey, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    The interaction of radiation from radioactive materials with the waste matrix can lead to the deterioration of the waste form resulting in the possible of gaseous species. Depending on the type and characteristics of the radiation source, the generation of hydrogen may predominate. Since the interaction of alpha particles with the waste form results in significant energy transfer, other gases such as carbon oxides, methane, nitrogen oxides, oxygen, water, and helium are possible. The type of gases produced from the waste forms is determined by the mechanisms involved in the waste degradation. For transuranic wastes, the identified degradation mechanisms are reported to be caused by radiolysis, thermal decomposition or dewatering, chemical corrosion, and bacterial action. While all these mechanisms may be responsible for the building of gases during the storage of wastes, radiolysis and thermal decomposition appear to be main contributors during waste transport operations. (authors)

  13. Solid waste as an energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armenski, Slave

    2004-01-01

    The solid wastes as sources of heat and electrical energy were analysed. Typical structure of solid waste and organic products from: municipal solid wastes, industrial wastes and agricultural wastes for some developed countries are presented. Some dates of agricultural wastes for R. Macedonia are presented. The structure and percentage of organic products and energy content of solid wastes are estimated. The quantity of heat from solid wastes depending of the waste mass is presented. The heat quantity of some solid wastes component and the mixed municipal waste is presented. (Original)

  14. Explorative analysis of microbes, colloids and gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallbeck, Lotta; Pedersen, Karsten (Microbial Analytics Sweden AB, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2008-08-15

    potential to transport radionuclides in groundwater. The aim of the study of colloids in the Forsmark 2.3 site investigation was to quantify and determine the composition of colloids in groundwater samples from the boreholes. There are both inorganic and organic colloids, and the site investigation measured both types. - Gases (Chapter 3): Dissolved gases in groundwater contribute to the mass of dissolved species. The distribution and composition of dissolved gases in deep groundwater are important to understand in the safety assessment of a deep geological nuclear waste repository: Micro bubbles of gas may potentially transport radionuclides from the repository to the surface. Oxygen, hydrogen sulphide and carbon dioxide are parts of fundamental redox couples that participate in several solid-aqueous phase transformations such as the precipitation of ferric iron oxides, iron sulphide and calcite. Methane and hydrogen, may serve as sources of energy to various microbiological processes

  15. Explorative analysis of microbes, colloids and gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallbeck, Lotta; Pedersen, Karsten

    2008-08-01

    radionuclides in groundwater. The aim of the study of colloids in the Forsmark 2.3 site investigation was to quantify and determine the composition of colloids in groundwater samples from the boreholes. There are both inorganic and organic colloids, and the site investigation measured both types. - Gases (Chapter 3): Dissolved gases in groundwater contribute to the mass of dissolved species. The distribution and composition of dissolved gases in deep groundwater are important to understand in the safety assessment of a deep geological nuclear waste repository: Micro bubbles of gas may potentially transport radionuclides from the repository to the surface. Oxygen, hydrogen sulphide and carbon dioxide are parts of fundamental redox couples that participate in several solid-aqueous phase transformations such as the precipitation of ferric iron oxides, iron sulphide and calcite. Methane and hydrogen, may serve as sources of energy to various microbiological processes

  16. Waste classification: a management approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickham, L.E.

    1984-01-01

    A waste classification system designed to quantify the total hazard of a waste has been developed by the Low-Level Waste Management Program. As originally conceived, the system was designed to deal with mixed radioactive waste. The methodology has been developed and successfully applied to radiological and chemical wastes, both individually and mixed together. Management options to help evaluate the financial and safety trade-offs between waste segregation, waste treatment, container types, and site factors are described. Using the system provides a very simple and cost effective way of making quick assessments of a site's capabilities to contain waste materials. 3 references

  17. Waste characterization: What's on second?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, F.J.; Smith, M.A.

    1989-07-01

    Waste characterization is the process whereby the physical properties and chemical composition of waste are determined. Waste characterization is an important element which is necessary to certify that waste meets the acceptance criteria for storage, treatment, or disposal. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders list and describe the germane waste form, package, and container criteria for the storage of both solid low-level waste package, and container criteria for the storage of both solid low-level waste (SLLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste, including chemical composition and compatibility, hazardous material content (e.g., lead), fissile material content, radioisotopic inventory, particulate content, equivalent alpha activity, thermal heat output, and absence of free liquids, explosives, and compressed gases. At the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the responsibility for waste characterization begins with the individual or individuals who generate the waste. The generator must be able to document the type and estimate the quantity of various materials (e.g., waste forms -- physical characteristics, chemical composition, hazardous materials, major radioisotopes) which have been placed into the waste container. Analyses of process flow sheets and a statistically valid sampling program can provide much of the required information as well as a documented level of confidence in the acquired data. A program is being instituted in which major generator facilities perform radionuclide assay of small packets of waste prior to being placed into a waste drum. 17 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  18. Greenhouse Gases and Animal Agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, J. (ed.) [Department of Animal Science, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido (Japan); Young, B.A. (ed.) [The University of Queensland, Gatton, Queensland 4343 (Australia)

    2002-07-01

    Reports from interdisciplinary areas including microbiology, biochemistry, animal nutrition, agricultural engineering and economics are integrated in this proceedings. The major theme of this book is environmental preservation by controlling release of undesirable greenhouse gases to realize the sustainable development of animal agriculture. Technology exists for the effective collection of methane generated from anaerobic fermentation of animal effluent and its use as a biomass energy source. Fossil fuel consumption can be reduced and there can be increased use of locally available energy sources. In addition, promoting environmentally-conscious agriculture which does not rely on the chemical fertilizer can be realized by effective use of animal manure and compost products.

  19. Mechanics of liquids and gases

    CERN Document Server

    Loitsyanskii, L G; Jones, W P

    1966-01-01

    Mechanics of Liquids and Gases, Second Edition is a 10-chapter text that covers significant revisions concerning the dynamics of an ideal gas, a viscous liquid and a viscous gas.After an expanded introduction to the fundamental properties and methods of the mechanics of fluids, this edition goes on dealing with the kinetics and general questions of dynamics. The next chapters describe the one-dimensional pipe flow of a gas with friction, the elementary theory of the shock tube; Riemann's theory of the wave propagation of finite intensity, and the theory of plane subsonic and supersonic flows.

  20. Arc plasma incineration of surrogate radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girold, C.; Cartier, R.; Taupiac, J.P.; Vandensteendam, C.; Baronnet, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this presentation is to demonstrate the feasibility to substitute a single plasma reactor, where the arc is transferred on a melt glass bath, for several steps in an existing nuclear technological wastes incinerator. The incineration of wastes, the produced gas treatment and the vitrification of ashes issued from waste incineration are the three simultaneous functions of this new kind of reactor. The three steps of the work are described: first, post-combustion in an oxygen plasma of gases generated from the waste pyrolysis, then, vitrification of ashes from the calcination of wastes in the transferred plasma furnace and finally, incineration/vitrification of wastes in the same furnace

  1. Critical analysis of the management of waste system originated at the uranium mining and processing. A case study of the Concentrated Unit of Uranium - INB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Valeska Peres de

    2005-01-01

    The uranium world market faced a depreciation of this commodity during the last decades. Recently, decreases in the secondary supply (represented by highly enriched uranium - HEU - stocks detained by the former Soviet Union) turned out the market dependent upon primary supply again. In order to cope with this changing demands and market conditions, new uranium mining/milling projects must start operation, or at least, former uranium production plants must be improved. Environmental questions have been and certainly will continue to be a determinant factor concerning the operational feasibility of these facilities. Mining/milling activities have the potential to cause risks to the human health and to the environment. In case of uranium projects, radiological impacts shall also be taken into consideration. Amongst the most relevant environmental aspects associated with the operation of a uranium project, generated wastes are usually of major concern and deserve appropriate management strategies. As a result the objective of the present work was to examine the waste management system of the Brazilian uranium production unity located at the municipality of Caetite, northeast region of the country. An open pit mine and a milling facility compose this unit. The extraction method employed is acid heap leach (using H 2 SO 4 ). It could be assessed that the overall conceptual management strategy is in agreement with the practices adopted worldwide. Atmospheric impacts, caused by the emissions of radon and aerosols must be investigated in more details. Mathematical simulation revealed that no significant impact in groundwater is expected due to mobilization and transport of radionuclides from the milling wastes. However, the impacts of drainage water, accumulated in the open pit, into groundwater cannot be discarded yet. Screening techniques were applied to assess the potential contribution of the leached ore piles as a 226 Ra source of pollution. Our results did not allow

  2. Reduction of Climate Gases by Energy Efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moe, N.

    1998-01-01

    Carbon dioxide cannot be depolluted in practice. However, there are two areas where measures can be taken to avoid CO 2 emissions: 1. Energy-efficiency. 2. Use of sustainable energy sources in energy production. It is characteristic that many measures which are good for the environment are also good from the point of view of cost efficiency, preparedness and employment. This is tru, for instance, of the greater use of biofuels instead of fossil fuels, collective heating systems as opposed to individual ones and economy measures - especially more efficient use of electricity. It is a question of thinking of the system as a whole. Methane is another factor which contributes to the greenhouse effect. Methane emissions can also be avoided, or reduced, by system-thinking. System-thinking is, for instance, not ro deposit combustible waste but to use it as an energy source. And why not produce electricity by using methane from existing landfill sites. Electrical energy is the most useful form of energy. Therefore, electricity should not, as a principal rule, be used for heating, or as process energy. The fact that energy-efficiency and emission of greenhouse gases are interrelated is shown in the following two examples. 1. Only about 25% of the energy content in extracted coal will reach the consumers as electricity when the production takes place in an ordinary, coal-fires condensing power station. 2. When district heating (room-heating and hot water) is produced in a modern heat-production plant by flue-gas condensation, about 90% of the energy is utilised for heating purposes. To obtain an overall picture of the amount of energy used for a purpose, e.g. heating or electricity, you must view the entire process from extraction to final use. Such a picture can show the energy efficiency and what losses arise. Efficiency measures can reduce the energy bill. They can also reduce pollution, greenhouse gases among other things. Examples will be given in this paper of energy

  3. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transuranic Waste Baseline inventory report. Volume 1. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    This document provides baseline inventories of transuranic wastes for the WIPP facility. Information on waste forms, forecasting of future inventories, and waste stream originators is also provided. A diskette is provided which contains the inventory database

  4. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transuranic Waste Baseline inventory report. Volume 1. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    This document provides baseline inventories of transuranic wastes for the WIPP facility. Information on waste forms, forecasting of future inventories, and waste stream originators is also provided. A diskette is provided which contains the inventory database.

  5. ITER waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosanvallon, S.; Na, B.C.; Benchikhoune, M.; Uzan, J. Elbez; Gastaldi, O.; Taylor, N.; Rodriguez, L.

    2010-01-01

    ITER will produce solid radioactive waste during its operation (arising from the replacement of components and from process and housekeeping waste) and during decommissioning (de-activation phase and dismantling). The waste will be activated by neutrons of energies up to 14 MeV and potentially contaminated by activated corrosion products, activated dust and tritium. This paper describes the waste origin, the waste classification as a function of the French national agency for radioactive waste management (ANDRA), the optimization process put in place to reduce the waste radiotoxicity and volumes, the estimated waste amount based on the current design and maintenance procedure, and the overall strategy from component removal to final disposal anticipated at this stage of the project.

  6. Radioactive wastes. Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaumont, R.

    2001-01-01

    Many documents (journal articles, book chapters, non-conventional documents..) deal with radioactive wastes but very often this topic is covered in a partial way and sometimes the data presented are contradictory. The aim of this article is to precise the definition of radioactive wastes and the proper terms to describe this topic. It describes the main guidelines of the management of radioactive wastes, in particular in France, and presents the problems raised by this activity: 1 - goal and stakes of the management; 2 - definition of a radioactive waste; 3 - radionuclides encountered; 4 - radio-toxicity and radiation risks; 5 - French actors of waste production and management; 6 - French classification and management principles; 7 - wastes origin and characteristics; 8 - status of radioactive wastes in France per categories; 9 - management practices; 10 - packages conditioning and fabrication; 11 - storage of wastes; 12 - the French law from December 30, 1991 and the opportunities of new ways of management; 13 - international situation. (J.S.)

  7. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morley, F.

    1980-01-01

    A summary is given of the report of an Expert Group appointed in 1976 to consider the 1959 White Paper 'The Control of Radioactive Wastes' in the light of the changes that have taken place since it was written and with the extended remit of examining 'waste management' rather than the original 'waste disposal'. The Group undertook to; review the categories and quantities present and future of radioactive wastes, recommend the principles for the proper management of these wastes, advise whether any changes in practice or statutory controls are necessary and make recommendations. (UK)

  8. Slurry growth and gas retention in synthetic Hanford waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Scheele, R.D.

    1992-09-01

    This work seeks to establish chemical and physical processes responsible for the generation and retention of gases within waste from a particular high-level waste tank on the Hanford Site, Tank 101-SY, through the use of synthetic wastes on a laboratory scale. The goal of these activities is to support the development of mitigation/remediation strategies for Tank 101-SY. Laboratory studies of aged synthetic waste have shown that gas generation occurs thermally at a significant level at current tank temperatures. Gas compositions include the same gases produced in actual tank waste, primarily N 2 , N 2 O, and H 2 . Gas stoichiometries have been shown to be greatly influenced by several organic and inorganic constituents within the synthetic waste. Retention of gases in the synthetic waste is in the form of bubble attachment to solid particles

  9. Developments in odour control and waste gas treatment biotechnology: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, J E; Parsons, S A; Stuetz, R M

    2001-02-01

    Waste and wastewater treatment processes produce odours, which can cause a nuisance to adjacent populations and contribute significantly to atmospheric pollution. Sulphurous compounds are responsible for acid rain and mist; many organic compounds of industrial origin contribute to airborne public health concerns, as well as environmental problems. Waste gases from industry have traditionally been treated using physicochemical processes, such as scrubbing, adsorption, condensation, and oxidation, however, biological treatment of waste gases has gained support as an effective and economical option in the past few decades. One emergent technique for biological waste gas treatment is the use of existing activated sludge plants as bioscrubbers, thus treating the foul air generated by other process units of the wastewater treatment system on site, with no requirement for additional units or for interruption of wastewater treatment. Limited data are available regarding the performance of activated sludge diffusion of odorous air in spite of numerous positive reports from full-scale applications in North America. This review argues that the information available is insufficient for precise process design and optimization, and simultaneous activated sludge treatment of wastewater and airborne odours could be adopted worldwide.

  10. CRNL active waste incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McQuade, D.W.

    1965-02-01

    At CRNL the daily collection of 1200 pounds of active combustible waste is burned in a refractory lined multi-chamber incinerator. Capacity is 500-550 pounds per hour; volume reduction 96%. Combustion gases are cooled by air dilution and decontaminated by filtration through glass bags in a baghouse dust collector. This report includes a description of the incinerator plant, its operation, construction and operating costs, and recommendations for future designs. (author)

  11. Throat gases against the CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaut, C.

    2006-01-01

    The steel production needs carbon consumption and generates carbon dioxide, the main greenhouse gases. It represents about 6 % of the greenhouse gases emissions in the world. That is why the steel industry began last year a research program, Ideogaz, to reduce its CO 2 releases. The first results on the throat gases recovery seems very promising: it uses 25 % less of carbon. The author presents the program and the main technical aspects of the method. (A.L.B.)

  12. Optical Lattice Gases of Interacting Fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-02

    interacting Fermi gases has topological properties similar to the conventional chiral p- wave state. These include a non-zero Chern number and the...interacting cold gases with broad impacts on the interfaces with condensed matter and particle physics . Applications and experiments of some of the physics ...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0016 Optical Lattice Gases of Interacting Fermions Wensheng Vincent Liu UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH Final Report 12/02/2015

  13. Biotreatment of ammonia and butanal containing waste gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Vriens, L.; Verachtert, H.

    1994-01-01

    Abstract The biological removal of ammonia and butanal in contaminated air was investigated by using, respectively, a laboratory-scale filter and a scrubber-filter combination. It was shown that ammonia can be removed with an elimination efficiency of 83% at a volumetric load of 100 m3·m–2·h–1 with

  14. Biotreatment of ammonia- and butanal-containing waste gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckhuysen, B; Vriens, L; Verachtert, H

    1994-10-01

    The biological removal of ammonia and butanal in contaminated air was investigated by using, respectively, a laboratory-scale filter and a scrubber-filter combination. It was shown that ammonia can be removed with an elimination efficiency of 83% at a volumetric load of 100 m3.m-2.h-1 with 4-16 ppm of ammonia. During the experiment percolates were analysed for nitrate, nitrite, ammonium and pH. It was found that the nitrification in the biofilter could deteriorate due to an inhibition of Nitrobacter species, when the free ammonia concentration was rising in the percolate. It should be easy to control such inhibition through periodic analysis of the liquid phase by using a filter-scrubber combination. Such a combination was studied for butanal removal. Butanal was removed with an elimination efficiency of 80% by a scrubber-filter combination at a volumetric load of 100 m3.m-2.h-1 and a high butanal input concentration. Mixing the filter material with CaCO3 and pH control of the liquid in the scrubber resulted in an increase of the elimination efficiency. These results, combined with previous results on the biofiltration of butanal and butyric acid, allow us to discuss the influence of odour compounds on the removal efficiency of such systems and methods for control. The results were used to construct a full-size system, which is described.

  15. Biotreatment of ammonia and butanal containing waste gases

    OpenAIRE

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Vriens, L.; Verachtert, H.

    1994-01-01

    Abstract The biological removal of ammonia and butanal in contaminated air was investigated by using, respectively, a laboratory-scale filter and a scrubber-filter combination. It was shown that ammonia can be removed with an elimination efficiency of 83% at a volumetric load of 100 m3·m–2·h–1 with 4–16 ppm of ammonia. During the experiment percolates were analysed for nitrate, nitrite, ammonium and pH. It was found that the nitrification in the biofilter could deteriorate due to an inhibitio...

  16. Gaseous waste processing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubokoya, Takashi.

    1992-01-01

    In a gaseous waste processing device, if activated carbon is charged uniformly to a holdup tower, the amount of radioactive rare gases held in a first tower at the uppermost stream is increased to greater than that in other towers at the downstream since the radioactive rare gases decay in the form of an exponential function. Then in the present invention, the entire length of a plurality of activated carbon holdup towers connected in series is made longer than that of the towers in the downstream. As a result, since the amount of radioactive rare gases held in each of the holdup towers is made uniform, even if any one of connecting pipelines is ruptured, the amount of radioactive rare gases flown out is uniform. Only the body length of the holdup tower is changed because it is economical in view of the design and the manufacture of the vessel, and the cross section of the portion in which activated carbons are filled is made identical to keep the optimum flow rate of the rare gases. Thus, the radioactivity releasing amount can be minimized upon occurrence of an accident. (N.H.)

  17. Removal of nitrogen oxides, 106RuO4 vapors and radioactive aerosols from the gas originating in radioactive wastes solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kepak, F.; Pecak, V.; Uher, E.; Kanka, J.; Koutova, S.; Matous, V.

    1985-01-01

    Procedures and equipment for the disposal of nitrogen oxides, RuO 4 vapors and radioactive aerosols of 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 60 Co and 125 Sb contained in the gas generated in the solidification of high- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes were tested on models. Nitrogen oxides were disposed of by absorption and chemical decomposition in various solutions of which the best results gave solutions of ammonium salts. Absorption in solutions, physical and chemical sorption on inorganic sorbents were tested for the disposal of RuO 4 . Aerosols were disposed of by absorption in absorption media with subsequent filtration. Of fibrous filter materials, Czechoslovak AEROS-2 and RA-2 filter papers were proven in the tests. Attention was also devoted to granular filter materials of which silica gel was chosen. On the basis of laboratory tests a multi-step treatment system was designed which consists of a condenser, a nitrogen oxide absorber, a liquid aerosol separator, absorption columns and aerosol filters. The whole system has been manufactured on pilot plant scale and the different parts are being produced. (Z.M.)

  18. thermo-stable alpha-amylase(S) from irradiated microbial origin utilizing agricultural and environmental wastes under solid state fermentation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moustafa, O.E.A.

    2002-01-01

    an investigation concerning the production of thermo-stable α-amylases by thermophilic bacterial and fungal isolates has been undertaken. nine thermophilic bacteria and five teen fungi were isolated from different localities viz. phyllosphere of water hyacinth, different desert plants leaves, fermented dough, oven dust, garbage , and soil. their amylolytic activities were tested by dinitrosalicylic acid color reagent (Dns) method when grown on some environmental pollutants (garbage and water hyacinth) as well as industrial wastes (Bagasse, biscuit, corn flex and dough residues ) as the sole carbon source at 65 o C for bacterial and at 50 o C for fungal isolates . isolates No. B 1 ,B 2 ,B 5 ,B 6 ,B 7 ,B 8 ,B 9 , and F 4 ,F 6 ,F 8 ,F 1 2,F 1 3 and F 1 5, exhibited the highest α -amylase production when grown on water hyacinth, while B 4 ,F 3 ,F 1 1 and F 1 3, on dough ; (B 3 ,F 9 and F 1 0 ) on bagasse and ( F 1 ,F 2 ,F 5 ,F 7 ,F 1 1 and F 1 4) on garbage. Out of the nine identified bacterial isolated, only two isolates viz; actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, B1 and strepto bacillus moniliformis, B 7 , exhibited the ability to produce high percentages of α amylases at 55 o C (while still able to produce the enzyme within 45-70 o C)

  19. Flow, origin, and age of groundwater in some deep-lying poorly permeable aquifers in the Netherlands; implications for geological waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasbergen, P.

    1985-01-01

    Interest in the hydrological properties of deep strata has been increasing rapidly, especially in relation to waste disposal. For the assessment of the geohydrological stability of the host-rock itself as well as of the migration of contaminants leached from a disposal facility, investigation of the hydrological system is obligatory. Three drillings down to and beyond 500 m through very thick clay layers yielded a number of data providing new information about the hydrological system of deep strata in the Netherlands. Clay samples were taken profiles of water quality vs. depth were established, and groundwater present above and below the deep clay strata was subjected to chemical analyses in isotope determinations. Well tests and slug tests were performed to determine the permeability of the underlying aquifers. Hydraulic conductivity was found to range from 10 -7 to 10 -6 m/s. The estimated age of the deep groundwater below the Oligocene clay is at most about 4 x 10 4 years. An interpretation of the flow system is given on the basis of the relations found between water quality, depth, the conductivity, and the measured water pressures. The present observations and interpretations lead to the conclusion that the groundwater in the investigated deep strata is part of a hydrological cycle whose scale is probably limited and in some places very limited. Studies based on a model support the presented conclusions. 18 references, 9 figures

  20. Evaluation of the production of gases in the acetobutilic fermentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte Torres, Alberto; Alarcon Granobles, John F; Pineros Forero, Edgar R

    1995-01-01

    The growing costs of the raw materials coming from the petroleum, base of the processes of acetone and butane, they have originated a renovated interest for the fermentative processes. These processes stopped to be applied in 1930 by their unfavorable economic conditions in comparison with the synthetic processes. The Institute of Biotechnology of the National University of Colombia, after considering that the country imports annually around 2500 tons of butanol and 80% of acetone, began in 1987 a program of development of the acetobutilic fermentation starting from cane molasses. In accordance with the study of economic pre feasible for the butanol and acetone production for fermentation, of Serrano and Pinzon, the gases constitute 83% of the total revenues received by sales, while the solvents, ethanol, butanol and acetone, only 16%, reason for which is necessary the evaluation of the gases produced in the fermentation

  1. Noble gases in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderon, M.; Burdine, J.A.

    1973-01-01

    Radioactive noble gases have made a significant contribution to diagnostic nuclear medicine. In the area of regional assessment of pulmonary function, 133 Xe has had its greatest clinical impact. Following a breath of 133 Xe gas, pulmonary ventilation can be measured using a scintillation camera or other appropriate radiation detector. If 133 Xe dissolved in saline is injected intravenously, both pulmonary capillary perfusion and ventilation can be measured since 90 percent of the highly insoluble xenon escapes into the alveoli during the first passage through the lungs. Radionuclide pulmonary function tests provide the first qualitative means of assessing lung ventilation and blood flow on a regional basis, and have recently been extended to include quantification of various parameters of lung function by means of a small computer interfaced to the scintillation camera. 133 Xe is also used in the measurement of organ blood flow following injection into a vessel leading into an organ such as the brain, heart kidneys, or muscles

  2. Waste incinerating plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1972-12-01

    This plant is provided with a NKK-Ferunst type reciprocating stage fire lattice which has a good ventilating effect and a proper stirring and loosening effect, achieving a high combustion rate, and has also a gas flow system by which gas can flow in the reverse direction to adjust its flow for seasonal variations in the quality of waste. Also, a room in which the exhaust gas is mixed is provided in this plant as a help for the complete neutralization and combustion of acid gas such as hydrogen chloride and imperfect combustion gas from plastic waste contained in wastes. In this system, waste can accept a sufficient radiant heat from the combustion gas, the furnace wall, and the ceiling; even on the post combustion fire lattice the ashes are given heat enough to complete the post combustion, so that it can be completely reduced to ashes. For these reasons, this type of incinerator is suitable for the combustion of low-calorie wastes such as city wastes. The harmful gases resulting from the combustion of wastes are treated completely by desulfurization equipment which can remove the oxides of sulfur. This type of plant also can dispose of a wide variety of wastes, and is available in several capacities from 30 tons per 8 hr to 1,200 tons per 24 hr.

  3. Plasma processes including electron beam for off-gases purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.; Witman, S.; Licki, J.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Non-thermal plasma technologies based on different methods of plasma generation are being applied for ozone generation for different applications, waste water and off-gases treatment. Plasmas create reactive species, in particular ions, radicals or other reactive compounds, which can decompose pollutant molecules, organic particulate matter or soot. Electron beam flue gas treatment is another plasma-based technology which has been successfully demonstrated on industrial scale coal fired power plants. High efficiency of SO 2 (> 95%) and NO x (> 70%) has been obtained and industrial plant applying this process has been built in Poland. The further investigations carried out all over the world have illustrated that the process can be applied for poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) destruction as well, and just recently research laboratories in the US and South Korea have reported in the feasibility of the process for mercury removal from the flue gas. The recent studies concern a new type of accelerators implementation in the industrial scale, application of the process in the high sulfur oil fired boilers and Diesel off - gases purification. The treatment of the flue gases with the high NOx concentration is a special challenge for the technology since the main energy consumption (and applied accelerators power) is related to this pollutant content in the processed off gases. The pulse beams and scavenger application can be a solution to reduce investment and operational costs. The further development of the technology is directly connected with high power accelerators development. Acknowledgement: The R and D activities are supported by the European Regional Development Found in the frame of the project PlasTEP 'Dissemination and fostering of plasma based technological innovation for environment protection in the Baltic Sea Region'.

  4. Hydrogeochemical processes governing the origin, transport and fate of major and trace elements from mine wastes and mineralized rock to surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    2011-01-01

    The formation of acid mine drainage from metals extraction or natural acid rock drainage and its mixing with surface waters is a complex process that depends on petrology and mineralogy, structural geology, geomorphology, surface-water hydrology, hydrogeology, climatology, microbiology, chemistry, and mining and mineral processing history. The concentrations of metals, metalloids, acidity, alkalinity, Cl-, F- and SO42- found in receiving streams, rivers, and lakes are affected by all of these factors and their interactions. Remediation of mine sites is an engineering concern but to design a remediation plan without understanding the hydrogeochemical processes of contaminant mobilization can lead to ineffective and excessively costly remediation. Furthermore, remediation needs a goal commensurate with natural background conditions rather than water-quality standards that might bear little relation to conditions of a highly mineralized terrain. This paper reviews hydrogeochemical generalizations, primarily from US Geological Survey research, that enhance our understanding of the origin, transport, and fate of contaminants released from mined and mineralized areas.

  5. Comparison of natural gases accumulated in Oligocene strata with hydrous pyrolysis gases from Menilite Shales of the Polish Outer Carpathians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotarba, M.J.; Curtis, John B.; Lewan, M.D.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the molecular and isotopic compositions of gases generated from different kerogen types (i.e., Types I/II, II, IIS and III) in Menilite Shales by sequential hydrous pyrolysis experiments. The experiments were designed to simulate gas generation from source rocks at pre-oil-cracking thermal maturities. Initially, rock samples were heated in the presence of liquid water at 330 ??C for 72 h to simulate early gas generation dominated by the overall reaction of kerogen decomposition to bitumen. Generated gas and oil were quantitatively collected at the completion of the experiments and the reactor with its rock and water was resealed and heated at 355 ??C for 72 h. This condition simulates late petroleum generation in which the dominant overall reaction is bitumen decomposition to oil. This final heating equates to a cumulative thermal maturity of 1.6% Rr, which represents pre-oil-cracking conditions. In addition to the generated gases from these two experiments being characterized individually, they are also summed to characterize a cumulative gas product. These results are compared with natural gases produced from sandstone reservoirs within or directly overlying the Menilite Shales. The experimentally generated gases show no molecular compositions that are distinct for the different kerogen types, but on a total organic carbon (TOC) basis, oil prone kerogens (i.e., Types I/II, II and IIS) generate more hydrocarbon gas than gas prone Type III kerogen. Although the proportionality of methane to ethane in the experimental gases is lower than that observed in the natural gases, the proportionality of ethane to propane and i-butane to n-butane are similar to those observed for the natural gases. ??13C values of the experimentally generated methane, ethane and propane show distinctions among the kerogen types. This distinction is related to the ??13C of the original kerogen, with 13C enriched kerogen generating more 13C enriched hydrocarbon gases than

  6. Concept of Heat Recovery from Exhaust Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowska, Maria; Nowak, Krzysztof; Proszak-Miąsik, Danuta; Rabczak, Sławomir

    2017-10-01

    The theme of the article is to determine the possibility of waste heat recovery and use it to prepare hot water. The scope includes a description of the existing sample of coal-fired boiler plant, the analysis of working condition and heat recovery proposals. For this purpose, a series of calculations necessary to identify the energy effect of exhaust temperature decreasing and transferring recovery heat to hot water processing. Heat recover solutions from the exhaust gases channel between boiler and chimney section were proposed. Estimation for the cost-effectiveness of such a solution was made. All calculations and analysis were performed for typical Polish conditions, for coal-fired boiler plant. Typicality of this solution is manifested by the volatility of the load during the year, due to distribution of heat for heating and hot water, determining the load variation during the day. Analysed system of three boilers in case of load variation allows to operational flexibility and adaptation of the boilers load to the current heat demand. This adaptation requires changes in the operating conditions of boilers and in particular assurance of properly conditions for the combustion of fuel. These conditions have an impact on the existing thermal loss and the overall efficiency of the boiler plant. On the boiler plant efficiency affects particularly exhaust gas temperature and the excess air factor. Increasing the efficiency of boilers plant is possible to reach by following actions: limiting the excess air factor in coal combustion process in boilers and using an additional heat exchanger in the exhaust gas channel outside of boilers (economizer) intended to preheat the hot water.

  7. Researches on the development of new composite materials complete / partially biodegradable using natural textile fibers of new vegetable origin and those recovered from textile waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, M. P.; Bulei, C.; Heput, T.; Kiss, I.

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the research is to develop new fully / partially biodegradable composite materials by using new natural fibers and those recovered from various wastes. Thus, the research aims to obtain some composites with matrix of various types of polymeric materials and the reinforcement phase of textile materials (of different natures, morphologies and composites) so that the resulting products to be (bio)degradable. The textile inserts used as raffle are ecological, non-toxic and biodegradable and they contain (divided or in combination) bast fibers (flax, hemp, jute) and other vegetable fibers (cotton, wool) as plain yarn or fabric, which can replace fibers of glass commonly used in polymeric composites. The main activities described in this article are carried out during the first phase of the research (phase I - initiation of research) and they are oriented towards the choice of types of textile inserts from which the composites will be obtained (the materials needed for the raffle), the choice of the types of polymers (the necessary materials for matrices) and choosing the variants of composites with different types and proportions of the constituent content (proposals and working variants) and choosing the right method for obtaining samples of composite materials (realization technology). The purpose of the research is to obtain composite materials with high structural, thermo-mechanical and / or tribological performances, according to ecological norms and international requirements in order to replace the existing classical materials, setting up current, innovative and high performance solutions, for applications in top areas such as automotive industry and not only.

  8. Waste Tank Safety Screening Module: An aspect of Hanford Site tank waste characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.G.; Wood, T.W.; Babad, H.; Redus, K.S.

    1994-01-01

    Forty-five (45) of the 149 Hanford single-shell tanks have been designated as Watch-List tanks for one or more high-priority safety issues, which include significant concentrations of organic materials, ferrocyanide salts, potential generation of flammable gases, high heat generation, criticality, and noxious vapor generation. While limited waste characterization data have been acquired on these wastes under the original Tri-Party Agreement, to date all of the tank-by-tank assessments involved in these safety issue designations have been based on historical data rather than waste on data. In response to guidance from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB finding 93-05) and related direction from the US Department of Energy (DOE), Westinghouse Hanford Company, assisted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory, designed a measurements-based screening program to screen all single-shell tanks for all of these issues. This program, designated the Tank Safety Screening Module (TSSM), consists of a regime of core, supernatant, and auger samples and associated analytical measurements intended to make first-order discriminations of the safety status on a tank-by-tank basis. The TSSM combines limited tank sampling and analysis with monitoring and tank history to provide an enhanced measurement-based categorization of the tanks relative to the safety issues. This program will be implemented beginning in fiscal year (FY) 1994 and supplemented by more detailed characterization studies designed to support safety issue resolution

  9. 40 CFR 89.312 - Analytical gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... determined to calibration gas tolerances by chromatographic analysis of total hydrocarbons plus impurities or.... (2) Mixtures of gases having the following chemical compositions shall be available: (i) C3H8 and... check gases shall contain propane with 350 ppmC ±75 ppmC hydrocarbon. The three oxygen interference...

  10. Greenhouse Gases Concentrations in the Atmosphere Along ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated effect of vehicular emission on greenhouse gases concentrations along selected roads of different traffic densities in Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria. Nine roads comprised highway, commercial and residential were selected. Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) were determined from both sides of the roads by ...

  11. Specific heats of degenerate ideal gases

    OpenAIRE

    Caruso, Francisco; Oguri, Vitor; Silveira, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    From arguments based on Heisenberg's uncertainty principle and Pauli's exclusion principle, the molar specific heats of degenerate ideal gases at low temperatures are estimated, giving rise to values consistent with the Nerst-Planck Principle (third law of Thermodynamics). The Bose-Einstein condensation phenomenon based on the behavior of specific heat of massive and non-relativistic boson gases is also presented.

  12. Method of contacting solids and gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1942-08-06

    A continuous method is described for contacting solids and gases. The process involves passing a confined stream of gases through an extended path including a treating zone and imposing a pressure on the stream of gases at least sufficient to overcome the resistence of said path to the flow of said gases. A solid in finely divided form is then introduced into said stream of gases, maintaining a vertical column of finely divided solid in fluidized state of a height which will produce a pressure at the column bottom at least equal to the gas pressure at the point of entry of the solids into the stream. The solids then pass from the bottom of the column into the stream.

  13. Wastes in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    As human space activities have created more wastes on low and high Earth orbits over the past 50 years than the solar system injected meteorites over billions of years, this report gives an overview of this problem. It identifies the origins of these space debris and wastes (launchers, combustion residues, exploitation wastes, out-of-use satellites, accidental explosions, accidental collisions, voluntary destructions, space erosion), and proposes a stock list of space wastes. Then, it distinguishes the situation for the different orbits: low Earth orbit or LEO (traffic, presence of the International Space Station), medium Earth orbits or MEO (traffic, operating satellites, wastes), geostationary Earth orbit or GEO (traffic, operating satellites, wastes). It also discusses wastes and bacteria present on the moon (due to Apollo missions or to crash tests). It evokes how space and nuclear industry is concerned, and discusses the re-entry issue (radioactive boomerang, metallic boomerang). It also indicates elements of international law

  14. Formation and fate of gases in the caverns of a repository in salt rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, W.; Morlock, G.; Gronemeyer, C.

    1992-01-01

    The report summarizes the knowledge avaible today of the mechanisms governing the formation and transport of gases in a salt mine repository for radioactive wastes. The work under review deals with the formation of gases-by way of radiolysis, corrosion, microbial degradation, thermally induced or primary gas generation - and analyses the efficiency of predicting and modelling the gas generation mechanisms in terms of the role of parameters involved, and accuracy. Existing gaps in available knowledge are shown and defined in terms of significance, leading to an analysis of interdependencies between the various mechanisms and to a statement concerning the necessity of establishing materials balances. (orig./EF) [de

  15. The economics of controlling stock pollutants: An efficient strategy for greenhouse gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, I.; Mendelsohn, R.

    1993-01-01

    Optimal control theory is applied to develop an efficient strategy to control stock pollutants such as greenhouse gases and hazardous waste. The optimal strategy suggests that, at any time, the marginal costs of abatement should be equated with the present value of the marginal damage of timely unabated emission. The optimal strategy calls for increasingly tight abatement over time as the pollutant stock accumulates. The optimal policy applied to greenhouse gases suggest moderate abatement efforts, at present, with the potential for much greater future efforts. 15 refs., 2 tabs

  16. Use of reactive gases with broad-beam radio frequency ion sources for industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, St.; Jolly, T.W.; Kohlstedt, H.; Waser, R.

    2004-01-01

    Broad-beam ion sources are used for a number of important industrial etching and deposition applications, and the use of inductively coupled plasmas has greatly increased the feasibility of using beams of reactive gases, especially of chlorine and oxygen, but also of CO, CO 2 , CF 4 , CHF 3 , SF 6 , etc. In order to gain more understanding of the factors that affect the composition of beams of these gases, we have used a Hiden energy-dispersive quadrupole mass spectrometer to analyze the flux of ions and energetic particles produced by an Oxford Instruments 15 cm rf ion source. For all of the above gases, we have analyzed the effects of changing the operating conditions on the composition of the ion beam, and the fractional production of multiply charged ions; on the plasma potential (and the consequential divergence of the ion beam) and on the spread in energy of the ion beam. We discuss how these factors influence the correct use of the ion source in etching applications with these gases. It is important that the design of the ion source should be optimized for the process gases that are used. The source was originally optimized for use on argon. We discuss the effect of the design on the source's performance with the different gases, and we consider whether design changes would be appropriate for optimum performance on different gases

  17. Kinetic Theory of Granular Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trizac, Emmanuel [Center of Theoretical Biological Physics, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0374 (United States); Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modeles Statistiques, Campus Universitaire, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2005-11-25

    Granular gases are composed of macroscopic bodies kept in motion by an external energy source such as a violent shaking. The behaviour of such systems is quantitatively different from that of ordinary molecular gases: due to the size of the constituents, external fields have a stronger effect on the dynamics and, more importantly, the kinetic energy of the gas is no longer a conserved quantity. The key role of the inelasticity of collisions has been correctly appreciated for about fifteen years, and the ensuing consequences in terms of phase behaviour or transport properties studied in an increasing and now vast body of literature. The purpose of this book is to help the newcomer to the field in acquiring the essential theoretical tools together with some numerical techniques. As emphasized by the authors-who were among the pioneers in the domain- the content could be covered in a one semester course for advanced undergraduates, or it could be incorporated in a more general course dealing with the statistical mechanics of dissipative systems. The book is self-contained, clear, and avoids mathematical complications. In order to elucidate the main physical ideas, heuristic points of views are sometimes preferred to a more rigorous route that would lead to a longer discussion. The 28 chapters are short; they offer exercises and worked examples, solved at the end of the book. Each part is supplemented with a relevant foreword and a useful summary including take-home messages. The editorial work is of good quality, with very few typographical errors. In spite of the title, kinetic theory stricto sensu is not the crux of the matter covered. The authors discuss the consequences of the molecular chaos assumption both at the individual particle level and in terms of collective behaviour. The first part of the book addresses the mechanics of grain collisions. It is emphasized that considering the coefficient of restitution {epsilon} -a central quantity governing the

  18. Kinetic Theory of Granular Gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trizac, Emmanuel

    2005-01-01

    Granular gases are composed of macroscopic bodies kept in motion by an external energy source such as a violent shaking. The behaviour of such systems is quantitatively different from that of ordinary molecular gases: due to the size of the constituents, external fields have a stronger effect on the dynamics and, more importantly, the kinetic energy of the gas is no longer a conserved quantity. The key role of the inelasticity of collisions has been correctly appreciated for about fifteen years, and the ensuing consequences in terms of phase behaviour or transport properties studied in an increasing and now vast body of literature. The purpose of this book is to help the newcomer to the field in acquiring the essential theoretical tools together with some numerical techniques. As emphasized by the authors-who were among the pioneers in the domain- the content could be covered in a one semester course for advanced undergraduates, or it could be incorporated in a more general course dealing with the statistical mechanics of dissipative systems. The book is self-contained, clear, and avoids mathematical complications. In order to elucidate the main physical ideas, heuristic points of views are sometimes preferred to a more rigorous route that would lead to a longer discussion. The 28 chapters are short; they offer exercises and worked examples, solved at the end of the book. Each part is supplemented with a relevant foreword and a useful summary including take-home messages. The editorial work is of good quality, with very few typographical errors. In spite of the title, kinetic theory stricto sensu is not the crux of the matter covered. The authors discuss the consequences of the molecular chaos assumption both at the individual particle level and in terms of collective behaviour. The first part of the book addresses the mechanics of grain collisions. It is emphasized that considering the coefficient of restitution ε -a central quantity governing the inelasticity of

  19. The storage of greenhouse gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, H.; Kaarstad, O.; Eliasson, B

    2000-01-01

    Since 1850, that is to say the beginning of the industrial era,the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has risen from 280 ppm to 370 ppm, this increase is mainly due to the combustion of fossil fuels. Today fossil fuels represent 85% of all the energy used in the world. Fearing progressive climatic changes, more and more governments become aware of the necessity of reducing the emission of greenhouse gases. A more efficient use of energy and the promoting of renewable energies and of the nuclear energy are the most evident solutions but they appear to be insufficient. A third solution is the storage of carbon dioxide in geological layers. This technique has been put into use since 1996 in Norway. An off-shore natural gas platform injects carbon dioxide in a geological reservoir situated 1000 meters below the ocean bed. The injection of CO 2 could be used in oil fields in order to facilitate the extraction of petroleum. Far more large and efficient reservoirs would be the oceans, they already hold up 40000 10 9 tons of dissolved CO 2 . Even if the double of the carbon dioxide accumulated in the atmosphere since 1850 were injected, the concentration of carbon in sea waters would rise by less than 2%. The safety of CO 2 storage and the impact on the environment of ocean injection sites are being studied. (A.C.)

  20. Greenhouse gases and emissions trading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBlanc, A.; Dudek, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Global cooperation is essential in cutting greenhouse-gas emissions, say Alice LeBlanc and Daniel J. Dudek of the Environmental Defense in New York City. The first step, they continue, is agreement among nations on an overall global limit for all greenhouse gases, followed by an allocation of the global limit among nations. The agreements must contain effective reporting and monitoring systems and enforcement provisions, they add. The Framework Convention on Climate Change, signed by most nations of the world in Brazil in 1992, provides the foundation for such an agreement, LeBlanc and Dudek note. open-quotes International emissions trading is a way to lower costs and expand reduction options for the benefit of all,close quotes they contend. Under such an arrangement, an international agency would assign allowances, stated in tons of carbon dioxide. Countries would be free to buy and sell allowances, but no country could exceed, in a given year, the total allowances it holds. By emitting less than its allowed amount, a country would accumulate more allowances, which it could sell. The authors claim such a system would offer benefits to the world economy by saving billions of dollars in pollution-reduction costs while still achieving emission limits established in an international agreement

  1. Mercury transformation and speciation in flue gases from anthropogenic emission sources: a critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Shuxiao; Wu, Qingru; Wang, Fengyang; Lin, Che-Jen; Zhang, Leiming; Hui, Mulin; Yang, Mei; Su, Haitao; Hao, Jiming

    2016-02-01

    Mercury transformation mechanisms and speciation profiles are reviewed for mercury formed in and released from flue gases of coal-fired boilers, non-ferrous metal smelters, cement plants, iron and steel plants, waste incinerators, biomass burning and so on. Mercury in coal, ores, and other raw materials is released to flue gases in the form of Hg0 during combustion or smelting in boilers, kilns or furnaces. Decreasing temperature from over 800 °C to below 300 °C in flue gases leaving boilers, kilns or furnaces promotes homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation of Hg0 to gaseous divalent mercury (Hg2+), with a portion of Hg2+ adsorbed onto fly ash to form particulate-bound mercury (Hgp). Halogen is the primary oxidizer for Hg0 in flue gases, and active components (e.g., TiO2, Fe2O3, etc.) on fly ash promote heterogeneous oxidation and adsorption processes. In addition to mercury removal, mercury transformation also occurs when passing through air pollution control devices (APCDs), affecting the mercury speciation in flue gases. In coal-fired power plants, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system promotes mercury oxidation by 34-85 %, electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and fabric filter (FF) remove over 99 % of Hgp, and wet flue gas desulfurization system (WFGD) captures 60-95 % of Hg2+. In non-ferrous metal smelters, most Hg0 is converted to Hg2+ and removed in acid plants (APs). For cement clinker production, mercury cycling and operational conditions promote heterogeneous mercury oxidation and adsorption. The mercury speciation profiles in flue gases emitted to the atmosphere are determined by transformation mechanisms and mercury removal efficiencies by various APCDs. For all the sectors reviewed in this study, Hgp accounts for less than 5 % in flue gases. In China, mercury emission has a higher Hg0 fraction (66-82 % of total mercury) in flue gases from coal combustion, in contrast to a greater Hg2+ fraction (29-90 %) from non-ferrous metal smelting, cement and

  2. Investigating tunable KRb gases and Bose-Einstein condensates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Nils Byg

    2015-01-01

    We present the production of dual-species Bose-Einstein condensates of 39K and 87Rb with tunable interactions. A dark spontaneous force optical trap was used for 87Rb to reduce the losses in 39K originating from light-assisted collisions in the magneto optical trapping phase. Using sympathetic...... for dual-species condensates with tunable interactions. Employing the dual-species condensates, the miscible to immiscible phase transition was investigated. By applying an empirical model, the transition was used to determine the background scattering length. Two species quantum gases with tunable...

  3. Process of producing carbonaceous materials; reaction with hydrogen gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1933-01-13

    A process is described for the production of valuable hydrocarbons by treating distillable carbonaceous materials together with hydrogen gases, under pressure and in contact with catalysts, the process consisting in adding to the original materials, first or during treatment, organic sulfonic acids together with metals from the fourth or eighth groups of the periodic system or a combination of these, or organic carbosilicic acids or inorganic acids containing oxides of sulfur or nitrogen or the anhydrides of these inorganic acids or variation of these compounds.

  4. Adverse Effects of Waste Generation in Calabar Urban, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adverse Effects of Waste Generation in Calabar Urban, Nigeria. ... degradation, blocking of drainage and emission of greenhouse gases. We found a number of health hazards, ranging from pollution to diseases on both human and animals.

  5. Biodiesel production from waste soybean oil biomass as renewable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-07-05

    Jul 5, 2010 ... biodegradable, produced from renewable sources and contributes a minimal amount of net green house gases .... Later, the waste cooking oil was filtered by filter paper to ... the alcoxide from absorbing water from the air.

  6. Experience with high-temperature filtration of incinerator flue gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpentier, S.; de Tassigny, C.

    1990-01-01

    It is always preferable to filter incinerator flue gases as close as possible to their origin, i.e. in a high-temperature zone, and means must be provided to destroy the other organic parts of the flyash resulting from these gases by in-filter combustion. The filter also traps a mineral part of the flyash, which eventually causes clogging and requires replacement or regeneration. Such filtration systems are available and can be operated on an industrial scale. They include candles made of micro-expanded refractory alloys supporting filtering media, porous ceramic candles and other devices. Research and subsequent pilot facility testing have enabled development of alumina fiber filter cartridges that offer more advantages than other equipment employed to date. Specifically, these advantages are: ultralight weight, which enables construction of systems that are relatively unaffected by creep and high-temperature deformations; excellent refractory qualities, which permit a use above 1000 degrees C; insensitivity to thermal shocks and in-situ carbon fines combustion capability; anti-acid quality of the material, which enables high-temperature filtration of acidic flue gases (chlorine and hydrochloric acid, SO x , etc.); low initial pressure drop of the cartridges; dimensional stability of the cartridges, which can be machined to a given tolerance with specific contours after casting and drying. This paper reports the results obtained during the last filtration system test campaign. Details are given for operating conditions, grain sizes and real-time monitoring of various parameters

  7. Method of processing liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naba, Katsumi; Oohashi, Takeshi; Kawakatsu, Ryu; Kuribayashi, Kotaro.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To process radioactive liquid wastes with safety by distillating radioactive liquid wastes while passing gases, properly treating the distillation fractions, adding combustible and liquid synthetic resin material to the distillation residues, polymerizing to solidify and then burning them. Method: Radioactive substance - containing liquid wastes are distillated while passing gases and the distillation fractions containing no substantial radioactive substances are treated in an adequate method. Synthetic resin material, which may be a mixture of polymer and monomer, is added together with a catalyst to the distillation residues containing almost of the radioactive substances to polymerize and solidify. Water or solvent in such an extent as not hindering the solidification may be allowed if remained. The solidification products are burnt for facilitating the treatment of the radioactive substances. The resin material can be selected suitably, methacrylate syrup (mainly solution of polymethylmethacrylate and methylmethacrylate) being preferred. (Seki, T.)

  8. Radiation methods for purification of water, wastewater and flue gases at international chemical congress of Pacific basic societies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikaev, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    Content of report, presented at the symposium Ecological applications of ionizing radiation (water, waste water and technological waste products), which took place within the frames of the International Chemical Congress of the Pacific Ocean Region counters (the PacifiChem'95, December 17-22, 1995, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA) is briefly presented. The problems on electron-radiation purification of natural water, domestic and technological waste waters, flue gases and contaminated soils, radiation treatment of the waste water sediments, ionizing radiation sources, applied in this area of technology and economics of radiation purification methods were discussed

  9. Original Misunderstanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Humorist Josh Billings quipped, "About the most originality that any writer can hope to achieve honestly is to steal with good judgment." Billings was harsh in his view of originality, but his critique reveals a tension faced by students every time they write a history paper. Research is the essence of any history paper. Especially in high school,…

  10. Process and apparatus for emissions reduction from waste incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khinkis, M.J.; Abbasi, H.A.; Lisauskas, R.A.; Itse, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a process for waste combustion. It comprises: introducing the waste into a drying zone within a combustion chamber; supplying air to the drying zone for preheating, drying, and partially combusting the waste; advancing the waste to a combustion zone within the combustion chamber; supplying air to the combustion zone for further advancing the waste to a burnout zone with the combustion chamber; supplying air to the burnout zone for final burnout of organics in the waste; and injecting fuel and recirculated glue gases into the combustion chamber above the waste to create a reducing secondary combustion zone

  11. Guides to pollution prevention: Selected hospital waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    The hazardous wastes generated by general medical and surgical hospitals are small in volume relative to those of industrial facilities; however, the wastes are of a wide variety. Some of the hazardous materials used by hospitals that become part of their waste streams include chemotherapy and antineoplastic chemicals, solvents, formaldehyde, photographic chemicals, radionuclides, mercury, waste anesthetic gases; and other toxic, corrosive and miscellaneous chemicals. Additional wastes such as infectious waste, incinerator exhaust, laundry-related waste, utility wastes, and trash were not addressed in the guide. Reducing the generation of these materials at the source, or recycling the wastes on- or off-site, will benefit hospitals by reducing disposal costs and lowering the liabilities associated with hazardous waste disposal. The guide provides an overview of hospital waste generating processes and presents options for minimizing waste generation through source reduction and recycling

  12. Thermodynamics of ultracold Fermi gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimbene, Sylvain

    2010-01-01

    Complex Hamiltonians from condensed matter, such as the Fermi-Hubbard model, can be experimentally studied using ultracold gases. This thesis describes a new method for determining the equation of state of an ultracold gas, making the comparison with many-body theories straightforward. It is based on the measurement of the local pressure inside a trapped gas from the analysis of its in situ image. We first apply this method to the study of a Fermi gas with resonant interactions, a weakly-interacting 7 Li gas acting as a thermometer. Surprisingly, none of the existing many-body theories of the unitary gas accounts for the equation of state deduced from our study over its full range. The virial expansion extracted from the high-temperature data agrees with the resolution of the three-body problem. At low temperature, we observe, contrary to some previous studies, that the normal phase behaves as a Fermi liquid. Finally we obtain the critical temperature for superfluidity from a clear signature on the equation of state. We also measure the pressure of the ground state as a function of spin imbalance and interaction strength - measure directly relevant to describe the crust of neutron stars. Our data validate Monte-Carlo simulations and quantify the Lee-Huang-Yang corrections to mean-field interactions in low-density fermionic or bosonic superfluids. We show that, in most cases, the partially polarized normal phase can be described as a Fermi liquid of polarons. The polaron effective mass extracted from the equation of state is in agreement with a study of collective modes. (author)

  13. Rare gases in Samoan xenoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poreda, R. J.; Farley, K. A.

    1992-09-01

    The rare gas isotopic compositions of residual harzburgite xenoliths from Savai'i (SAV locality) and an unnamed seamount south of the Samoan chain (PPT locality) provide important constraints on the rare gas evolution of the mantle and atmosphere. Despite heterogeneous trace element compositions, the rare gas characteristics of the xenoliths from each of the two localities are strikingly similar. SAV and PPT xenoliths have 3He/ 4He ratios of11.1 ± 0.5 R A and21.6 ± 1 R A, respectively; this range is comparable to the 3He/ 4He ratios in Samoan lavas and clearly demonstrates that they have trapped gases from a relatively undegassed reservoir. The neon results are not consistent with mixing between MORB and a plume source with an atmospheric signature. Rather, the neon isotopes reflect either a variably degassed mantle (with a relative order of degassing of Loihi Honda et al. that the 20Ne/ 22Ne ratio in the mantle more closely resembles the solar ratio than the atmospheric one. 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios in the least contaminated samples range from 4,000 to 12,000 with the highest values in the 22 RA PPT xenoliths. There is no evidence for atmospheric 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios in the mantle source of these samples, which indicates that the lower mantle may have 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios in excess of 5,000. Xenon isotopic anomalies in 129Xe and 136Xe are as high as 6%, or about half of the maximum MORB excess and are consistent with the less degassed nature of the Samoan mantle source. These results contradict previous suggestions that the high 3He/ 4He mantle has a near-atmospheric heavy rare gas isotopic composition.

  14. Waste management. Sector 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The waste management section of this report deals with two sectors: land disposal of solid waste and wastewater treatment. It provides background information on the type of emissions that contribute to the greenhouse gases from these two sectors, presents both sector current status in Lebanon, describes the methodology followed to estimate the corresponding emissions, and presents the results obtained regarding greenhouse emissions. The total methane emissions from solid waste disposal on land are 42.804 Gg approximately. There are no emissions from wastewater and industrial handling systems because, for the target year 1994, there was no treatment facilities in Lebanon. The wastewater (municipal, commercial and industrial) was directly discharged into the sea, rivers, ravines or septic tanks which indicate that methane or nitrous oxide emissions are significant if not nonexistent. Note that this situation will change in the future as treatment plants are being constructed around the country and are expected to come into operation by the year 2000

  15. Radioactive wastes - inventories and classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennecke, P.; Hollmann, A.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is given of the origins, types, conditioning, inventories, and expected abundance of radioactive wastes in the future in the Federal Republic of Germany. The Federal Government's radioactive waste disposal scheme provides that radioactive wastes be buried in deep geological formations which are expected to ensure a maintenance-free, unlimited and safe disposal without intentional excavation of the wastes at a later date. (orig./BBR) [de

  16. Incineration of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caramelle, D.; Florestan, J.; Waldura, C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that one of the methods used to reduce the volume of radioactive wastes is incineration. Incineration also allows combustible organic wastes to be transformed into inert matter that is stable from the physico-chemical viewpoint and ready to be conditioned for long-term stockage. The quality of the ashes obtained (low carbon content) depends on the efficiency of combustion. A good level of efficiency requires a combustion yield higher than 99% at the furnace door. Removal efficiency is defined as the relation between the CO 2 /CO + CO 2 concentrations multiplied by 100. This implies a CO concentration of the order of a few vpm. However, the gases produced by an incineration facility can represent a danger for the environment especially if toxic or corrosive gases (HCL,NO x ,SO 2 , hydrocarbons...) are given off. The gaseous effluents must therefore be checked after purification before they are released into the atmosphere. The CO and CO 2 measurement gives us the removal efficiency value. This value can also be measured in situ at the door of the combustion chamber. Infrared spectrometry is used for the various measurements: Fourier transform infrared spectrometry for the off-gases, and diode laser spectrometry for combustion

  17. Exemplary design of climate-friendly waste management in the State of Berlin; Vorbildhafte Konzeption einer klimavertraeglichen Abfallentsorgung im Land Berlin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Regine; Fehrenbach, Horst [ifeu - Institut fuer Energie- und Umweltforschung Heidelberg GmbH, Heidelberg (Germany); Wiegel, Ulrich; Ebert, Knud [ICU - Ingenieurconsulting Umwelt und Bau Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Schwilling, Thomas; Mehner, Heidelinde [SenStadtUm - Senatsverwaltung fuer Stadtentwicklung und Umwelt, Berlin (Germany). Referat Abfallwirtschaft

    2013-05-15

    On behalf of the Senate Department for Environment of the State of Berlin IFEU Heidelberg and ICU Berlin analysed a climate friendly waste treatment for the 36 most important waste types. The inventory for 2010 showed that the management of the 6.7 million tonnes of waste in the State of Berlin led to a remarkable prevention of greenhouse gas emissions of about -900,000 tonnes of CO{sub 2}-equivalents. Treatment optimisation for half of the waste types and increased source separation of dry recyclables and organics can lead to an additional mitigation of greenhouse gases of about -248,000 tonnes CO{sub 2}-equivalents. The impact of waste management on the global warming potential was determined using the standardised LCA method modified for waste management. A key element of the study was the intensive and constructive exchange with stakeholders. The results were integrated into an action plan based on the findings of the analysis of potentials and optimisation scenarios. For the relevant waste types of municipal origin property specifications were prepared. The specifications include distinct minimum criteria for an optimised treatment to reach the identified waste specific greenhouse gas reductions. The focus of the study was on climate change. A second study will be extended to further important environmental impacts like resource saving. (orig.)

  18. METHODOLOGY & CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BARKER, S.A.

    2006-07-27

    Waste stored within tank farm double-shell tanks (DST) and single-shell tanks (SST) generates flammable gas (principally hydrogen) to varying degrees depending on the type, amount, geometry, and condition of the waste. The waste generates hydrogen through the radiolysis of water and organic compounds, thermolytic decomposition of organic compounds, and corrosion of a tank's carbon steel walls. Radiolysis and thermolytic decomposition also generates ammonia. Nonflammable gases, which act as dilutents (such as nitrous oxide), are also produced. Additional flammable gases (e.g., methane) are generated by chemical reactions between various degradation products of organic chemicals present in the tanks. Volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals in tanks also produce organic vapors. The generated gases in tank waste are either released continuously to the tank headspace or are retained in the waste matrix. Retained gas may be released in a spontaneous or induced gas release event (GRE) that can significantly increase the flammable gas concentration in the tank headspace as described in RPP-7771. The document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 5 is the annual update of the methodology and calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs.

  19. Solid Waste Biodegradation Enhancements and the Evaluation of Analytical Methods Used to Predict Waste Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Ryan J.

    2002-01-01

    Conventional landfills are built to dispose of the increasing amount of municipal solid waste (MSW) generated each year. A relatively new type of landfill, called a bioreactor landfill, is designed to optimize the biodegradation of the contained waste to stabilized products. Landfills with stabilized waste pose little threat to the environment from ozone depleting gases and groundwater contamination. Limited research has been done to determine the importance of biodegradation enhancement tech...

  20. Anaesthetic gases: environmental impact and alternatives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Little consideration has been given to the environmental impact of anaesthetic gas .... our practice to select gases with a lower environmental impact is also ... is used as raw material for new anaesthetics. ... none in the pipeline.1. Conclusion.

  1. Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The Voluntary Reporting Program for greenhouse gases is part of an attempt by the U.S. Government to develop innovative, low-cost, and nonregulatory approaches to limit emissions of greenhouse gases. It is one element in an array of such programs introduced in recent years as part of the effort being made by the United States to comply with its national commitment to stabilize emissions of greenhouse gases under the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions of greenhouse gases.

  2. Granular Gases: Probing the Boundaries of Hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhirsch, I.

    1999-01-01

    The dissipative nature of the particle interactions in granular systems renders granular gases mesoscopic and bearing some similarities to regular gases in the ''continuum transition regime'' where shear rates and/or thermal gradients are very large). The following properties of granular gases support the above claim: (i). Mean free times are of the same order as macroscopic time scales (inverse shear rates); (ii). Mean free paths can be macroscopic and comparable to the system's dimensions; (iii). Typical flows are supersonic; (iv). Shear rates are typically ''large''; (v). Stress fields are scale (resolution) dependent; (vi). Burnett and super-Burnett corrections to both the constitutive relations and the boundary conditions are of importance; (vii). Single particle distribution functions can be far from Gaussian. It is concluded that while hydrodynamic descriptions of granular gases are relevant, they are probing the boundaries of applicability of hydrodynamics and perhaps slightly beyond

  3. Greenhouse gases - observed tendencies contra scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groenaas, Sigbjoern

    2006-01-01

    The article presents a study of the increase in greenhouse gases and concludes that it will be necessary to substantially reduce the CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere in order to avoid serious climatic changes

  4. Climate Change, Greenhouse Gases and Aerosols

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    user

    their radiative properties are similar to the glass used in a green- house. Greenhouse gases in the Earth's atmosphere absorb 90% of the radiation emitted .... and wind speed and direction in each box is calculated using the physical laws gov-.

  5. Roadside management strategies to reduce greenhouse gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Californias Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (AB 32), Sustainable Communities and Climate Protection Act : (SB 375), and Executive Order S-14-08 direct Caltrans to develop actions to reduce greenhouse gases (GHGs). Air : pollution reduction is...

  6. Original Article

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administratör

    Original Article. Prevalence of Gall Bladder Stones among Type 2 Diabetic ... Increasing age, female gender, overweight, familial history of the disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus is all associated ... GBS development in diabetics. An Italian ...

  7. ORIGINAL ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    UDS Publishers Limited All Right Reserved 2026-6294. ORIGINAL ... Reproductive development and function in human and other ... sulting solution was filtered and left to stand for three days to ..... male rat brain and pituitary. Brain Res 164,.

  8. Original pedagogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Christina Haandbæk

    Original pedagogues Distention between competences and originality By Christina Haandbæk Schmidt, ph. d. student Aarhus University, Denmark This presentation concerns a Ph.D. project (Sept. 2012 –Sept. 2015) about pedagogues in day care facilities and their struggles to develop and retain...... shall argue that it is necessary for the pedagogues to know how they are constituted by the regimes of power on one side and on the other side are forced to create themselves. This knowledge could transform pedagogues into what I suggest calling ‘original pedagogues’, who have an authentic, ethic...... and professional autonomy in exercising judgment concerning pedagogical situations. To understand how pedagogues can struggle the distention between being competent and being original the project draws on both Michel Foucault and Charles Taylor as two incompatible theories on modern identity. The study...

  9. The origin of the elements. Chapter 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayler, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the questions: how the present chemical composition is related to the original composition of the Universe, and what was the nature of that original composition. In particular, the chemical evolution of the Galaxy is discussed. Section headings are: observations of chemical composition (stars, cosmic gases, galaxies, element abundance); theoretical considerations (nucleosynthesis); cosmological element production (the Hot Big Bang theory); galactic nucleosynthesis. (U.K.)

  10. Gases for an SSC muon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; Datskos, P.G.; Carter, J.G.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1990-01-01

    Recent measurements of electron drift velocities as a function of the density-reduced electric field E/N are reported for a number of unitary gases and the mixtures CO 2 /CH 4 and NH 3 /CF 4 /Ar. Calculated values of the mean electron energy as a function of E/N are also reported for unitary gases and mixtures of CO 2 /CH 4 . 7 refs., 5 figs

  11. Flux Jacobian Matrices For Equilibrium Real Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokur, Marcel

    1990-01-01

    Improved formulation includes generalized Roe average and extension to three dimensions. Flux Jacobian matrices derived for use in numerical solutions of conservation-law differential equations of inviscid flows of ideal gases extended to real gases. Real-gas formulation of these matrices retains simplifying assumptions of thermodynamic and chemical equilibrium, but adds effects of vibrational excitation, dissociation, and ionization of gas molecules via general equation of state.

  12. Pseudogap phenomena in ultracold atomic Fermi gases

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Qijin; Wang, Jibiao

    2014-01-01

    The pairing and superfluid phenomena in a two-component ultracold atomic Fermi gas is an analogue of Cooper pairing and superconductivity in an electron system, in particular, the high $T_c$ superconductors. Owing to the various tunable parameters that have been made accessible experimentally in recent years, atomic Fermi gases can be explored as a prototype or quantum simulator of superconductors. It is hoped that, utilizing such an analogy, the study of atomic Fermi gases may shed light to ...

  13. Effect of air-polluting gases on plant metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegler, I

    1972-01-01

    Among the air-polluting gases, SO/sub 2/, ozone, peroxyacetylnitrate (PAN) and fluorine are those whose action is studied most. This review tries to show the connection between the well-known macroscopic symptoms, on the one hand, the the primary point of attack at the enzymatic level, the changes in the plant's metabolism, and the microscopic and electronmicroscopic results, on the other. PAN and ozone, which originate through the action of sunlight on auto-exhausts, cause the strong oxidizing character of this type of smog. Their primary point of attack seems to be their oxidizing effect on protein SH-groups. PAN in special oxidizes the SH-groups of a photoreducible disulfide containing chloroplast protein, thus blocking photosynthesis. SO/sub 2/, which originates from combustion of coal and petroleum as well as from roasting of sulfur-containing ores, causes the reductive character of this type of smog. SO/sub 2/ has a special position among the air-polluting gases because it can be incorporated without damaging effect into the normal sulfur metabolism up to a certain level. After exceeding this limit, it causes a rapid depression of photosynthesis. F/sup -/ is bound as a salt in the cell wall or in the cell vacuole and is thereby prevented from its damaging effect on metabolic processes up to a certain level. Upon exceeding this, it acts mainly on the enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism. In a few examples it is shown in which way the collapse of cell compartmentation causes the loss of regulatory mechanisms of the cell. The influence of internal (genetic conditions, physiological age etc.) and external (light, temperature, humidity etc.) factors on the general metabolism, and, in this way, on the sensitivity of the plant to air-polluting gases, is shown. 195 references.

  14. The incineration of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thegerstroem, C.

    1980-03-01

    In this study, made on contract for the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, different methods for incineration of radioactive wastes are reviewed. Operation experiences and methods under development are also discussed. The aim of incineration of radioactive wastes is to reduce the volume and weight of the wastes. Waste categories most commonly treated by incineration are burnable solid low level wastes like trash wastes consisting of plastic, paper, protective clothing, isolating material etc. Primarily, techniques for the incineration of this type of waste are described but incineration of other types of low level wastes like oil or solvents and medium level wastes like ion-exchange resins is also briefly discussed. The report contains tables with condensed data on incineration plants in different countries. Problems encountered, experiences and new developments are reviewed. The most important problems in incineration of radioactive wastes have been plugging and corrosion of offgas systems, due to incomplete combustion of combustion of materials like rubber and PVC giving rise to corrosive gases, combined with inadequate materials of construction in heat-exchangers, channels and filter housings. (author)

  15. Analysis of electron interactions in dielectric gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivet, Aurelio; Duque, Daniel; Vega, Lourdes F.

    2007-01-01

    We present and discuss results concerning electron interactions processes of dielectric gases and their relationship with the macroscopic behavior of these gases, in particular, with their dielectric strength. Such analysis is based on calculating energies of reactions for molecular ionization, dissociative ionization, parent negative ion formation, and dissociative electron attachment processes. We hypothesize that the estimation of the required energy for a reduced number of processes that take place in electrically stressed gases could be related to the gas' capability to manage the electron flow during an electrical discharge. All calculations were done with semiempirical quantum chemistry methods, including an initial optimization of molecular geometry and heat of formation of the dielectric gases and all of species that appear during electron interaction reactions. The performance of semiempirical methods Austin model 1 and Parametric model 3 (PM3) was compared for several compounds, PM3 being superior in most cases. Calculations performed for a sample of nine dielectric gases show that electron attachment and detachment processes occur in different energy bands that do not overlap for any value of the dielectric strength. We have also analyzed the relationship between dielectric strength and two physical properties: electron affinity and ionization energy. Calculations performed for 43 dielectric gases show no clear correlation between them, although certain guidelines for the qualitative estimation of dielectric strength can still be assessed

  16. Gases and carbon in metals. Pt. 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jehn, H.; Speck, H.; Hehn, W.; Fromm, E.; Hoerz, G.

    1981-01-01

    This issue is part of a series of data on 'Gases and Carbon in Metals' which supplements the data compilation in the book 'Gase und Kohlenstoff in Metallen' (Gases and Carbon in Metals), edited by E. Fromm and E. Gebhardt, Springer-Verlag, Berlin 1976. The present survey includes results from papers published after the copy deadline and recommends critically selected data. Furthermore, it comprises a bibliography of relevant literature. For each element, firstly data on binary systems are presented, starting with hydrogen and followed by carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and rare gases. Within one metal-metalloid system the data are listed under topics such as solubility, solubility limit, dissociation pressure of compounds, vapour pressure of volatile oxides, thermodynamic data, diffusion, transport parameters (effective valence, heat of transport), permeation of gases through metals, gas absorption and gas desorption kinetics, compound formation kinetics, precipitation kinetics, and property changes. Following the data on binary systems, the data of ternary systems are presented, beginning with systems which contain one metal and two gases or one gas and carbon and continuing with systems with two metals and one gas or carbon. (orig./GE)

  17. Mixed Waste Integrated Program: A technology assessment for mercury-containing mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perona, J.J.; Brown, C.H.

    1993-03-01

    The treatment of mixed wastes must meet US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for chemically hazardous species and also must provide adequate control of the radioactive species. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development established the Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) to develop mixed-waste treatment technology in support of the Mixed Low-Level Waste Program. Many DOE mixed-waste streams contain mercury. This report is an assessment of current state-of-the-art technologies for mercury separations from solids, liquids, and gases. A total of 19 technologies were assessed. This project is funded through the Chemical-Physical Technology Support Group of the MWIP

  18. Chemistry and Vent Pressure of Very High-Temperature Gases Emitted from Pele Volcano on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotov, M. Y.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Galileo data for magma temperature at Pele and HST chemical data (SO2, S2, and SO) for Pele plumes were used to evaluate vent pressure (10 -4 -2 bar), the oxidation state (2-3 log fO2 units below Ni-NiO), and chemistry of volcanic gases. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Natural and human-related sources of ozone-forming trace gases in southern Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholes, RJ

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available or vehicular pollution. The cloud of tropospheric ozone which forms over southern Africa every spring probably has its main origin in natural emissions of the ozone-forming trace gases, including CO from vegetation fires, emissions of NO from soils...

  20. The role of moisture on combustion of pyrolysis gases in wildland fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selina C. Ferguson; Ambarish Dahale; Babak Shotorban; S. Mahalingam; David R. Weise

    2013-01-01

    The role of water vapor, originated from the moisture content in vegetation, on the combustion process was investigated via simulating an opposed diffusion flame and a laminar premixed flame with pyrolysis gases as the fuel and air as the oxidizer. The fuel was mixed with water vapor, and the simulation was repeated for various water mole fractions. In both of the...

  1. Fernald waste management and disposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, M.L.; Fisher, L.A.; Frost, M.L.; Rast, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    Historically waste management within the Department of Energy complex has evolved around the operating principle of packaging waste generated and storing until a later date. In many cases wastes were delivered to onsite waste management organizations with little or no traceability to origin of generation. Sites then stored their waste for later disposition offsite or onsite burial. While the wastes were stored, sites incurred additional labor costs for maintaining, inspecting and repackaging containers and capital costs for storage warehouses. Increased costs, combined with the inherent safety hazards associated with storage of hazardous material make these practices less attractive. This paper will describe the methods used at the Department of Energy's Fernald site by the Waste Programs Management Division to integrate with other site divisions to plan in situ waste characterization prior to removal. This information was utilized to evaluate and select disposal options and then to package and ship removed wastes without storage

  2. Biological processes for mitigation of greenhouse gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benemann, John R. [California Univ., Dept. of Plant and Microbial Biology, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-07-01

    Biological processes driven by photosynthesis cycle through the atmosphere well over an order of magnitude more CO{sub 2} than is currently emitted from the combustion of fossils fuels. Already human activities control and appropriate almost half the primary photosynthetic productivity of the planet. Better management of natural and man-made ecosystems affords many opportunities for mitigation of greenhouse gases, through sink enhancements, source reduction and substitution of fossil fuels with biofuels. Biofuels can be recovered from most organic wastes, from agricultural and forestry residues, and from biomass produced solely for energy use. However, the currently low costs of fossil fuels limits the market for biofuels. Accounting for the greenhouse mitigation value of biofuels would significantly increase their contribution to world fuel suppliers, estimated to be currently equivalent to about 15% of fossil fuel usage. Another limiting factor in expanding the use of biofuels is the relatively low solar energy conversion efficiencies of photosynthesis. Currently well below 1% of solar energy is converted into biomass energy even by intensive agricultural or forestry systems, with peak conversion efficiencies about 2 to 3% for sugar cane or microalgae cultures. One approach to increase photosynthetic efficiencies, being developed at the University of California Berkeley, is to reduce the amount of light-gathering chlorophyll in microalgae and higher plants. This would reduce mutual shading and also increase photosynthetic efficiencies under full sunlight intensities. Estimates of the potential of photosynthetic greenhouse mitigation processes vary widely. However, even conservative estimates for biofuels substituting for fossil fuels project the potential to reduce a large fraction of current increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels. Biofuels production will require integration with existing agronomic, forestry and animal husbandry systems, and improved

  3. Recent Experimental Advances to Determine (noble) Gases in Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipfer, R.; Brennwald, M. S.; Huxol, S.; Mächler, L.; Maden, C.; Vogel, N.; Tomonaga, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In aquatic systems noble gases, radon, and bio-geochemically conservative transient trace gases (SF6, CFCs) are frequently applied to determine water residence times and to reconstruct past environmental and climatic conditions. Recent experimental breakthroughs now enable ● to apply the well-established concepts of terrestrial noble gas geochemistry in waters to the minute water amounts stored in sediment pore space and in fluid inclusions (A), ● to determine gas exchange processes on the bio-geochemical relevant time scales of minutes - hours (B), and ● to separate diffusive and advective gas transport in soil air (C). A. Noble-gas analysis in water samples (transport in the pore space and identifying the origin of bio- and geogenic fluids in (un) consolidated sediments [1]. Advanced techniques that combine crushing and sieving speleothem samples in ultra-high-vacuum to a specific grain size allow to separate air and water-bearing fluid inclusions and thus enables noble-gas-based reconstruction of environmental conditions from water masses as small as 1mg [2]. B. The coupling of noble gas analysis with approaches of gas chromatography permits combined analysis of noble gases and other gases species (e.g., SF6, CFCs, O2, N2) from a single water sample. The new method substantially improves ground water dating by SF6 and CFCs as excess air is quantified from the same sample and hence can adequately be corrected for [3]. Portable membrane-inlet mass spectrometers enable the quasi-continuous and real-time analysis of noble gases and other dissolved gases directly in the field, allowing, for instance, quantification of O2 turnover rates on small time scales [4]. C. New technical developments perfect 222Rn analysis in water by the synchronous the determination of the short-lived 220Rn. The combined 220,222Rn analysis sheds light on the emanation behaviour of radon by identifying soil water content to be the crucial control of 220Rn occurrence in the environment

  4. Behaviour Test with the Leaching of a Waste package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, G.R

    1999-01-01

    The radioactive wastes are classified, in low, intermediate and high level wastes, according to the characteristics of the radionuclides in, its specific activity and half-life.Those are the three parameters that indicate how long the radioactive waste will be keep confined, in safe conditions before its contaminants go into the environment or before the institutional controls on the final disposal installations are removed.The confinement time can be estimated in ten half-lives, because since that moment its activity has decayed at one thousandth from the original .In low level wastes the confinement periods are nearly fifty years while in intermediate level, the periods can be until three hundreds years.These times are normally controlled by government institutions that are in charge of looking after people about the no-liberation of toxic elements at the environment.Therefore the wastes can be confined in a motionless matrix so that they can be placed in shallow land burials.On the other hand, the high level wastes which confinement times are estimated in ten or so thousand years, must be disposed in deep underground geological repositories.Obviously, there are no state controls for them.There are several matrices or different ways of stabilizing a waste, that will be introduced in this essay.It is also important to take account into the factors that degrade those matrices and speed up the released time of the radionuclides into the environment.There have been analyzed too, the radionuclides transport process that go through the matrix and the factors that affect the aforesaid process.Moreover, the diffusion was studied in a such detailed way, assuming that it is the most important mass transport process, in agreement with other studies made before.The leach rates and the diffusion coefficients have been calculated and determinated by means of measurements in a full scale leaching test.Those coefficients were compared with small-scale laboratory and

  5. Dissolved helium, inert gases, radium and radon in groundwaters from the Altnabreac research site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, J.N.; Kay, R.L.F.

    1985-01-01

    A groundwater geochemical study has been carried out at Altnabreac, Cenithness, Scotland, to investigate the feasibility of disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in crystalline rock. A groundwater flow model was constructed for sampling a section at depths up to 300 m. Measurements of inert gases dissolved in groundwaters are used, with parallel measurements of 14 C, tritium, oxygen and hydrogen isotopes to infer groundwater ages and residence times. (UK)

  6. Application of a power recovery system to gas turbine exhaust gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudat, N.P.; James, O.R.

    1979-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of a power recovery system to recover waste heat from the exhaust gases of gas turbines and convert this energy into shaft horsepower. Also discussed are power cycles, selection of power fluid, equipment selection, and application of the power recovery system to various gas turbines. Several charts and tables are included: process flow diagram, cycle efficiencies, curve for estimating recoverable horsepower

  7. Radiation-chemical removal of exhaust gases of thermal power stations from nitrogen and sulfur oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimov, G.Ya.; Gerasimova, T.S.; Tokmacheva, I.P.; Fadeev, S.A.; Faminskaya, M.V.

    1991-01-01

    Problem related to numerical simulation of kinetic processes occuring in waste flue gases of heat and power plants when they are treated by fast electrons are considered. The system of gas-phase chemical reactions describing kinetics of NO transformation in the presence of ammonia was studied. Different groups of reactions resulting in SO 2 oxidation were analyzed. Results of the calculations are compared with experimental data

  8. Wastes options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maes, M.

    1992-01-01

    After a description of the EEC environmental policy, some wastes families are described: bio-contaminant wastes (municipal and industrial), hospitals wastes, toxic wastes in dispersed quantities, nuclear wastes (radioactive and thermal), plastics compounds wastes, volatiles organic compounds, hydrocarbons and used solvents. Sources, quantities and treatments are given. (A.B.). refs., figs., tabs

  9. Slurry growth, gas retention, and flammable gas generation by Hanford radioactive waste tanks: Synthetic waste studies, FY 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Ryan, J.L.; Scheele, R.D.; Tingey, J.M.

    1992-08-01

    Of 177 high-level waste storage tanks on the Hanford Site, 23 have been placed on a safety watch list because they are suspected of producing flammable gases in flammable or explosive concentrate. One tankin particular, Tank 241-SY-101 (Tank 101-SY), has exhibited slow increases in waste volume followed by a rapid decrease accompanied by venting of large quantities of gases. The purpose of this study is to help determine the processes by which flammable gases are produced, retained, and eventually released from Tank 101-SY. Waste composition data for single- and double-shell waste tanks on the flammable gas watch listare critically reviewed. The results of laboratory studies using synthetic double-shell wastes are summarized, including physical and chemical properties of crusts that are formed, the stoichiometry and rate ofgas generation, and mechanisms responsible for formation of a floating crust

  10. Waste Sites - Municipal Waste Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — A Municipal Waste Operation is a DEP primary facility type related to the Waste Management Municipal Waste Program. The sub-facility types related to Municipal Waste...

  11. Composting of food wastes: Status and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerda, Alejandra; Artola, Adriana; Font, Xavier; Barrena, Raquel; Gea, Teresa; Sánchez, Antoni

    2018-01-01

    This review analyses the main challenges of the process of food waste composting and examines the crucial aspects related to the quality of the produced compost. Although recent advances have been made in crucial aspects of the process, such composting microbiology, improvements are needed in process monitoring. Therefore, specific problems related to food waste composting, such as the presence of impurities, are thoroughly analysed in this study. In addition, environmental impacts related to food waste composting, such as emissions of greenhouse gases and odours, are discussed. Finally, the use of food waste compost in soil bioremediation is discussed in detail. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Volume reduction of waste contaminated by fission product elements and plutonium using molten salt combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, D.E.; Grantham, L.F.; Paulson, R.B.

    1979-01-01

    In the Molten Salt Combustion Process, transuranic or β-γ organic waste and air are continuously introduced beneath the surface of a sodium carbonate-containing melt at a temperature of about 800 0 C. Complete combustion of the organic material to carbon dioxide and steam occurs without the conversion of nitrogen to nitrogen oxides. The noxious gases formed by combustion of the chloride, sulfur or phosphorus content of the waste instantly react with the melt to form the corresponding sodium compounds. These compounds as well as the ash and radionuclides are retained in the molten salt. The spent salt is either fused cast into an engineered disposal container or processed to recover salt and plutonium. Molten salt combustion reduces the waste to about 2% of its original volume. Many reactor or reprocessing wastes which cannot be incinerated without difficulty are readily combusted in the molten salt. A 50 kg/hr molten salt combustion system is being designed for the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Construction of the combustor started during 1977, and combustor startup was scheduled for the spring of 1978

  13. ORIGINAL ARTICLES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES. Illnesses of Herod the Great. Francois P Retief, Johan F G Cilliers. Herod the Great, ldumean by birth, was king ofthe Jews from 40 to 4 BC. An able statesman, builder and warrior, he ruthlessly stamped out all perceived opposition to his rule. His last decade was characterised by vicious strife within ...

  14. ORIGINAL ARTICLES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES. OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE OF. INTERNS TO BLOOD IN AN AREA. OF HIGH HIV SEROPREVALENCE. A S Karstaedt, L Pantanowitz. Objective. To determine the epidemiology of work-related exposure to blood among interns. Design. Interns were invited to complete anonymously a questionnaire ...

  15. ORIGINAL ARTICLES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES. References. 1. McCarthy D, Amos A, Zimmet P. The rising global burden of diabetes and its complications: estimates and projections to the year 2010. Diabet Med 1997; 14: suppl 5, Sl-585. 2. Zgibor JC, Songer TJ, Kelsey SF, et al. The association of diabetes specialist care with health care practices ...

  16. ORIGINAL ARTICLES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES. Cost to patients of obtaining treatment for HIV/AIDS in. South Africa. Sydney Rosen, Mpefe Ketlhapile, Ian Sanne, Mary Bachman DeSilva. Background. South Africa is providing antiretroviral (ARV) drugs for HIV I AIDS free of charge in order to increase access for poorer patients and promote ...

  17. ORIGINAL ARTICLES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES could be chosen to link to action policy decisions. In the. Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) programme, such a screening test would also remind the health provider to prescribe an iron tonic and to emphasise the importance of a balanced diet. A potential disadvantage of copper ...

  18. Original Article

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arab Journal of Nephrology and Transplantation. 2013 Sep;6(3):153-60. Original Article. AJNT. Abstract. Introduction: Dense Deposit Disease (DDD) is a devastating renal disease that leads to renal failure within. 10 years of diagnosis in about half of affected patients. In this study, we evaluated the relative prevalence and.

  19. ORIGINAL ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    One of the concerns among mothers for delivery is labor pain. There are various ... Journal of Medical and Biomedical Sciences (2017) 6(2): 11-16. © UDS Publishers ... ORIGINAL ARTICLE ..... effective than a placebo during the first stage of.

  20. Original Article

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pezhman Kharazm

    treatment in 32 patients who were admitted in Shohada-E-Tajrish hospital with final diagnosis of AMI from March 1996 to March 2002. ... of the patient and diagnostic studies and early surgical or non surgical intervention is the most ... operative diagnosis of etiology was based on presence of pulse at the origin of mesenteric.

  1. ORIGINAL ARTICLES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES. References. 1. UNAIDS. Report on the Global HTV/AIDS Epidemic. Geneva: June 2000. 2. Connor E..\\1, Sperling RS, Gelber R. et al. Reduction of maternal-infant transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 with zidovu dine treatment. N Eng! J Med 1994; 331:1173-1180. 3. Undegren ML ...

  2. Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A facility based comparative cross-sectional study ... Health care delivery should consider the desire for children by men and .... Socio-Demographic Characteristics of the .... For substitution, children are an important part of marriage, current child needs sibling, original desires .... does not, the only way to avoid the risk of.

  3. ORIGINAL ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    source of blood supply whilst in developed countries VNRDs are the major source. This study de- termined and ... UDS Publishers Limited All Right Reserved 2026-6294. ORIGINAL ..... ferral rate of females in comparison to males as pre- .... nors at blood bank of a medical college,. Australia. Med J Armed Forces 61: 131- 4.

  4. ORIGINAL ARTICLES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    alternatives to conventional care (homoeopathy, chiropractic, acupuncture, etc.), and also recognise the groundswell of interest in and support for inclusion of benefits for services provided by traditional healers. The transition from the original, relatively restricted approach which was concerned with established, mainstream.

  5. Original contributions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hefere

    Original contributions ... Results suggest that there is a significant positive ... psychological abuse, including economic abuse, intimidation, harassment, stalking, damage ... or maintaining the structure and function of the African home (Alio et al., 2011; Jewkes,. Levin ... Revictimisation occurs due to emotional violence and.

  6. Original Copies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2013-01-01

    of similarity by looking at artefactual similarity as the results of prototyping and as a production of simulacra. In this light, the concept of copying turns out to be more than simply a matter of trying to imitate an exotic or prestigious original, and it fundamentally raises the question how different a copy...

  7. ORIGINAL ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    there are racial and gender differences in the knowledge and awareness of HPV among Guyanese. The study aimed to ... UDS Publishers Limited All Right Reserved 2026-6294. ORIGINAL ... shown that, about 80.0% of women contracted HPV infection before ... 2010), age of initial sexual contact, and lack of symp- toms for ...

  8. Management of small quantities of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    The main objective of this publication is to provide practical guidance primarily to developing Member States on the predisposal management of small quantities of radioactive waste arising from hospitals, laboratories, industries, institutions, research reactors and research centres.The publication covers the management of liquid, solid and gaseous radioactive wastes at the users' premises and gives general guidance on procedures at a centralized waste management facility. Predisposal management of radioactive waste includes handling, treatment, conditioning, storage and transportation. This publication provides information and guidance on the following topics: national waste management framework; origin and characteristics of radioactive waste arising from users generating small quantities of waste; radioactive waste management concepts appropriate for small quantities; local waste management; the documentation and approval necessary for the consignment of waste to a centralized waste management facility; centralized waste management; exemption of radionuclides from the regulatory body; transportation; environmental monitoring; quality assurance for the whole predisposal process; regional co-operation aspects

  9. Incineration of technological waste contaminated with alpha emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otter, C.; Moncouyoux, J.P.; Cartier, R.; Durec, J.P.; Afettouche, R.

    1990-01-01

    A large R and D programme is in progress at the CEA on alpha-bearing waste incineration. The program is developed in the laboratory and a pilot plant including the following aspects: physico-chemical characterization of wastes, study of thermal decomposition of wastes, laboratory study of generated gases (first with inactive then with active wastes), development of an industrial pilot plant with inactive wastes, study of corrosion resistance of material (laboratory and pilot plant), study and qualification of nuclear measurements on wastes, ashes and equipment [fr

  10. Integrated treatment process of hazardous and mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibuya, M.; Suzuki, K.; Fujimura, Y.; Nakashima, T.; Moriya, Y.

    1993-01-01

    An integrated waste treatment system was studied based on technologies developed for the treatment of liquid radioactive, organic, and aqueous wastes containing hazardous materials and soils contaminated with heavy metals. The system consists of submerged incineration, metal ion fixing and stabilization, and soil washing treatments. Introduction of this system allows for the simultaneous processing of toxic waste and contaminated soils. Hazardous organic wastes can be decomposed into harmless gases, and aqueous wastes can be converted into a dischargeable effluent. The contaminated soil is backfilled after the removal of toxic materials. Experimental data show that the integration system is practical for complicated toxic wastes

  11. Solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The article drawn up within the framework of 'the assessment of the state of the environment in Lebanon' provides an overview of solid waste management, and assesses future wastes volume and waste disposal issues.In particular it addresses the following concerns: - Long term projections of solid waste arisings (i.e. domestic, industrial, such commercial wastes, vehicle types, construction waste, waste oils, hazardous toxic wastes and finally hospital and clinical wastes) are described. - Appropriate disposal routes, and strategies for reducing volumes for final disposal - Balance between municipal and industrial solid waste generation and disposal/treatment and - environmental impacts (aesthetics, human health, natural environment )of existing dumps, and the potential impact of government plans for construction of solid waste facilities). Possible policies for institutional reform within the waste management sector are proposed. Tables provides estimations of generation rates and distribution of wastes in different regions of Lebanon. Laws related to solid waste management are summarized

  12. Waste Management Operations Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sease, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    The major function of the Program is to operate the Laboratory's systems and facilities for collecting and disposing of radioactive gaseous, liquid, and solid wastes. This includes collection and shallow land burial of about 2000 m 3 of β-γ contaminated waste and retrievable storage of about 60 m 3 of transuranium contaminated waste annually; ion-exchange treatment and release to the environment of about 450 x 10 3 m 3 of slightly contaminated water; volume reduction by evaporation of about 5000 m 3 of intermediate-level liquid waste followed by hydrofracture injection of the concentrate; and scrubbing and/or filtration of the gases from radioactive operations prior to release to the atmosphere. In addition, this year disposal of about 350,000 gal of radioactive sludge from the old (no longer in service) gunite tanks began. Operations are in conformance with rules and regulations presently applicable to ORNL. This Program is responsible for planning and for development activities for upgrading the facilities, equipment, and procedures for waste disposal to ensure ORNL work incorporates the latest technology. Major (line-item) new facilities are provided as well as substantial (GPP) upgrading of old facilities. These activities as well as the technical and engineering support to handle them are discussed

  13. Nuclear waste disposal: technology and environmental hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hare, F.K.; Aikin, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: introduction; the nature and origin of wastes (fuel cycles; character of wastes; mining and milling operations; middle stages; irradiated fuel; reprocessing (waste generation); reactor wastes); disposal techniques and disposal of reprocessing wastes; siting of repositories; potential environmental impacts (impacts after emplacement in a rock repository; catastrophic effects; dispersion processes (by migrating ground water); thermal effects; future security; environmental survey, monitoring and modelling); conclusion. (U.K.)

  14. Processing method for miscellaneous radioactive solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Masami; Komori, Itaru; Nishi, Takashi.

    1995-01-01

    Miscellaneous solid wastes are subjected to heat treatment at a temperature not lower than a carbonizing temperature of organic materials in the wastes and not higher than the melting temperature of inorganic materials in the wastes, for example, not lower than 200degC but not higher than 660degC, and then resultant miscellaneous solid wastes are solidified using a water hardening solidification material. With such procedures, the organic materials in the miscellaneous solids are decomposed into gases. Therefore, solid materials excellent in long term stability can be formed. In addition, since the heat treatment is conducted at a relatively low temperature such as not higher than 660degC, the generation amount of off gases is reduced to simplify an off gas processing system, and since molten materials are not formed, handing is facilitated. (T.M.)

  15. Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anglin, J. R.; Ketterle, W.

    2003-01-01

    The early experiments on Bose-Einstein condensation in dilute atomic gases accomplished three longstanding goals. First, cooling of neutral atoms into their motional state, thus subjecting them to ultimate control, limited only by Heisenberg uncertainty relation. Second, creation of a coherent sample of atoms, in which all occupy the same quantum states, and the realization of atom lasers - devices that output coherent matter waves. And third, creation of gaseous quantum fluid, with properties that are different from the quantum liquids helium-3 and helium-4. The field of Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases has continued to progress rapidly, driven by the combination of new experimental techniques and theoretical advances. The family of quantum degenerate gases has grown, and now includes metastable and fermionic atoms. condensates have become an ultralow-temperature laboratory for atom optics, collisional physics and many-body physics, encompassing phonons, superfluidity, quantized vortices, Josephson junctions and quantum phase transitions. (author)

  16. Density Fluctuations in Uniform Quantum Gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosse, J.; Pathak, K. N.; Singh, G. S.

    2011-01-01

    Analytical expressions are given for the static structure factor S(k) and the pair correlation function g(r) for uniform ideal Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac gases for all temperatures. In the vicinity of Bose Einstein condensation (BEC) temperature, g(r) becomes long ranged and remains so in the condensed phase. In the dilute gas limit, g(r) of bosons and fermions do not coincide with Maxwell-Boltzmann gas but exhibit bunching and anti-bunching effect respectively. The width of these functions depends on the temperature and is scaled as √(inverse atomic mass). Our numerical results provide the precise quantitative values of suppression/increase (antibunching and bunching) of the density fluctuations at small distances in ideal quantum gases in qualitative agreement with the experimental observation for almost non-trapped dilute gases.

  17. Method of processing radioactive rare gase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagusagawa, Atsushi; Tuda, Kazuaki.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a safety processing method without using mechanical pumps or pressure-proof containers and, accordingly, with no risk for the leakage of radioactive rare gas. Method: A container filled with zeolige is inserted with a cover being opened into an autoclave. Meanwhile, krypton-containing gases are supplied to an adsorption tower filled with adsorbents, cooled, adsorbed and then heated to desorb adsorbed krypton. The krypton-containing gases are introduced due to the pressure difference to the autoclave thereby causing krypton to adsorb at ambient temperature to zeolite. Then, the inside of the autoclave is heated to desorb krypton and adsorbed moistures from zeolite and the pressure is elevated. After sending the gases under pressure to the adsorption tower, the zeolite-filled container is taken out from the autoclave, tightly closed and then transferred to a predetermined site. (Takahashi, M.)

  18. GREENHOUSE GASES AND MEANS OF PREVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušica Stojanović

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The greenhouse effect can be defined as the consequence of increased heating of the Earth's surface, as well as the lower atmosphere by carbon dioxide, water vapor, and other trace amounts gases. It is well-known that human industrial activities have released large amounts of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, about 900 billion tons of carbon dioxide, and it is estimated that up to 450 billion are still in the atmosphere. In comparison to greenhouse gases water vapor is one of the greatest contributors to the greenhouse effect on Earth. Many projects, as does the PURGE project, have tendences to build on the already conducted research and to quantify the positive and negative impacts on health and wellbeing of the population with greenhouse gas reduction strategies that are curently being implemented and should be increasingly applied in various sectors and urban areas, having offices in Europe, China and India.

  19. Dark lump excitations in superfluid Fermi gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan-Xia; Duan, Wen-Shan

    2012-11-01

    We study the linear and nonlinear properties of two-dimensional matter-wave pulses in disk-shaped superfluid Fermi gases. A Kadomtsev—Petviashvili I (KPI) solitary wave has been realized for superfluid Fermi gases in the limited cases of Bardeen—Cooper—Schrieffer (BCS) regime, Bose—Einstein condensate (BEC) regime, and unitarity regime. One-lump solution as well as one-line soliton solutions for the KPI equation are obtained, and two-line soliton solutions with the same amplitude are also studied in the limited cases. The dependence of the lump propagating velocity and the sound speed of two-dimensional superfluid Fermi gases on the interaction parameter are investigated for the limited cases of BEC and unitarity.

  20. Dark lump excitations in superfluid Fermi gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yan-Xia; Duan Wen-Shan

    2012-01-01

    We study the linear and nonlinear properties of two-dimensional matter-wave pulses in disk-shaped superfluid Fermi gases. A Kadomtsev—Petviashvili I (KPI) solitary wave has been realized for superfluid Fermi gases in the limited cases of Bardeen—Cooper—Schrieffer (BCS) regime, Bose—Einstein condensate (BEC) regime, and unitarity regime. One-lump solution as well as one-line soliton solutions for the KPI equation are obtained, and two-line soliton solutions with the same amplitude are also studied in the limited cases. The dependence of the lump propagating velocity and the sound speed of two-dimensional superfluid Fermi gases on the interaction parameter are investigated for the limited cases of BEC and unitarity

  1. Waste management - sewage - special wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The 27 papers represent a cross-section of the subject waste management. Particular attention is paid to the following themes: waste avoidance, waste product utilization, household wastes, dumping technology, sewage sludge treatments, special wastes, seepage from hazardous waste dumps, radioactive wastes, hospital wastes, purification of flue gas from waste combustion plants, flue gas purification and heavy metals, as well as combined sewage sludge and waste product utilization. The examples given relate to plants in Germany and other European countries. 12 papers have been separately recorded in the data base. (DG) [de

  2. Emission of greenhouse gases from sewage installations; Emissies van broeikasgassen van rwzi's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Voorthuizen, E.; Van Leusden, M.; Visser, A.; Kruit, J. [Royal Haskoning, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Kampschreur, M.; Van Dongen, U.; Van Loosdrecht, M. [Technische Universiteit Delft TUD, Delft (Netherlands)

    2010-03-15

    Emissions of greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N2O) from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are monitored. The emission of CO2 from waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) is related to the use of electricity, natural gas or other fossil fuels. The amount and origin of the emission of CH4 and N2O, however, is unknown. Presently emission factors from the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) and the Dutch Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment (VROM) are used to estimate those emissions. The aim of the study on the title subject was to determine the level of N2O and CH4 emission from Dutch WWTPs to understand the accuracy of the existing emission factors. In this way an estimation of the total greenhouse gas emission from a Dutch WWTP can be made. The emission of N2O and CH4 was measured at three WWTPs in the Netherlands: Papendrecht, Kortenoord and Kralingseveer [Dutch] In deze studie zijn de indirecte en directe emissies van broeikasgassen (CO2, CH4 en N2O) van rwzi's in kaart gebracht aan de hand van metingen. De resultaten hebben aanleiding gegeven voor een vervolgonderzoek waarbij onder meer kennis wordt ontwikkeld op het gebied van methaanvorming (CH4) in de riolering en mogelijkheden om de emissie van methaan op een zuivering te reduceren. Met betrekking tot lachgas N2O wordt onderzoek gedaan naar de vormingsprocessen van lachgas en de wijze waarop deze vrijkomt vanuit een rwzi. Verder worden relaties tussen lachgasemissie en procesparameters inzichtelijk gemaakt. Met deze kennis is het hopelijk in de toekomst mogelijk om maatregelen te nemen die de vorming en emissie van lachgas vanuit rwzi's te reduceren.

  3. EB technology for the purification of flue gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Takuji

    2003-01-01

    Sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides in flue gas from coal-combustion boilers in power plants, dioxins in flue gas from municipal waste incineration facilities and toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in off-gas from painting or cleaning factories are among air pollutants for which emission is regulated by a law in Japan. Electron beam is the effective and easy controllable radiation source for treatment of these flue gases. This report describes outline of the results so far obtained at JAERI on electron beam treatment of flue gas. The removal performance higher than 90% at 10 kGy for flue gas containing 800 ppm SOx and 225 ppm NOx were achieved and being applied to real-scale power plants in Poland and China with expectation of cost reduction of 20% compared to conventional plants. Decomposition of dioxins in flue gas from solid waste incinerators is another project. Using an accelerator of 300 keV and 40 mA for treatment of real incineration gas at 200degC, we obtain 90% decomposition of dioxins at 15 kGy irradiation. Expansion of these flue gas purification technologies combined with low-energy electron accelerators is expected. (S. Ohno)

  4. Petroleum Gases Market in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bumin, S.; Ozyoruk, B.

    2007-01-01

    and Europe. Therefore, Turkey is widely called as 'The Energy Bridge between the East and the West'. Turkey's natural energy resources are quite diversified; hard coal, lignite, asphaltite, oil, natural gas, hydro, geothermal, wood, animal and plant wastes, solar and secondary energy resources such as coke and briquettes are produced and consumed. Although Turkey's oil and natural gas reserves are limited, coal reserves are quite abundant. Energy forecasts show that primary energy demand would be 117 million TOE in 2005 and 156 million TOE in 2010. Turkey has a large LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas) consumption, which ranks third in Europe and within the top ten in the world. Turkey's LPG market structure depends largely on imports. At the end of 2005, the LPG consumption was around 3.7 billion tonnes and about 80 % of this, which amounts to 2.8 billion tonnes, has been provided through imports.(author)

  5. Management of Radioactive Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchokosa, P.

    2010-01-01

    Management of Radioactive Wastes is to protect workers and the public from the radiological risk associated with radioactive waste for the present and future. It application of the principles to the management of waste generated in a radioisotope uses in the industry. Any material that contains or is contaminated with radionuclides at concentrations or radioactivity levels greater than ‘exempt quantities’ established by the competent regulatory authorities and for which no further use is foreseen or intended. Origin of the Radioactive Waste includes Uranium and Thorium mining and milling, nuclear fuel cycle operations, Operation of Nuclear power station, Decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities and Institutional uses of isotopes. There are types of radioactive waste: Low-level Waste (LLW) and High-level Waste. The Management Options for Radioactive Waste Depends on Form, Activity, Concentration and half-lives of the radioactive waste, Storage and disposal methods will vary according to the following; the radionuclides present, and their concentration, and radio toxicity. The contamination results basically from: Contact between radioactive materials and any surface especially during handling. And it may occur in the solid, liquid or gas state. Decontamination is any process that will either reduce or completely remove the amount of radionuclides from a contaminated surface

  6. On levels unconditional declassification of solid materials with very low radioactive content and downloads liquids and gases to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This guide aims to establish radiological criteria for declassification (waiver) of the radioactive material of radiological regulatory control and levels unconditional clearance for solid materials and the authorized discharge limits for liquids and gases to the environment that meet these criteria for exposure scenarios acceptably conservative. This Guide to radioactive waste from the apply industrial, medical and research, which they will be managed as waste conventional. This guidance excludes from its scope the option of recycling and reuse of materials that have been declassified and wastes arising from activities and practices which naturally occurring radionuclides present are.

  7. Gases and vacua handbook of vacuum physics

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, A H

    2013-01-01

    Handbook of Vacuum Physics, Volume 1: Gases and Vacua presents three major topics, which are the fourth to sixth parts of this volume. These topics are the remarks on units of physical quantities; kinetic theory of gases and gaseous flow; and theory of vacuum diffusion pumps. The first topic aims to present concisely the significance of units of physical quantities, catering the need and interest of those who take measurements and make calculations in different fields of vacuum sciences. The technique and applications of this particular topic are also provided. The second main topic focuses sp

  8. Measuring Viscosities of Gases at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jag J.; Mall, Gerald H.; Hoshang, Chegini

    1987-01-01

    Variant of general capillary method for measuring viscosities of unknown gases based on use of thermal mass-flowmeter section for direct measurement of pressure drops. In technique, flowmeter serves dual role, providing data for determining volume flow rates and serving as well-characterized capillary-tube section for measurement of differential pressures across it. New method simple, sensitive, and adaptable for absolute or relative viscosity measurements of low-pressure gases. Suited for very complex hydrocarbon mixtures where limitations of classical theory and compositional errors make theoretical calculations less reliable.

  9. Itinerant Ferromagnetism in Ultracold Fermi Gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Itinerant ferromagnetism in cold Fermi gases with repulsive interactions is studied applying the Jastrow-Slater approximation generalized to finite polarization and temperature. For two components at zero temperature a second order transition is found at akF ≃ 0.90 compatible with QMC. Thermodyna......Itinerant ferromagnetism in cold Fermi gases with repulsive interactions is studied applying the Jastrow-Slater approximation generalized to finite polarization and temperature. For two components at zero temperature a second order transition is found at akF ≃ 0.90 compatible with QMC...

  10. Flammability characteristics of combustible gases and vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabetakis, M. G. [Bureau of Mines, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1964-05-01

    This is a summary of the available limit of flammability, autoignition and burning-rate data for more than 200 combustible gases and vapors in air and other oxidants, as well as of empirical rules and graphs that can be used to predict similar data for thousands of other combustibles under a variety of environmental conditions. Spec$c data are presented on the paraffinic, unsaturated, aromatic, and alicyclic hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, and sulfur compounds, and an assortment of fuels, fuel blends, hydraulic fluids, engine oils, and miscellaneous combustible gases and vapors.

  11. Investigations into electrical discharges in gases

    CERN Document Server

    Klyarfel'D, B N

    2013-01-01

    Investigations into Electrical Discharges in Gases is a compilation of scientific articles that covers the advances in the investigation of the fundamental processes occurring in electrical discharges in gases and vapors. The book details the different aspects of the whole life cycle of an arc, which include the initiation of a discharge, its transition into an arc, the lateral spread of the arc column, and the recovery of electric strength after extinction of an arc. The text also discusses the methods for the dynamic measurement of vapor density in the vicinity of electrical discharges, alon

  12. Nanoclusters and Microparticles in Gases and Vapors

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, Boris M

    2012-01-01

    Research of processes involving Nanoclusters and Microparticleshas been developing fastin many fields of rescent research, in particular in materials science. To stay at the cutting edge of this development, a sound understanding of the processes is needed. In this work, several processes involving small particles are described, such as transport processes in gases, charging of small particles in gases, chemical processes, atom attachment and quenching of excited atomic particles on surfaces, nucleation, coagulation, coalescence and growth processes for particles and aggregates. This work pres

  13. Indoor air pollution caused by geothermal gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the little-known but potentially serious indoor air quality problems that may occur where buildings are constructed on geothermal ground. The main problems are related to seepage of carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulphide, radon and other gases from soil cavities directly into indoor air through perforations in the structure. These gases present a health hazard, and hydrogen sulphide, which is particularly corrosive, may cause problems electrical and electronic systems. Counter-measures are not always effective, so developments in such areas should only be undertaken with a clear understanding of site-specific issues and their possible solutions. (author)

  14. Ultracold Dipolar Gases in Optical Lattices

    OpenAIRE

    Trefzger, C.; Menotti, C.; Capogrosso-Sansone, B.; Lewenstein, M.

    2011-01-01

    This tutorial is a theoretical work, in which we study the physics of ultra-cold dipolar bosonic gases in optical lattices. Such gases consist of bosonic atoms or molecules that interact via dipolar forces, and that are cooled below the quantum degeneracy temperature, typically in the nK range. When such a degenerate quantum gas is loaded into an optical lattice produced by standing waves of laser light, new kinds of physical phenomena occur. These systems realize then extended Hubbard-type m...

  15. Toluene : biological waste-gas treatment, toxicity and microbial adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, F.J.

    1995-01-01

    Due to the increasing stringent legislation concerning the emission of volatile organic compounds, there is nowadays a growing interest to apply biological waste-gas treatment techniques for the removal of higher concentrations of specific contaminants from waste gases. Fluctuations in the

  16. Hazardous waste systems analysis at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urioste, J.

    1997-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory produces routine and non-routine hazardous waste as a by-product of mission operations. Hazardous waste commonly generated at the Laboratory includes many types of laboratory research chemicals, solvents, acids, bases, carcinogens, compressed gases, metals, and other solid waste contaminated with hazardous waste. The Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental Stewardship Office has established a Hazardous Waste Minimization Coordinator to specifically focus on routine and non-routine RCRA, TSCA, and other administratively controlled wastes. In this process, the Waste Minimization Coordinator has developed and implemented a systems approach to define waste streams, estimate waste management costs and develop plans to implement avoidance practices, and develop projects to reduce or eliminate the waste streams at the Laboratory. The paper describes this systems approach

  17. Fluidized bed incineration of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    A fluidized-bed incineration facility is being designed for installation at the Rocky Flats Plant to demonstrate a process for the combustion of transuranic waste. The unit capacity will be about 82 kg/hr of combustible waste. The combustion process will utilize in situ neutralization of acid gases generated in the process. The equipment design is based on data generated on a pilot unit and represents a scale-up of nine. Title I engineering is at least 70 percent complete

  18. Regulation of radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This bulletin contains information about activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD). In this leaflet the regulation of radioactive waste management of the UJD are presented. Radioactive waste (RAW) is the gaseous, liquid or solid material that contains or is contaminated with radionuclides at concentrations or activities greater than clearance levels and for which no use is foreseen. The classification of radioactive waste on the basis of type and activity level is: - transition waste; - short lived low and intermediate level waste (LlLW-SL); - long lived low and intermediate level waste (LlLW-LL); - high level waste. Waste management (in accordance with Act 130/98 Coll.) involves collection, sorting, treatment, conditioning, transport and disposal of radioactive waste originated by nuclear facilities and conditioning, transport to repository and disposal of other radioactive waste (originated during medical, research and industrial use of radioactive sources). The final goal of radioactive waste management is RAW isolation using a system of engineered and natural barriers to protect population and environment. Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic regulates radioactive waste management in accordance with Act 130/98 Coll. Inspectors regularly inspect and evaluate how the requirements for nuclear safety at nuclear facilities are fulfilled. On the basis of safety documentation evaluation, UJD issued permission for operation of four radioactive waste management facilities. Nuclear facility 'Technologies for treatment and conditioning contains bituminization plants and Bohunice conditioning centre with sorting, fragmentation, evaporation, incineration, supercompaction and cementation. Final product is waste package (Fibre reinforced container with solidified waste) acceptable for near surface repository in Mochovce. Republic repository in Mochovce is built for disposal of short lived low and intermediate level waste. Next

  19. Radioactive waste (disposal)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkin, P.

    1985-01-01

    The disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes was discussed. The following aspects were covered: public consultation on the principles for assessing disposal facilities; procedures for dealing with the possible sites which the Nuclear Industry Radioactive Waste Executive (NIREX) had originally identified; geological investigations to be carried out by NIREX to search for alternative sites; announcement that proposal for a site at Billingham is not to proceed further; NIREX membership; storage of radioactive wastes; public inquiries; social and environmental aspects; safety aspects; interest groups; public relations; government policies. (U.K.)

  20. Waste management and climate protection. Contribution of Bavarian waste management for greenhouse gas minimization; Abfallwirtschaft und Klimaschutz. Beitrag der bayerischen Abfallwirtschaft zur Treibhausgas-Minderung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peche, R.; Kreibe, S. [bifa Umweltinstitut, Augsburg (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    bifa created a material flow model for approximately 23 million tons of Bavarian municipal and industrial waste that incorporates collection of waste, waste disposal and processing and treatment of residual material. bifa determined the influence of these material flows on emissions of greenhouse gases. The analysis shows that the Bavarian waste management achieved a reduction of greenhouse gases in the municipal and industrial waste sector that amounted to 3.2 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalents (CO{sub 2}E) in 2003, thus reducing environmental impact considerably. To see the overall reduction of greenhouse gases it is however necessary to compare the system of waste collection, waste treatment and waste processing with a fictitious scenario of waste disposal exclusively via landfill. This would cause an environmental load of 9.58 million tons CO{sub 2}E. Together with the amount of reduction attained in 2003, an overall reduction of greenhouse gas emissions of 12.78 millions tons CO{sub 2}E has thus been achieved by the Bavarian waste management. Analysis of possible future waste processing and waste avoidance measures showed two areas with significant additional potential for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. One is waste avoidance - e. g. through increased municipal counselling - however, this is difficult to realize. The other possibility is the optimisation of bio-waste processing. (orig.)

  1. Serpentinization and the origin of hydrogen gas in Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coveney, R.M. Jr.; Goebel, E.D.; Zeller, E.J.; Dreschhoff, G.A.M.; Angino, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogen gas occurs in ten Kansas wells near the Mid-Continent rift system. Since 1982, two wells have yielded small amounts of gases containing an average of 29-37 mole % H/sub 2/, the remainder being chiefly N/sub 2/ with only traces of hydrocarbons. Isotopic compositions for hydrogen (delta D = -740 to -836 per thousand) imply near-ambient (about 10/sup 0/C) equilibration temperatures for the gases, which are among the most deuterium-depleted in nature and resemble the H/sub 2/-rich gases described from ophiolites in Oman. Isotopic values for the Kansas N/sub 2/ differ slightly from those of the atmosphere, but not enough to rule out an atmospheric origin. Because they are low in CH/sub 4/ and CO/sub 2/, expected byproducts of biogenic activity, the gases are probably abiogenic in origin. The existence of such gases near a major rift system, containing mafic rocks, and not far from known kimberlites is consistent with an origin from reactions involving Fe/sup +2/ oxidation, for example during serpentinization. Because the gases may be associated with kimberlites and deep-seated rifting, mantle outgassing is possible, but such an origin would be difficult to reconcile with the low isotopic temperatures. The H/sub 2/ gases from Kansas (and elsewhere) seem to be too low in pressure to have commercial value. However, neither the Kansas gases nor those from other H/sub 2/ occurrences have been adequately examined to assess their importance as potential resources. 4 figures, 3 tables.

  2. Radioactive waste treatment apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrams, R.F.; Chellis, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Radioactive waste treatment apparatus is disclosed in which the waste is burned in a controlled combustion process, the ash residue from the combustion process is removed and buried, the gaseous effluent is treated in a scrubbing solution the pH of which is maintained constant by adding an alkaline compound to the solution while concurrently extracting a portion of the scrubbing solution, called the blowdown stream. The blowdown stream is fed to the incinerator where it is evaporated and the combustibles in the blowdown stream burned and the gaseous residue sent to the scrubbing solution. Gases left after the scrubbing process are treated to remove iodides and are filtered and passed into the atmosphere

  3. MOCVD waste gas treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geelen, A. van; Bink, P.H.M.; Giling, L.J.

    1993-01-01

    A large scale production of GaAs based solar cells with MOCVD will give rise to a considerable use of arsine. Therefore a gas treatment system is needed to convert the waste gases into less toxic compounds. In this study seven different gas treatment systems for MOCVD are compared by quantifying the environmental aspects. The systems are divided in wet systems, adsorption systems and thermal systems. The smallest amount of waste is produced by adsorption and thermal systems. Adsorption systems use the smallest amount of energy. The amount of primary materials used for the equipment varies per system. All systems are safe, but adsorption systems are simplest. At the moment, adsorption systems are probably the best choice from an environmental point of view. Nevertheless thermal systems have some potential advantages which make them interesting for the future

  4. Nuclear waste management at DOE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perge, A.F.

    1979-01-01

    DOE is responsible for interim storage for some radioactive wastes and for the disposal for most of them. Of the wastes that have to be managed a significant part are a result of treatment systems and devices for cleaning gases. The long term waste management objectives place minimal reliance on surveillance and maintenance. Thus, the concerns about the chemical, thermal, and radiolytic degradation of wastes require technology for converting the wastes to forms acceptable for long term isolation. The strategy of the DOE airborne radioactive waste management program is to increase the service life and reliability of filters; to reduce filter wastes; and in anticipation of regulatory actions that would require further reductions in airborne radioactive releases from defense program facilities, to develop improved technology for additional collection, fixation, and long-term management of gaseous wastes. Available technology and practices are adequate to meet current health and safety standards. The program is aimed primarily at cost effective improvements, quality assurance, and the addition of new capability in areas where more restrictive standards seem likely to apply in the future

  5. Greenhouse gases study in Amazonia; Estudo de gases de efeito estufa na Amazonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Amelio, Monica Tais Siqueira

    2006-07-01

    The Amazon plays an important role on the global carbon cycle, as changing as carbon storage, since Amazon Basin is the biggest area of tropical forest, around 50% of global. Natural's process, deforestation, and use land are CO{sub 2} sources. The Amazon forest is a significant source of N{sub 2}O by soil process, and CH{sub 4} by anaerobic process like flooded areas, rice cultures, and others sources. This project is part of the LBA project (Large-Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia), and this project is 'Vertical profiles of carbon dioxide and other trace gas species over the Amazon basin using small aircraft'. Since December 2000 vertical profiles of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO, H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O and SF{sub 6} have been measured above central Amazonia. The local sampling was over Tapajos National Forest, a primary forest in Para State, where had a CO{sub 2} flux tower and an east impact area with sources like animals, rice cultivation, biomass burning, etc, to compare the influence of an impact area and a preserved area in the profiles. The Reserva Biologica de Cuieiras, at Amazon State, is the other studied place, where there already exists a CO{sub 2} flux tower, and an east preserved area at this State, to compare with the Cuieiras. The sampling has been carried out on vertical profile from 1000 ft up to 12000 ft using a semi-automated sampling package developed at GMD/NOAA and a small aircraft. The analysis uses the MAGICC system (Multiple Analysis of Gases Influence Climate Change) which is installed at the Atmospheric Chemistry Laboratory (LQA) in IPEN (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares). The results showed that all gases studied, except H{sub 2} gas, has been following the global trend. At the Para State, for the studied years, the Amazonian Forest performed as small CO{sub 2} sink. To compare Wet and Dry Seasons, subtracted the Ascension concentration values in the period to remove the global influence. So that

  6. Greenhouse gases study in Amazonia; Estudo de gases de efeito estufa na Amazonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Amelio, Monica Tais Siqueira

    2006-07-01

    The Amazon plays an important role on the global carbon cycle, as changing as carbon storage, since Amazon Basin is the biggest area of tropical forest, around 50% of global. Natural's process, deforestation, and use land are CO{sub 2} sources. The Amazon forest is a significant source of N{sub 2}O by soil process, and CH{sub 4} by anaerobic process like flooded areas, rice cultures, and others sources. This project is part of the LBA project (Large-Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia), and this project is 'Vertical profiles of carbon dioxide and other trace gas species over the Amazon basin using small aircraft'. Since December 2000 vertical profiles of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO, H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O and SF{sub 6} have been measured above central Amazonia. The local sampling was over Tapajos National Forest, a primary forest in Para State, where had a CO{sub 2} flux tower and an east impact area with sources like animals, rice cultivation, biomass burning, etc, to compare the influence of an impact area and a preserved area in the profiles. The Reserva Biologica de Cuieiras, at Amazon State, is the other studied place, where there already exists a CO{sub 2} flux tower, and an east preserved area at this State, to compare with the Cuieiras. The sampling has been carried out on vertical profile from 1000 ft up to 12000 ft using a semi-automated sampling package developed at GMD/NOAA and a small aircraft. The analysis uses the MAGICC system (Multiple Analysis of Gases Influence Climate Change) which is installed at the Atmospheric Chemistry Laboratory (LQA) in IPEN (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares). The results showed that all gases studied, except H{sub 2} gas, has been following the global trend. At the Para State, for the studied years, the Amazonian Forest performed as small CO{sub 2} sink. To compare Wet and Dry Seasons, subtracted the Ascension concentration values in the period to remove the global influence. So that, in the 2004 and

  7. Electron-Atom Collisions in Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2013-01-01

    Electron-atom collisions in gases are an aspect of atomic physics. Three experiments in this field employing a thyratron are described: (i) the Ramsauer-Townsend effect, (ii) the excitation and ionization potentials of xenon and (iii) the ion-electron recombination after interrupting the electric discharge.

  8. Acid dew point measurement in flue gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struschka, M.; Baumbach, G.

    1986-06-01

    The operation of modern boiler plants requires the continuous measurement of the acid dew point in flue gases. An existing measuring instrument was modified in such a way that it can determine acid dew points reliably, reproduceably and continuously. The authors present the mechanisms of the dew point formation, the dew point measuring principle, the modification and the operational results.

  9. Properties and Bibliography of GaSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-01

    Musaev, A. E. Bakhyshev, N. M. Gasanly and L. G. Musaeva . (1975). "Anisotropy of the optical constants of GaS and GaSe near the absorption edge." Sov...Phys. Semiconductors. 9 94-95 Russian ref.: Fiz. Tekh. Poluprovodn. 9 142-145 (January 1975). Akhundov, G. A., L. G. Musaeva and M. D. Khomutova

  10. Mitigation of greenhouse gases from agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schils, R.L.M.; Ellis, J. L.; de Klein, C. A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Models are widely used to simulate the emission of greenhouse gases (GHG). They help to identify knowledge gaps, estimate total emissions for inventories, develop mitigation options and policies, raise awareness and encourage adoption. These models vary in scale, scope and methodological approach...

  11. Noble gases as cardioprotectants - translatability and mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Kirsten F.; Weber, Nina C.; Hollmann, Markus W.; Preckel, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Several noble gases, although classified as inert substances, exert a tissue-protective effect in different experimental models when applied before organ ischaemia as an early or late preconditioning stimulus, after ischaemia as a post-conditioning stimulus or when given in combination before,

  12. Toxicity of pyrolysis gases from polyether sulfone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilado, C. J.; Olcomendy, E. M.

    1979-01-01

    A sample of polyether sulfone was evaluated for toxicity of pyrolysis gases, using the toxicity screening test method developed at the University of San Francisco. Animal response times were relatively short at pyrolysis temperatures of 600 to 800 C, with death occurring within 6 min. The principal toxicant appeared to be a compound other than carbon monoxide.

  13. Anaesthetic gases: environmental impact and alternatives ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaesthetic gases: environmental impact and alternatives. ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... to be small when compared to gaseous emissions from industrial and agricultural sources, the actual percentage contribution to climate change is small. ... EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  14. Cold quantum gases with resonant interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis, B.

    2008-01-01

    We study ultracold gases of alkali-metal atoms in the quantum degenerate regime. The interatomic interactions in these type of systems can be tuned using resonances induced by magnetic or electric fields. The tunability of the interactions, together with the possibility of confining the atoms with

  15. Teacher's Guide for Balloons and Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Joe H.; And Others

    This guide was developed to provide children with an opportunity to prepare and collect several common gases and to discover and work with some of their properties. The guide is divided into five major sections: (1) introduction, (2) materials, (3) activities, (4) balloons aloft, and (5) an appendix. The introduction provides information…

  16. Prediction of friction coefficients for gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M. F.

    1969-01-01

    Empirical relations are used for correlating laminar and turbulent friction coefficients for gases, with large variations in the physical properties, flowing through smooth tubes. These relations have been used to correlate friction coefficients for hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and air.

  17. Original Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Natarajan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available History that comes to us as a chronology of events is really a collective existence that is evolving through several stages to develop Individuality in all members of the society. The human community, nation states, linguistic groups, local castes and classes, and families are the intermediate stages in development of the Individual. The social process moves through phases of survival, growth, development and evolution. In the process it organizes the consciousness of its members at successive levels from social external manners, formed behavior, value-based character and personality to culminate in the development of Individuality. Through this process, society evolves from physicality to Mentality. The power of accomplishment in society and its members develops progressively through stages of skill, capacity, talent, and ability. Original thinking is made possible by the prior development of thinking that organizes facts into information. The immediate result of the last world war was a shift in reliance from physical force and action to mental conception and mental activity on a global scale. At such times no problem need defy solution, if only humanity recognizes the occasion for thinking and Original Thinking. The apparently insoluble problems we confront are an opportunity to formulate a comprehensive theory of social evolution. The immediate possibility is to devise complete solutions to all existing problems, if only we use the right method of thought development.

  18. Study on the impact of industrial flue gases on the PCDD/Fs congener profile in ambient air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Węgiel, Małgorzata; Chrząszcz, Ryszard; Maślanka, Anna; Grochowalski, Adam

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of emissions from combustion processes from sinter, medical, waste and sewage waste incineration plants on the PCDD and PCDF congener profile in ambient air in Krakow (city in Poland). The subject matter of the study were air samples from the outskirts and the city center. It was found that in flue gases from industrial sources and in ambient air the share of PCDF congeners in relation to the total content of PCDD/Fs was higher than the share of PCDDs. However, in air samples collected in the city center, this relationship was reversed. The PCDD congener profiles in flue gases and in air samples are comparable. However, in the samples from the city centre, the share of OCDD is significantly higher and amounts to about 80%. The PCDF congener shares show higher spatial diversity, although in all the analyzed air samples, ODCF and 1,2,3,4,6,7,8 HpCDF dominated. Analyzing the share of congeners in regard to the sum of PCDDs/Fs a mutual resemblance of air from the suburbs, exhaust gases from the sinter ore and sewage sludge incinerator plant was observed. The study showed a similarity between the profile of congeners in air from the city centre and exhaust gases from the medical waste incinerator. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Membrane bioreactors for waste gas treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reij, M.W.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.; Hartmans, S.

    1998-01-01

    This review describes the recent development of membrane reactors for biological treatment of waste gases. In this type of bioreactor gaseous pollutants are transferred through a membrane to the liquid phase, where micro-organisms degrade the pollutants. The membrane bioreactor combines the

  20. Membrane bioreactors for waste gas treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reij, M.W.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.; Hartmans, S.

    1998-01-01

    This review describes the recent development of membrane reactors for biological treatment of waste gases. In this type of bioreactor gaseous pollutants are transferred through a membrane to the liquid phase, where micro-organisms degrade the pollutants. The membrane bioreactor combines the

  1. Algal Biomass from Wastewater and Flue Gases as a Source of Bioenergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Lage

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Algae are without doubt the most productive photosynthetic organisms on Earth; they are highly efficient in converting CO2 and nutrients into biomass. These abilities can be exploited by culturing microalgae from wastewater and flue gases for effective wastewater reclamation. Algae are known to remove nitrogen and phosphorus as well as several organic contaminants including pharmaceuticals from wastewater. Biomass production can even be enhanced by the addition of CO2 originating from flue gases. The algal biomass can then be used as a raw material to produce bioenergy; depending on its composition, various types of biofuels such as biodiesel, biogas, bioethanol, biobutanol or biohydrogen can be obtained. However, algal biomass generated in wastewater and flue gases also contains contaminants which, if not degraded, will end up in the ashes. In this review, the current knowledge on algal biomass production in wastewater and flue gases is summarized; special focus is given to the algal capacity to remove contaminants from wastewater and flue gases, and the consequences when converting this biomass into different types of biofuels.

  2. Waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewska, E.

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter formation of wastes and basic concepts of non-radioactive waste management are explained. This chapter consists of the following parts: People in Peril; Self-regulation of nature as a guide for minimizing and recycling waste; The current waste management situation in the Slovak Republic; Categorization and determination of the type of waste in legislative of Slovakia; Strategic directions waste management in the Slovak Republic.

  3. Adsorption properties of fission gases Xe and Kr on pristine and doped graphene: A first principle DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazhappilly, Tijo, E-mail: tijoj@barc.gov.in [Theoretical Chemistry Section, Chemistry Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Ghanty, Tapan K., E-mail: tapang@barc.gov.in [Theoretical Chemistry Section, Chemistry Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Jagatap, B.N. [Theoretical Chemistry Section, Chemistry Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2017-07-15

    Graphene has excellent adsorption properties due to large surface area and has been used in applications related to gas sorption and separation. The separation of radioactive noble gases using graphene is an interesting area of research relevant to nuclear waste management. Radioactive noble gases Xe and Kr are present in the off-gas streams from nuclear fission reactors and spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The entrapment of these volatile fission gases is important in the context of nuclear safety. The separation of Xe from Kr is extremely difficult, and energy intensive cryogenic distillation is generally employed. Physisorption based separation techniques using porous materials is a cost effective alternative to expensive cryogenic distillation. Thus, adsorption of noble gases on graphene is relevant for fundamental understanding of physisorption process. The properties of graphene can be tuned by doping and incorporation of defects. In this regard, we study the binding affinity of Xe and Kr in pristine and doped graphene sheets. We employ first principle calculations using density functional theory, corrected for dispersion interactions. The structural parameters obtained from the current study show excellent agreement with the available theoretical and experimental observations on similar systems. Noble gas adsorption energies on pristine graphene match very well with the available literature. Our results show that the binding energy of fission gases Xe and Kr on graphene can be considerably improved through doping the lattice with a heteroatom. - Graphical abstract: The adsorption of radioactive fission gases Xe and Kr on pristine/doped graphene is an interesting topic in the context of nuclear waste management. Previous experimental and computational studies about Xe/Kr adsorption on graphene were limited to only on pristine graphene. The doping by hetero atom changes the electronic properties of graphene and creates active sites in the lattice. Based

  4. Radioactive waste management - v. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    In this second part, the program of waste management of non-military origin of the following countries: USA, United Kingdom, France, Canada, Federal Republic of Germany, and Japan, is presented. For each country, a brief overview on its nuclear program, to identify the reason of the major emphasis done by this country for a specific waste management, is presented. The legislation control, the classification, the treatment and, the options for waste disposal are also presented. (M.C.K.) [pt

  5. Auditing hazardous waste incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayanty, R.K.M.; Allen, J.M.; Sokol, C.K.; von Lehmden, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that audit standards consisting of volatile and semivoltile organics have been established by the EPA to be provided to federal, state, and local agencies or their contractors for use in performance audits to assess the accuracy of measurement methods used during hazardous waste trial burns. The volatile organic audit standards currently total 29 gaseous organics in 5, 6, 7, 9, and 18-component mixtures at part-per-billion (ppb) levels (1 to 10 000 ppb) in compressed gas cylinders in a balance gas of nitrogen. The semivoltile organic audit standards currently total six organics which are spiked onto XAD-2 cartridges for auditing analysis procedures. Studies of all organic standards have been performed to determine the stability of the compounds and the feasibility of using them as performance audit materials. Results as of July 1987 indicate that all of the selected organic compounds are adequately stabile for use as reliable audit materials. Performance audits have been conducted with the audit materials to assess the accuracy of the measurement methods. To date, 160 performance audits have been initiated with the ppb-level audit gases. The audit results obtained with audit gases during hazardous waste trial burn tests were generally within ±50% of the audit concentrations. A limited number of audit results have been obtained with spiked XAD-2 cartridges, and the results have generally been within ±35% of the audit concentrations

  6. Electricity from waste heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larjola, Jaakko; Lindgren, Olli; Vakkilainen, Esa

    In industry and in ships, large amounts of waste heat with quite a high release temperature are produced: examples are combustion gases and the exhaust gases of ceramic kilns. Very often they cannot be used for heating purposes because of long transport distances or because there is no local district heating network. Thus, a practical solution would be to convert this waste heat into electric power. This conversion may be carried out using an ORC-plant (Organic Rankine Cycle). There are probably some twenty ORC-plants in commercial use in the world. They are, however, usually based on conventional power plant technology, and are rather expensive, complicated and may have significant maintenance expenses. In order to obviate these problems, a project was started at Lappeenranta University of Technology at the beginning of 1981 to develop a high-speed, hermetic turbogenerator as the prime mover of the ORC. With this new technology the whole ORC-plant is quite simple, with only one moving part in the power system. It is expected to require very little maintenance, and the calculations made give for it significantly lower specific price than for the conventional technology ORC-plant. Two complete prototypes of the new technology ORC-plant have been built, one to the laboratory, other to industrial use. The nominal output of both is 100 kW electricity. Calculated amortization times for the new ORC-plant range from 2.1 to 6.

  7. Quench origins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devred, A.

    1990-03-01

    In this paper, I shall discuss the quench origins. I shall first establish a method of classification and introduce the notions of conductor-limited and energy-deposited quenches. Next the paper will be devoted to the study of conductor-limited quenches, and I shall introduce the notions of plateau and of fraction of short sample. Also the paper will be devoted to the study of energy-deposited quenches, and I shall introduce the notions of training and of minimum energy deposit; I shall then review the possible causes of energy release. Lastly, I shall introduce the notion of operating margin, and I shall indicate how to optimize the operating margin in order to limit the risk of premature quenching. 112 refs., 14 figs

  8. Origin of the atmospheres of the earth and the planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z M

    1978-06-01

    From a systematic analysis of the whole history of the protoplanetary cloud and the observational facts of the earth's atmosphere, new theory is proposed on the origin of the atmospheres of the earth and the planets. For the earth-like planets, there were profound primordial atmospheres originated from the protoplanetary cloud by the accretion of the embryoes of planets. These primordial atmospheres has existed in a time scale of 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 7/ years and were composed of chemically reducing gases. The presence of such a reducing atmosphere may be of great significance to the theories of cosmogony and the origin of life. The contents are as follows: the escape of the nebulae and the planetary atmospheres, the blowing-off of the atmospheres and the disspiation of gases driven by the solar wind, the accretion of gases by the planetary embryoes, the primordial atmospheres.

  9. Final disposal of radioactive waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freiesleben H.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the origin and properties of radioactive waste as well as its classification scheme (low-level waste – LLW, intermediate-level waste – ILW, high-level waste – HLW are presented. The various options for conditioning of waste of different levels of radioactivity are reviewed. The composition, radiotoxicity and reprocessing of spent fuel and their effect on storage and options for final disposal are discussed. The current situation of final waste disposal in a selected number of countries is mentioned. Also, the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency with regard to the development and monitoring of international safety standards for both spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management is described.

  10. Nuclear Waste Disposal Program 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-12-01

    This comprehensive brochure published by the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA) discusses the many important steps in the management of radioactive waste that have already been implemented in Switzerland. The handling and packaging of waste, its characterisation and inventorying, as well as its interim storage and transport are examined. The many important steps in Swiss management of radioactive waste already implemented and wide experience gained in carrying out the associated activities are discussed. The legal framework and organisational measures that will allow the selection of repository sites are looked at. The various aspects examined include the origin, type and volume of radioactive wastes, along with concepts and designs for deep geological repositories and the types of waste to be stored therein. Also, an implementation plan for the deep geological repositories, the required capacities and the financing of waste management activities are discussed as is NAGRA’s information concept. Several diagrams and tables illustrate the program

  11. Analysis of carbon stable isotope to determine the origin and migration of gaseous hydrocarbon in the Brazilian sedimentary basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaki, T.; Rodrigues, R.

    1986-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of natural gases to determine the origin and gaseous hydrocarbon migration of Brazilian sedimentar basins is analysed. The carbon isotopic ratio of methane from natural gases depends on the process of gas formation and stage of organic matter maturation. In the geochemical surface exploration the biogenic gases are differentiated from thermogenic gases, because the last one is isotopically heavier. As the isotopic composition of methane has not changed during migration, the migrated gases from deeper and more mature source rocks are identified by its relative 13 C enrichment. The methane was separated from chromatography and and the isotopic analysis was done with mass spectrometer. (M.C.K.) [pt

  12. Hospital waste processing. Tratamiento de residuos hospitalarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocafiguera, X de

    1994-01-01

    Generally speaking, Hospitalary wastes are apparently similar to any kind of urban waste. Nevertheless it must be taken into account that the origin of Hospitalary wastes is different as they can be contaminated with microbes, virus, bacteria, bacillus...Because of this they should be treated and stored with special techniques in all the process. (Author)

  13. EVALUATION OF SIGNIFICANT ANTHROPOGENIC SOURCES OF RADIATIVELY IMPORTANT TRACE GASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report is an initial evaluation of significant anthropogenic sources of radiatively important trace gases. missions of greenhouse gases from human activities--including fossil fuel combustion, industrial/agricultural activities, and transportation--contribute to the increasin...

  14. 75 FR 57669 - Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ... Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action amends the Final Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Rule to require reporters... Numbers GHG greenhouse gas GHGRP Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program HCFC hydrochlorofluorocarbon HFC...

  15. Geodesics in thermodynamic state spaces of quantum gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, H.; Obata, T.; Hara, H.

    2002-01-01

    The geodesics for ideal quantum gases are numerically studied. We show that 30 ideal quantum state is connected to an ideal classical state by geodesics and that the bundle of geodesics for Bose gases have a tendency of convergence

  16. Radiolytic generation of gases in reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramshesh, V.; Venkateswarlu, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    Water or heavy water is used in different circuits in a reactor. Their most common use is as a moderator and/or as a coolant. Light water is used at other places such as in end shield, calandria vault etc., In the process they are exposed to intense ionizing radiation and undergo radiolytic degradation. The molecular produts of radiolysis are hydrogen, hydrogen peroxide and oxygen. As is commonly known if hydrogen is formed beyond a certain level, in the presence of oxygen it may lead to combustion or even explosion. Thus one should comprehend the basic principles of radiolysis and see whether the concentration of these gases under various conditions can be worked out. This report attempts to analyse in depth the radiolytic generation of gases in reactor systems. (author). 3 tabs

  17. Simulation of diffusion in concentrated lattice gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehr, K.W.

    1986-01-01

    Recently the diffusion of particles in lattice gases was studied extensively by theoretical methods and numerical simulations. This paper reviews work on collective and, in particular, on tracer diffusion. The diffusion of tagged particles is characterized by a correlation factor whose behavior as a function of concentration is now well understood. Also the detailed kinetics of the tracer transitions was investigated. A special case is the one-dimensional lattice gas where the tracer diffusion coefficient vanishes. An interesting extension is the case of tagged atoms with a different transition rate. This model allows to study various physical situations, including impurity diffusion, percolation, and diffusion in partially blocked lattices. Finally some recent work on diffusion in lattice gases under the influence of a drift field will be reported. (author)

  18. Functional renormalization and ultracold quantum gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floerchinger, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Modern techniques from quantum field theory are applied in this work to the description of ultracold quantum gases. This leads to a unified description of many phenomena including superfluidity for bosons and fermions, classical and quantum phase transitions, different dimensions, thermodynamic properties and few-body phenomena as bound state formation or the Efimov effect. The non-perturbative treatment with renormalization group flow equations can account for all known limiting cases by solving one single equation. It improves previous results quantitatively and brings qualitatively new insights. As an example, new quantum phase transitions are found for fermions with three spin states. Ultracold atomic gases can be seen as an interesting model for features of high energy physics and for condensed matter theory. The research reported in this thesis helps to solve the difficult complexity problem in modern theoretical physics. (orig.)

  19. Properties of quantum self-gravitating gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumyantseva, E.N.

    1981-01-01

    Ways of development of the quantum field theory in the general relativity theory are under consideration. A direction, where consideration of quantum fields in strong nonstatic gravitational fields leads to such effects as particle production, is found out. Authors managed to explain properties of quantum self-gravitating gases on the base of an expansion the fugacity in power series for bose- and fermi gases. Expressions for fluctuations in statistical models of the Fridmann universe are presented. The spectrum density of relict neutrinos in Fridmann models is calculated. A characteristic low boundary of the neutrino energy spectrum constitutes 1 MeV. A number of neutrinos with such energies practically is equal to zero. A great number of neutrinos has energies 0 . It is precisely these neurinos, which are responsible for the closed state of the universe according to the built up model

  20. Detecting Friedel oscillations in ultracold Fermi gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechers, Keno; Hueck, Klaus; Luick, Niclas; Lompe, Thomas; Moritz, Henning

    2017-09-01

    Investigating Friedel oscillations in ultracold gases would complement the studies performed on solid state samples with scanning-tunneling microscopes. In atomic quantum gases interactions and external potentials can be tuned freely and the inherently slower dynamics allow to access non-equilibrium dynamics following a potential or interaction quench. Here, we examine how Friedel oscillations can be observed in current ultracold gas experiments under realistic conditions. To this aim we numerically calculate the amplitude of the Friedel oscillations which are induced by a potential barrier in a 1D Fermi gas and compare it to the expected atomic and photonic shot noise in a density measurement. We find that to detect Friedel oscillations the signal from several thousand one-dimensional systems has to be averaged. However, as up to 100 parallel one-dimensional systems can be prepared in a single run with present experiments, averaging over about 100 images is sufficient.

  1. Two-Dimensional Homogeneous Fermi Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueck, Klaus; Luick, Niclas; Sobirey, Lennart; Siegl, Jonas; Lompe, Thomas; Moritz, Henning

    2018-02-01

    We report on the experimental realization of homogeneous two-dimensional (2D) Fermi gases trapped in a box potential. In contrast to harmonically trapped gases, these homogeneous 2D systems are ideally suited to probe local as well as nonlocal properties of strongly interacting many-body systems. As a first benchmark experiment, we use a local probe to measure the density of a noninteracting 2D Fermi gas as a function of the chemical potential and find excellent agreement with the corresponding equation of state. We then perform matter wave focusing to extract the momentum distribution of the system and directly observe Pauli blocking in a near unity occupation of momentum states. Finally, we measure the momentum distribution of an interacting homogeneous 2D gas in the crossover between attractively interacting fermions and bosonic dimers.

  2. Comparing greenhouse gases for policy purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmalensee, R.

    1993-01-01

    In order to derive optimal policies for greenhouse gas emissions control, the discounted marginal damages of emissions from different gases must be compared. The greenhouse warming potential (GWP) index, which is most often used to compare greenhouse gases, is not based on such a damage comparison. This essay presents assumptions under which ratios of gas-specific discounted marginal damages reduce to ratios of discounted marginal contributions to radiative forcing, where the discount rate is the difference between the discount rate relevant to climate-related damages and the rate of growth of marginal climate-related damages over time. If there are important gas-specific costs or benefits not tied to radiative forcing, however, such as direct effects of carbon dioxide on plant growth, there is in general no shortcut around explicit comparison of discounted net marginal damages. 16 refs

  3. Oxygen partial pressure sensor for gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbero, J.A.; Azcona, M.A.; Orce, A.

    1997-01-01

    Precise measurement of very low oxygen partial pressure is important in both laboratories and industries. Particularly in nuclear industry, it is relevant in the different steps of the nuclear fuel fabrication. It is presented an instrument which is handy and of easy construction, suitable for the measurement of oxygen partial pressure of gases, in the range of 10 -6 -1 atm. It is based on a solid electrolyte galvanic cell, using Yttria doped zirconia as a ceramic membrane. Through an indirect measurement and calibration, the instrument can be used to measure the content of free oxygen in liquids. It is a import feature in NPP instrumentation. The equipment was calibrated with mixtures of special nonreactive gases. (author). 5 refs

  4. Oxygen partial pressure sensor for gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbero, J.A.; Azcona, M.A.; Orce, A. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche

    1997-10-01

    Precise measurement of very low oxygen partial pressure is important in both laboratories and industries. Particularly in nuclear industry, it is relevant in the different steps of the nuclear fuel fabrication. It is presented an instrument which is handy and of easy construction, suitable for the measurement of oxygen partial pressure of gases, in the range of 10{sup -6}-1 atm. It is based on a solid electrolyte galvanic cell, using Yttria doped zirconia as a ceramic membrane. Through an indirect measurement and calibration, the instrument can be used to measure the content of free oxygen in liquids. It is a import feature in NPP instrumentation. The equipment was calibrated with mixtures of special nonreactive gases. (author). 5 refs.

  5. Method for enhancing microbial utilization rates of gases using perfluorocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turick, C.E.

    1997-06-10

    A method of enhancing the bacterial reduction of industrial gases using perfluorocarbons (PFCs) is disclosed. Because perfluorocarbons (PFCs) allow for a much greater solubility of gases than water does, PFCs have the potential to deliver gases in higher concentrations to microorganisms when used as an additive to microbial growth media thereby increasing the rate of the industrial gas conversion to economically viable chemicals and gases. 3 figs.

  6. Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Bernot

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this model report is to assess the potential impacts of igneous intrusion on waste packages and waste forms in the emplacement drifts at the Yucca Mountain Repository. The model is based on conceptual models and includes an assessment of deleterious dynamic, thermal, hydrologic, and chemical impacts. This constitutes the waste package and waste form impacts submodel of the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) model assessing the impacts of a hypothetical igneous intrusion event on the repository total system performance. This submodel is carried out in accordance with Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of SR and LA (BSC 2003a) and Total System Performance Assessment-License Application Methods and Approaches (BSC 2002a). The technical work plan is governed by the procedures of AP-SIII.10Q, Models. Any deviations from the technical work plan are documented in the TSPA-LA approach to implementing the models for waste package and waste form response during igneous intrusion is based on identification of damage zones. Zone 1 includes all emplacement drifts intruded by the basalt dike, and Zone 2 includes all other emplacement drifts in the repository that are not in Zone 1. This model report will document the following model: (1) Impacts of magma intrusion on the components of engineered barrier system (e.g., drip shields and cladding) of emplacement drifts in Zone 1, and the fate of waste forms. (2) Impacts of conducting magma heat and diffusing magma gases on the drip shields, waste packages, and cladding in the Zone 2 emplacement drifts adjacent to the intruded drifts. (3) Impacts of intrusion on Zone 1 in-drift thermal and geochemical environments, including seepage hydrochemistry. The scope of this model only includes impacts to the components stated above, and does not include impacts to other engineered barrier system (EBS) components such as the invert and

  7. Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Bernot

    2004-08-16

    The purpose of this model report is to assess the potential impacts of igneous intrusion on waste packages and waste forms in the emplacement drifts at the Yucca Mountain Repository. The model is based on conceptual models and includes an assessment of deleterious dynamic, thermal, hydrologic, and chemical impacts. This constitutes the waste package and waste form impacts submodel of the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) model assessing the impacts of a hypothetical igneous intrusion event on the repository total system performance. This submodel is carried out in accordance with Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of SR and LA (BSC 2003a) and Total System Performance Assessment-License Application Methods and Approaches (BSC 2002a). The technical work plan is governed by the procedures of AP-SIII.10Q, Models. Any deviations from the technical work plan are documented in the TSPA-LA approach to implementing the models for waste package and waste form response during igneous intrusion is based on identification of damage zones. Zone 1 includes all emplacement drifts intruded by the basalt dike, and Zone 2 includes all other emplacement drifts in the repository that are not in Zone 1. This model report will document the following model: (1) Impacts of magma intrusion on the components of engineered barrier system (e.g., drip shields and cladding) of emplacement drifts in Zone 1, and the fate of waste forms. (2) Impacts of conducting magma heat and diffusing magma gases on the drip shields, waste packages, and cladding in the Zone 2 emplacement drifts adjacent to the intruded drifts. (3) Impacts of intrusion on Zone 1 in-drift thermal and geochemical environments, including seepage hydrochemistry. The scope of this model only includes impacts to the components stated above, and does not include impacts to other engineered barrier system (EBS) components such as the invert and

  8. Role of buffer gases in optoacoustic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas III, L.J.; Kelly, M.J.; Amer, N.M.

    1978-01-01

    The dependence of an acoustically resonant optoacoustic signal on the molecular weight and thermodynamic and transport properpties of the buffer gas is reported. Our results show that careful selection of such gases can significantly increase the sensitivity and flexibility of optoacoustic spectroscopy. We also demonstrate that such thermodynamic quantities as γ (equivalentC/sub p//C/sub v/) and sound velocity can now be measured readily and accurately. Other potential applications are suggested

  9. Splitting of inviscid fluxes for real gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Van Leer, Bram; Shuen, Jian-Shun

    1990-01-01

    Flux-vector and flux-difference splittings for the inviscid terms of the compressible flow equations are derived under the assumption of a general equation of state for a real gas in equilibrium. No necessary assumptions, approximations for auxiliary quantities are introduced. The formulas derived include several particular cases known for ideal gases and readily apply to curvilinear coordinates. Applications of the formulas in a TVD algorithm to one-dimensional shock-tube and nozzle problems show their quality and robustness.

  10. The Osher scheme for real gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Ambady; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1990-01-01

    An extension of Osher's approximate Riemann solver to include gases with an arbitrary equation of state is presented. By a judicious choice of thermodynamic variables, the Riemann invariats are reduced to quadratures which are then approximated numerically. The extension is rigorous and does not involve any further assumptions or approximations over the ideal gas case. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and accuracy of the proposed method.

  11. Effect of Greenhouse Gases Dissolved in Seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Shigeki

    2015-12-30

    A molecular dynamics simulation has been performed on the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane dissolved in a sodium chloride aqueous solution, as a simple model of seawater. A carbon dioxide molecule is also treated as a hydrogen carbonate ion. The structure, coordination number, diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, specific heat, and thermal conductivity of the solutions have been discussed. The anomalous behaviors of these properties, especially the negative pressure dependence of thermal conductivity, have been observed in the higher-pressure region.

  12. Paschen's law studies in cold gases

    OpenAIRE

    Massarczyk, R.; Chu, P.; Elliott, S. R.; Rielage, K.; Dugger, C.; Xu, W.

    2016-01-01

    The break-through voltage over small gaps has been investigated for differing gap distances, gas pressures, and gas temperatures in nitrogen, neon, argon and xenon gases. A deviation from Paschen's law at micro gap distances has been found. The breakthrough behavior of the fill gas in colder environments was tested as well. A significant shift of the curve relative to the results at room temperature was observed. The results can be explained by combining Paschen's law and the ideal gas law.

  13. Paschen's law studies in cold gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massarczyk, R.; Chu, P.; Dugger, C.; Elliott, S. R.; Rielage, K.; Xu, W.

    2017-06-01

    The break-through voltage behavior over small gaps has been investigated for differing gap distances, gas pressures, and gas temperatures in nitrogen, neon, argon and xenon gases. A deviation from Paschen's law at micro gap distances has been found. At lower temperatures, a significant shift of the curve relative to the results at room temperature was observed. This behavior can be explained by combining Paschen's law and the ideal gas law.

  14. Paschen's law studies in cold gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massarczyk, R.; Chu, P.; Elliott, S.R.; Rielage, K.; Xu, W.; Dugger, C.

    2017-01-01

    The break-through voltage behavior over small gaps has been investigated for differing gap distances, gas pressures, and gas temperatures in nitrogen, neon, argon and xenon gases. A deviation from Paschen's law at micro gap distances has been found. At lower temperatures, a significant shift of the curve relative to the results at room temperature was observed. This behavior can be explained by combining Paschen's law and the ideal gas law.

  15. The effects of spin in gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laloee, F.; Freed, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    Low-density gases, in which atoms are separated by large distances, have long provided an enjoyable playground for physicists. One might suppose the pleasure of the playground would by now have been exhausted by the very simplicity of low-density gases. Recent work by a number of investigators including the author shows that this is not the case low-density gases continue to serve up a rich variety of phenomena as well as counterintuitive surprises. In particular, the macroscopic properties of a gas composed of individual hydrogen or helium atoms can under special circumstances by changed dramatically by quantum-mechanical effects. According to quantum theory, the nucleus of an atom behaves in a way similar to a rotating top, which has angular momentum about its axis of rotation; that is, the nucleus has spin, known more precisely as spin angular momentum. If the atoms of a gas are spin-polarized, so that their nuclei all have their spins pointing in the same direction, the viscosity of the gas can be changed enormously and so can its ability to conduct heat. Quantum-mechanical correlations among the nuclei called spin waves, which up to now had been observed only in certain liquids and solids such as magnets, can also arise. The changes are large enough for one to say the quantum-mechanical effects have caused the gas to take on entirely new properties. In a certain sense it is amazing to think that polarizing the nuclear spins can have any effect on the macroscopic properties of the gas, since the nuclear spins are son weakly coupled to the outside world. Yet the observations are in full agreement with with theory. Moreover, because spin-polarized gases are still fairly simple systems, they can be understood in terms fundamental principles, something that is still not possible to do in the case of liquids and solids

  16. Glass Membrane For Controlled Diffusion Of Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, James E.; Kenyon, Brian E.

    2001-05-15

    A glass structure for controlled permeability of gases includes a glass vessel. The glass vessel has walls and a hollow center for receiving a gas. The glass vessel contains a metal oxide dopant formed with at least one metal selected from the group consisting of transition metals and rare earth metals for controlling diffusion of the gas through the walls of the glass vessel. The vessel releases the gas through its walls upon exposure to a radiation source.

  17. Effect of photocurrent amplification in In sub 2 O sub 3 -GaSe heterostructure

    CERN Document Server

    Drapak, S I

    2001-01-01

    The experimentally determined effects of originating the photocurrent amplification in the In sub 2 O sub 3 -GaSe heterostructure with localization of the barrier plane perpendicular to the semiconductor layers are described. The value of the amplification coefficient by the reverse displacement U = 10 V reached M approx = 82 and the absolute value of the current sensitivity - 30-32 A/W. The mechanism of the current transfer through the dielectric, inevitable originating on the gallium monoselenide surface, is determined on the basis of the volt-ampere characteristics study. The supposition is made on the change in the conductivity mechanisms by transferring the barrier plane from the parallel to the perpendicular one to the GaSe layers

  18. Treatment of alpha bearing wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This report deals with the current state of the art of alpha waste treatment, which is an integral part of the overall nuclear waste management system. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) defines alpha bearing waste as 'waste containing one or more alpha emitting radionuclides, usually actinides, in quantities above acceptable limits'. The limits are established by national regulatory bodies. The limits above which wastes are considered as alpha contaminated refer to the concentrations of alpha emitters that need special consideration for occupational exposures and/or potential safety, health, or environmental impact during one or more steps from generation through disposal. Owing to the widespread use of waste segregation by source - that is, based upon the 'suspect origin' of the material - significant volumes of waste are being handled as alpha contaminated which, in fact, do not require such consideration by reason of risk or environmental concern. The quantification of de minimis concepts by national regulatory bodies could largely contribute to the safe reduction of waste volumes and associated costs. Other factors which could significantly contribute to the reduction of alpha waste arisings are an increased application of assaying and sorting, instrumentation and the use of feedback mechanisms to control or modify the processes which generate these wastes. Alpha bearing wastes are generated during fabrication and reprocessing of nuclear fuels, decommissioning of alpha contaminated facilities, and other activities. Most alpha wastes are contact handled, but a small portion may require shielding or remote handling because of high levels of neutron (n), beta (β), or gamma (γ) emissions associated with the waste material. This report describes the sources and characteristics of alpha wastes and strategies for alpha waste management. General descriptions of treatment processes for solid and liquid alpha wastes are included. 71 refs, 14 figs, 9 tabs

  19. Agreements on emission of greenhouse gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aulstad, Johan Greger

    2001-01-01

    Agreements on emission of greenhouse gases is one of the instruments used by Norwegian authorities to meet their obligations with respect to the Climate Convention and the Kyoto Protocol. This book discusses the legal issues raised by these agreements. A main topic is how the industrial emissions conform to the Pollution Act. Does the Pollution Act apply to these emissions? What is the impact of the sanction rules in this act on the emissions? The book also deals with the following general questions that arise in connection with the application of public authority: (1) Can the administration grant concessions and permits in the form of agreements? (2) What commitments can be imposed on a private party by the administration by agreement? (3) Should the procedures set down in the Pollution Act and in the Public Administration Act be followed fully when the pollution authorities make agreements? Is the opportunity of the administration to reverse more restricted when they make agreements than when they make one-sided decisions? Although this discussion primarily deals with the emission of greenhouse gases, the reasoning and conclusions are relevant in many other types of agreements in which the public administration is one of the parties. The agreement that regulates the emissions of greenhouse gases from the Norwegian aluminium industry is described in a special section. The book also gives a brief account of how agreements are used in the Danish climate policy

  20. Diffusion coefficients gases, dissolved in fluid of NPPs circulation contours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piontkovskij, A.I.

    2000-01-01

    In article is brought analysis of diverse gases diffusion coefficients computation methods, dissolved in liquid. On the basis of this analysis and treatment of being equalizations for concrete gases and certain parameters offers universal diffusion coefficients determination dependence for diverse gases in wide range of parameters, circulation contours typical for work NPP

  1. 30 CFR 75.322 - Harmful quantities of noxious gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Harmful quantities of noxious gases. 75.322... quantities of noxious gases. Concentrations of noxious or poisonous gases, other than carbon dioxide, shall... Governmental Industrial Hygienists in “Threshold Limit Values for Substance in Workroom Air” (1972). Detectors...

  2. 76 FR 73885 - Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 229 / Tuesday... 98 [EPA-HQ-OAR-2011-0147; FRL-9493-9] RIN 2060-AQ85 Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases AGENCY... the Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Rule to correct certain technical and editorial errors...

  3. 76 FR 47391 - Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-04

    ... Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 150 / Thursday...-HQ-OAR-2011-0147; FRL-9443-1] RIN 2060-AQ85 Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases AGENCY... provisions in the Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Rule to correct certain technical and editorial...

  4. Thermodynamics of Quantum Gases for the Entire Range of Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Shyamal; Jana, Debnarayan

    2012-01-01

    We have analytically explored the thermodynamics of free Bose and Fermi gases for the entire range of temperature, and have extended the same for harmonically trapped cases. We have obtained approximate chemical potentials for the quantum gases in closed forms of temperature so that the thermodynamic properties of the quantum gases become…

  5. Method and apparatus for treating gaseous effluents from waste treatment systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Philip A.; Kujawa, Stephan T.

    2000-01-01

    Effluents from a waste treatment operation are incinerated and oxidized by passing the gases through an inductively coupled plasmas arc torch. The effluents are transformed into plasma within the torch. At extremely high plasma temperatures, the effluents quickly oxidize. The process results in high temperature oxidation of the gases without addition of any mass flow for introduction of energy.

  6. Waste package characterisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sannen, L.; Bruggeman, M.; Wannijn, J.P

    1998-09-01

    Radioactive wastes originating from the hot labs of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN contain a wide variety of radiotoxic substances. The accurate characterisation of the short- and long-term radiotoxic components is extremely difficult but required in view of geological disposal. This paper describes the methodology which was developed and adopted to characterise the high- and medium-level waste packages at the SCK-CEN hot laboratories. The proposed method is based on the estimation of the fuel inventory evacuated in a particular waste package; a calculation of the relative fission product contribution on the fuel fabrication and irradiation footing; a comparison of the calculated, as expected, dose rate and the real measured dose rate of the waste package. To cope with the daily practice an appropriate fuel inventory estimation route, a user friendly computer programme for fission product and corresponding dose rate calculation, and a simple dose rate measurement method have been developed and implemented.

  7. Waste package characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannen, L.; Bruggeman, M.; Wannijn, J.P.

    1998-09-01

    Radioactive wastes originating from the hot labs of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN contain a wide variety of radiotoxic substances. The accurate characterisation of the short- and long-term radiotoxic components is extremely difficult but required in view of geological disposal. This paper describes the methodology which was developed and adopted to characterise the high- and medium-level waste packages at the SCK-CEN hot laboratories. The proposed method is based on the estimation of the fuel inventory evacuated in a particular waste package; a calculation of the relative fission product contribution on the fuel fabrication and irradiation footing; a comparison of the calculated, as expected, dose rate and the real measured dose rate of the waste package. To cope with the daily practice an appropriate fuel inventory estimation route, a user friendly computer programme for fission product and corresponding dose rate calculation, and a simple dose rate measurement method have been developed and implemented

  8. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grass, F.

    1982-01-01

    Following a definition of the term 'radioactive waste', including a discussion of possible criteria allowing a delimitation of low-level radioactive against inactive wastes, present techniques of handling high-level, intermediate-level and low-level wastes are described. The factors relevant for the establishment of definitive disposals for high-level wastes are discussed in some detail. Finally, the waste management organization currently operative in Austria is described. (G.G.)

  9. Waste Determination Equivalency - 12172

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, Rebecca D. [Savannah River Remediation (United States)

    2012-07-01

    by the Secretary of Energy in January of 2006 based on proposed processing techniques with the expectation that it could be revised as new processing capabilities became viable. Once signed, however, it became evident that any changes would require lengthy review and another determination signed by the Secretary of Energy. With the maturation of additional salt removal technologies and the extension of the SWPF start-up date, it becomes necessary to define 'equivalency' to the processes laid out in the original determination. For the purposes of SRS, any waste not processed through Interim Salt Processing must be processed through SWPF or an equivalent process, and therefore a clear statement of the requirements for a process to be equivalent to SWPF becomes necessary. (authors)

  10. Mechanisms of gas bubble retention and release: results for Hanford Waste Tanks 241-S-102 and 241-SY-103 and single-shell tank simulants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Rassat, S.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Konynenbelt, J.H.; Tingey, S.M.; Mendoza, D.P.

    1996-09-01

    Research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has probed the physical mechanisms and waste properties that contribute to the retention and release of flammable gases from radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford. This study was conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNNL Flammable Gas Project. The wastes contained in the tanks are mixes of radioactive and chemical products, and some of these wastes are known to generate mixtures of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Because these gases are flammable, their retention and episodic release pose a number of safety concerns

  11. Mechanisms of gas bubble retention and release: results for Hanford Waste Tanks 241-S-102 and 241-SY-103 and single-shell tank simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Rassat, S.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Konynenbelt, J.H.; Tingey, S.M.; Mendoza, D.P.

    1996-09-01

    Research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has probed the physical mechanisms and waste properties that contribute to the retention and release of flammable gases from radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford. This study was conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNNL Flammable Gas Project. The wastes contained in the tanks are mixes of radioactive and chemical products, and some of these wastes are known to generate mixtures of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Because these gases are flammable, their retention and episodic release pose a number of safety concerns.

  12. Waste management, waste resource facilities and waste conversion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirbas, Ayhan

    2011-01-01

    In this study, waste management concept, waste management system, biomass and bio-waste resources, waste classification, and waste management methods have been reviewed. Waste management is the collection, transport, processing, recycling or disposal, and monitoring of waste materials. A typical waste management system comprises collection, transportation, pre-treatment, processing, and final abatement of residues. The waste management system consists of the whole set of activities related to handling, treating, disposing or recycling the waste materials. General classification of wastes is difficult. Some of the most common sources of wastes are as follows: domestic wastes, commercial wastes, ashes, animal wastes, biomedical wastes, construction wastes, industrial solid wastes, sewer, biodegradable wastes, non-biodegradable wastes, and hazardous wastes.

  13. Energetic conversion (biogas) of used edible oils by means of co-digestion together with various waste materials from the food industry; Valorisation energetique (biogaz) d'huiles comestibles usagees par codigestion avec differents dechets d'origine agroalimentaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Membrez, Y; Fruteau de Laclos, H

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this project was the valorisation of used edible oils by co-digestion together with agricultural or food waste, without any risk for human and animal health. It included the technical economical aspects. In the bibliographic part a state-of-the-art on fat digestion in Switzerland and Europe was done. The possible co-substrates were examined, under a biological aspect as well as economical and strategic aspects. Food waste from restaurants and canteens, that are used up to now for pig feeding, were retained. The co-digestion gives a new perspective for the valorisation of this kind of waste, whose traditional way of valorisation is compromised by the new EU directives. The experimental part aimed to define the possibilities and limits for the co-digestion of used edible oil with food waste as co-substrate. The study was done in a 690 litres bio-reactor. The results showed that co-digestion of edible oil with food waste is feasible with interesting performances, if oil doesn't account for more than 15% of the mixture (on dry matter). Biogas production amounted to 400-450 litres per kg input COD (chemical oxygen demand), with 60-65% CH{sub 4}. Based on the observed results a tender document was done, in order to consult manufacturers of co-digestion plants. An economical simulation was realised on the basis of the most complete offer. This simulation revealed that a benefit of CHF 3500 per year can be obtained for a plant processing 200 t/y edible oil and 9000 t/y food waste. Co-digestion allows for valorisation of edible oil, together with a co-substrate whose traditional utilisation will not be possible in the future. It leads to the production of renewable energy, with a positive economical balance. (author)

  14. Method to reduce the nitrogen oxide content of gaseous wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klopp, G.; Sueto, J.; Szasz, K.; Szebenyi, I.; Winkler, G.; Machacs, M.; Palmai, G.

    1980-11-13

    The proposed process is suited for the denitrification of waste gases from nitric acid plants. It proceeds without an additional energy source with an integrated adsorption unit which guaranties the complete recirculation of the produced nitrogen oxides and allows the regeneration of the adsorbents by the use of the energy from the oxidation of nitrous oxide to nitric oxide. The desorption is carried out by the intermediate passage of the hot gases from the oxidizer through the adsorber.

  15. Kinetic theory of nonideal gases and nonideal plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Klimontovich, Yu L

    2013-01-01

    Kinetic Theory of Nonideal Gases and Nonideal Plasmas presents the fundamental aspects of the kinetic theory of gases and plasmas. The book consists of three parts, which attempts to present some of the ideas, methods and applications in the study of the kinetic processes in nonideal gases and plasmas. The first part focuses on the classical kinetic theory of nonideal gases. The second part discusses the classical kinetic theory of fully ionized plasmas. The last part is devoted to the quantum kinetic theory of nonideal gases and plasmas. A concluding chapter is included, which presents a shor

  16. The Radioactive Waste Management at Studsvik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedlund, R; Lindskog, A

    1966-04-15

    The report was originally prepared as a contribution to the discussions in an IAEA panel on economics of radioactive waste management held in Vienna from 13 - 17 December 1965. It contains the answers and comments to the questions of a questionnaire for the panel concerning the various operations associated with the management (collection, transport, treatment, discharge, storage, and operational monitoring) of: - radioactive liquid wastes, except high-level effluents from reactor fuel recovering operations; - solid wastes, except those produced from treatment of high level wastes; - gaseous wastes produced from treatment of the foregoing liquid and solid wastes; - equipment decontamination facilities and radioactive laundries.

  17. The Radioactive Waste Management at Studsvik

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedlund, R.; Lindskog, A.

    1966-04-01

    The report was originally prepared as a contribution to the discussions in an IAEA panel on economics of radioactive waste management held in Vienna from 13 - 17 December 1965. It contains the answers and comments to the questions of a questionnaire for the panel concerning the various operations associated with the management (collection, transport, treatment, discharge, storage, and operational monitoring) of: - radioactive liquid wastes, except high-level effluents from reactor fuel recovering operations; - solid wastes, except those produced from treatment of high level wastes; - gaseous wastes produced from treatment of the foregoing liquid and solid wastes; - equipment decontamination facilities and radioactive laundries

  18. Managing a mixed waste program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    IT Corporation operates an analytical laboratory in St. Louis capable of analyzing environmental samples that are contaminated with both chemical and radioactive materials. Wastes generated during these analyses are hazardous in nature; some are listed wastes others exhibit characteristic hazards. When the original samples contain significant quantities of radioactive material, the waste must be treated as a mixed waste. A plan was written to document the waste management program describing the management of hazardous, radioactive and mixed wastes. This presentation summarizes the methods employed by the St. Louis facility to reduce personnel exposures to the hazardous materials, minimize the volume of mixed waste and treat the materials prior to disposal. The procedures that are used and the effectiveness of each procedure will also be discussed. Some of the lessons that have been learned while dealing with mixed wastes will be presented as well as the solutions that were applied. This program has been effective in reducing the volume of mixed waste that is generated. The management program also serves as a method to manage the costs of the waste disposal program by effectively segregating the different wastes that are generated

  19. Models for recurrent gas release event behavior in hazardous waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.N.; Arnold, B.C.

    1994-08-01

    Certain radioactive waste storage tanks at the United States Department of Energy Hanford facilities continuously generate gases as a result of radiolysis and chemical reactions. The congealed sludge in these tanks traps the gases and causes the level of the waste within the tanks to rise. The waste level continues to rise until the sludge becomes buoyant and ''rolls over'', changing places with heavier fluid on top. During a rollover, the trapped gases are released, resulting, in a sudden drop in the waste level. This is known as a gas release event (GRE). After a GRE, the wastes leading to another GRE. We present nonlinear time waste re-congeals and gas again accumulates leading to another GRE. We present nonlinear time series models that produce simulated sample paths that closely resemble the temporal history of waste levels in these tanks. The models also imitate the random GRE, behavior observed in the temporal waste level history of a storage tank. We are interested in using the structure of these models to understand the probabilistic behavior of the random variable ''time between consecutive GRE's''. Understanding the stochastic nature of this random variable is important because the hydrogen and nitrous oxide gases released from a GRE, are flammable and the ammonia that is released is a health risk. From a safety perspective, activity around such waste tanks should be halted when a GRE is imminent. With credible GRE models, we can establish time windows in which waste tank research and maintenance activities can be safely performed

  20. Waste Treatment Technology Process Development Plan For Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this Process Development Plan is to summarize the objectives and plans for the technology development activities for an alternative path for disposition of the recycle stream that will be generated in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility (LAW Recycle). This plan covers the first phase of the development activities. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to recycle it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be concentrated by evaporation and returned to the LAW vitrification facility. Because this stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are also problematic for the glass waste form, they accumulate in the Recycle stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and reducing the halides in the Recycle is a key component of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, this stream does not have a proven disposition path, and resolving this gap becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and to develop a process that will remove radionuclides from this stream and allow its diversion to another disposition path, greatly decreasing the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. The origin of this LAW Recycle stream will be from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover or precipitates of scrubbed components (e.g. carbonates). The soluble