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Sample records for waste forum llw

  1. Low-Level Waste (LLW) forum meeting report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties

  2. Low-Level Waste (LLW) forum meeting report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  3. LLW Forum meeting report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) meeting on May 29 through May 31, 1996.The LLW Forum is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties

  4. LLW Forum meeting report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This report summarizes the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) meeting on May 29 through May 31, 1996.The LLW Forum is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  5. LLW Forum meeting report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This document reports the details of the Quarterly Meeting of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Forum held in San Diego, California during January 23-25, 1991. Topics discussed include: State and Compact Progress Reports; Legal Updates; Update on Technical Assistance; Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Regarding Surcharge Rebates; Update on TCC Activities; NRC Update; Disposal of Commercial Mixed Waste; Update on EPA Activities; ACNW Working Group on Mixed Waste; National Profile on Mixed Waste; Commercial Perspective on Mixed Waste; Update on DOT Activities; Source Terms; Materials and Waste; Storage: and Waste Acceptance Criteria and Packaging

  6. LLW Forum meeting report, October 26--27, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties. This report details activities of the meeting held October 26-27, 1994

  7. LLW Forum meeting report, October 26--27, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties. This report details activities of the meeting held October 26-27, 1994.

  8. LLW Forum meeting report, February 13--16, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties. This report details activities at the meeting held February 13-16, 1996

  9. LLW (Low-Level Waste) Forum meeting report, February 10-13, 1998, San Diego, CA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum met in San Diego, California, on February 10--13, 1998. Twenty-four Forum Participants, Alternate Forum Participants, and meeting designees representing 19 compacts, host states, and unaffiliated states participated. Additional information was provided by 19 resource people from, variously, the States of California, Colorado, and Utah; the National Governors' Association; the Department of the Army; EPA; DOE and DOE's National Low-Level Waste Management Program; NRC; the Electric Power Research Institute and the Nuclear Energy Institute; US Ecology, Chem-Nuclear Systems, Envirocare of Utah, and Waste Control Specialists (represented by Egan and Associates); and Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power. Also in attendance, as observers, were six other state and compact officials; a staff person from DOE's National Low-Level Waste Management Program; one NRC headquarters staff person; and seven representatives of other interested parties, including a regional generators' organization, two generators, one California anti-nuclear group, and two private companies

  10. LLW Forum meeting report, January 31--February 3, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties. This report details activities of the meeting held January 31-February 3, 1995

  11. LLW Forum meeting report, January 31--February 3, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties. This report details activities of the meeting held January 31-February 3, 1995.

  12. LLW Forum meeting report, May 7--9, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, C.; Brown, H.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

    1997-05-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum met in Chicago, Illinois, on may 7--9, 1997. Twenty-three Forum Participants, Alternate Forum Participants, and meeting designees representing 20 compacts and states participated. A report on the meeting is given under the following subtitles: New developments in states and compacts; Upgrading an existing disposal facility; Revisions to DOE Order 5820 re DOE waste management; Conference of radiation control program directors: Recent and upcoming activities; National Conference of State Legislatures' (NCSL) low-level radioactive waste working group: Recent and upcoming activities; Executive session; LLW forum business session; Public involvement and risk communication: Success at West Valley, New York; DOE low-level waste management program; impact of the International Atomic Energy Agency's convention on waste; Panel discussion: The environmental justice concept--Past, present and future; New technologies for processing and disposal of LLRW; High-level and low-level radioactive waste: A dialogue on parallels and intersections; Draft agreement re uniform application of manifesting procedures; Regulatory issues focus; LLW forum October 1997 agenda planning; Resolutions; LLW forum regulatory issues discussion group meets; and Attendance

  13. LLW Forum meeting report, July 20--22, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representative, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. This report details activities of the meeting held July 20-22, 1994

  14. LLW Forum meeting report, October 20--22, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, C.; Brown, H.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

    1997-10-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum met in Annapolis, Maryland, on October 20--22, 1997. Twenty-six Forum Participants, Alternate Forum Participants, and meeting designees representing 22 compacts and states participated. A report on the meeting is given under the following subtitles: New developments in states and compacts; Discussion with NRC Commissioner McGaffigan; Regulatory issues session; Executive session; LLW forum business session; DOE low-level waste management program; Transportation of radioactive waste; Environmental equity: Title VI; Congressional studies on Ward Valley Site; Implementation of DOE's strategy for waste management; Relicensing Envirocare; Draft agreement for uniform application of manifesting procedures; CRCPD report; Panel: Future of low-level radioactive waste management; Agenda planning: February 1998; Resolutions; and Attendance

  15. LLW Forum meeting report, April 18--19, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. LLW Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently- operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This quarterly meeting was held on April 18-19, 1991

  16. LLW Forum meeting report, April 25--27, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Low-Level radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. LLW Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This quarterly meeting was held April 25-27, 1994 and activities during the first quarter of 1994 are detailed

  17. LLW Forum meeting report, April 25--27, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The Low-Level radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. LLW Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This quarterly meeting was held April 25-27, 1994 and activities during the first quarter of 1994 are detailed..

  18. LLW (Low-Level Waste) Notes, Volume 13, Number 1, February 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    LLW Notes is a newsletter distributed to Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum Participants and other state and compact officials. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties. This issue focuses on the following topics: DOI approves Ward Valley permit application; Project evidentiary hearings begin in Texas; and Summary judgment motions in California breach of contract action

  19. LLW (Low-Level Waste) Notes, Volume 13, Number 1, February 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    LLW Notes is a newsletter distributed to Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum Participants and other state and compact officials. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties. This issue focuses on the following topics: DOI approves Ward Valley permit application; Project evidentiary hearings begin in Texas; and Summary judgment motions in California breach of contract action.

  20. Managing commercial low-level radioactive waste beyond 1992: Transportation planning for a LLW disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    This technical bulletin presents information on the many activities and issues related to transportation of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) to allow interested States to investigate further those subjects for which proactive preparation will facilitate the development and operation of a LLW disposal facility. The activities related to transportation for a LLW disposal facility are discussed under the following headings: safety; legislation, regulations, and implementation guidance; operations-related transport (LLW and non-LLW traffic); construction traffic; economics; and public involvement

  1. LLW Forum summary report, volume 2. No. 2. June 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    Information provided for each compact and its host state includes: governing body, member states, compact establishment date, current waste management, regulatory and program responsibility, siting responsibility, other involvement, disposal technology, siting, licensing, development costs, and operational date

  2. LLW notes. Volume 11, No.8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    'LLW Notes' is distributed by Afton Associates, Inc. to Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum Participants and other state, and compact officials identified by those Participants to receive 'LLW Notes'. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties

  3. LLW notes. Vol. 11, No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    'LLW Notes' is distributed by Afton Associates, Inc. to Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum Participants and other state and compact officials identified by those Participants to receive 'LLW Notes'. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties

  4. LLW notes. Vol. 11, No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    `LLW Notes` is distributed by Afton Associates, Inc. to Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum Participants and other state and compact officials identified by those Participants to receive `LLW Notes`. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  5. LLW notes, Vol. 11, No. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    `LLW Notes` is distributed by Afton Associates, Inc. to Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum Participants and other state, and compact officials identified by those Participants to receive LLW Notes. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  6. LLW notes, Vol. 11, No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    'LLW Notes' is distributed by Afton Associates, Inc. to Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum Participants and other state, and compact officials identified by those Participants to receive LLW Notes. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties

  7. Implementation of Waste Tracking System for LLW and MLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Y. S.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, K. H.

    2010-01-01

    The real-time Waste Tracking System (WTS) has been implemented for the integrated management of LLW and MLW from the receiving time at the production area till the managing period after the shutdown of disposal site. The relevant information by each process on take-over and receiving plan, preliminary inspection, receiving, transportation, site inspection, disposal and shutdown is over all managed by WTS

  8. LLW Notes, Volume 12, Number 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, C.; Brown, H.; Colsant, J.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

    1997-03-01

    Contents include articles entitled: California DHS sues US Interior Department to compel land transfer; LLW Forum holds winter meeting; LLW Forum waste information working group meets; LLW Forum regulatory issues discussion group meets; Envirocare investigation transferred to feds; Host state TCC meets in Laughlin, Nevada; BLM to require new permit for California site testing; Federal agencies and committees; Pena sworn in as Energy Secretary, Grumbly departs DOE; U.S. Supreme Court tackles property rights issues; GAO to study DOI's actions; Congress scrutinizes FY '98 budget requests; and Senate committee passes high-level waste bill: Clinton threatens to veto

  9. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-01-01

    In June 28, 1997, the Low Level Waste (LLW) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13031A-85. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, lidder/delidder device and the supercompactor were also conducted. As of November 24, 1997, 2 of the 131 test exceptions that affect the LLW glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test Exceptions are provided as appendices to this report

  10. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox acceptance test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-02-17

    In June 28, 1997, the Low Level Waste (LLW) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13031A-85. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, lidder/delidder device and the supercompactor were also conducted. As of November 24, 1997, 2 of the 131 test exceptions that affect the LLW glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test Exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

  11. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox operational test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kersten, J.K.

    1998-01-01

    The Low Level Waste (LLW) Process Gloveboxes are designed to: receive a 55 gallon drum in an 85 gallon overpack in the Entry glovebox (GBIOI); and open and sort the waste from the 55 gallon drum, place the waste back into drum and relid in the Sorting glovebox (GB 102). In addition, waste which requires further examination is transferred to the LLW RWM Glovebox via the Drath and Schraeder Bagiess Transfer Port (DO-07-201) or sent to the Sample Transfer Port (STC); crush the drum in the Supercompactor glovebox (GB 104); place the resulting puck (along with other pucks) into another 85 gallon overpack in the Exit glovebox (GB 105). The status of the waste items is tracked by the Data Management System (DMS) via the Plant Control System (PCS) barcode interface. As an item is moved from the entry glovebox to the exit glovebox, the Operator will track an items location using a barcode reader and enter any required data on the DMS console. The Operational Test Procedure (OTP) will perform evolution's (described below) using the Plant Operating Procedures (POP) in order to verify that they are sufficient and accurate for controlled glovebox operation

  12. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox operational test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersten, J.K.

    1998-02-19

    The Low Level Waste (LLW) Process Gloveboxes are designed to: receive a 55 gallon drum in an 85 gallon overpack in the Entry glovebox (GBIOI); and open and sort the waste from the 55 gallon drum, place the waste back into drum and relid in the Sorting glovebox (GB 102). In addition, waste which requires further examination is transferred to the LLW RWM Glovebox via the Drath and Schraeder Bagiess Transfer Port (DO-07-201) or sent to the Sample Transfer Port (STC); crush the drum in the Supercompactor glovebox (GB 104); place the resulting puck (along with other pucks) into another 85 gallon overpack in the Exit glovebox (GB 105). The status of the waste items is tracked by the Data Management System (DMS) via the Plant Control System (PCS) barcode interface. As an item is moved from the entry glovebox to the exit glovebox, the Operator will track an items location using a barcode reader and enter any required data on the DMS console. The Operational Test Procedure (OTP) will perform evolution`s (described below) using the Plant Operating Procedures (POP) in order to verify that they are sufficient and accurate for controlled glovebox operation.

  13. LLW Notes, vol. 9, no. 1. February/March 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    LLW Notes is published ten times each year and is distributed to Low- Level Radioactive Waste Forum Participants and other state and compact officials identified by those Participants to receive LLW Notes. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies

  14. Trends of radioactive waste management policy and disposal of LLW/ILW in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyasaka, Yasuhiko

    2003-01-01

    In 1997, the UK program for the deep disposal of radioactive waste was stopped with the refusal by the Secretary of State for the Environment to allow Nuclear Industry Radioactive Waste Executive, Ltd. (Nirex) to go ahead with its plans for an underground Rock Characterization Facility (RCF) at Sellafield, seen as the precursor of an underground repository for LLW/ILW. Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) and the Developed Administrations published a white paper 'Managing Radioactive Waste Safety' Proposal for developing a policy for managing solid radioactive waste in the UK on 12 September 2001. The paper set out five-stage program of action for reaching decisions until 2007. It suggests their view can be sought via opinion polls, the Internet, workshops, citizens, juries, consensus conferences, stakeholder, local authority and community groups and research panels. With the exception of a disposal facility associated with the operation of the Dounreay site on the north coast of Scotland, essentially all LLW in the UK is disposed of at the Drigg site, near Sellafield. The site has been in operation since 1959. Until 1988, disposals were solely in trenches, cut into the glacial tills underlying the site. In 1988, an engineered concrete vault was brought into operation and is currently in use. Drigg only has a finite capacity in the currently area and may be full by about 2050, hence new arrangements will have to examine. This report describes the trends of radioactive waste management policy and disposal of LLW/ILW in the UK. These include: NDA(Nuclear Decommissioning Authority) organization plan, Feb. 2003; Encapsulation of LLW/ILW and safe store for ILW; Summary of LLW repository at the Drigg site; Nirex concept for underground storage/disposal of LLW/ILW. This information and new approach of the safe management of radioactive waste in the UK will prove helpful to the planning for future management and disposal of LLW in Japan. (author)

  15. WRAP low level waste restricted waste management (LLW RWM) glovebox acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leist, K.J.

    1997-01-01

    On April 22, 1997, the Low Level Waste Restricted Waste Management (LLW RWM) glovebox was tested using acceptance test procedure 13027A-87. Mr. Robert L. Warmenhoven served as test director, Mr. Kendrick Leist acted as test operator and test witness, and Michael Lane provided miscellaneous software support. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine glovebox control system interlocks, operator Interface Unit (OIU) menus, alarms, and messages. Basic drum port and lift table control sequences were demonstrated. OIU menus, messages, and alarm sequences were examined, with few exceptions noted. Barcode testing was bypassed, due to the lack of installed equipment as well as the switch from basic reliance on fixed bar code readers to the enhanced use of portable bar code readers. Bar code testing was completed during performance of the LLW RWM OTP. Mechanical and control deficiencies were documented as Test Exceptions during performance of this Acceptance Test. These items are attached as Appendix A to this report

  16. Nuclear waste disposal educational forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    In keeping with a mandate from the US Congress to provide opportunities for consumer education and information and to seek consumer input on national issues, the Department of Energy's Office of Consumer Affairs held a three-hour educational forum on the proposed nuclear waste disposal legislation. Nearly one hundred representatives of consumer, public interest, civic and environmental organizations were invited to attend. Consumer affairs professionals of utility companies across the country were also invited to attend the forum. The following six papers were presented: historical perspectives; status of legislation (Senate); status of legislation (House of Representatives); impact on the legislation on electric utilities; impact of the legislation on consumers; implementing the legislation. All six papers have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base

  17. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides highlights from the 1995 summer meeting of the Low Level radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: new developments in state and compacts; federal waste management; DOE plans for Greater-Than-Class C waste management; mixed wastes; commercial mixed waste management; international export of rad wastes for disposal; scintillation cocktails; license termination; pending legislation; federal radiation protection standards.

  18. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This paper provides highlights from the 1995 summer meeting of the Low Level radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: new developments in state and compacts; federal waste management; DOE plans for Greater-Than-Class C waste management; mixed wastes; commercial mixed waste management; international export of rad wastes for disposal; scintillation cocktails; license termination; pending legislation; federal radiation protection standards

  19. Overview of EPA's environmental standards for the land disposal of LLW and NARM waste - 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruhlke, J.M.; Galpin, F.L.; Holcomb, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency program to develop proposed generally applicable environmental standards for land disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and certain naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive wastes has been completed. The elements of the proposed standards include the following: (a) exposure limits for predisposal management and storage operations, (b) criteria for other regulatory agencies to follow in specifying wastes that are below regulatory concern; (c) postdisposal exposure limits, (d) groundwater protection requirements, and (e) qualitative implementation requirements. In addition to covering those radioactive wastes subject to the Atomic Energy Act, the Agency also intends to propose a standard to require the disposal of high concentration, naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive materials wastes exceeding 2 nCi/g, excluding a few consumer items, in regulated LLW disposal facilities

  20. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-2: Mixed GTCC LLW assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirner, N.P.

    1994-09-01

    Mixed greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (mixed GTCC LLW) is waste that combines two characteristics: it is radioactive, and it is hazardous. This report uses information compiled from Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Characterization: Estimated Volumes, Radionuclide Activities, and Other Characteristics (DOE/LLW 1 14, Revision 1), and applies it to the question of how much and what types of mixed GTCC LLW are generated and are likely to require disposal in facilities jointly regulated by the DOE and the NRC. The report describes how to classify a RCRA hazardous waste, and then applies that classification process to the 41 GTCC LLW waste types identified in the DOE/LLW-114 (Revision 1). Of the 41 GTCC LLW categories identified, only six were identified in this study as potentially requiring regulation as hazardous waste under RCRA. These wastes can be combined into the following three groups: fuel-in decontamination resins, organic liquids, and process waste consisting of lead scrap/shielding from a sealed source manufacturer. For the base case, no mixed GTCC LLW is expected from nuclear utilities or sealed source licensees, whereas only 177 ml of mixed GTCC LLW are expected to be produced by other generators through the year 2035. This relatively small volume represents approximately 40% of the base case estimate for GTCC wastes from other generators. For these other generators, volume estimates for mixed GTCC LLW ranged from less than 1 m 3 to 187 m 3 , depending on assumptions and treatments applied to the wastes

  1. LLW Notes: Volume 10, Number 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties

  2. LLW notes: Volume 10, Number 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties

  3. LLW notes: Volume 10, Number 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, C.

    1995-09-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties

  4. LLW Notes: Volume 10, Number 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties

  5. LLW Notes: Volume 10, Number 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, C.

    1995-10-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties

  6. LLW notes: Volume 10, Number 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  7. LLW Notes: Volume 10, Number 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  8. LLW Notes: Volume 10, Number 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, C. [ed.] [Afton Associates, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  9. LLW Notes: Volume 10, Number 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, C.

    1995-01-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties

  10. LLW notes: Volume 10, Number 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, C. [ed.] [Afton Associates, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  11. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sternwheeler, W.D.E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper provides highlights from the 1992 winter meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Wastes Forum. Topics of discussion included: legal information; state and compact reports; freedom of information requests; and storage

  12. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This paper provides highlights from the summer meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics of discussion included: responsibility for nonfuel component disposal; state experiences in facility licensing; and volume projections

  13. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report provides highlights from the 1992 fall meeting of the Low LEvel Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: disposal options after 1992; interregional agreements; management alternatives; policy; and storage

  14. Updated Strategic Assessment of the U.S. NRC Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) Program and the new WCS Commercial Disposal Facility for LLW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessel, David S.; Kim, Chang-Lak [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The purpose of this paper is to review the updated NRC low level radioactive waste regulatory strategy and also present an update on a significant change in the LLW disposal landscape in the U.S., the opening of a new commercial disposal facility, the Texas Compact Waste Facility (CWF) in Andrews, Texas. Operational since spring of 2012, the CWF is owned and licensed by the state of Texas and operated by Waste Control Specialists LLC (WCS). The WCS facility in western Andrews County is the only commercial facility in the United States licensed to dispose of Class A, B and C LLW in the U.S. in the past 40 years. Based on the observation that other suitable sites have been identified such as the Clive, Utah site that meet (almost) all of these criteria it would appear that the first and last factors in our list are the most problematic and it will require a change in the public acceptance and the political posture of states to help solve the national issue of safe and cost-effective LLW disposal.

  15. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report contains highlights from the 1991 fall meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included legal updates; US NRC updates; US EPA updates; mixed waste issues; financial assistance for waste disposal facilities; and a legislative and policy report

  16. Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, B.D.; Gertz, C.P.; Clayton, W.A.; Crowe, B.M.

    1998-01-01

    In 1978, the Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), established a managed LLW disposal project at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Two, sites which were already accepting limited amounts of on-site generated waste for disposal and off-site generated Transuranic Waste for interim storage, were selected to house the disposal facilities. In those early days, these sites, located about 15 miles apart, afforded the DOE/NV the opportunity to use at least two technologies to manage its waste cost effectively. The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) uses engineered shallow-land burial cells to dispose packaged waste while the Area 3 RWMS uses subsidence craters formed from underground testing of nuclear weapons for the disposal of packaged and unpackaged bulk waste. The paper describes the technical attributes of both Area 5 and Area 3 facilities, the acceptance process, the disposal processes, and present and future capacities of both sites

  17. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This paper provides highlights from the spring meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics of discussion included: state and compact reports; New York's challenge to the constitutionality of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Amendments Act of 1985; DOE technical assistance for 1993; interregional import/export agreements; Department of Transportation requirements; superfund liability; nonfuel bearing components; NRC residual radioactivity criteria

  18. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-12-31

    This paper provides highlights from the October 1990 meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics of discussion included: a special session on liability and financial assurance needs; proposal to dispose of mixed waste at federal facilities; state plans for interim storage; and hazardous materials legislation.

  19. LLW Notes, volume 9, No. 7. November and December 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    LLW Notes is distributed to Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum Participants and other state and compact officials identified by those Participants to receive LLW Notes. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of state and compact representatives appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties

  20. LLW Notes, vol.9, no. 5. August/September 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    LLW Notes is distributed to Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum Participants and other state and compact officials identified by those Participants to receive LLW Notes. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of state and compact representatives appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties

  1. LLW Notes, vol.9, no. 5. August/September 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    LLW Notes is distributed to Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum Participants and other state and compact officials identified by those Participants to receive LLW Notes. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of state and compact representatives appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  2. LLW Notes, Volume 9, Number 6. October 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    LLW Notes is distributed to Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum Participants and other state and compact officials identified by those Participants to receive LLW Notes. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of state and compact representatives appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties

  3. LLW Notes, volume 9, No. 7. November and December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    LLW Notes is distributed to Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum Participants and other state and compact officials identified by those Participants to receive LLW Notes. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of state and compact representatives appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  4. LLW Notes, Volume 9, Number 6. October 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    LLW Notes is distributed to Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum Participants and other state and compact officials identified by those Participants to receive LLW Notes. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of state and compact representatives appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  5. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-3: GTCC LLW assumptions matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This study identifies four categories of GTCC LLW: nuclear utility; sealed sources; DOE-held; and other generators. Within each category, inventory and projection data are modeled in three scenarios: (1) Unpackaged volume--this is the unpackaged volume of waste that would exceed Class C limits if the waste calculation methods in 10 CFR 61.55 were applied to the discrete items before concentration averaging methods were applied to the volume; (2) Not-concentration-averaged (NCA) packaged volume--this is the packaged volume of GTCC LLW assuming that no concentration averaging is allowed; and (3) After-concentration-averaging (ACA) packaged volume--this is the packaged volume of GTCC LLW, which, for regulatory or practical reasons, cannot be disposed of in a LLW disposal facility using allowable concentration averaging practices. Three cases are calculated for each of the volumes described above. These values are defined as the low, base, and high cases. The following tables explain the assumptions used to determine low, base, and high case estimates for each scenario, within each generator category. The appendices referred to in these tables are appendices to Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Characterization: Estimated Volumes, Radionuclide Activities, and Other Characteristics (DOE/LLW-114, Revision 1)

  6. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This paper provides the results of the winter meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Discussions were held on the following topics: new developments in states and compacts; adjudicatory hearings; information exchange on siting processes, storage surcharge rebates; disposal after 1992; interregional access agreements; and future tracking and management issues

  7. Removal of radioactive caesium from low level radioactive waste (LLW) streams using cobalt ferrocyanide impregnated organic anion exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valsala, T.P., E-mail: tpvalsala@yahoo.co.in [Waste Management Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay 400 085 (India); Roy, S.C. [PREFRE Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur 401 502 (India); Shah, J.G. [Back End Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay 400 085 (India); Gabriel, J.; Raj, Kanwar [Waste Management Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay 400 085 (India); Venugopal, V. [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay 400 085 (India)

    2009-07-30

    The volumes of low level waste (LLW) generated during the operation of nuclear reactor are very high and require a concentration step before suitable matrix fixation. The volume reduction (concentration) is achieved either by co-precipitating technique or by the use of highly selective sorbents and ion exchange materials. The present study details the preparation of cobalt ferrocyanide impregnated into anion exchange resin and its evaluation with respect to removal of Cs in LLW streams both in column mode and batch mode operations. The Kd values of the prepared exchanger materials were found to be very good in actual reactor LLW solutions also. It was observed that the exchanger performed very well in the pH range of 3-9. A batch size of 6 g l{sup -1} of the exchanger was enough to give satisfactory decontamination for Cs in actual reactor LLW streams. The lab scale and pilot plant scale performance of the exchanger material in both batch mode and column mode operations was very good.

  8. Investigations with respect to pressure build-up in 200 l drums with supercompacted low level waste (LLW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroth, K.; Lammertz, H.

    1988-04-01

    In the drum storage facilities of various nuclear power stations, ballooning effects have recently been observed on a limited number of 200 l drums filled with hypercompacted mixed LLW. The ballooning of the drums lid and bottom is due to internal overpressure caused by gas formation in the waste. The internal drum pressures and the composition of the drum gases were measured on a considerable number of 200 l drums. Hydrogen, formed by chemical reactions between the waste components, was identified as the pressure generating gas. The reasons for the hydrogen formation were investigated on both real and simulated wastes. (orig.) [de

  9. Low-Level Waste Forum notes and summary reports for 1994. Volume 9, Number 3, May-June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-06-01

    This issue includes the following articles: Vermont ratifies Texas compact; Pennsylvania study on rates of decay for classes of low-level radioactive waste; South Carolina legislature adjourns without extending access to Barnwell for out-of-region generators; Southeast Compact Commission authorizes payments for facility development, also votes on petitions, access contracts; storage of low-level radioactive waste at Rancho Seco removed from consideration; plutonium estimates for Ward Valley, California; judgment issued in Ward Valley lawsuits; Central Midwest Commission questions court`s jurisdiction over surcharge rebates litigation; Supreme Court decides commerce clause case involving solid waste; parties voluntarily dismiss Envirocare case; appellate court affirms dismissal of suit against Central Commission; LLW Forum mixed waste working group meets; US EPA Office of Radiation and Indoor Air rulemakings; EPA issues draft radiation site cleanup regulation; EPA extends mixed waste enforcement moratorium; and NRC denies petition to amend low-level radioactive waste classification regulations.

  10. Low-Level Waste Forum notes and summary reports for 1994. Volume 9, Number 3, May-June 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This issue includes the following articles: Vermont ratifies Texas compact; Pennsylvania study on rates of decay for classes of low-level radioactive waste; South Carolina legislature adjourns without extending access to Barnwell for out-of-region generators; Southeast Compact Commission authorizes payments for facility development, also votes on petitions, access contracts; storage of low-level radioactive waste at Rancho Seco removed from consideration; plutonium estimates for Ward Valley, California; judgment issued in Ward Valley lawsuits; Central Midwest Commission questions court's jurisdiction over surcharge rebates litigation; Supreme Court decides commerce clause case involving solid waste; parties voluntarily dismiss Envirocare case; appellate court affirms dismissal of suit against Central Commission; LLW Forum mixed waste working group meets; US EPA Office of Radiation and Indoor Air rulemakings; EPA issues draft radiation site cleanup regulation; EPA extends mixed waste enforcement moratorium; and NRC denies petition to amend low-level radioactive waste classification regulations

  11. ASSESSING EXPOSURE TO THE PUBLIC FROM LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE (LLW) TRANSPORTATION TO THE NEVADA TEST SITE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.J.; Campbell, S.; Church, B.W.; Shafer, D. S.; Gillespie, D.; Sedano, S.; Cebe, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Nevada Test Site (NTS) is one of two regional sites where low-level radioactive waste (LLW) from approved DOE and U.S. DOD generators across the United States is disposed. In federal fiscal year (FY) 2002, over 57,000 cubic meters of waste was transported to and disposed at the NTS. DOE and U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations ensure that radiation exposure from truck shipments to members of the public is negligible. Nevertheless, particularly in rural communities along transportation routes in Utah and Nevada, there is perceived risk from members of the public about incremental exposure from LLW trucks, especially when ''Main Street'' and the LLW transportation route are the same. To better quantify the exposure to gamma radiation, a stationary monitoring array of four pressurized ion chambers (PICs) have been set up in a pullout just before LLW trucks reach the entrance to the NTS. The PICs are positioned at a distance of one meter from the sides of the truck trailer and at a height appropriate for the design of the trucks that will be used in FY2003 to haul LLW to the NTS. The use of four PICs (two on each side of the truck) is to minimize and to correct for non-uniformity where radiation levels from waste packages vary from side to side, and from front to back in the truck trailer. The PIC array is being calibrated by collecting readings from each PIC exposed to a known 137Cs source that was positioned at different locations on a flatbed stationed in the PIC array, along with taking secondary readings from other known sources. Continuous data collection using the PICs, with and without a truck in the array, is being used to develop background readings. In addition, acoustic sensors are positioned on each side of the PIC array to record when a large object (presumably a truck) enters the array. In FY2003, PIC surveys from as many incoming LLW trucks as possible will be made and survey data

  12. LLW simmers as states scramble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malloy, M.

    1994-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste disposal could be reaching a crisis point as states and private industry scramble to come up with permitted disposal facilities. Although not as notorious as high-level radioactive waste, the disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) is becoming more of concern -- some say nearing a crisis -- nationwide, because of the limited number of storage sites available. Most states have formed into groups called compacts, in which they jointly set up storage and disposal sites for their LLW. Most of the overall universe of LLW is generated and handled by the US Department of Energy. The remainder is produced and dealt with commercially. Commercial sources account for about one million cubic feet of LLW annually. LLW is defined as anything that is not the more potent, spent high-level nuclear fuel waste or radioactive waste from transuranic processes. Ninety to ninety-five percent of LLW is trash. The rest is either short-lived, or in a third category of both long- and short-lived LLW. That third category, while small, can still account for a high amount of curies of radioactivity

  13. Preliminary low-level waste feed definition guidance - LLW pretreatment interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shade, J.W.; Connor, J.M.; Hendrickson, D.W.; Powell, W.J.; Watrous, R.A.

    1995-02-01

    The document describes limits for key constituents in the LLW feed, and the bases for these limits. The potential variability in the stream is then estimated and compared to the limits. Approaches for accomodating uncertainty in feed inventory, processing strategies, and process design (melter and disposal system) are discussed. Finally, regulatory constraints are briefly addressed

  14. Review on waste inventory, waste characteristics and candidate site for LLW disposal in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamkate, P.; Sriyotha, P.; Punnachaiya, M.; Danladkaew, K.

    1997-01-01

    It is a worldwide practice that radioactive waste has to be kept under control to be ensured of low potential impact on man and his environment. In Thailand, the OAEP is responsible for all radioactive waste management activities, both operation and the competent authority. The radioactive waste in Thailand consists of low level wastes from the application of radioisotopes in medical treatment and industry, the operation of the 2 MW TRIGA Mark III Research Reactor and the production of radioisotopes at OAEP. A plan for central disposal site has been set up. The near surface disposal method is chosen for this aspect because of its simple, inexpensive and adequate safe and very well know process. 8 refs., 6 tabs

  15. DOE LLW classification rationale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, A.Y.

    1991-01-01

    This report was about the rationale which the US Department of Energy had with low-level radioactive waste (LLW) classification. It is based on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's classification system. DOE site operators met to review the qualifications and characteristics of the classification systems. They evaluated performance objectives, developed waste classification tables, and compiled dose limits on the waste. A goal of the LLW classification system was to allow each disposal site the freedom to develop limits to radionuclide inventories and concentrations according to its own site-specific characteristics. This goal was achieved with the adoption of a performance objectives system based on a performance assessment, with site-specific environmental conditions and engineered disposal systems

  16. Packaging LLW and ILW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flowers, R.H.; Owen, R.G.

    1991-01-01

    Low level waste (LLW) accounts for 70-80% by volume of all radioactive wastes produced by the nuclear industry. It has low specific activity, negligible actinide content and requires little, if any, shielding to protect workers. Volume reduction for LLW of high volume but low density may be achieved by incineration and compaction as appropriate, before packaging for disposal by near surface burial. Intermediate level waste (ILW) is treated and packed to convert it into a stable form to minimize any release of activity and make handling easier. The matrix chosen for immobilization, usually cement, polymers or bitumen, depends on the nature of the waste and the acceptance criteria of the disposal facility. The special case of LLW and ILW which will arise from reactor decommissioning is discussed. Packaging methods adopted by individual countries are reviewed. The range of costs involved for packaging ILW is indicated. There is no international consensus on the performance required from packaged waste to ensure its suitability both for interim storage and final disposal. (UK)

  17. EUROSAFE forum 2013. Safe disposal of nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    The proceedings of the EUROSAFE forum 2013 - safe disposal of nuclear waste include contributions to the following topics: Nuclear installation safety - assessment; nuclear installation safety - research; waste and decommissioning - dismantling; radiation protection, 3nvironment and emergency preparedness; security of nuclear installations and materials.

  18. The Evolution of Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) Disposal Practices at the Savannah River Site Coupled with Vigorous Stakeholder Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, W. T.; Wilhite, E. L.; Cook, J. R.; Sauls, V. W.

    2002-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal practices at SRS evolved from trench disposal with little long-term performance basis to disposal in robust concrete vaults, again without modeling long-term performance. Now, based on an assessment of long-term performance of various waste forms and methods of disposal, the LLW disposal program allows for a ''smorgasbord'' of various disposal techniques and waste forms, all modeled to ensure long-term performance is understood. New disposal techniques include components-in-grout, compaction/volume reduction prior to disposal, and trench disposal of extremely low activity waste. Additionally, factoring partition coefficient (Kd) measurements based on waste forms has been factored into performance models. This paper will trace the development of the different disposal methods, and the extensive public communications effort that resulted in endorsement of the changes by the SRS Citizens Advisory Board

  19. Integration of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor installations for the purpose of optimizing treatment, storage, and disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, M.; Gnoose, J.; Coony, M.; Martin, E.; Piscitella, R.

    1998-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) manages a multibillion dollar environmental management (EM) program. In June 1996, the Assistant Secretary of Energy for EM issued a memorandum with guidance and a vision for a ten year planning process for the EM Program. The purpose of this process, which became known as the Accelerated Cleanup: Focus on 2006, is to make step changes within the DOE complex regarding the approach for making meaningful environmental cleanup progress. To augment the process, Assistant Secretary requested the site contractors to engage in an effort to identify and evaluate integration alternatives for EM waste stream treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) that would parallel the 2006 Plan. In October 1996, ten DOE contractor installations began the task of identifying alternative opportunities for low level radioactive waste (LLW). Cost effective, efficient solutions were necessary to meet all requirements associated with storing, characterizing, treating, packaging, transporting, and disposing of LLW while protecting the workers' health and safety, and minimizing impacts to the environment. To develop these solutions, a systems engineering approach was used to establish the baseline requirements, to develop alternatives, and to evaluate the alternatives. Key assumptions were that unique disposal capabilities exist within the DOE that must be maintained; private sector disposal capability for some LLW may not continue to exist into the foreseeable future; and decisions made by the LLW Team must be made on a system or complex wide basis to fully realize the potential cost and schedule benefits. This integration effort promoted more accurate waste volume estimates and forecasts; enhanced recognition of existing treatment, storage, and disposal capabilities and capacities; and improved identification of cost savings across the complex

  20. Summary report, low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts. Vol. 4. No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    'Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Activities in the States and Compacts' is a supplement to 'LLW Notes' and is distributed periodically by Afton Associates, Inc. to state, compact and federal officials that receive 'LLW Notes'. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties

  1. Summary report. Low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts. Volume 4, No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    'Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Activities in the States and Compacts' is a supplement to 'LLW Notes' and is distributed periodically by Afton Associates, Inc. to state, compact and federal officials that receive 'LLW Notes'. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low- Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties

  2. The cost of LLW disposal - Is it sound economics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stelluto, Janis D.

    1992-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management is a growth industry. Since 1980, when the LLW Policy Act was passed, regional and state LLW bureaucracies have grown, and LLW services and consulting businesses have prospered. Most states and federal agencies have LLW programs with increased regulation of LLW management. Costs of all these programs have soared as facilities for LLW disposal are proposed in sixteen, or more, locations in the country. LLW management costs have also increased as licensees implement comprehensive programs for volume reduction and waste form stabilization. Yet, the total cost of LLW management service is borne by nearly the same universe of payers as in 1980: taxpayers and radioactive materials licensees. Those costs are, in turn, passed on through taxes and consumer costs. Ultimately, everybody pays. Despite this investment, the LLW situation is adrift. New facilities have not been built, and existing facilities are closing or limiting access. LLW management has not advanced to a respected field of engineering and science. Nor does it include exceptional benefit and opportunity to host communities. A new focus is needed to allow an economically sound solution to emerge, one where the supply of LLW management and disposal fits the demand for service. (author)

  3. Control of water infiltration into near surface LLW [low-level radioactive waste] disposal units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, R.K.; Ridky, R.W.; O'Donnell, E.O.

    1990-12-01

    Three kinds of waste disposal unit covers a barriers to water infiltration are being investigated. They are: (1) resistive layer barrier, (2) conductive layer barrier, and (3) bioengineering management. The resistive layer barrier consists of compacted earthen material (e.g. clay). The conductive layer barrier consists of a conductive layer in conjunction with a capillary break. As long as unsaturated flow conditions are maintained the conductive layer will wick water around the capillary break. Below grade layered covers such as (1) and (2) will fail if there is appreciable subsidence of the cover. Remedial action for this kind of failure will be difficult. A surface cover, called bioengineering management, is meant to overcome this problem. The bioengineering management surface barrier is easily repairable if damaged by subsidence; therefore, it could be the system of choice under active subsidence conditions. The bioengineering management procedure also has been shown to be effective in dewatering saturated trenches and could be used for remedial action efforts. After cessation of subsidence, that procedure could be replaced by a resistive layer barrier, or perhaps even better, a resistive layer barrier/conductive layer barrier system. This latter system would then give long-term effective protection against water entry to waste and without institutional care. These various concepts are being assessed in six large (70ft x 45ft x 10ft each) lysimeters at Beltsville, Maryland. 6 refs., 20 figs.,

  4. Proceedings of the eighth annual DOE low-level waste management forum: Executive summary, opening plenary session, closing plenary session, attendees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    The Eighth Annual DOE (Department of Energy) Low-Level Waste Management Forum was held in September 1986, in Denver, Colorado, to provide a forum for exchange of information on low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management activities, requirements, and plans. The one hundred ninety attendees included representatives from the DOE Nuclear Energy and Defense Low-Level Waste Management Programs, DOE Operations Offices and their contractors; representatives from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), US Geological Survey, and their contractors; representatives of states and regions responsible for development of new commercial low-level waste disposal facilities; representatives of utilities, private contractors, disposal facility operators, and other parties concerned with low-level waste management issues. Plenary sessions were held at the beginning and conclusion of the meeting, while eight concurrent topical sessions were held during the intervening two days. The meeting was organized by topical areas to allow for information exchange and discussion on current and future low-level radioactive waste management challenges. Session chairmen presented summaries of the discussions and conclusions resulting from their respective sessions. Selected papers in this volume have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  5. Proceedings of the eighth annual DOE low-level waste management forum: Executive summary, opening plenary session, closing plenary session, attendees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-02-01

    The Eighth Annual DOE (Department of Energy) Low-Level Waste Management Forum was held in September 1986, in Denver, Colorado, to provide a forum for exchange of information on low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management activities, requirements, and plans. The one hundred ninety attendees included representatives from the DOE Nuclear Energy and Defense Low-Level Waste Management Programs, DOE Operations Offices and their contractors; representatives from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), US Geological Survey, and their contractors; representatives of states and regions responsible for development of new commercial low-level waste disposal facilities; representatives of utilities, private contractors, disposal facility operators, and other parties concerned with low-level waste management issues. Plenary sessions were held at the beginning and conclusion of the meeting, while eight concurrent topical sessions were held during the intervening two days. The meeting was organized by topical areas to allow for information exchange and discussion on current and future low-level radioactive waste management challenges. Session chairmen presented summaries of the discussions and conclusions resulting from their respective sessions. Selected papers in this volume have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  6. Materials and degradation modes in an alternative LLW [low-level waste] disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowgill, M.G.; MacKenzie, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    The materials used in the construction of alternative low-level waste disposal facilities will be subject to interaction with both the internal and the external environments associated with the facilities and unless precautions are taken, may degrade, leading to structural failure. This paper reviews the characteristics of both environments with respect to three alternative disposal concepts, then assesses how reaction with them might affect the properties of the materials, which include concrete, steel-reinforced concrete, structural steel, and various protective coatings and membranes. It identifies and evaluates the probability of reactions occurring which might lead to degradation of the materials and so compromise the structure. The probability of failure (interpreted relative to the ability of the structure to restrict ingress and egress of water) is assessed for each material and precautionary measures, intended to maximize the durability of the facility, are reviewed. 19 refs., 2 tabs

  7. Low-level waste (LLW) reclamation program for the Point Lepreau Solid Radioactive Waste Management Facility (SRWMF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mersereau, M.; McIntyre, K.

    2006-01-01

    Low level radioactive waste retrieved from intermediate storage vaults at Point Lepreau Generating Station has been sorted to remove the non-radioactive portion. The program began with trials to validate procedures and equipment, followed by a production run that is on-going. Waste boxes are opened and sorted at a ventilated sorting table. The sorted waste is directed to the station's free-release ('Likely Clean') waste stream or to the radioactive waste stream, depending on activity measurements. The radioactive waste content of the sorted materials has been reduced by 96% (by mass) using this process. (author)

  8. Low-level waste (LLW) reclamation program for the Point Lepreau Solid Radioactive Waste Management Facility (SRWMF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mersereau, M.; McIntyre, K. [Point Lepreau Generating Station, Lepreau, New Brunswick (Canada)]. E-mail: MMersereau@nbpower.com; KMcIntyre@nbpower.com

    2006-07-01

    Low level radioactive waste retrieved from intermediate storage vaults at Point Lepreau Generating Station has been sorted to remove the non-radioactive portion. The program began with trials to validate procedures and equipment, followed by a production run that is on-going. Waste boxes are opened and sorted at a ventilated sorting table. The sorted waste is directed to the station's free-release ('Likely Clean') waste stream or to the radioactive waste stream, depending on activity measurements. The radioactive waste content of the sorted materials has been reduced by 96% (by mass) using this process. (author)

  9. A Novel and Cost Effective Approach to the Decommissioning and Decontamination of Legacy Glove Boxes - Minimizing TRU Waste and Maximizing LLW Waste - 13634

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pancake, Daniel; Rock, Cynthia M.; Creed, Richard [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Donohoue, Tom; Martin, E. Ray; Mason, John A. [ANTECH Corporation 9050 Marshall Court, Westminster, CO, 80031 (United States); Norton, Christopher J.; Crosby, Daniel [Environmental Alternatives, Inc., 149 Emerald Street, Suite R, Keene, NH 03431 (United States); Nachtman, Thomas J. [InstaCote, Inc., 160 C. Lavoy Road, Erie, MI, 48133 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the process of decommissioning two gloveboxes at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) that were employed for work with plutonium and other radioactive materials. The decommissioning process involved an initial phase of clearing tools and materials from the glove boxes and disconnecting them from the laboratory infrastructure. The removed materials, assessed as Transuranic (TRU) waste, were packaged into 55 gallon (200 litre) drums and prepared for ultimate disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) at Carlsbad New Mexico. The boxes were then sampled to determine the radioactive contents by means of smears that were counted with alpha and beta detectors to determine the residual surface contamination, especially in terms of alpha particle emitters that are an indicator of TRU activity. Paint chip samples were also collected and sent for laboratory analysis in order to ascertain the radioactive contamination contributing to the TRU activity as a fixed contamination. The investigations predicted that it may be feasible to reduce the residual surface contamination and render the glovebox structure low level waste (LLW) for disposal. In order to reduce the TRU activity a comprehensive decontamination process was initiated using chemical compounds that are particularly effective for lifting and dissolving radionuclides that adhere to the inner surfaces of the gloveboxes. The result of the decontamination process was a reduction in the TRU surface activity on the inner surfaces of the gloveboxes by four orders of magnitude in terms of disintegrations per unit area (DPA). The next phase of the process involved a comprehensive assay of the gloveboxes using a combination of passive neutron and gamma ray scintillation detectors and a shielded and collimated high purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma ray detector. The HPGe detector was used to obtain gamma ray spectra for a variety of measurement positions within the glovebox. The spectra were used to

  10. A Novel and Cost Effective Approach to the Decommissioning and Decontamination of Legacy Glove Boxes - Minimizing TRU Waste and Maximizing LLW Waste - 13634

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancake, Daniel; Rock, Cynthia M.; Creed, Richard; Donohoue, Tom; Martin, E. Ray; Mason, John A.; Norton, Christopher J.; Crosby, Daniel; Nachtman, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the process of decommissioning two gloveboxes at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) that were employed for work with plutonium and other radioactive materials. The decommissioning process involved an initial phase of clearing tools and materials from the glove boxes and disconnecting them from the laboratory infrastructure. The removed materials, assessed as Transuranic (TRU) waste, were packaged into 55 gallon (200 litre) drums and prepared for ultimate disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) at Carlsbad New Mexico. The boxes were then sampled to determine the radioactive contents by means of smears that were counted with alpha and beta detectors to determine the residual surface contamination, especially in terms of alpha particle emitters that are an indicator of TRU activity. Paint chip samples were also collected and sent for laboratory analysis in order to ascertain the radioactive contamination contributing to the TRU activity as a fixed contamination. The investigations predicted that it may be feasible to reduce the residual surface contamination and render the glovebox structure low level waste (LLW) for disposal. In order to reduce the TRU activity a comprehensive decontamination process was initiated using chemical compounds that are particularly effective for lifting and dissolving radionuclides that adhere to the inner surfaces of the gloveboxes. The result of the decontamination process was a reduction in the TRU surface activity on the inner surfaces of the gloveboxes by four orders of magnitude in terms of disintegrations per unit area (DPA). The next phase of the process involved a comprehensive assay of the gloveboxes using a combination of passive neutron and gamma ray scintillation detectors and a shielded and collimated high purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma ray detector. The HPGe detector was used to obtain gamma ray spectra for a variety of measurement positions within the glovebox. The spectra were used to

  11. Low-Level Waste Forum meeting report. Quarterly meeting, July 23--24, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-12-31

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. The Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This report contains information synthesizing the accomplishments of the Forum, as well as any new advances that have been made in the management of low-level radioactive wastes.

  12. Low-level Waste Forum meeting report. Fall meeting, October 20--22, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. The Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This report contains information synthesizing the accomplishments of the Forum, as well as any new advances that have been made in the management of low-level radioactive wastes

  13. Low-level Waste Forum meeting report. Spring meeting, April 28--30, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. The Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This report contains information synthesizing the accomplishments of the Forum, as well as any new advances that have been made in the management of low-level radioactive wastes

  14. Low-level Waste Forum meeting report. Summer meeting, July 21--23, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. The Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This report contains information synthesizing the accomplishments of the Forum, as well as any new advances that have been made in the management of low-level radioactive wastes

  15. Low-level Waste Forum meeting report. Winter meeting, January 26--28, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. The Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This report contains information synthesizing the accomplishments of the Forum, as well as any new advances that have been made in the management of low-level radioactive wastes

  16. Low-level Waste Forum meeting report. Winter meeting, January 26--28, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. The Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This report contains information synthesizing the accomplishments of the Forum, as well as any new advances that have been made in the management of low-level radioactive wastes.

  17. Low-level Waste Forum meeting report. Quarterly meeting, July 25--26, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum is an association of representatives of states and compacts established to facilitate state and compact commission implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The Forum provides an opportunity for states and compacts to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies. The Forum participants include representatives from regional compacts, designated host states, unaffiliated states, and states with currently-operating low-level radioactive waste facilities. This report contains information synthesizing the accomplishments of the Forum, as well as any new advances that have been made in the management of low-level radioactive wastes

  18. Proceedings of a public forum on environmental protection criteria for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    Three topics were discussed at this forum: (1) what is radioactive waste; (2) what are the characteristics of an adequate risk assessment and of acceptable risks from radioactive waste; and (3) what control measures should be undertaken for radioactive wastes. This document includes statements of issues and objectives of Working Groups I, II, and III; responses of forum participants; conclusions of working groups; and prepared statements from the public

  19. UK strategy for nuclear industry LLW - 16393

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Matthew; Fisher, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    In March 2007 the UK Government and devolved administrations (for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, from here on referred to as 'Government') published their policy for the management of solid low level waste ('the Policy'). The Policy sets out a number of core principles for the management of low level waste (LLW) and charges the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority with developing a UK-wide strategy in the case of LLW from nuclear sites. The UK Nuclear Industry LLW Strategy has been developed within the framework of the principles set out in the policy. A key factor in the development of this strategy has been the strategic partnership the NDA shares with the Low Level Waste Repository near Drigg (LLWR), who now have a role in developing strategy as well as delivering an optimised waste management service at the LLWR. The strategy aims to support continued hazard reduction and decommissioning by ensuring uninterrupted capability and capacity for the management and disposal of LLW in the UK. The continued availability of a disposal route for LLW is considered vital by both the nuclear industry and non-nuclear industry low level waste producers. Given that the UK will generate significantly more low level waste (∼ 3.1 million m 3 ) than there is capacity at the LLWR (∼0.75 million m 3 ), developing alternative effective ways to manage LLW is critical. The waste management hierarchy is central to the strategy, which includes strategic goals at all levels of the hierarchy to improve its application across the industry. (authors)

  20. Shipment of LLW by intercoastal maritime service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbour, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    Transportation costs are a significant element of total waste disposal costs. In 1982, Nuclear Metals, Inc. (NMI) began a series of tests and investigations to examine the feasibility of using alternative modes for its low-level waste (LLW) shipments. NMI's investigations and experience have identified significant problems in transporting LLW by rail. Intercoastal maritime service, however, has been demonstrated as a safe and cost-effective way of transporting LLW from eastern seaboard generation sites to the repository at Beatty, Nevada. Intuition is an unreliable guide in this area. Waste managers need to periodically assess and compare combined transportation and burial costs for all site options to ensure that disposal operations are conducted in the most rational way

  1. LLW Dumpster study: Task 009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frye, J.A.

    1989-08-01

    Over a span of several years, the public has reported visible leakage emanating from ten cubic yard Dumpsters used to transport Low Level Radioactive Wastes (LLW) from LANL generation sites to the disposal site at TA-54, Area G. The purpose of this study was to: Investigate probable causes of leakages, Inspect existing Dumpsters in the fields Propose immediate short-range solutions to the problem, and Propose long-range solutions based on predicted future requirements. Field investigations indicated that LLW is handled carefully and professional at the individual generation sites and again during pick-up delivery, and disposal at TA-54. It was also apparent, however, that Dumpsters not designed for LLW service are used to store this radioactive material for extended time periods while being subjected to the full range of Northern New Mexico weather conditions. All Dumpsters inspected had 1/8 in to 2 in gaps in their closures (loading doors and discharge ramps) through which driving rain or melting snow could easily enter. Seven Dumpsters were located outside secure areas. No cases of actual contamination were discovered, only the appearance of contamination i.e. the dripping of collected rainwater or melting ice and snow from Dumpsters being transported over public roads

  2. Implementation of a geological disposal facility (GDF) in the UK by the NDA Radioactive Waste Management Directorate (RWMD): the potential for interaction between the co-located ILW/LLW and HLW/SF components of a GDF - 16306

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towler, George; Hicks, Tim; Watson, Sarah; Norris, Simon

    2009-01-01

    In June 2008 the UK government published a 'White Paper' as part of the 'Managing Radioactive Waste Safety' (MRWS) programme to provide a framework for managing higher activity radioactive wastes in the long-term through geological disposal. The White Paper identifies that there are benefits to disposing all of the UK's higher activity wastes (Low and Intermediate Level Waste (LLW and ILW), High Level Waste (HLW), Spent Fuel (SF), Uranium (U) and Plutonium (Pu)) at the same site, and this is currently the preferred option. It also notes that research will be required to support the detailed design and safety assessment in relation to any potentially detrimental interactions between the different modules. Different disposal system designs and associated Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) will be required for these different waste types, i.e. ILW/LLW and HLW/SF. If declared as waste U would be disposed as ILW and Pu as HLW/SF. The Geological Disposal Facility (GDF) would therefore comprise two co-located modules (respectively for ILW/LLW and HLW/SF). This paper presents an overview of a study undertaken to assess the implications of co-location by identifying the key Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) interactions that might occur during both the operational and post-closure phases, and their consequences for GDF design, performance and safety. The MRWS programme is currently seeking expressions of interest from communities to host a GDF. Therefore, the study was required to consider a wide range of potential GDF host rocks and consistent, conceptual disposal system designs. Two example disposal concepts (i.e. combinations of host rock, GDF design including wasteform and layout, etc.) were carried forward for detailed assessment and a third for qualitative analysis. Dimensional and 1D analyses were used to identify the key interactions, and 3D models were used to investigate selected interactions in more detail. The results of this study show that it is possible

  3. Proceedings of the European Forum on Nuclear Waste governance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Electronuclear production is a component of France's and Europe's energy supplies. However, populations remain worried as nuclear electricity produces dangerous radioactive waste for many generations. They are all the more worried so as they are not enough informed and involved in decision-making. After having analysed in 2003 the issue of national choices and their compatibility with a European directive, the European talks' ambition is to clarify the responsibilities of the different stakeholders for a good governance. Indeed, these have to make their strategies for everlasting solutions understood, inform about costs that correspond to an efficient and long-term management of nuclear waste and about their financing. How are roles shared between States, producers, managers, researchers and local entities? The European Talks has organised the dialog between stakeholders from several member States of the EU around two series of questions: - What are industrial and economic actors strategies? In which public framework are they included? How do they anticipate the future? The speakers have analysed their own experiences in order to examine what could an efficient and fair regulation and costs sharing be. - What are nuclear stakeholders commitments on the field? What kind of projects could be initiated? How could these stakeholders become partners for sustainable development? Here again, experiences have been shared in the perspective of mobilizing energies on concrete projects. This document is the proceedings of this second European Forum on this topic. Content: 1 - Opening by Christian Namy, president of the Meuse General Council; Message from Patrick Devedjian, French vice- minister of Industry. 2 - First round table 'The stakeholders strategy and their management of nuclear waste in France and in Europe' (Moderator: Alejo Vidal Quadras Roca, vice-president of the European Parliament, Spain): Speaker: Yves Le Bars, chairman, ANDRA, Discussants: Jozsef Hegyhati

  4. DBMS: a tool for managing LLW data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlajcic, P.

    1984-01-01

    As part of the DOE's National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program, a Data Base Management System (DBMS) has been developed by EG and G Idaho, lead contractor for the national LLW management program, in cooperation with the DOE and the Southern States Energy Board, a regional research group sponsored by 17 states. Basically, DBMS offers states free use of a powerful central computer (located in Idaho) for the storage, processing, and retrieval of LLW data, and the capability to forecast their handling, treatment, transport, and disposal needs

  5. Comments on EPA's LLW preproposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littleton, B.K.; Weinstock, L.

    1995-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently developing standards for the management, storage, and disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW). The Atomic Energy Act delegated EPA, among other provisions, the authority to establish generally applicable standards for the disposal of radioactive waste to ensure that the public and the environment are adequately protected from potential radiation impacts. As an initial effort to open communications on a standard for LLW, the Agency developed a preproposal draft (Preproposal Draft of 40 CFR Part 193 - 30 Nov 94) and circulated it to interested parties for review and comment. The extended comment period ended April 12, 1995. A summary of the comments received and analyzed to date follows. After all comments have been analyzed, the rule will undergo an Agency clearance process and be sent to the Office of Management and Budget for review. After that review, the formal process of publication of the proposed rule in the Federal Register and the formal public comment period will begin

  6. Feasibility study on equipment of LLW management business system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Takafumi

    2010-01-01

    LLW from university and private company has been kept in their own nuclear facilities in Japan. RANDEC has been studying business system for the treatment and conditioning of LLW before disposal. Reference to proven waste treatment process used in Nuclear Power Plant, it was studied that the appropriate treatment process for the LLW from university and private company. The waste will be collected from the university and private company to a central treatment facility. After operations such as unpacking, classification, compression, incineration and others, the waste will be treated to waste form. Most equipment are adopted by the process technology used in Nuclear Power Plant. But some equipment such as measurement of radio activity and solidification of powder need to be studied for the treatment of LLW from university and private company. (author)

  7. Models and criteria for LLW disposal performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.F.; Cohen, J.J.

    1980-12-01

    A primary objective of the Low Level Waste (LLW) Management Program is to assure that public health is protected. Predictive modeling, to some extent, will play a role in meeting this objective. This paper considers the requirements and limitations of predictive modeling in providing useful inputs to waste mangement decision making. In addition, criteria development needs and the relation between criteria and models are discussed

  8. Models and criteria for LLW disposal performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.F.; Cohen, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    A primary objective of the Low Level Waste (LLW) Management Program is to assure that public health is protected. Predictive modeling, to some extent, will play a role in meeting this objective. This paper considers the requirements and limitations of predictive modeling in providing useful inputs to waste management decision making. In addition, criteria development needs and the relation between criteria and models are discussed

  9. Evaluation of Proposed New LLW Disposal Activity: Disposal of Aqueous PUREX Waste Stream in the Saltstone Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    The Aqueous PUREX waste stream from Tanks 33 and 35, which have been blended in Tank 34, has been identified for possible processing through the Saltstone Processing Facility for disposal in the Saltstone Disposal Facility

  10. A University forum on low-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ring, J.; Lorenzen, W.; Osborne, F.; Shapiro, J.

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the Biomedical Radioactive Waste Management Program at Harvard University. Included is an overview of the program and specific discussions of education of laboratory technicians; specific waste processing methods; laboratory decay-in-storage; packaging by researcher; processing in the local waste room; transfer from local disposal to on-site management facility; program results

  11. Leach studies of chelating agents and influence on radionuclide leaching from simulated LLW/ILW cement waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vejmelka, P.; Koester, R.; Ferrara, D.; Wacks, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    Leach studies were performed on cemented waste forms containing sodium nitrate, trace amounts of cesium-137, and cobalt-60, and a chelating agent (ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), or citric acid). Leaching of the chelates was measured in water and the effect of the chelates on the release of the Cs-137 and Co-60 was studied. The time dependence of the release rate of the chelates is comparable but the chelate concentration in solution and the released fractions are different. EDTA shows the highest release rate followed by NTA and citrate. The release of the non complex forming cesium is not affected by the presence of the chelates. Independent from the strong complex formation of cobalt with EDTA, NTA, and citrate in the alkaline region the cobalt release is also not affected by the presence of the chelates. The high calcium content of the system decreases the stability of the Co complexes in the high pH region (12-13). Experiments were performed to determine the equilibrium concentration of the chelates between liquid and solid phases. The liquid phases were deionized water, saturated sodium chloride, 24 percent magnesium chloride and Q-brine. The equilibrium studies are based on the assumption that in time a stable final condition is to be established in the near field of the waste form in which each compound is at chemical equilibrium between the dissolved and the various solid phases. The total release may be assessed from the concentration in solution and flow rate out of the near field. The fraction of EDTA released from the cement ranged from 0.2 in the Q-brine to 0.5 in the saturated sodium chloride. The concentration of EDSA in solution was dependent on the original amount in the cement sample, but the released fraction was independent of the initial loading. Indicating, EDTA concentration is not affected by solubility limits. 11 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Progress on management business system of LLW generated from research and industrial nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumida, Tatsuo

    2014-01-01

    RANDEC has been studying a management business system of LLW (Low Level Waste) generated from research and industrial facilities since 2008. To examine economical problems, the income and expenditure of LLW treatment business was simulated. As a result, raising method of the funds which is required in preparatory stage of LLW treatment business is an obvious issue to carry out as public utility works. (author)

  13. Development of test methods for quality control of LLW and MLW in cement or polymers (Parts 1 and 2). Task 3. Characterization of radioactive waste forms. A series of final reports (1985-1989) no. 39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelis, G. de; Marchetti, A.; Balzamo, S.

    1992-01-01

    This report is divided into two parts. In the first part, the qualification of samples arising from the cementation of low (LLW) and intermediate level ( MLW) radioactive wastes is studied. In particular, bead ion exchange resins, filter sludges, BWR evaporator concentrates and decontamination solutions have been taken into account. The properties of the final waste forms have been compared with the ones of laboratory scale samples. The qualification of the solidified wastes was performed according to the requirements of the Italian Regulatory Body. Particular attention is devoted to mechanical and thermal properties, biodegradability and behaviour versus water. In the second part, the influence of different parameters on the leaching of Cesium from cemented BWR evaporator concentrates (sulfates) is tested. In particular the influence of the variation of temperature, initial concentration of the tracer, renewal and chemical composition of the leachant, size of the sample, has been tested. 20 refs., 68 figs., 21 tabs

  14. Ensuring robust decisions and deployable solutions in UK LLW management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) is responsible for the decommissioning and site restoration of civil nuclear liabilities in the UK. Our decommissioning programme will last over 100 years and generate approximately 3.8 million m3 of LLW, three quarters of which will be VLLW. As well as decommissioning sites, our estate includes operations, such as power generation at Wylfa and reprocessing and waste management at Sellafield. As a result we have a clear interest in effective and affordable management of low level waste. This is further enhanced by two important aspects: our role in developing and implementing strategy for the management of nuclear industry LLW in the UK and our ownership of the Low Level Waste Repository, a critical part of the UK's radioactive waste management infrastructure. Disposal capacity at LLWR is a precious resource; recognition of this fact has provided effective leverage to changing the way LLW is managed in the UK. In 2010 we published the UK Nuclear Industry LLW Strategy which comprised three main themes: the waste hierarchy; making the best use of existing LLW management assets; and, the need for new fit-for-purpose waste management routes. In order to preserve disposal capacity at LLWR we wanted to increase choice for organisations that manage LLW. Regulation of the LLW management has also had to keep pace with and enable this change. Increasing choice requires an increased focus on making robust, and not always easy, decisions. In the past, 'LLW' was simply consigned for disposal at LLWR, now LLW managers have to make decisions between clearance, exemption, reuse, recycling, incineration and disposal. Arguably, these decisions become more finely balanced at the lower end of the LLW spectrum. In the UK, a number of tools and sources of support are in place to help with this process, including: the National LLW Programme; good practice guidance (industry led) on assessing Best Available Techniques; and a

  15. Radioactive waste management - turning options into solutions. 3rd scientific forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-03-01

    The objective of the Scientific Forum was to bring to the attention of senior governmental representatives present at the IAEA General Conference some of the important scientific and technical issues in the field of radioactive waste management and to promote awareness of the international dimension of current developments. The Forum was intended, in part, to disseminate and build upon the observations, conclusions and recommendations of the International Conference on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management organised by the IAEA, in co-operation with the European Commission, the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and the World Health Organisation, and hosted in Cordoba by the Government of Spain. This report presents an overview of the issues raised in the discussions

  16. Managing California's low-level waste: state policy and waste generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasternak, A.D.; Cramer, E.N.

    1985-01-01

    Since 1982, public and private organizations in California that use radioactive materials and generate low-level radioactive waste have worked together through the California Radioactive Materials Management Forum (CRMMF) to assure the continued safe disposal of low-level waste (LLW). The forum's corporate and institutional members include electric utilities, universities, hospitals, industries, professional societies, and firms engaged in biological research and the manufacture of radiopharmaceuticals. In addition, over 200 individuals are members. The objectives of CRMMF are: (a) establishing a disposal facility for LLW in California and (b) maintaining access to the existing disposal sites in Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina until a California site is licensed and operating. This paper describes the forum's programs in the areas of legislation, litigation, and public information that contribute to the achievement of these objectives

  17. Low-Level Waste Forum notes and summary reports for 1994. Volume 9, Number 2, April 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    This is a publication of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum Participants. The topics of the publication include DOE policy, state concerns and activities, court hearings and decisions, federal agency activities, US NRC waste management function reorganization, low-level radioactive waste storage and compaction, and US NRC rulemaking and hearings

  18. Low-Level Waste Forum notes and summary reports for 1994. Volume 9, Number 2, April 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-04-01

    This is a publication of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum Participants. The topics of the publication include DOE policy, state concerns and activities, court hearings and decisions, federal agency activities, US NRC waste management function reorganization, low-level radioactive waste storage and compaction, and US NRC rulemaking and hearings.

  19. LLW disposal, 1996 and beyond, an industry perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genoa, P.H.

    1996-01-01

    In this article the author reviews what has been done in the past 15 years in terms of opening sites for disposal of low-level radioactive wastes, and what seems to be on the horizon. He reviews process timelines, timelines from regional efforts, and timelines for LLW facilities. The author also looks at what types of changes have been made in the generation, control, and volume of LLW. He examines the pressures which have driven these changes, both from society and from cost control economics. The author tries to look at what government, waste generators, and the waste management industry should do to make progress toward adequate solutions to address the LLW disposal problems

  20. Guidance for closure of existing DOE LLW disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchfield, L.

    1987-01-01

    During FY 1986, a closure guidance document was developed. The purpose of this document is to provide guidance in support of DOE Order 5820.2 to site operating contractors for the stabilization and closure of existing low-level waste (LLW) shallow land disposal sites at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Guidance is provided to aid operators in placing existing LLW sites in a closed conditions, i.e., a condition in which a nonoperational site meets postclosure performance requirements and can be shown, within a high degree of confidence, to perform as anticipated in the future, under the most cost-effective maintenance approach. Guidance is based on the philosophy that closure should be planned and performed using a systems approach. Plans for FY 1987 call for revision of the document to incorporate more information on closure of LLW sites also containing radioactive mixed waste and/or transuranic waste. 4 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  1. Operation of the online forum for the discussion of high level radioactive waste and related issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furihata, Shiori; Sugiyama, Naoki; Kikuchi, AKiko; Takizawa, Masayuki

    2002-03-01

    JNC is releasing information on the technical reliability for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) to public. However, the recognition and understanding of general public on the geological disposal of HLW are not satisfied. Recently more and more people are using the Internet, which is two-way, instant and open communication network. So JNC has offered the opportunity for discussing the topics related to geological disposal of HLW on the Internet web site since fiscal year 1999. In this fiscal year, the online forum was opened from January 25 to March 11. The forum was held on the web server independent from JNC so that discussion is done as fairly and objectively as possible. The event, which is the online discussion by university students in nation-wide, was specially held. The number of accesses to the forum significantly increased in this period compared to that of last two fiscal years. The adequate operation of the forum and the presentation of the information about geological disposal of HLW were surveyed by the questionnaire distributed to the participants. (author)

  2. Economic analysis of alternative LLW disposal methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foutes, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has evaluated the costs and benefits of alternative disposal technologies as part of its program to develop generally applicable environmental standards for the land disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). Costs, population health effects and Critical Population Group (CPG) exposures resulting from alternative waste treatment and disposal methods were developed and input into the analysis. The cost-effectiveness analysis took into account a number of waste streams, hydrogeologic and climatic region settings, and waste treatment and disposal methods. Total costs of each level of a standard included costs for packaging, processing, transportation, and burial of waste. Benefits are defined in terms of reductions in the general population health risk (expected fatal cancers and genetic effects) evaluated over 10,000 years. A cost-effectiveness ratio, was calculated for each alternative standard. This paper describes the alternatives considered and preliminary results of the cost-effectiveness analysis

  3. The Yami's opposition to the Lanyu LLW storage installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, K.K.; Chang, S.Y.

    1993-01-01

    Since 1982, the solidified low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) in Taiwan, regardless of the origins, have been sent to Lanyu for interim storage. Lanyu is a small island located 80 kilometers southeast of Taiwan. Its unique Polynesian cultural characteristics make it an attractive tourist spot. Dissatisfaction of being the commonly neglected powerless minority, in addition to the political claims from the outside environmental activists made the majority of the Lanyu residents oppose the operation of the storage facility. Approximately 80,000 drums of these wastes have been sent to Lanyu. Although the radiological monitoring results demonstrated that the current operation causes negligible impact on the environment. Accounting for the fast changing social and political situations in Taiwan today, without a good public acceptance program for both sides, the continuous operation of the Lanyu LLW storage facility until the year 2002, at which time the LLW disposal facility will be commissioned, could be in limbo

  4. Evaluation of Proposed New LLW Disposal Activity Disposal of Compacted Job Control Waste, Non-compactible, Non-incinerable Waste, And Other Wasteforms In Slit Trenches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WILHITE, ELMER L.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of trench disposal of low-level wasteforms that were not analyzed in the original performance assessment for the E-Area low-level waste facility, but were analyzed in the revised performance assessment is evaluated. This evaluation was conducted to provide a bridge from the current waste acceptance criteria, which are based on the original performance assessment, to those that will be developed from the revised performance assessment. The conclusion of the evaluation is that any waste except for materials that would retain radionuclides more strongly than soil that meets the radionuclide concentration of package limits for trench burial based on the revised performance assessment, and presented in Table 1 of this document, is suitable for trench disposal; provided that, for cellulosic material the current 40 percent restriction is retained. Table 2 of this document lists materials acceptable for trench disposal

  5. PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL AND STRUCTURAL EVOLUTIION OF ZEOLITE-CONTAINING WASTE FORMS PRODUCED FROM METAKAOLINITE AND CALCINED SODUIM BEARING WASTE (HLW AND/OR LLW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grutzeck, Michael W.

    2003-01-01

    Zeolites can adsorb liquids and gases, take part in catalytic reactions and serve as cation exchange media. They are commercially available as finely divided powders. Using zeolites to manage radioactive waste is not new, but a process by which zeolites can be made to act both as a host phase and a cementing agent is. It is notable that zeolites occur in nature as well consolidated/cemented deposits. The Romans used blocks of Neapolitan zeolitized tuff as a building material and some of these buildings are still standing. Zeolites are easy to synthesize from a wide range of both natural and man-made precursor materials. The method of making a ''hydroceramic'' is derived from a process in which metakaolinite (thermally dehydroxylated kaolinite) is slurried with a dilute sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution and then reacted for hours to days at mildly elevated temperatures (60-200 C). The zeolites that form in solution are finely divided powders containing micrometer sized crystals. However, if the process is changed and only enough concentrated sodium hydroxide solution (e.g. 12 M) is added to the metakaolinite to give the mixture a putty-like consistency and the mixture is then cured under similar conditions, the mixture becomes a very hard ceramic-like material containing distinct tectosilicate crystallites (zeolites and feldspathoids) imbedded in an X-ray amorphous sodium aluminosilicate hydrate matrix. Due to the material's vitreous character, the composite has been called a hydroceramic. Similar to zeolite/feldspathoid powders, a hydroceramic is able to sequester cations and a wide range of salt molecules (e.g., nitrate, nitrite and sulfate) in lattice positions and within structural channels and voids thus rendering them ''insoluble'' and making them an ideal contingency waste form for solidifying radioactive waste. The obvious similarities between a hydroceramic waste form and a waste form based on solidified Portland-cement grout are superficial because their

  6. PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL AND STRUCTURAL EVOLUTIION OF ZEOLITE-CONTAINING WASTE FORMS PRODUCED FROM METAKAOLINITE AND CALCINED SODUIM BEARING WASTE (HLW AND/OR LLW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grutzeck, Michael W.

    2004-01-01

    Zeolites are extremely versatile. They can adsorb liquids and gases and serve as cation exchange media. They occur in nature as well cemented deposits. The Romans used blocks of zeolitized tuff as a building material. Using zeolites for the management of radioactive waste is not new, but a process by which the zeolites can be made to act as a cementing agent is. Zeolitic materials are relatively easy to synthesize from a wide range of both natural and man-made precursors. The process under study is derived from a well known method in which metakaolin (thermally dehydroxylated kaolin a mixture of kaolinite and smaller amounts of quartz and mica that has been heated to ∼700 C) is mixed with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and water and reacted in slurry form (for a day or two) at mildly elevated temperatures. The zeolites form as finely divided powders containing micrometer ((micro)m) sized crystals. However, if the process is changed slightly and just enough concentrated sodium hydroxide solution is added to the metakaolinite to make a thick paste and then the paste is cured under mild hydrothermal conditions (60-200 C), the mixture forms a concrete-like ceramic material made up of distinct crystalline tectosilicate minerals (zeolites and feldspathoids) imbedded in an X-ray amorphous hydrated sodium aluminosilicate matrix. Due to its vitreous character we have chosen to call this composite a ''hydroceramic''. Similar to zeolite powders, a hydroceramic is able to sequester cations in both lattice positions and within the channels and voids present in its tectosilicate framework structure. It can also accommodate a wide range of salt molecules (e.g., sodium nitrate) within these same openings thus rendering them insoluble. Due to its fine crystallite size and cementing character, the matrix develops significant physical strength. The obvious similarities between a hydroceramic waste form and a waste form based on solidified Portland cement grout are only superficial because

  7. Westinghouse Savannah River Site Supplier Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Information Exchange Forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturm, H.F. Jr.; Hottel, R.E.; Christoper, N.

    1994-01-01

    The Savannah River Site conducted its first Supplier Information Exchange in September 1993. The intent of the conference was to inform potential suppliers of the Savannah River Sites mission and research and development program objectives in the areas of environmental restoration and waste management, and to solicit proposals for innovative research in those areas. Major areas addressed were Solid Waste, Environmental Restoration, Environmental Monitoring, Transition/Decontamination and Decommissioning, and the Savannah River Technology Center. A total of 1062 proposals were received addressing the 89 abstracts presented. This paper will describe the forum the process for solicitation, the process for proposal review and selection, and review the overall results and benefits to Savannah River

  8. LLW and ILW disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Summaries from the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD of the main programmes for low and intermediate level waste repositories in countries with the firmest timetables for their development are given in the form of a table and notes. An IAEA overview of low and intermediate level waste management practice in 26 countries is also tabulated. (author)

  9. Physical, Chemical and Structural Evolution of Zeolite-Containing Waste Forms Produced from Metakaolinite and Calcined Sodium Bearing Waste (HLW and/or LLW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grutzeck, Michael W.

    2005-01-01

    Zeolites are extremely versatile. They can adsorb liquids and gases and serve as cation exchange media. They occur in nature as well cemented deposits. The ancient Romans used blocks of zeolitized tuff as a building material. Using zeolites for the management of radioactive waste is not a new idea, but a process by which the zeolites can be made to act as a cementing agent is. Zeolitic materials are relatively easy to synthesize from a wide range of both natural and man-made substances. The process under study is derived from a well known method in which metakaolin (an impure thermally dehydroxylated kaolinite heated to ∼700 C containing traces of quartz and mica) is mixed with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and reacted in slurry form (for a day or two) at mildly elevated temperatures. The zeolites form as finely divided powders containing micrometer ((micro)m) sized crystals. However, if the process is changed slightly and only just enough concentrated sodium hydroxide solution is added to the metakaolinite to make a thick crumbly paste and then the paste is compacted and cured under mild hydrothermal conditions (60-200 C), the mixture will form a hard ceramic-like material containing distinct crystalline tectosilicate minerals (zeolites and feldspathoids) imbedded in an X-ray amorphous hydrated sodium aluminosilicate matrix. Due to its lack of porosity and vitreous appearance we have chosen to call this composite a ''hydroceramic''

  10. Modeling the economics of LLW volume reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voth, M.H.; Witzig, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    Generators of low-level (radioactive) waste (LLW) are under pressure to implement volume reduction (VR) programs for political and economic reasons. Political reasons include the appearance of generating less waste or meeting quotas. Economic reasons include avoiding high disposal costs and associated surcharges. Volume reduction results in less total volume over which fixed disposal costs are allocated and therefore higher unit costs for disposal. As numerous small compacts are developed, this often overlooked effect becomes more pronounced. The described model presents two unique significant features. First, a feedback loop considers the impact of VR on disposal rates, and second, it appeals to logic without extensive knowledge of VR technology or computer modeling. The latter feature is especially useful in conveying information to students and nontechnical decision makers, demonstrating the impact of each of a complicated set of variables with reproducible results

  11. Development of the advanced package system for miscellaneous LLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, K.

    1991-01-01

    Miscellaneous LLW (low-level radioactive miscellaneous solid wastes) such as parts of machines, pieces of piping, HEPA filter, incineration ashes from nuclear power plants will be disposed in shallow land after stuffing into 200 liter steel drums. The package system of these miscellaneous LLW is required to contain such radionuclides as 14 C, 137 Cs and etc. for a few hundred years. The advanced package system for miscellaneous LLW has been developed. This package system is composed of steel drums with resin mortar inner liner and non shrinkage fills with high flowability. Resin mortar liners have stronger water permeability resistance and higher compressive strength than other cement mortars. Strong water permeability resistance of resin mortar liners prevent underground water from infiltration into fills and solid wastes. On the other hand, as the high flowabilities and non shrinkage of this fills give very low gross void fraction of the package system and have strong adsorption ability of radionuclides. In addition, steel drums with resin mortar inner liners have merits in their high density, uniformity and simplicity in manufacturing. Consequently, this package system is promising candidate barrier for the containment of radionuclides from miscellaneous LLW. (J.P.N.)

  12. LLW Forum summary report: Volume 2, Number 1.1, February 1994: Low-level radioactive waste management activities in the states and compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, C.

    1994-02-01

    Information presented for compacts and their home states includes: regulatory and program responsibility; siting responsibility, other involvement; siting; licensing; development costs; and disposal facility operation

  13. Economy may be harmed by lack of LLW disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    A study released by Organizations United for Responsible Low-Level Radioactive Waste Solutions warns that the substantial benefits of using radioactive materials are threatened by the lack of a low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility. The main point of the study is the threat to the American economy posed by insufficient facilities for disposal of the 1.7 billion ft 3 of LLW produced by the use of radioactive materials every year only 34.8 percent of which comes from nuclear power plants. open-quotes Thirty years of experience have provided the technical knowledge to design waste disposal facilities that protect the public and environment. But an impending lack of adequate disposal facilities jeopardizes our continued use of radioactive materials,close quotes according to the study

  14. Generation and release of radioactive gases in LLW disposal facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, M.S. [Harvard School Public Health, Boston, MA (United States); Simonson, S.A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The atmospheric release of radioactive gases from a generic engineered LLW disposal facility and its radiological impacts were examined. To quantify the generation of radioactive gases, detailed characterization of source inventory for carbon-14, tritium, iodine-129, krypton-85, and radon-222, was performed in terms of their activity concentrations; their distribution within different waste classes, waste forms and containers; and their subsequent availability for release in volatile or gaseous form. The generation of gases was investigated for the processes of microbial activity, radiolysis, and corrosion of waste containers and metallic components in wastes. The release of radionuclides within these gases to the atmosphere was analyzed under the influence of atmospheric pressure changes.

  15. Economic analysis of alternative LLW disposal methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foutes, C.E.; Queenan, C.J. III

    1987-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has evaluated the costs and benefits of alternative disposal technologies as part of its program to develop generally applicable environmental standards for the land disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). Costs, population health effects and Critical Population Group (CPG) exposures resulting from alternative waste treatment and disposal methods were evaluated both in absolute terms and also relative to a base case (current practice). Incremental costs of the standard included costs for packaging, processing, transportation, and burial of waste. Benefits are defined in terms of reductions in the general population health risk (expected fatal cancers and genetic effects) evaluated over 10,000 years. A cost-effectiveness ratio, defined as the incremental cost per avoided health effect, was calculated for each alternative standard. The cost-effectiveness analysis took into account a number of waste streams, hydrogeologic and climatic region settings, and waste treatment and disposal methods. This paper describes the alternatives considered and preliminary results of the cost-effectiveness analysis. 15 references, 7 figures, 3 tables

  16. How a developing country is facing LLW disposal problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C.C.; Shao, Y.T.; Tsai, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    Taiwan is a small island which measures about 36,000 square kilometers with over 70% mountainous area. Today over 90% of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) is produced from six nuclear power units operated by the Taiwan Power Company (Taipower or TPC). The rest of the country's LLW is produced from medical, agricultural, industrial, educational and research programs. Due to the fact that over 90% of Taiwan's LLW is produced by Taipower, Taipower was designated by the Government to dispose of LLW for entire country. This paper will focus on the planning and implementation of the first phase. Through area screening and potential site evaluation, candidate sites will be selected based on currently available information and sites investigation. At the same time, the disposal methods will be evaluated in terms of safety, cost, and Taiwan's generic conditions of climate, geology, and topography. The conceptual design of the disposal method(s) will then be developed. Also, during site investigation, preliminary designs will be made

  17. Proceedings of the Recycling Council of Ontario's energy from waste forum : is there a role for advanced thermal technologies in effective waste management?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The lack of landfill capacity in Ontario and the threat of United States border closures to Canadian waste exportation has led to an increased interest in the viability of advanced thermal technologies for the management of waste residuals. Rising energy costs have also led governments and industries to examine the cost benefits of producing energy from waste (EFW) and using waste as a fuel replacement. This forum was held by the Recycling Council of Ontario to investigate the environmental and economic impacts of investing in EFW technologies. The forum was divided into 4 focus areas: (1) a comparison of the environmental and economic implications of landfilling and EFW technology; (2) an overview of facilities currently operating in Europe which included a policy and regulation background and an outline of technologies used; (3) an overview of EFW technologies currently used in Canada; (4) and an outline of municipal and privately-owned EFW pilot plants and proposed facilities in Ontario. Descriptions of facilities were provided, as well as a history of the policy decisions and processes needed to include EFW as a waste management tool. Issues concerning public consultation practices and the impact of EFW on waste diversion activities were reviewed, and a descriptions of EFW technologies were provided. Eleven presentations were given at the forum, 3 of which were catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  18. Preliminary fee methodology for recovering GTCC-LLW management costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, L.L.

    1990-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is currently planning a fee to recover costs of managing Greater-Than-Class-C Low-Level Waste (GTCC-LLW). A cash flow basis will be used for fee calculations to ensure recovery of all applicable program costs. Positive cash flows are revenues received from waste generators. Negative cash flows are program expenses for storage, transportation, treatment, and disposal of the wastes and for program development, evaluation, and administration. Program balances are the net result of positive and negative cash flows each year. The methodology calculates fees that will recovery all program expenses taking into account cost inflation. 3 refs., 1 tab

  19. Long-range low-level waste management needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloyna, E.F.

    1980-01-01

    In all waste management considerations, it is necessary to establish the waste source; characterize the waste components; determine treatability; evaluate specific details that comprise a systems approach to overall waste management; and implement practical collection, packaging, storage disposal and monitoring technology. This paper evaluates management considerations by defining the source and magnitude of low-level wastes (LLW), relating LLW disposal, defining principles of LLW burial, and listing LLW burial considerations. 17 refs

  20. Nondestructive and quantitative characterization of TRU and LLW mixed-waste using active and passive gamma-ray spectrometry and computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camp, D.C.; Martz, H.E.

    1991-11-12

    The technology being proposed by LLNL is an Active and Passive Computed Tomography (A P CT) Drum Scanner for contact-handled (CH) wastes. It combines the advantages offered by two well-developed nondestructive assay technologies: gamma-ray spectrometry and computed tomography (CT). Coupled together, these two technologies offer to nondestructively and quantitatively characterize mixed- wastes forms. Gamma-ray spectroscopy uses one or more external radiation detectors to passively and nondestructively measure the energy spectrum emitted from a closed container. From the resulting spectrum one can identify most radioactivities detected, be they transuranic isotopes, mixed-fission products, activation products or environmental radioactivities. Spectral libraries exist at LLNL for all four. Active (A) or transmission CT is a well-developed, nondestructive medical and industrial technique that uses an external-radiation beam to map regions of varying attenuation within a container. Passive (P) or emission CT is a technique mainly developed for medical application, e.g., single-photon emission CT. Nondestructive industrial uses of PCT are under development and just coming into use. This report discuses work on the A P CT Drum Scanner at LLNL.

  1. Nondestructive and quantitative characterization of TRU and LLW mixed-waste using active and passive gamma-ray spectrometry and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, D.C.; Martz, H.E.

    1991-01-01

    The technology being proposed by LLNL is an Active and Passive Computed Tomography (A ampersand P CT) Drum Scanner for contact-handled (CH) wastes. It combines the advantages offered by two well-developed nondestructive assay technologies: gamma-ray spectrometry and computed tomography (CT). Coupled together, these two technologies offer to nondestructively and quantitatively characterize mixed- wastes forms. Gamma-ray spectroscopy uses one or more external radiation detectors to passively and nondestructively measure the energy spectrum emitted from a closed container. From the resulting spectrum one can identify most radioactivities detected, be they transuranic isotopes, mixed-fission products, activation products or environmental radioactivities. Spectral libraries exist at LLNL for all four. Active (A) or transmission CT is a well-developed, nondestructive medical and industrial technique that uses an external-radiation beam to map regions of varying attenuation within a container. Passive (P) or emission CT is a technique mainly developed for medical application, e.g., single-photon emission CT. Nondestructive industrial uses of PCT are under development and just coming into use. This report discuses work on the A ampersand P CT Drum Scanner at LLNL

  2. Lessons learned from international siting experiences of LLW Disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, G.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that the United States can gain insight into successfully siting low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities by studying the process in other nations. Siting experiences in France and Sweden are compared to experiences in the United States. Three factors appear to making siting of LLW disposal facilities easier in France and Sweden than in the United States. First, the level of public trust in the government and the entities responsible for siting, developing, and operating a LLW disposal facility is much greater in France and Sweden than in the United States. Second, France and Sweden are much more dependent on nuclear power than is the United States. Third, French and Swedish citizens do not have the same access to the siting process (i.e., legal means to intervene) as do U.S. citizens. To compensate for these three factors, public officials responsible for siting a facility may need to better listen to the concerns of public interest groups and citizen advisory committees and amend their siting process accordingly and better share power and control with the public. If these two techniques are implemented earnestly by the states, siting efforts may be increasingly more successful in the United States

  3. Learning and adapting to societal requirements for radioactive waste management. Key findings and experience of the forum on stakeholder confidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) is an ongoing initiative of the Nea Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC). The FSC is composed of nominees from Nea member countries and consists mostly of representatives of national organisations (implementers, regulators, policy makers, research and development personnel) with responsibility for, and experience of, interacting with stakeholders. The FSC mandate includes the following: to define, oversee and carry out work programme activities in the strategic area of public perception and stakeholder confidence, as assigned by the RWMC; to advise the RWMC on major and emerging issues in the area of public perception and stakeholder confidence related to waste management; to act as a forum to share experience in achieving stakeholder confidence and, in particular, in how to obtain the confidence of local communities and their representatives and intermediaries with the technical decision makers; to analyse today processes for embedding waste management programmes into a socio-political, decision-making context; to identify opportunities for harmonized views of member countries regarding successful and unsuccessful experiences in interacting with stakeholders, technical concerns of stakeholders, effective means of communicating with technical and nontechnical audiences. This report presents the key FSC findings based on the substantial documentation and experience developed by the Forum during its first four years of activity (2000-2004). The historical context within which the FSC was established is also described and provides a perspective to those findings. An appendix recounts the collective experience of the FSC members, including their views of the impact of FSC activities on participating organisations. The FSC will build upon the present findings during its next phase of work. (author)

  4. LLW Notes, Volume 12, Number 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, C.; Brown, H.; Gedden, R.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

    1997-04-01

    Contents include articles entitled: Texas Authority's funding pending before conference committee: Auditor's report favors authority; Revisions likely for Illinois siting law; Midwest Compact votes on Ohio fundings: Less approved than requested; Walter Sturgeon named executive director of North Carolina authority; New forum participant for Massachusetts; CRCPD holds fifth workshop for LLRW regulators; DOD generators hold annual meeting; State legislators' LLRW working group meets; NRC Chairman Jackson responds to proposal to amend the Policy Act; US Ecology uses to recover costs and lost profits and/or to compel Ward Valley land transfer; New suit against Envirocare and others alleges unlawful business practices; Federal court finds line-item veto unconstitutional; States/utilities seek to escrow nuclear waste payments; High-level waste bill passes Senate; NRC releases decommissioning rule; EPA Region VI re La Paz Agreement; EPA, NRC debate NRC's decommissioning rule: No progress re approaches to risk harmonization; and Mousseau heads DOE's national low-level waste management program

  5. Onsite LLW storage at Cook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacRae, W.T.

    1994-01-01

    The Donald C. Cook nuclear plant has gained much experience through the onsite storage of low-level radioactive waste. Owned and operated by the Indiana Michigan Power Company, which is owned by American Electric Power, the plant is located in Bridgman, Michigan, on the southeast side of Lake Michigan, about 50 miles from Chicago. In November 1990, waste generators in the state of Michigan were denied access to licensed low-level waste disposal sites because of a lack of progress by the state in developing its own disposal site. Because of this lack, wastes from the Cook plant have been stored onsite for three years. This article covers four issues related to the Cook nuclear plant's experience in the low-level waste storage: storage capacity and waste generation rates, waste form and packages, regulatory issues, and the monitoring of the waste

  6. Greater-than-Class-C Low-Level Waste Data Base user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    The Greater-than-Class-C Low-level Waste (GTCC LLW) Data Base characterizes GTCC LLW using low, base, and high cases for three different scenarios: unpackaged, packaged, and concentration averages. The GTCC LLW Data Base can be used to project future volumes and radionuclide activities. This manual provides instructions for users of the GTCC LLW Data Base

  7. 'Strategy is a commodity, implementation is an art' - 2 years of implementation of the UK national LLW strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassidy, Helen; Rossiter, David

    2013-01-01

    The Low Level Waste Repository (LLWR) is the primary facility for disposal of Low Level Waste (LLW) in the United Kingdom (UK), serving the UK nuclear industry and a diverse range of other sectors. Management of LLW in the UK historically was dominated by disposal to the LLWR. The value of the LLWR as a national asset was recognised by the 2007 UK Governmental Policy on management of solid LLW. At this time, analysis of the projected future demand for disposal at LLWR against facility capacity was undertaken identifying a credible risk that the capacity of LLWR would be insufficient to meet future demand if existing waste management practices were perpetuated. To mitigate this risk a National Strategy for the management of LLW in the UK was developed by the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA), partnered with LLW Repository Ltd. (the organisation established in 2008 to manage the LLWR on behalf of NDA). This strategy was published in 2010 and identified three mechanisms for protection of the capacity of LLWR - application of the Waste Hierarchy by waste producers; optimised use of existing assets for LLW management; and opening of new waste treatment and disposal routes to enable diversion of waste away from the LLWR. (authors)

  8. The regulator's evolving role and image in radioactive waste management. Lessons learnt within the Nea forum on stake holder confidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Of all the institutional actors in the field of long-term radioactive waste management (RWM), it is perhaps the regulatory authorities that have restyled their roles most significantly. Modern societal demands on risk governance and the widespread adoption of stepwise decision-making processes have influenced the image and role of regulators. Legal instruments both reflect and encourage a new set of behaviours and a new understanding of how regulators may best serve the public interest. This report, based on the work of the NEA Forum on Stakeholder Confidence, presents findings of relevance to regulators and examines their role within a robust and transparent RWM decision-making process. Detailed international observations are provided on the role of regulatory authorities; characteristics of the regulatory process; attributes that help achieve public confidence; and regulatory communication approaches. (author)

  9. Packaged low-level waste verification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuite, K.T.; Winberg, M.; Flores, A.Y.; Killian, E.W.; McIsaac, C.V.

    1996-01-01

    Currently, states and low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal site operators have no method of independently verifying the radionuclide content of packaged LLW that arrive at disposal sites for disposal. At this time, disposal sites rely on LLW generator shipping manifests and accompanying records to insure that LLW received meets the waste acceptance criteria. An independent verification system would provide a method of checking generator LLW characterization methods and help ensure that LLW disposed of at disposal facilities meets requirements. The Mobile Low-Level Waste Verification System (MLLWVS) provides the equipment, software, and methods to enable the independent verification of LLW shipping records to insure that disposal site waste acceptance criteria are being met. The MLLWVS system was developed under a cost share subcontract between WMG, Inc., and Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies through the Department of Energy's National Low-Level Waste Management Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

  10. LLW Notes, Volume 12, Number 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, C.; Brown, H. [eds.; Gedden, R.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

    1997-04-01

    Contents include articles entitled: Texas Authority`s funding pending before conference committee: Auditor`s report favors authority; Revisions likely for Illinois siting law; Midwest Compact votes on Ohio fundings: Less approved than requested; Walter Sturgeon named executive director of North Carolina authority; New forum participant for Massachusetts; CRCPD holds fifth workshop for LLRW regulators; DOD generators hold annual meeting; State legislators` LLRW working group meets; NRC Chairman Jackson responds to proposal to amend the Policy Act; US Ecology uses to recover costs and lost profits and/or to compel Ward Valley land transfer; New suit against Envirocare and others alleges unlawful business practices; Federal court finds line-item veto unconstitutional; States/utilities seek to escrow nuclear waste payments; High-level waste bill passes Senate; NRC releases decommissioning rule; EPA Region VI re La Paz Agreement; EPA, NRC debate NRC`s decommissioning rule: No progress re approaches to risk harmonization; and Mousseau heads DOE`s national low-level waste management program.

  11. Strategic environmental assessment for UK LLW management - 16392

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craze, Andrew; Clark, Matthew; Davis, Pete

    2009-01-01

    NDA is delivering a Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) to underpin the UK Nuclear Industry Low Level Waste Strategy. The purpose of this assessment is embed sustainability issues into our decision making and to fulfill our requirements under the European Union's Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) Directive (2004/42/EU) and transposing UK Regulations, and to underpin the development of the strategy. The outputs of the SEA have provided input into particular aspects of the strategy, leading to a more robust and better informed result. Development of options to be assessed under the SEA has looked at a number of factors, including: - what the strategy is aiming to achieve - expectation from stakeholders as to what should be addressed - consideration of tactical approaches to implementation of the strategy in addition to high level strategic issues - links to other projects and programmes (for example the Environmental Safety Case for the Low Level Waste Repository. The SEA aims to provide a robust assessment of the environmental and sustainability impacts of alternative strategies for providing continued capability and capacity for the management and disposal of LLW in the UK. The assessment also considers other, more tactical, issues around implementation of the strategy, for example: issues around the location of LLW management facilities; the environmental impacts of alternative waste treatment options (metal recycling etc); considerations of alternative approaches to the classification of radioactive waste and opportunities that would result. Critical to the development of the SEA has been the involvement of statutory and non-statutory stakeholders, who have informed both the output and the approach taken. (authors)

  12. Development of LLW and VLLW disposal business cost estimation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koibuchi, Hiroko; Ishiguro, Hideharu; Matsuda, Kenji

    2004-01-01

    In order to undertake the LLW and VLLW disposal business, various examinations are carried out in RANDEC. Since it is important in undertaking this business to secure funds, a disposal cost must be calculated by way of trial. However, at present, there are many unknown factors such as the amount of wastes, a disposal schedule, the location of a disposal site, and so on, and the cost cannot be determined. Meanwhile, the cost depends on complicated relations among these factors. Then, a 'LLW and VLLW disposal business cost estimation system' has been developed to calculate the disposal cost easily. This system can calculate an annual balance of payments by using a construction and operation cost of disposal facilities, considering economic parameters of tax, inflation rate, interest rate and so on. And the system can calculate internal reserves to assign to next-stage upkeep of the disposal facilities after the disposal operation. A model of disposal site was designed based on assumption of some preconditions and a study was carried out to make a trial calculation by using the system. Moreover, it will be required to reduce construction cost by rationalizing the facility and to make flat an annual business spending by examining the business schedule. (author)

  13. Use of a Shielded High Resolution Gamma Spectrometry System to Segregate LLW from Contact Handleable ILW Containing Plutonium - 13046

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lester, Rosemary; Wilkins, Colin [Canberra UK Ltd, Unit 1 B528.1, Harwell Science Campus, Oxfordshire OX11 0DF (United Kingdom); Chard, Patrick [Canberra UK Ltd, Forss Business and Technology park, Thurso, Caithness KW14 7UZ (United Kingdom); Jaederstroem, Henrik; LeBlanc, Paul; Mowry, Rick [Canberra Industries, Inc., 800 Research Parkway, Meriden, Connecticut, 06450 (United States); MacDonald, Sanders; Gunn, William [Dounreay Site Restoration Limited, Dounreay, Thurso, Caithness, KW14 7TZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    Dounreay Site Restoration Limited (DSRL) have a number of drums of solid waste that may contain Plutonium Contaminated Material. These are currently categorised as Contact Handleable Intermediate Level Waste (CHILW). A significant fraction of these drums potentially contain waste that is in the Low Level Waste (LLW) category. A Canberra Q2 shielded high resolution gamma spectrometry system is being used to quantify the total activity of drums that are potentially in the LLW category in order to segregate those that do contain LLW from CHILW drums and thus to minimise the total volume of waste in the higher category. Am-241 is being used as an indicator of the presence of plutonium in the waste from its strong 59.54 keV gamma-ray; a knowledge of the different waste streams from which the material originates allows a pessimistic waste 'fingerprint' to be used in order to determine an upper limit to the activities of the weak and non-gamma-emitting plutonium and associated radionuclides. This paper describes the main features of the high resolution gamma spectrometry system being used by DSRL to perform the segregation of CHILW and LLW and how it was configured and calibrated using the Canberra In-Situ Object Counting System (ISOCS). It also describes how potential LLW drums are selected for assay and how the system uses the existing waste stream fingerprint information to determine a reliable upper limit for the total activity present in each measured drum. Results from the initial on-site commissioning trials and the first measurements of waste drums using the new monitor are presented. (authors)

  14. Test Plan: Phase 1, Hanford LLW melter tests, GTS Duratek, Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, W.C.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides a test plan for the conduct of vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Low-Level Waste (LLW) Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it [one of seven selected for glass melter testing under Purchase Order MMI-SVV-384215] is GTS Duratek, Inc., Columbia, Maryland. The GTS Duratek project manager for this work is J. Ruller. This test plan is for Phase I activities described in the above Purchase Order. Test conduct includes melting of glass with Hanford LLW Double-Shell Slurry Feed waste simulant in a DuraMelter trademark vitrification system

  15. Interim Storage Facility for LLW of Decommissioning Nuclear Research Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amato, S.; Ugolini, D.; Basile, F. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Nuclear Decommissioning and Facility Management Unit, TP 800, Via E. Fermi 2749, 21027 Ispra - VA (Italy)

    2009-06-15

    JRC-Ispra has initiated a Decommissioning and Waste Management (D and WM) Programme of all its nuclear facilities. In the frame of this programme, it has been decided to build an interim storage facility to host conditioned low level waste (LLW) that had been produced during the operation of JRC-Ispra nuclear research reactors and laboratories and that will be produced from their decommissioning. This paper presents the main characteristics of the facility. The storage ISFISF has a rectangular shape with uniform height and it is about 128 m long, 41 m wide and 9 m high. The entire surface affected by the facility, including screening area and access roads, is about 27.000 m{sup 2}. It is divided in three sectors, a central one, about 16 m long, for loading/unloading operations and operational services and two lateral sectors, each about 55 m long, for the conditioned LLW storage. Each storage sector is divided by a concrete wall in two transversal compartments. The ISFISF, whose operational lifetime is 50 years, is designed to host the conditioned LLW boxed in UNI CP-5.2 packages, 2,5 m long, 1.65 m wide, and 1,25 m high. The expected nominal inventory of waste is about 2100 packages, while the maximum storage is 2540 packages, thus a considerably large reserve capacity is available. The packages will be piled in stacks of maximum number of five. The LLW is going to be conditioned with a cement matrix. The maximum weight allowed for each package has been fixed at 16.000 kg. The total radioactivity inventory of waste to be hosted in the facility is about 30 TBq (mainly {beta}/{gamma} emitters). In order to satisfy the structural, seismic, and, most of all, radiological requirements, the external walls of the ISFISF are made of pre-fabricated panels, 32 cm thick, consisting of, from inside to outside, 20 cm of reinforced concrete, 7 cm of insulating material, and again 5 cm of reinforced concrete. For the same reason the roof is made with pre-fabricated panels in

  16. North American Wood Waste Forum: Summary of Group Feedback, 2-3, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bob Falk

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the feedback and recommendations of the North American Wood Recovery Group. This report summarizes the barriers and opportunities in wood recovery, reuse, and recycling as identified by this group of stakeholders from the wood industry, waste industry, and relevant government agencies.

  17. The application of probabilistic risk assessment to a LLW incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, K.K.; Huang, F.T.

    1993-01-01

    The 100 Kg/hr low-level radioactive waste (LLW) incinerator and the 1,500 ton supercompactor are two main vehicles in the Taiwan Power Company's Volume Reduction Center. Since the hot test of the incinerator in mid 1990, various problems associated with the original design and operating procedures were encountered. During the early stages of putting an incinerator in service, the modification and fine-tuning of the system would help future reliable operations. The probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) method was introduced to evaluate the interaction between potential system failure and its environmental impact and further help diagnose the system defects initially. The draft Level 1 system analysis was completed and the event and fault trees were constructed. Qualitatively, this approach is useful for preventing the system failure from occurring. However, Levels 2 and 3 analysis can only be done when sufficient data become available in the future

  18. Radioactive waste management. Introductory statement of the 3rd scientific forum during the 44th session of the IAEA General Conference. Vienna, 19 September 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2000-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the introductory statement made by the Director General of the IAEA at the 3rd scientific forum organized during the 44th session of the IAEA General Conference, Vienna, 19 september 2000, on the management of radioactive waste. He emphasized the following aspects: progress made in technology and public acceptance, global challenges, international co-operation, building a stronger framework

  19. Control of water infiltration into near surface LLW disposal units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, R.K.; Ridky, R.W.; O'Donnell, E.

    1992-10-01

    The project objective is to assess means for controlling waste infiltration through waste disposal unit covers in humid regions. Experimental work is being performed in large scale lysimeters (70inch x 45inch x lOinch) at Beltsville, MD and results of the assessment are applicable to disposal of LLW, uranium mill tailings, hazardous waste, and sanitary landfills. Three concepts are under investigation: (1) resistive layer barrier, (2) conductive layer barrier, and bioengineering water management. The resistive layer barrier consists of compacted earth (clay). The conductive layer barrier is a special case of the capillary barrier and it requires a flow layer (e.g. fine sandy loam) over a capillary break. As long as unsaturated conditions am maintained water is conducted by the flow layer to below the waste. This barrier is most efficient at low flow rates and is thus best placed below a resistive layer barrier. Such a combination of the resistive layer over the conductive layer barrier promises to be highly effective provided there is no appreciable subsidence. Bioengineering water management is a surface cover that is designed to accommodate subsidence. It consists of impermeable panels which enhance run-off and limit infiltration. Vegetation is planted in narrow openings between panels to transpire water from below the panels. TWs system has successfully dewatered two lysimeters thus demonstrating that this procedure could be used for remedial action (''drying out'') existing water-logged disposal sites at low cost

  20. Proceedings of the sixth annual Participants' Information Meeting DOE Low-Level Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    Sessions were held on disposal technology, characteristics and treatment of low-level waste, environmental aspects and performance prediction, predicting source terms for low-level wastes (LLW), performance assessment for LLW disposal facilities, and approaches to LLW facility siting and characteristics. Fifty-six papers were indexed separately

  1. Development of DUST: A computer code that calculates release rates from a LLW disposal unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    Performance assessment of a Low-Level Waste (LLW) disposal facility begins with an estimation of the rate at which radionuclides migrate out of the facility (i.e., the disposal unit source term). The major physical processes that influence the source term are water flow, container degradation, waste form leaching, and radionuclide transport. A computer code, DUST (Disposal Unit Source Term) has been developed which incorporates these processes in a unified manner. The DUST code improves upon existing codes as it has the capability to model multiple container failure times, multiple waste form release properties, and radionuclide specific transport properties. Verification studies performed on the code are discussed

  2. Waste-form development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Colombo, P.

    1982-01-01

    Contemporary solidification agents are being investigated relative to their applications to major fuel cycle and non-fuel cycle low-level waste (LLW) streams. Work is being conducted to determine the range of conditions under which these solidification agents can be applied to specific LLW streams. These studies are directed primarily towards defining operating parameters for both improved solidification of problem wastes and solidification of new LLW streams generated from advanced volume reduction technologies. Work is being conducted to measure relevant waste form properties. These data will be compiled and evaluated to demonstrate compliance with waste form performance and shallow land burial acceptance criteria and transportation requirements

  3. Taking the UK's national LLW programme from strategy development to implementation - 59059

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossiter, David; O'Donnell, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    In 2008 UK Nuclear Waste Management Ltd (UKNWM) became the Parent Body Organisation (PBO) at the Low Level Waste Repository (LLWR) in the UK. LLWR is the primary disposal facility for the UK's LLW, supporting a wide range of industries across the nuclear power generation, reprocessing, defence, health care, education, and oil and gas sectors. One of the key tasks following the appointment of the new PBO was to work with the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) to develop a national strategy for LLW generated in the UK, predominantly in the NDA estate. The new National Strategy for LLW was required to address the gap between the forecast waste arisings and predicted capacity at LLWR. The National Strategy for LLW Management was published in August 2010 following an 18 month development period. The main focus of the strategy is on three areas: - Application of the waste management hierarchy to extend the life of LLWR and ensure waste is managed in a risk-based, fit-for-purpose manner - Making best use of existing assets such as transport, packaging, treatment and disposal facilities - Opening up new fit-for-purpose waste management routes to divert waste away from LLWR Developing a robust strategy is vital to provide strategic direction to Government, waste producers, regulators, and stakeholders. Once the strategy is developed and approved, the key challenge is then to implement the strategy on a national scale in an efficient and cost-effective manner that delivers maximum value for money to the UK taxpayer. As well as developing the strategy, LLWR has been actively working to develop the enablers to implement the strategy. Since the publication of the strategy in August 2010 LLWR has been re-organised to reflect the shift in focus, from strategy development to implementation and delivery of the strategy. New resources have been brought in with international waste management experience to help integrate delivery with waste producers. This paper covers the

  4. Managing our Nuclear Waste: Choosing Safety and Sustainable Development. Proceedings of the European Forum 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Claude; SCHNEITER, Jean-Louis; Lamoureux, Francois; ); Haug, Peter; Flueler, Thomas; Bouzon, Jean-Luc; Carlsson, Torsten; DEMET, Michel; Marsily, Ghislain de; Gadbois, Serge; Gatignol, Claude; Hooft, Evelyn; Jordan Cizelj, Romana; Rollinger, Francois; Bataille, Christian; Shaver, Kathryn; Linkohr, Rolf; Castellan, Angelo; Collard, Daniel; Devezeaux, Jean-Guy; Dose, Francois; Dupraz, Bernard; Gonnot, Francois-Michel; Leclere, Robert; Pradel, Philippe; Webster, Simon; ); Herzog, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    , professor of geology, member of CNE, Academy of Sciences and Academy of Technologies, Serge Gadbois, sociologist, member of Mutadis and COWAM, Claude Gatignol, Manche representative at the French Parliament, member of OPECST, Evelyn Hooft, ONDRAF, Belgium; Romana Jordan Cizelj, Member of the European Parliament, Slovenia, Francois Rollinger, CFDT - CSSIN. 4 - Audition: Christian Bataille, Nord representative at the French Parliament, member of OPECST, Kathryn Shaver, Head of NWMO, Canada. 5 - 2. round table 'Research laboratories and disposal sites: opportunities for dynamics based on sustainable development' (Chairman: Rolf Linkohr, nuclear physicist, Head of C.E.R.E.S. (DE)). The idea is to increase awareness of the fact that our system of production is tending towards eco-production. The nuclear industry has been a pioneer in this respect, by developing new technologies. In fact, the management and storage of waste is a very high-tech industry which can create a range of businesses with added value e.g. storage, safety etc. Moreover, the producers of waste 'have other expertise' which can be called upon by 'departements' that have agreed to the siting of such disposal sites, using the expertise in a way that takes account of the 'departement's' specific advantages (biomass from farming and forestry, control of energy requirements for small businesses etc.). This presupposes that all local and industrial stakeholders will shoulder their responsibilities and make a commitment, along with the local people, to create new training and businesses in the area concerned. A number of questions will be looked at in detail: - the social and environmental responsibility of waste producers: the technologies and expertise that should be used to further sustainable development (nuclear safety and security, bio-fuels, control of energy demands etc.) - partnerships in contracts of agreed objectives; the involvement of all players; the issue of public/private sector partnerships to fund

  5. EUROSAFE forum 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-07-01

    The proceedings of the Eurosafe forum 2016 includes contributions to the following issues: Seminar 1: nuclear installation safety - assessment; Seminar 2: Nuclear installation safety - research; Seminar 3: Waste management and decommissioning - dismantling; Seminar 4: radiation protection, environment and emergency preparedness; Seminar 5: security of nuclear installations and materials.

  6. Current status of sea transport of nuclear fuel materials and LLW in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Hideo

    2000-01-01

    Along with the basic policy of the nuclear fuel cycle of Japan, many fuel cycle facilities have been already constructed in Rokkasho-Mura, Aomori prefecture, such as the uranium enrichment plant, the low level waste disposal center and the receiving pool of the spent nuclear fuels for reprocessing. These facilities belong to the Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited. (JNFL). Domestic sea transport of the spent nuclear fuels (SF) has been carried out since 1977 to the Tokai Reprocessing Plant, and the first sea transport of the SF to the fuel cycle facility in Rokkasho-Mura was done in Oct, 1998 using a new exclusive ship 'Rokuei-Maru'. Sea transport of the low level radioactive wastes (LLW) has been carried out since 1992 to the Rokkasho LLW Disposal Center, and about 130,000 LLW drams were transported from the nuclear power plant sites. These sea transport have demonstrated the safety of the transport of the nuclear fuel cycle materials. It is hoped that the safe sea transport of the nuclear fuel materials will contribute to the more progress of the nuclear fuel cycle activities of Japan. (author)

  7. Waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutson, G.V.

    1996-01-01

    Numerous types of waste are produced by the nuclear industry ranging from high-level radioactive and heat-generating, HLW, to very low-level, LLW and usually very bulky wastes. These may be in solid, liquid or gaseous phases and require different treatments. Waste management practices have evolved within commercial and environmental constraints resulting in considerable reduction in discharges. (UK)

  8. Research and development of treatment techniques for LLW from decommissioning: Decontamination and volume reduction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirabayashi, T.; Kameo, Y.; Nakashio, N.

    2001-01-01

    For the purpose of reducing the amount and/or volume of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) arising from decommissioning of nuclear reactor, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been developing four decontamination techniques. They are: (a) Gas-carrying abrasive method, (b) In-situ remote electropolishing method for pipe system before dismantling, (c) Bead reaction - thermal shock method, and (d) Laser induced chemical method for components after dismantling. JAERI in developing techniques are also carrying out melting tests of metal and non-metal. Melting was confirmed to be effective in reducing the volume, homogenizing, and furthermore stabilizing non-metallic wastes. (author)

  9. 77 FR 38789 - Notice of Availability of Draft Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Evaluation for the Concentrator...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... disposal facility, either the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at DOE's Nevada National Security... offsite LLW disposal facility, either the NNSS Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site or the Waste... radioactive waste (HLW) and may be managed and disposed of offsite as low-level waste (LLW). DOE prepared the...

  10. LLW disposal wasteform preparation in the UK: the role of high force compaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L. F.; Fearnley, I. G. [British Nuclear Fuels Ltd., Sellafield (United Kingdom)

    1991-07-01

    British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) owns and operates the principal UK solid low level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal site. The site is located at Drigg in West Cumbria some 6 km to the south east of BNFL's Sellafield reprocessing complex. Sellafield is the major UK generator of LLW, accounting for about 85% of estimated future arisings of raw (untreated, unpackaged) waste. Non-Sellafield consignors to the Drigg site include other BNFL production establishments, nuclear power stations, sites of UKAEA, Ministry of Defence facilities, hospitals, universities, radioisotope production sites and various other industrial organisations. In September 1987, BNFL announced a major upgrade of operations at the Drigg site aimed at improving management practices, the efficiency of space utilisation and enhancing the visual impact of disposal operations. During 1989 a review of plans for compaction and containerisation of Sellafield waste identified that residual voidage in ISO freight containers could be significant even after the introduction of compaction. Subsequent studies which examined a range of compaction and packaging options concluded that the preferred scheme centred on the use of high force compaction (HFC) of compactable waste, and grouting to take up readily accessible voidage in the wasteform. The paper describes the emergence of high force compaction as the preferred scheme for wasteform preparation and subsequent benefits against the background of the overall development of Low Level Waste disposal operations at Drigg.

  11. LLW disposal wasteform preparation in the UK: the role of high force compaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, L. F.; Fearnley, I. G.

    1991-01-01

    British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) owns and operates the principal UK solid low level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal site. The site is located at Drigg in West Cumbria some 6 km to the south east of BNFL's Sellafield reprocessing complex. Sellafield is the major UK generator of LLW, accounting for about 85% of estimated future arisings of raw (untreated, unpackaged) waste. Non-Sellafield consignors to the Drigg site include other BNFL production establishments, nuclear power stations, sites of UKAEA, Ministry of Defence facilities, hospitals, universities, radioisotope production sites and various other industrial organisations. In September 1987, BNFL announced a major upgrade of operations at the Drigg site aimed at improving management practices, the efficiency of space utilisation and enhancing the visual impact of disposal operations. During 1989 a review of plans for compaction and containerisation of Sellafield waste identified that residual voidage in ISO freight containers could be significant even after the introduction of compaction. Subsequent studies which examined a range of compaction and packaging options concluded that the preferred scheme centred on the use of high force compaction (HFC) of compactable waste, and grouting to take up readily accessible voidage in the wasteform. The paper describes the emergence of high force compaction as the preferred scheme for wasteform preparation and subsequent benefits against the background of the overall development of Low Level Waste disposal operations at Drigg

  12. An overview of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plummer, T.L.; Morreale, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of low-level radioactive (LLW) waste management is to safely dispose of LLW while protecting the health of the public and the quality of the environment. LLW in the United States is generated through both Department of Energy (DOE) and commercial activities. In this paper, waste from commercial activities will be referred to as ''commercial LLW.'' The DOE waste will not be discussed in this paper. Commercial LLW is waste that is generated by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) designated licensees or Agreement States. Commercial LLW is generated by nuclear power reactors, hospitals, universities, and manufacturers. This paper will give an overview of the current disposal technologies planned by selected States' for disposing of their LLW and the processes by which those selections were made. 3 refs

  13. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project

    2008-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

  14. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project

    2008-01-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal

  15. Solid low level waste management guidelines: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castagnacci, A.; Dalton, D.; Genoa, P.

    1994-11-01

    Since 1989, the nuclear industry has been moving in the direction of greater minimization of low level radioactive waste (LLW). This has been driven in part by increasing regulatory attention, but it also is in response to the desire on the part of nuclear utilities to be more cost efficient and to be environmentally responsive. Over the past half-dozen years, LLW disposal costs have increased dramatically. In addition, improvements in LLW volume reduction technologies have substantially reduced the volume of LLW that is disposed. At the same time, utilities are implementing aggressive source reduction programs and programs to reuse materials so as to extend the useful life of many materials. Thus, there has been a dramatic change in LLW economics and LLW management practices in just the past few years. This report was developed by utility nuclear experts to provide guidance to all utilities on mechanisms for integrating the program economics, advanced volume reduction techniques, and approaches to source reduction. Thus, utilizes will be able to use this report as a guide to optimizing their LLW program economics and minimizing LLW disposal volumes to the smallest reasonable fraction. This report discusses the implementation of these guidelines, management support, waste materials and waste inventory, radioactive tool and equipment management, protective clothing management, processing and volume reduction, solid LLW tracking, outage LLW management, and interim storage of LLW

  16. LLW/Il conditioning for transportation, storage and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pech, R.; Chevalier, Ph.

    2000-01-01

    In France, Sogefibre (Cogema subsidiary) has developed original containers adapted to the conditioning of LLW and ILW and assuring integrity of the waste form over long period of time. These containers have been designed according to the following criteria, derived from Andra's requirement for the surface disposal: Mechanical strength, resistance to microcracking, Radioactive containment and long life: 300 years minimum. Choice of formulation for the concrete as well as selection of raw materials have been optimised in this objective. Sizes and shapes of Fiber Reinforced Concrete Containers (FRCC) have been developed in relation with handling means of Cogema La Hague facilities for automatized operations. Experience gained after nearly 10 years and 40000 FRCC produced shows that choices have been right and properties of FRCC effectively useful. The paper also recalls mechanical and containment properties and the durability assessment recently updated thanks to results of computer modelling. Degradation phenomenon of the Blended Ternary Cement (clinker, slag, ash) used in FRCC is described and the model presented. (authors)

  17. Preparing, Loading and Shipping Irradiated Metals in Canisters Classified as Remote-Handled (RH) Low-Level Waste (LLW) From Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClelland, B.C.; Moore, T.D.

    2006-01-01

    Irradiated metals, classified as remote-handled low-level waste generated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, were containerised in various sized canisters for long-term storage. The legacy waste canisters were placed in below-grade wells located at the 7827 Facility until a pathway for final disposal at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) could be identified and approved. Once the pathway was approved, WESKEM, LLC was selected by Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC to prepare, load, and ship these canisters from ORNL to the NTS. This paper details some of the technical challenges encountered during the retrieval process and solutions implemented to ensure the waste was safely and efficiently over-packed and shipped for final disposal. The technical challenges detailed in this paper include: 1) how to best perform canister/lanyard pre-lift inspections since some canisters had not been moved in ∼10 years, so deterioration was a concern; 2) replacing or removing damaged canister lanyards; 3) correcting a mis-cut waste canister lanyard resulting in a shielded overpack lid not seating properly; 4) retrieving a stuck canister; and 5) developing a path forward after an overstrained lanyard failed causing a well shield plug to fall and come in contact with a waste canister. Several of these methods can serve as positive lessons learned for other projects encountering similar situations. (authors)

  18. Development of multi-purpose containers for managing LLW/VLLW from D and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Sol; Park, Jae Ho; Sung, Nak Hoon; Yang, Ge Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Radioactive waste container designs should comply with the requirements for safety (i.e., transportation, storage, disposal) and other criteria such as economics and technology. These criteria are also applicable to the future management of the large amount of LLW and VLLW to arise from decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of nuclear power plants, which have different features compared to that of wastes from operation and maintenance (O and M). This paper proposes to develop a set of standard containers of multi-purpose usage for transportation, storage and disposal. The concepts of the containers were optimized for management of D and D wastes in consideration of national system for radioactive waste management, in particular the Gyeongju Repository and associated infrastructures. A set of prototype containers were designed and built : a soft bag for VLLW, two metallic containers for VLLW/LLW (a standard IP2 container for sea transport and ISO container for road transport). Safety analyses by simulation and tests of these designs show they are in compliance with the regulatory requirements. A further development of a container with concrete is foreseen for 2016

  19. Development of multi-purpose containers for managing LLW/VLLW from D and D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Sol; Park, Jae Ho; Sung, Nak Hoon; Yang, Ge Hyung [KONES Corporation., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Radioactive waste container designs should comply with the requirements for safety (i.e., transportation, storage, disposal) and other criteria such as economics and technology. These criteria are also applicable to the future management of the large amount of LLW and VLLW to arise from decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of nuclear power plants, which have different features compared to that of wastes from operation and maintenance (O and M). This paper proposes to develop a set of standard containers of multi-purpose usage for transportation, storage and disposal. The concepts of the containers were optimized for management of D and D wastes in consideration of national system for radioactive waste management, in particular the Gyeongju Repository and associated infrastructures. A set of prototype containers were designed and built : a soft bag for VLLW, two metallic containers for VLLW/LLW (a standard IP2 container for sea transport and ISO container for road transport). Safety analyses by simulation and tests of these designs show they are in compliance with the regulatory requirements. A further development of a container with concrete is foreseen for 2016.

  20. Joint US Geological Survey, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission workshop on research related to low-level radioactive waste disposal, May 4-6, 1993, National Center, Reston, Virginia; Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Peter R.; Nicholson, Thomas J.

    1996-01-01

    This report contains papers presented at the "Joint U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Technical Workshop on Research Related to Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) Disposal" that was held at the USGS National Center Auditorium, Reston, Virginia, May 4-6, 1993. The objective of the workshop was to provide a forum for exchange of information, ideas, and technology in the geosciences dealing with LLW disposal. This workshop was the first joint activity under the Memorandum of Understanding between the USGS and NRC's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research signed in April 1992.Participants included invited speakers from the USGS, NRC technical contractors (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories and universities) and NRC staff for presentation of research study results related to LLW disposal. Also in attendance were scientists from the DOE, DOE National Laboratories, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, State developmental and regulatory agencies involved in LLW disposal facility siting and licensing, Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL), private industry, Agricultural Research Service, universities, USGS and NRC.

  1. LLW Notes, Volume 12, Number 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, C.; Brown, H.; Colsant, J.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    Contents include articles entitled: Suit against Envirocare sparks investigations: Formal petition filed with NRC; Group alleges misconduct by USGS re Beatty study; EPA rescinds NESHAPs subpart 1; Northwest Compact executive director changes jobs; New forum participant for the state of New Jersey; and Director of North Carolina division of radiation control retires

  2. LLW Notes, Volume 12, Number 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, C.; Brown, H. [eds.; Colsant, J.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    Contents include articles entitled: Suit against Envirocare sparks investigations: Formal petition filed with NRC; Group alleges misconduct by USGS re Beatty study; EPA rescinds NESHAPs subpart 1; Northwest Compact executive director changes jobs; New forum participant for the state of New Jersey; and Director of North Carolina division of radiation control retires.

  3. Development of a plan for a national LLW information management system based on data acquired from a uniform manifest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gingerich, R.; Shimer, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    The Western Governors' Association (WGA), with funding from the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program, has completed an 18-month national project to develop a plan for a national low-level waste (LLW) information management system based on data from a uniform manifest for shipments of LLW. Under the plan, waste generators would fill out a manifest for a shipment just as they do currently, but they would use a nationally standard form. Shortly after a shipment arrives at a disposal facility or a processor, data from the manifest would be entered into the Program's Low-Level Waste Information Management System (LLWIMS). The data would be available via computer to state, compact and federal officials. This paper provides an overview of the plan for implementing and operating a national information management system linked to manifest data. It reports on the progress that has been made toward implementing the system and outlines the work that remains to be done. Finally, the paper examines the crucial role the system will play in the development of an acceptable system for managing the nation's LLW, particularly in the post-1986 transition period

  4. Advanced methods for incineration of solid, burnable LLW and melting for recycling of scrap metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, G.; Lorenzen, J.; Lindberg, M.; Olsson, L.; Wirendal, B.

    2003-01-01

    Radioactive contaminated waste is a great cost factor for nuclear power plants and other nuclear industry. On the deregulated electricity market the price on produced kWh is an important competition tool. Therefore the waste minimisation and volume reduction has given highest priority by many power producers in the process to achieve savings and hence low production cost. Studsvik RadWaste AB in Nykoeping, Sweden, is a company specialised in volume reduction of LLW, as solid combustible waste and as scrap metal for melting and recycling. The treatment facility in Sweden offers this kind of services - together with segmentation and decontamination when necessary - for several customers from Europe, Japan and USA. In addition to these treatment services a whole spectrum of services like transportation, measurement and safeguard, site assistance, industrial cleaning and decontamination in connection with demolition at site is offered from the Studsvik company. (orig.)

  5. Conceptual designs for waste quality checking facilities for low level and intermediate level radioactive wastes and hazardous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driver, S.; Griffiths, M.; Leonard, C.D.; Smith, D.L.G.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarises work carried out on the design of facilities for the quality checking of Intermediate and Low Level Radioactive Waste and Hazardous Waste. The procedures used for the quality checking of these categories of waste are summarised. Three building options are considered: a separate LLW facility, a combined facility for LLW and HW and a Waste Quality Checking Facility for the three categories of waste. Budget Cost Estimates for the three facilities are given based on 1991 prices. (author)

  6. Proceedings of the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management waste reduction workshop 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    The fourth of a series of waste minimization/reduction workshops was held at the Sheridan Grand Hotel in Tampa, Florida, on February 6--7, 1990. The workshops are held under the auspices of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. This workshop provided a forum for waste minimization/reduction planning, including waste minimization assessments. The workshops assist DOE waste-generating sites in implementing waste minimization/reduction programs, plans, and activities, thus providing for optimal waste reduction within the DOE complex. All wastes are considered within this discipline: liquid, solid, and airborne, within the categories of high-level, transuranic (TRU), low-level (LLW), hazardous, and mixed. Topics of discussion within workshops encompassed a wide range of subjects. Subjects included any method or technical activity from waste generation to disposal, such as process design or improvement, substitution of materials, waste segregation and recycling/reuse, waste treatment and processing, and administrative controls (procurement and waste awareness training). Consideration was also given to activities for remedial action and for decontamination and disposal. 1 tab

  7. A process for establishing a financial assurance plan for LLW disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.

    1993-04-01

    This document describes a process by which an effective financial assurance program can be developed for new low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities. The report identifies examples of activities that might cause financial losses and the types of losses they might create, discusses mechanisms that could be used to quantify and ensure against the various types of potential losses identified and describes a decision process to formulate a financial assurance program that takes into account the characteristics of both the potential losses and available mechanisms. A sample application of the concepts described in the report is provided

  8. A process for establishing a financial assurance plan for LLW disposal facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, P. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). National Low-Level Waste Management Program

    1993-04-01

    This document describes a process by which an effective financial assurance program can be developed for new low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities. The report identifies examples of activities that might cause financial losses and the types of losses they might create, discusses mechanisms that could be used to quantify and ensure against the various types of potential losses identified and describes a decision process to formulate a financial assurance program that takes into account the characteristics of both the potential losses and available mechanisms. A sample application of the concepts described in the report is provided.

  9. Technical feasibility of retrieval within the UK repository concept for ILW/LLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCall, A.; McKirdy, B.

    2000-01-01

    Nirex is developing a staged, reversible concept for the disposal of ILW and certain LLW in the UK. Within that concept, the retrievability strategy includes the option of keeping open the repository, for an extended period, after all waste has been emplaced. In examining the feasibility of such an approach, a number of key technical issues have been identified and options for addressing these issues have been established. This paper will describe the issues identified and the development of practical solutions for incorporating retrievability within the Nirex concept. (author)

  10. A Comprehensive Solution for Managing TRU and LLW From Generation to Final Disposition - 13205

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tozer, Justin C.; Sanchez, Edwina G.; Dorries, Alison M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A LANL multi-disciplinary team faced the challenge of building and delivering a waste information system capable of managing radioactive, hazardous, and industrial waste from cradle to grave. The result is the Waste Compliance and Tracking System (WCATS) a flexible, adaptive system that has allowed LANL to consolidate its legacy applications into one system, and leverage the advantages of managing all waste types within a single scalable enterprise application. Key functionality required for robust waste operations, include: waste characterization, waste identification, transportation, inventory management, waste processing, and disposal. In order to maintain data quality, field operations such as waste identification, surveillance checklists, wall-to-wall inventory assessments, waste transfers, shipment pickup and receipt, and simple consolidation operations are captured by the operator or technician using mobile computers. Work flow is managed via end-user defined work paths, to ensure that unit operations are performed in the correct order. Regulatory compliance reports and algorithms are provided to support typical U.S. EPA, DOT, NRC, and DOE requirements, including the EPA hazardous waste manifest, NRC LLW manifest, DOE nuclear material at risk, RCRA TSDF inventory rules, and so forth. The WCATS application has allowed LANL to migrate and consolidate its disparate legacy applications. The design and implementation is generalized so that facility owners can customize the user interface, setup facilities and unit operations (i.e., treatment, storage, disposal, characterization, and administrative), define inventory compliance rules, and establish custom work flow requirements. (authors)

  11. A Comprehensive Solution for Managing TRU and LLW From Generation to Final Disposition - 13205

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tozer, Justin C.; Sanchez, Edwina G.; Dorries, Alison M.

    2013-01-01

    A LANL multi-disciplinary team faced the challenge of building and delivering a waste information system capable of managing radioactive, hazardous, and industrial waste from cradle to grave. The result is the Waste Compliance and Tracking System (WCATS) a flexible, adaptive system that has allowed LANL to consolidate its legacy applications into one system, and leverage the advantages of managing all waste types within a single scalable enterprise application. Key functionality required for robust waste operations, include: waste characterization, waste identification, transportation, inventory management, waste processing, and disposal. In order to maintain data quality, field operations such as waste identification, surveillance checklists, wall-to-wall inventory assessments, waste transfers, shipment pickup and receipt, and simple consolidation operations are captured by the operator or technician using mobile computers. Work flow is managed via end-user defined work paths, to ensure that unit operations are performed in the correct order. Regulatory compliance reports and algorithms are provided to support typical U.S. EPA, DOT, NRC, and DOE requirements, including the EPA hazardous waste manifest, NRC LLW manifest, DOE nuclear material at risk, RCRA TSDF inventory rules, and so forth. The WCATS application has allowed LANL to migrate and consolidate its disparate legacy applications. The design and implementation is generalized so that facility owners can customize the user interface, setup facilities and unit operations (i.e., treatment, storage, disposal, characterization, and administrative), define inventory compliance rules, and establish custom work flow requirements. (authors)

  12. Analysis of low-level wastes. Review of hazardous waste regulations and identification of radioactive mixed wastes. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowerman, B.S.; Kempf, C.R.; MacKenzie, D.R.; Siskind, B.; Piciulo, P.L.

    1985-12-01

    Regulations governing the management and disposal of hazardous wastes have been promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency under authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. These were reviewed and compared with the available information on the properties and characteristics of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW). In addition, a survey was carried out to establish a data base on the nature and composition of LLW in order to determine whether some LLW streams could also be considered hazardous as defined in 40 CFR Part 261. For the survey, an attempt was made to obtain data on the greatest volume of LLW; hence, as many large LLW generators as possible were contacted. The list of 238 generators contacted was based on information obtained from NRC and other sources. The data base was compiled from completed questionnaires which were returned by 97 reactor and non-reactor facilities. The waste volumes reported by these respondents corresponded to approximately 29% of all LLW disposed of in 1984. The analysis of the survey results indicated that three broad categories of LLW may be radioactive mixed wastes. They include: waste containing organic liquids, disposed of by all types of generators; wastes containing lead metal, i.e., discarded shielding or lead containers; wastes containing chromates, i.e., nuclear power plant process wastes where chromates are used as corrosion inhibitors. Certain wastes, specific to particular generators, were identified as potential mixed wastes as well. 8 figs., 48 tabs

  13. The establishment of computer codes for radiological assessment on LLW final disposal in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.C.; Chen, H.T.; Shih, C.L.; Yeh, C.S.; Tsai, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    For final shallow land disposal of Low Level Waste (LLW) in Taiwan, an effort was initiated to establish the evaluation codes for the needs of environmental impact analysis. The objective of the computer code is to set up generic radiological standards for future evaluation on 10 CFR Part 61 Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Wastes. In determining long-term influences resulting from radiological impacts of LLW at disposal sites there are at least three quantifiable impact measures selected for calculation: dose to members of the public (individual and population), occupational exposures and costs. The computer codes are from INTRUDE, INVERSI and INVERSW of NUREG-0782, OPTIONR and GRWATRR of NUREG-0945. They are both installed in FACOM-M200 and IBM PC/AT systems of Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER). The systematic analysis of the computer codes depends not only on the data bases supported by NUREG/CR-1759 - Data Base for Radioactive Waste Management, Volume 3, Impact Analysis Methodology Report but also the information collected from the different exposure scenarios and pathways. The sensitivity study is also performed to assure the long-term stability and security for needs of determining performance objectives

  14. Facility status and progress of the INEL's WERF MLLW and LLW incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conley, D.; Corrigan, S.

    1996-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL) Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) incinerator began processing beta/gamma- emitting low-level waste (LLW) in September 1984. A Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) trial burn for the WERF incinerator was conducted in 1986, and in 1989 WERF began processing (hazardous and low-level radioactive) waste known as mixed low-level waste (MLLW). On February 14, 1991 WERF operations were suspended to improve operating procedures and configuration management. On July 12, 1995, WERF initiated incineration of LLW; and on September 20, 1995 WERF resumed its primary mission of incinerating MLLW. MLLW incineration is proceeding under RCRA interim status. State of Idaho issuance of the Part B permit is one of the State's highest permitting priorities. The State of Idaho's Division of Environmental Quality is reviewing the permit application along with a revised trial burn plan that was also submitted with the application. The trial burn has been proposed to be performed in 1996 to demonstrate compliance with the current incinerator guidance. This paper describes the experiences and problems associated with WERF's operations, incineration of MLLW, and the RCRA Part B Permit Application. Some of the challenges that have been overcome include waste characterization, waste repackaging, repackaged waste storage, and implementation of RCRA interim status requirements. A number of challenges remain. They include revision of the RCRA Part B Permit Application and the Trial Burn Plan in response to comments from the state permit application reviewers as well as facility and equipment upgrades required to meet RCRA Permitted Status

  15. SAMJ FORUM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-09-01

    Sep 1, 2006 ... SAMJ FORUM. 862. Undernutrition, brain growth and intellectual development ... They were matched for age and sex with a control group of 11 ... of the average weight for Cape Coloured children of this age.' Thus was the ...

  16. Forum Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Yasuko

    2014-01-01

    Social class has been underresearched in the field of applied linguistics. The central goal of this forum was to stimulate more conversation about social class as it impacts language learning and teaching. In this article, I comment on 3 salient themes that have emerged in the 5 articles: (1) agency and structure in language learning and teaching,…

  17. A59 waste repackaging database (AWARD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keel, A.

    1993-06-01

    This document describes the data structures to be implemented to provide the A59 Waste Repackaging Database (AWARD); a Computer System for the in-cave Bertha waste sorting and LLW repackaging operations in A59. (Author)

  18. Scenario sensitivity analyses performed on the PRESTO-EPA LLW risk assessment models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandrowski, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently developing standards for the land disposal of low-level radioactive waste. As part of the standard development, EPA has performed risk assessments using the PRESTO-EPA codes. A program of sensitivity analysis was conducted on the PRESTO-EPA codes, consisting of single parameter sensitivity analysis and scenario sensitivity analysis. The results of the single parameter sensitivity analysis were discussed at the 1987 DOE LLW Management Conference. Specific scenario sensitivity analyses have been completed and evaluated. Scenario assumptions that were analyzed include: site location, disposal method, form of waste, waste volume, analysis time horizon, critical radionuclides, use of buffer zones, and global health effects

  19. Estimating heel retrieval costs for underground storage tank waste at Hanford. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMuth, S.

    1996-01-01

    Approximately 100 million gallons (∼400,000 m 3 ) of existing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owned radioactive waste stored in underground tanks can not be disposed of as low-level waste (LLW). The current plan for disposal of UST waste which can not be disposed of as LLW is immobilization as glass and permanent storage in an underground repository. Disposal of LLW generally can be done sub-surface at the point of origin. Consequently, LLW is significantly less expensive to dispose of than that requiring an underground repository. Due to the lower cost for LLW disposal, it is advantageous to separate the 100 million gallons of waste into a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) and a large volume of LLW

  20. Low-level radioactive waste disposal technologies used outside the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Templeton, K.J.; Mitchell, S.J.; Molton, P.M.; Leigh, I.W.

    1994-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal technologies are an integral part of the waste management process. In the United States, commercial LLW disposal is the responsibility of the State or groups of States (compact regions). The United States defines LLW as all radioactive waste that is not classified as spent nuclear fuel, high- level radioactive waste, transuranic waste, or by-product material as defined in Section II(e)(2) of the Atomic Energy Act. LLW may contain some long-lived components in very low concentrations. Countries outside the United States, however, may define LLW differently and may use different disposal technologies. This paper outlines the LLW disposal technologies that are planned or being used in Canada, China, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Sweden, Taiwan, and the United Kingdom (UK)

  1. Low-level waste certification plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhalph, W.O.

    1995-01-01

    This plan describes the organization and methodology for the certification of solid low-level waste (LLW) and mixed-waste (MW) generated at any of the facilities or major work activities of the Engineered Process Application (EPA) organization. The primary LLW and MW waste generating facility operated by EPA is the 377 Building. This plan does not cover the handling of hazardous or non-regulated waste, though they are mentioned at times for completeness

  2. Geochemical effects on the behavior of LLW radionuclides in soil/groundwater environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupka, K.M.; Sterne, R.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Assessing the migration potential of radionuclides leached from low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and decommissioning sites necessitates information on the effects of sorption and precipitation on the concentrations of dissolved radionuclides. Such an assessment requires that the geochemical processes of aqueous speciation, complexation, oxidation/reduction, and ion exchange be taken into account. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is providing technical support to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for defining the solubility and sorption behavior of radionuclides in soil/ground-water environments associated with engineered cementitious LLW disposal systems and decommissioning sites. Geochemical modeling is being used to predict solubility limits for radionuclides under geochemical conditions associated with these environments. The solubility limits are being used as maximum concentration limits in performance assessment calculations describing the release of contaminants from waste sources. Available data were compiled regarding the sorption potential of radionuclides onto {open_quotes}fresh{close_quotes} cement/concrete where the expected pH of the cement pore waters will equal to or exceed 10. Based on information gleaned from the literature, a list of preferred minimum distribution coefficients (Kd`s) was developed for these radionuclides. The K{sub d} values are specific to the chemical environments associated with the evolution of the compositions of cement/concrete pore waters.

  3. Proceedings of the ninth annual DOE low-level waste management forum: executive summary, technical and special session summaries, attendees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This first volume of proceedings contains summaries of each of six technical sessions as well as three special sessions held during the conference. The six technical sessions were: Disposal technology and facility development (15 papers); Institutional and regulatory issues (10); Performance assessment (14); Waste characterization and verification (7); Site closure and stabilization (6); and Waste treatment (8). The three special sessions were: 1) Review of criteria for guidance on alternative disposal technology; 2) Hazardous waste regulatory update; and 3) Challenges to meeting the 1993 deadline. All papers have been indexed for inclusion on the Energy Data Base

  4. Analysis of the low-level waste radionuclide inventory for the Radioactive Waste Management Complex performance assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plansky, L.E.; Hoiland, S.A.

    1992-02-01

    This report summarizes the results of a study to improve the estimates of the radionuclides in the low-level radioactive waste (LLW) inventory which is buried in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The work is done to support the RWMC draft performance assessment (PA). Improved radionuclide inventory estimates are provided for the INEL LLW generators. Engineering, environmental assessment or other research areas may find use for the information in this report. It may also serve as a LLW inventory baseline for data quality assurance. The individual INEL LLW generators, their history and their activities are also described in detail.

  5. Analysis of the low-level waste radionuclide inventory for the Radioactive Waste Management Complex performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plansky, L.E.; Hoiland, S.A.

    1992-02-01

    This report summarizes the results of a study to improve the estimates of the radionuclides in the low-level radioactive waste (LLW) inventory which is buried in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The work is done to support the RWMC draft performance assessment (PA). Improved radionuclide inventory estimates are provided for the INEL LLW generators. Engineering, environmental assessment or other research areas may find use for the information in this report. It may also serve as a LLW inventory baseline for data quality assurance. The individual INEL LLW generators, their history and their activities are also described in detail

  6. LLW Notes, Volume 12, Number 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, C.; Brown, H.; Gedden, R.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

    1997-06-01

    Contents include articles entitled: USGS report supports previous conclusions re tritium migration at Beatty; Ohio selects new contractor for screening; Maine Yankee's future uncertain; Southeast Compact limits funds for North Carolina project; California, Energy, and Interior exchange correspondence on Ward Valley testing; TCC meets in Salt Lake City, Utah; Garner named executive director and forum participant for Northwest Compact; Seventh Circuit upholds Energy Secretary's determination re distribution of surcharge rebates; US Ecology sues Nebraska re wetlands mitigation; US Supreme Court hears line-item veto challenge; Court rules NAS must provide public access; WCS sues Envirocare of Texas; DOE and Envirocare sign consent agreement; NRC issues performance assessment guidance; NRC to publish final decommissioning rule; House subcommittee passes Texas Consent Act; Environmental justice bill introduced in the House; and International nuclear safety body established

  7. LLW Notes, Volume 12, Number 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, C.; Brown, H. [eds.; Gedden, R.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

    1997-06-01

    Contents include articles entitled: USGS report supports previous conclusions re tritium migration at Beatty; Ohio selects new contractor for screening; Maine Yankee`s future uncertain; Southeast Compact limits funds for North Carolina project; California, Energy, and Interior exchange correspondence on Ward Valley testing; TCC meets in Salt Lake City, Utah; Garner named executive director and forum participant for Northwest Compact; Seventh Circuit upholds Energy Secretary`s determination re distribution of surcharge rebates; US Ecology sues Nebraska re wetlands mitigation; US Supreme Court hears line-item veto challenge; Court rules NAS must provide public access; WCS sues Envirocare of Texas; DOE and Envirocare sign consent agreement; NRC issues performance assessment guidance; NRC to publish final decommissioning rule; House subcommittee passes Texas Consent Act; Environmental justice bill introduced in the House; and International nuclear safety body established.

  8. T-Rex system for operation in TRU, LLW, and hazardous zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kline, H.M.; Andreychek, T.P.; Beeson, B.K.

    1993-01-01

    There are a large number of sites around the world containing TRU (transuranic) waste, low level waste (LLW), and hazardous areas that require teleoperated, heavy lift manipulators with long reach and high precision to handle the materials stored there. Teleoperation of the equipment is required to reduce the risk to operating personnel to as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) levels. The Transuranic Storage Area Remote Excavator system (T-Rex) is designed to fill this requirement at low cost through the integration of a production front shovel excavator with a control system, local and remote operator control stations, a closed-circuit television system (CCTV), multiple end effectors and a quick-change system. This paper describes the conversion of an off-the-shelf excavator with a hydraulic control system, the integration of an onboard remote control system, vision system, and the design of a remote control station

  9. Proceedings of the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    The fifth of a series of waste minimization (WMIN)/reduction workshops (Waste Reduction Workshop V) was held at the Little Tree Inn in Idaho Falls, Idaho, on July 24--26, 1990. The workshops are held under the auspices of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for sharing site activities in WMIN/reduction planning. Topics covered were management commitment, organizational structure, goal setting, reporting requirements, data bases and tracking systems, pollution prevention, awareness and incentives, information exchange, process waste assessment (PWA) implementation, and recycling internal and external. The workshops assist DOE waste-generating sites in implementing WMIN/reduction programs, plans, and activities, thus providing for optimal waste reduction within the DOE complex. All wastes are considered within this discipline: liquid, solid, and airborne, within the categories of high-level waste (HLW), transuranic waste (TRU), low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste, and mixed waste

  10. Proceedings of the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    The fifth of a series of waste minimization (WMIN)/reduction workshops (Waste Reduction Workshop V) was held at the Little Tree Inn in Idaho Falls, Idaho, on July 24--26, 1990. The workshops are held under the auspices of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for sharing site activities in WMIN/reduction planning. Topics covered were management commitment, organizational structure, goal setting, reporting requirements, data bases and tracking systems, pollution prevention, awareness and incentives, information exchange, process waste assessment (PWA) implementation, and recycling internal and external. The workshops assist DOE waste-generating sites in implementing WMIN/reduction programs, plans, and activities, thus providing for optimal waste reduction within the DOE complex. All wastes are considered within this discipline: liquid, solid, and airborne, within the categories of high-level waste (HLW), transuranic waste (TRU), low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste, and mixed waste.

  11. Building Confidence in LLW Performance Assessments - 13386

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rustick, Joseph H.; Kosson, David S.; Krahn, Steven L.; Clarke, James H. [Vanderbilt University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation, Nashville, Tennessee, 37235 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The performance assessment process and incorporated input assumptions for four active and one planned DOE disposal sites were analyzed using a systems approach. The sites selected were the Savannah River E-Area Slit and Engineered Trenches, Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility, Idaho Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Oak Ridge Environmental Management Waste Management Facility, and Nevada National Security Site Area 5. Each disposal facility evaluation incorporated three overall system components (1) site characteristics (climate, geology, geochemistry, etc.), (2) waste properties (waste form and package), and (3) engineered barrier designs (cover system, liner system). Site conceptual models were also analyzed to identity the main risk drivers and risk insights controlling performance for each disposal facility. (authors)

  12. Building Confidence in LLW Performance Assessments - 13386

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rustick, Joseph H.; Kosson, David S.; Krahn, Steven L.; Clarke, James H.

    2013-01-01

    The performance assessment process and incorporated input assumptions for four active and one planned DOE disposal sites were analyzed using a systems approach. The sites selected were the Savannah River E-Area Slit and Engineered Trenches, Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility, Idaho Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Oak Ridge Environmental Management Waste Management Facility, and Nevada National Security Site Area 5. Each disposal facility evaluation incorporated three overall system components (1) site characteristics (climate, geology, geochemistry, etc.), (2) waste properties (waste form and package), and (3) engineered barrier designs (cover system, liner system). Site conceptual models were also analyzed to identity the main risk drivers and risk insights controlling performance for each disposal facility. (authors)

  13. Potential GTCC LLW sealed radiation source recycle initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, D.

    1992-04-01

    This report suggests 11 actions that have the potential to facilitate the recycling (reuse or radionuclide) of surplus commercial sealed radiation sources that would otherwise be disposed of as greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste. The suggestions serve as a basis for further investigation and discussion between the Department of Energy, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Agreement States, and the commercial sector. Information is also given that describes sealed sources, how they are used, and problems associated with recycling, including legal concerns. To illustrate the nationwide recycling potential, Appendix A gives the estimated quantity and application information for sealed sources that would qualify for disposal in commercial facilities if not recycle. The report recommends that the Department of Energy initiate the organization of a forum to explore the suggested actions and other recycling possibilities

  14. View graph presentations of the sixth DOE industry/university/lab forum on robotics for environmental restoration and waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The mission of the Robotics Technology Development Program involves the following: develop robotic systems where justified by safety, cost, and/or efficiency arguments; integrate the best talent from National Labs, industry, and universities in focused teams addressing complex-wide problems; and involve customers in the identification and development of needs driven technologies. This presentation focuses on five areas. They are: radioactive tank waste remediation (Richland); mixed waste characterization, treatment, and disposal (Idaho Falls); decontamination and decommissioning (Morgantown); landfill stabilization (Savannah River); and contaminant plumes containment and remediation (Savannah River).

  15. View graph presentations of the sixth DOE industry/university/lab forum on robotics for environmental restoration and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    The mission of the Robotics Technology Development Program involves the following: develop robotic systems where justified by safety, cost, and/or efficiency arguments; integrate the best talent from National Labs, industry, and universities in focused teams addressing complex-wide problems; and involve customers in the identification and development of needs driven technologies. This presentation focuses on five areas. They are: radioactive tank waste remediation (Richland); mixed waste characterization, treatment, and disposal (Idaho Falls); decontamination and decommissioning (Morgantown); landfill stabilization (Savannah River); and contaminant plumes containment and remediation (Savannah River)

  16. Proceedings of the eighth annual DOE low-level waste management forum: Technical Session 8, Future DOE low-level waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    This volume contains the following papers: (1) DOE Systems Approach and Integration; (2) Impacts of Hazardous Waste Regulation on Low-Level Waste Management; (3) Site Operator Needs and Resolution Status; and (4) Establishment of New Disposal Capacity for the Savannah River Plant. All papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (AT)

  17. Mechanisms of long-term concrete degradation in LLW disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, V.C.

    1987-01-01

    Most low-level waste (LLW) disposal alternatives, except shallow land burial and improved shallow land burial, involve the use of concrete as an extra barrier for containment. Because concrete is a porous-type material, its moisture retention and transport properties can be characterized with parameters that are also used to characterize the geohydrologic properties of soils. Several processes can occur with the concrete to degrade it and to increase both the movement of water and contaminants through the disposal facility. The effect of these processes must be quantified in designing and estimating the long-term performance of disposal facilities. Modeling the long-term performance of LLW disposal technologies involves, first, estimating the degradation rate of the concrete in a particular facility configuration and environmental setting; second, calculating the water flow through the facility as a function of time; third, calculating the contaminant leaching usually by diffusion or dissolution mechanisms, and then coupling the facility water and contaminant outflow to a hydrogeological and environmental uptake model for environmental releases or doses

  18. Evaluation of potential mixed wastes containing lead, chromium, or used oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siskind, B.; MacKenzie, D.R.; Bowerman, B.S.; Kempf, C.R.; Piciulo, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the results of follow-on studies conducted by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on certain kinds of low-level waste (LLW) which could also be classified as hazardous waste subject to regulation by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Such LLW is termed ''mixed waste.'' Additional data have been collected and evaluated on two categories of potential mixed waste, namely LLW containing metallic lead and LLW containing chromium. Additionally, LLW with organic liquids, especially liquid scintillation wastes, are reviewed. In light of a proposed EPA rule to list used oil as hazardous waste, the potential mixed waste hazard of used oil contaminated with radionuclides is discussed. It is concluded that the EPA test for determining whether a solid waste exhibits the hazardous characteristic of extraction procedure toxicity does not adequately simulate the burial environment at LLW disposal sites, and in particular, does not adequately assess the potential for dissolution and transport of buried metallic lead. Also, although chromates are, in general, not a normal or routine constitutent in commercial LLW (with the possible exception of chemical decontamination wastes), light water reactors which do use chromates might find it beneficial to consider alternative corrosion inhibitors. In addition, it is noted that if used oil is listed by the EPA as hazardous waste, LLW oil may be managed by a scheme including one or more of the following processes: incineration, immobilization, sorption, aqueous extraction and glass furnace processing

  19. The role of the national low level waste repository operator in delivering new solutions for the management of low level wastes in the UK - 16217

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walkingshaw, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The UK National Low Level Waste Repository (LLWR) is located near to the village of Drigg in West Cumbria. It is the principal site for disposal of solid Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) in the United Kingdom. This paper describes the program of work currently being undertaken by the site's operators, (LLW Repository Ltd and its newly appointed Parent Body Organisation), to extend the life of the LLWR and reduce the overall cost of LLW management to the UK taxpayer. The current focus of this program is to prevent disposal capacity being taken up at LLWR by waste types which lend themselves to alternative treatment and/or disposition routes. The chosen approach enables consignors to segregate LLW at source into formats which allow further treatment for volume reduction or, (for wastes with lower levels of activity), consignment in the future to alternative disposal facilities. Segregated waste services are incorporated into LLW Disposal commercial agreements between the LLWR operator and waste consignors. (author)

  20. Low-level waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyette, M.L.; Dolak, D.A.

    1996-12-01

    This report provides technical support information for use in analyzing environmental impacts associated with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management alternatives in the Waste-Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Waste loads treated and disposed of for each of the LLW alternatives considered in the DOE WM PEIS are presented. Waste loads are presented for DOE Waste Management (WM) wastes, which are generated from routine operations. Radioactivity concentrations and waste quantities for treatment and disposal under the different LLW alternatives are described for WM waste. 76 refs., 14 figs., 42 tabs.

  1. Issue briefs on low-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This report contains 4 Issue Briefs on low-level radioactive wastes. They are entitled: Handling, Packaging, and Transportation, Economics of LLW Management, Public Participation and Siting, and Low Level Waste Management

  2. Radioisotope Characterization of HB Line Low Activity Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a physical, chemical, hazardous and radiological characterization of Low-Level Waste (LLW) generated in HB-Line as required by the 1S Manual, Savannah River Site Waste Acceptance Criteria Manual

  3. Developing a LLW disposal facility in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, S.A.; Gaynor, R.K.; Hanrahan, T.P.

    1988-01-01

    US Ecology has been designated by the State of California to site and operate a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. The firm identified three sites for detailed characterization work in February, 1987. Ecological and archaeological studies and related environmental assessments were undertaken to obtain land use permits from the Bureau of Land Management, which holds title to the sites. Geophysics investigations, exploratory borings, well drilling and weather station installation followed. Local Committees were established for each site to assist US Ecology in evaluating socio-economic impacts, and Native Americans were consulted regarding cultural resources. The project's Citizens Advisory Committee assisted in evaluating the three candidate sites. US Ecology systematically integrated citizen involvement into the technical studies leading to selection of the two site finalists. This approach furthered two objectives. Community leaders and the public received accurate information on the nature of low-level radioactive waste and the environmental conditions appropriate for its disposal

  4. LLW Notes, Volume 12, Number 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, C.; Brown, H.; Colsant, J.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

    1997-02-01

    Contents include the following articles: National Environmental Justice Advisory Council considers Ward Valley resolution; NGA urges Congressional and Presidential support for low-level radioactive waste compacts and transfer of federal land in Ward Valley; RFP issued for SEIS on Ward Valley land transfer; Illinois siting criteria finalized; Consideration of tribal concerns during Ward Valley siting process; State legislators' LLRW working group meets in D.C.; Upcoming state and compact events; Court calendar; Texas compact legislation introduced in Congress; Superfund reform is a priority for 105th Congress; High-level waste bill gets off to an early start; Fort Mojave petition NEJAC for Ward Valley resolution; EPA withdraws cleanup rule from OMB; Board ruling raises doubts about proposed Louisiana enrichment facility; DOE recommends external regulation by NRC; and Supplement--Background on environmental justice

  5. LLW Notes, Volume 12, Number 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, C.; Brown, H. [eds.; Colsant, J.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

    1997-02-01

    Contents include the following articles: National Environmental Justice Advisory Council considers Ward Valley resolution; NGA urges Congressional and Presidential support for low-level radioactive waste compacts and transfer of federal land in Ward Valley; RFP issued for SEIS on Ward Valley land transfer; Illinois siting criteria finalized; Consideration of tribal concerns during Ward Valley siting process; State legislators` LLRW working group meets in D.C.; Upcoming state and compact events; Court calendar; Texas compact legislation introduced in Congress; Superfund reform is a priority for 105th Congress; High-level waste bill gets off to an early start; Fort Mojave petition NEJAC for Ward Valley resolution; EPA withdraws cleanup rule from OMB; Board ruling raises doubts about proposed Louisiana enrichment facility; DOE recommends external regulation by NRC; and Supplement--Background on environmental justice.

  6. Low-Level Waste Forum notes and summary reports for 1994. Volume 9, Number 4, July 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    This issue includes the following articles: Federal Facility Compliance Act Task Force forms mixed waste workgroup; Illinois Department of Nuclear Safety considers construction of centralized storage facility; Midwest Commission agrees on capacity limit, advisory committee; EPA responds to California site developer's queries regarding application of air pollutant standards; county-level disqualification site screening of Pennsylvania complete; Texas Compact legislation introduced in US Senate; Generators ask court to rule in their favor on surcharge rebates lawsuit; Vermont authority and Battelle settle wetlands dispute; Eighth Circuit affirms decision in Nebraska community consent lawsuit; Nebraska court dismisses action filed by Boyd County local monitoring committee; NC authority, Chem-Nuclear, and Stowe exonerated; Senator Johnson introduces legislation to transfer Ward Valley site; Representative Dingell writes to Clinton regarding disposal of low-level radioactive waste; NAS committee on California site convenes; NRC to improve public petition process; NRC releases draft proposed rule on criteria for decontamination and closure of NRC-licensed facilities; and EPA names first environmental justice federal advisory council

  7. Low-Level Waste Forum notes and summary reports for 1994. Volume 9, Number 4, July 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-07-01

    This issue includes the following articles: Federal Facility Compliance Act Task Force forms mixed waste workgroup; Illinois Department of Nuclear Safety considers construction of centralized storage facility; Midwest Commission agrees on capacity limit, advisory committee; EPA responds to California site developer`s queries regarding application of air pollutant standards; county-level disqualification site screening of Pennsylvania complete; Texas Compact legislation introduced in US Senate; Generators ask court to rule in their favor on surcharge rebates lawsuit; Vermont authority and Battelle settle wetlands dispute; Eighth Circuit affirms decision in Nebraska community consent lawsuit; Nebraska court dismisses action filed by Boyd County local monitoring committee; NC authority, Chem-Nuclear, and Stowe exonerated; Senator Johnson introduces legislation to transfer Ward Valley site; Representative Dingell writes to Clinton regarding disposal of low-level radioactive waste; NAS committee on California site convenes; NRC to improve public petition process; NRC releases draft proposed rule on criteria for decontamination and closure of NRC-licensed facilities; and EPA names first environmental justice federal advisory council.

  8. Waste form development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Colombo, P.

    1982-01-01

    In this program, contemporary solidification agents are being investigated relative to their applications to major fuel cycle and non-fuel cycle low-level waste (LLW) streams. Work is being conducted to determine the range of conditions under which these solidification agents can be applied to specific LLW streams. These studies are directed primarily towards defining operating parameters for both improved solidification of problem wastes and solidification of new LLW streams generated from advanced volume reduction technologies. Work is being conducted to measure relevant waste form properties. These data will be compiled and evaluated to demonstrate compliance with waste form performance and shallow land burial acceptance criteria and transportation requirements (both as they exist and as they are modified with time). 6 tables

  9. Geohydrological considerations in land disposal of LLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, G.T.; Tamura, T.

    1981-01-01

    The geohydrological and geochemical factors that affect the transport, transfer, and transformation of the waste in the aquifer system as a result of shallow land burial practices are discussed. They include surface topography and its character, the extent of the aquifer, nearby surface water bodies, groundwater basin divide, watershed boundaries, rainfall rate, infiltration from surface water bodies, potential evapotranspiration, hydraulic conductivity, water capacity, porosity, compressibility of the matrix, dispersivity, hydrolysis, photolysis, oxidation, volatilization, biolysis, precipitation, mineral comosition, and flow dynamics. Depending on the availability of data and the detail of information desired, three levels of analyses may be undertaken. Two examples are used to illustrate these three levels of analyses using hypothetical parameters. The examples are constructed to represent the leaching from wet water body and shallow burials, respectively. The former typifies a class of problems of groundwater contamination from coal-catching basins and uranium mill tailings. The latter represents classical examples of shallow land burials such as coal solid wastes, chemical dumping and sanitary landfill

  10. INEL waste reduction: summary paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhoades, W.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in southeastern Idaho. Located at the INEL are a Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) which processes low level radioactive waste (LLW) materials and a Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) which provides for disposal of radioactive waste materials. There are currently 9 active facilities (waste generators) at the INEL which produce an average total volume of about 5000 cubic meters of solid LLW annually. This boxed or bulk waste is ultimately disposed of at the RWMC Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The SDA is currently the only active LLW disposal site at the INEL, and the prospects for opening another shallow land burial disposal facility are uncertain. Therefore, it has become imperative that EG and G Idaho Waste Management Department make every reasonable effort to extend the disposal life of the SDA. Among Waste Management Department's principal efforts to extend the SDA disposal life are operation of the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) and administration of the INEL Waste Reduction Program. The INEL Waste Reduction Program is charged with providing assistance to all INEL facilities in reducing LLW generation rates to the lowest practical levels while at the same time encouraging optimum utilization of the volume reduction capabilities of WERF. Both waste volume and waste generation reductions are discussed

  11. Greater-than-Class C low-level waste characterization technical review process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchison, D.; Magleby, M.

    1990-01-01

    Existing volume projections of greater-than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW) vary significantly. The Department of Energy (DOE) National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP) has undertaken activities to develop a best estimate of GTCC LLW volumes and activities for use as the planning basis. Initial information about the generation of GTCC LLW was obtained through a DOE Energy Information Administration survey. That information, combined with information from other related literature, formed the basis of a computer model, which projects potential GTCC LLW. This paper describes uncertainties in existing GTCC LLW characterization and volume projections data and describes the technical review process that is being used to assist in projections of GTCC LLW expected for storage and disposal. 8 refs., 2 tabs.

  12. Greater-than-Class C low-level waste characterization technical review process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchison, D.; Magleby, M.

    1990-01-01

    Existing volume projections of greater-than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW) vary significantly. The Department of Energy (DOE) National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP) has undertaken activities to develop a best estimate of GTCC LLW volumes and activities for use as the planning basis. Initial information about the generation of GTCC LLW was obtained through a DOE Energy Information Administration survey. That information, combined with information from other related literature, formed the basis of a computer model, which projects potential GTCC LLW. This paper describes uncertainties in existing GTCC LLW characterization and volume projections data and describes the technical review process that is being used to assist in projections of GTCC LLW expected for storage and disposal. 8 refs., 2 tabs

  13. Low level waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, P.R.H.; Wilson, M.A.

    1983-11-01

    Factors in selecting a site for low-level radioactive waste disposal are discussed. South Australia has used a former tailings dam in a remote, arid location as a llw repository. There are also low-level waste disposal procedures at the Olympic Dam copper/uranium project

  14. A59 waste repackaging database (AWARD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keel, A.

    1993-06-01

    This paper sets out the requirements for AWARD (the A59 Waste Repackaging Database); a computer-based system to record LLW sorting and repacking information from the North Cave Line in A59. A solution will be developed on the basis of this document. AWARD will record and store details entered from waste sorting and LLW repackaging operations. This document will be used as the basis of the development of the host computer system. (Author)

  15. LLW Notes, Volume 12, Number 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, C.; Brown, H. [eds.; Gedden, R.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    Contents include articles entitled: Chem-Nuclear documents new plan for Barnwell; Nebraska releases technical analysis of LLRW facility; Southeast Compact suspends funding for NC facility development; NC governor and Southeast Compact differ on proposed MOU; Midwest Compact to return export fees; State legislators` group revises radioactive waste policy; Internal documents discuss administration`s policy on Ward Valley; BLM issues EA for Ward Valley testing; California DHS, NRC criticize DOI`s testing protocols; Army removes training mines from Ward Valley site; The 1997 gubernatorial elections and a look ahead to 1998; Court throws out case challenging Pennsylvania`s siting law; DOE files notice of appeal in WCS suit; Central Compact moves to dismiss ``Veto`` authority suit; Congress exempts NAS from FACA; Judge sets schedule for Ward Valley case; Court won`t order DOE to accept spent fuel by deadline; NRC chairman expresses concern re CERCLA reauthorization; Senators question EPA`s guidance on remediation; EPA issues guidance, criticizes NRC decommissioning rule; Members of Congress clarify FUSRAP transfer; HLW legislation passes House by wide margin; Takings legislation passes House; Energy and water bill signed into law; and Senate confirms 5 of 6 DOE appointees.

  16. LLW Notes, Volume 12, Number 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, C.; Brown, H.; Gedden, R.; Lovinger, T.; Scheele, L.; Shaker, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    Contents include articles entitled: Chem-Nuclear documents new plan for Barnwell; Nebraska releases technical analysis of LLRW facility; Southeast Compact suspends funding for NC facility development; NC governor and Southeast Compact differ on proposed MOU; Midwest Compact to return export fees; State legislators' group revises radioactive waste policy; Internal documents discuss administration's policy on Ward Valley; BLM issues EA for Ward Valley testing; California DHS, NRC criticize DOI's testing protocols; Army removes training mines from Ward Valley site; The 1997 gubernatorial elections and a look ahead to 1998; Court throws out case challenging Pennsylvania's siting law; DOE files notice of appeal in WCS suit; Central Compact moves to dismiss ''Veto'' authority suit; Congress exempts NAS from FACA; Judge sets schedule for Ward Valley case; Court won't order DOE to accept spent fuel by deadline; NRC chairman expresses concern re CERCLA reauthorization; Senators question EPA's guidance on remediation; EPA issues guidance, criticizes NRC decommissioning rule; Members of Congress clarify FUSRAP transfer; HLW legislation passes House by wide margin; Takings legislation passes House; Energy and water bill signed into law; and Senate confirms 5 of 6 DOE appointees

  17. LLW Notes supplement, Volume 12, Number 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    Federal criteria for determining whether a project presents an environmental justice concern are currently subject to multiple interpretations. There are no federal statutes or regulations that specifically reference or address environmental justice, and the guidelines that are being developed by the Council on Environmental Quality are currently in draft form. The lack of consistent and clear federal criteria for determining what constitutes an environmental justice impact--and how to determine whether environmental justice issues have been effectively addressed--can create a dilemma for state agencies that wish to include--or have already included--environmental justice, along with legal, economic and technical issues, as a consideration when siting a facility. The following information is therefore provided for those agencies and commissions seeking to site, to license, to construct and to operate a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. Topics include: National Environmental Justice Advisory Council; NEJAC members; Federal definitions of environmental justice; and EPA's role in federal land transfers. Federal agencies can achieve environmental justice by identifying and addressing--as appropriate--disproportionately high and adverse human health or environmental effects of [federal agency] programs, policies, and activities on minority populations and low-income populations

  18. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-4: Packaging factors for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, G.; Grant, P.; Winberg, M.; Williams, K.

    1994-09-01

    This report estimates packaging factors for several waste types that are potential greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste (LLW). The packaging factor is defined as the volume of a GTCC LLW disposal container divided by the as-generated or ''unpackaged'' volume of the waste loaded into the disposal container. Packaging factors reflect any processes that reduce or increase an original unpackaged volume of GTCC LLW, the volume inside a waste container not occupied by the waste, and the volume of the waste container itself. Three values are developed that represent (a) the base case or most likely value for a packaging factor, (b) a high case packaging factor that corresponds to the largest anticipated disposal volume of waste, and (c) a low case packaging factor for the smallest volume expected. GTCC LLW is placed in three categories for evaluation in this report: activated metals, sealed sources, and all other waste

  19. Methods for verifying compliance with low-level radioactive waste acceptance criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes the methods that are currently employed and those that can be used to verify compliance with low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility waste acceptance criteria (WAC). This report presents the applicable regulations representing the Federal, State, and site-specific criteria for accepting LLW. Typical LLW generators are summarized, along with descriptions of their waste streams and final waste forms. General procedures and methods used by the LLW generators to verify compliance with the disposal facility WAC are presented. The report was written to provide an understanding of how a regulator could verify compliance with a LLW disposal facility`s WAC. A comprehensive study of the methodology used to verify waste generator compliance with the disposal facility WAC is presented in this report. The study involved compiling the relevant regulations to define the WAC, reviewing regulatory agency inspection programs, and summarizing waste verification technology and equipment. The results of the study indicate that waste generators conduct verification programs that include packaging, classification, characterization, and stabilization elements. The current LLW disposal facilities perform waste verification steps on incoming shipments. A model inspection and verification program, which includes an emphasis on the generator`s waste application documentation of their waste verification program, is recommended. The disposal facility verification procedures primarily involve the use of portable radiological survey instrumentation. The actual verification of generator compliance to the LLW disposal facility WAC is performed through a combination of incoming shipment checks and generator site audits.

  20. Methods for verifying compliance with low-level radioactive waste acceptance criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes the methods that are currently employed and those that can be used to verify compliance with low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility waste acceptance criteria (WAC). This report presents the applicable regulations representing the Federal, State, and site-specific criteria for accepting LLW. Typical LLW generators are summarized, along with descriptions of their waste streams and final waste forms. General procedures and methods used by the LLW generators to verify compliance with the disposal facility WAC are presented. The report was written to provide an understanding of how a regulator could verify compliance with a LLW disposal facility's WAC. A comprehensive study of the methodology used to verify waste generator compliance with the disposal facility WAC is presented in this report. The study involved compiling the relevant regulations to define the WAC, reviewing regulatory agency inspection programs, and summarizing waste verification technology and equipment. The results of the study indicate that waste generators conduct verification programs that include packaging, classification, characterization, and stabilization elements. The current LLW disposal facilities perform waste verification steps on incoming shipments. A model inspection and verification program, which includes an emphasis on the generator's waste application documentation of their waste verification program, is recommended. The disposal facility verification procedures primarily involve the use of portable radiological survey instrumentation. The actual verification of generator compliance to the LLW disposal facility WAC is performed through a combination of incoming shipment checks and generator site audits

  1. Low-level radioactive waste research program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donnell, E.; Lambert, J.

    1989-11-01

    The Waste Management Branch, Division of Engineering, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, has developed a strategy for conducting research on issues of concern to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its efforts to ensure safe disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). The resulting LLW research program plan provides an integrated framework for planning the LLW research program to ensure that the program and its products are responsive and timely for use in NRC's LLW regulatory program. The plan discusses technical and scientific issues and uncertainties associated with the disposal of LLW, presents programmatic goals and objectives for resolving them, establishes a long-term strategy for conducting the confirmatory and investigative research needed to meet these goals and objectives, and includes schedules and milestones for completing the research. Areas identified for investigation include waste form and other material concerns, failure mechanisms and radionuclide releases, engineered barrier performance, site characterization and monitoring, and performance assessment. The plan proposes projects that (1) analyze and test actual LLW and solidified LLW under laboratory and field conditions to determine leach rates and radionuclide releases, (2) examine the short- and long-term performance of concrete-enhanced LLW burial structures and high-integrity containers, and (3) attempt to predict water movement and contaminant transport through low permeability saturated media and unsaturated porous media. 4 figs., 3 tabs

  2. T-Rex system for operation in TRU, LLW, and hazardous zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kline, H.M.; Andreycheck, T.P.; Beeson, B.K.

    1995-01-01

    T-Rex stands for Transuranic Storage Area Remote Excavator that is dedicated to the retrieval of above ground waste containers and overburden at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. There are a number of sites around the world containing (transuranic) (TRU), low level (LLW), and hazardous wastes that requires teleoperated, heavy lift manipulators with long reach and high precision to handle the materials stored there. Remote operation of equipment will reduce the risk to personnel to as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) levels. The T-Rex is designed to fulfill this requirement at relatively low cost through the integration of a production front shovel excavator with a control system, local and remote operator control stations, a closed-circuit television system (CCTV), and multiple end effectors with quick changeout capability. This paper describes the conversion of an off-the-shelf excavator to a machine utilizing a modified hydraulic system, an integrated onboard remote control system, CCTV system, collision avoidance system, and a remote control station

  3. Lighting detectives forum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Katja; Skindbjerg Kristensen, Lisbeth

    2003-01-01

    Belysning for boligområder var emnet for lighting detectives forum, der blev afholdt i Stockholm i august 2003.......Belysning for boligområder var emnet for lighting detectives forum, der blev afholdt i Stockholm i august 2003....

  4. Highly durable and low permeable concrete for LLW facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagibashi, Kunio; Saito, Toshio; Odagawa, Masaro.

    1997-01-01

    Concrete used for LLW facilities is required to be highly durable. The authors evaluated concrete containing glycol ether derivatives and silica fume as admixtures. Compressive strength, diffusion coefficient of water, depth of accelerated carbonation, drying shrinkage, depth of chlorides penetration and resistance to freezing and thawing were investigated using concrete specimens. Compressive strength, depth of accelerated carbonation, diffusion coefficient of 137 Cs were investigated using mortar specimens before and after irradiation of gamma rays. Results showed that using glycol ether derivatives and silica fume was effective in improving the durability. (author)

  5. Final Design Report for the RH LLW Disposal Facility (RDF) Project, Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austad, Stephanie Lee

    2015-01-01

    The RH LLW Disposal Facility (RDF) Project was designed by AREVA Federal Services (AFS) and the design process was managed by Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) for the Department of Energy (DOE). The final design report for the RH LLW Disposal Facility Project is a compilation of the documents and deliverables included in the facility final design.

  6. Low-level radioactive waste management: transitioning to off-site disposal at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorries, Alison M.

    2010-01-01

    Facing the closure of nearly all on-site management and disposal capability for low-level radioactive waste (LLW), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is making ready to ship the majority of LLW off-site. In order to ship off-site, waste must meet the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facility's (TSDF) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). In preparation, LANL's waste management organization must ensure LANL waste generators characterize and package waste compliantly and waste characterization documentation is complete and accurate. Key challenges that must be addressed to successfully make the shift to off-site disposal of LLW include improving the detail, accuracy, and quality of process knowledge (PK) and acceptable knowledge (AK) documentation, training waste generators and waste management staff on the higher standard of data quality and expectations, improved WAC compliance for off-site facilities, and enhanced quality assurance throughout the process. Certification of LANL generators will allow direct off-site shipping of LLW from their facilities.

  7. Inventory and characteristics of current and projected low-level radioactive materials and waste in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisaria, A.; Bugos, R.G.; Pope, R.B.; Salmon, R.; Storch, S.N.; Lester, P.B.

    1994-01-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB), under US Department of Energy (DOE) funding and guidance, provides an annual update of compiled data on current and projected inventories and characteristics of DOE and commercially owned radioactive wastes. The data base addresses also the inventories of DOE and commercial spent fuel. These data are derived from reliable information from government sources, open literature, technical reports, and direct contacts. The radioactive materials considered are spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste (HLW), transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level waste (LLW), commercial uranium mill tailings, environmental restoration wastes, and mixed-LLW. This paper primarily focuses on LLW inventory and characterization

  8. Collective bads: The case of low-level radioactive waste compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinnis, M.V.

    1994-01-01

    In low-level radioactive waste (LLW) compact development, policy gridlock and intergovernmental conflict between states has been the norm. In addition to the not-in-my-backyard (NIMBY) phenomenon, LLW compacts must content with myriad political and ethical dilemmas endemic to a particular collective bad. This paper characterizes the epistemology of collective bads, and reviews how LLW compacts deal with such bads. In addition, using data from survey questionnaires and interviews, this paper assesses the cooperative nature of LLW compacts in terms of their levels of regional autonomy, regional efficacy, allocation of costs and benefits, and their technocentric orientation

  9. Quality checking of radioactive and hazardous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billington, D.M.; Burgoyne, S.M.J.; Dale, C.J.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the work of the HMIP Waste Quality Checking Laboratory (WQCL) for the period September 1989 -August 1991. The WQCL has conducted research and development of procedures for the receipt, sampling and analysis of low level solid radioactive waste (LLW), intermediate level radioactive waste (ILW) and hazardous chemical waste (HW). Operational facilities have been commissioned for quality checking both LLW and HW. Waste quality checking has been completed on LLW packages seized from the UK waste disposal route by HMIP Inspectors. Packages have ranged in size from the 200 litre steel drum to half-height ISO freight container. Development work was continued on methods of sample extraction and radio-chemical analysis for cement encapsulated ILW in the form of magnox, graphite and stainless steel. This work was undertaken on non-radioactive simulants. (author)

  10. Certification Plan, low-level waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, R.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. This plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Waste Certification Specialist to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Waste generators have the primary responsibility for the proper characterization of LLW. The Waste Certification Specialist verifies and certifies that LBL LLW is characterized, handled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Certification is the governing process in which LBL personnel conduct their waste generating and waste handling activities in such a manner that the Waste Certification Specialist can verify that the requirements of WHC-WAC are met

  11. Characterization of waste streams on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, A.L.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Jackson, A.M.; Butcher, B.T. Jr.; Van Cleve, J.E. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) plants generate solid low-level waste (LLW) that must be disposed of or stored on-site. The available disposal capacity of the current sites is projected to be fully utilized during the next decade. An LLW disposal strategy has been developed by the Low-Level Waste Disposal Development and Demonstration (LLWDDD) Program as a framework for bringing new, regulator-approved disposal capacity to the ORR. An increasing level of waste stream characterization will be needed to maintain the ability to effectively manage solid LLW by the facilities on the ORR under the new regulatory scenario. In this paper, current practices for solid LLW stream characterization, segregation, and certification are described. In addition, the waste stream characterization requirements for segregation and certification under the LLWDDD Program strategy are also examined. 6 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  12. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsoulfanidis, N.

    1991-01-01

    The management of radioactive waste is a very important part of the nuclear industry. The future of the nuclear power industry depends to a large extent on the successful solution of the perceived or real problems associated with the disposal of both low-level waste (LLW) and high-level waste (HLW). All the activities surrounding the management of radioactive waste are reviewed. The federal government and the individual states are working toward the implementation of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act and the Low-Level Waste Policy Act. The two congressional acts are reviewed and progress made as of early 1990 is presented. Spent-fuel storage and transportation are discussed in detail as are the concepts of repositories for HLW. The status of state compacts for LLW is also discussed. Finally, activities related to the decommissioning of nuclear facilities are also described

  13. Low-level radioactive waste treatment systems in northern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoeblom, R.

    1987-08-01

    In the United States, the use of low-level waste (LLW) treatment systems by low level waste generators can be expected to expand with increasing costs for disposal and continuing uncertainty over the availability of disposal space. This development increases the need for performance information and operational data and has prompted the US Department of Energy to commission several compilations of LLW systems experience. The present paper summarizes some of the know-how from Northern Europe where the incentive for LLW treatment and volume reduction is very high since deposition space has not been available for many years. 65 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  14. Impacts of hazardous waste regulation on low-level waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharples, F.E.; Eyman, L.D.

    1987-01-01

    Since passage of the 1984 amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), major changes have occurred in the regulation of hazardous waste. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has also greatly modified its interpretation of how these regulations apply to wastes from federal facilities, including defense wastes from US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. As a result, the regulatory distinctions between low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and hazardous waste are becoming blurred. This paper discusses recent statutory and regulatory changes and how they might affect the management of LLW at DOE facilities. 6 references

  15. Department of Energy low-level radioactive waste disposal concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, C.; Page, L.; Morreale, B.; Owens, C.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Energy manages its low-level waste (LLW), regulated by DOE Order 5820.2A by using an overall systems approach. This systems approach provides an improved and consistent management system for all DOE LLW waste, from generation to disposal. This paper outlines six basic disposal concepts used in the systems approach, discusses issues associated with each of the concepts, and outlines both present and future disposal concepts used at six DOE sites

  16. Operating experience of a mobile waste shredding system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, R.N.; Volodzko, M.; Naughton, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    The disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) in the United States has become a significant problem challenging the commercial nuclear power industry. Over the past several years, there have been major changes in various aspects of LLW generation, shipment and disposal. These changes have been characterized by legislative uncertainty, more stringent regulations and increasing restrictions on shipments imposed by disposal sites and regulatory requirements. These effects have strongly impacted the current nationwide disposal system for LLW, and the industry is faced with higher shipping and disposal costs, on-site storage and soon, in some cases, no availability LLW disposal sites. The industry is responding to this problem by scrutinizing and improving the way in which LLW is managed on-site. Conventional and advanced volume reduction (VR) radwaste treatment systems are receiving more attention with both short- and long-term solutions being considered

  17. Reverse osmosis: experience of cold commissioning trials in waste immobilisation plant, Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anand, G.; Bose, Aditi; Verma, B.B.

    1999-01-01

    Industrial scale reverse osmosis plant for low level radioactive waste put up in Waste Immobilisation Plant (WIP), Trombay is the first of its kind in India. The performance test with inactive simulated waste is meeting the desired performance. The preliminary treatment of LLW stream at W.I.P., Trombay is proposed to be carried out with reverse osmosis membrane separation process. The design, recovery and rejection ratio of LLW is described

  18. The Department of Energy's National Disposition Strategy for the Treatment and Disposal of Low Level and Mixed Low Level Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, G.R.; Tonkay, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) program is committed to the environmental remediation of DOE sites. This cleanup mission will continue to produce large amounts of Low Level Waste (LLW) and Mixed Low-Level Waste (MLLW). This paper reports on the development of the DOE LLW/MLLW National Disposition Strategy that maps the Department's long-range strategy to manage LLW and MLLW. Existing corporate LLW and MLLW data proved insufficient to develop this strategy. Therefore, new data requirements were developed in conjunction with waste managers. The paper will report on the results of this data collection effort, which will result in development of DOE LLW/MLLW disposition maps. (authors)

  19. Waste segregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.E.; Colombo, P.

    1982-01-01

    A scoping study has been undertaken to determine the state-of-the-art of waste segregation technology as applied to the management of low-level waste (LLW). Present-day waste segregation practices were surveyed through a review of the recent literature and by means of personal interviews with personnel at selected facilities. Among the nuclear establishments surveyed were Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories and plants, nuclear fuel cycle plants, public and private laboratories, institutions, industrial plants, and DOE and commercially operated shallow land burial sites. These survey data were used to analyze the relationship between waste segregation practices and waste treatment/disposal processes, to assess the developmental needs for improved segregation technology, and to evaluate the costs and benefits associated with the implementation of waste segregation controls. This task was planned for completion in FY 1981. It should be noted that LLW management practices are now undergoing rapid change such that the technology and requirements for waste segregation in the near future may differ significantly from those of the present day. 8 figures

  20. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) planning for the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of the waste. This report estimates volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms of GTCC LLW to the year 2035. It groups the waste into four categories, representative of the type of generator or holder of the waste: Nuclear Utilities, Sealed Sources, DOE-Held, and Other Generator. GTCC LLW includes activated metals (activation hardware from reactor operation and decommissioning), process wastes (i.e., resins, filters, etc.), sealed sources, and other wastes routinely generated by users of radioactive material. Estimates reflect the possible effect that packaging and concentration averaging may have on the total volume of GTCC LLW. Possible GTCC mixed LLW is also addressed. Nuclear utilities will probably generate the largest future volume of GTCC LLW with 65--83% of the total volume. The other generators will generate 17--23% of the waste volume, while GTCC sealed sources are expected to contribute 1--12%. A legal review of DOE`s obligations indicates that the current DOE-Held wastes described in this report will not require management as GTCC LLW because of the contractual circumstances under which they were accepted for storage. This report concludes that the volume of GTCC LLW should not pose a significant management problem from a scientific or technical standpoint. The projected volume is small enough to indicate that a dedicated GTCC LLW disposal facility may not be justified. Instead, co-disposal with other waste types is being considered as an option.

  1. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) planning for the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of the waste. This report estimates volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms of GTCC LLW to the year 2035. It groups the waste into four categories, representative of the type of generator or holder of the waste: Nuclear Utilities, Sealed Sources, DOE-Held, and Other Generator. GTCC LLW includes activated metals (activation hardware from reactor operation and decommissioning), process wastes (i.e., resins, filters, etc.), sealed sources, and other wastes routinely generated by users of radioactive material. Estimates reflect the possible effect that packaging and concentration averaging may have on the total volume of GTCC LLW. Possible GTCC mixed LLW is also addressed. Nuclear utilities will probably generate the largest future volume of GTCC LLW with 65--83% of the total volume. The other generators will generate 17--23% of the waste volume, while GTCC sealed sources are expected to contribute 1--12%. A legal review of DOE's obligations indicates that the current DOE-Held wastes described in this report will not require management as GTCC LLW because of the contractual circumstances under which they were accepted for storage. This report concludes that the volume of GTCC LLW should not pose a significant management problem from a scientific or technical standpoint. The projected volume is small enough to indicate that a dedicated GTCC LLW disposal facility may not be justified. Instead, co-disposal with other waste types is being considered as an option

  2. Control of water infiltration into near surface LLW disposal units: Task report, A discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, R.K.; Ridky, R.W.; O'Donnell, E.

    1988-03-01

    The principal pathway for water entry into LLW disposal units in the humid eastern United States is through their covers. Two types of sub-surface features that may be constructed to enhance run-off (surface or sub-surface run-off) and thus reduce percolation are the resistive layer barrier, and the conductive layer barrier. The resistive layer barrier is the compacted soil or compacted clay layer and depends on compaction of permeable porous material to obtain low flow rates. The conductive layer barrier is a special case of the capillary barrier. Use is made of the capillary barrier phenomenon not only to increase the moisture content above an interface but to divert water away from the waste. During such diversion the water is at all times at negative capillary potential or under tension in the flow layer. A very effective barrier system might be constructed by placing a resistive barrier over a conductive barrier. Such a system must fail if appreciable subsidence takes place. An alternate procedure called bioengineering management utilizes engineered features at the surface (as opposed to the subsurface) to ensure adequate run-off. The engineered features are combined with stressed vegetation, that is, vegetation in an overdraft condition, to control deep percolation. (59 refs., 10 figs.)

  3. Restraint effect of water infiltration by soil cover types of LLW disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. M.; Lee, E. Y.; Lee, C. K.; Kim, C. L.

    2002-01-01

    Since soil cover for LLW disposal vault shows quite different restraint effect of water infiltration depending on its type, four different types of soil cover were studied and simulated using HELP code. Simulation result showed that Profile B1 is the most effective type in restraint of water infiltration to the disposal vault. Profile B1 is totally 6m thick and composed of silt, gravelly sand, pea gravel, sand and clayey soil mixed with bentonite 20%. Profile B1 also includes artificial layers, such as asphalt and geomembrane layers. This profile is designed conceptually by NETEC for the soil cover of the near surface disposal facility of the low-level radioactive waste. For comparison, 3 types of different profile were tested. One profile includes bentonite mixed layer only as water barrier layer, or one as same as profile B1 but without geomembrane layer or one without asphalt layer respectively. The simulation using HELP code showed that the water balance in profile B1 was effectively controlled

  4. Study of physical resistance of the disposal facility for accidental artificial event in LLW disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Suihei; Irie, Masaaki; Uchida, Masahiro

    2013-11-01

    This report refer to results of examine what follows for structural stability evaluation for the LLW disposal facility in depth over general human activity in underground. Study of physically resistance on the facility for accidental artificial event, namely tunneling an operation facing the disposal facility in future. Physically resistance to excavation of tunneling etc. in disposal facility is studied based on supposing of Tunnel Boring Machine as an excavator, paying attention to reinforcement bar in concrete and steel plate of waste package, as feature of strength in these material differs from rock strength. And it is examined not only resistibility on excavation but also about hard situations of excavation in tunneling works, and namely give thorough consideration to critical quantity of cutting to reinforcement bar and steel plate that could keep resistibility on excavation based on tunneling velocity and limits time furthermore. It requests necessity of evaluation in consider with metal corrosion that status alteration on disposal facility is considered with on timescale. Period of keep on the physically resistance is estimated by velocity of metal corrosion consequently. The physically resistance is kept until metal corrosion reach remaining its material, giving a limits of the physically resistance on inside of facility. Main point of physically resistance in the report will be made the good use of a practice to physically resistance evaluation of in safety assessment. (author)

  5. Commercial disposal options for Idaho National Engineering Laboratory low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, C.L.; Widmayer, D.A.

    1995-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned, contractor-operated site. Significant quantities of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) have been generated and disposed of onsite at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The INEL expects to continue generating LLW while performing its mission and as aging facilities are decommissioned. An on-going Performance Assessment process for the RWMC underscores the potential for reduced or limited LLW disposal capacity at the existing onsite facility. In order to properly manage the anticipated amount of LLW, the INEL is investigating various disposal options. These options include building a new facility, disposing the LLW at other DOE sites, using commercial disposal facilities, or seeking a combination of options. This evaluation reports on the feasibility of using commercial disposal facilities

  6. Final waste management programmatic environmental impact statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    This Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) is a nationwide study examining the environmental impacts of managing five types of radioactive and hazardous wastes generated by past and future nuclear defense and research activities at a variety of sites located around the United States. The five waste types are low-level mixed waste (LLMW), low-level waste (LLW), transuranic waste (TRUW), high-level waste (HLW), and hazardous waste (HW)

  7. Greater-than-Class-C low-level radioactive waste management concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knecht, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    In 1986, Public Law 99-240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 assigned to the Federal Government responsibility for the disposal of commercial greater-than-Class-C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste (LLW). In 1987, DOE committed to Congress to accept GTCC LLW and provide storage and other waste management as necessary until disposal capacity is available. Current estimates are that about 6,000 m 3 of unpackaged GTCC LLW will be generated to the year 2020. Generators estimate that 100 m 3 of raw GTCC LLW might exceed planned storage capacity to the year 2020. This paper reports the activities of the National Low-Level Waste Program to manage GTCC low-level radioactive waste

  8. U.S. policy and current practices for blending low-level radioactive waste for disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessel, David S.; Kim, Chang Lak [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    In the near future, many countries, including the Republic of Korea, will face a significant increase in low level radioactive waste (LLW) from nuclear power plant decommissioning. The purpose of this paper is to look at blending as a method for enhancing disposal options for low-level radioactive waste from the decommissioning of nuclear reactors. The 2007 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission strategic assessment of the status of the U.S. LLW program identified the need to move to a risk-informed and performance-based regulatory approach for managing LLW. The strategic assessment identified blending waste of varying radionuclide concentrations as a potential means of enhancing options for LLW disposal. The NRC's position is that concentration averaging or blending can be performed in a way that does not diminish the overall safety of LLW disposal. The revised regulatory requirements for blending LLW are presented in the revised NRC Branch Technical Position for Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation (CA BTP 2015). The changes to the CA BTP that are the most significant for NPP operation, maintenance and decommissioning are reviewed in this paper and a potential application is identified for decommissioning waste in Korea. By far the largest volume of LLW from NPPs will come from decommissioning rather than operation. The large volumes in decommissioning present an opportunity for significant gains in disposal efficiency from blending and concentration averaging. The application of concentration averaging waste from a reactor bio-shield is also presented.

  9. Low-level radioactive waste facility siting in the Rocky Mountain compact region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitman, M.

    1983-09-01

    The puprose of the Rocky Mountain Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact is to develop a regional management system for low-level waste (LLW) generated in the six states eligible for membership: Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming. Under the terms of the compact, any party state generating at least 20% of the region's waste becomes responsible for hosting a regional LLW management facility. However, the compact prescribes no system which the host state must follow to develop a facility, but rather calls on the state to fulfill its responsibility through reliance on its own laws and regulations. Few of the Rocky Mountain compact states have legislation dealing specifically with LLW facility siting. Authority for LLW facility siting is usually obtained from radiation control statutes and solid or hazardous waste statutes. A state-by-state analysis of the siting authorities of each of the Rock Mountain compact states as they pertain to LLW disposal facility siting is presented. Siting authority for LLW disposal facilities in the Rocky Mountain compact region runs from no authority, as in Wyoming, to general statutory authority for which regulations would have to be promulgated, as in Arizona and Nevada, to more detailed siting laws, as in Colorado and New Mexico. Barring an amendment to, or different interpretation of, the Utah Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act, none of the Rocky Mountain States' LLW facility siting authorities preempt local veto authorities

  10. U.S. policy and current practices for blending low-level radioactive waste for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessel, David S.; Kim, Chang Lak

    2016-01-01

    In the near future, many countries, including the Republic of Korea, will face a significant increase in low level radioactive waste (LLW) from nuclear power plant decommissioning. The purpose of this paper is to look at blending as a method for enhancing disposal options for low-level radioactive waste from the decommissioning of nuclear reactors. The 2007 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission strategic assessment of the status of the U.S. LLW program identified the need to move to a risk-informed and performance-based regulatory approach for managing LLW. The strategic assessment identified blending waste of varying radionuclide concentrations as a potential means of enhancing options for LLW disposal. The NRC's position is that concentration averaging or blending can be performed in a way that does not diminish the overall safety of LLW disposal. The revised regulatory requirements for blending LLW are presented in the revised NRC Branch Technical Position for Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation (CA BTP 2015). The changes to the CA BTP that are the most significant for NPP operation, maintenance and decommissioning are reviewed in this paper and a potential application is identified for decommissioning waste in Korea. By far the largest volume of LLW from NPPs will come from decommissioning rather than operation. The large volumes in decommissioning present an opportunity for significant gains in disposal efficiency from blending and concentration averaging. The application of concentration averaging waste from a reactor bio-shield is also presented

  11. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulse, R.A.

    1991-08-01

    Planning for storage or disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of that waste to estimate volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms. Data from existing literature, disposal records, and original research were used to estimate the characteristics and project volumes and radionuclide activities to the year 2035. GTCC LLW is categorized as: nuclear utilities waste, sealed sources waste, DOE-held potential GTCC LLW; and, other generator waste. It has been determined that the largest volume of those wastes, approximately 57%, is generated by nuclear power plants. The Other Generator waste category contributes approximately 10% of the total GTCC LLW volume projected to the year 2035. Waste held by the Department of Energy, which is potential GTCC LLW, accounts for nearly 33% of all waste projected to the year 2035; however, no disposal determination has been made for that waste. Sealed sources are less than 0.2% of the total projected volume of GTCC LLW

  12. Review of private sector and Department of Energy treatment, storage, and disposal capabilities for low-level and mixed low-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willson, R.A.; Ball, L.W.; Mousseau, J.D.; Piper, R.B.

    1996-03-01

    Private sector capacity for treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of various categories of radioactive waste has been researched and reviewed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company, the primary contractor for the INEL. The purpose of this document is to provide assistance to the INEL and other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites in determining if private sector capabilities exist for those waste streams that currently cannot be handled either on site or within the DOE complex. The survey of private sector vendors was limited to vendors currently capable of, or expected within the next five years to be able to perform one or more of the following services: low-level waste (LLW) volume reduction, storage, or disposal; mixed LLW treatment, storage, or disposal; alpha-contaminated mixed LLW treatment; LLW decontamination for recycling, reclamation, or reuse; laundering of radioactively-contaminated laundry and/or respirators; mixed LLW treatability studies; mixed LLW treatment technology development. Section 2.0 of this report will identify the approach used to modify vendor information from previous revisions of this report. It will also illustrate the methodology used to identify any additional companies. Section 3.0 will identify, by service, specific vendor capabilities and capacities. Because this document will be used to identify private sector vendors that may be able to handle DOE LLW and mixed LLW streams, it was decided that current DOE capabilities should also be identified. This would encourage cooperation between DOE sites and the various states and, in some instances, may result in a more cost-effective alternative to privatization. The DOE complex has approximately 35 sites that generate the majority of both LLW and mixed LLW. Section 4.0 will identify these sites by Operations Office, and their associated LLW and mixed LLW TSD units

  13. Review of private sector and Department of Energy treatment, storage, and disposal capabilities for low-level and mixed low-level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willson, R.A.; Ball, L.W.; Mousseau, J.D.; Piper, R.B.

    1996-03-01

    Private sector capacity for treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of various categories of radioactive waste has been researched and reviewed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company, the primary contractor for the INEL. The purpose of this document is to provide assistance to the INEL and other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites in determining if private sector capabilities exist for those waste streams that currently cannot be handled either on site or within the DOE complex. The survey of private sector vendors was limited to vendors currently capable of, or expected within the next five years to be able to perform one or more of the following services: low-level waste (LLW) volume reduction, storage, or disposal; mixed LLW treatment, storage, or disposal; alpha-contaminated mixed LLW treatment; LLW decontamination for recycling, reclamation, or reuse; laundering of radioactively-contaminated laundry and/or respirators; mixed LLW treatability studies; mixed LLW treatment technology development. Section 2.0 of this report will identify the approach used to modify vendor information from previous revisions of this report. It will also illustrate the methodology used to identify any additional companies. Section 3.0 will identify, by service, specific vendor capabilities and capacities. Because this document will be used to identify private sector vendors that may be able to handle DOE LLW and mixed LLW streams, it was decided that current DOE capabilities should also be identified. This would encourage cooperation between DOE sites and the various states and, in some instances, may result in a more cost-effective alternative to privatization. The DOE complex has approximately 35 sites that generate the majority of both LLW and mixed LLW. Section 4.0 will identify these sites by Operations Office, and their associated LLW and mixed LLW TSD units.

  14. Waste minimization handbook, Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boing, L.E.; Coffey, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    This technical guide presents various methods used by industry to minimize low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated during decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) activities. Such activities generate significant amounts of LLW during their operations. Waste minimization refers to any measure, procedure, or technique that reduces the amount of waste generated during a specific operation or project. Preventive waste minimization techniques implemented when a project is initiated can significantly reduce waste. Techniques implemented during decontamination activities reduce the cost of decommissioning. The application of waste minimization techniques is not limited to D and D activities; it is also useful during any phase of a facility's life cycle. This compendium will be supplemented with a second volume of abstracts of hundreds of papers related to minimizing low-level nuclear waste. This second volume is expected to be released in late 1996

  15. Waste minimization handbook, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boing, L.E.; Coffey, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    This technical guide presents various methods used by industry to minimize low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated during decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) activities. Such activities generate significant amounts of LLW during their operations. Waste minimization refers to any measure, procedure, or technique that reduces the amount of waste generated during a specific operation or project. Preventive waste minimization techniques implemented when a project is initiated can significantly reduce waste. Techniques implemented during decontamination activities reduce the cost of decommissioning. The application of waste minimization techniques is not limited to D and D activities; it is also useful during any phase of a facility`s life cycle. This compendium will be supplemented with a second volume of abstracts of hundreds of papers related to minimizing low-level nuclear waste. This second volume is expected to be released in late 1996.

  16. Thermal denitration and mineralization of waste constituents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenni, J.A.; Boardman, R.D.

    1997-08-01

    In order to produce a quality grout from LLW using hydraulic cements, proper conditioning of the waste is essential for complete cement curing. Several technologies were investigated as options for conditions. Since the LLW is dilute, removal of all, or most, of the water will significantly reduce the final waste volume. Neutralization of the LLW is also desirable since acidic liquids to not allow cement to cure properly. The nitrate compounds are very soluble and easily leached from solid waste forms; therefore, denitration is desirable. Thermal and chemical denitration technologies have the advantages of water removal, neutralization, and denitration. The inclusion of additives during thermal treatment were investigated as a method of forming insoluable waste conditions.

  17. Thermal denitration and mineralization of waste constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nenni, J.A.; Boardman, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    In order to produce a quality grout from LLW using hydraulic cements, proper conditioning of the waste is essential for complete cement curing. Several technologies were investigated as options for conditions. Since the LLW is dilute, removal of all, or most, of the water will significantly reduce the final waste volume. Neutralization of the LLW is also desirable since acidic liquids to not allow cement to cure properly. The nitrate compounds are very soluble and easily leached from solid waste forms; therefore, denitration is desirable. Thermal and chemical denitration technologies have the advantages of water removal, neutralization, and denitration. The inclusion of additives during thermal treatment were investigated as a method of forming insoluable waste conditions

  18. An Assessment of Using Vibrational Compaction of Calcined HLW and LLW in DWPF Canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Yun-Bo; Amme, Robert C.; Shayer, Zeev

    2008-01-01

    both of them) of applying the vibrational forces? 2) What is best mode of operation: first fill the canister with calcined waste and then vibrate it and refill it again, or apply vibrational forces during the filling process. By optimum or best we mean less creation of stress/strain forces during the volume reduction vibration process. Lessons learnt: This preliminary study shows that; 1) The maximum stress concentration always occurs in the canister wall, however its location varies and depends on the loading condition, and vibration process. 2) The proposed vibrational process would not cause any damages to the granulated calcined waste. 3) The first natural frequency of the longitudinal vibration of the canister is around 400 Hz, which is far away from the applied vibrational frequencies and from possibility of resonance phenomena that may cause damage to the canister 4) The relationship between the maximum internal stress and the frequency of the applied load is not parabolic. 5) The mechanical properties of the granulated calcined nuclear waste have small impact on the internal stress of the canister. Finally, the calculated data suggested that applying vibrational forces will keep the entire canister whole without any indication of development defects, and will have significant economical benefits of handling HLW and LLW in calcined forms, from waste manipulation, storage and transportation

  19. Comparison of low-level waste disposal programs of DOE and selected international countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meagher, B.G.; Cole, L.T.

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to examine and compare the approaches and practices of selected countries for disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) with those of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The report addresses the programs for disposing of wastes into engineered LLW disposal facilities and is not intended to address in-situ options and practices associated with environmental restoration activities or the management of mill tailings and mixed LLW. The countries chosen for comparison are France, Sweden, Canada, and the United Kingdom. The countries were selected as typical examples of the LLW programs which have evolved under differing technical constraints, regulatory requirements, and political/social systems. France was the first country to demonstrate use of engineered structure-type disposal facilities. The UK has been actively disposing of LLW since 1959. Sweden has been disposing of LLW since 1983 in an intermediate-depth disposal facility rather than a near-surface disposal facility. To date, Canada has been storing its LLW but will soon begin operation of Canada's first demonstration LLW disposal facility

  20. Integrated Data Base: Status and waste projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    The Integrated Data Base (IDB) is the official US Department of Energy (DOE) data base for spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories and projections. DOE low-level waste (LLW) is just one of the many waste types that are documented with the IDB. Summary-level tables and figures are presented illustrating historical and projected volume changes of DOE LLW. This information is readily available through the annual IDB publication. Other presentation formats are also available to the DOE community through a request to the IDB Program. 4 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  1. Selection of models to calculate the LLW source term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, T.M.

    1991-10-01

    Performance assessment of a LLW disposal facility begins with an estimation of the rate at which radionuclides migrate out of the facility (i.e., the source term). The focus of this work is to develop a methodology for calculating the source term. In general, the source term is influenced by the radionuclide inventory, the wasteforms and containers used to dispose of the inventory, and the physical processes that lead to release from the facility (fluid flow, container degradation, wasteform leaching, and radionuclide transport). In turn, many of these physical processes are influenced by the design of the disposal facility (e.g., infiltration of water). The complexity of the problem and the absence of appropriate data prevent development of an entirely mechanistic representation of radionuclide release from a disposal facility. Typically, a number of assumptions, based on knowledge of the disposal system, are used to simplify the problem. This document provides a brief overview of disposal practices and reviews existing source term models as background for selecting appropriate models for estimating the source term. The selection rationale and the mathematical details of the models are presented. Finally, guidance is presented for combining the inventory data with appropriate mechanisms describing release from the disposal facility. 44 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  2. 1980 state-by-state assessment of low-level radioactive wastes shipped to commercial disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    Information is presented on the volumes, curie values, sources, and disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) in each state. The wastes are segmented into 2 broad categories - institutional/industrial and commercial power reactor wastes. The volumes and curie values were obtained from the commercial site operators. The percentage of LLW disposed of at each of the 3 operating disposal sites located at Barnwell, SC, Beatty, NV, and Richland, WA are included

  3. Demonstration tests for low level radioactive waste packaging safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, I.; Shimura, S.; Miki, T.; Tamamura, T.; Kunitomi, K.

    1993-01-01

    The transport packaging for low level radioactive waste (so-called the LLW packaging) has been developed to be utilized for transportation of LLW in 200 liter-drums from Japanese nuclear power stations to the LLW Disposal Center at Rokkashomura in Aomori Prefecture. Transportation is expected to start from December in 1992. We will explain the brief history of the development, technical features and specifications as well as two kinds of safety demonstration tests, namely one is '1.2 meter free drop test' and the other is 'ISO container standard test'. (J.P.N.)

  4. Differential diagnosis of pulmonary emphysema using the CT index: LL%w

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitahara, Yoshinari; Takamoto, Masahiro; Maruyama, Masao; Tanaka, Yasushi; Ishibashi, Tuneo; Shinoda, Atsushi [Ohmuta National Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)

    1989-06-01

    We measured the computed tomography (CT) index, LL%w, in 81 patients of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. In this study we defined LL%w as the mean value of the proportion of the low density area under -950 Hounsfield units in the six lung fields: upper, middle and lower lung fields bilaterally, at deep expiration. To examine the usefulness of LL%w in differentiating pulmomary emphysema (PE) from bronchial asthma (BA) and chronic bronchitis (CB), we excluded the overlapped cases of each disease. Mean value (+- standard deviation) of LL%w in PE was 24.6+-20.2% (n=40), whereas it was 0.5+-0.8% (n=27) in BA and 0.2+-0.3% (n=14) in CB respectively. There were clear statistically differences in the values of LL%w between clinically diagnosed emphysema and others. We considered that the value of LL%w within 1% would be observed nonspecifically, because the frequent existence of low density areas originated in bronchial tangents and/or motion artifacts mainly in the left lower lung field. Thus we judged that cases with over 1% of LL%w had abnormal CT findings. The relationship between clinically diagnosed emphysema and CT abnormality (LL%w > 1%) was significant in the analysis of the four-fold table. The CT sensitivity for diagnosing PE was 100%, the CT specificity was 87.8%, and CT accuracy was 93.8%. When cases of LL%w > 1% were shown in BA or CB, it would be better to consider the existence of complicated emphysema or the presence of air trapping or air spaces of any origin. We compared three groups (A', E', C') selected from groups BA, PE and CB, respectively. The groups consisted of patients showing almost the same mean values of FEV{sub 1.0}/VC(%). The value of the LL%w of E', selected from PE, also showed a significantly higher value than those from BA or CB. (J.P.N).

  5. Differential diagnosis of pulmonary emphysema using the CT index: LL%w

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitahara, Yoshinari; Takamoto, Masahiro; Maruyama, Masao; Tanaka, Yasushi; Ishibashi, Tuneo; Shinoda, Atsushi

    1989-01-01

    We measured the computed tomography (CT) index, LL%w, in 81 patients of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. In this study we defined LL%w as the mean value of the proportion of the low density area under -950 Hounsfield units in the six lung fields: upper, middle and lower lung fields bilaterally, at deep expiration. To examine the usefulness of LL%w in differentiating pulmomary emphysema (PE) from bronchial asthma (BA) and chronic bronchitis (CB), we excluded the overlapped cases of each disease. Mean value (± standard deviation) of LL%w in PE was 24.6±20.2% (n=40), whereas it was 0.5±0.8% (n=27) in BA and 0.2±0.3% (n=14) in CB respectively. There were clear statistically differences in the values of LL%w between clinically diagnosed emphysema and others. We considered that the value of LL%w within 1% would be observed nonspecifically, because the frequent existence of low density areas originated in bronchial tangents and/or motion artifacts mainly in the left lower lung field. Thus we judged that cases with over 1% of LL%w had abnormal CT findings. The relationship between clinically diagnosed emphysema and CT abnormality (LL%w > 1%) was significant in the analysis of the four-fold table. The CT sensitivity for diagnosing PE was 100%, the CT specificity was 87.8%, and CT accuracy was 93.8%. When cases of LL%w > 1% were shown in BA or CB, it would be better to consider the existence of complicated emphysema or the presence of air trapping or air spaces of any origin. We compared three groups (A', E', C') selected from groups BA, PE and CB, respectively. The groups consisted of patients showing almost the same mean values of FEV 1.0 /VC(%). The value of the LL%w of E', selected from PE, also showed a significantly higher value than those from BA or CB. (J.P.N)

  6. Safety analysis and inventory control of transuranic and low-level waste in common storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porten, D.R.; Bonner, A.L.; Joyce, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology developed For the inventory control of low-level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste, when both are stored in the same location, and both contribute to an inventory constrained by safety considerations. Development of the method arose from the necessity to make safety analysis calculations for the addition of LLW, in quantities greater than existing inventory limits would allow when stored with TRU waste, in the Hanford Central Waste Complex (CWC)-Ensuring that the dose consequences of credible releases are maintained at low-hazard limits or less, was used to allow greater than Type A quantities of LLW into the CWC. Basically, what happens is the original limited amount of TRU allowed is reduced by some equivalent amount of LLW introduced. The total quantity of TRU, and LLW in excess of Type A quantities, must be administratively maintained via curie equivalency Factors to ensure operation as a low-hazard Facility. The ''equivalency'' between TRU and LLW proposed here is specific only to the CWC, but the methodology can be used for other specific applications, such as TRU and LLW storage or handling facilities where inventory limits must be enforced or where a simplified inventory system is required

  7. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant low-level waste grout stabilization development program FY-96 status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, A.K.

    1996-09-01

    The general purpose of the Grout Stabilization Development Program is to solidify and stabilize the liquid low-level wastes (LLW) generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). It is anticipated that LLW will be produced from the following: (1) chemical separation of the tank farm high-activity sodium-bearing waste; (2) retrieval, dissolution, and chemical separation of the aluminum, zirconium, and sodium calcines; (3) facility decontamination processes; and (4) process equipment waste. The main tasks completed this fiscal year as part of the program were chromium stabilization study for sodium-bearing waste and stabilization and solidification of LLW from aluminum and zirconium calcines. The projected LLW will be highly acidic and contain high amounts of nitrates. Both of these are detrimental to Portland cement chemistry; thus, methods to precondition the LLW and to cure the grout were explored. A thermal calcination process, called denitration, was developed to solidify the waste and destroy the nitrates. A three-way blend of Portland cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash was successfully tested. Grout cubes were prepared at various waste loadings to maximize loading while meeting compressive strength and leach resistance requirements. For the sodium LLW, a 25% waste loading achieves a volume reduction of 3.5 and a compressive strength of 2,500 pounds per square inch while meeting leach, mix, and flow requirements. It was found that the sulfur in the slag reduces the chromium leach rate below regulatory limits. For the aluminum LLW, a 15% waste loading achieves a volume reduction of 8.5 and a compressive strength of 4,350 pounds per square inch while meeting leach requirements. Likewise for zirconium LLW, a 30% waste loading achieves a volume reduction of 8.3 and a compressive strength of 3,570 pounds per square inch

  8. Carbon sequestration leadership forum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) is an international climate change initiative that will focus on development of carbon capture and storage technologies as a means of accomplishing long-term stabilisation of greenhouse gas levels in the atmosphere. This initiative is designed to improve these technologies through coordinated research and development with international partners and private industry. Three types of cooperation are currently envisioned within the framework of the Forum: data gathering, information exchange, and joint projects. Data gathered from participating countries will be aggregated, summarised, and distributed to all of the Forum's participants. Joint projects will be identified by member nations with the Forum serving as a mechanism for bringing together government and private sector representatives from member countries. The article also reports the inaugural meeting which was held 23-25 June 2003 in Washington.

  9. EDM forum supplement overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calonge, Ned

    2012-07-01

    The Agency for Health Research and Quality funded the Electronic Data Methods Forum (EDM Forum) to share the experiences and learnings from 11 research teams funded through three different grant programs, each of which involve the use of electronic clinical data in Comparative Effectiveness Research and Patient-Centered Outcomes Research. This overview is meant to describe the context in which the EDM forum was created and to introduce the set of papers in this supplement to Medical Care that describe the challenges and approaches to the use of electronic clinical data in the three key areas of analytic methods, clinical informatics and data governance. The participants in the EDM Forum are providing innovative approaches to generate information that can support the building of a "learning health care system." The compilation of papers presented in this supplement should serve as a resource to others working to develop the infrastructure for collecting, validating and using electronic data for research.

  10. The Czechoslovak nuclear forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadlec, J.

    1992-01-01

    The Czechoslovak Nuclear Forum is a civic initiative that is involved with the safe, economically efficient and generally acceptable development of nuclear power. Its efforts are aimed at incorporation into a broader European context. The Forum is a FORATOM member organization. Its activities are intended to contribute to the establishment of a favorable climate for a further progress of nuclear power in elected bodies (Parliament, municipal and district authorities), in mass media and among the public. (M.D.)

  11. Melter system technology testing for Hanford Site low-level tank waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.

    1996-01-01

    Following revisions to the Tri-Party Agreement for Hanford Site cleanup, which specified vitrification for Complete melter feasibility and system operability immobilization of the low-level waste (LLW) tests, select reference melter(s), and establish reference derived from retrieval and pretreatment of the radioactive LLW glass formulation that meets complete systems defense wastes stored in 177 underground tanks, commercial requirements (June 1996). Available melter technologies were tested during 1994 to 1995 as part of a multiphase program to select reference Submit conceptual design and initiate definitive design technologies for the new LLW vitrification mission

  12. Low-level radioactive waste vitrification: effect of Cs partitioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, W.S.; Ougouag, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    The traditional Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) immobilization options are cementation or bituminization. Either of these options could be followed by shallow-land burial (SLB) or above-ground disposal. These rather simple LLW procedures appeared to be readily available, to meet regulatory requirements, and to satisfy cost constraints. The authorization of State Compacts, the forced closure of half of the six SLB disposal facilities of the nation, and the escalation of transportation/disposal fees diminish the viability of these options. The synergetic combination of these factors led to a reassessment of traditional methods and to an investigation of other techniques. This paper analyzes the traditional LLW immobilization options, reviews the impact of the LLW stream composition on Low-Level Waste Vitrification (LLWV), then proposes and briefly discusses several techniques to control the volatile radionuclides in a Process Improved LLWV system (PILLWV)

  13. Low-level waste drum staging building at Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility, TA-16, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Environmental Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The proposed action is to place a 3 meter (m) by 4.5 m (10 ft x 15 ft) prefabricated storage building (transportainer) adjacent to the existing Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) at Technical Area (TA-) 16, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and to use the building as a staging site for sealed 55 galllon drums of noncompactible waste contaminated with low levels of tritium (LLW). Up to eight drums of waste would be accumulated before the waste is moved by LANL Waste Management personnel to the existing on-site LLW disposal area at TA-54. The drum staging building would be placed on a bermed asphalt pad, near other existing accumulation structures for office trash and compactible LLW. The no-action alternative is to continue storing drums of LLW in the WETF laboratories where they occupy valuable work space, hamper movement of personnel and equipment, and require waste management personnel to enter those laboratories in order to remove filled drums. No new waste would be generated by implementing the proposed action; no changes or increases in WETF operations or waste production rate are anticipated as a result of staging drums of LLW outside the main laboratory building. The site for the LLW drum staging building would not impact any sensitive areas. Tritium emissions from the drums of LLW were included within the source term for normal operations at the WETF; the cumulative impacts would not be increased

  14. Treatment methods for radioactive mixed wastes in commercial low-level wastes: technical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKenzie, D.R.; Kempf, C.R.

    1986-01-01

    Treatment options for the management of three generic categories of radioactive mixed waste in commercial low-level wastes (LLW) have been identified and evaluated. These wastes were characterized as part of a BNL study in which LLW generators were surveyed for information on potential chemical hazards in their wastes. The general treatment options available for mixed wastes are destruction, immobilization, and reclamation. Solidification, absorption, incineration, acid digestion, wet-air oxidation, distillation, liquid-liquid wastes. Containment, segregation, decontamination, and solidification or containment of residues, have been considered for lead metal wastes which have themselves been contaminated and are not used for purposes of waste disposal shielding, packaging, or containment. For chromium-containing wastes, solidification, incineration, wet-air oxidation, acid digestion, and containment have been considered. For each of these wastes, the management option evaluation has included an assessment of testing appropriate to determine the effect of the option on both the radiological and potential chemical hazards present

  15. Treatment methods for radioactive mixed wastes in commercial low-level wastes: technical considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKenzie, D.R.; Kempf, C.R.

    1986-01-01

    Treatment options for the management of three generic categories of radioactive mixed waste in commercial low-level wastes (LLW) have been identified and evaluated. These wastes were characterized as part of a BNL study in which LLW generators were surveyed for information on potential chemical hazards in their wastes. The general treatment options available for mixed wastes are destruction, immobilization, and reclamation. Solidification, absorption, incineration, acid digestion, wet-air oxidation, distillation, liquid-liquid wastes. Containment, segregation, decontamination, and solidification or containment of residues, have been considered for lead metal wastes which have themselves been contaminated and are not used for purposes of waste disposal shielding, packaging, or containment. For chromium-containing wastes, solidification, incineration, wet-air oxidation, acid digestion, and containment have been considered. For each of these wastes, the management option evaluation has included an assessment of testing appropriate to determine the effect of the option on both the radiological and potential chemical hazards present.

  16. Determination of a radioactive waste classification system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, J.J.; King, W.C.

    1978-03-01

    Several classification systems for radioactive wastes are reviewed and a system is developed that provides guidance on disposition of the waste. The system has three classes: high-level waste (HLW), which requires complete isolation from the biosphere for extended time periods; low-level waste (LLW), which requires containment for shorter periods; and innocuous waste (essentially nonradioactive), which may be disposed of by conventional means. The LLW/innocuous waste interface was not defined in this study. Reasonably conservative analytical scenarios were used to calculate that HLW/LLW interface level which would ensure compliance with the radiological exposure guidelines of 0.5 rem/y maximum exposure for a few isolated individuals and 0.005 rem/y for large population groups. The recommended HLW/LLW interface level for /sup 239/Pu or mixed transuranic waste is 1.0 ..mu..Ci/cm/sup 3/ of waste. Levels for other radionuclides are based upon a risk equivalent to this level. A cost-benefit analysis in accordance with as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) and National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) guidance indicates that further reduction of this HLW/LLL interface level would entail marginal costs greater than $10/sup 8/ per man-rem of dose avoided. The environmental effects considered were limited to those involving human exposure to radioactivity.

  17. Determination of a radioactive waste classification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, J.J.; King, W.C.

    1978-03-01

    Several classification systems for radioactive wastes are reviewed and a system is developed that provides guidance on disposition of the waste. The system has three classes: high-level waste (HLW), which requires complete isolation from the biosphere for extended time periods; low-level waste (LLW), which requires containment for shorter periods; and innocuous waste (essentially nonradioactive), which may be disposed of by conventional means. The LLW/innocuous waste interface was not defined in this study. Reasonably conservative analytical scenarios were used to calculate that HLW/LLW interface level which would ensure compliance with the radiological exposure guidelines of 0.5 rem/y maximum exposure for a few isolated individuals and 0.005 rem/y for large population groups. The recommended HLW/LLW interface level for 239 Pu or mixed transuranic waste is 1.0 μCi/cm 3 of waste. Levels for other radionuclides are based upon a risk equivalent to this level. A cost-benefit analysis in accordance with as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) and National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) guidance indicates that further reduction of this HLW/LLL interface level would entail marginal costs greater than $10 8 per man-rem of dose avoided. The environmental effects considered were limited to those involving human exposure to radioactivity

  18. Low-level radioactive waste disposal operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanford, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) generates Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) from various activities: research and development, sampling and storage of TRU wastes, decommissioning and decontamination of facilities, and from LANL's major role in stockpile stewardship. The Laboratory has its own active LLW disposal facility located at Technical Area 54, Area G. This paper will identify the current operations of the facility and the issues pertaining to operating a disposal facility in today's compliance and cost-effective environment

  19. Impacts of hazardous waste regulation on low-level waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharples, F.E.; Eyman, L.D.

    1986-01-01

    The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 have greatly expanded the universe of what, and who, is regulated under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Handling requirements for hazardous waste are becoming increasingly more stringent, particularly where land disposal is concerned. DOE needs to begin actively pursuing strategies directed at keeping the management of LLW clearly separated from wastes that are legitimately regulated under RCRA. Such strategies would include instituting systemwide changes in internal management practices, establishing improved location standards for LLW disposal, and negotiating interagency compromise agreements to obtain variances from RCRA requirements where necessary and appropriate

  20. Caustic Recycling Pilot Unit to Separate Sodium from LLW at Hanford Site - 12279

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendleton, Justin; Bhavaraju, Sai; Priday, George; Desai, Aditya; Duffey, Kean; Balagopal, Shekar [Ceramatec Inc., Salt Lake City, UT 84119 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Advanced Remediation Technologies initiative, a scheme was developed to combine Continuous Sludge Leaching (CSL), Near-Tank Cesium Removal (NTCR), and Caustic Recycling Unit (CRU) using Ceramatec technology, into a single system known as the Pilot Near-Tank Treatment System (PNTTS). The Cesium (Cs) decontaminated effluent from the NTCR process will be sent to the caustic recycle process for recovery of the caustic which will be reused in another cycle of caustic leaching in the CSL process. Such an integrated mobile technology demonstration will give DOE the option to insert this process for sodium management at various sites in Hanford, and will minimize the addition of further sodium into the waste tanks. This allows for recycling of the caustic used to remove aluminum during sludge washing as a pretreatment step in the vitrification of radioactive waste which will decrease the Low Level Waste (LLW) volume by as much as 39%. The CRU pilot process was designed to recycle sodium in the form of pure sodium hydroxide. The basis for the design of the 1/4 scale pilot caustic recycling unit was to demonstrate the efficient operation of a larger scale system to recycle caustic from the NTCR effluent stream from the Parsons process. The CRU was designed to process 0.28 liter/minute of NTCR effluent, and generate 10 M concentration of 'usable' sodium hydroxide. The proposed process operates at 40 deg. C to provide additional aluminum solubility and then recover the sodium hydroxide to the point where the aluminum is saturated at 40 deg. C. A system was developed to safely separate and vent the gases generated during operation of the CRU with the production of 10 M sodium hydroxide. Caustic was produced at a rate between 1.9 to 9.3 kg/hr. The CRU was located inside an ISO container to allow for moving of the unit close to tank locations to process the LLW stream. Actual tests were conducted with the NTCR effluent

  1. Overview of mixed waste issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piciulo, P.L.; Bowerman, B.S.; Kempf, C.R.; MacKenzie, D.R.; Siskind, B.

    1986-01-01

    Based on BNL's study it was concluded that there are LLWs which contain chemically hazardous components. Scintillation liquids may be considered an EPA listed hazardous waste and are, therefore, potential mixed wastes. Since November, 1985 no operating LLW disposal site will accept these wastes for disposal. Unless such wastes contain de minimis quantities of radionuclides, they cannot be disposed of at an EPA an EPA permitted site. Currently generators of LSC wastes can ship de minimis wastes to be burned at commercial facilities. Oil wastes will also eventually be an EPA listed waste and thus will have to be considered a potential radioactive mixed wasted unless NRC establishes de minimis levels of radionuclides below which oils can be managed as hazardous wastes. Regarding wastes containing lead metal there is some question as to the extent of the hazard posed by lead disposed in a LLW burial trench. Chromium-containing wastes would have to be tested to determine whether they are potential mixed wastes. There may be other wastes that are mixed wastes; the responsibility for determining this rests with the waste generator. It is believed that there are management options for handling potential mixed wastes but there is no regulatory guidance. BNL has identified and evaluated a variety of treatment options for the management of potential radioactive mixed wastes. The findings of that study showed that application of a management option with the purpose of addressing EPA concern can, at the same time, address stabilization and volume reduction concerns of NRC

  2. Design and construction of low level radioactive waste disposal facility at Rokkasho storage center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, K.; Itoh, H.; Iimura, H.; Shimoda, H.

    1992-01-01

    Japan Nuclear Fuel Industries Co., Inc. (JNFI) which has been established to dispose through burial the low-level radioactive waste (LLW) produced by nuclear power stations over the country is now constructing Rokkasho LLW Storage Center at Rokkasho Village,Aomori Prefecture. At this storage center JNFI plans to bury about 200,000m 3 , of LLW (equivalent to about one million drums each with a 200 liter capacity), and ultimately plans to bury about 600,000m 3 about 3 million drums of LLW. About the construction of the burial facilities for the first-stage LLW equivalent to 200,000 drums (each with a 200-liter capacity) we obtained the government's permit in November, 1990 and set out the construction work from the same month, which has since been promoted favorably. The facilities are scheduled to start operation from December, 1992. This paper gives an overview of at these facilities

  3. Disposal of low-level and mixed low-level radioactive waste during 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    Isotopic inventories and other data are presented for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed LLW disposed (and occasionally stored) during calendar year 1990 at commercial disposal facilities and Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Detailed isotopic information is presented for the three commercial disposal facilities located near Barnwell, SC, Richland, WA, and Beatty, NV. Less information is presented for the Envirocare disposal facility located near Clive, UT, and for LLW stored during 1990 at the West Valley site. DOE disposal information is included for the Savannah River Site (including the saltstone facility), Nevada Test Site, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Hanford Site, Y-12 Site, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Summary information is presented about stored DOE LLW. Suggestions are made about improving LLW disposal data

  4. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Code of Record

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.L. Austad, P.E.; L.E. Guillen, P.E.; C. W. McKnight, P.E.; D. S. Ferguson, P.E.

    2012-06-01

    The Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Project addresses an anticipated shortfall in remote-handled LLW disposal capability following cessation of operations at the existing facility, which will continue until it is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). Development of a new onsite disposal facility will provide necessary remote-handled LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate remote-handled LLW. This report documents the Code of Record for design of a new LLW disposal capability. The report is owned by the Design Authority, who can authorize revisions and exceptions. This report will be retained for the lifetime of the facility.

  5. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Code of Record

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.L. Austad, P.E.; L.E. Guillen, P.E.; C. W. McKnight, P.E.; D. S. Ferguson, P.E.

    2014-06-01

    The Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Project addresses an anticipated shortfall in remote-handled LLW disposal capability following cessation of operations at the existing facility, which will continue until it is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). Development of a new onsite disposal facility will provide necessary remote-handled LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate remote-handled LLW. This report documents the Code of Record for design of a new LLW disposal capability. The report is owned by the Design Authority, who can authorize revisions and exceptions. This report will be retained for the lifetime of the facility.

  6. Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Code of Record

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austad, S. L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Guillen, L. E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McKnight, C. W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ferguson, D. S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Project addresses an anticipated shortfall in remote-handled LLW disposal capability following cessation of operations at the existing facility, which will continue until it is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). Development of a new onsite disposal facility will provide necessary remote-handled LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate remote-handled LLW. This report documents the Code of Record for design of a new LLW disposal capability. The report is owned by the Design Authority, who can authorize revisions and exceptions. This report will be retained for the lifetime of the facility.

  7. Verifying generator waste certification: NTS waste characterization QA requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.E.; Brich, R.F.

    1988-01-01

    Waste management activities managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) include the disposal of low-level wastes (LLW) and mixed waste (MW), waste which is both radioactive and hazardous. A majority of the packaged LLW is received from offsite DOE generators. Interim status for receipt of MW at the NTS Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) was received from the state of Nevada in 1987. The RWMS Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) is expected to be operational in 1988 for approved DOE MW generators. The Nevada Test Site Defense Waste Acceptance Criteria and Certification Requirements (NVO-185, Revision 5) delineates waste acceptance criteria for waste disposal at the NTS. Regulation of the hazardous component of mixed waste requires the implementation of US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Waste generators must implement a waste certification program to provide assurance that the disposal site waste acceptance criteria are met. The DOE/Nevada Operations Office (NV) developed guidance for generator waste certification program plans. Periodic technical audits are conducted by DOE/NV to assess performance of the waste certification programs. The audit scope is patterned from the waste certification program plan guidance as it integrates and provides a common format for the applicable criteria. The criteria focus on items and activities critical to processing, characterizing, packaging, certifying, and shipping waste

  8. Complex-wide review of DOE's Low-Level Waste Management ES ampersand H vulnerabilities. Volume I. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) conducted a comprehensive complex-wide review of its management of low-level waste (LLW) and the radioactive component of mixed low-level waste (MLLW). This review was conducted in response to a recommendation from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) which was established and authorized by Congress to oversee DOE. The DNFSB's recommendation concerning conformance with safety standards at DOE LLW sites was issued on September 8, 1994 and is referred to as Recommendation 94-2. DOE's Implementation Plan for its response to Recommendation 94-2 was submitted to the DNFSB on March 31, 1995. The DNFSB recommended that a complex-wide review of DOE's LLW management be initiated. The goal of the complex-wide review of DOE's LLW management system was to identify both programmatic and physical vulnerabilities that could lead to unnecessary radiation exposure of workers or the public or unnecessary releases of radioactive materials to the environment. Additionally, the DNFSB stated that an objective of the complex-wide review should be to establish the dimensions of the DOE LLW problem and support the identification of corrective actions to address safe disposition of past, present, and future volumes of LLW. The complex-wide review involved an evaluation of LLW management activities at 38 DOE facilities at 36 sites that actively manage LLW and MLLW

  9. Low-level waste certification plan for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Hazardous Waste Handling Facility. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan is composed to meet the requirements found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and follows the suggested outline provided by WHC in the letter of April 26, 1990, to Dr. R.H. Thomas, Occupational Health Division, LBL. LLW is to be transferred to the WHC Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington

  10. Low-level waste certification plan for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Hazardous Waste Handling Facility. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-10

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan is composed to meet the requirements found in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and follows the suggested outline provided by WHC in the letter of April 26, 1990, to Dr. R.H. Thomas, Occupational Health Division, LBL. LLW is to be transferred to the WHC Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington.

  11. Sources, amounts, and characteristics of low-level radioactive solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibbey, A.H.; Godbee, H.W.

    1979-01-01

    Low-level radioactive solid wastes (LLW) are generated in the nuclear fuel cycle, national defense programs, institutional (especially medical/biological) applications, and other research and development activities. The estimated total accumulation of defense LLW, approx. 50.8 x 10 6 ft 3 (approx. 1.4 x 10 6 m 3 ), is roughly three times that estimated for commercial LLW, mill tailings excepted. All nuclear fuel cycle steps generate some LLW, but power plants are the chief source. From 1975 through 1977, reactor process stream cleanup generated approx. 1 x 10 6 (approx. 2.8 x 10 4 m 3 ) annually. Spent fuel storage (or reprocessing) and facility decontamination and decommissioning will become important LLW generators as the nuclear power industry matures. The LLW contains dry contaminated trash, much of which is combustible and/or compactible; discarded tools and equipment; wet filter sludges and ion-exchange resins; disposable filter cartridges; and solidified or sorbed liquids, including some organics. A distinguishing characteristic of LLW is a long-lived alpha-emitting transuranic content of 5 ft 3 (approx. 2.1 x 10 4 m 3 )/y. The majority of these wastes, > 6 x 10 5 ft 3 (> 1.7 x 10 4 m 3 ), was medical and academic wastes which usually contained isotopes with induced activities of less than or equal to 60-day half-life, neglecting 3 H and 14 C

  12. Project Execution Plan for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danny Anderson

    2014-07-01

    As part of ongoing cleanup activities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), closure of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) is proceeding under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (42 USC 9601 et seq. 1980). INL-generated radioactive waste has been disposed of at RWMC since 1952. The Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at RWMC accepted the bulk of INL’s contact and remote-handled low-level waste (LLW) for disposal. Disposal of contact-handled LLW and remote-handled LLW ion-exchange resins from the Advanced Test Reactor in the open pit of the SDA ceased September 30, 2008. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at RWMC will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the SDA (approximately at the end of fiscal year FY 2017). The continuing nuclear mission of INL, associated ongoing and planned operations, and Naval spent fuel activities at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) require continued capability to appropriately dispose of contact and remote handled LLW. A programmatic analysis of disposal alternatives for contact and remote-handled LLW generated at INL was conducted by the INL contractor in Fiscal Year 2006; subsequent evaluations were completed in Fiscal Year 2007. The result of these analyses was a recommendation to the Department of Energy (DOE) that all contact-handled LLW generated after September 30, 2008, be disposed offsite, and that DOE proceed with a capital project to establish replacement remote-handled LLW disposal capability. An analysis of the alternatives for providing replacement remote-handled LLW disposal capability has been performed to support Critical Decision-1. The highest ranked alternative to provide this required capability has been determined to be the development of a new onsite remote-handled LLW disposal facility to replace the existing remote-handled LLW disposal vaults at the SDA. Several offsite DOE

  13. Radioactive waste management complex low-level waste radiological composite analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, J.M.; Becker, B.H.; Magnuson, S.O.; Keck, K.N.; Honeycutt, T.K.

    1998-05-01

    The composite analysis estimates the projected cumulative impacts to future members of the public from the disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) and all other sources of radioactive contamination at the INEEL that could interact with the LLW disposal facility to affect the radiological dose. Based upon the composite analysis evaluation, waste buried in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the RWMC is the only source at the INEEL that will significantly interact with the LLW facility. The source term used in the composite analysis consists of all historical SDA subsurface disposals of radionuclides as well as the authorized LLW subsurface disposal inventory and projected LLW subsurface disposal inventory. Exposure scenarios evaluated in the composite analysis include all the all-pathways and groundwater protection scenarios. The projected dose of 58 mrem/yr exceeds the composite analysis guidance dose constraint of 30 mrem/yr; therefore, an options analysis was conducted to determine the feasibility of reducing the projected annual dose. Three options for creating such a reduction were considered: (1) lowering infiltration of precipitation through the waste by providing a better cover, (2) maintaining control over the RWMC and portions of the INEEL indefinitely, and (3) extending the period of institutional control beyond the 100 years assumed in the composite analysis. Of the three options investigated, maintaining control over the RWMC and a small part of the present INEEL appears to be feasible and cost effective.

  14. Radioactive waste management complex low-level waste radiological composite analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, J.M.; Becker, B.H.; Magnuson, S.O.; Keck, K.N.; Honeycutt, T.K.

    1998-05-01

    The composite analysis estimates the projected cumulative impacts to future members of the public from the disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) and all other sources of radioactive contamination at the INEEL that could interact with the LLW disposal facility to affect the radiological dose. Based upon the composite analysis evaluation, waste buried in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the RWMC is the only source at the INEEL that will significantly interact with the LLW facility. The source term used in the composite analysis consists of all historical SDA subsurface disposals of radionuclides as well as the authorized LLW subsurface disposal inventory and projected LLW subsurface disposal inventory. Exposure scenarios evaluated in the composite analysis include all the all-pathways and groundwater protection scenarios. The projected dose of 58 mrem/yr exceeds the composite analysis guidance dose constraint of 30 mrem/yr; therefore, an options analysis was conducted to determine the feasibility of reducing the projected annual dose. Three options for creating such a reduction were considered: (1) lowering infiltration of precipitation through the waste by providing a better cover, (2) maintaining control over the RWMC and portions of the INEEL indefinitely, and (3) extending the period of institutional control beyond the 100 years assumed in the composite analysis. Of the three options investigated, maintaining control over the RWMC and a small part of the present INEEL appears to be feasible and cost effective

  15. WRAP Module 1 waste characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayancsik, B.A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present the characterization methodology for waste generated, processed, or otherwise the responsibility of the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 facility. The scope of this document includes all solid low level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU), mixed waste (MW), and dangerous waste. This document is not meant to be all-inclusive of the waste processed or generated within WRAP Module 1, but to present a methodology for characterization. As other streams are identified, the method of characterization will be consistent with the other streams identified in this plan. The WRAP Module 1 facility is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The facility's function is two-fold. The first is to verify/characterize, treat and repackage contact handled (CH) waste currently in retrievable storage in the LLW Burial Grounds, Hanford Central Waste Complex, and the Transuranic Storage and Assay Facility (TRUSAF). The second is to verify newly generated CH TRU waste and LLW, including MW. The WRAP Module 1 facility provides NDE and NDA of the waste for both drums and boxes. The NDE is used to identify the physical contents of the waste containers to support waste characterization and processing, verification, or certification. The NDA results determine the radioactive content and distribution of the waste

  16. Influence of non-technical policies on choices of waste solidification technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trubatch, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses non-technical policy considerations which may improperly influence decisions on the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes (''LLW''). These policy considerations are contained principally in several State and Federal statutes which regulate various aspects of LLW disposal. One policy consideration in particular, the unqualified bias in favor of volume reduction, is shown to present a substantial potential for leading to technically suboptimal decisions on the appropriate processes for solidifying LLW. To avoid the unintended skewing of technical decisions by non-technical policy considerations, certain current policies may need to be revised to ensure that the choices of waste treatment, including decisions on solidification, are based primarily on reasonable assurance of adequate protection of public health and safety. This goal may be realized in part by basing any disposal fee structure on more than just LLW volume to include consideration of the waste's activity and its difficulty of confinement

  17. An innovative approach to solid Low Level Radioactive Waste processing and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancake, D.C. Jr.; Sodaro, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper will focus on a new system of Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) accumulation, processing and packaging, as-well as the implementation of a Laboratory-wide training program used to introduce new waste accumulation containers to all of the on-site radioactive waste generators, and to train them on the requirements of this innovative waste characterization and documentation program

  18. The Accelerator Reliability Forum

    CERN Document Server

    Lüdeke, Andreas; Giachino, R

    2014-01-01

    A high reliability is a very important goal for most particle accelerators. The biennial Accelerator Reliability Workshop covers topics related to the design and operation of particle accelerators with a high reliability. In order to optimize the over-all reliability of an accelerator one needs to gather information on the reliability of many different subsystems. While a biennial workshop can serve as a platform for the exchange of such information, the authors aimed to provide a further channel to allow for a more timely communication: the Particle Accelerator Reliability Forum [1]. This contribution will describe the forum and advertise it’s usage in the community.

  19. Incremental Risks of Transporting NARM to the LLW Disposal Facility at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiner, R.F.

    1999-01-01

    This study models the incremental radiological risk of transporting NARM to the Hanford commercial LLW facility, both for incident-free transportation and for possible transportation accidents, compared with the radiological risk of transporting LLW to that facility. Transportation routes are modeled using HIGHWAY 3.1 and risks are modeled using RADTRAN 4. Both annual population doses and risks, and annual average individual doses and risks are reported. Three routes to the Hanford site were modeled from Albany, OR, from Coeur d'Alene, ID (called the Spokane route), and from Seattle, WA. Conservative estimates are used in the RADTRAN inputs, and RADTRAN itself is conservative

  20. Water Finance Webinars and Forums

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Center hosts a series of water finance forums. These forums bring together communities with drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater project financing needs in an interactive peer-to-peer networking format.

  1. The Canadian approach to nuclear codes and standards. A CSA forum for development of standards for CANDU: radioactive waste management and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, T.; Azeez, S.; Dua, S.

    2006-01-01

    Together with the Canadian Standards Association (CSA), industry stakeholders, governments, and the public have developed a suite of standards for CANDU nuclear power plants that generate electricity in Canada and abroad. In this paper, we will describe: CSA's role in national and international nuclear standards development; the key issues and priority projects that the nuclear standards program has addressed; the new CSA nuclear committees and projects being established, particularly those related to waste management and decommissioning; the hierarchy of nuclear regulations, nuclear, and other standards in Canada, and how they are applied by AECL; the standards management activities; and the future trends and challenges for CSA and the nuclear community. CSA is an accredited Standards Development Organization (SDO) and part of the international standards system. CSA's Nuclear Strategic Steering Committee (NSSC) provides leadership, direction, and support for a standards committee hierarchy comprised of members from a balanced matrix of interests. The NSSC strategically focuses on industry challenges; a new nuclear regulatory system, deregulated energy markets, and industry restructuring. As the first phase of priority projects is nearing completion, the next phase of priorities is being identified. These priorities address radioactive waste management, environmental radiation management, decommissioning, structural, and seismic issues. As the CSA committees get established in the coming year, members and input will be solicited for the technical committees, subcommittees, and task forces for the following related subjects: Radioactive Waste Management; a) Dry Storage of Irradiated Fuel; b) Short-Term Radioactive Waste Management; c) Long-Term Storage and Disposal of Radioactive Waste. 2. Decommissioning Nuclear Power is highly regulated, and public scrutiny has focused Codes and Standards on public and worker safety. Licensing and regulation serves to control

  2. Design for the second phase Rokkasho LLW burial facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumata, Tadamasa

    1997-01-01

    Rokkasho Low Level radioactive Waste management center of Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (hereafter called JNFL) has been operating for five years and about 90,000 (200 liter) drums have already been buried. Currently, JNFL is planning the 2nd phase of the burial program. The basic design of the new facility has been completed and applied for license additionally. Wastes buried in the 2nd phase facility are mainly dry active wastes from nuclear power plants. Inflammable wastes except for plastics are incinerated before they are disposed, because organic materials can generate gas and their degraded materials affect the distribution coefficients of the radionuclides. Most of the aluminum wastes which can generate hydrogen gas by corrosion are also removed from the waste. The 2nd phase facility accepts metal, plastics and non-flammable wastes. These are solidified with mortar in the 200 liter drums at the power plants. The radioactive inventory of the 2nd phase facility is considered to be as much as that of the 1st phase facility. (author)

  3. Treatment of low level radioactive liquid waste containing appreciable concentration of TBP degraded products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsala, T P; Sonavane, M S; Kore, S G; Sonar, N L; De, Vaishali; Raghavendra, Y; Chattopadyaya, S; Dani, U; Kulkarni, Y; Changrani, R D

    2011-11-30

    The acidic and alkaline low level radioactive liquid waste (LLW) generated during the concentration of high level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) prior to vitrification and ion exchange treatment of intermediate level radioactive liquid waste (ILW), respectively are decontaminated by chemical co-precipitation before discharge to the environment. LLW stream generated from the ion exchange treatment of ILW contained high concentrations of carbonates, tributyl phosphate (TBP) degraded products and problematic radio nuclides like (106)Ru and (99)Tc. Presence of TBP degraded products was interfering with the co-precipitation process. In view of this a modified chemical treatment scheme was formulated for the treatment of this waste stream. By mixing the acidic LLW and alkaline LLW, the carbonates in the alkaline LLW were destroyed and the TBP degraded products got separated as a layer at the top of the vessel. By making use of the modified co-precipitation process the effluent stream (1-2 μCi/L) became dischargeable to the environment after appropriate dilution. Based on the lab scale studies about 250 m(3) of LLW was treated in the plant. The higher activity of the TBP degraded products separated was due to short lived (90)Y isotope. The cement waste product prepared using the TBP degraded product was having good chemical durability and compressive strength. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. THE ENVIRONMENTAL COMMUNICATION FORUM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    could enable the more effective communication of envi:onmental issues, not forgetting the importance ... headquarters, when she explained the psychology used to try to persuade people to care for their environ- ment. ... offering a facility if those to whom it is offered are unaware of its existence, or of its value. This the forum ...

  5. 2012 National Leadership Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Two key themes emerged from the 2012 National Leadership Forum: Taking Business to School, which was hosted by the Career and Technical Education Foundation at the end of May. The first was that employers are looking for a workforce that is technologically savvy while having leadership and employability skills. The second is that the business…

  6. Potential co-disposal of greater-than-class C low-level radioactive waste with Department of Energy special case waste - greater-than-class C low-level waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allred, W.E.

    1994-09-01

    This document evaluates the feasibility of co-disposing of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) special case waste (SCW). This document: (1) Discusses and evaluates key issues concerning co-disposal of GTCC LLW with SCW. This includes examining these issues in terms of regulatory concerns, technical feasibility, and economics; (2) Examines advantages and disadvantages of such co-disposal; and (3) Makes recommendations. Research and analysis of the issues presented in this report indicate that it would be technically and economically feasible to co-dispose of GTCC LLW with DOE SCW. However, a dilemma will likely arise in the current division of regulatory responsibilities between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and DOE (i.e., current requirement for disposal of GTCC LLW in a facility licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission). DOE SCW is currently not subject to this licensing requirement

  7. A demonstration program to evaluate centralized LLW Incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burian, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Dramatic increases in low level waste burial charges in the last five years have spurred interest in achieving higher volume reduction than currently achieved by compaction. Battelle has completed a planning study to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of central site incineration for dry active waste to service several generators within a geographical area. We initiated licensing by the USNRC and Ohio EPA and developed plans, procedures, and estimated costs for licensing, construction, operation, and decommissioning of a central site incinerator. In addition, acceptance criteria were established for incoming waste. Response from the NRC and Ohio EPA indicated that no major obstacles existed toward obtaining licenses. The economic study indicated that a commercial incineration operation lasting 20 years or more was economically advantageous over direct burial of compacted waste, assuming that burial costs continue to escalate at their current rates. However, a 5-year demonstration period was not economically advantageous because of the short period to recover the fixed capital investment

  8. Performance assessment strategy for low-level waste disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starmer, R.J.; Deering, L.G.; Weber, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff views on predicting the performance of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. Under the Atomic Energy Act, as amended, and the Low Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act, as amended, the NRC and Agreement States license land disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) using the requirements in 10 CFR Part 61 or comparable state requirements. The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe regulatory requirements for performance assessment in low-level waste licensing, a strategy for performance assessments to support license applications, and NRC staff licensing evaluation of performance assessments. NRC's current activities in developing a performance assessment methodology will provide an overall systems modeling approach for assessing the performance of LLW disposal facilities. NRC staff will use the methodology to evaluate performance assessments conducted by applicants for LLW disposal facilities. The methodology will be made available to states and other interested parties

  9. Low-level tank waste simulant data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokken, R.O.

    1996-04-01

    The majority of defense wastes generated from reprocessing spent N- Reactor fuel at Hanford are stored in underground Double-shell Tanks (DST) and in older Single-Shell Tanks (SST) in the form of liquids, slurries, sludges, and salt cakes. The tank waste remediation System (TWRS) Program has the responsibility of safely managing and immobilizing these tank wastes for disposal. This report discusses three principle topics: the need for and basis for selecting target or reference LLW simulants, tanks waste analyses and simulants that have been defined, developed, and used for the GDP and activities in support of preparing and characterizing simulants for the current LLW vitrification project. The procedures and the data that were generated to characterized the LLW vitrification simulants were reported and are presented in this report. The final section of this report addresses the applicability of the data to the current program and presents recommendations for additional data needs including characterization and simulant compositional variability studies

  10. EPA's LLW standards program: Below regulatory concern criteria development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, W.F.; Gruhlke, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing generally applicable environmental standards for land disposal of low-level radioactive wastes. These standards will include criteria for determining which wastes have sufficiently low levels of radioactivity to be considered ''Below Regulatory Concern'' (BRC) in regards to their radiation hazard. Risk assessments to support the BRC criteria include an analysis of 18 surrogate radioactive waste streams, generated by nuclear power reactors and other fuel cycle facilities, industrial, medical and educational facilities, and consumers. Deregulated disposal alternatives, such as sanitary landfills, municipal dumps, incinerators and on-site landfills, situated in diverse demographic settings are used in the analysis. A number of waste streams which contributed only small doses or fractions of a health effect over 10,000 years were identified. Disposal of such wastes without consideration of their very low radioactivity could result in significant cost savings to the commercial fuel cycle and government operations as well as to medical, educational, and industrial facilities, and with minimal risk to the public. The concept of BRC wastes appears both feasible and cost effective

  11. Implementation and responsibility for waste disposal : AEC sets up frameworks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Commission approved the report ''measures for treatment and disposal of radioactive waste'' made by its advisory committee; which clarifies where the legal responsibility lies in relation to the waste treatment and disposal. In principle, the waste producers, i.e. the electric power companies should be responsible for the treatment and disposal of low-level radioactive waste and the Government for regulation of the safety of waste management. Then, in connection with a LLW ultimate storage facility planned in Aomori Prefecture, the waste disposal company may be responsible for safety of the LLW management. The disposal of high-level radioactive waste is the responsibility of the Government, the waste producer being responsible for the cost. Contents are the following: organization and responsibility for treatment and disposal of radioactive waste; concept of disposal of TRU waste. (Mori, K.)

  12. Delivering step change improvements to UK low level waste strategy - 16188

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, Jason; Rossiter, David

    2009-01-01

    The UK Nuclear Industry continues to produce significant quantities of Low Level Waste (LLW) as decommissioning projects generating waste become more prevalent. Current infrastructure and projected increasing waste volumes will deliver a volumetric shortfall of storage capacity in the near future. Recently established as a standalone site licence company, the Low Level Waste Repository (LLWR) near Drigg, in West Cumbria (formerly operated and owned by British Nuclear Group) is tasked with managing the safe treatment and disposal of LLW in the UK, on behalf of the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA). The problem is complex involving many stakeholders with potentially different priorities. Previously, most nuclear waste generators operated independently with limited integration with other similar organisations. However, the current financial, programme and technical pressures require collaborative working to facilitate a step-change improvement in LLW management. Achieving this quickly is as much of a challenge as delivering robust cost effective technical solutions. NDA is working in partnership with LLWR to develop a LLW Strategy for the Nuclear Industry and has in parallel commissioned a number of studies by the National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL), looking at opportunities to share best practice. A National Strategy Group has been established to develop a working partnership between the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority, LLW Repository Ltd, Regulators, Stakeholders and LLW Consignors, promoting innovation, value for money, and robust implementation of the waste hierarchy (avoid-reduce-re-use-recycle). Additionally the LLWR supported by the NNL have undertaken a comprehensive strategic review of the UK's LLW management activities. Initial collaborative work has provided for the first time a detailed picture of the existing strategic baseline and identified significant national benefits from improving the way LLW is forecasted, characterised, segregated, and

  13. Environmental assessment for the construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Waste Segregation Facility at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction, operation and decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of the Waste Segregation Facility (WSF) for the sorting, shredding, and compaction of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. The LLW to be processed consists of two waste streams: legacy waste which is currently stored in E-Area Vaults of SRS and new waste generated from continuing operations. The proposed action is to construct, operate, and D ampersand D a facility to process low-activity job-control and equipment waste for volume reduction. The LLW would be processed to make more efficient use of low-level waste disposal capacity (E-Area Vaults) or to meet the waste acceptance criteria for treatment at the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at SRS

  14. Waste form development/test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1983-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate new solidification agents relative to their potential application to wastes generated by advanced high volume reduction technologies, e.g., incinerator ash, dry solids, and ion exchange resins. Candidate materials selected for the solidification of these wastes include a modified sulfur cement and low-density polyethylene, neither of which are currently employed commerically for the solidification of low-level waste (LLW). As both the modified sulfur cement and the polyethylene are thermoplastic materials, a heated screw type extruder is utilized in the production of waste form samples for testing and evaluation. In this regard, work is being conducted to determine the range of conditions under which these solidification agents can be satisfactorily applied to the specific LLW streams and to provide information relevant to operating parameters and process control

  15. Immobilization and Waste Form Product Acceptance for Low Level and TRU Waste Forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtzscheiter, E.W.; Harbour, J.R.

    1998-05-01

    The Tanks Focus Area is supporting technology development in immobilization of both High Level (HLW) and Low Level (LLW) radioactive wastes. The HLW process development at Hanford and Idaho is patterned closely after that of the Savannah River (Defense Waste Processing Facility) and West Valley Sites (West Valley Demonstration Project). However, the development and options open to addressing Low Level Waste are diverse and often site specific. To start, it is important to understand the breadth of Low Level Wastes categories

  16. State implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985: Progress and issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tait, T.D.

    1987-03-01

    The 1980 Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act (Public Law 96-573) assigned each state the responsibility for providing disposal capacity for the low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated within its borders, except for certain LLW generated by the activities of the federal government. The law also authorized and encouraged states to enter into interstate compacts to provide for the establishment and operation of regional LLW disposal facilities. The January 1986 enactment of Public Law 99-240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA), resolved an impasse that had delayed congressional consent to seven interstate compacts formed for the regional disposal of LLW. The Act ensures that LLW generators will have continued access to the three existing commercial LLW disposal sites through 1992 as long as their states or regions are in compliance with milestones prescribed in the Act for development of new disposal facilities. Furthermore, the LLRWPAA assigned several responsibilities to the Department of Energy. The objective of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 is to ensure the development of an effective, safe, and environmentally acceptable nationwide system for the disposal of LLW by 1993. The Department of Energy is assisting the states and regions to achieve that objective and ensure that the system that is developed provides for the safe management and disposal of LLW at reasonable costs. Furthermore, the Department is working with the states and regions to ensure that while the new system is being developed, there are not disruptions in the current LLW management and disposal practices and that the public continues to receive the benefits of the industries that rely on nuclear materials to deliver their services

  17. Development of low-level radioactive waste disposal capacity in the United States - progress or stalemate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devgun, J.S.; Larson, G.S.

    1995-01-01

    It has been fifteen years since responsibility for the disposal of commercially generated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) was shifted to the states by the United States Congress through the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 (LLRWPA). In December 1985, Congress revisited the issue and enacted the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA). No new disposal sites have opened yet, however, and it is now evident that disposal facility development is more complex, time-consuming, and controversial than originally anticipated. For a nation with a large nuclear power industry, the lack of availability of LLW disposal capacity coupled with a similar lack of high-level radioactive waste disposal capacity could adversely affect the future viability of the nuclear energy option. The U.S. nuclear power industry, with 109 operating reactors, generates about half of the LLW shipped to commercial disposal sites and faces dwindling access to waste disposal sites and escalating waste management costs. The other producers of LLW - industries, government (except the defense related research and production waste), academic institutions, and medical institutions that account for the remaining half of the commercial LLW - face the same storage and cost uncertainties. This paper will summarize the current status of U.S. low-level radioactive waste generation and the status of new disposal facility development efforts by the states. The paper will also examine the factors that have contributed to delays, the most frequently suggested alternatives, and the likelihood of change

  18. Development of low-level radioactive waste disposal capacity in the United States -- Progress or stalemate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devgun, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    It has been fifteen years since responsibility for the disposal of commercially generated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) was shifted to the states by the United States Congress through the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 (LLRWPA). In December 1985, Congress revisited the issue and enacted the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA). No new disposal sites have opened yet, however, and it is now evident that disposal facility development is more complex, time-consuming, and controversial than originally anticipated. For a nation with a large nuclear power industry, the lack of availability of LLW disposal capacity coupled with a similar lack of high-level radioactive waste disposal capacity could adversely affect the future viability of the nuclear energy option. The US nuclear power industry, with 109 operating reactors, generates about half of the LLW shipped to commercial disposal sites and faces dwindling access to waste disposal sites and escalating waste management costs. The other producers of LLW -- industries, government (except the defense related research and production waste), academic institutions, and medical institutions that account for the remaining half of the commercial LLW -- face the same storage and cost uncertainties. This paper will summarize the current status of US low-level radioactive waste generation and the status of new disposal facility development efforts by the states. The paper will also examine the factors that have contributed to delays, the most frequently suggested alternatives, and the likelihood of change

  19. Internet Forums for Suicide Bereavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Eleanor; Krysinska, Karolina; O'Dea, Bridianne; Robinson, Jo

    2017-11-01

    Bereavement by suicide is associated with a number of consequences including poor mental health outcomes and increased suicide risk. Despite this, the bereaved by suicide may be reluctant to seek help from friends, family, and professionals. Internet forums and social networking sites are a popular avenue of support for the bereaved, but to date there is a lack of research into their use and efficacy. To survey users of suicide bereavement Internet forums and Facebook groups regarding their help-seeking behaviors, use of forums, and perceived benefits and limitations of such use. This study employed a cross-sectional design in which users of suicide bereavement Internet forums and Facebook groups completed an anonymous online survey. Participants were 222 users of suicide bereavement Internet forums. Most participants (93.2%) had sought face-to-face help from sources other than Internet forums, but were more likely to seek help in the near future from informal rather than formal sources. Forums were perceived as highly beneficial and there were few limitations. The generalizability of these results to other internet forums may be limited. Additionally, we were not able to examine differences between forums in terms of quality or user-reported efficacy. Finally, the data reflects the subjective views of forum users, which may differ from the views of moderators or experts. Internet forums, including Facebook groups, appear to be a useful adjunct to face-to-face help-seeking for supporting those who have been bereaved by suicide.

  20. Waste inspection tomography (WIT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardi, R.T. [Bio-Imaging Research, Inc., Lincolnshire, IL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT) provides mobile semi-trailer mounted nondestructive examination (NDE) and assay (NDA) for nuclear waste drum characterization. WIT uses various computed tomography (CT) methods for both NDE and NDA of nuclear waste drums. Low level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU), and mixed radioactive waste can be inspected and characterized without opening the drums. With externally transmitted x-ray NDE techniques, WIT has the ability to identify high density waste materials like heavy metals, define drum contents in two- and three-dimensional space, quantify free liquid volumes through density and x-ray attenuation coefficient discrimination, and measure drum wall thickness. With waste emitting gamma-ray NDA techniques, WIT can locate gamma emitting radioactive sources in two- and three-dimensional space, identify gamma emitting, isotopic species, identify the external activity levels of emitting gamma-ray sources, correct for waste matrix attenuation, provide internal activity approximations, and provide the data needed for waste classification as LLW or TRU.

  1. Waste inspection tomography (WIT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardi, R.T.

    1995-01-01

    Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT) provides mobile semi-trailer mounted nondestructive examination (NDE) and assay (NDA) for nuclear waste drum characterization. WIT uses various computed tomography (CT) methods for both NDE and NDA of nuclear waste drums. Low level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU), and mixed radioactive waste can be inspected and characterized without opening the drums. With externally transmitted x-ray NDE techniques, WIT has the ability to identify high density waste materials like heavy metals, define drum contents in two- and three-dimensional space, quantify free liquid volumes through density and x-ray attenuation coefficient discrimination, and measure drum wall thickness. With waste emitting gamma-ray NDA techniques, WIT can locate gamma emitting radioactive sources in two- and three-dimensional space, identify gamma emitting, isotopic species, identify the external activity levels of emitting gamma-ray sources, correct for waste matrix attenuation, provide internal activity approximations, and provide the data needed for waste classification as LLW or TRU

  2. Control of water infiltration into near surface LLW disposal units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donnell, E.; Ridky, R.W.; Schulz, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    Water infiltration to buried waste is the prime problem of concern in designing waste disposal units for the humid areas. Conventional compacted clay layers (resistance layer barriers) have been subject to failure by subsidence and by permeability increases brought about by plant roots. A clay barrier with a rock cover sans plants is being investigated. Also a combination of a resistive layer overlying a conductive layer is being investigated. Laboratory studies indicate that this approach can be very effective and field evaluations are underway. However, it must be noted that subsidence will negate the effectiveness of any buried layer barriers. A surface barrier (bioengineering management) has been valuated in the field and found to be very effective in preventing water entry into waste disposal units. This surface barrier is easily repairable if damaged by subsidence and could be the system of choice under active subsidence conditions

  3. Basic approach to the disposal of low level radioactive waste generated from nuclear reactors containing comparatively high radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, Yoshinori

    1998-01-01

    Low level radioactive wastes (LLW) generated from nuclear reactors are classified into three categories: LLW containing comparatively high radioactivity; low level radioactive waste; very low level radioactive waste. Spent control rods, part of ion exchange resin and parts of core internals are examples of LLW containing comparatively high radioactivity. The Advisory Committee of Atomic Energy Commission published the report 'Basic Approach to the Disposal of LLW from Nuclear Reactors Containing Comparatively High Radioactivity' in October 1998. The main points of the proposed concept of disposal are as follows: dispose of underground deep enough not be disturb common land use (e.g. 50 to 100 m deep); dispose of underground where radionuclides migrate very slowly; dispose of with artificial engineered barrier which has the same function as the concrete pit; control human activities such as land use of disposal site for a few hundreds years. (author)

  4. US Department of Energy National Solid Waste Information Management System (NSWIMS): Annual report for calendar year 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, W.L.

    1988-07-01

    The Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS) is the database used to gather information for the US Department of Energy (DOE) on DOE and Department of Defense solid low-level radioactive waste (LLW). The National SWIMS Annual Report (NSWIMS) provides officials of the DOE with management information on the entire DOE/defense solid LLW cycle. The acronym for the annual report, NSWIMS, signifies that an improved format has been developed to make this document a more useful tool for assessing solid LLW management performance. Part I provides a composite summary of the DOE/defense solid LLW management. It includes data related to waste generation, forecasting, treatment, and disposal. Part II contains SWIMS computer-supplied information with discussions of the data presented, standardized and simplified data tables, and revised figures. All data are presented without interpretation and are potentially useful to users for evaluating trends, identifying possible problem areas, and defining future implications. 33 figs., 29 tabs.

  5. Commissioning Tests of the Ulchin LLW Vitrification Facility In Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyung-Hwa, Yang; Sang-Woon, Shin; Chan-Kook, Moon

    2009-01-01

    Since 1994, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. (KHNP) has, together with SGN in France and Hyundai ROTEM, investigated and developed a vitrification process using a Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) to treat low-and intermediate-level radioactive waste. A commercialization project was launched in 2002 as a governmental nuclear power technology development project. The installation of the first commercial plant, Ulchin Vitrification Facility (UVF), was completed in 2007 inside Ulchin nuclear power plants no. 5 and 6. Combustible dry active waste and low-level ion exchange resin will be treated in the UVF. The UVF has a waste feeding capacity of 20 kg/h and consists of waste pretreatment and feeding systems, a cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) system, an off-gas treatment system, a dust recycling system, as well as other systems. In order to assure that systems and equipments meet their design objectives and that the UVF complies with applicable regulations, equipment tests, system functional tests and inactive performance tests were conducted. Furthermore, a long-term inactive test was carried out for 202 hours to evaluate the overall performance and stability of the facility. During the test, about 1,700 kg of surrogate waste was vitrified and 302 kg of waste glass was poured into a glass mould. As the gaseous emission from the UVF was one of the key issues for the operational license and public acceptance, 25 hazardous gases and dusts were analyzed. The compressive strength of the waste glasses was also measured. Results showed that effluent concentrations of the off-gases and the quality of the waste glass met the regulatory limits with sufficient margins. Operation procedures of the UVF were revised based on experiences gained from the tests. By demonstrating satisfactory performance of the UVF, KHNP acquired an operational license in October, 2008 as an amendment to the operational license of the Ulchin NPPs. We are planning to conduct a simulated

  6. Life-Cycle Cost and Risk Analysis of Alternative Configurations for Shipping Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PM Daling; SB Ross; BM Biwer

    1999-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is a major receiver of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) for disposal. Currently, all LLW received at NTS is shipped by truck. The trucks use highway routes to NTS that pass through the Las Vegas Valley and over Hoover Dam, which is a concern of local stakeholder groups in the State of Nevada. Rail service offers the opportunity to reduce transportation risks and costs, according to the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM-PEIS). However, NTS and some DOE LLW generator sites are not served with direct rail service so intermodal transport is under consideration. Intermodal transport involves transport via two modes, in this case truck and rail, from the generator sites to NTS. LLW shipping containers would be transferred between trucks and railcars at intermodal transfer points near the LLW generator sites, NTS, or both. An Environmental Assessment (EA)for Intermodal Transportation of Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site (referred to as the NTSIntermodal -M) has been prepared to determine whether there are environmental impacts to alterations to the current truck routing or use of intermodal facilities within the State of Nevada. However, an analysis of the potential impacts outside the State of Nevada are not addressed in the NTS Intermodal EA. This study examines the rest of the transportation network between LLW generator sites and the NTS and evaluates the costs, risks, and feasibility of integrating intermodal shipments into the LLW transportation system. This study evaluates alternative transportation system configurations for NTS approved and potential generators based on complex-wide LLW load information. Technical judgments relative to the availability of DOE LLW generators to ship from their sites by rail were developed. Public and worker risk and life-cycle cost components are quantified. The study identifies and evaluates alternative scenarios that increase the use of rail (intermodal

  7. Life-Cycle Cost and Risk Analysis of Alternative Configurations for Shipping Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PM Daling; SB Ross; BM Biwer

    1999-12-17

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is a major receiver of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) for disposal. Currently, all LLW received at NTS is shipped by truck. The trucks use highway routes to NTS that pass through the Las Vegas Valley and over Hoover Dam, which is a concern of local stakeholder groups in the State of Nevada. Rail service offers the opportunity to reduce transportation risks and costs, according to the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM-PEIS). However, NTS and some DOE LLW generator sites are not served with direct rail service so intermodal transport is under consideration. Intermodal transport involves transport via two modes, in this case truck and rail, from the generator sites to NTS. LLW shipping containers would be transferred between trucks and railcars at intermodal transfer points near the LLW generator sites, NTS, or both. An Environmental Assessment (EA)for Intermodal Transportation of Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site (referred to as the NTSIntermodal -M) has been prepared to determine whether there are environmental impacts to alterations to the current truck routing or use of intermodal facilities within the State of Nevada. However, an analysis of the potential impacts outside the State of Nevada are not addressed in the NTS Intermodal EA. This study examines the rest of the transportation network between LLW generator sites and the NTS and evaluates the costs, risks, and feasibility of integrating intermodal shipments into the LLW transportation system. This study evaluates alternative transportation system configurations for NTS approved and potential generators based on complex-wide LLW load information. Technical judgments relative to the availability of DOE LLW generators to ship from their sites by rail were developed. Public and worker risk and life-cycle cost components are quantified. The study identifies and evaluates alternative scenarios that increase the use of rail (intermodal

  8. Cleaning of liquid LLW from decontamination processes using semipermeable membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulama, M.; Deneanu, N.; Pavelescu, M.

    2003-01-01

    Of the three processes, which have been used extensively for liquid radioactive waste purification, evaporation and ion exchange are costly and flocculation gives a low degree of purification. By comparison to that, reverse osmosis offers intermediate purification at reasonable cost. Present research is examining the potential of using a membrane filtration system for the removal of dissolved radionuclides, but chemical treatment showed as necessary to convert soluble radionuclides, organic traces and metals to insoluble, filterable species. Liquid wastes within a CANDU station are segregated into normal and low-activity waste streams. The normal-activity waste includes wastes from the laboratories, laundries, some service-building drains, upgrade drains, and decontamination center. The drains from the reactor building, the heavy-water area, the spent-fuel pool, and the resin storage area are also directed to this normal activity wastes from showers and building drains in areas of the service building that would not normally be contaminated. The aqueous liquid wastes from the decontamination center and the other collected wastes from the chemical drain system are currently treated by the membrane plant. Generally, the liquid waste streams are effectively volume-reduced by a combination of continuous crossflow microfiltration (MF), spiral wound reverse osmosis (SWRO) and tubular reverse osmosis membrane technologies. Backwash chemical cleaning wastes from the membrane plant are further volume-reduced by evaporation. The concentrate from the membrane plant is ultimately immobilized with bitumen. The ability of the MF/SWRO technology to remove impurities non-selectively makes it suitable for the treatment of radioactive effluents from operating nuclear plants, with proper membrane selection, feed characterization, system configuration and system chemistry control. The choice of polysulfonate material for membrane was based on the high flow rates achievable with this

  9. Strategies, technologies, and economics for managing greater-than-class C waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danna, J.G.; Baird, R.D.; Chau, T.K.

    1994-01-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act 0f 1985, Public Law 99-240, transferred responsibility for disposing of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated by commercial licensees from the states to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Development of permanent disposal capacity for GTCC LLW requires the evaluation of potential disposal concepts in terms of technical feasibility, economics, and institutional concerns. Previous studies have identified 13 potential GTCC LLW disposal concepts and have characterized volumes and types of GTCC LLW. Data from these studies, along with newly developed data pertaining to concept designs and hypothetical sites, were used to evaluate each concept's technical feasibility. An evaluation of the cost effectiveness of the technically feasible disposal concepts was also conducted

  10. Radiation protection forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, W.

    2010-01-01

    The National Director of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority and Radiation Protection of Uruguay in the first forum for radiation protection set out the following themes: activity of regulatory body, radiation safety, physical security, safeguards, legal framework, committed substantive program, use of radiation, risks and benefits, major sources of radiation, the national regulatory framework, national inventory of sources, inspections, licensing, import and export of sources control , radioactive transport, materials safety, agreements, information and teaching, radiological emergencies and prompt response.

  11. Young physicists' forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, T.

    2001-01-01

    The Young Physicists' Forum was an opportunity for the younger members of the particle-physics community to gather at Snowmass 2001 and to study and debate major issues that face the field over the next twenty years. Discussions were organized around three major topics: outreach and education, the impact of globalization, and building a robust and balanced field. We report on the results of these discussions, as presented on July 17, 2001

  12. Secondary Low-Level Waste Treatment Strategy Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.M. LaRue

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this analysis is to identify and review potential options for processing and disposing of the secondary low-level waste (LLW) that will be generated through operation of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). An estimate of annual secondary LLW is generated utilizing the mechanism established in ''Secondary Waste Treatment Analysis'' (Reference 8.1) and ''Secondary Low-Level Waste Generation Rate Analysis'' (Reference 8.5). The secondary LLW quantities are based on the spent fuel and high-level waste (HLW) arrival schedule as defined in the ''Controlled Design Assumptions Document'' (CDA) (Reference 8.6). This analysis presents estimates of the quantities of LLW in its various forms. A review of applicable laws, codes, and standards is discussed, and a synopsis of those applicable laws, codes, and standards and their impacts on potential processing and disposal options is presented. The analysis identifies viable processing/disposal options in light of the existing laws, codes, and standards, and then evaluates these options in regard to: (1) Process and equipment requirements; (2) LLW disposal volumes; and (3) Facility requirements

  13. Microbial degradation of low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, R.D.; Hamilton, M.A.; Veeh, R.H.; McConnell, J.W. Jr.

    1994-04-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission stipulates that disposed low-level radioactive waste (LLW) be stabilized. Because of apparent ease of use and normal structural integrity, cement has been widely used as a binder to solidify LLW. However, the resulting waste forms are sometimes susceptible to failure due to the actions of waste constituents, stress, and environment. This report reviews laboratory efforts that are being developed to address the effects of microbiologically influenced chemical attack on cement-solidified LLW. Groups of microorganisms are being employed that are capable of metabolically converting organic and inorganic substrates into organic and mineral acids. Such acids aggressively react with cement and can ultimately lead to structural failure. Results on the application of mechanisms inherent in microbially influenced degradation of cement-based material are the focus of this report. Sufficient data-validated evidence of the potential for microbially influenced deterioration of cement-solidified LLW has been developed during the course of this study. These data support the continued development of appropriate tests necessary to determine the resistance of cement-solidified LLW to microbially induced degradation that could impact the stability of the waste form. They also justify the continued effort of enumeration of the conditions necessary to support the microbiological growth and population expansion

  14. Performance evaluation and operational experience with a semi-automatic monitor for the radiological characterization of low-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davey, E.C.; Csullog, G.W.

    1987-03-01

    Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL) have undertaken a Waste Disposal Project to co-ordinate the transition from the current practice of interim storage to permanent disposal for low-level radioactive wastes (LLW). The strategy of the project is to classify and segregate waste segments according to their hazardous radioactive lifetimes and to emplace them in disposal facilities engineered to isolate and contain them. To support this strategy, a waste characterization program was set up to estimate the volume and radioisotope inventories of the wastes managed by CRNL. A key element of the program is the demonstration of a non-invasive measurement technique for the isotope-specific characterization of solid LLW. This paper describes the approach taken at CRNL for the non-invasive assay of LLW and the field performance and early operational experience with a waste characterization monitor to be used in a waste processing facility

  15. Performance evaluation and operational experience with a semi-automatic monitor for the radiological characterization of low-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davey, E.C.; Csullog, G.W.

    1987-01-01

    Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL) have undertaken a Waste Disposal Project to co-ordinate the transition from the current practice of interim storage to permanent disposal for low-level radioactive wastes (LLW). The strategy of the project is to classify and segregate waste segments according to their hazardous radioactive lifetimes and to emplace them in disposal facilities engineered to isolate and contain them. To support this strategy, a waste characterization program was set up to estimate the volume and radioisotope inventories of the wastes managed by CRNL. A key element of the program is the demonstration of a non-invasive measurement technique for the isotope-specific characterization of solid LLW. This paper describes the approach taken at CRNL for the non-invasive assay of LLW and the field performance and early operational experience with a waste characterization monitor to be used in a waste processing facility

  16. Intermodal transportation of low-level radioactive waste to the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) presently serves as a disposal site for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated by DOE-approved generators. The environmental impacts resulting from the disposal of LLW at the NTS are discussed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Nevada Test Site Off-Site Locations in the State of Nevada (NTS EIS). During the formal NTS EIS scoping period, it became clear that transportation of LLW was an issue that required attention. Therefore, the Nevada Transportation Protocol Working Group (TPWG) was formed in 1995 to identify, prioritize, and understand local issues and concerns associated with the transportation of LLW to the NTS. Currently, generators of LLW ship their waste to the NTS by legal-weight truck. In 1995, the TPWG suggested the DOE could reduce transportation costs and enhance public safety by using rail transportation. The DOE announced, in October 1996, that they would study the potential for intermodal transportation of LLW to the NTS, by transferring the LLW containers from rail cars to trucks for movements to the NTS. The TPWG and DOE/NV prepared the NTS Intermodal Transportation Facility Site and Routing Evaluation Study to present basic data and analyses on alternative rail-to-truck transfer sites and related truck routes for LLW shipments to the NTS. This Environmental Assessment (EA) identifies the potential environmental impacts and transportation risks of using new intermodal transfer sites and truck routes or continuing current operations to accomplish the objectives of minimizing radiological risk, enhancing safety, and reducing cost. DOE/NV will use the results of the assessment to decide whether or not to encourage the LLW generators and their transportation contractors to change their current operations to accomplish these objectives

  17. 77 FR 26991 - Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... parts. In the first part, the NRC staff will seek public feedback on the pros and cons of the four... (47 FR 57446). The rule applies to any near-surface LLW disposal technology. The regulations emphasize... site characteristics (waste package, waste form, disposal technology, cover technology and geo...

  18. 77 FR 10401 - Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... part, the NRC staff will seek public feedback on the pros and cons of the four technical issues... near-surface LLW disposal technology, including shallow-land burial, engineered land disposal methods... developed based on the candidate site characteristics (waste package, waste form, disposal technology, cover...

  19. Engineering report of plasma vitrification of Hanford tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrickson, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides an analysis of vendor-derived testing and technology applicability to full scale glass production from Hanford tank wastes using plasma vitrification. The subject vendor testing and concept was applied in support of the Hanford LLW Vitrification Program, Tank Waste Remediation System

  20. Performance assessment review for DOE LLW disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhite, Elmer L.

    1992-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) disposes of low-level radioactive waste in near-surface disposal facilities. Safety of the disposal operations is evaluated for operational safety as well as long-term safety. Operational safety is evaluated based on the perceived level of hazard of the operation and may vary from a simple safety assessment to a safety analysis report. Long-term safety of all low-level waste disposal systems is evaluated through the conduct of a radiological performance assessment. The US DOE has established radiological performance objectives for disposal of low-level waste. They are to protect a member of the general public from receiving over 25 mrem/y, and an inadvertent intruder into the waste from receiving over 100 mrem/y continuous exposure or 500 mrem from a single exposure. For a disposal system to be acceptable, a performance assessment must be prepared which must be technically accurate and provide reasonable assurance that these performance objectives are met. Technical quality of the performance assessments is reviewed by a panel of experts. The panel of experts is used in two ways to assure the technical quality of performance assessment. A preliminary (generally 2 day) review by the panel is employed in the late stages of development to provide guidance on finalizing the performance assessment. The comments from this review are communicated to the personnel responsible for the performance assessment for consideration and incorporation. After finalizing the performance assessment, it is submitted for a formal review. The formal review is accomplished by a much more thorough analysis of the performance assessment over a multi-week time period. The panel then formally reports their recommendations to the US DOE waste management senior staff who make the final determination on acceptability of the performance assessment. A number of lessons have been learned from conducting several preliminary reviews of performance

  1. Oak Ridge Low Level Waste Management Task Force summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Hoesen, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    New facilities are required in the next five years to manage low level radioactive wastes (LLW) produced on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The Central Waste Disposal Facility (CWDF) was planned to provide the needed additional facilities beginning in late 1985. The CWDF was planned as a shallow land burial facility to dispose of non-stabilized LLW. However, comments on the CWDF Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) received from the State of Tennessee, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission identified major issues related to the treatment of alternatives as required by the National Environmental Policy Act, and the potential for unacceptable groundwater contamination resulting from shallow land burial of non-stabilized waste. A series of initial and detailed evaluations are being conducted to develop the basic environmental performance and cost information needed to compare several LLW management approaches and arrive at a proposed system for development. The evaluations are targeted for completion by October

  2. Visual Analysis of MOOC Forums with iForum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Siwei; Zhao, Jian; Cui, Weiwei; Qu, Huamin

    2017-01-01

    Discussion forums of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC) provide great opportunities for students to interact with instructional staff as well as other students. Exploration of MOOC forum data can offer valuable insights for these staff to enhance the course and prepare the next release. However, it is challenging due to the large, complicated, and heterogeneous nature of relevant datasets, which contain multiple dynamically interacting objects such as users, posts, and threads, each one including multiple attributes. In this paper, we present a design study for developing an interactive visual analytics system, called iForum, that allows for effectively discovering and understanding temporal patterns in MOOC forums. The design study was conducted with three domain experts in an iterative manner over one year, including a MOOC instructor and two official teaching assistants. iForum offers a set of novel visualization designs for presenting the three interleaving aspects of MOOC forums (i.e., posts, users, and threads) at three different scales. To demonstrate the effectiveness and usefulness of iForum, we describe a case study involving field experts, in which they use iForum to investigate real MOOC forum data for a course on JAVA programming.

  3. California LLW disposal site development update: Ahead of milestone schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, S.A.; Gaynor, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    US Ecology has been designated by the State of California to locate, develop and operate a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. In early 1986, the firm identified eighteen desert basins in southeastern California for siting consideration. Three candidate sites were selected for detailed field characterization work in February, 1987. A preferred site for licensing purposes will be identified in early 1988. California is currently ahead of the siting milestone schedule mandated by the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act. It is likely that a license application will be filed before the 1990 milestone date. This paper describes the process undertaken by US Ecology to identify three candidates sites for characterization, and the public involvement program supporting this decision. Future activities leading to final site development are also described

  4. 76 FR 10810 - Public Workshop to Discuss Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ... Radioactive Waste Management AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Public Workshop and Request for... regulatory framework for the management of commercial low-level radioactive waste (LLW). The purpose of this...-level radioactive wastes that did not exist at the time part 61 was promulgated. The developments...

  5. 78 FR 75913 - Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    ... site, including the disposal of Hanford's low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level... would be processed for disposal in Low- Level Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds (LLBGs) Trenches 31 and... treating radioactive waste from 177 underground storage tanks (149 Single-Shell Tanks [SSTs] and 28 Double...

  6. Practical Model of Cement Based Grout Mix Design, for Use into Low Level Radiation Waste Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Lidia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The cement based grouts, as functional performance composite materials, are widely used for both immobilisation and encapsulation as well as for stabilization in the field of inorganic waste management. Also, to ensure that low level radioactive waste (LLW are contained for storage and ultimate disposal, they are encapsulated or immobilized in monolithic waste forms, with cement –based grouts.

  7. Changes in US commercial radioactive waste management and lessons learned in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Tingsong; Yan Cangsheng

    2014-01-01

    The changes of commercial radioactive waste management in the US and the work done by the LLW generators in seeking new means to cost-effectively dispose these wastes without prejudicing future disposal options are introduced. Then the article concludes the lessons learned on radioactive waste management in China. (authors)

  8. The incineration of low-level radioactive waste: A report for the Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, S.W.

    1990-06-01

    This report is a summary of the contemporary use of incineration technology as a method for volume reduction of LLW. It is intended primarily to serve as an overview of the technology for waste management professionals involved in the use or regulation of LLW incineration. It is also expected that organizations presently considering the use of incineration as part of their radioactive waste management programs will benefit by gaining a general knowledge of incinerator operating experience. Specific types of incineration technologies are addressed in this report, including designation of the kinds of wastes that can be processed, the magnitudes of volume reduction that are achievable in typical operation, and requirements for ash handling and off-gas filtering and scrubbing. A status listing of both US and foreign incinerators provides highlights of activities at government, industry, institutional, and commercial nuclear power plant sites. The Federal and State legislative structures for the regulation of LLW incineration are also described. 84 refs., 33 tabs

  9. Emergency response information within the National LLW Information Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paukert, J.G.; Fuchs, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, with operational assistance from EG and G Idaho, Inc., maintains the National Low-Level Waste Information Management System, a relational data base management system with extensive information collection and reporting capabilities. The system operates on an IBM 4341 main-frame computer in Idaho Falls, Idaho and is accessible through terminals in 46 states. One of the many programs available on the system is an emergency response data network, which was developed jointly by EG and G Idaho, Inc. and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. As a prototype, the program comprises emergency response team contacts, policies, activities and decisions; federal, state and local government contacts; facility and support center locations; and news releases for nine reactor sites in the southeast. The emergency response program provides a method for consolidating currently fragmented information into a central and user-friendly system. When the program is implemented, immediate answers to response questions will be available through a remote terminal or telephone on a 24-hour basis. In view of current hazardous and low-level waste shipment rates and future movements of high-level waste, the program can offer needed and timely information for transportation as well as site incident response

  10. Microbial degradation of low-level radioactive waste. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, R.D.; Hamilton, M.A.; Veeh, R.H.; McConnell, J.W. Jr.

    1996-06-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission stipulates in 10 CFR 61 that disposed low-level radioactive waste (LLW) be stabilized. To provide guidance to disposal vendors and nuclear station waste generators for implementing those requirements, the NRC developed the Technical Position on Waste Form, Revision 1. That document details a specified set of recommended testing procedures and criteria, including several tests for determining the biodegradation properties of waste forms. Information has been presented by a number of researchers, which indicated that those tests may be inappropriate for examining microbial degradation of cement-solidified LLW. Cement has been widely used to solidify LLW; however, the resulting waste forms are sometimes susceptible to failure due to the actions of waste constituents, stress, and environment. The purpose of this research program was to develop modified microbial degradation test procedures that would be more appropriate than the existing procedures for evaluation of the effects of microbiologically influenced chemical attack on cement-solidified LLW. The procedures that have been developed in this work are presented and discussed. Groups of microorganisms indigenous to LLW disposal sites were employed that can metabolically convert organic and inorganic substrates into organic and mineral acids. Such acids aggressively react with cement and can ultimately lead to structural failure. Results on the application of mechanisms inherent in microbially influenced degradation of cement-based material are the focus of this final report. Data-validated evidence of the potential for microbially influenced deterioration of cement-solidified LLW and subsequent release of radionuclides developed during this study are presented

  11. Nuclear waste landscapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, B.D.; Cameron, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the authors explore the time dimension in nuclear waste disposal, with the hope of untangling future land use issues for a full range of radioactive waste facilities. The longevity and hazards presented by nuclear reactor irradiated (spent) fuel and liquid reprocessing waste are well known. Final repositories for these highly radioactive wastes, to be opened early in the 21st Century, are to be located deep underground in rural locations throughout the developed world. Safety concerns are addressed by engineered and geological barriers containing the waste containers, as well as through geographic isolation from heavily populated areas. Yet nuclear power plants (as well as other applications of atomic energy) produce an abundance of other types of radioactive wastes. These materials are generally known as low level wastes (LLW) in the United States, though their level of longevity and radioactivity can vary dramatically

  12. Greater confinement disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevorrow, L.E.; Gilbert, T.L.; Luner, C.; Merry-Libby, P.A.; Meshkov, N.K.; Yu, C.

    1985-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) includes a broad spectrum of different radionuclide concentrations, half-lives, and hazards. Standard shallow-land burial practice can provide adequate protection of public health and safety for most LLW. A small volume fraction (approx. 1%) containing most of the activity inventory (approx. 90%) requires specific measures known as greater-confinement disposal (GCD). Different site characteristics and different waste characteristics - such as high radionuclide concentrations, long radionuclide half-lives, high radionuclide mobility, and physical or chemical characteristics that present exceptional hazards - lead to different GCD facility design requirements. Facility design alternatives considered for GCD include the augered shaft, deep trench, engineered structure, hydrofracture, improved waste form, and high-integrity container. Selection of an appropriate design must also consider the interplay between basic risk limits for protection of public health and safety, performance characteristics and objectives, costs, waste-acceptance criteria, waste characteristics, and site characteristics

  13. Summary of EPA's risk assessment results from the analysis of alternative methods of low-level waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandrowski, M.S.; Hung, C.Y.; Meyer, G.L.; Rogers, V.C.

    1987-01-01

    Evaluation of the potential health risk and individual exposure from a broad number of disposal alternatives is an important part of EPA's program to develop generally applicable environmental standards for the land disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW). The Agency has completed an analysis of the potential population health risks and maximum individual exposures from ten disposal methods under three different hydrogeological and climatic settings. This paper briefly describes the general input and analysis procedures used in the risk assessment for LLW disposal and presents their preliminary results. Some important lessons learned from simulating LLW disposal under a large variety of methods and conditions are identified

  14. Investigations of potential below regulatory concern (de minimus) wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruhlke, J.M.; Galpin, F.L.

    1983-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) includes a wide variety of waste types. Many organizations are contemplating the merits of declaring certain LLW as de minimus. The concept of de minimus has considerable support, as evidenced by the comments on NRC's rulemaking for 10 CFR Part 61, Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste. Practical and philosophical considerations lend weight to the further investigation of the de minimus concept for LLW. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognizes the interest and efforts in the concept of de minimus. Because the term de minimus may imply a lack of concern for the risks of disposal, we use the term Below Regulatory Concern (BRC). EPA has developed technical information, cost data, and a methodology for selecting promising candidate waste streams. The NRC's breakdown of LLW, as provided in the supporting documentation for 10 CFR Part 51, serves as a starting point for evaluating individual waste streams. Waste streams may then be ranked on the basis of individual dose, population health impact, and cost/benefit. A set of waste streams consistently ranks near the top in all categories and deserves further analysis. This screening is the initial step in an overall effort to develop a basis for determining the appropriateness and form of generic BRC criteria. 14 references, 8 tables

  15. Iodine-129 Dose in LLW Disposal Facility Performance Assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhite, E.L.

    1999-01-01

    Iodine-129 has the lowest Performance Assessment derived inventory limit in SRS disposal facilities. Because iodine is concentrated in the body to one organ, the thyroid, it has been thought that dilution with stable iodine would reduce the dose effects of 129I.Examination of the dose model used to establish the Dose conversion factor for 129I shows that, at the levels considered in performance assessments of low-level waste disposal facilities, the calculated 129I dose already accounts for ingestion of stable iodine. At higher than normal iodine ingestion rates, the uptake of iodine by the thyroid itself decrease, which effectively cancels out the isotopic dilution effect

  16. Microbial degradation of low-level radioactive waste. Volume 2, Annual report for FY 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, R.D.; Hamilton, M.A.; Veeh, R.H.; McConnell, J.W. Jr.

    1995-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission stipulates in 10 CFR 61 that disposed low-level radioactive waste (LLW) be stabilized. To provide guidance to disposal vendors and nuclear station waste generators for implementing those requirements, the NRC developed the Technical Position on Waste Form, Revision 1. That document details a specified set of recommended testing procedures and criteria, including several tests for determining the biodegradation properties of waste forms. Cement has been widely used to solidify LLW; however, the resulting waste forms are sometimes susceptible to failure due to the actions of waste constituents, stress, and environment. The purpose of this research program is to develop modified microbial degradation test procedures that will be more appropriate than the existing procedures for evaluating the effects of microbiologically influenced chemical attack on cement-solidified LLW. Groups of microorganisms indigenous to LLW disposal sites are being employed that can metabolically convert organic and inorganic substrates into organic and mineral acids. Such acids aggressively react with cement and can ultimately lead to structural failure. Results over the past year on the application of mechanisms inherent in microbially influenced degradation of cement-based material are the focus of the annual report. Data-validated evidence of the potential for microbially influenced deterioration of cement-solidified LLW and subsequent release of radionuclides has been developed during this study

  17. Forum-ing: Signature practice for public theological discourse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The forum meets every Monday morning, except when there is a national holiday. It has operated 30 consecutive years. The forum has a series of presentations, including the opening prayer, self-introductions of each person, a report of the executive director, special presentations from selected community groups, reports, ...

  18. Cemented materials in the LLW and MLW Spanish disposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerrero, A.

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available BWR and PWR cemented matrices to confine low and medium simulated liquid radioactive wastes have been submitted to the leaching process in de-ionized water at 20ºC and 40ºC, to obtain the medium leachability index (L and the effective diffusion coefficient (De of different ions. Otherwise, it has been studied the associated expansion of the backfilling mortar of the concrete containers of the Spanish repository of these wastes, due to a possible attack of the sulfate ions coming from the cemented matrices.

    Matrices cementicias confinantes tipo BWR y PWR de residuos simulados de baja y media radiactividad se han sometido a procesos de lixiviación en agua desionizada a 20ºC y 40ºC, obteniéndose los índices medios de lixiviación (L y el coeficiente de difusión efectiva (De de algunos iones. Por otra parte, se ha estudiado la expansión asociada a un mortero de relleno constitutivo del depósito de almacenamiento de los residuos, por posible ataque de los iones SO4-2 procedentes de las matrices.

  19. SITE GENERATED RADIOLOGICAL WASTE HANDLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. C. Khamankar

    2000-06-20

    The Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System handles radioactive waste products that are generated at the geologic repository operations area. The waste is collected, treated if required, packaged for shipment, and shipped to a disposal site. Waste streams include low-level waste (LLW) in solid and liquid forms, as-well-as mixed waste that contains hazardous and radioactive constituents. Liquid LLW is segregated into two streams, non-recyclable and recyclable. The non-recyclable stream may contain detergents or other non-hazardous cleaning agents and is packaged for shipment. The recyclable stream is treated to recycle a large portion of the water while the remaining concentrated waste is packaged for shipment; this greatly reduces the volume of waste requiring disposal. There will be no liquid LLW discharge. Solid LLW consists of wet solids such as ion exchange resins and filter cartridges, as-well-as dry active waste such as tools, protective clothing, and poly bags. Solids will be sorted, volume reduced, and packaged for shipment. The generation of mixed waste at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) is not planned; however, if it does come into existence, it will be collected and packaged for disposal at its point of occurrence, temporarily staged, then shipped to government-approved off-site facilities for disposal. The Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System has equipment located in both the Waste Treatment Building (WTB) and in the Waste Handling Building (WHB). All types of liquid and solid LLW are processed in the WTB, while wet solid waste from the Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System is packaged where received in the WHB. There is no installed hardware for mixed waste. The Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System receives waste from locations where water is used for decontamination functions. In most cases the water is piped back to the WTB for processing. The WTB and WHB provide staging areas for storing and shipping LLW

  20. SITE GENERATED RADIOLOGICAL WASTE HANDLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. C. Khamankar

    2000-01-01

    The Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System handles radioactive waste products that are generated at the geologic repository operations area. The waste is collected, treated if required, packaged for shipment, and shipped to a disposal site. Waste streams include low-level waste (LLW) in solid and liquid forms, as-well-as mixed waste that contains hazardous and radioactive constituents. Liquid LLW is segregated into two streams, non-recyclable and recyclable. The non-recyclable stream may contain detergents or other non-hazardous cleaning agents and is packaged for shipment. The recyclable stream is treated to recycle a large portion of the water while the remaining concentrated waste is packaged for shipment; this greatly reduces the volume of waste requiring disposal. There will be no liquid LLW discharge. Solid LLW consists of wet solids such as ion exchange resins and filter cartridges, as-well-as dry active waste such as tools, protective clothing, and poly bags. Solids will be sorted, volume reduced, and packaged for shipment. The generation of mixed waste at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) is not planned; however, if it does come into existence, it will be collected and packaged for disposal at its point of occurrence, temporarily staged, then shipped to government-approved off-site facilities for disposal. The Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System has equipment located in both the Waste Treatment Building (WTB) and in the Waste Handling Building (WHB). All types of liquid and solid LLW are processed in the WTB, while wet solid waste from the Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System is packaged where received in the WHB. There is no installed hardware for mixed waste. The Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System receives waste from locations where water is used for decontamination functions. In most cases the water is piped back to the WTB for processing. The WTB and WHB provide staging areas for storing and shipping LLW

  1. Draft low level waste technical summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, W.J.; Benar, C.J.; Certa, P.J.; Eiholzer, C.R.; Kruger, A.A.; Norman, E.C.; Mitchell, D.E.; Penwell, D.E.; Reidel, S.P.; Shade, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to present an outline of the Hanford Site Low-Level Waste (LLW) disposal program, what it has accomplished, what is being done, and where the program is headed. This document may be used to provide background information to personnel new to the LLW management/disposal field and to those individuals needing more information or background on an area in LLW for which they are not familiar. This document should be appropriate for outside groups that may want to learn about the program without immediately becoming immersed in the details. This document is not a program or systems engineering baseline report, and personnel should refer to more current baseline documentation for critical information

  2. Design and operational considerations of United States commercial near-surface low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birk, S.M.

    1997-10-01

    In accordance with the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, states are responsible for providing for disposal of commercially generated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) within their borders. LLW in the US is defined as all radioactive waste that is not classified as spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste, transuranic waste, or by-product material resulting from the extraction of uranium from ore. Commercial waste includes LLW generated by hospitals, universities, industry, pharmaceutical companies, and power utilities. LLW generated by the country''s defense operations is the responsibility of the Federal government and its agency, the Department of Energy. The commercial LLRW disposal sites discussed in this report are located near: Sheffield, Illinois (closed); Maxey Flats, Kentucky (closed); Beatty, Nevada (closed); West Valley, New York (closed); Barnwell, South Carolina (operating); Richland, Washington (operating); Ward Valley, California, (proposed); Sierra Blanca, Texas (proposed); Wake County, North Carolina (proposed); and Boyd County, Nebraska (proposed). While some comparisons between the sites described in this report are appropriate, this must be done with caution. In addition to differences in climate and geology between sites, LLW facilities in the past were not designed and operated to today''s standards. This report summarizes each site''s design and operational considerations for near-surface disposal of low-level radioactive waste. The report includes: a description of waste characteristics; design and operational features; post closure measures and plans; cost and duration of site characterization, construction, and operation; recent related R and D activities for LLW treatment and disposal; and the status of the LLW system in the US

  3. Low-level waste program technical strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bledsoe, K.W.

    1994-01-01

    The Low-Level Waste Technical Strategy document describes the mechanisms which the Low-Level Waste Program Office plans to implement to achieve its mission. The mission is to manage the receipt, immobilization, packaging, storage/disposal and RCRA closure (of the site) of the low-level Hanford waste (pretreated tank wastes) in an environmentally sound, safe and cost-effective manner. The primary objective of the TWRS Low-level waste Program office is to vitrify the LLW fraction of the tank waste and dispose of it onsite

  4. Alternative solidified forms for nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, J.L.; Ross, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive wastes will occur in various parts of the nuclear fuel cycle. These wastes have been classified in this paper as high-level waste, intermediate and low-level waste, cladding hulls, and residues. Solidification methods for each type of waste are discussed in a multiple barrier context of primary waste form, applicable coatings or films, matrix encapsulation, canister, engineered structures, and geological storage. The four major primary forms which have been most highly developed are glass for HLW, cement for ILW, organics for LLW, and metals for hulls

  5. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2005-01-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal

  6. Developers@CERN Forums: Python

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The Developers@CERN Forums second edition took place at the end of May on the topic of Python. How do developers at CERN interact with Python? Which cutting-edge projects are using Python? What were the highlights of this most recent forum?

  7. London International Youth Science Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auty, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the 2010 London International Youth Science Forum (LIYSF) and shares his experience in attending the forum. Unlike the Harry Messel event in Sydney, which takes place every two years, LIYSF is an annual event. Before moving to Imperial College London, LIYSF was held at the Institute of Electrical Engineers and…

  8. Low-level waste institutional waste incinerator program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.D.

    1980-04-01

    Literature surveyed indicated that institutional LLW is composed of organic solids and liquids, laboratory equipment and trash, and some pathological waste. Some toxic and hazardous chemicals are included in the variety of LLW generated in the nation's hospitals, universities, and research laboratories. Thus, the incinerator to be demonstrated in this program should be able to accept each of these types of materials as feedstock. Effluents from the DOE institutional incinerator demonstration should be such that all existing and proposed environmental standards be met. A design requirement was established to meet the most stringent flue gas standards. LLW incineration practice was reviewed in a survey of institutional LLW generators. Incinerator manufacturers were identified by the survey, and operational experience in incineration was noted for institutional users. Manufacturers identified in the survey were contacted and queried with regard to their ability to supply an incinerator with the desired capability. Special requirements for ash removal characteristics and hearth type were imposed on the selection. At the present time, an incinerator type, manufacturer, and model have been chosen for demonstration

  9. Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardi, R.T.

    1995-01-01

    Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT) provides mobile semi-trailer mounted nondestructive examination (NDE) and assay (NDA) for nuclear waste drum characterization. WIT uses various computed tomography (CT) methods for both NDE and NDA of nuclear waste drums. Low level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU), and mixed radioactive waste can be inspected and characterized without opening the drums. With externally transmitted x-ray NDE techniques, WIT has the ability to identify high density waste materials like heavy metals, define drum contents in two- and three-dimensional space, quantify free liquid volumes through density and x-ray attenuation coefficient discrimination, and measure drum wall thickness. With waste emitting gamma-ray NDA techniques, WIT can locate gamma emitting radioactive sources in two- and three-dimensional space, identify gamma emitting isotopic species, identify the external activity levels of emitting gamma-ray sources, correct for waste matrix attenuation, provide internal activity approximations, and provide the data needed for waste classification as LLW or TRU. The mobile feature of WIT allows inspection technologies to be brought to the nuclear waste drum storage site without the need to relocate drums for safe, rapid, and cost-effective characterization of regulated nuclear waste. The combination of these WIT characterization modalities provides the inspector with an unprecedented ability to non-invasively characterize the regulated contents of waste drums as large as 110 gallons, weighing up to 1,600 pounds. Any objects that fit within these size and weight restrictions can also be inspected on WIT, such as smaller waste bags and drums that are five and thirty-five gallons

  10. The International Technical Safety Forum

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    The International Technical Safety Forum is a meeting of safety experts from several physics labs in Europe and the US. Since 1998 participants have been meeting every couple of years to discuss common challenges in safety matters. The Forum helps them define best practices and learn from the important lessons learned by others.   The Forum's participants in front of building 40. This year, the meeting took place at CERN from 12 to 16 April. “This year's meeting covered subjects ranging from communication and training in matters of safety, to cryogenic safety, emergency preparedness and risk analysis”, explains Ralf Trant, head of the CERN Safety Commission and organiser of this year’s Forum. Radiation protection issues are not discussed at the meeting since they involve different expertise. The goal of the Forum is to allow participants to share experience, learn lessons and acquire specific knowledge in a very open way. Round-table discussions, dedicated time for ...

  11. Current status of low-level-waste-segregation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.E.; Colombo, P.; Sailor, V.L.

    1982-01-01

    The adoption of improved waste segregation practices by waste generators and burial sites will result in the improved disposal of low-level wastes (LLW) in the future. Many of the problems connected with this disposal mode are directly attributable to or aggravated by the indiscriminate mixing of various waste types in burial trenches. Thus, subsidence effects, contact with ground fluids, movement of radioactivity in the vapor phase, migration of radionuclides due to the presence of chelating agents or products of biological degradation, deleterious chemical reactions, and other problems have occurred. Regulations are currently being promulgated which will require waste segregation to a high degree at LLW burial sites. The state-of-the-art of LLW segregation technology and current practices in the USA have been surveyed at representative facilities. Favorable experience has been reported at various sites following the application of segregation controls. This paper reports on the state-of-the-art survey and addresses current and projected LLW segregation practices and their relationship to other waste management activities

  12. Forum on Stakeholder Confidence: A Platform to build and share Knowledge about Stakeholder Confidence in Radioactive Waste Management. Reflections on Stakeholder Involvement. How do we ensure engagement for a project running over decades - Case study Sweden. Case Study Switzerland: stakeholder involvement in the Swiss site selection procedure; View of the Implementer on the Swiss Site Selection Procedure. Stakeholder Engagement on Radioactive Waste: Australia's Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuenzi, Pascale Jana; Shaver, Kathryn; Gerhardsson, Ansi; Toernqvist, Johanna Yngve; Bjoerklund, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Session 4 focused on the topic of radioactive waste management and how governments, implementers and regulators have utilised stakeholder involvement to make fair and sustainable decisions. Presentations included case studies from Australia, Canada, Sweden and Switzerland. The session also provided insight on how the Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC), created by the NEA Radioactive Waste Management Committee in 2000, has brought together policy-makers, regulatory officials, experts, implementers and industry representatives to promote open discussion on radioactive waste management among various stakeholders. The session highlighted an ongoing transition of radioactive waste management from theoretical foundations to practical implementation, and how stakeholder involvement plays a significant role in this process. In Mr Minon's opening remarks, he highlighted that a both politically and scientifically stable solution for deep geological repositories must be found, built on trust among all stakeholders. The joint presentation by Ms Kuenzi and Mr Birkhaeuser provided an example of how the younger generation was involved in discussions on radioactive waste management by inviting ten youth from Switzerland to participate in FSC's National Workshop in 2016. Based on the outcomes of the workshop, it will be critical to continue engagement of youth in the near future by expanding outreach to increase participation levels. The Swedish case study illustrated that the roles of a potential repository host community, the implementer and the regulator are complementary. These actors maintained engagement at a high level over decades by ensuring an open process and by building competence in the municipal government. Ms Shaver's presentation conveyed the benefits of sustained engagement. Several presentations also marked the importance of utilising social media in informing stakeholders on issues related to radioactive waste management. Examples of implementation in using

  13. Waste-Form Development Program. Annual progress report, October 1981-September 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Colombo, P.

    1982-09-01

    Low-level wastes (LLW) at nuclear facilities have traditionally been solidified using portland cement (with and without additives). Urea-formaldehyde has been used for LLW solidification while bitumen (asphalt) and thermosetting polymers will be applied to domestic wastes in the near future. Operational difficulties have been observed with each of these solidification agents. Such difficulties include incompatibility with waste constitutents inhibiting solidification, premature setting, free standing water and fires. Some specific waste types have proven difficult to solidify with one or more of the contemporary agents. Similar problems are also anticipated for the solidification of new wastes, which are generated using advanced volume reduction technologies, and with the application of additional agents which may be introduced in the near future for the solidification of LLW. In the Waste Form Development program, contemporary solidification agents are being investigated relative to their potential applications to major fuel cycle and non-fuel cycle LLW streams. The range of conditions under which these solidification agents can be satisfactorily applied to specific LLW streams is being determined. These studies are primarily directed towards defining operating parameters for both improved solidification of problem wastes such as ion exchange resins, organic liquids and oils for which prevailing processes, as currently employed, appear to be inadequate, and solidification of new LLW streams including high solids content evaporator concentrates, dry solids, and incinerator ash generated from advanced volume reduction technologies. Solidified waste forms are tested and evaluated to demonstrate compliance with waste form performance and shallow land burial (SLB) acceptance criteria and transportation requirements (both as they currently exist and as they are anticipated to be modified with time)

  14. Control of water infiltration into near surface LLW disposal units. Progress report on field experiments at a humid region site, Beltsville, Maryland: Volume 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, R.K.; Ridky, R.W.; O'Donnell, E.

    1994-12-01

    The project objective is to assess means for controlling waste infiltration through waste disposal unit covers in humid regions. Experimental work is being performed in large scale lysimeters (70 ft x 45 ft x 10 ft) at Beltsville, MD and results of the assessment are applicable to disposal of LLW, uranium mill tailings, hazardous waste, and sanitary landfills. Three concepts are under investigation: (1) resistive layer barrier, (2) conductive layer barrier, and bioengineering water management. The resistive layer barrier consists of compacted earth (clay). The conductive layer barrier is a special case of the capillary barrier and it requires a flow layer (e.g. fine sandy loam) over a capillary break. As long as unsaturated conditions are maintained water is conducted by the flow layer to below the waste. This barrier is most efficient at low flow rates and is thus best placed below a resistive layer barrier. Such a combination of the resistive layer over the conductive layer barrier promises to be highly effective provided there is no appreciable subsidence. Bioengineering water management is a surface cover that is designed to accommodate subsidence. It consists of impermeable panels which enhance run-off and limit infiltration. Vegetation is planted in narrow openings between panels to transpire water from below the panels. This system has successfully dewatered two lysimeters thus demonstrating that this procedure could be used for remedial action (drying out) existing water-logged disposal sites at low cost

  15. Management of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendee, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes is perhaps the most controversial and least understood aspect of the use of nuclear materials in generating electrical power, the investigation of biochemical processes through tracer kinetics, and the diagnosis and treatment of disease. In the siting of nuclear power facilities, the disposal of radioactive wastes is invariably posed as the ultimate unanswerable question. In the fall of 1979, biochemical and physiologic research employing radioactive tracers was threatened with a slowdown resulting from temporary closure of sites for disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW). Radioactive pharmaceuticals used extensively for diagnosis and treatment of human disease have increased dramatically in price, partly as a result of the escalating cost of disposing of radioactive wastes created during production of the labeled pharmaceuticals. These problems have resulted in identification of the disposal of LLW as the most pressing issue in the entire scheme of management of hazardous wastes. How this issue as well as the separate issue of disposal of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW) are being addressed at both national and state levels is the subject of this chapter

  16. Low-level radioactive waste source terms for the 1992 integrated data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loghry, S.L.; Kibbey, A.H.; Godbee, H.W.; Icenhour, A.S.; DePaoli, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    This technical manual presents updated generic source terms (i.e., unitized amounts and radionuclide compositions) which have been developed for use in the Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These source terms were used in the IDB annual report, Integrated Data Base for 1992: Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste Inventories, Projections, and Characteristics, DOE/RW-0006, Rev. 8, October 1992. They are useful as a basis for projecting future amounts (volume and radioactivity) of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) shipped for disposal at commercial burial grounds or sent for storage at DOE solid-waste sites. Commercial fuel cycle LLW categories include boiling-water reactor, pressurized-water reactor, fuel fabrication, and uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) conversion. Commercial nonfuel cycle LLW includes institutional/industrial (I/I) waste. The LLW from DOE operations is category as uranium/thorium fission product, induced activity, tritium, alpha, and open-quotes otherclose quotes. Fuel cycle commercial LLW source terms are normalized on the basis of net electrical output [MW(e)-year], except for UF 6 conversion, which is normalized on the basis of heavy metal requirement [metric tons of initial heavy metal ]. The nonfuel cycle commercial LLW source term is normalized on the basis of volume (cubic meters) and radioactivity (curies) for each subclass within the I/I category. The DOE LLW is normalized in a manner similar to that for commercial I/I waste. The revised source terms are based on the best available historical data through 1992

  17. Department of Energy treatment capabilities for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrell, D.K.; Fischer, D.K.

    1995-01-01

    This report provides brief profiles for 26 low-level and high-level waste treatment capabilities available at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), Savannah River Site (SRS), and West Valley Demonstration Plant (WVDP). Six of the treatments have potential use for greater-than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW). They include: (a) the glass ceramic process and (b) the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility incinerator at INEL; (c) the Super Compaction and Repackaging Facility and (d) microwave melting solidification at RFP; (e) the vitrification plant at SRS; and (f) the vitrification plant at WVDP. No individual treatment has the capability to treat all GTCC LLW streams. It is recommended that complete physical and chemical characterizations be performed for each GTCC waste stream, to permit using multiple treatments for GTCC LLW

  18. Information systems to support low-level waste management: perspective from the State of Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willaford, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The Illinois Department of Nuclear Safety (IDNS) is required by state law to develop a comprehensive regulatory system for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management. Reliable, extensive information about LLW in Illinois is needed to plan and implement such a regulatory program. IDNS annually surveys, by mail and follow-up phone calls, approximately 260 LLW generators in Illinois. This information is being supplemented by a more detailed characterization of waste streams. Additional information needed for IDNS's regulatory program includes data on components of a waste disposal facility (e.g., concrete performance), site and performance computer models for various kinds of sites and for alternative waste disposal facility designs. In the future, all states will need more information than has been historically the case, given the changes in management and disposal systems and the increased role of the states

  19. 2008 GRS specialized forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butz, H.P.

    2008-01-01

    After the successful trial run in 2007, the 2008 GRS Specialized Forum held at the Cologne Wolkenburg on April 7 and 8, 2008 was a full success. GRS, Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, plans to resume in this way its GRS specialized lectures series with a tradition of many years. Approximately 180 participants from public authorities, licensees, the nuclear industry, research and engineering establishments as well as universities showed their interest in current GRS activities. On 2 days, only GRS experts presented fundamental and GRS-specific approaches in scientific analysis, new research findings, and possibilities of advancing scientific methods under the four headings of Reactor Safety Research and Evaluation, Topical Subjects of Reactor Safety, Radiation Protection Activities, and Repository Safety and Environmental Research. The discussions held after each presentation offered a number of critical, but valuable and welcome, contributions from the different perspectives of the discussants. (orig.)

  20. Defining mixed low-level radioactive and hazardous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, M.F.

    1987-01-01

    During the last several months, staffs of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have been developing a working definition of Mixed Low-Level Radioactive and Hazardous Waste (Mixed LLW). Such wastes are currently being regulated by NRC under authority of the Atomic Energy Act (AEA), as amended, and by EPA under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended. Development of the definition is one component of a comprehensive program to resolve differences between the regulatory programs of the two agencies pertaining to the regulation of the management and disposal of Mixed LLW. Although the definition is still undergoing legal and policy reviews in both agencies, this paper presents the current working definition, discusses a methodology that may be used by NRC licensees to identify Mixed LLW, and provides responses to anticipated questions from licensees about the definition. 3 references, 1 figure

  1. The SGHWR decommissioning project-waste strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, G.; Napper, M.

    1999-01-01

    Every facility must reach a stage in the decommissioning process where low-level waste (LLW) becomes the major factor in the decommissioning costs, therefore a cost-effective strategy for dealing with the waste must be sought. This paper describes the waste management strategy process that was carried out at the steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR) at Winfrith in Dorset. Obviously, each facility will have its own specific radiological problems, with its own unique fingerprint, which will have to be addressed, and, therefore, the optimum waste management strategy will differ for each facility. However, from the work done at SGHWR, it can be seen that it is possible to formulate a structured approach for dealing with LLW which meets the requirements of all stake holders, is safe, technically acceptable, cost-effective, and, furthermore, is equally applicable to other plants. (author)

  2. Feed Materials Production Center Waste Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, R.E.; Allen, T.; Castle, S.A.; Hopper, J.P.; Oelrich, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    In the process of producing uranium metal products used in Department of Energy (DOE) defense programs at other DOE facilities, various types of wastes are generated at the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC). Process wastes, both generated and stored, are discussed in the Waste Management Plan and include low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed hazardous/radioactive waste, and sanitary/industrial waste. Scrap metal waste and wastes requiring special remediation are also addressed in the Plan. The Waste Management Plan identifies the comprehensive programs developed to address safe storage and disposition of all wastes from past, present, and future operations at the FMPC. Waste streams discussed in this Plan are representative of the waste generated and waste types that concern worker and public health and safety. Budgets and schedules for implementation of waste disposition are also addressed. The waste streams receiving the largest amount of funding include LLW approved for shipment by DOE/ORO to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (MgF 2 , slag leach filter cake, and neutralized raffinate); remedial action wastes (waste pits, K-65 silo waste); thorium; scrap metal (contaminated and noncontaminated ferrous and copper scrap); construction rubble and soil generated from decontamination and decommissioning of outdated facilities; and low-level wastes that will be handled through the Low-Level Waste Processing and Shipping System (LLWPSS). Waste Management milestones are also provided. The Waste Management Plan is divided into eight major sections: Introduction; Site Waste and Waste Generating Process; Strategy; Projects and Operations; Waste Stream Budgets; Milestones; Quality Assurance for Waste Management; and Environmental Monitoring Program

  3. Alternative concepts for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal: Conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    This conceptual design report is provided by the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Low-Level Waste Management Program to assist states and compact regions in developing new low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities in accordance with the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendment Act of 1985. The report provides conceptual designs and evaluations of six widely considered concepts for LLW disposal. These are shallow land disposal (SLD), intermediate depth disposal (IDD), below-ground vaults (BGV), above-ground vaults (AGV), modular concrete canister disposal (MCCD), earth-mounded concrete bunker (EMCB). 40 refs., 45 figs., 77 tabs

  4. Assessment of greater-than-Class C waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuman, R.; Jennrich, E.A.; Merrell, G.B.

    1991-02-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A regulates the onsite disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at all DOE facilities. Among its stipulations, the Order states that ''Disposition of wastes designated as greater-than-Class C, as defined in 10 CFR 61.55 must be handled as special cases. Disposal systems for such waste must be justified by a specific performance assessment.'' Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) personnel have undertaken a review and performance assessment of LLW disposal at its Area-G disposal facility, which is described in this report

  5. Identifying industrial best practices for the waste minimization of low-level radioactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, V.

    1996-04-01

    In US DOE, changing circumstances are affecting the management and disposal of solid, low-level radioactive waste (LLW). From 1977 to 1991, the nuclear power industry achieved major reductions in solid waste disposal, and DOE is interested in applying those practices to reduce solid waste at DOE facilities. Project focus was to identify and document commercial nuclear industry best practices for radiological control programs supporting routine operations, outages, and decontamination and decommissioning activities. The project team (DOE facility and nuclear power industry representatives) defined a Work Control Process Model, collected nuclear power industry Best Practices, and made recommendations to minimize LLW at DOE facilities.

  6. Study on the establishment of technical standards of radioactive wastes (annual report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jhin Wung; Hwang, Y. S.; Kim, S. H.; Yoo, J. H.; Lee, I. H.; Yang, H. B.; Rhim, J. K.

    1997-03-01

    From 1989, KAERI and KINS have worked together to set up national regulations to safely manage radioactive wastes. This year project covers 3 items : 1) post-closure surveillance criteria and closure criteria for disposal of LLW wastes, 2) standard format and contents of safety analysis report for spent fuel interim storage, and 3) review of existing regulations. Results from detailed research shall be used to set up the MOST notices on the safe management of radioactive wastes. Even though this project has been stopped after the national rearrangement on the management of LLW, KINS which jointly has studied this project shall independently study it in the future. (author)

  7. Waste inventory, waste characteristics and waste repositories in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimooka, K.

    1997-01-01

    There are two types of repositories for the low level radioactive wastes in Japan. One is a trench type repository only for concrete debris generated from the dismantling of the research reactor. According to the safety assurance system, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has disposed of the concrete debris arose from the dismantling of the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR). The other type is the concreted pit with engineered barriers. Rokkasho Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Center has this type of repository mainly for the power plant wastes. Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. (JNFL) established by electric power companies is the operator of the LLW disposal project. JNFL began the storage operation in 1992 and buried approximately 60,000 drums there. Two hundred thousand drums of uniformly solidified, waste may be buried ultimately. 4 refs, 3 tabs

  8. Development of a multimedia radionuclide exposure model for low-level waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Y.; Whelan, G.; Skaggs, R.L.

    1982-03-01

    A method is being developed for assessing exposures of the air, water, and plants to low-level waste (LLW) as a part of an overall development effort of a LLW site evaluation methodology. The assessment methodology will predict LLW exposure levels in the environment by simulating dominant mechanisms of LLW migration and fate. The methodology consists of a series of physics-based models with proven histories of success; the models interact with each other to simulate LLW transport in the ecosystem. A scaled-down version of the methodology was developed first by combining the terrestrial ecological model, BIOTRAN; the overland transport model, ARM; the instream hydrodynamic model, DKWAV; and the instream sediment-contaminant transport model, TODAM (a one-dimensional version of SERATRA). The methodology was used to simulate the migration of 239 Pu from a shallow-land disposal site (known as Area C) located near the head of South Mortandad Canyon on the LANL site in New Mexico. The scenario assumed that 239 Pu would be deposited on the land surface through the natural processes of plant growth, LLW uptake, dryfall, and litter decomposition. Runoff events would then transport 239 Pu to and in the canyon. The model provided sets of simulated LLW levels in soil, water and terrestrial plants in the region surrounding the site under a specified land-use and a waste management option. Over a 100-yr simulation period, only an extremely small quantity (6 x 10 -9 times the original concentration) of buried 239 Pu was taken up by plants and deposited on the land surface. Only a small fraction (approximately 1%) of that contamination was further removed by soil erosion from the site and carried to the canyon, where it remained. Hence, the study reveals that the environment around Area C has integrity high enough to curtail LLW migration under recreational land use

  9. Alternative techniques for low-level waste shallow land burial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, G.B.; Mezga, L.J.

    1983-01-01

    Experience to date relative to the shallow land burial of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) indicates that the physical stability of the disposal unit and the hydrologic isolation of the waste are the two most important factors in assuring disposal site performance. Disposal unit stability can be ensured by providing stable waste packages and waste forms, compacting backfill material, and filling the void spaces between the packages. Hydrologic isolation can be achieved though a combination of proper site selection, subsurface drainage controls, internal trench drainage systems, and immobilization of the waste. A generalized design of a LLW disposal site that would provide the desired long-term isolation of the waste is discussed. While this design will be more costly than current practices, it will provide additional confidence in predicted and reliability and actual site performance

  10. Treatment of mixed radioactive liquid wastes at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.

    1994-01-01

    Aqueous mixed waste at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is traditionally generated in small volumes with a wide variety of compositions. A cooperative effort at ANL between Waste Management (WM) and the Chemical Technology Division (CMT) was established, to develop, install, and implement a robust treatment operation to handle the majority of such wastes. For this treatment, toxic metals in mixed-waste solutions are precipitated in a semiautomated system using Ca(OH) 2 and, for some metals, Na 2 S additions. This step is followed by filtration to remove the precipitated solids. A filtration skid was built that contains several filter types which can be used, as appropriate, for a variety of suspended solids. When supernatant liquid is separated from the toxic-metal solids by decantation and filtration, it will be a low-level waste (LLW) rather than a mixed waste. After passing a Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test, the solids may also be treated as LLW

  11. Proceedings of the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management: Waste reduction workshop 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    The focus of this workshop was on goal setting and the methods of establishing meaningful goals for a waste minimization program. These workshops assist DOE waste-generating sites in implementing waste minimization plans and programs, thus providing for optimal waste reduction within the DOE complex. All wastes are considered liquid, solid, and airborne within the categories of high-level waste, transuranic waste (TRU), low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste, mixed waste, office waste, and sanitary waste. Topics of discussion within workshops encompass a wide range of subjects. Subjects include any method or technical activity from waste generation to disposal, such as process design or improvements, substitution of materials, waste segregation and recycling/reuse, waste treatment and processing, and administrative controls (procurement and waste awareness training). Consideration is also given to activities for remedial action and for decontamination and decommissioning

  12. Characterization of low-level waste from the industrial sector, and near-term projection of waste volumes and types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKenzie, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    A telephone survey of low-level waste generators has been carried out in order to make useful estimates of the volume and nature of the waste which the generators will be shipping for disposal when the compacts and states begin operating new disposal facilities. Emphasis of the survey was on the industrial sector, since there has been little information available on characteristics of industrial LLW. Ten large industrial generators shipping to Richland, ten shipping to Barnwell, and two whose wastes had previously been characterized by BNL were contacted. The waste volume shipped by these generators accounted for about two-thirds to three-quarters of the total industrial volume. Results are given in terms of the categories of LLW represented and of the chemical characteristics of the different wastes. Estimates by the respondents of their near-term waste volume projections are presented

  13. Characterization of low-level waste from the industrial sector, and near-term projection of waste volumes and types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKenzie, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    A telephone survey of low-level waste generators has been carried out in order to make useful estimates of the volume and nature of the waste which the generators are shipping for disposal when the compacts and states begin operating new disposal facilities. Emphasis of the survey was on the industrial sector, since there has been little information available on characteristics of industrial LLW. Ten large industrial generators shipping to Richland, ten shipping to Barnwell, and two whose wastes had previously been characterized by BNL were contacted. The waste volume shipped by these generators accounted for about two-thirds to three-quarters of the total industrial volume. Results are given in terms of the categories of LLW represented and of the chemical characteristics of the different wastes. Estimates by the respondents of their near-term waste volume projections are presented

  14. Gas generation from low-level radioactive waste: Concerns for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siskind, B.

    1992-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste (ACNW) has urged the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to reexamine the topic of hydrogen gas generation from low-level radioactive waste (LLW) in closed spaces to ensure that the slow buildup of hydrogen from water-bearing wastes in sealed containers does not become a problem for long-term safe disposal. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has prepared a report, summarized in this paper, for the NRC to respond to these concerns. The paper discusses the range of values for G(H 2 ) reported for materials of relevance to LLW disposal; most of these values are in the range of 0.1 to 0.6. Most studies of radiolytic hydrogen generation indicate a leveling off of pressurization, probably because of chemical kinetics involving, in many cases, the radiolysis of water within the waste. Even if no leveling off occurs, realistic gas leakage rates (indicating poor closure by gaskets on drums and liners) will result in adequate relief of pressure for radiolytic gas generation from the majority of commercial sector LLW packages. Biodegradative gas generation, however, could pose a pressurization hazard even at realistic gas leakage rates. Recommendations include passive vents on LLW containers (as already specified for high integrity containers) and upper limits to the G values and/or the specific activity of the LLW

  15. ECNS '99 - Young scientists forum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceretti, M.; Janssen, S.; McMorrow, D.F.

    2000-01-01

    The Young Scientists Forum is a new venture for ECNS and follows the established tradition of an active participation by young scientists in these conferences. At ECNS '99 the Young Scientists Forum brought together 30 young scientists from 13 European countries. In four working groups, they disc......The Young Scientists Forum is a new venture for ECNS and follows the established tradition of an active participation by young scientists in these conferences. At ECNS '99 the Young Scientists Forum brought together 30 young scientists from 13 European countries. In four working groups......, they discussed emerging scientific trends in their areas of expertise and the instrumentation required to meet the scientific challenges. The outcome was presented in the Young Scientists Panel on the final day of ECNS '99. This paper is a summary of the four working group reports prepared by the Group Conveners...

  16. Nuclear waste management policy in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    The object of the nuclear waste management policy in France has always been to protect the worker and the public from unacceptable risks. The means and the structures developed to reach this objective, however, have evolved with time. One fact has come out ever more clearly over the years: Nuclear waste problems cannot be considered in a piecemeal fashion. The French nuclear waste management structure and policy aim at just this global approach. Responsibilities have been distributed between the main partners: the waste producers and conditioners, the research teams, the safety authorities, and the long-term waste manager, National Radioactive Waste Management Agency. The main technical options adopted for waste forms are embedding in hydraulic binders, bitumen, or thermosetting resins for low-level waste (LLW) and medium-level waste (MLW), and vitrification for high-level, liquid wastes. One shallow land disposal site for LLW and MLW has been in operation since 1969, the Centre of La Manche. Alpha-bearing and high-level waste will be disposed of by deep geological storage, possibly in granite formations. Further RandD aims mainly at improving present-day practices, developing more durable, long-term, alpha-bearing waste for all solid waste forms and going into all aspects of deep geological disposal characterization

  17. Assessment of Reusing 14-Ton, Thin-Wall, Depleted UF6 Cylinders as LLW Disposal Containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, D.G.; Poole, A.B.; Shelton, J.H.

    2000-01-01

    Approximately 700,000 MT of DUF 6 is stored, or will be produced under a current agreement with the USEC, at the Paducah site in Kentucky, Portsmouth site in Ohio, and ETTP site in Tennessee. On July 21, 1998, the 105th Congress approved Public Law 105-204, which directed that facilities be built at the Kentucky and Ohio sites to convert DUF 6 to a stable form for disposition. On July 6, 1999, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued the ''Final Plan for the Conversion of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride as Required by Public Law 105-204'', in which DOE committed to develop a ''Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Materials Use Roadmap''. On September 1,2000, DOE issued the ''Draft Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Materials Use Roadmap'' (Roadmap), which provides alternate paths for the long-term storage, beneficial use, and eventual disposition of each product form and material that will result from the DUF 6 conversion activity. One of the paths being considered for DUF 6 cylinders is to reuse the empty cylinders as containers to transport and dispose of LLW, including the converted DU. The Roadmap provides results of the many alternate uses and disposal paths for conversion products and the empty DUF 6 storage cylinders. As a part of the Roadmap, evaluations were conducted of cost savings, technical maturity, barriers to implementation, and other impacts. Results of these evaluations indicate that using the DUF 6 j storage cylinders as LLW disposal containers could provide moderate cost savings due to the avoided cost of purchasing LLW packages and the avoided cost of disposing of the cylinders. No significant technical or institutional .issues were identified that.would make using cylinders as LLW packages less effective than other disposition paths. Over 58,000 cylinders have been used, or will be used, to store DUF 6 . Over 5 1,000 of those cylinders are 14TTW cylinders with a nominal wall thickness of 5/16-m (0.79 cm). These- 14TTW cylinders, which have a nominal diameter

  18. Forum on orthophotography: Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1990-01-01

    A Forum on Orthophotography was held on May 15, 1990, at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The forum was sponsored jointly by the U.S. Soil Conservation Service, the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Governors' Association, and the National Association of Counties. The purpose of the forum was to expand the understanding and use of orthophoto products among the user community, as well as among those currently considering, or as yet unfamiliar with, the use of these products. It was also intended to provide a forum for assessing requirements for, and interest in, orthophoto products and for the identification and discussion of issues and future needs concerning orthophoto use and coordination. The 1-day forum was organized into three major sessions that focussed on technical aspects, user applications, and management issues. The first session presented a brief background and overview of the technical characteristics of standard and digital orthophotos. The second session included formal presentations by Federal, State, and county government agencies on their current and planned applications of orthophoto products, with particular emphasis on their use within geographic information systems. In the third session, private industry addressed their community's interest, capabilities, and potential role. This session also included a proposal by the U.S. Soil Conservation Service for a national cooperative program for the production of l:12,000-scale orthophotoquad products. In addition to the formal presentations, the forum provided a time for open discussion in which attendees had an opportunity to exchange information and make statements about their needs or other items pertinent to the production and dissemination of orthophoto products. Several agency orthophoto product exhibits and interactive demonstrations were also available throughout the day. This report includes a forum agenda and

  19. Fagligt Forum ved en skillevej

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Claus

    2008-01-01

    Med cvu-bibliotekernes overgang til professionshøjskoler ændres det biblioteksfaglige landskab. Det har Fagligt Forum taget konsekvensen af og nedlægger sig selv i løbet af 2000......Med cvu-bibliotekernes overgang til professionshøjskoler ændres det biblioteksfaglige landskab. Det har Fagligt Forum taget konsekvensen af og nedlægger sig selv i løbet af 2000...

  20. Forum, Dedicated to Inclusive Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vachkov I.V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available 26 – 27 of February 2015 in Kazan, in the University of Management “TISBI” been held National (All-Russian forum of promotion of ideas and principles of inclusive education (with international participants “Study and live together: open space of inclusion”. During the work of Forum the most topical questions of inclusive education implement in Russian Federation been discussed.

  1. Waste minimization for commercial radioactive materials users generating low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, D.K.; Gitt, M.; Williams, G.A.; Branch, S.; Otis, M.D.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Schurman, D.L.

    1991-07-01

    The objective of this document is to provide a resource for all states and compact regions interested in promoting the minimization of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). This project was initiated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and Massachusetts waste streams have been used as examples; however, the methods of analysis presented here are applicable to similar waste streams generated elsewhere. This document is a guide for states/compact regions to use in developing a system to evaluate and prioritize various waste minimization techniques in order to encourage individual radioactive materials users (LLW generators) to consider these techniques in their own independent evaluations. This review discusses the application of specific waste minimization techniques to waste streams characteristic of three categories of radioactive materials users: (1) industrial operations using radioactive materials in the manufacture of commercial products, (2) health care institutions, including hospitals and clinics, and (3) educational and research institutions. Massachusetts waste stream characterization data from key radioactive materials users in each category are used to illustrate the applicability of various minimization techniques. The utility group is not included because extensive information specific to this category of LLW generators is available in the literature

  2. Selection of Technical Solutions for the Management of Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-07-01

    The objectives of this publication are to identify and critically review the criteria to be considered while selecting waste management technologies; summarize, evaluate, rank and compare the different technical solutions; and offer a systematic approach for selecting the best matching solution. This publication covers the management of radioactive waste from all nuclear operations, including waste generated from research reactors, power reactors, and nuclear fuel cycle activities including high level waste (HLW) arising from reprocessing and spent nuclear fuel declared as waste (SFW), as well as low level waste (LLW) and intermediate level waste (ILW) arising from the production and use of radionuclides in industry, agriculture, medicine, education and research.

  3. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix A-2: Timing of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinke, W.F.

    1994-09-01

    Planning for the storage or disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of that waste. Timing, or the date the waste will require storage or disposal, is an integral aspect of that planning. The majority of GTCC LLW is generated by nuclear power plants, and the length of time a reactor remains operational directly affects the amount of GTCC waste expected from that reactor. This report uses data from existing literature to develop high, base, and low case estimates for the number of plants expected to experience (a) early shutdown, (b) 40-year operation, or (c) life extension to 60-year operation. The discussion includes possible effects of advanced light water reactor technology on future GTCC LLW generation. However, the main focus of this study is timing for shutdown of current technology reactors that are under construction or operating

  4. The management and disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginniff, M.E.; Blair, I.M.

    1986-01-01

    After an introduction on how radioactivity and radiation can cause damage, the three main types of radioactive wastes (high level (HLW), intermediate level (ILW) and low level (LLW)) are defined and the quantities of each produced, and current disposal method mentioned. The Nuclear Industry Radioactive Waste Executive (NIREX) was set up in 1982 to make proposals for the packaging, transportation and disposal of ILW and, if approved, to manage their implementation. NIREX has also taken over some aspects of the LLW disposal programme, and keeps an inventory of the radioactive waste in the country. The NIREX proposals are considered. For ILW this is that ILW should be immersed in a matrix of concrete, then stored in a repository, the design of which is discussed. The transportation of the concrete blocks is also mentioned. Possible sites for a suitable repository are discussed. Efforts are being made to gain public acceptance of these sites. (U.K.)

  5. The green highway forum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    In late 2004, as part of American Coal Ash Association's (ACAA) strategic planning process, a plan was approved by its Board of Directors implementing a 'green highways' concept which emphasized use of coal combustion products (CCPs) in highways in a variety of ways including being used alone, in combination with other forms of CCPs, and combined with non ash materials. The incentives behind the developed concept were the derived advantages from beneficial technical economic and environmental impacts. Although the primary use of fly ash is concrete, other forms of CCPs could be considered for more non-traditional highway applications. For example, these might include soils stabilization, binders for in-place pavement recycling, use in flowable fills, aggregates, source materials for structural fills and embankments, components in manufactured soils, and for granular base courses beneath pavements. At this same time, unknown to ACCA, EPA Region 3 in Philadelphia was working with the Wetlands and Watershed Work Group, a non-profit organization involved in wetlands policy and management along with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) on their own Green Highways initiative. These groups were planning a conference, the 'Green Highway Forum'. This was held in College Park, Maryland at the University of Maryland, Nov 8-10 2005. At the conference a draft 'roadmap' was presented as a guide to executive level participants bringing the diverse viewpoints of many agencies and interest groups together. Ten guiding principals were considered. The 'Green Highways' is a new effort to recognize the 'greenness' of many projects already completed and those to be initiated. 2 photos.

  6. The European vocation of the Romanian Atomic Forum. Participation to the FORATOM working groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirica, Teodor

    2004-01-01

    ROMATOM, the Romanian Atomic Forum, participates in the activity of the following FORATOM working groups: Quality Management, Business Excellence, Accession Task Force, Radioactive Waste Management, Civil Liability and Law Aspects, Climatic Changes. Recently, Romania was invited to attend the working groups for Research and Development and Community Waste Management

  7. Evaluation of Department of Energy-held potential Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    A number of commercial facilities have generated potential Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste (GTCC LLW), and through contractual arrangements with the US Department of Energy (DOE) and/or for health and safety reasons, the waste is being stored by DOE. A determination is required, considering specific circumstances under which DOE accepted the waste, whether disposal is a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-licensed facility or by DOE in a nonlicensed facility is appropriate. This report presents the preliminary results of an assessment conducted by EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. legal counsel and GTCC LLW Program staff

  8. Characteristics of low-level radioactive waste disposed during 1987--1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roles, G.W.

    1990-12-01

    This report presents the volume, activity, and radionuclide distributions in low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposed during 1987 through 1989 at the commercial disposal facilities located near Barnwell, SC, Richland, WA, and Beatty, NV. The report has been entirely assembled from descriptions of waste provided in LLW shipment manifests. Individual radionuclide distributions are listed as a function of waste class, of general industry, and of waste stream. In addition, information is presented about disposal of wastes containing chelating agents, about use of solidification media, about the distribution of radiation levels at the surfaces of waste containers, and about the distribution of waste container sizes. Considerably more information is presented about waste disposed at the Richland and Beatty disposal facilities than at the Barnwell disposal facility

  9. Treatment of liquid radioactive waste: Evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeiffer, R.

    1982-01-01

    About 10.000 m 3 of low active liquid waste (LLW) arise in the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe. Chemical contents of this liquid waste are generally not declared. Resulting from experiments carried out in the Center during the early sixties, the evaporator facility was built in 1968 for decontamination of LLW. The evaporators use vapor compression and concentrate recirculation in the evaporator sump by pumps. Since 1971 the medium active liquid waste (MLW) from the Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant (WAK) was decontaminated in this evaporator facility, too. By this time the amount of low liquid waste (LLW) had been decontaminated without mentionable interruptions. Afterwards a lot of interruptions of operations occurred, mainly due to leakages of pumps, valves and pipes. There was also a very high radiation level for the operating personnel. As a consequence of this experience a new evaporator facility for decontamination of medium active liquid waste was built in 1974. This facility started operation in 1976. The evaporator has natural circulation and is heated by steam through a heat exchanger. (orig./RW)

  10. Low-level wastes pathways at EDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilmoine, R.; Casseau, L.Ph.

    1999-01-01

    First, what are, for EDF, the main issues dealing with the future management of low level wastes (LLW) will be recalled; and followed by a description of what are the implications of implementing these management principles: areas zoning, set up of pathways, traceability of the wastes and associated controls. The origin of the wastes will then be described using both qualitative and quantitative approaches; the description will specifically address the spreading of wastes production in time. LLW management at EDF will then be envisaged: storage in a specific discharge, pathways for treatment and elimination of wastes with acceptable radiological impact and costs. The example of LLW oils will be developed: particularly as far as hypothesis and results concerning the radiological impacts are concerned. The choice of incineration will then be justified, however expected difficulties to implement it industrially will be pointed out. Other on going studies and their main results will be mentioned: the present time is a turning point on that issue between thought and action; to be on going dismantling must take into account the emerging principles and give rise to good communication. (author)

  11. State compacts and low-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, H.

    1984-01-01

    In 1979, for the first time, low-level waste (LLW) was brought to the attention of policy makers in most states. For several decades, technical personnel had regulated and managed LLW, but elected officials and their staff had been largely ignorant of the origins and destination of low-level radioactive materials. Events in the fall of 1979 set in motion a sequence of events that has compelled the continuing attention of policy makers in every state in the nation. In December 1979, the Executive Committee of the National Governors' Association appointed an eight-member task force, chaired by Governor Bruce Babbitt of Arizona, to review low-level waste management and to formulate state policy by July 1980. The principal findings were as follows: 1. LLW could be managed most efficiently, both technically and politically, at the state level. 2. Each state should take responsibility for its own waste. 3. The creation of a regional waste management system by means of interstate compacts offered the best promise of creating new disposal capacity. 4. Regions should be allowed to exclude waste generated outside their borders after a specified date

  12. Final disposal of radioactive waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freiesleben H.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the origin and properties of radioactive waste as well as its classification scheme (low-level wasteLLW, intermediate-level waste – ILW, high-level waste – HLW are presented. The various options for conditioning of waste of different levels of radioactivity are reviewed. The composition, radiotoxicity and reprocessing of spent fuel and their effect on storage and options for final disposal are discussed. The current situation of final waste disposal in a selected number of countries is mentioned. Also, the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency with regard to the development and monitoring of international safety standards for both spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management is described.

  13. The Forum on Stakeholder Confidence celebrates a decade of work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescatore, C.; Mays, C.; Diaconu, D.

    2010-01-01

    Since its foundation in 2000, the NEA Radioactive Waste Management Committee (RWMC) Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) has fostered constructive dialogues and interactions with hundreds of interested parties in radioactive waste management, ranging from specialists and academic researchers, national and local politicians to local stakeholders and associations. Many of those partners came to Paris in September 2010 to participate in the colloquium 'Looking Back, Looking Forward in Stakeholder Engagement'. This Ten- year Anniversary Colloquium as well as the FSC's eleventh regular meeting on the following two days were open to all interested parties. This article describes the Forum and the online reports in which learning is shared. It highlights the two major topics discussed at the Colloquium and reviews the joint evaluation made there of FSC achievements. Finally, it points to the directions selected for a new decade of work

  14. Does the choice of reactor affect public acceptance of wastes?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhaber, H.

    1993-01-01

    A prime goal of this conference is to suggest future reactor types that would produce greater public acceptability. Presumably the wastes generated by these cycles would, because of lesser amounts or activities, engender fewer disputes over policy than in the past. However, the world-wide arguments over low-level wastes (LLW) suggest this intent is not likely to be achieved. While the activity of these wastes is a tiny fraction of high-level wastes (HLW), the controversies over the former, in Korea, the US and elsewhere, have been as great as for the latter. There is no linear relationship between activity and political desirability. What is needed is a new approach to disposing of and siting all nuclear wastes: LLW, mixed and HLW

  15. Control of water infiltration into near surface LLW disposal units. Progress report on field experiments at a humid region site, Beltsville, Maryland: Volume 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, R.K.; Ridky, R.W.

    1995-04-01

    This study's objective is to assess means for controlling water infiltration through waste disposal unit covers in humid regions. Experimental work is being performed in large-scale lysimeters 21.34 m x 13.72 m x 3.05 m (75 ft x 45 ft x 10 ft) at Beltsville, Maryland. Results of the assessment are applicable to disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW), uranium mill tailings, hazardous waste, and sanitary landfills. Three kinds of waste disposal unit covers or barriers to water infiltration are being investigated: (1) resistive layer barrier, (2) conductive layer barrier, and (3) bioengineering management. The resistive layer barrier consists of compacted earthen material (e.g., clay). The conductive layer barrier consists of a conductive layer in conjunction with a capillary break. As long as unsaturated flow conditions are maintained, the conductive layer will wick water around the capillary break. Below-grade layered covers such as (1) and (2) will fail if there is appreciable subsidence of the cover, and remedial action for this kind of failure will be difficult. A surface cover, called bioengineering management, is meant to overcome this problem. The bioengineering management surface barrier is easily repairable if damaged by subsidence; therefore, it could be the system of choice under active subsidence conditions. The bioengineering management procedure also has been shown to be effective in dewatering saturated trenches and could be used for remedial action efforts. After cessation of subsidence, that procedure could be replaced by a resistive layer barrier or, perhaps even better, by a resistive layer barrier/conductive layer barrier system. The latter system would then give long-term effective protection against water entry into waste without institutional care

  16. Control of water infiltration into near surface LLW disposal units: Progress report on field experiments at a humid region site, Beltsville, Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, R.K.; Ridky, R.W.

    1996-08-01

    This study's objective is to assess means for controlling water infiltration through waste disposal unit covers in humid regions. Experimental work is being performed in large-scale lysimeters 21.34 m x 13.72 m x 3.05 m (70 ft x 45 ft x 10 ft) at Beltsville, Maryland. Results of the assessment are applicable to disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW), uranium mill tailings, hazardous waste, and sanitary landfills. Three kinds of waste disposal unit covers or barriers to water infiltration are being investigated: (1) resistive layer barrier, (2) conductive layer barrier, and (3) bioengineering management. The resistive layer barrier consists of compacted earthen material (e.g., clay). The conductive layer barrier consists of a conductive layer in conjunction with a capillary break. As long as unsaturated flow conditions are maintained, the conductive layer will wick water around the capillary break. Below-grade layered covers such as (1) and (2) will fail if there is appreciable subsidence of the cover, and remedial action for this kind of failure will be difficult. A surface cover, called bioengineering management, is meant to overcome this problem. The bioengineering management surface barrier is easily repairable if damaged by subsidence; therefore, it could be the system of choice under active subsidence conditions. The bioengineering management procedure also has been shown to be effective in dewatering saturated trenches and could be used for remedial action efforts. After cessation of subsidence, that procedure could be replaced by a resistive layer barrier or, perhaps even better, by a resistive layer barrier/conductive layer barrier system. The latter system would then give long-term effective protection against water entry into waste without institutional care

  17. Control of water infiltration into near surface LLW disposal units-progress report on field experiments at a humid region site, Beltsville, Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donnell, E.; Ridky, R.W.; Schulz, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    The study's objective is to assess means for controlling water infiltration through waste disposal unit covers in humid regions. Experimental work is being performed in large-scale lysimeters (75'x45'x10') at Beltsville, MD, and results of the assessment are applicable to disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW), uranium mill tailings, hazardous waste, and sanitary landfills. Three kinds of waste disposal unit covers or barriers to water infiltration are being investigated. They are: (1) resistive layer barrier, (2) conductive layer barrier, and (3) bioengineering management. The conductive layer barrier consists of a conductive layer in conjunction with a capillary break. As long as unsaturated flow conditions are maintained, the conductive layer will wick water around the capillary break. Below-grade layered covers such as (1) and (2) will fail if there is appreciable subsidence of the cover. Remedial action for this kind of failure will be difficult. A surface cover, called bioengineering management, is meant to overcome this problem. The bioengineering management surface barrier is easily repairable if damaged by subsidence; therefore, it could be the system of choice under active subsidence conditions. The bioengineering management procedure also has been shown to be effective in dewatering saturated trenches and could be used for remedial action efforts. After cessation of subsidence, that procedure could be replaced by a resistive layer barrier, or perhaps even better, a resistive layer barrier/conductive layer barrier system. This latter system would then give long-term effective protection against water entry into waste and without institutional care

  18. Environmental assessment for the treatment of Class A low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste generated by the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently evaluating low-level radioactive waste management alternatives at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) located on the Western New York Nuclear Service Center (WNYNSC) near West Valley, New York. The WVDP's mission is to vitrify high-level radioactive waste resulting from commercial fuel reprocessing operations that took place at the WNYNSC from 1966 to 1972. During the process of high-level waste vitrification, low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level waste (MILLW) will result and must be properly managed. It is estimated that the WVDP's LLW storage facilities will be filled to capacity in 1996. In order to provide sufficient safe storage of LLW until disposal options become available and partially fulfill requirements under the Federal Facilities Compliance Act (FFCA), the DOE is proposing to use U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission-licensed and permitted commercial facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Clive, Utah; and Houston, Texas to treat (volume-reduce) a limited amount of Class A LLW and MLLW generated from the WVDP. Alternatives for ultimate disposal of the West Valley LLW are currently being evaluated in an environmental impact statement. This proposed action is for a limited quantity of waste, over a limited period of time, and for treatment only; this proposal does not include disposal. The proposed action consists of sorting, repacking, and loading waste at the WVDP; transporting the waste for commercial treatment; and returning the residual waste to the WVDP for interim storage. For the purposes of this assessment, environmental impacts were quantified for a five-year operating period (1996 - 2001). Alternatives to the proposed action include no action, construction of additional on-site storage facilities, construction of a treatment facility at the WVDP comparable to commercial treatment, and off-site disposal at a commercial or DOE facility

  19. Waste management system functional requirements for Interim Waste Management Facilities (IWMFs) and technology demonstrations, LLWDDD [Low-Level Disposal Development and Demonstration] Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to build upon the preceding decisions and body of information to prepare draft system functional requirements for each classification of waste disposal currently proposed for Low-Level Waste Disposal Development Demonstration (LLWDDD) projects. Functional requirements identify specific information and data needs necessary to satisfy engineering design criteria/objectives for Interim Waste Management Facilities. This draft will suppor the alternatives evaluation process and will continue to evolve as strategy is implemented, regulatory limits are established, technical and economic uncertainties are resolved, and waste management plans are being implemented. This document will become the planning basis for the new generation of solid LLW management facilities on new sites on the Reservation. Eighteen (18) general system requirements are identified which are applicable to all four Low-Level Waste (LLW) disposal classifications. Each classification of LLW disposal is individually addressed with respect ot waste characteristics, site considerations, facility operations, facility closure/post-closure, intruder barriers, institutional control, and performance monitoring requirements. Three initial LLW disposal sites have been proposed as locations on the ORR for the first demonstrations

  20. New trends in the low-level waste management in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, A.; Donato, A.

    1987-01-01

    The low level radioactive waste production per year in Italy is evaluated to be at the origin of the order of about 2500 cu.m.. The LLW management scheme in the past was based on a double approach, depending on the waste origin. The LLW from nuclear activities were stored on site under the responsibility of the producers, which had no real possibility to dispose off the LLW in the lack of authorized disposal sites. The management of the LLW coming from other activities (hospitals, university etc.) was left mainly to the sense of responsibility of the same producers which, under the local authorities authorization released case by case, were permitted by the existing regulations to store and sometimes to discharge the wastes, after a suitable decay period. In this context, the government charged the ENEA (Italian Committee for Nuclear and Alternative Energies Development), in the frame of the national energy plan, to overview and organize the whole matter. This paper describes the new trends adopted by ENEA for the LLW management

  1. Separation, Concentration, and Immobilization of Technetium and Iodine from Alkaline Supernate Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Harvey; Michael Gula

    1998-12-07

    Development of remediation technologies for the characterization, retrieval, treatment, concentration, and final disposal of radioactive and chemical tank waste stored within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex represents an enormous scientific and technological challenge. A combined total of over 90 million gallons of high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW) are stored in 335 underground storage tanks at four different DOE sites. Roughly 98% of this waste is highly alkaline in nature and contains high concentrations of nitrate and nitrite salts along with lesser concentrations of other salts. The primary waste forms are sludge, saltcake, and liquid supernatant with the bulk of the radioactivity contained in the sludge, making it the largest source of HLW. The saltcake (liquid waste with most of the water removed) and liquid supernatant consist mainly of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide salts. The main radioactive constituent in the alkaline supernatant is cesium-137, but strontium-90, technetium-99, and transuranic nuclides are also present in varying concentrations. Reduction of the radioactivity below Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits would allow the bulk of the waste to be disposed of as LLW. Because of the long half-life of technetium-99 (2.1 x 10 5 y) and the mobility of the pertechnetate ion (TcO 4 - ) in the environment, it is expected that technetium will have to be removed from the Hanford wastes prior to disposal as LLW. Also, for some of the wastes, some level of technetium removal will be required to meet LLW criteria for radioactive content. Therefore, DOE has identified a need to develop technologies for the separation and concentration of technetium-99 from LLW streams. Eichrom has responded to this DOE-identified need by demonstrating a complete flowsheet for the separation, concentration, and immobilization of technetium (and iodine) from alkaline supernatant waste.

  2. Forum-ing: Signature practice for public theological discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward P. Wimberly

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces a unique model for public theological conversation and discourse, which was developed by the Concerned Black Clergy of Atlanta (CBC. It was a model developed in response to the problems of poverty, homelessness, and the ‘missing and murdered children’ victimised in Atlanta, Georgia in the United States of America in the early 1980s. It was originally organised to respond to the economic, financial, spiritual, emotional, employment, housing and resource needs of the underserved poor. This unique practice is called forum-ing. The forum meets every Monday morning, except when there is a national holiday. It has operated 30 consecutive years. The forum has a series of presentations, including the opening prayer, self-introductions of each person, a report of the executive director, special presentations from selected community groups, reports, and then questions and answers. The end result is that those attending engage in a process of discourse that enables them to internalise new ideas, approaches, and activities for addressing poverty and injustice in the community. Key to forum-ing for the 21st century is that it is a form of public practical theology rooted and grounded in non-violence growing out of the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s in the United States. The overall purpose of this article is to contribute to the effort of the Faculty of Theology at the University of Pretoria (South Africa to identify those variables that will assist religious leaders in South Africa to develop public conversational spaces to enhance democratic participation. This article presents one model from the African American community in Atlanta, Georgia. The hope is to lift up key variables that might assist in the practical and pastoral theological conversation taking place in South Africa at present.

  3. Improving plant performance through efficient nuclear waste management - The French experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses high and low level waste management and its effect on Plant Performance. In France, high level waste policy is an improtant factor in plant performance. The LLW section of the paper discusses the role of French Industry organization as well as the benefits of standard plants with standard practices. The regulation of the production of waste and the waste processing by utilities is covered

  4. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept the following: • DOE hazardous and non-hazardous non-radioactive classified waste • DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW) • DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW) • U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste The LLW and MLLW listed above may also be classified waste. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and shall be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. Classified waste may be sent to the NNSS as classified matter. Section 3.1.18 provides the requirements that must be met for permanent burial of classified matter. The NNSA/NFO and support contractors are available to assist the generator in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NFO Environmental Management Operations (EMO) at (702) 295-7063, and the call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

  5. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept the following: DOE hazardous and non-hazardous non-radioactive classified waste; DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW); DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW); and, U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste. The LLW and MLLW listed above may also be classified waste. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and shall be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. Classified waste may be sent to the NNSS as classified matter. Section 3.1.18 provides the requirements that must be met for permanent burial of classified matter. The NNSA/NFO and support contractors are available to assist the generator in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NFO Environmental Management Operations (EMO) at (702) 295-7063, and the call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

  6. Environmental monitoring of subsurface low-level waste disposal facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashwood, T.L.; Hicks, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) generates low-level waste (LLW) as part of its research and isotope production activities. This waste is managed in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Solid LLW management includes disposal in above-ground, tumulus-type facilities as well as in various types of subsurface facilities. Since 1986, subsurface disposal has been conducted using various designs employing greater-confinement-disposal (GCD) techniques. The purpose of this paper is to present monitoring results that document the short-term performance of these GCD facilities

  7. Vectra GSI, Inc. low-level waste melter testing Phase 1 test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stegen, G.E.; Wilson, C.N.

    1996-02-21

    A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Vectra GSI, Inc. was one of seven vendors selected for Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW that were completed during fiscal year 1995. The attached report prepared by Vectra GSI, Inc. describes results of melter testing using slurry feed and dried feeds. Results of feed drying and prereaction tests using a fluid bed calciner and rotary dryer also are described.

  8. Vectra GSI, Inc. low-level waste melter testing Phase 1 test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stegen, G.E.; Wilson, C.N.

    1996-01-01

    A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Vectra GSI, Inc. was one of seven vendors selected for Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW that were completed during fiscal year 1995. The attached report prepared by Vectra GSI, Inc. describes results of melter testing using slurry feed and dried feeds. Results of feed drying and prereaction tests using a fluid bed calciner and rotary dryer also are described

  9. National Institutes of Health: Mixed waste stream analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirner, N.P.; Faison, G.P.; Johnson, D.R.

    1994-08-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 requires that the US Department of Energy (DOE) provide technical assistance to host States, compact regions, and unaffiliated States to fulfill their responsibilities under the Act. The National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP) operated for DOE by EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. provides technical assistance in the development of new commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal capacity. The NLLWMP has been requested by the Appalachian Compact to help the biomedical community become better acquainted with its mixed waste streams, to help minimize the mixed waste streams generated by the biomedical community, and to provide applicable treatment technologies to those particular mixed waste streams. Mixed waste is waste that satisfies the definition of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) in the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 (LLRWPA) and contains hazardous waste that either (a) is listed as a hazardous waste in Subpart D of 40 CFR 261, or (b) causes the LLW to exhibit any of the hazardous waste characteristics identified in 40 CFR 261. The purpose of this report is to clearly define and characterize the mixed waste streams generated by the biomedical community so that an identification can be made of the waste streams that can and cannot be minimized and treated by current options. An understanding of the processes and complexities of generation of mixed waste in the biomedical community may encourage more treatment and storage options to become available

  10. Defense waste management operations at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.E.; Kendall, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    Waste management activities were initiated at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to dispose of low-level wastes (LLW) produced by the Department of Energy's (DOE's) weapons testing program. Disposal activities have expanded from the burial of atmospheric weapons testing debris to demonstration facilities for greater-than-Class C (GTCC) waste, transuranic (TRU) waste storage and certification, and the development of a mixed waste (MW) facility. Site specific operational research projects support technology development required for the various disposal facilities. The annual cost of managing the facilities is about $6 million depending on waste volumes and types

  11. Mixed waste treatment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, M.M.; Hunt, L.F.; Sanow, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    The Idaho Operations Office of the Department of Energy (DOE) made the decision in 1984 to prohibit the disposal of mixed waste (MW) (combustible waste-toxic metal waste) in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility. As a result of this decision and due to there being no EPA-permitted MW treatment/storage/disposal (T/S/D) facilities, the development of waste treatment methods for MW was initiated and a storage facility was established to store these wastes while awaiting development of treatment systems. This report discusses the treatment systems developed and their status. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  12. Radioactive waste management after NPP accident: Post-Chernobyl experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhalevich, A.; Grebenkov, A.

    2000-01-01

    As a result of the Chernobyl NPP accident a very large amount of so-called 'Chernobyl waste' were generated in the territory of Belarus, which was contaminated much more than all other countries. These wastes relate mainly to two following categories: low-level waste (LLW) and new one 'Conventionally Radioactive Waste' (CRW). Neither regulations nor technology and equipment were sufficiently developed for such an amount and kind of waste before the accident. It required proper decisions in respect of regulations, treatment, transportation, disposal of waste, etc. (author)

  13. 17. telekomunikacioni forum TELFOR 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nebojša N. Gaćeša

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available U Beogradu je 24, 25. i 26. novembra 2009. godine, u Sava centru, održan 17. telekomunikacioni forum TELFOR 2009, u organizaciji Društva za telekomunikacije – Beograd, „Telekom Srbija“ a. d., JP PTT saobraćaja „Srbija“, Elektrotehničkog fakulteta Univerziteta u Beogradu i IEEE Serbia & Montenegro ComSoc Chapter and Section. Telekomunikacioni forum TELFOR organizuje se sedamnaesti put kao domaći i regionalni godišnji skup stručnjaka koji rade u oblastima telekomunikacija i informacionih tehnologija. Učesnici su uglavnom telekomunikacioni inženjeri, ali i ekonomisti, pravnici, menadžeri, operatori i drugi. Na taj način TELFOR predstavlja forum u okviru kojeg se razmatraju sva relevantna pitanja telekomunikacija: tehnička, razvojna, regulatorna i ekonomska, pitanja proizvodnje opreme, usluga, servisa i funkcionisanja sistema.

  14. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-5: Impact of the 1993 NRC draft Branch Technical Position on concentration averaging of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuite, P.; Tuite, K.; Harris, G.

    1994-09-01

    This report evaluates the effects of concentration averaging practices on the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) generated by the nuclear utility industry and sealed sources. Using estimates of the number of waste components that individually exceed Class C limits, this report calculates the proportion that would be classified as GTCC LLW after applying concentration averaging; this proportion is called the concentration averaging factor. The report uses the guidance outlined in the 1993 Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) draft Branch Technical Position on concentration averaging, as well as waste disposal experience at nuclear utilities, to calculate the concentration averaging factors for nuclear utility wastes. The report uses the 1993 NRC draft Branch Technical Position and the criteria from the Barnwell, South Carolina, LLW disposal site to calculate concentration averaging factors for sealed sources. The report addresses three waste groups: activated metals from light water reactors, process wastes from light-water reactors, and sealed sources. For each waste group, three concentration averaging cases are considered: high, base, and low. The base case, which is the most likely case to occur, assumes using the specific guidance given in the 1993 NRC draft Branch Technical Position on concentration averaging. To project future GTCC LLW generation, each waste category is assigned a concentration averaging factor for the high, base, and low cases

  15. Legislator's guide to low-level radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, J.M.; Melson, L.G.

    1981-05-01

    The purpose of the guide is to provide state legislators and their staff with information on low-level radioactive waste management, issues of special concern to the states, and policy options. During 1979, producers of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) faced a crisis. Two of the three commercial disposal sites were temporarily closed and some LLW producers were running short on storage space. For hospitals, clinics, research organizations, and some industries, this meant potential curtailment of activities that produced these materials. Commercial nuclear reactors were not as hard hit during the crisis because they have larger storage areas. The two sites at Beatty, Nevada, and Hanford, Washington, reopened and the immediate crisis was averted. However, the longer term problem of shortage of disposal capacity was just beginning to be recognized. States should be concerned with this problem for several reasons. First, all states produce LLW although the volumes differ among states. Second, states have the responsibility to protect the public health and welfare of their citizens. Third, states may be given the authority to regulate LLW disposal if they enter into agreements with the federal government (Agreement States Program), and 26 states have that authority. Fourth, because of the long-term monitoring and surveillance necessary at a disposal site, states rather than private industry will be held responsible for ensuring that the disposal site is performing safely. Finally, Congress established a policy in 1980 that each state is responsible for the safe disposal of LLW generated within its borders. This policy also includes provisions that could lead to excluding states from using disposal facilities unless they have entered into regional agreements with other states. Two primary options exist for a state: developing its own disposal facility for LLW generated within its borders or joining with other states to develop a regional disposal facility

  16. Preliminary Disposal Analysis for Selected Accelerator Production of Tritium Waste Streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ades, M.J.; England, J.L.

    1998-06-01

    A preliminary analysis was performed for two selected Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) generated mixed and low-level waste streams to determine if one mixed low-level waste (MLLW) stream that includes the Mixed Waste Lead (MWL) can be disposed of at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at the Hanford Site and if one low-level radioactive waste (LLW) stream, that includes the Tungsten waste stream (TWS) generated by the Tungsten Neutron Source modules and used in the Target/Blanket cavity vessel, can be disposed of in the LLW Vaults at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). The preliminary disposal analysis that the radionuclide concentrations of the two selected APT waste streams are not in full compliance with the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and the Performance Assessment (PA) radionuclide limits of the disposal sites considered

  17. Plans for managing greater-than-glass C low-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newberry, W.F.; Coleman, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Low-level waste is defined in the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (Title I, Public Law 99-240) as radioactive waste that is neither high-level radioactive waste, spent nuclear fuel, nor by-product material (mill tailings). This paper presents proposed plans for the Department of Energy to fulfill its responsibility to dispose of GTCC LLW under the 1985 law, and to ensure that safe options are available for long-term management of such, pending the availability of disposal capacity. In the absence of a concentration-based definition for high-level waste, there currently is no upper bound for the concentration of radionuclides in low-level waste. DOE's plans for managing and disposing of GTCC LLW are generally consistent with a report issued by the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment in October 1988, An Evaluation of Options for Managing Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste

  18. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix D-3: Characterization of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste from other generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Other Generators category includes all greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) that is not generated or held by nuclear utilities or sealed sources licensees or that is not stored at Department of Energy facilities. To determine the amount of waste within this category, 90 LLW generators were contacted; 13 fit the Other Generators category. Based on information received from the 13 identified Other Generators, the GTCC LLW Management Program was able to (a) characterize the nature of industries in this category, (b) estimate the 1993 inventory of Other Generator waste for high, base, and low cases, and (c) project inventories to the year 2035 for high, base, and low cases. Assumptions were applied to each of the case estimates to account for generators who may not have been identified in this study

  19. Siting simulation for low-level waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roop, R.D.; Rope, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Mock Site Licensing Demonstration Project has developed the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Siting Simulation, a role-playing exercise designed to facilitate the process of siting and licensing disposal facilities for low-level waste (LLW). This paper describes the development, content, and usefulness of the siting simulation. The simulation can be conducted at a workshop or conference, involves 14 or more participants, and requires about eight hours to complete. The simulation consists of two sessions; in the first, participants negotiate the selection of siting criteria, and in the second, a preferred disposal site is chosen from three candidate sites. The project has sponsored two workshops (in Boston, Massachusetts and Richmond, Virginia) in which the simulation has been conducted for persons concerned with LLW management issues. It is concluded that the simulation can be valuable as a tool for disseminating information about LLW management; a vehicle that can foster communication; and a step toward consensus building and conflict resolution. The DOE National Low-Level Waste Management Program is now making the siting simulation available for use by states, regional compacts, and other organizations involved in development of LLW disposal facilities

  20. Assessment of waste characteristics and waste management practices for the Midwest compact region:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    To define that system and optimize its components, it is necessary to know various characteristics of the LLW generated in the Midwest Compact Region. It must have projections for the annual volumes from the states in the compact to determine the size and lifetimes of waste management facilities. Information on the different volumes of the region's LLW that fall into NRC waste classes will help determine volumes of waste that may need separate disposal. Eventually, licensing a LLW disposal facility will require source terms /emdash/ quantities and concentrations of nuclides placed in the facility /emdash/ in order to conduct performance assessments. To provide the information needed to make informed decisions about the nature and size of the Midwest region's low-level waste management system, information was gathered from a number of sources. The information was placed in a computer data base to preserve it and to facilitate extracton of combinations of data. This report describes how the information was assembled and the nature of the computerized data base. It also provides a baseline characterization of the low-level waste being generated and shipped for disposal from the Midwest region in the late 1980's. 10 refs., 7 figs., 13 tabs

  1. Social and institutional evaluation report for Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.L.; Lewis, B.E.; Turner, K.H.; Rozelle, M.A.

    1993-10-01

    This report identifies and characterizes social and institutional issues that would be relevant to the siting, licensing, construction, closure, and postclosure of a Greater-Than-Class-C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) disposal facility. A historical perspective of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and LLW disposal programs is provided as an overview of radioactive waste disposal and to support the recommendations and conclusions in the report. A characterization of each issue is provided to establish the basis for further evaluations. Where applicable, the regulatory requirements of 10 CFR 60 and 61 are incorporated in the issue characterizations. The issues are used to compare surface, intermediate depth, and deep geologic disposal alternatives. The evaluation establishes that social and institutional issues do not significantly discriminate among the disposal alternatives. Recommendations are provided for methods by which the issues could be considered throughout the lifecycle of a GTCC LLW disposal program

  2. Social and institutional evaluation report for Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, T.L.; Lewis, B.E.; Turner, K.H.; Rozelle, M.A. [Dames and Moore, Denver, CO (United States)

    1993-10-01

    This report identifies and characterizes social and institutional issues that would be relevant to the siting, licensing, construction, closure, and postclosure of a Greater-Than-Class-C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) disposal facility. A historical perspective of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and LLW disposal programs is provided as an overview of radioactive waste disposal and to support the recommendations and conclusions in the report. A characterization of each issue is provided to establish the basis for further evaluations. Where applicable, the regulatory requirements of 10 CFR 60 and 61 are incorporated in the issue characterizations. The issues are used to compare surface, intermediate depth, and deep geologic disposal alternatives. The evaluation establishes that social and institutional issues do not significantly discriminate among the disposal alternatives. Recommendations are provided for methods by which the issues could be considered throughout the lifecycle of a GTCC LLW disposal program.

  3. Intruder scenarios for site-specific waste classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is currently revising its low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management requirements and guidelines for waste generated at its facilities that support defense missions. Specifically, draft DOE 5820.2A, Chapter 3, describes the purpose, policy, and requirements necessary for the management of defense LLW. The draft DOE policy calls for DOE LLW operations to be managed to protect the health and safety of the public, preserve the environment, and ensure that no remedial action will be necessary after termination of operations. The requirements and guidelines apply to radioactive wastes but are also intended to apply to mixed hazardous and radioactive wastes as defined in draft DOE 5400.5, Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste. The basic approach used by DOE is to establish overall performance objectives in terms of ground-water protection and public radiation dose limits and to require site-specific performance assessments to determine compliance. As a result of these performance assessments, each site shall develop waste acceptance criteria that define the allowable quantities and concentrations of specific radioisotopes. Additional limitations on waste disposal design, waste form, and waste treatment shall also be developed on a site-specific basis. As a key step in the site-specific performance assessments, an evaluation must be conducted of potential radiation doses to intruders who may inadvertently move onto a closed DOE LLW disposal site after loss of institutional controls must be conducted. This paper describes the types of intruder scenarios that should be considered when performing this step of the site-specific performance assessment

  4. Quality assessment of immobilized wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rzyski, B.M.; Suarez, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    A final repository concept for LLW and ILW is being studied in Brazil. It is thus now possible to assess in a systematic way the requirements on the waste packages in each step of the treatment, conditioning, storage, transport, disposal and the quality control procedure needed to show the requirements are fulfilled. The methodology to perform this assessment is discussed in this paper. The results of this methodology is proposed as basis for the licencing of the disposal of different waste packages in Brazil. (author) [pt

  5. Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovard, Pierre

    The origin of the wastes (power stations, reprocessing, fission products) is determined and the control ensuring the innocuity with respect to man, public acceptance, availability, economics and cost are examined [fr

  6. Clean option: An alternative strategy for Hanford Tank Waste Remediation. Volume 2, Detailed description of first example flowsheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    Disposal of high-level tank wastes at the Hanford Site is currently envisioned to divide the waste between two principal waste forms: glass for the high-level waste (HLW) and grout for the low-level waste (LLW). The draft flow diagram shown in Figure 1.1 was developed as part of the current planning process for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS), which is evaluating options for tank cleanup. The TWRS has been established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to safely manage the Hanford tank wastes. It includes tank safety and waste disposal issues, as well as the waste pretreatment and waste minimization issues that are involved in the ``clean option`` discussed in this report. This report describes the results of a study led by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to determine if a more aggressive separations scheme could be devised which could mitigate concerns over the quantity of the HLW and the toxicity of the LLW produced by the reference system. This aggressive scheme, which would meet NRC Class A restrictions (10 CFR 61), would fit within the overall concept depicted in Figure 1.1; it would perform additional and/or modified operations in the areas identified as interim storage, pretreatment, and LLW concentration. Additional benefits of this scheme might result from using HLW and LLW disposal forms other than glass and grout, but such departures from the reference case are not included at this time. The evaluation of this aggressive separations scheme addressed institutional issues such as: radioactivity remaining in the Hanford Site LLW grout, volume of HLW glass that must be shipped offsite, and disposition of appropriate waste constituents to nonwaste forms.

  7. Development of a computerized data base for low-level waste leaching data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, D.R.; Colombo, P.

    1987-01-01

    A computerized data base (db) of low-level waste (LLW) leaching data is being compiled by Brookhaven National Laboratory under contract to the DOE Low-Level Waste Management Program. Although this db is being compiled as part of an effort to develop accelerated leach test procedures for LLW forms, other involved in LLW management may find it useful. The db is implemented on an IBM PC XT and is self-contained in that its data manipulation and analysis programs are not proprietary (i.e., need not be purchased). The db includes data from the Accelerated Leach Test(s) Program plus selected literature data, which have been selected based on criteria that include completeness of the experimental description and elucidation of leaching mechanisms. 6 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  8. Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Program 1992 baseline strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    This baseline strategy document describes Department of Energy (DOE) goals, objectives, and strategy for fulfilling its responsibility to dispose of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) according to the requirements of Section 3(b) of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, Public Law 99-240. This document describes the baseline strategy being employed at the end of FY 1992. The strategy for fulfilling the above responsibility consists of three tasks: interim storage of limited quantities of GTCC LLW at a currently operating DOE facility to eliminate a potential public health and safety threcceptance of GTCC LLW for storage in a DOE dedicated facility on an as-needed basis pending disposal; and disposal in a facility licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The objectives, assumptions, and strategies for each of these tasks are presented in this plan

  9. Managing Greater-Than-Class C low-level radioactive waste: A strategic plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    This strategic plan describes the DOE goals, objectives, and strategy for fulfilling its responsibility to dispose of Greater-Than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW), in accordance with the requirements of Section 3(b) of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, Public Law 99-240. The strategy for fulfilling this responsibility consists of three sequential tasks: interim storage of limited quantities of GTCC LLW at currently operating DOE facilities on an as-needed basis; general acceptance of GTCC LLW for storage in a DOE dedicated facility pending disposal; and disposal in a facility licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The objectives, assumptions, and strategies for each of these tasks are presented in this plan

  10. GTS Duratek, phase I Hanford low-level waste melter tests: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, W.C.

    1995-01-01

    A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense waste stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW was completed during fiscal year 1995. This document is the final report on testing performed by GTS Duratek Inc. in Columbia, Maryland. GTS Duratek (one of the seven vendors selected) was chosen to demonstrate Joule heated melter technology under WHC subcontract number MMI-SVV-384215. The report contains description of the tests, observations, test data and some analysis of the data as it pertains to application of this technology for LLW vitrification. The document also contains summaries of the melter offgas reports issued as separate documents for the 100 kg melter (WHC-SD-WM-VI-028) and for the 1000 kg melter (WHC-SD-WM-VI-029)

  11. Operation for Rokkasho Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamizono, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    The Rokkasho Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) Disposal Center is located in Oishitai, Rokkasho-mura, Kamikitagun, of Aomori Prefecture. This district is situated in the southern part of Shimohita Peninsula in the northeastern corner of the prefecture, which lies at the northern tip of Honshu, Japan's main island. The Rokkasho LLW Disposal Center deals with only LLW generated by operating of nuclear power plants. The No.1 and No.2 disposal facility are now in operation. The disposal facilities in operation have a total dispose capacity of 80,000m 3 (equivalent to 400,000 drums). Our final business scope is to dispose of radioactive waste corresponding to 600,000 m 3 (equivalent to 3000,000 drums). For No.1 disposal facility, we have been disposing of homogeneous waste, including condensed liquid waste, spent resin, solidified with cement and asphalt, etc. For No.2 disposal facility, we can bury a solid waste solidified with mortar, such as activated metals and plastics, etc. Using an improved construction technology for an artificial barrier, the concrete pits in No.2 disposal facility could be constructed more economical and spacious than that of No.1. Both No.1 and No.2 facility will be able to bury about 200,000 waste packages (drums) each corresponding to 40,000 m 3 . As of March 17, 2008, Approximately 200,00 waste drums summing up No.1 and No.2 disposal facility have been received from Nuclear power plants and buried. (author)

  12. Emotional isolation in BBC Forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sienkiewicz, J; Chmiel, A

    2014-01-01

    We analyze emotionally annotated massive data from BBC Forum and examine properties of the isolation phenomenon of negative and positive users. Our results show the existence of a percolation threshold dependent on the average emotional value in the network of negatively charged nodes

  13. 11. Rostock bioenergy forum. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelles, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The seven main focus of the bioenergy forum were: 1. Political regulation and its consequences; 2. Flexible energy supply; 3. Biorefineries for the use of residues from bioenergy production; 4. Process optimization biogas; 5. Alternative substrates for biogas production; 6. Cross-sectoral bioenergy concept; 7. Transport sector (biofuels). Five lectures are separately analyzed for this database. [de

  14. Final environmental assessment for off-site transportation of low-level waste from four California sites under the management of the U.S. Department of Energy Oakland Operations Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-10-01

    The Department of Energy Oakland Operations Office (DOE/OAK) manages sites within California that generate Low Level Waste (LLW) in the course or routine site operations. It is the preference of the DOE to dispose of LLW at federally owned and DOE-operated disposal facilities; however, in some circumstances DOE Headquarters has determined that disposal at commercial facilities is appropriate, as long as the facility meets all regulatory requirements for the acceptance and disposal of LLW, including the passage of a DOE audit to determine the adequacy of the disposal site. The DOE would like to ship LLW from four DOE/OAK sites in California which generate LLW, to NRC-licensed commercial nuclear waste disposal facilities such as Envirocare in Clive, Utah and Chem Nuclear in Barnwell, South Carolina. Transportation impacts for shipment of LLW and MLLW from DOE Oakland sites to other DOE sites was included in the impacts identified in the Department's Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM-PEIS), published in May, 1997, and determined to be low. The low impacts for shipment to commercial sites identified herein is consistent with the WM-PEIS results

  15. Waste Management Facilities Cost Information for transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.; Burton, D.

    1994-09-01

    This report contains transportation costs for most types of DOE waste streams: low-level waste (LLW), mixed low-level waste (MLLW), alpha LLW and alpha MLLW, greater-than-Class C (GTCC) LLW and DOE equivalent waste, transuranic waste (TRU), spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and hazardous waste. Unit rates for transportation of contact-handled ( 200 mrem/hr contact dose) radioactive waste have been estimated previously, and a summary has been included in earlier WMFCI reports. In order to have a single source for obtaining transportation cost for all radioactive waste, the transportation costs for the contact- and remote-handled wastes are repeated in this report. Land transportation of radioactive and hazardous waste is subject to regulations promulgated by DOE, the US Department of Transportation (DOT), the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and state and local agencies. The cost estimates in this report assume compliance with applicable regulations. It should be noted that the trend is toward greater restrictions on transportation of radioactive waste (e.g., truck or rail car speed, shipping route, security escort, and personnel training requirements), which may have a significant impact on future costs

  16. 1st Quarter Transportation Report FY 2015: Radioactive Waste Shipments to and from the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, Louis [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-02-20

    This report satisfies the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) commitment to prepare a quarterly summary report of radioactive waste shipments to and from the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at Area 5. There were no shipments sent for offsite treatment and returned to the NNSS this quarter. This report summarizes the 1st quarter of Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) shipments. Tabular summaries are provided which include the following: Sources of and carriers for LLW and MLLW shipments to and from the NNSS; Number and external volume of LLW and MLLW shipments; Highway routes used by carriers; and Incident/accident data applicable to LLW and MLLW shipments. In this report shipments are accounted for upon arrival at the NNSS, while disposal volumes are accounted for upon waste burial. The disposal volumes presented in this report include minor volumes of non-radioactive classified waste/material that were approved for disposal (non-radioactive classified or nonradioactive classified hazardous). Volume reports showing cubic feet generated using the Low-Level Waste Information System may vary slightly due to rounding conventions for volumetric conversions from cubic meters to cubic feet.

  17. Spatial and temporal distribution of risks associated with low-level radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, P.B.

    1988-01-01

    The major purposes of this dissertation are to examine the economic tradeoffs which arise in the process of LLW disposal and to derive a framework within which the impact of these tradeoffs on LLW disposal policy can be analyzed. There are two distinct stages in the disposal of LLW - the transportation of the waste from sources to disposal sites and the disposal of the waste. The levels of costs and risks associated with these two stages depend on the number and location of disposal sites. Having more disposal sites results in lower transportation costs and risks but also in greater disposal costs and risks. The tradeoff between transportation costs and risks can also be viewed as a tradeoff between present and future risks. Therefore, an alteration in the spatial distribution of LLW disposal sites necessarily implies a change in the temporal distribution of risks. These tradeoffs are examined in this work through the use of a transportation model to which probabilistic radiation exposure constraints are added. Future (disposal) risks are discounted. The number and capacities of LLW disposal sites are varied in order to derive a series of system costs and corresponding expected cancers. This provides policy makers with a cost vs. cancers possibility function

  18. Predisposal management of low and intermediate level radioactive waste. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Radioactive waste is generated in the generation of electricity in nuclear power reactors and in the use of radioactive material in industry, research and medicine. The importance of the safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized. The principles and requirements that govern the safety of the management of radioactive waste are presented in 'The Principles of Radioactive Waste Management', 'Legal and Governmental Infrastructure for Nuclear, Radiation, Radioactive Waste and Transport Safety' and 'Predisposal Management of Radioactive Waste, Including Decommissioning'. The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide regulatory bodies and the operators that generate and manage radioactive waste with recommendations on how to meet the principles and requirements established in Refs for the predisposal management of LLW. This Safety Guide deals with the safety issues associated with the predisposal management of LLW from nuclear fuel cycle facilities, large research and development installations and radioisotope production facilities. This includes all steps and activities in the management of waste, from its initial generation to its final acceptance at a waste disposal facility or the removal of regulatory control. The predisposal management of radioactive waste includes decommissioning. The term 'decommissioning' encompasses both the process of decommissioning a facility and the management of the waste that results (prior to its disposal). Recommendations on the process of decommissioning are provided in Refs. Recommendations on the management of the waste resulting from decommissioning are included in this Safety Guide. Although the mining and milling of uranium and thorium ores is part of the nuclear fuel cycle, the management of the operational waste (e.g. waste rock, tailings and effluent treatment waste) from these activities is not within the scope of this Safety Guide. The LLW that is

  19. Evaluating Options for Disposal of Low-Level Waste at LANL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargis, K.M.; French, S.B.; Boyance, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) generates a wide range of waste types, including solid low-level radioactive waste (LLW), in conducting its national security mission and other science and technology activities. Although most of LANL's LLW has been disposed on-site, limitations on expansion, stakeholder concerns, and the potential for significant volumes from environmental remediation and decontamination and demolition (D and D) have led LANL to evaluate the feasibility of increasing off-site disposal. It appears that most of the LLW generated at LANL would meet the Waste Acceptance Criteria at the Nevada Test Site or available commercial LLW disposal sites. Some waste is considered to be problematic to transport to off-site disposal even though it could meet the off-site Waste Acceptance Criteria. Cost estimates for off-site disposal are being evaluated for comparison to estimated costs under the current plans for continued on-site disposal. An evaluation of risks associated with both on-site and off-site disposal will also be conducted. (authors)

  20. Forum environmental and energy technology 2013. Power-heat cogeneration and air pollution prevention; Forum Umwelt- und Energietechnik 2013. Kraftwaermekopplung und Luftreinhaltung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlowitz, Otto; Meyer, Sven

    2013-07-01

    The volume covers the following topics: The teaching reward 2013 - concept and implementation of the ''Forum environmental and energy technology''; energy efficient air pollution control and material recovery; air pollution control by oxidation; electrical energy production from low-temperature waste heat (ORC processes), electrical power production and process heat utilization.

  1. Certification Plan, Radioactive Mixed Waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, R.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of radioactive mixed waste (RMW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). RMW is low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or transuranic (TRU) waste that is co-contaminated with dangerous waste as defined in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and the Washington State Dangerous Waste Regulations, 173-303-040 (18). This waste is to be transferred to the Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington. This plan incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF (Section 4); and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification

  2. Design and operational considerations of United States commercial nea-surface low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birk, Sandra M.

    1997-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste disposal standards and techniques in the United States have evolved significantly since the early 1960's. Six commercial LLW disposal facilities(Barnwell, Richland, Ward Valley, Sierra Blanca, Wake County and Boyd County) operated and proposed between 1962 and 1997. This report summarizes each site's design and operational considerations for near-surface disposal of low-level radioactive waste. These new standards and mitigating efforts at closed facilities (Sheffield, Maxey Flats, Beatty and West Valley) have helped to ensure that the public has been safely protected from LLW. 15 refs

  3. Model for analyzing demand for low-level waste transport containers - regionalized and non-regionalized scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, A.J.; Rose, K.

    1982-01-01

    Certain types of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) must be shipped in expensive special containers. It is therefore desirable to keep container utilization high. There must be a stock of containers sufficient to ship waste in a timely fashion, but one does not want to have containers sitting idle a significant fraction of the time. A computerized discrete event network model has been developed and is described in this report. The model allows an analyst to determine the effects of varying the increase in LLW, establishment of regional disposal, etc. on requirements for shipping containers

  4. Overview of Nevada Test Site Radioactive and Mixed Waste Disposal Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carilli, J.T.; Krenzien, S.K.; Geisinger, R.G.; Gordon, S.J.; Quinn, B.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Management Program is responsible for carrying out the disposal of on-site and off-site generated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and low-level radioactive mixed waste (MW) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Core elements of this mission are ensuring safe and cost-effective disposal while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. This paper focuses on the impacts of new policies, processes, and opportunities at the NTS related to LLW and MW. Covered topics include: the first year of direct funding for NTS waste disposal operations; zero tolerance policy for non-compliant packages; the suspension of mixed waste disposal; waste acceptance changes; DOE Consolidated Audit Program (DOECAP) auditing; the 92-Acre Area closure plan; new eligibility requirements for generators; and operational successes with unusual waste streams

  5. Treatment methods for radioactive mixed wastes in commercial low-level wastes - technical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKenzie, D.R.; Kempf, C.R.

    1986-01-01

    Treatment options for the management of three generic categories of radioactive mixed waste in commercial low-level wastes (LLW) have been identified and evaluated. These wastes were characterized as part of a BNL study in which LLW generators were surveyed for information on potential chemical hazards in their wastes. The general treatment options available for mixed wastes are destruction, immobilization, and reclamation. Solidification, absorption, incineration, acid digestion, wet-air oxidation, distillation, liquid-liquid solvent extraction, and specific chemical destruction techniques have been considered for organic liquid wastes. Containment, segregation, decontamination, and solidification or containment of residues, have been considered for lead metal wastes which have themselves been contaminated and are not used for purposes of waste disposal shielding, packaging, or containment. For chromium-containing wastes, solidification, incineration, wet-air oxidation, acid digestion, and containment have been considered. Fore each of these wastes, the management option evaluation has included an assessment of testing appropriate to determine the effect of the option on both the radiological and potential chemical hazards present

  6. Treatability study of absorbent polymer waste form for mixed waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, S. D.; Lehto, M. A.; Stewart, N. A.; Croft, A. D.; Kern, P. W.

    2000-01-01

    A treatability study was performed to develop and characterize an absorbent polymer waste form for application to low level (LLW) and mixed low level (MLLW) aqueous wastes at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). In this study absorbent polymers proved effective at immobilizing aqueous liquid wastes in order to meet Land Disposal Restrictions for subsurface waste disposal. Treatment of aqueous waste with absorbent polymers provides an alternative to liquid waste solidification via high-shear mixing with clays and cements. Significant advantages of absorbent polymer use over clays and cements include ease of operations and waste volume minimization. Absorbent polymers do not require high-shear mixing as do clays and cements. Granulated absorbent polymer is poured into aqueous solutions and forms a gel which passes the paint filter test as a non-liquid. Pouring versus mixing of a solidification agent not only eliminates the need for a mixing station, but also lessens exposure to personnel and the potential for spread of contamination from treatment of radioactive wastes. Waste minimization is achieved as significantly less mass addition and volume increase is required of and results from absorbent polymer use than that of clays and cements. Operational ease and waste minimization translate into overall cost savings for LLW and MLLW treatment

  7. Waste management facilities cost information for transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.; Burton, D.

    1995-06-01

    This report contains cost information on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex waste streams that will be addressed by DOE in the programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) project. It describes the results of the task commissioned by DOE to develop cost information for transportation of radioactive and hazardous waste. It contains transportation costs for most types of DOE waste streams: low-level waste (LLW), mixed low-level waste (MLLW), alpha LLW and alpha MLLW, Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) LLW and DOE equivalent waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and hazardous waste. Unit rates for transportation of contact-handled (<200 mrem/hr contact dose) and remote-handled (>200 mrem/hr contact dose) radioactive waste are estimated. Land transportation of radioactive and hazardous waste is subject to regulations promulgated by DOE, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and state and local agencies. The cost estimates in this report assume compliance with applicable regulations.

  8. Waste management facilities cost information for transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.; Burton, D.

    1995-06-01

    This report contains cost information on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex waste streams that will be addressed by DOE in the programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) project. It describes the results of the task commissioned by DOE to develop cost information for transportation of radioactive and hazardous waste. It contains transportation costs for most types of DOE waste streams: low-level waste (LLW), mixed low-level waste (MLLW), alpha LLW and alpha MLLW, Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) LLW and DOE equivalent waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and hazardous waste. Unit rates for transportation of contact-handled ( 200 mrem/hr contact dose) radioactive waste are estimated. Land transportation of radioactive and hazardous waste is subject to regulations promulgated by DOE, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and state and local agencies. The cost estimates in this report assume compliance with applicable regulations

  9. Management of Radioactive Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchokosa, P.

    2010-01-01

    Management of Radioactive Wastes is to protect workers and the public from the radiological risk associated with radioactive waste for the present and future. It application of the principles to the management of waste generated in a radioisotope uses in the industry. Any material that contains or is contaminated with radionuclides at concentrations or radioactivity levels greater than ‘exempt quantities’ established by the competent regulatory authorities and for which no further use is foreseen or intended. Origin of the Radioactive Waste includes Uranium and Thorium mining and milling, nuclear fuel cycle operations, Operation of Nuclear power station, Decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities and Institutional uses of isotopes. There are types of radioactive waste: Low-level Waste (LLW) and High-level Waste. The Management Options for Radioactive Waste Depends on Form, Activity, Concentration and half-lives of the radioactive waste, Storage and disposal methods will vary according to the following; the radionuclides present, and their concentration, and radio toxicity. The contamination results basically from: Contact between radioactive materials and any surface especially during handling. And it may occur in the solid, liquid or gas state. Decontamination is any process that will either reduce or completely remove the amount of radionuclides from a contaminated surface

  10. EUFOREA Rhinology Research Forum 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellings, P W; Akdis, C A; Bachert, C

    2017-01-01

    The first European Rhinology Research Forum organized by the European Forum for Research and Education in Allergy and Airway Diseases (EUFOREA) was held in the Royal Academy of Medicine in Brussels on 17th and 18th November 2016, in collaboration with the European Rhinologic Society (ERS......) and the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA2LEN). One hundred and thirty participants (medical doctors from different specialties, researchers, as well as patients and industry representatives) from 27 countries took part in the multiple perspective discussions including brainstorming sessions on care...... pathways and research needs in rhinitis and rhinosinusitis. The debates started with an overview of the current state of the art, including weaknesses and strengths of the current practices, followed by the identification of essential research needs, thoroughly integrated in the context of Precision...

  11. Waste receiving and processing facility module 1 data management system software project management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.

    1994-01-01

    This document provides the software development plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is one of the plant computer systems for the new WRAP 1 facility (Project W-026). The DMS will collect, store, and report data required to certify the low level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste items processed at WRAP 1 as acceptable for shipment, storage, or disposal

  12. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 Data Management System software requirements specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosnick, C.K.

    1996-01-01

    This document provides the software requirements for Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is one of the plant computer systems for the new WRAP 1 facility (Project W-0126). The DMS will collect, store and report data required to certify the low level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste items processed at WRAP 1 as acceptable for shipment, storage, or disposal

  13. The chemistry, waste form development, and properties of the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic (NAC) process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattus, A.J.; Lee, D.D.; Youngblood, E.L.; Walker, J.F. Jr.; Tiegs, T.N.

    1994-01-01

    A process for the conversion of alkaline, aqueous nitrate wastes to ammonia gas at low temperature, based upon the use of the active metal reductant aluminum, has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The process is also well suited for the removal of low-level waste (LLW) radioelements and hazardous metals which report to the solid, alumina-based by-product. ne chemistry of the interaction of aluminum powders with nitrate, and other waste stream metals is presented

  14. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 Data Management System Software Requirements Specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brann, E.C. II.

    1994-01-01

    This document provides the software requirements for Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is one of the plant computer systems for the new WRAP 1 facility (Project W-026). The DMS will collect, store and report data required to certify the low level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste items processed at WRAP 1 as acceptable for shipment, storage, or disposal

  15. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 Data Management System Software Requirements Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brann, E.C. II

    1994-09-09

    This document provides the software requirements for Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is one of the plant computer systems for the new WRAP 1 facility (Project W-026). The DMS will collect, store and report data required to certify the low level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste items processed at WRAP 1 as acceptable for shipment, storage, or disposal.

  16. Online Groups and Patient Forums

    OpenAIRE

    Dosani, Sabina; Harding, Claire; Wilson, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Online mental health support forums are becoming increasingly popular and there is evidence that they are useful: particularly for providing anonymous support and filling information gaps. However, there are also very real concerns about negative outcomes for users. One online mental health service, Big White Wall, manages these risks and supports its members through the provision of 24 hour professional moderation. Comparison of Big White Wall’s member population with the population of one L...

  17. 3rd Quarter Transportation Report FY 2014: Radioactive Waste Shipments to and from the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, Louis

    2014-01-01

    This report satisfies the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) commitment to prepare a quarterly summary report of radioactive waste shipments to the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at Area 5. There were no shipments sent for offsite treatment and returned to the NNSS this quarter. This report summarizes the 3rd quarter of Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) shipments. This report also includes annual summaries for FY 2014 in Tables 4 and 5. Tabular summaries are provided which include the following: Sources of and carriers for LLW and MLLW shipments to and from the NNSS; Number and external volume of LLW and MLLW shipments; Highway routes used by carriers; and Incident/accident data applicable to LLW and MLLW shipments. In this report shipments are accounted for upon arrival at the NNSS, while disposal volumes are accounted for upon waste burial. The disposal volumes presented in this report do not include minor volumes of non-radioactive materials that were approved for disposal. Volume reports showing cubic feet generated using the Low-Level Waste Information System may vary slightly due to differing rounding conventions.

  18. National Institutes of Health: Mixed waste minimization and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    The Appalachian States Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission requested the US Department of Energy's National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP) to assist the biomedical community in becoming more knowledgeable about its mixed waste streams, to help minimize the mixed waste stream generated by the biomedical community, and to identify applicable treatment technologies for these mixed waste streams. As the first step in the waste minimization process, liquid low-level radioactive mixed waste (LLMW) streams generated at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) were characterized and combined into similar process categories. This report identifies possible waste minimization and treatment approaches for the LLMW generated by the biomedical community identified in DOE/LLW-208. In development of the report, on site meetings were conducted with NIH personnel responsible for generating each category of waste identified as lacking disposal options. Based on the meetings and general waste minimization guidelines, potential waste minimization options were identified

  19. National Institutes of Health: Mixed waste minimization and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The Appalachian States Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission requested the US Department of Energy`s National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP) to assist the biomedical community in becoming more knowledgeable about its mixed waste streams, to help minimize the mixed waste stream generated by the biomedical community, and to identify applicable treatment technologies for these mixed waste streams. As the first step in the waste minimization process, liquid low-level radioactive mixed waste (LLMW) streams generated at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) were characterized and combined into similar process categories. This report identifies possible waste minimization and treatment approaches for the LLMW generated by the biomedical community identified in DOE/LLW-208. In development of the report, on site meetings were conducted with NIH personnel responsible for generating each category of waste identified as lacking disposal options. Based on the meetings and general waste minimization guidelines, potential waste minimization options were identified.

  20. Permitting plan for the immobilized low-activity waste project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deffenbaugh, M.L.

    1997-01-01

    This document addresses the environmental permitting requirements for the transportation and interim storage of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) produced during Phase 1 of the Hanford Site privatization effort. Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Milestone M-90 establishes a new major milestone, and associated interim milestones and target dates, governing acquisition and/or modification of facilities necessary for: (1) interim storage and disposal of Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) immobilized low-activity tank waste (ILAW) and (2) interim storage of TWRS immobilized HLW (IHLW) and other canistered high-level waste forms. Low-activity waste (LAW), low-level waste (LLW), and high-level waste (HLW) are defined by the TWRS, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) DOE/EIS-0189, August 1996 (TWRS, Final EIS). By definition, HLW requires permanent isolation in a deep geologic repository. Also by definition, LAW is ''the waste that remains after separating from high-level waste as much of the radioactivity as is practicable that when solidified may be disposed of as LLW in a near-surface facility according to the NRC regulations.'' It is planned to store/dispose of (ILAW) inside four empty vaults of the five that were originally constructed for the Group Program. Additional disposal facilities will be constructed to accommodate immobilized LLW packages produced after the Grout Vaults are filled. The specifications for performance of the low-activity vitrified waste form have been established with strong consideration of risk to the public. The specifications for glass waste form performance are being closely coordinated with analysis of risk. RL has pursued discussions with the NRC for a determination of the classification of the Hanford Site's low-activity tank waste fraction. There is no known RL action to change law with respect to onsite disposal of waste