WorldWideScience

Sample records for waste fiber generated

  1. Identification of Important Process Variables for Fiber Spinning of Protein Nanotubes Generated from Waste Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    PEEK Polyether ether ketone POM Polarized optical microscopy PT Phosphate-Tris (spinning buffer) SDS-PAGE Sodium dodecyl sulfate...the form of a gas such as water, ammonia, carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide , carbon dioxide and nitrogen. Carbonization is carried out at... steel . Therefore, spider silk fibers possess the desirable mechanical properties for lightweight, high-performance fiber, and composite applications

  2. Fiber Arts and Generative Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Kuhn

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The fiber arts, because they are practiced in different forms around the globe, have the potential to teach us much about generative justice that unites labor, ecological, and expressive values. The ecological mutualism documented in Navajo corrals supports traditional weaving, dyeing, food, and medicinal practices in a sustainable and generative cycle that survives despite disruption and exploitation. The network of fiber craftspeople, retailers, ranchers, teachers, spinners, and dyers and their organizations supports the social mutualism of fiber communities. Fiber arts practices can benefit individuals, communities, the environment, and public health, among other things. Conscious fiber activism and critical making can also be used to explicitly draw attention to problems such as overconsumption, waste, industrial “fast fashion,” labor exploitation, environmental degradation, toxic risks, intolerance, and the devaluing of women and their work. Fiber arts have the potential to support environmental and social mutualism and catalyze a new aesthetic of long-term attachment to meaningful objects and communities, reinforcing the creation and conservation of expressive, ecological, and labor value. 

  3. Thermal stress control using waste steel fibers in massive concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabi, Sahar; Bakhshi, Hossein; Sarkardeh, Hamed; Nikoo, Hamed Safaye

    2017-11-01

    One of the important subjects in massive concrete structures is the control of the generated heat of hydration and consequently the potential of cracking due to the thermal stress expansion. In the present study, using the waste turnery steel fibers in the massive concretes, the amount of used cement was reduced without changing the compressive strength. By substituting a part of the cement with waste steel fibers, the costs and the generated hydration heat were reduced and the tensile strength was increased. The results showed that by using 0.5% turnery waste steel fibers and consequently, reducing to 32% the cement content, the hydration heat reduced to 23.4% without changing the compressive strength. Moreover, the maximum heat gradient reduced from 18.5% in the plain concrete sample to 12% in the fiber-reinforced concrete sample.

  4. Waste Generation Overview, Course 23263

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, Lewis Edward

    2016-01-01

    This course, Waste Generation Overview Live (COURSE 23263), provides an overview of federal and state waste management regulations, as well as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) policies and procedures for waste management operations. The course covers the activities involved in the cradle-to-grave waste management process and focuses on waste characterization, waste compatibility determinations and classification, and the storage requirements for temporary waste accumulation areas at LANL. When you have completed this course, you will be able to recognize federal, state, and LANL environmental requirements and their impact on waste operations; recognize the importance of the cradle-to-grave waste management process; identify the roles and responsibilities of key LANL waste management personnel (e.g., Waste Generator, Waste Management Coordinator, Waste Stream Profile approver, and Waste Certification Official); characterize a waste stream to determine whether it meets the definition of a hazardous waste, as well as characterize the use and minimum requirements for use of acceptable knowledge (AK) for waste characterization and waste compatibility documentation requirements; and identify the requirements for setting up and managing temporary waste accumulation areas.

  5. Waste Generation Overview, Course 23263

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Lewis Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-28

    This course, Waste Generation Overview Live (COURSE 23263), provides an overview of federal and state waste management regulations, as well as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) policies and procedures for waste management operations. The course covers the activities involved in the cradle-to-grave waste management process and focuses on waste characterization, waste compatibility determinations and classification, and the storage requirements for temporary waste accumulation areas at LANL. When you have completed this course, you will be able to recognize federal, state, and LANL environmental requirements and their impact on waste operations; recognize the importance of the cradle-to-grave waste management process; identify the roles and responsibilities of key LANL waste management personnel (e.g., Waste Generator, Waste Management Coordinator, Waste Stream Profile approver, and Waste Certification Official); characterize a waste stream to determine whether it meets the definition of a hazardous waste, as well as characterize the use and minimum requirements for use of acceptable knowledge (AK) for waste characterization and waste compatibility documentation requirements; and identify the requirements for setting up and managing temporary waste accumulation areas.

  6. Waste generator services implementation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousseau, J.; Magleby, M.; Litus, M.

    1998-04-01

    Recurring waste management noncompliance problems have spurred a fundamental site-wide process revision to characterize and disposition wastes at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The reengineered method, termed Waste Generator Services, will streamline the waste acceptance process and provide waste generators comprehensive waste management services through a single, accountable organization to manage and disposition wastes in a timely, cost-effective, and compliant manner. This report outlines the strategy for implementing Waste Generator Services across the INEEL. It documents the culmination of efforts worked by the LMITCO Environmental Management Compliance Reengineering project team since October 1997. These efforts have included defining problems associated with the INEEL waste management process; identifying commercial best management practices; completing a review of DOE Complex-wide waste management training requirements; and involving others through an Integrated Process Team approach to provide recommendations on process flow, funding/charging mechanisms, and WGS organization. The report defines the work that will be performed by Waste Generator Services, the organization and resources, the waste acceptance process flow, the funding approach, methods for measuring performance, and the implementation schedule and approach. Field deployment will occur first at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant in June 1998. Beginning in Fiscal Year 1999, Waste Generator Services will be deployed at the other major INEEL facilities in a phased approach, with implementation completed by March 1999.

  7. Waste generator services implementation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousseau, J.; Magleby, M.; Litus, M.

    1998-04-01

    Recurring waste management noncompliance problems have spurred a fundamental site-wide process revision to characterize and disposition wastes at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The reengineered method, termed Waste Generator Services, will streamline the waste acceptance process and provide waste generators comprehensive waste management services through a single, accountable organization to manage and disposition wastes in a timely, cost-effective, and compliant manner. This report outlines the strategy for implementing Waste Generator Services across the INEEL. It documents the culmination of efforts worked by the LMITCO Environmental Management Compliance Reengineering project team since October 1997. These efforts have included defining problems associated with the INEEL waste management process; identifying commercial best management practices; completing a review of DOE Complex-wide waste management training requirements; and involving others through an Integrated Process Team approach to provide recommendations on process flow, funding/charging mechanisms, and WGS organization. The report defines the work that will be performed by Waste Generator Services, the organization and resources, the waste acceptance process flow, the funding approach, methods for measuring performance, and the implementation schedule and approach. Field deployment will occur first at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant in June 1998. Beginning in Fiscal Year 1999, Waste Generator Services will be deployed at the other major INEEL facilities in a phased approach, with implementation completed by March 1999

  8. Dynamics of radioactive waste generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogaru, Daniela; Virtopeanu, Cornelia; Ivan, Alexandrina

    2008-01-01

    In Romania there are in operation three facilities licensed for collection, treatment and storage of radioactive waste resulted from industry, research, medicine, and agriculture, named institutional radioactive waste. The repository, which is of near surface type, is designed for disposing institutional radioactive waste. The institutional radioactive wastes generated are allowed to be disposed into repository according to the waste acceptance criteria, defined for the disposal facility. The radioactive wastes which are not allowed for disposal are stored on the site of each facility which is special authorised for this. The paper describes the dynamics of generation of institutional waste in Romania, both for radioactive waste which are allowed to be disposed into repository and for radioactive waste which are not allowed to be disposed of. (authors)

  9. Generation of non-overlapping fiber architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapelle, Lucie; Lévesque, M.; Brøndsted, Povl

    2015-01-01

    and polymer networks. The model takes into account the complex geometry of the fiber arrangement in which a fiber can be modeled with a certain degree of bending while keeping a main fiber orientation. The model is built in two steps. First, fibers are generated as a chain of overlapping spheres or as a chain......: a repulsion force to suppress the overlap between two fibers and a bending and stretching force to ensure that the fiber structure is kept unchanged. The model can be used as the geometrical basis for further finite-element modelling....

  10. Fiber Generators in Needleless Electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Niu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional electrospinning often uses a needle-like nozzle to produce nanofibers with a very low production rate. Despite the enormous application potential, needle electrospun nanofibers meet difficulties in broad applications in practice, due to the lack of an economic and efficient way to scale up the electrospinning process. Recently, needleless electrospinning has emerged as a new electrospinning mode and shown ability to produce nanofibers on large-scales. It has been established that the fiber generator, also referred to as “spinneret” in this paper, in needleless electrospinning plays a key role in scaling up the nanofiber production. This paper summarizes the recent advances in the development of needleless spinnerets and their influences on electrospinning process, nanofiber quality, and productivity.

  11. Model for future waste generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundqvist, Jan-Olov; Stenmarck, Aasa; Ekvall, Tomas

    2010-06-15

    The research presented in this report is part of the effort to estimate future Swedish waste quantities in the research programme Towards Sustainable Waste Management. More specifically, we estimate future waste coefficients that are designed to be fed into EMEC, which describes the Swedish economy in terms of 26 industrial sectors, a public sector, and households. Production in the model of industry and public sector requires input of labour, capital, energy, and other commodities. With waste-intensity coefficients added to each production parameter in each sector, EMEC can calculate the future waste quantities generated in different economic scenarios. To produce the waste-intensity coefficients, we make a survey of the current Swedish waste statistics. For each waste category from each sector we estimate whether the quantity depends primarily on the production in the sector, on the inputs of commodities, on the depreciation of capital goods, or on the size of the workforce in the sector. We calculate current waste-intensity coefficients by dividing the waste quantities by the parameter(s) to which they are assigned. We also present five different scenarios to describe how the waste intensity can develop until the year 2030. As far as possible and when deemed to be relevant, we have set the industrial waste generation to depend on the use of a commodity or an energy carrier. The quantity of spent vehicles and most equipment is set to depend on the depreciation of capital goods. Some wastes have been allocated to the staff, for example household waste from business. The quantities of wastes from households have a similar approach where every waste category is assigned to a combination of 26 different commodities

  12. Polyurethane Production from Waste Bale Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim BİLİCİ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the methods of eliminating the pollution from wastes of the materials produced as much as the production methods are important. This requires efficiently use of sources economical and ecologically. Polyester based polymers, which is one of the most important consumed plastic materials in the world, have lots of number of recycling methods. Basically it is called chemical and physical recycling. Chemical recycle methods include glycolysis, aminolysis, methanolysis, hydrolysis and etc.. In this study aromatic polyester polyols produced from bale fiber wastes via glycolysis method. Zinc Acetate used as a catalysts and diethylene glycol used for the glycolysis reaction and moiety of glycol investigated as an experimental parameter. Polyurethane material produced via obtained polyol and TDI (Toluene di Isocyanate reaction. Obtained polyurethane material investigated via FTIR and TGA and compared with the commercial polyurethane. As a result, it has been decided that glycolysis is usable and applicable method for the waste bale fibers.

  13. Power generation from waste wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitsche, H

    1980-04-18

    Since the energy crisis, power generation from waste wood has become increasingly important. The most profitable way to use waste wood in woodworking plants with an annual production of 100 to 150,000 m/sup 3/ solid measure of wood chips and bark is by combustion and thermal energy recovery. In plants with an annual production of 10,000 m/sup 3/ solid measure of wood chips and bark, electric power generation is a suitable application.

  14. Embedded fiber optic ultrasonic sensors and generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorighi, John F.; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar; Achenbach, Jan D.

    1995-04-01

    Ultrasonic sensors and generators based on fiber-optic systems are described. It is shown that intrinsic fiber optic Fabry-Perot ultrasound sensors that are embedded in a structure can be stabilized by actively tuning the laser frequency. The need for this method of stabilization is demonstrated by detecting piezoelectric transducer-generated ultrasonic pulses in the presence of low frequency dynamic strains that are intentionally induced to cause sensor drift. The actively stabilized embedded fiber optic Fabry-Perot sensor is also shown to have sufficient sensitivity to detect ultrasound that is generated in the interior of a structure by means of a high-power optical fiber that pipes energy from a pulsed laser to an embedded generator of ultrasound.

  15. Fiber to the home: next generation network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chengxin; Guo, Baoping

    2006-07-01

    Next generation networks capable of carrying converged telephone, television (TV), very high-speed internet, and very high-speed bi-directional data services (like video-on-demand (VOD), Game etc.) strategy for Fiber To The Home (FTTH) is presented. The potential market is analyzed. The barriers and some proper strategy are also discussed. Several technical problems like various powering methods, optical fiber cables, and different network architecture are discussed too.

  16. Waste Generation Overview Refresher, Course 21464

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Lewis Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-12-13

    This course, Waste Generation Overview Refresher (COURSE 21464), provides an overview of federal and state waste management regulations, as well as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) policies and procedures for waste management operations. The course covers the activities involved in the cradle-to- grave waste management process and focuses on waste characterization, waste compatibility determinations and classification, and the storage requirements for temporary waste accumulation areas at LANL.

  17. Factors affecting the rural domestic waste generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Darban Astane

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study was carried out to evaluate the quantity and quality of rural domestic waste generation and to identify the factors affecting it in rural areas of Khodabandeh county in Zanjan Province, Iran. Waste samplings consisted of 318 rural households in 11 villages. In order to evaluate the quality and quantity of the rural domestic waste, waste production was classified into 12 groups and 2 main groups of organic waste and solid waste. Moreover, kriging interpolation technique in ARC-GIS software was used to evaluate the spatial distribution of the generated domestic waste and ultimately multiple regression analysis was used to evaluate the factors affecting the generation of domestic waste. The results of this study showed that the average waste generated by each person was 0.588 kilograms per day. with the share of organic waste generated by each person being 0.409 kilograms per day and the share of solid waste generated by each person being 0.179 kilograms per day. The results from spatial distribution of waste generation showed a certain pattern in three groups and a higher rate of waste generation in the northern and northwestern parts, especially in the subdistrict. The results of multiple regression analysis showed that the households’ income, assets, age, and personal attitude are respectively the most important variables affecting waste generation. The housholds’ attitude and indigenous knowledge on efficient use of materials are also the key factors which can help reducing waste generation.

  18. Characterization of ecofriendly polyethylene fiber from plastic bag waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soekoco, Asril S.; Noerati, Komalasari, Maya; Kurniawan, Hananto, Agus

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the characterization of fiber morphology, fiber count and tenacity of polyethylene fiber which is made from plastic bag waste. Recycling plastic bag waste into textile fiber has not developed yet. Plastic bag waste was recycled into fiber by melt spinning using laboratory scale melt spinning equipment with single orifice nozzle and plunger system. The basic principle of melt spinning is by melting materials and then extruding it through small orifice of a spinning nozzle to form fibers. Diameter and cross section shape of Recycled polyethylene fiber were obtained by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) instrumentation. Linear density of the recycled fiber were analyzed by calculation using denier and dTex formulation and The mechanical strength of the fibers was measured in accordance with the ASTM D 3379-75 standard. The cross section of recycled fiber is circular taking the shape of orifice. Fiber count of 303.75 denier has 1.84 g/denier tenacity and fiber count of 32.52 has 3.44 g/denier tenacity. This conditions is affected by the growth of polymer chain alignment when take-up axial velocity become faster. Recycled polyethylene fiber has a great potential application in non-apparel textile.

  19. Solid waste generation in reprocessing nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    North, E.D.

    1975-01-01

    Estimates are made of the solid wastes generated annually from a 750-ton/year plant (such as the NFS West Valley plant): high-level waste, hulls, intermediate level waste, failed equipment, HEPA filters, spent solvent, alpha contaminated combustible waste, and low specific activity waste. The annual volume of each category is plotted versus the activity level

  20. Verifying generator waste certification: NTS waste characterization QA requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.E.; Brich, R.F.

    1988-01-01

    Waste management activities managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) include the disposal of low-level wastes (LLW) and mixed waste (MW), waste which is both radioactive and hazardous. A majority of the packaged LLW is received from offsite DOE generators. Interim status for receipt of MW at the NTS Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) was received from the state of Nevada in 1987. The RWMS Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) is expected to be operational in 1988 for approved DOE MW generators. The Nevada Test Site Defense Waste Acceptance Criteria and Certification Requirements (NVO-185, Revision 5) delineates waste acceptance criteria for waste disposal at the NTS. Regulation of the hazardous component of mixed waste requires the implementation of US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Waste generators must implement a waste certification program to provide assurance that the disposal site waste acceptance criteria are met. The DOE/Nevada Operations Office (NV) developed guidance for generator waste certification program plans. Periodic technical audits are conducted by DOE/NV to assess performance of the waste certification programs. The audit scope is patterned from the waste certification program plan guidance as it integrates and provides a common format for the applicable criteria. The criteria focus on items and activities critical to processing, characterizing, packaging, certifying, and shipping waste

  1. Second generation PMR polyimide/fiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavano, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    A second generation polymerization monomeric reactants (PMR) polyimdes matrix system (PMR 2) was characterized in both neat resin and composite form with two different graphite fiber reinforcements. Three different formulated molecular weight levels of laboratory prepared PMR 2 were examined, in addition to a purchased experimental fully formulated PMR 2 precurser solution. Isothermal aging of graphite fibers, neat resin samples and composite specimens in air at 316 C were investigated. Humidity exposures at 65 C and 97 percent relative humidity were conducted for both neat resin and composites for eight day periods. Anaerobic char of neat resin and fire testing of composites were conducted with PMR 15, PMR 2, and an epoxy system. Composites were fire tested on a burner rig developed for this program. Results indicate that neat PMR 2 resins exhibit excellent isothermal resistance and that PMR 2 composite properties appear to be influenced by the thermo-oxidative stability of the reinforcing fiber.

  2. Training waste generators: The first responder in proper waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.

    1989-01-01

    Dealing with waste effectively requires a ''cradle to grave'' approach to waste management. The first step in that chain of custody is the waste generator. The waste generator plays the key role in the correct identification, packaging, and disposal of waste. The Technical Resources and Training Section at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed several short training programs for waste generators. This training presents a consistent approach to proper handling of waste within the ORNL waste management system. This training has been developed for generators of solid low-level radioactive waste, hazardous and mixed waste, and transuranic waste. In addition to the above, a Waste Minimization training program has been developed for use by all organizations at ORNL who generate any type of hazardous waste. These training programs represent a combined effort of the training staff and the technical staff to assure that all ORNL staff accept their responsibility for handling all types of radioactive and hazardous wastes correctly from its generation to its disposal. 4 refs

  3. Methane generation from waste materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samani, Zohrab A.; Hanson, Adrian T.; Macias-Corral, Maritza

    2010-03-23

    An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

  4. Charging generators for waste management costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.B.; Homan, F.J.

    1988-01-01

    Implementation of a plan to charge waste management costs to the facility that generates such waste requires a long-term commitment and consistent administration. The benefit is that generators are provided the incentive to optimize waste management practices if the charges are appropriately applied. This paper summarizes (1) a plan to charge waste generators, (2) the administrative structure of the plan, (3) a comparison between the rate structure and changes in waste disposal operations, and (4) issues that have surfaced as the plan is implemented. 2 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  5. Reduced waste generation technical work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy has established policies for avoiding plutonium losses to the waste streams and minimizing the generation of wastes produced at its nuclear facilities. This policy is evidenced in DOE Order 5820.2, which states ''Technical and administrative controls shall be directed towards reducing the gross volume of TRU waste generated and the amount of radioactivity in such waste.'' To comply with the DOE directive, the Defense Transuranic Waste Program (DTWP) supports and provides funding for specific research and development tasks at the various DOE sites to reduce the generation of waste. This document has been prepared to give an overview of current and past Reduced Waste Generation task activities which are to be based on technical and cost/benefit factors. The document is updated annually, or as needed, to reflect the status of program direction. Reduced Waste Generation (RWG) tasks encompass a wide range of goals which are basically oriented toward (1) avoiding the generation of waste, (2) changing processes or operations to reduce waste, (3) converting TRU waste into LLW by sorting or decontamination, and (4) reducing volumes through operations such as incineration or compaction

  6. Charging generators for waste management costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.B.; Homan, F.J.

    1988-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the need for waste management that incorporates improved waste-handling techniques and more stringent regulatory requirements to prevent future liabilities such as Superfund sites. DOE-Oak Ridge Operations (DOE-ORO) has recognized that an effective waste management program focuses on control at the source and that the burden for responsible waste management can be placed on generators by charging for waste management costs. The principle of including the waste management costs in the total cost of the product, even when the product is research and development, is being implemented at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This paper summarizes a plan to charge waste generators, the administrative structure of the plan, a comparison between the rate structure and changes in waste disposal operations, and issues that have surfaced as the plan is implemented

  7. Charging generators for waste management costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.B.; Homan, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    DOE-Oak Ridge Operations (DOE-ORO) has recognized that an effective waste management program focuses on control at the source and that the burden for responsible waste management can be placed on generators by charging for waste management costs. The principle of including the waste management costs in the total cost of the product, even when the product is research and development, is being implemented at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Charging waste management costs to the pollutor creates an incentive to optimize processes so that less waste is produced and provides a basis for determining the cost effectiveness. 2 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  8. Municipal solid waste generation in Kathmandu, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangi, Mohan B; Pretz, Christopher R; Urynowicz, Michael A; Gerow, Kenneth G; Reddy, J M

    2011-01-01

    Waste stream characteristics must be understood to tackle waste management problems in Kathmandu Metropolitan City (KMC), Nepal. Three-stage stratified cluster sampling was used to evaluate solid waste data collected from 336 households in KMC. This information was combined with data collected regarding waste from restaurants, hotels, schools and streets. The study found that 497.3 g capita(-1) day(-1) of solid waste was generated from households and 48.5, 113.3 and 26.1 kg facility(-1) day(-1) of waste was generated from restaurants, hotels and schools, respectively. Street litter measured 69.3 metric tons day(-1). The average municipal solid waste generation rate was 523.8 metric tons day(-1) or 0.66 kg capita(-1) day(-1) as compared to the 320 metric tons day(-1) reported by the city. The coefficient of correlation between the number of people and the amount of waste produced was 0.94. Key household waste constituents included 71% organic wastes, 12% plastics, 7.5% paper and paper products, 5% dirt and construction debris and 1% hazardous wastes. Although the waste composition varied depending on the source, the composition analysis of waste from restaurants, hotels, schools and streets showed a high percentage of organic wastes. These numbers suggest a greater potential for recovery of organic wastes via composting and there is an opportunity for recycling. Because there is no previous inquiry of this scale in reporting comprehensive municipal solid waste generation in Nepal, this study can be treated as a baseline for other Nepalese municipalities. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Multifunctional Next Generation Carbon Nanotube Super Fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ait-Haddou, Hassan

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this program was to produce continuous strong CNT-based fibers. The production of continuous fibers was met and we have matched 2/3 of the strength of what has been previously reported with CNT-PAN fibers...

  10. Photonic crystal fibers for supercontinuum generation pumped by a gain-switched CW fiber laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Casper; Noordegraaf, Danny; Hansen, Kim P.

    2012-01-01

    Supercontinuum generation in photonics crystal fibers (PCFs) pumped by CW lasers yields high spectral power density and average power. However, such systems require very high pump power and long nonlinear fibers. By on/off modulating the pump diodes of the fiber laser, the relaxation oscillations...... of the laser can be exploited to enhance the broadening process. The physics behind the supercontinuum generation is investigated by sweeping the fiber length, the zero dispersion wavelength, and the fiber nonlinearity. We show that by applying gain-switching a high average output power of up to 30 W can...

  11. Waste Generation in Denmark 1994-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Louise Lykke; Bentzen, Jan Børsen

    In recent years the amount of waste generated by Danish firms has increased significantly. In the present analysis we use the decomposition analysis, which has been widely used in the energy economics literature to explain the mechanisms influencing energy consumption and CO2 emissions. In this p......In recent years the amount of waste generated by Danish firms has increased significantly. In the present analysis we use the decomposition analysis, which has been widely used in the energy economics literature to explain the mechanisms influencing energy consumption and CO2 emissions....... In this paper the methodology is transferred to the topic of waste generation and is used to analyse why the amount of business waste is increasing. The empirical application is related to data for the volumes of waste generated in the Danish economy for the main sectors as well as the manufacturing sector...... covering the time span 1994-2005 has been included. By means of the Log-Mean Divisia Index Method (LMDI) an algebraic decomposition of the data for the waste amounts generated is performed. This methodology separates the increases in waste amounts into effects related to economic activity, industrial...

  12. Processing of basalt fiber production waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevostyanov, V. S.; Shatalov, A. V.; Shatalov, V. A.; Golubeva, U. V.

    2018-03-01

    The production of mineral rock wool forms a large proportion of off-test waste products. In addition to the cost of their production, there are costs for processing and utilization, such as transportation, disposal and preservation. Besides, wastes have harmful effect on the environment. This necessitates research aimed to study the stress-related characteristics of materials, their recyclability and use in the production of heat-saving products.

  13. Methodology for generating waste volume estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.Q.; Hale, T.; Miller, D.

    1991-09-01

    This document describes the methodology that will be used to calculate waste volume estimates for site characterization and remedial design/remedial action activities at each of the DOE Field Office, Oak Ridge (DOE-OR) facilities. This standardized methodology is designed to ensure consistency in waste estimating across the various sites and organizations that are involved in environmental restoration activities. The criteria and assumptions that are provided for generating these waste estimates will be implemented across all DOE-OR facilities and are subject to change based on comments received and actual waste volumes measured during future sampling and remediation activities. 7 figs., 8 tabs

  14. Estimation of restaurant solid waste generation rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, H.H.; Major, I.

    2002-01-01

    Most solid waste utilities try to create a billing schedule that is proportional to solid waste generation rates. This research was trying to determine if the current billing rate structure was appropriate or if a different rate structure should be implemented. A multiple regression model with forward stepwise addition was developed which accurately predicts weekly solid waste generation rates for restaurants. The model was based on a study of daily solid waste generation at twenty-one different businesses. The weight and volume of solid waste generated was measure daily for two weeks during the winter and two weeks during the summer. Researchers followed the collection truck and measured the volume and weight of the container contents. Data was collected on the following independent variables describing each establishment; weight of waste per collection, volume per collection, container utilization factor, building area, contract haulers bill, yearly property tax, yearly solid waste tax, average number of collections per week, type of restaurant, modal number of collections per week, storage container size, waste density, number of employees, number of hours open per week, and weekly collection capacity (collections per week times storage container size). Independent variables were added to the regression equation based on their partial correlation coefficient and confidence level. The regression equations developed had correlation coefficients of 0.87 to 1.00, which was much better than the correlation coefficient (0.84) of an existing model DeGeare and Ongerth (1971) and a correlation coefficient of 0.54 based on the current solid waste disposal tax. (author)

  15. Effect of waste banner as fiber on mechanical properties of concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmawati, Anis; Saputro, Ida Nugroho

    2017-06-01

    Banner is broadly used as advertisement media and event backdrop that is usually only used at one moment, resulting to a lot of waste banners. Banner made from nylon fiber is covered by polyvinyl. Nylon is well known as a material with high tensile strength. This research was done as a preliminary investigation on the opportunity of using the waste banner as fiber material of concrete by evaluating its mechanical properties, namely compressive and flexural strength. Research conducted by making cylinder shape specimens of 15 mm in diameter and 300 mm in height for the compressive strength test. While the specimen shape for flexural strength test was a rectangular prism with dimension of 150 mm in height, 150 mm in width, and 600 mm in length. Fiber generated from waste banner was added in concrete mixtures with percentage of 0.00%, 0.20%, 0.40%, 0.60%, 0.80%, and 1.00% by weight of concrete. The concrete strength was tested at 28 days after standard moisture and temperature curing. Experimental results indicated that the addition of 0.20% of waste banner obtained the highest compressive strength that was 21.967 Mpa, while 0.40% of waste banner obtained the highest flexural strength of 4.663 Mpa.

  16. Process, product, and waste-stream monitoring with fiber optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milanovich, F.P.; Hirschfeld, T.

    1983-07-01

    Fiber optic technology, motivated by communications and defense applications, has advanced significantly the past ten years. In particular, advances have been made in visible radiation transmission efficiency with concurrent reductions in fiber size, weight, and cost. Researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) coupled these advances in fiber optic technology with analytical fluorescence analysis to establish a new technology - remote fiber fluorimetry (RFF). Laser-based RFF offers the potential to measure and monitor from one central and remote laboratory, on-line, and in near real time, trace (ppM) to substantial (g/L) concentrations of selected chemical species in typical process, product, and waste streams. The fluorimeter consists of a fluorescence or Raman spectrometer; unique coupling optics that separates input excitation (laser) radiation from return (fluorescence) radiation; a fiber optic cable; and an optrode - a terminal that interfaces the fiber to the measurement point, which is designed to respond quantitatively to a particular chemical species. At LLNL, research is underway into optrodes that measure pressure, temperature, and pH and those that detect and quantify various actinides, sulfates, inorganic chloride, hydrogen sulfide, aldehydes, and alcohols

  17. Modelling gas generation in radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agg, P.J.

    1993-02-01

    In a repository containing low- and intermediate-level waste, gas generation will occur principally by the coupled processes of metal corrosion and microbial degradation of cellulosic waste. This Paper describes a mathematical model design to address gas generation by these mechanisms. The metal corrosion model incorporates a three-stage process encompassing both aerobic and anaerobic corrosion regimes; the microbial degradation model simulates the activities of eight different microbial populations, which are maintained as functions both of pH and of the concentrations of particular chemical species. Gas concentrations have been measured over a period of three years in large-scale drum experiments designed to simulate repository conditions. Model predictions are confirmed against the experimental measurements, and a prediction is then made of gas concentrations and generation rates over an assessment period of one million years in a radioactive waste repository. (author)

  18. Modelling gas generation in radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agg, P.J.

    1992-07-01

    In a repository containing low- and intermediate-level waste, gas generation will occur principally by the coupled processes of metal corrosion and microbial degradation of cellulosic waste. This paper describes a mathematical model designed to address gas generation by these mechanisms. The metal corrosion model incorporates a three-stage process encompassing both aerobic and anaerobic corrosion regimes; the microbial degradation model simulates the activities of eight different microbial populations, which are maintained as functions both of pH and of the concentrations of particular chemical species. Gas concentrations have been measured over a period of three years in large-scale drum experiments designed to simulate repository conditions. Model predictions are confirmed against the experimental measurements, and a prediction is then made of gas concentrations and generation rates over an assessment period of one million years in a radioactive waste repository. (Author)

  19. Second Generation Waste Package Design Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armijo, J.S.; Misra, M.; Kar, Piyush

    2007-01-01

    The following describes the objectives of Project Activity 023 ''Second Generation Waste Package Design Study'' under DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC28-04RW12232. The objectives of this activity are: to review the current YMP baseline environment and establish corrosion test environments representative of the range of dry to intermittently wet conditions expected in the drifts as a function of time; to demonstrate the oxidation and corrosion resistance of A588 weathering steel and reference Alloy 22 samples in the representative dry to intermittently dry conditions; and to evaluate backfill and design features to improve the thermal performance analyses of the proposed second-generation waste packages using existing models developed at the University of Nevada, Reno(UNR). The work plan for this project activity consists of three major tasks: Task 1. Definition of expected worst-case environments (humidity, liquid composition and temperature) at waste package outer surfaces as a function of time, and comparison with environments defined in the YMP baseline; Task 2. Oxidation and corrosion tests of proposed second-generation outer container material; and Task 3. Second Generation waste package thermal analyses. Full funding was not provided for this project activity

  20. Transportation and disposal of low-and medium level waste using fiber reinforced concrete overpacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pech, R.; Verdier, A.

    1993-01-01

    A multiple-year research effort by Cogema culminated in the development of a new process to immobilize nuclear waste in concrete overpacks reinforced with metal fibers. The fiber concrete overpacks satisfy all French safety requirements relating to waste immobilization and disposal, and have been certified by Andra, the national radioactive waste management agency. This presentation will cover the use of the fiber-reinforced concrete overpack for disposal and transportation, and will discuss their fabrication. (J.P.N.)

  1. Fate of Gases generated from Nuclear Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasulu, M.; Francis, A. J. [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Francis, A. J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York (United States)

    2013-05-15

    The backfill materials such as cement, bentonite or crushed rock are used as engineered barriers against groundwater infiltration and radionuclide transport. Gas generation from radioactive wastes is attributed to radiolysis, corrosion of metals, and degradation of organic materials. Corrosion of steel drums and biodegradation of organic materials in L/ILW can generate gas which causes pressure build up and has the potential to compromise the integrity of waste containers and release the radionuclides and other contaminants into the environment. Performance assessment therefore requires a detailed understanding of the source and fate of gas generation and transport within the disposal system. Here we review the sources and fate of various type of gases generated from nuclear wastes and repositories. Studies on modeling of the fate and transport of repository gases primarily deal with hydrogen and CO{sub 2}. Although hydrogen and carbon dioxide are the major gases of concern, microbial transformations of these gases in the subterranean environments could be significant. Metabolism of hydrogen along with the carbon dioxide results in the formation of methane, low molecular weight organic compounds and cell biomass and thus could affect the total inventory in a repository environment. Modeling studies should take into consideration of both the gas generation and consumption processes over the long-term.

  2. Ocean disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    The objective of this study was to predict tensile stress levels in thin-walled titanium alloy and thick-walled carbon steel containers designed for the ocean disposal of heat-generating radioactive wastes. Results showed that tensile stresses would be produced in both designs by the expansion of the lead filter, for a temperature rise of 200 0 C. Tensile stress could be reduced if the waste heat output at disposal was reduced. Initial stresses for the titanium-alloy containers could be relieved by heat treatment. (UK)

  3. Production of bacterial cellulose and enzyme from waste fiber sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial cellulose (BC) is a highly crystalline and mechanically stable nanopolymer, which has excellent potential as a material in many novel applications, especially if it can be produced in large amounts from an inexpensive feedstock. Waste fiber sludge, a residue with little or no value, originates from pulp mills and lignocellulosic biorefineries. A high cellulose and low lignin content contributes to making the fiber sludge suitable for bioconversion, even without a thermochemical pretreatment step. In this study, the possibility to combine production of BC and hydrolytic enzymes from fiber sludge was investigated. The BC was characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis, and its mechanical properties were investigated. Results Bacterial cellulose and enzymes were produced through sequential fermentations with the bacterium Gluconacetobacter xylinus and the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei. Fiber sludges from sulfate (SAFS) and sulfite (SIFS) processes were hydrolyzed enzymatically without prior thermochemical pretreatment and the resulting hydrolysates were used for BC production. The highest volumetric yields of BC from SAFS and SIFS were 11 and 10 g/L (DW), respectively. The BC yield on initial sugar in hydrolysate-based medium reached 0.3 g/g after seven days of cultivation. The tensile strength of wet BC from hydrolysate medium was about 0.04 MPa compared to about 0.03 MPa for BC from a glucose-based reference medium, while the crystallinity was slightly lower for BC from hydrolysate cultures. The spent hydrolysates were used for production of cellulase with T. reesei. The cellulase activity (CMCase activity) in spent SAFS and SIFS hydrolysates reached 5.2 U/mL (87 nkat/mL), which was similar to the activity level obtained in a reference medium containing equal amounts of reducing sugar. Conclusions It was shown that waste fiber sludge is a suitable raw material for production of

  4. Infrared Supercontinuum Generation in Soft-glass Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Christian

    This Ph.D.-project presents numerical simulations of supercontinuum (SC) generation in optical fiber laser systems based on various soft-glass materials. Extensive numerical modeling is performed in order to understand and characterize the generated SC. This includes a review of the generalized...

  5. Physical and thermal behavior of cement composites reinforced with recycled waste paper fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospodarova, Viola; Stevulova, Nadezda; Vaclavik, Vojtech; Dvorsky, Tomas

    2017-07-01

    In this study, three types of recycled waste paper fibers were used to manufacture cement composites reinforced with recycled cellulosic fibers. Waste cellulosic fibers in quantity of 0.2, 0.3, and 0.5 wt.% were added to cement mixtures. Physical properties such as density, water capillarity, water absorbability and thermal conductivity of fiber cement composites were studied after 28 days of hardening. However, durability of composites was tested after their water storage up to 90 days. Final results of tested properties of fiber cement composites were compared with cement reference sample without cellulosic fibers.

  6. Generation of electronic waste in India: Current scenario, dilemmas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper tries to quantify the amount of E-waste generated in India with the related stakeholder involvement. Electronic waste (E-waste) or waste electrical and electronic equipments (WEEE), which is relatively a recent addition to the hazardous waste stream, is drawing rapid attention across the globe as the quantity ...

  7. Minimizing generator liability while disposing hazardous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canter, L.W.; Lahlou, M.; Pendurthi, R.P.

    1991-01-01

    Potential liabilities associated with hazardous waste disposal are related to waste properties, disposal practices and the potential threat to people and the environment in case of a pollutant release. Based on various regulations, these liabilities are enforceable and longstanding. A methodology which can help hazardous waste generators select a commercial disposal facility with a relatively low risk of potential liability is described in this paper. The methodology has two parts. The first part has 8 categories encompassing 30 factors common to all facilities, and the second part includes one category dealing with 5 factors on specific wastes and treatment/disposal technologies. This two-part evaluation feature enables the user to adapt the methodology to any type of waste disposal. In determining the scores for the factors used in the evaluation. an unranked paired comparison technique with slight modifications was used to weight the relative importance of the individual factors. In the methodology it is possible for the user to redefine the factors and change the scoring system. To make the methodology more efficient, a user-friendly computer program has been developed; the computer program is written so that desired changes in the methodology can be readily implemented

  8. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    This fourth Annual Report presents and analyzes 1995 DOE complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention activities at 40 reporting sites in 25 States, and trends DOE waste generation from 1991 through 1995. DOE has established a 50% reduction goal (relative to the 1993 baseline) for routine operations radioactive and hazardous waste generation, due by December 31, 1999. Routine operations waste generation decreased 37% from 1994 to 1995, and 43% overall from 1993--1995

  9. Ocean disposal of heat generating waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    A number of options for the disposal of vitrified heat generating waste are being studied to ensure that safe methods are available when the time comes for disposal operations to commence. This study has considered the engineering and operational aspects of the Penetrator Option for ocean disposal to enable technical comparisons with other options to be made. In the Penetrator Option concept, waste would be loaded into carefully designed containers which would be launched at a suitable deep ocean site where they would fall freely through the water and would embed themselves completely within the seabed sediments. Radiological protection would be provided by a multi-barrier system including the vitrified waste form, the penetrator containment, the covering sediment and the ocean. Calculations and demonstration have shown that penetrators could easily achieve embedment depths in excess of 30m and preliminary radiological assessments indicate that 30m of intact sediment would be an effective barrier for radionuclide isolation. The study concludes that a 75mm thickness of low carbon steel appears to be sufficient to provide a containment life of 500 to 1000 years during which time the waste heat output would have decayed to an insignificant level. Disposal costs have been assessed. (author)

  10. Non-woven Textile Materials from Waste Fibers for Cleanup of Waters Polluted with Petroleum and Oil Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neznakomova, Margarita; Boteva, Silvena; Tzankov, Luben; Elhag, Mohamed

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the possibility of using non-woven materials (NWM) from waste fibers for oil spill cleanup and their subsequent recovery. Manufacture of textile and readymade products generates a significant amount of solid waste. A major part of it is deposited in landfills or disposed of uncontrollably. This slowly degradable waste causes environmental problems. In the present study are used two types of NWM obtained by methods where waste fibers are utilized. Thus, real textile products are produced (blankets) with which spills are covered and removed by adsorption. These products are produced by two methods: the strengthening of the covering from recovered fibers is made by entanglement when needles of special design pass through layers (needle-punching) or by stitching with thread (technology Maliwatt). Regardless of the random nature of the fiber mixture, the investigated products are good adsorbents of petroleum products. The nature of their structure (a significant void volume and developed surface) leads to a rapid recovery of the spilled petroleum products without sinking of the fiber layer for the sampled times. The used NWM can be burned under special conditions.

  11. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant hydrogen generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.B.; King, A.D. Jr.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.

    1996-02-01

    The most promising method for the disposal of highly radioactive nuclear wastes is a vitrification process in which the wastes are incorporated into borosilicate glass logs, the logs are sealed into welded stainless steel canisters, and the canisters are buried in suitably protected burial sites for disposal. The purpose of the research supported by the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) project of the Department of Energy through Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and summarized in this report was to gain a basic understanding of the hydrogen generation process and to predict the rate and amount of hydrogen generation during the treatment of HWVP feed simulants with formic acid. The objectives of the study were to determine the key feed components and process variables which enhance or inhibit the.production of hydrogen. Information on the kinetics and stoichiometry of relevant formic acid reactions were sought to provide a basis for viable mechanistic proposals. The chemical reactions were characterized through the production and consumption of the key gaseous products such as H 2 . CO 2 , N 2 0, NO, and NH 3 . For this mason this research program relied heavily on analyses of the gases produced and consumed during reactions of the HWVP feed simulants with formic acid under various conditions. Such analyses, used gas chromatographic equipment and expertise at the University of Georgia for the separation and determination of H 2 , CO, CO 2 , N 2 , N 2 O and NO

  12. Supercontinuum Generation in Uniform and Tapered Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Simon Toft; Møller, Uffe Visbech; Larsen, Casper

    Supercontinuum generation (SCG) is a striking phenomenon of extreme spectral broadening involving a wealth of beautiful nonlinear physics. The study of SCG and development of today’s commercial sources really took off with the invention of the photonic crystal fiber (PCF), in which light can be m...

  13. Initial steps of supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilligsøe, Karen Marie; Paulsen, H.N.; Thøgersen, J.

    2003-01-01

    The onset of supercontinuum generation in a photonic crystal fiber is investigated experimentally and numerically as a function of pump wavelength and intensity with 100-fs pulses. Soliton formation is found to be the determining factor in the initial step. The formation and behavior of a blueshi...

  14. Generation and propagation of radially polarized beams in optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramachandran, Siddharth; Kristensen, P; Yan, M F

    2009-01-01

    Beams with polarization singularities have attracted immense recent attention in a wide array of scientific and technological disciplines. We demonstrate a class of optical fibers in which these beams can be generated and propagated over long lengths with unprecedented stability, even...

  15. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    This sixth Annual Report presents and analyzes DOE Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention activities at 36 reporting sites from 1993 through 1997. In May 1996, the Secretary of Energy established a 50 percent Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goal (relative to the 1993 baseline) for routine operations radioactive and hazardous waste generation, to be achieved by December 31, 1999. Excluding sanitary waste, routine operations waste generation increased three percent from 1996 to 1997, and decreased 61 percent overall from 1993 to 1997. DOE has achieved its Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goals for routine operations based upon a comparison of 1997 waste generation to the 1993 baseline. However, it is important to note that increases in low-level radioactive and low-level mixed waste generation could reverse this achievement. From 1996 to 1997, low-level radioactive waste generation increased 10 percent, and low-level mixed waste generation increased slightly. It is critical that DOE sites continue to reduce routine operations waste generation for all waste types, to ensure that DOE's Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goals are achieved by December 31, 1999

  16. Food waste from Danish households: Generation and composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edjabou, Maklawe Essonanawe; Petersen, Claus; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable solutions for reducing food waste require a good understanding of food waste generation and composition, including avoidable and unavoidable food waste. We analysed 12 tonnes of residual household waste collected from 1474 households, without source segregation of organic waste. Food...... waste was divided into six fractions according to avoidability, suitability for home-composting and whether or not it was cooked, prepared or had been served within the household. The results showed that the residual household waste generation rate was 434 ± 18 kg per household per year, of which 183...... ± 10 kg per year was food waste. Unavoidable food waste amounted to 80 ± 6 kg per household per year, and avoidable food waste was 103 ± 9 kg per household per year. Food waste mass was influenced significantly by the number of occupants per household (household size) and the housing type. The results...

  17. Guidelines for generators of hazardous chemical waste at LBL and guidelines for generators of radioactive and mixed waste at LBL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the acceptance criteria for the transfer of hazardous chemical waste to LBL's Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF). Hazardous chemical waste is a necessary byproduct of LBL's research and technical support activities. This waste must be handled properly if LBL is to operate safely and provide adequate protection to staff and the environment. These guidelines describe how you, as a generator of hazardous chemical waste, can meet LBL's acceptance criteria for hazardous chemical waste

  18. Ocean disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    A study of container designs for heat generating radioactive waste disposal in the deep ocean sediments is presented. The purpose of the container would be to isolate the waste from the environment for a period of 500 to 1000 years. The container designs proposed are based on the use of either corrosion allowance or corrosion resistant metals. Appropriate overpack wall thicknesses are suggested for each design using the results of corrosion studies and experiments but these are necessarily preliminary and data relevant to corrosion in deep ocean sediments remain sparse. It is concluded that the most promising design concept involves a thin titanium alloy overpack in which all internal void spaces are filled with lead or cement grout. In situ temperatures for the sediment adjacent to the emplaced 50 year cooled waste containers are calculated to reach about 260 deg C. The behaviour of the sediments at such a high temperature is not well understood and the possibility of 100 years interim storage is recommended for consideration to allow further cooling. Further corrosion data and sediment thermal studies would be required to fully confirm the engineering feasibility of these designs. (author)

  19. Geological disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    A number of options for the disposal of vitrified heat-generating radioactive waste are being studied to ensure that safe methods are available when the time comes for disposal operations to commence. This study has considered the feasibility of three designs for containers which would isolate the waste from the environment for a minimum period of 500 to 1000 years. The study was sub-divided into the following major sections: manufacturing feasibility; stress analysis; integrity in accidents; cost benefit review. The candidate container designs were taken from the results of a previous study by Ove Arup and Partners (1985) and were developed as the study progressed. Their major features can be summarised as follows: (A) a thin-walled corrosion-resistant metal shell filled with lead or cement grout. (B) an unfilled thick-walled carbon steel shell. (C) an unfilled carbon steel shell planted externally with corrosion-resistant metal. Reference repository conditions in clay, granite and salt, reference disposal operations and metals corrosion data have been taken from various European Community radioactive waste management research and engineering projects. The study concludes that design Types A and B are feasible in manufacturing terms but design Type C is not. It is recommended that model containers should be produced to demonstrate the proposed methods of manufacture and that they should be tested to validate the analytical techniques used. (author)

  20. Unidirectional high fiber content composites: Automatic 3D FE model generation and damage simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2009-01-01

    A new method and a software code for the automatic generation of 3D micromechanical FE models of unidirectional long-fiber-reinforced composite (LFRC) with high fiber volume fraction with random fiber arrangement are presented. The fiber arrangement in the cross-section is generated through random...

  1. Tapered fluorotellurite microstructured fibers for broadband supercontinuum generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Wang, Kangkang; Yao, Chuanfei; Jia, Zhixu; Wang, Shunbin; Wu, Changfeng; Qin, Guanshi; Ohishi, Yasutake; Qin, Weiping

    2016-02-01

    Fluorotellurite microstructured fibers (MFs) based on TeO2-BaF2-Y2O3 glasses are fabricated by using a rod-in-tube method. Tapered fluorotellurite MFs with varied transition region lengths are prepared by employing an elongation machine. By using a tapered fluorotellurite MF with a transition region length of ∼3.3  cm as the nonlinear medium and a 1560 nm femtosecond fiber laser as the pump source, broadband supercontinuum generation covering from 470 to 2770 nm is obtained. The effects of the transition region length of the tapered fluorotellurite MF on supercontinuum generation are also investigated. Our results show that tapered fluorotellurite MFs are promising nonlinear media for generating broadband supercontinuum light expanding from visible to mid-infrared spectral region.

  2. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-01

    This Annual Report summarizes and highlights waste generation, waste reduction, pollution prevention accomplishments, and cost avoidance for 44 U.S. Department of Energy reporting sites for Calendar Year 1999. This section summarizes Calendar Year 1999 Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention accomplishments.

  3. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This Annual Report summarizes and highlights waste generation, waste reduction, pollution prevention accomplishments, and cost avoidance for 44 U.S. Department of Energy reporting sites for Calendar Year 1999. This section summarizes Calendar Year 1999 Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention accomplishments

  4. Guidelines for generators of hazardous chemical waste at LBL and Guidelines for generators of radioactive and mixed waste at LBL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the acceptance criteria for the transfer of hazardous chemical, radioactive, and mixed waste to Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's (LBL) Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF). These guidelines describe how a generator of wastes can meet LBL's acceptance criteria for hazardous chemical, radioactive, and mixed waste. 9 figs

  5. Ocean disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    The detailed radiological assessment of any proposed operations for the disposal of heat-generating radioactive waste in deep ocean sediments would require data describing expected embedment depths and spacing of the waste. In this study a theoretical model which predicts penetrator trajectories from launch through to rest in the sediment has been produced and has been used to generate data for environmental models. The trajectory model has been used to study the effects of small imperfections and launch parameters on the motion of a reference penetrator through water and sediment. The model predicts that the horizontal displacements of the penetrators' final resting places in the sediment from their launch positions at the ocean surface could be limited to less than 15m by twisting their tail fins uniformly by just one degree to induce spinning. The reference penetrator is predicted to achieve satisfactory embedment depth for all the cases considered including allowance for the effect of curved penetration paths in the seabed. However, the ability of the model to represent highly non-linear sediment penetration paths is demonstrated. Distribution histograms of seabed impact points relative to specific release points are presented. The area of seabed required is calculated. (author)

  6. Estimation of construction and demolition waste using waste generation rates in Chennai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, V G; Kalidindi, Satyanarayana N

    2017-06-01

    A large amount of construction and demolition waste is being generated owing to rapid urbanisation in Indian cities. A reliable estimate of construction and demolition waste generation is essential to create awareness about this stream of solid waste among the government bodies in India. However, the required data to estimate construction and demolition waste generation in India are unavailable or not explicitly documented. This study proposed an approach to estimate construction and demolition waste generation using waste generation rates and demonstrated it by estimating construction and demolition waste generation in Chennai city. The demolition waste generation rates of primary materials were determined through regression analysis using waste generation data from 45 case studies. Materials, such as wood, electrical wires, doors, windows and reinforcement steel, were found to be salvaged and sold on the secondary market. Concrete and masonry debris were dumped in either landfills or unauthorised places. The total quantity of construction and demolition debris generated in Chennai city in 2013 was estimated to be 1.14 million tonnes. The proportion of masonry debris was found to be 76% of the total quantity of demolition debris. Construction and demolition debris forms about 36% of the total solid waste generated in Chennai city. A gross underestimation of construction and demolition waste generation in some earlier studies in India has also been shown. The methodology proposed could be utilised by government bodies, policymakers and researchers to generate reliable estimates of construction and demolition waste in other developing countries facing similar challenges of limited data availability.

  7. Electricity generation in Nigeria from municipal solid waste using the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electricity generation in Nigeria from municipal solid waste using the Swedish Wasteto-Energy Model. ... Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management ... Waste-to-energy (WTE) technology in Nigeria is still at the infancy stage ...

  8. Radioactive wastes with negligible heat generation suitable for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennecke, P.; Schumacher, J.; Warnecke, E.

    1987-01-01

    It is planned to dispose of radioactive wastes with negligible heat generation in the Konrad repository. Preliminary waste acceptance requirements are derived taking the results of site-specific safety assessments as a basis. These requirements must be fulfilled by the waste packages on delivery. The waste amounts which are currently stored and those anticipated up to the year 2000 are discussed. The disposability of these waste packages in the Konrad repository was evaluated. This examination reveals that basically almost all radioactive wastes with negligible heat generation can be accepted. (orig.) [de

  9. Peregrine soliton generation and breakup in standard telecommunications fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammani, Kamal; Kibler, Bertrand; Finot, Christophe; Morin, Philippe; Fatome, Julien; Dudley, John M; Millot, Guy

    2011-01-15

    We present experimental and numerical results showing the generation and breakup of the Peregrine soliton in standard telecommunications fiber. The impact of nonideal initial conditions is studied through direct cutback measurements of the longitudinal evolution of the emerging soliton dynamics and is shown to be associated with the splitting of the Peregrine soliton into two subpulses, with each subpulse itself exhibiting Peregrine soliton characteristics. Experimental results are in good agreement with simulations.

  10. Ocean disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    This report is based on an emplacement techniques review prepared for the Department of the Environment in February 1983, which appeared as Chapter III of the Nuclear Energy Agency, Seabed Working Group's Status Report. The original document (DOE/RW/83.032) has been amended to take account of the results of field trials carried out in March 1983 and to better reflect current UK Government policy on ocean disposal of HGW. In particular Figure 7 has been redrawn using more realistic drag factors for the calculation of the terminal velocity in water. This report reviews the work conducted by the SWG member countries into the different techniques of emplacing heat generating radioactive waste into the deep ocean sediments. It covers the waste handling from the port facilities to final emplacement in the seabed and verification of the integrity of the canister isolation system. The two techniques which are currently being considered in detail are drilled emplacement and the free fall penetrator. The feasibility study work in progress for both techniques as well as the mathematical and physical modelling work for embedment depth and hole closure behind the penetrator are reviewed. (author)

  11. Study on reducing the generation of general waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Toshio; Aoki, Isao; Watahiki, Masatoshi

    2000-04-01

    On August 1999, the Director of Tokai Work proposed an activity regarding recycling and reuse of general waste generated from Tokai Works. The activity was initiated by the Waste Management and Fuel Cycle Research Center, and is now being in progress through out the Tokai Works. In the course of this activity, Plutonium Fuel Center had settled the working Group and the issues related to the waste reductive have been examined. This report collects the problems that became obvious through the survey of existing segregation method, treatment process, and the amount of the waste generation, and accounts for the concrete methodology for the recycling and reuse of general waste. In order to reduce waste, it is necessary to aware of the facing issues and adopt the countermeasures proposed in this report whenever possible. The activity will then leads us to reduce waste generation, which in turn will enable us to make 100% waste recycling possible. (author)

  12. Ocean disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    The feasibility of safe ocean disposal options for heat-generating radioactive waste relies on the existence of suitable disposal sites. This review considers the status of the development of site selection criteria and the results of the study area investigations carried out under various national and international research programmes. In particular, the usefulness of the results obtained is related to the data needed for environmental and emplacement modelling. Preliminary investigations have identified fifteen potential deep ocean study areas in the North Atlantic. From these Great Meteor East (GME), Southern Nares Abyssal Plan (SNAP) and Kings Trough Flank (KTF) were selected for further investigation. The review includes appraisals of regional geology, geophysical studies, sedimentology, geotechnical studies, geochemical studies and oceanography. (author)

  13. Newly Generated Liquid Waste Processing Alternatives Study, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landman, William Henry; Bates, Steven Odum; Bonnema, Bruce Edward; Palmer, Stanley Leland; Podgorney, Anna Kristine; Walsh, Stephanie

    2002-09-01

    This report identifies and evaluates three options for treating newly generated liquid waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The three options are: (a) treat the waste using processing facilities designed for treating sodium-bearing waste, (b) treat the waste using subcontractor-supplied mobile systems, or (c) treat the waste using a special facility designed and constructed for that purpose. In studying these options, engineers concluded that the best approach is to store the newly generated liquid waste until a sodium-bearing waste treatment facility is available and then to co-process the stored inventory of the newly generated waste with the sodium-bearing waste. After the sodium-bearing waste facility completes its mission, two paths are available. The newly generated liquid waste could be treated using the subcontractor-supplied system or the sodium-bearing waste facility or a portion of it. The final decision depends on the design of the sodium-bearing waste treatment facility, which will be completed in coming years.

  14. Optimal Trajectories Generation in Robotic Fiber Placement Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jiuchun; Pashkevich, Anatol; Caro, Stéphane

    2017-06-01

    The paper proposes a methodology for optimal trajectories generation in robotic fiber placement systems. A strategy to tune the parameters of the optimization algorithm at hand is also introduced. The presented technique transforms the original continuous problem into a discrete one where the time-optimal motions are generated by using dynamic programming. The developed strategy for the optimization algorithm tuning allows essentially reducing the computing time and obtaining trajectories satisfying industrial constraints. Feasibilities and advantages of the proposed methodology are confirmed by an application example.

  15. Guidelines for generators of hazardous chemical waste at LBL and guidelines for generators of radioactive and mixed waste at LBL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    In part one of this document the Governing Documents and Definitions sections provide general guidelines and regulations applying to the handling of hazardous chemical wastes. The remaining sections provide details on how you can prepare your waste properly for transport and disposal. They are correlated with the steps you must take to properly prepare your waste for pickup. The purpose of the second part of this document is to provide the acceptance criteria for the transfer of radioactive and mixed waste to LBL's Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF). These guidelines describe how you, as a generator of radioactive or mixed waste, can meet LBL's acceptance criteria for radioactive and mixed waste

  16. Double nanosecond pulses generation in ytterbium fiber laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiko, V. P.; Samokhvalov, A. A., E-mail: samokhvalov.itmo@gmail.com; Yakovlev, E. B.; Zhitenev, I. Yu.; Kliushin, A. N. [Saint-Petersburg State University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, Kronverksky Pr. 49, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lednev, V. N. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov Str., 38, Moscow (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology MISiS, Leninskyave., 4, Moscow (Russian Federation); Pershin, S. M. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov Str., 38, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    Double pulse generation mode for nanosecond ytterbium fiber laser was developed. Two sequential 60-200 ns laser pulses with variable delay between them were generated by acousto-optic modulator opening with continuous diode pumping. A custom radio frequency generator was developed to produce two sequential “opening” radio pulses with a delay of 0.2–1 μs. It was demonstrated that double pulse generation did not decrease the average laser power while providing the control over the laser pulse power profile. Surprisingly, a greater peak power in the double pulse mode was observed for the second laser pulse. Laser crater studies and plasma emission measurements revealed an improved efficiency of laser ablation in the double pulse mode.

  17. Agricultural waste concept, generation, utilization and management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agricultural wastes are non-product outputs of production and processing of ... less than the cost of collection, transportation, and processing for beneficial use. ... Agricultural waste management system (AWMS) was discussed and a typical ...

  18. Source segregation of food waste in office areas: Factors affecting waste generation rates and quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edjabou, Vincent Maklawe Essonanawe; Boldrin, Alessio; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Existing legislation mandates that the amount of waste being recycled should be increased. Among others, in its Resource Strategy Plan, the Danish Government decided that at least 60% of food waste generated by the service sector, including in office areas, should be source-sorted and collected...... separately by 2018. To assess the achievability of these targets, source-sorted food waste and residual waste from office areas was collected and weighed on a daily basis during 133 working days. Waste composition analyses were conducted every week to investigate the efficiency of the source-sorting campaign...... and the purity of the source-sorted food waste. The moisture content of source-sorted food waste and residual waste fractions, and potential methane production from source-sorted food waste, was also investigated.Food waste generation equated to 23. ±. 5. kg/employee/year, of which 20. ±. 5. kg...

  19. Municipal solid waste generation and disposal in Robe town, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasu, Duguma; Faye, Tesfaye; Kiros, Amaha; Balew, Abel

    2018-04-20

    The amount of solid waste generated in developing countries is rising from time to time due to economic growth, change in consumer behavior and lifestyles of people. But it is hard to manage and handle the increase of solid waste with existing waste management infrastructure. Thus, the management system of solid waste is very poor and become a serious problem. The main purpose of this study is to quantify the volume of solid waste generated and investigate factors affecting generation and disposal of wastes in the study area. The result of this study indicated that total waste generated from households was about 97.092kg/day.Furthermore, the study reveals that the solid waste generation rate of the town is 0.261kg/person/day.About 57.5% of solid waste is properly disposed of to landfill site whereas the remaining 42.5% is illegally dumped at the roadsides and open fields. Implication Statement Nowadays, in developing countries there is high concentration of people in urban areas and cause for the generation of enormous concentration of municipal waste in urban areas. Therefore this finding will be important for various policy makers and town planners. It may also serve as a benchmark for the municipal authorities of the town for whom the problem is still invisible and negligible and can push environmental protection authorities to reexamine the implementation of their policies and strategies with regard to the broader issues of human and environmental health condition of town dwellers.

  20. Bonded carbon or ceramic fiber composite filter vent for radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassell, Gilbert W.; Brugger, Ronald P.

    1985-02-19

    Carbon bonded carbon fiber composites as well as ceramic or carbon bonded ceramic fiber composites are very useful as filters which can separate particulate matter from gas streams entraining the same. These filters have particular application to the filtering of radioactive particles, e.g., they can act as vents for containers of radioactive waste material.

  1. Characterization of waste streams and suspect waste from largest Los Alamos National Laboratory generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soukup, J.D.; Erpenbeck, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed waste stream characterization of 4 primary generators of low level waste at LANL was performed to aid in waste minimization efforts. Data was compiled for these four generators from 1988 to the present for analyses. Prior waste minimization efforts have focused on identifying waste stream processes and performing source materials substitutions or reductions where applicable. In this historical survey, the generators surveyed included an accelerator facility, the plutonium facility, a chemistry and metallurgy research facility, and a radiochemistry research facility. Of particular interest in waste minimization efforts was the composition of suspect low level waste in which no radioactivity is detected through initial survey. Ultimately, this waste is disposed of in the LANL low level permitted waste disposal pits (thus filling a scarce and expensive resource with sanitary waste). Detailed analyses of the waste streams from these 4 facilities, have revealed that suspect low level waste comprises approximately 50% of the low level waste by volume and 47% by weight. However, there are significant differences in suspect waste density when one considers the radioactive contamination. For the 2 facilities that deal primarily with beta emitting activation and spallation products (the radiochemistry and accelerator facilities), the suspect waste is much lower density than all low level waste coming from those facilities. For the 2 facilities that perform research on transuranics (the chemistry and metallurgy research and plutonium facilities), suspect waste is higher in density than all the low level waste from those facilities. It is theorized that the low density suspect waste is composed primarily of compactable lab trash, most of which is not contaminated but can be easily surveyed. The high density waste is theorized to be contaminated with alpha emitting radionuclides, and in this case, the suspect waste demonstrates fundamental limits in detection

  2. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation

  3. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

  4. Estimation of construction waste generation and management in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofoworola, Oyeshola Femi; Gheewala, Shabbir H

    2009-02-01

    This study examines construction waste generation and management in Thailand. It is estimated that between 2002 and 2005, an average of 1.1 million tons of construction waste was generated per year in Thailand. This constitutes about 7.7% of the total amount of waste disposed in both landfills and open dumpsites annually during the same period. Although construction waste constitutes a major source of waste in terms of volume and weight, its management and recycling are yet to be effectively practiced in Thailand. Recently, the management of construction waste is being given attention due to its rapidly increasing unregulated dumping in undesignated areas, and recycling is being promoted as a method of managing this waste. If effectively implemented, its potential economic and social benefits are immense. It was estimated that between 70 and 4,000 jobs would have been created between 2002 and 2005, if all construction wastes in Thailand had been recycled. Additionally it would have contributed an average savings of about 3.0 x 10(5) GJ per year in the final energy consumed by the construction sector of the nation within the same period based on the recycling scenario analyzed. The current national integrated waste management plan could enhance the effective recycling of construction and demolition waste in Thailand when enforced. It is recommended that an inventory of all construction waste generated in the country be carried out in order to assess the feasibility of large scale recycling of construction and demolition waste.

  5. NOVEL USE OF WASTE KERATIN AND COTTON LINTER FIBERS FOR PROTOTYPE TISSUE PAPERS AND THEIR EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Shi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Corporate environmental sustainability calls for sustainable product manufacturing with less creation of waste material or increased reuse of waste materials. One example is the use of keratin fiber from the poultry industry and cotton linter from the textile industry for paper and tissue manufacturing. In this paper, the feasibility of using these waste fibers to make paper was demonstrated in handsheets. The properties of these handsheets were compared to the properties of handsheets made with standard bleached eucalyptus tropical hardwood fibers. A blend of cotton linter and keratin fibers at 80/20 and 60/40 ratios showed a 59% and 73% improvement in sheet bulk, respectively, compared to eucalyptus handsheets. Similarly, air permeability of the cotton / keratin fiber handsheets improved 414% and 336%, respectively, versus the eucalyptus. However, the tensile index of the cotton and keratin fiber blends was lower than the eucalyptus sheets. There was no remarkable difference in water absorbency up to 20% keratin fiber. Above 20% of keratin fibers the water absorbency started to decrease, which is likely attributable to the hydrophobic nature of the protein-based keratin fiber.

  6. Making Plant-Support Structures From Waste Plant Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Robert C.; < oscjmocl. < attjew K/; {ertzbprm. A,amda; Ej (e. Cjad); Hunt, John

    2006-01-01

    Environmentally benign, biodegradable structures for supporting growing plants can be made in a process based on recycling of such waste plant fiber materials as wheat straw or of such derivative materials as paper and cardboard. Examples of structures that can be made in this way include plant plugs, pots, planter-lining mats, plant fences, and root and shoot barriers. No chemical binders are used in the process. First, the plant material is chopped into smaller particles. The particles are leached with water or steam to remove material that can inhibit plant growth, yielding a fibrous slurry. If the desired structures are plugs or sheets, then the slurry is formed into the desired shapes in a pulp molding subprocess. If the desired structures are root and shoot barriers, pots, or fences, then the slurry is compression-molded to the desired shapes in a heated press. The processed materials in these structures have properties similar to those of commercial pressboard, but unlike pressboard, these materials contain no additives. These structures have been found to withstand one growth cycle, even when wet

  7. Impact of socioeconomic status on municipal solid waste generation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, D; Kumar, A; Samadder, S R

    2016-03-01

    The solid waste generation rate was expected to vary in different socioeconomic groups due to many environmental and social factors. This paper reports the assessment of solid waste generation based on different socioeconomic parameters like education, occupation, income of the family, number of family members etc. A questionnaire survey was conducted in the study area to identify the different socioeconomic groups that may affect the solid waste generation rate and composition. The average waste generated in the municipality is 0.41 kg/capita/day in which the maximum waste was found to be generated by lower middle socioeconomic group (LMSEG) with average waste generation of 0.46 kg/capita/day. Waste characterization indicated that there was no much difference in the composition of wastes among different socioeconomic groups except ash residue and plastic. Ash residue is found to increase as we move lower down the socioeconomic groups with maximum (31%) in lower socioeconomic group (LSEG). The study area is a coal based city hence application of coal and wood as fuel for cooking in the lower socioeconomic group is the reason for high amount of ash content. Plastic waste is maximum (15%) in higher socioeconomic group (HSEG) and minimum (1%) in LSEG. Food waste is a major component of generated waste in almost every socioeconomic group with maximum (38%) in case of HSEG and minimum (28%) in LSEG. This study provides new insights on the role of various socioeconomic parameters on generation of household wastes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment of national waste generation in EU Member States’ efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Halkos, George; Petrou, Kleoniki Natalia

    2018-01-01

    Waste generation and management may be considered as either a by-product of economic actions or even used as input to economic activity like energy recovery. Every country produces different amounts of municipal solid waste (MSW) and with different composition. This paper deals with the efficiency of 28 EU Member States for the years 2008, 2010 and 2012 by employing Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) and by using eight parameters, namely waste generation, employment rate, capital formation, GDP,...

  9. Sandwich-structured hollow fiber membranes for osmotic power generation

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Feng Jiang; Zhang, Sui; Chung, Neal Tai-Shung

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a novel sandwich-structured hollow fiber membrane has been developed via a specially designed spinneret and optimized spinning conditions. With this specially designed spinneret, the outer layer, which is the most crucial part of the sandwich-structured membrane, is maintained the same as the traditional dual-layer membrane. The inner substrate layer is separated into two layers: (1) an ultra-thin middle layer comprising a high molecular weight polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) additive to enhance integration with the outer polybenzimidazole (PBI) selective layer, and (2) an inner-layer to provide strong mechanical strength for the membrane. Experimental results show that a high water permeability and good mechanical strength could be achieved without the expensive post treatment process to remove PVP which was necessary for the dual-layer pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) membranes. By optimizing the composition, the membrane shows a maximum power density of 6.23W/m2 at a hydraulic pressure of 22.0bar when 1M NaCl and 10mM NaCl are used as the draw and feed solutions, respectively. To our best knowledge, this is the best phase inversion hollow fiber membrane with an outer selective PBI layer for osmotic power generation. In addition, this is the first work that shows how to fabricate sandwich-structured hollow fiber membranes for various applications. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Sandwich-structured hollow fiber membranes for osmotic power generation

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Feng Jiang

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a novel sandwich-structured hollow fiber membrane has been developed via a specially designed spinneret and optimized spinning conditions. With this specially designed spinneret, the outer layer, which is the most crucial part of the sandwich-structured membrane, is maintained the same as the traditional dual-layer membrane. The inner substrate layer is separated into two layers: (1) an ultra-thin middle layer comprising a high molecular weight polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) additive to enhance integration with the outer polybenzimidazole (PBI) selective layer, and (2) an inner-layer to provide strong mechanical strength for the membrane. Experimental results show that a high water permeability and good mechanical strength could be achieved without the expensive post treatment process to remove PVP which was necessary for the dual-layer pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) membranes. By optimizing the composition, the membrane shows a maximum power density of 6.23W/m2 at a hydraulic pressure of 22.0bar when 1M NaCl and 10mM NaCl are used as the draw and feed solutions, respectively. To our best knowledge, this is the best phase inversion hollow fiber membrane with an outer selective PBI layer for osmotic power generation. In addition, this is the first work that shows how to fabricate sandwich-structured hollow fiber membranes for various applications. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Perturbative approach to continuum generation in a fiber Bragg grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, P S; Nicholson, J W

    2006-08-21

    We derive a perturbative solution to the nonlinear Schrödinger equation to include the effect of a fiber Bragg grating whose bandgap is much smaller than the pulse bandwidth. The grating generates a slow dispersive wave which may be computed from an integral over the unperturbed solution if nonlinear interaction between the grating and unperturbed waves is negligible. Our approach allows rapid estimation of large grating continuum enhancement peaks from a single nonlinear simulation of the waveguide without grating. We apply our method to uniform and sampled gratings, finding good agreement with full nonlinear simulations, and qualitatively reproducing experimental results.

  12. FTIR fiber optic methods for the analysis of Hanford Site waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebagay, T.V.; Cash, R.J.; Dodd, D.A.

    1995-06-01

    Sampling and chemical characterization of mixed high-level waste stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site is currently in progress. Waste tank safety concerns have provided impetus to analyze this waste. A major safety issue is the possibility of significant concentrations of fuel (ferrocyanide and/or organic compounds) in contact with oxidizers (nitrates and nitrites). It is postulated that under dry conditions and elevated temperatures, ferrocyanide- and/or organic-bearing wastes could undergo rapid exothermic reactions. To maintain the tanks in a safe condition, data are needed on the moisture and fuel concentrations in the waste. Because of the highly radioactive nature of the waste, non-radioactive waste simulants mimicking actual waste are used to provide an initial basis for identifying realistic waste tank safety concerns. Emphasis has been placed on the use of new or existing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR)-based systems with potential for field or tank deployment to perform in situ remote waste characterization. Near-infrared diffuse reflectance and mid-infrared attenuated total reflectance fiber optic probes coupled to a Bio-Rad FTS 60A spectrometry system have been evaluated. The near-infrared diffuse reflectance fiber probe system has also been used for preliminary screening of the moisture content and chemical composition of actual Hanford Site waste tank waste core samples. The attributes of this method for analyzing actual radioactive waste are discussed

  13. Regional waste treatment facilities with underground monolith disposal for all low-heat-generating nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1982-01-01

    An alternative system for treatment and disposal of all ''low-heat-generating'' nuclear wastes from all sources is proposed. The system, Regional Waste Treatment Facilities with Underground Monolith Disposal (RWTF/UMD), integrates waste treatment and disposal operations into single facilities at regional sites. Untreated and/or pretreated wastes are transported from generation sites such as reactors, hospitals, and industries to regional facilities in bulk containers. Liquid wastes are also transported in bulk after being gelled for transport. The untreated and pretreated wastes are processed by incineration, crushing, and other processes at the RWTF. The processed wastes are mixed with cement. The wet concrete mixture is poured into large low-cost, manmade caverns or deep trenches. Monolith dimensions are from 15 to 25 m wide, and 20 to 60 m high and as long as required. This alternative waste system may provide higher safety margins in waste disposal at lower costs

  14. Geological disposal of heat generating radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    A study has been made of the requirements and design features for containers to isolate vitrified heat generating radioactive waste from the environment for a period of 500 to 1000 years. The requirements for handling, storing and transporting containers have been identified following a study of disposal operations, and the pressures and temperatures which may possibly be experienced in clay, granite and salt formations have been estimated. A range of possible container designs have been proposed to satisfy the requirements of each of the disposal environments. Alternative design concepts in corrosion resistant or corrosion allowance material have been suggested. Potentially suitable container shell materials have been selected following a review of corrosion studies and although metals have not been specified in detail, titanium alloys and low carbon steels are thought to be appropriate for corrosion resistant and corrosion allowance designs respectively. Performance requirements for container filler materials have been identified and candidate materials assessed. A preliminary container stress analysis has shown the importance of thermal modelling and that if lead is used as a filler it dominates the stress response of the container. Possible methods of manufacturing disposal containers have been assessed and found to be generally feasible. (author)

  15. Abrasion Resistance and Mechanical Properties of Waste-Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Roller-compacted Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildizel, S. A.; Timur, O.; Ozturk, A. U.

    2018-05-01

    The potential use of waste glass fibers in roller-compacted concrete (RCC) was investigated with the aim to improve its performance and reduce environmental effects. The research was focused on the abrasion resistance and compressive and flexural strengths of the reinforced concrete relative to those of reference mixes without fibers. The freeze-thaw resistance of RCC mixes was also examined. It was found that the use of waste glass fibers at a rate of 2 % increased the abrasion resistance of the RCC mixes considerably.

  16. Guidelines for developing certification programs for newly generated TRU waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitty, W.J.; Ostenak, C.A.; Pillay, K.K.S.; Geoffrion, R.R.

    1983-05-01

    These guidelines were prepared with direction from the US Department of Energy (DOE) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Management Program in support of the DOE effort to certify that newly generated TRU wastes meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria. The guidelines provide instructions for generic Certification Program preparation for TRU-waste generators preparing site-specific Certification Programs in response to WIPP requirements. The guidelines address all major aspects of a Certification Program that are necessary to satisfy the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria and their associated Compliance Requirements and Certification Quality Assurance Requirements. The details of the major element of a Certification Program, namely, the Certification Plan, are described. The Certification Plan relies on supporting data and control documentation to provide a traceable, auditable account of certification activities. Examples of specific parts of the Certification Plan illustrate the recommended degree of detail. Also, a brief description of generic waste processes related to certification activities is included

  17. Los Alamos Plutonium Facility newly generated TRU waste certification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruetzmacher, K.; Montoya, A.; Sinkule, B.; Maez, M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the activities being planned and implemented to certify newly generated contact handled transuranic (TRU) waste produced by Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL's) Plutonium Facility. Certifying waste at the point of generation is the most important cost and labor saving step in the WIPP certification process. The pedigree of a waste item is best known by the originator of the waste and frees a site from expensive characterization activities such as those associated with legacy waste. Through a cooperative agreement with LANLs Waste Management Facility and under the umbrella of LANLs WIPP-related certification and quality assurance documents, the Plutonium Facility will be certifying its own newly generated waste. Some of the challenges faced by the Plutonium Facility in preparing to certify TRU waste include the modification and addition of procedures to meet WIPP requirements, standardizing packaging for TRU waste, collecting processing documentation from operations which produce TRU waste, and developing ways to modify waste streams which are not certifiable in their present form

  18. Medical and Biohazardous Waste Generator's Guide (Revision 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste Management Group

    2006-01-01

    These guidelines describe procedures to comply with all Federal and State laws and regulations and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) policy applicable to State-regulated medical and unregulated, but biohazardous, waste (medical/biohazardous waste). These guidelines apply to all LBNL personnel who: (1) generate and/or store medical/biohazardous waste, (2) supervise personnel who generate medical/biohazardous waste, or (3) manage a medical/biohazardous waste pickup location. Personnel generating biohazardous waste at the Joint Genome Institute/Production Genomics Facility (JGI/PGF) are referred to the guidelines contained in Section 9. Section 9 is the only part of these guidelines that apply to JGI/PGF. Medical/biohazardous waste referred to in this Web site includes biohazardous, sharps, pathological and liquid waste. Procedures for proper storage and disposal are summarized in the Solid Medical/Biohazardous Waste Disposal Procedures Chart. Contact the Waste Management Group at 486-7663 if you have any questions regarding medical/biohazardous waste management

  19. Generation and management of waste electric vehicle batteries in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, ChengJian; Zhang, Wenxuan; He, Wenzhi; Li, Guangming; Huang, Juwen; Zhu, Haochen

    2017-09-01

    With the increasing adoption of EVs (electric vehicles), a large number of waste EV LIBs (electric vehicle lithium-ion batteries) were generated in China. Statistics showed generation of waste EV LIBs in 2016 reached approximately 10,000 tons, and the amount of them would be growing rapidly in the future. In view of the deleterious effects of waste EV LIBs on the environment and the valuable energy storage capacity or materials that can be reused in them, China has started emphasizing the management, reuse, and recycling of them. This paper presented the generation trend of waste EV LIBs and focused on interrelated management development and experience in China. Based on the situation of waste EV LIBs management in China, existing problems were analyzed and summarized. Some recommendations were made for decision-making organs to use as valuable references to improve the management of waste EV LIBs and promote the sustainable development of EVs.

  20. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation

  1. Gas generation phenomena in radioactive waste transportation packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigrey, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    The interaction of radiation from radioactive materials with the waste matrix can lead to the deterioration of the waste form resulting in the possible of gaseous species. Depending on the type and characteristics of the radiation source, the generation of hydrogen may predominate. Since the interaction of alpha particles with the waste form results in significant energy transfer, other gases such as carbon oxides, methane, nitrogen oxides, oxygen, water, and helium are possible. The type of gases produced from the waste forms is determined by the mechanisms involved in the waste degradation. For transuranic wastes, the identified degradation mechanisms are reported to be caused by radiolysis, thermal decomposition or dewatering, chemical corrosion, and bacterial action. While all these mechanisms may be responsible for the building of gases during the storage of wastes, radiolysis and thermal decomposition appear to be main contributors during waste transport operations. (authors)

  2. Gas generation from transuranic waste degradation: an interim assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecke, M.A.

    1979-10-01

    A review of all available, applicable data pertaining to gas generation from the degradation of transuranic waste matrix material and packaging is presented. Waste forms are representative of existing defense-related TRU wastes and include cellulosics, plastics, rubbers, concrete, process sludges, and mild steel. Degradation mechanisms studied were radiolysis, thermal, bacterial, and chemical corrosion. Gas generation rates are presented in terms of moles of gas produced per year per drum, and in G(gas) values for radiolytic degradation. Comparison of generation rates is made, as is a discussion of potential short- and long-term concerns. Techniques for reducing gas generation rates are discussed. 6 figures, 10 tables

  3. Photonic bandgap fiber lasers and multicore fiber lasers for next generation high power lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirakawa, A.; Chen, M.; Suzuki, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Photonic bandgap fiber lasers are realizing new laser spectra and nonlinearity mitigation that a conventional fiber laser cannot. Multicore fiber lasers are a promising tool for power scaling by coherent beam combination. © 2014 OSA....

  4. Biosorption of uranium in radioactive liquid organic waste by coconut fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marumo, Julio Takehiro; Ferreira, Eduardo Gurzoni Alvares; Vieira, Ludmila Cabreira; Ferreira, Rafael Vicente de Padua; Silva, Edson Antonio da

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive liquid organic waste needs special attention because the available treatment processes are often expensive and difficult to be managed. Biosorption is a potential technique since it allies low cost with relatively high efficiency. Biosorption has been defined as the property of certain biomolecules to bind and remove selected ions or other molecules from aqueous solutions. Biosorption using vegetable biomass from agricultural waste has become a very attractive technique because it involves the removal of heavy metal ions by low cost biosorbent. This technique could be employed in the treatment of radioactive liquid wastes. Among the biosorbent reported in the literature, coconut fiber (Cocos nucifera L.) is highlighted due to the large number of functional groups in its composition. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of coconut fiber to remove uranium from radioactive liquid organic waste. This work was divided into three stages: 1) Preparation and activation of the coconut fiber; 2) Physical characterization of the biomass, 3) Batch biosorption experiments. Two forms of coconut fiber were tested, raw and activated. The activation was performed with dilute HNO3 and NaOH solutions. The parameters evaluated for physical characterization of biomass were morphological characteristics of coconut fiber, real and apparent density and surface area. The biomass was suspended in 10 ml of solutions prepared with distillate water and radioactive liquid waste for 2 hours in the proportion of 0.2% w/v. After the contact time, the coconut fiber was removed by filtration and the supernatant, analyzed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES).The results were evaluated using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The maximum capacity for the raw coconut fiber was lower than the activated one, removing only 1.14mg/g against 2.61mg/g. These results suggest that biosorption with coconut fiber in activated form can be applied in the

  5. Biosorption of uranium in radioactive liquid organic waste by coconut fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marumo, Julio Takehiro; Ferreira, Eduardo Gurzoni Alvares; Vieira, Ludmila Cabreira; Ferreira, Rafael Vicente de Padua, E-mail: jtmarumo@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Silva, Edson Antonio da, E-mail: edson.silva2@unioeste.br [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana (UNIOESTE), Toledo, PR (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Radioactive liquid organic waste needs special attention because the available treatment processes are often expensive and difficult to be managed. Biosorption is a potential technique since it allies low cost with relatively high efficiency. Biosorption has been defined as the property of certain biomolecules to bind and remove selected ions or other molecules from aqueous solutions. Biosorption using vegetable biomass from agricultural waste has become a very attractive technique because it involves the removal of heavy metal ions by low cost biosorbent. This technique could be employed in the treatment of radioactive liquid wastes. Among the biosorbent reported in the literature, coconut fiber (Cocos nucifera L.) is highlighted due to the large number of functional groups in its composition. The aim of this study was to assess the potential of coconut fiber to remove uranium from radioactive liquid organic waste. This work was divided into three stages: 1) Preparation and activation of the coconut fiber; 2) Physical characterization of the biomass, 3) Batch biosorption experiments. Two forms of coconut fiber were tested, raw and activated. The activation was performed with dilute HNO3 and NaOH solutions. The parameters evaluated for physical characterization of biomass were morphological characteristics of coconut fiber, real and apparent density and surface area. The biomass was suspended in 10 ml of solutions prepared with distillate water and radioactive liquid waste for 2 hours in the proportion of 0.2% w/v. After the contact time, the coconut fiber was removed by filtration and the supernatant, analyzed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES).The results were evaluated using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The maximum capacity for the raw coconut fiber was lower than the activated one, removing only 1.14mg/g against 2.61mg/g. These results suggest that biosorption with coconut fiber in activated form can be applied in the

  6. Separation efficiency of two waste polymer fibers for oily water treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sokolović Dunja S.; Vulić Tatjana J.; Kiralj Arpad I.; Hadnađev-Kostić Milica S.; Sokolović Srđan S.

    2016-01-01

    This work is concerned with the efficiency of two different waste polymeric materials as the filter media in a laboratory-scale bed coalescer in the horizontal fluid flow mode, operating in a steady-state regime. The applied materials are: waste polyethylene terephthalate from textile industry, BA1 and waste polypropylene from carpet industry, PP. Using these compressible fiber polymeric materials, high bed porosity (up to 98%) could be obtained. The invest...

  7. The UK waste input-output table: Linking waste generation to the UK economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salemdeeb, Ramy; Al-Tabbaa, Abir; Reynolds, Christian

    2016-10-01

    In order to achieve a circular economy, there must be a greater understanding of the links between economic activity and waste generation. This study introduces the first version of the UK waste input-output table that could be used to quantify both direct and indirect waste arisings across the supply chain. The proposed waste input-output table features 21 industrial sectors and 34 waste types and is for the 2010 time-period. Using the waste input-output table, the study results quantitatively confirm that sectors with a long supply chain (i.e. manufacturing and services sectors) have higher indirect waste generation rates compared with industrial primary sectors (e.g. mining and quarrying) and sectors with a shorter supply chain (e.g. construction). Results also reveal that the construction, mining and quarrying sectors have the highest waste generation rates, 742 and 694 tonne per £1m of final demand, respectively. Owing to the aggregated format of the first version of the waste input-output, the model does not address the relationship between waste generation and recycling activities. Therefore, an updated version of the waste input-output table is expected be developed considering this issue. Consequently, the expanded model would lead to a better understanding of waste and resource flows in the supply chain. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Forecasting municipal solid waste generation using artificial intelligence modelling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Maryam; El Hanandeh, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) management is a major concern to local governments to protect human health, the environment and to preserve natural resources. The design and operation of an effective MSW management system requires accurate estimation of future waste generation quantities. The main objective of this study was to develop a model for accurate forecasting of MSW generation that helps waste related organizations to better design and operate effective MSW management systems. Four intelligent system algorithms including support vector machine (SVM), adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), artificial neural network (ANN) and k-nearest neighbours (kNN) were tested for their ability to predict monthly waste generation in the Logan City Council region in Queensland, Australia. Results showed artificial intelligence models have good prediction performance and could be successfully applied to establish municipal solid waste forecasting models. Using machine learning algorithms can reliably predict monthly MSW generation by training with waste generation time series. In addition, results suggest that ANFIS system produced the most accurate forecasts of the peaks while kNN was successful in predicting the monthly averages of waste quantities. Based on the results, the total annual MSW generated in Logan City will reach 9.4×10(7)kg by 2020 while the peak monthly waste will reach 9.37×10(6)kg. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Charging for waste motivates generators to optimize waste control at the source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.B.; Homan, F.J.

    1988-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the need for waste management that incorporates improved waste-handling techniques and more stringent regulatory requirements to prevent future liabilities such as Superfund sites. DOE-Oak Ridge Operations (DOE-ORO) has recognized that an effective waste management program focuses on control at the source and that the burden for responsible waste management can be placed on generators by charging for waste management costs. The principle of including the waste management costs in the total cost of the product, even when the product is research and development, is being implemented at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Charging waste management costs to generators creates an incentive to optimize processes so that less waste is produced, and it provides a basis for determining the cost effectiveness of capital improvements so that the mature phase of waste management can be attained. Improving waste management practices requires a long-range commitment and consistent administration. Making this commitment and providing adequate funding for proper waste disposal are most cost-effective measures than the alternative of paying for remedial actions after improper disposal. This paper summarizes a plan to charge waste generators, the administrative structure of the plan, a comparison between the rate structure and changes in waste disposal operations, and issues that have surfaced as the plan is implemented

  10. Certification document for newly generated contact-handled transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Box, W.D.; Setaro, J.

    1984-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has requested that all national laboratories handling defense waste develop and augment a program whereby all newly generated contact-handled transuranic (TRU) waste be contained, stored, and then shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in accordance with the requirements set forth in WIPP-DOE-114. The program described in this report delineates how Oak Ridge National Laboratory intends to comply with these requirements and lists the procedures used by each generator to ensure that their TRU wastes are certifiable for shipment to WIPP

  11. Solid waste generation and characterization in the University of Lagos for a sustainable waste management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniran, A E; Nubi, A T; Adelopo, A O

    2017-09-01

    Waste characterization is the first step to any successful waste management policy. In this paper, the characterization and the trend of solid waste generated in University of Lagos, Nigeria was carried out using ASTM D5231-92 and Resource Conservation Reservation Authority RCRA Waste Sampling Draft Technical Guidance methods. The recyclable potential of the waste is very high constituting about 75% of the total waste generated. The estimated average daily solid waste generation in Unilag Akoka campus was estimated to be 32.2tons. The solid waste characterization was found to be: polythene bags 24% (7.73tons/day), paper 15% (4.83tons/day), organic matters 15%, (4.83tons/day), plastic 9% (2.90tons/day), inert materials 8% (2.58tons/day), sanitary 7% (2.25tons/day), textile 7% (2.25tons/day), others 6% (1.93tons/day), leather 4% (1.29tons/day) metals 3% (0.97tons/day), glass 2% (0.64tons/day) and e-waste 0% (0.0tons/day). The volume and distribution of polythene bags generated on campus had a positive significant statistical correlation with the distribution of commercial and academic structures on campus. Waste management options to optimize reuse, recycling and reduce waste generation were discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. SITE GENERATED RADIOLOGICAL WASTE HANDLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. C. Khamankar

    2000-06-20

    The Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System handles radioactive waste products that are generated at the geologic repository operations area. The waste is collected, treated if required, packaged for shipment, and shipped to a disposal site. Waste streams include low-level waste (LLW) in solid and liquid forms, as-well-as mixed waste that contains hazardous and radioactive constituents. Liquid LLW is segregated into two streams, non-recyclable and recyclable. The non-recyclable stream may contain detergents or other non-hazardous cleaning agents and is packaged for shipment. The recyclable stream is treated to recycle a large portion of the water while the remaining concentrated waste is packaged for shipment; this greatly reduces the volume of waste requiring disposal. There will be no liquid LLW discharge. Solid LLW consists of wet solids such as ion exchange resins and filter cartridges, as-well-as dry active waste such as tools, protective clothing, and poly bags. Solids will be sorted, volume reduced, and packaged for shipment. The generation of mixed waste at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) is not planned; however, if it does come into existence, it will be collected and packaged for disposal at its point of occurrence, temporarily staged, then shipped to government-approved off-site facilities for disposal. The Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System has equipment located in both the Waste Treatment Building (WTB) and in the Waste Handling Building (WHB). All types of liquid and solid LLW are processed in the WTB, while wet solid waste from the Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System is packaged where received in the WHB. There is no installed hardware for mixed waste. The Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System receives waste from locations where water is used for decontamination functions. In most cases the water is piped back to the WTB for processing. The WTB and WHB provide staging areas for storing and shipping LLW

  13. SITE GENERATED RADIOLOGICAL WASTE HANDLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S. C. Khamankar

    2000-01-01

    The Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System handles radioactive waste products that are generated at the geologic repository operations area. The waste is collected, treated if required, packaged for shipment, and shipped to a disposal site. Waste streams include low-level waste (LLW) in solid and liquid forms, as-well-as mixed waste that contains hazardous and radioactive constituents. Liquid LLW is segregated into two streams, non-recyclable and recyclable. The non-recyclable stream may contain detergents or other non-hazardous cleaning agents and is packaged for shipment. The recyclable stream is treated to recycle a large portion of the water while the remaining concentrated waste is packaged for shipment; this greatly reduces the volume of waste requiring disposal. There will be no liquid LLW discharge. Solid LLW consists of wet solids such as ion exchange resins and filter cartridges, as-well-as dry active waste such as tools, protective clothing, and poly bags. Solids will be sorted, volume reduced, and packaged for shipment. The generation of mixed waste at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) is not planned; however, if it does come into existence, it will be collected and packaged for disposal at its point of occurrence, temporarily staged, then shipped to government-approved off-site facilities for disposal. The Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System has equipment located in both the Waste Treatment Building (WTB) and in the Waste Handling Building (WHB). All types of liquid and solid LLW are processed in the WTB, while wet solid waste from the Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System is packaged where received in the WHB. There is no installed hardware for mixed waste. The Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System receives waste from locations where water is used for decontamination functions. In most cases the water is piped back to the WTB for processing. The WTB and WHB provide staging areas for storing and shipping LLW

  14. Waste management, energy generation, material recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    The concept of process pyrolysis according to the system of low-temperature pyrolysis (up to 450 Cel) for the purpose of waste processing is described. This system not only uses the material value (raw materials) but also the processing value (energetic utilization of organic components). Three product groups are mentioned where process pyrolysis can be applied: 1. rubber-metall connecting, coated and non-coated components, 2. Compound materials like pc boards, used electronic devices, films, used cables and batteries, 3. organic waste and residues like foils, insulating material, lubricating, oil and grease, flooring. Importance of waste management is emphasized, economic aspects are illustrated.

  15. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-01

    This seventh Annual Report presents and analyzes DOE Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention activities at 45 reporting sites from 1993 through 1998. This section summarizes Calendar Year 1998 Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention accomplishments. More detailed information follows this section in the body of the Report. In May 1996, the Secretary of Energy established a 50 percent Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goal (relative to the 1993 baseline) for routine operations radioactive, mixed, and hazardous waste generation, to be achieved by December31, 1999. DOE has achieved its Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goals for routine operations based upon a comparison of 1998 waste generation to the 1993 baseline. Excluding sanitary waste, routine operations waste generation decreased 67 percent overall from 1993 to 1998. However, for the first time since 1994, the total amount of materials recycled by the Complex decreased from 109,600 metric tons in 1997 to 92,800 metric tons in 1998. This decrease is attributed to the fact that in 1997, several large ''one-time only'' recycling projects were conducted throughout the Complex. In order to demonstrate commitment to DOE's Complex-wide recycling goal, it is important for sites to identify all potential large-scale recycling/reuse opportunities.

  16. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 2, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains information on hazardous materials at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation

  17. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 2, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous materials at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

  18. Medical and biohazardous waste generator`s guide: Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This Guide describes the procedures required to comply with all federal and state laws and regulations and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) policy applicable to medical and biohazardous waste. The members of the LBL Biological Safety Subcommittee participated in writing these policies and procedures. The procedures and policies in this Guide apply to LBL personnel who work with infectious agents or potentially infectious agents, publicly perceived infectious items or materials (e.g., medical gloves, culture dishes), and sharps (e.g., needles, syringes, razor blades). If medical or biohazardous waste is contaminated or mixed with a hazardous chemical or material, with a radioactive material, or with both, the waste will be handled in accordance with the applicable federal and State of California laws and regulations for hazardous, radioactive, or mixed waste.

  19. Quantifying and analysing food waste generated by Indonesian undergraduate students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandasari, P.

    2018-03-01

    Despite the fact that environmental consequences derived from food waste have been widely known, studies on the amount of food waste and its influencing factors have relatively been paid little attention. Addressing this shortage, this paper aimed to quantify monthly avoidable food waste generated by Indonesian undergraduate students and analyse factors influencing the occurrence of avoidable food waste. Based on data from 106 undergraduate students, descriptive statistics and logistic regression were applied in this study. The results indicated that 4,987.5 g of food waste was generated in a month (equal to 59,850 g yearly); or 47.05 g per person monthly (equal to 564.62 g per person per a year). Meanwhile, eating out frequency and gender were found to be significant predictors of food waste occurrence.

  20. Annual Report on Waste Generation and Waste Minimization Progress, 1991--1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    This report is DOE's first annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress. Data presented in this report were collected from all DOE sites which met minimum threshold criteria established for this report. The fifty-seven site submittals contained herein represent data from over 100 reporting sites within 25 states. Radioactive, hazardous and sanitary waste quantities and the efforts to minimize these wastes are highlighted within the fifty-seven site submittals. In general, sites have made progress in moving beyond the planning phase of their waste minimization programs. This is evident by the overall 28 percent increase in the total amount of materials recycled from 1991 to 1992, as well as individual site initiatives. During 1991 and 1992, DOE generated a total of 279,000 cubic meters of radioactive waste and 243,000 metric tons of non-radioactive waste. These waste amounts include significant portions of process wastewater required to be reported to regulatory agencies in the state of Texas and the state of Tennessee. Specifically, the Pantex Plant in Texas treats an industrial wastewater that is considered by the Texas Water Commission to be a hazardous waste. In 1992, State regulated wastewater from the Pantex Plant represented 3,620 metric tons, 10 percent of the total hazardous waste generated by DOE. Similarly, mixed low-level wastewater from the TSCA Incinerator Facility at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site in Tennessee represented 55 percent of the total radioactive waste generated by DOE in 1992

  1. Annual Report on Waste Generation and Waste Minimization Progress, 1991--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    This report is DOE`s first annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress. Data presented in this report were collected from all DOE sites which met minimum threshold criteria established for this report. The fifty-seven site submittals contained herein represent data from over 100 reporting sites within 25 states. Radioactive, hazardous and sanitary waste quantities and the efforts to minimize these wastes are highlighted within the fifty-seven site submittals. In general, sites have made progress in moving beyond the planning phase of their waste minimization programs. This is evident by the overall 28 percent increase in the total amount of materials recycled from 1991 to 1992, as well as individual site initiatives. During 1991 and 1992, DOE generated a total of 279,000 cubic meters of radioactive waste and 243,000 metric tons of non-radioactive waste. These waste amounts include significant portions of process wastewater required to be reported to regulatory agencies in the state of Texas and the state of Tennessee. Specifically, the Pantex Plant in Texas treats an industrial wastewater that is considered by the Texas Water Commission to be a hazardous waste. In 1992, State regulated wastewater from the Pantex Plant represented 3,620 metric tons, 10 percent of the total hazardous waste generated by DOE. Similarly, mixed low-level wastewater from the TSCA Incinerator Facility at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site in Tennessee represented 55 percent of the total radioactive waste generated by DOE in 1992.

  2. Audits of hazardous waste TSDFs let generators sleep easy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, F.H.

    1990-01-01

    Because of the increasingly strict enforcement of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), generators of hazardous waste are compelled to investigate the hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facility (TSDF) they use. This investigation must include an environmental and a financial audit. Simple audits may be performed by the hazardous waste generator, while more thorough ones such as those performed for groups of generators are more likely to be conducted by environmental consultants familiar with treatment, storage, and disposal techniques and the regulatory framework that guides them

  3. Incorporation of waste and fiber kaolin caroa panels in Medium Density Fiberboard - MDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezerra, A.F.C.; Santana, L.N.L.; Neves, G.A.; Carvalho, L.H. de; Lopes, F.F.M.

    2012-01-01

    Medium-density panels are composites molded under high temperature and pressure which have physical and mechanical properties similar to those of solid wood. Their composition includes eucalyptus grandis fibers and pinus elliotii fibers, but other fibers can be used such as caroa fibers. The goal of this work was to manufacture panels which kaolin waste and caroa fibers and compare their physical, chemical and mechanical of these panels with a others. Both residue and the fibers were characterized by: differential thermal analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis and Xray diffraction. Through the process of pressing the test specimens were fabricated, test samples were evaluated by three point bending, internal bond, water absorption and swelling in thickness. The samples have low levels of thickness swelling, flexural strength and higher tensile and absorption content relative to commercial MDF. (author)

  4. Factors determining waste generation in Spanish towns and cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prades, Miriam; Gallardo, Antonio; Ibàñez, Maria Victoria

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the generation and composition of municipal solid waste in Spanish towns and cities with more than 5000 inhabitants, which altogether account for 87% of the Spanish population. To do so, the total composition and generation of municipal solid waste fractions were obtained from 135 towns and cities. Homogeneity tests revealed heterogeneity in the proportions of municipal solid waste fractions from one city to another. Statistical analyses identified significant differences in the generation of glass in cities of different sizes and in the generation of all fractions depending on the hydrographic area. Finally, linear regression models and residuals analysis were applied to analyze the effect of different demographic, geographic, and socioeconomic variables on the generation of waste fractions. The conclusions show that more densely populated towns, a hydrographic area, and cities with over 50,000 inhabitants have higher waste generation rates, while certain socioeconomic variables (people/car) decrease that generation. Other socioeconomic variables (foreigners and unemployment) show a positive and null influence on that waste generation, respectively.

  5. An innovative simulation tool for waste to energy generation opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Abderezzak

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The new world energy policies encourage the use of renewable energy sources with clean technologies, and abandon progressively the fossil fuel dependence. Another energy generation trend called commonly the “Waste-to-Energy” solution, uses organic waste as a response for two major problems: energy generation and waste management. Thanks to the anaerobic digestion, the organic waste can provide a biogas composed essentially from Carbone dioxide (CO2 and Methane (CH4. This work aims essentially to help students, researchers and even decision makers to consider the importance of biogas generation. The proposed tool is the last version of our previous tool which is enhanced and completed. It presents the potential to produce biogas of any shortlisted kind of waste, including also some energy valorization ways. A technical economical data are introduced for eventual feasibility studies.

  6. Recycling polyethylene terephthalate wastes as short fibers in Strain-Hardening Cementitious Composites (SHCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiuyi; Yu, Jing; Li, Hedong; Lam, Jeffery Y K; Shih, Kaimin; Sham, Ivan M L; Leung, Christopher K Y

    2018-05-26

    As an important portion of the total plastic waste bulk but lack of reuse and recycling, the enormous amounts of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) solid wastes have led to serious environmental issues. This study explores the feasibility of recycling PET solid wastes as short fibers in Strain-Hardening Cementitious Composites (SHCCs), which exhibit strain-hardening and multiple cracking under tension, and therefore have clear advantages over conventional concrete for many construction applications. Based on micromechanical modeling, fiber dispersion and alkali resistance, the size of recycled PET fibers was first determined. Then the hydrophobic PET surface was treated with NaOH solution followed by a silane coupling agent to achieve the dual purpose of improving the fiber/matrix interfacial frictional bond (from 0.64 MPa to 0.80 MPa) and enhancing the alkali resistance for applications in alkaline cementitious environment. With surface treatment, recycling PET wastes as fibers in SHCCs is a promising approach to significantly reduce the material cost of SHCCs while disposing hazardous PET wastes in construction industry. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Pathways for Disposal of Commercially-Generated Tritiated Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halverson, Nancy V. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Environmental Sciences and Biotechnology

    2016-09-26

    From a waste disposal standpoint, tritium is a major challenge. Because it behaves like hydrogen, tritium exchanges readily with hydrogen in the ground water and moves easily through the ground. Land disposal sites must control the tritium activity and mobility of incoming wastes to protect human health and the environment. Consequently, disposal of tritiated low-level wastes is highly regulated and disposal options are limited. The United States has had eight operating commercial facilities licensed for low-level radioactive waste disposal, only four of which are currently receiving waste. Each of these is licensed and regulated by its state. Only two of these sites accept waste from states outside of their specified regional compact. For waste streams that cannot be disposed directly at one of the four active commercial low-level waste disposal facilities, processing facilities offer various forms of tritiated low-level waste processing and treatment, and then transport and dispose of the residuals at a disposal facility. These processing facilities may remove and recycle tritium, reduce waste volume, solidify liquid waste, remove hazardous constituents, or perform a number of additional treatments. Waste brokers also offer many low-level and mixed waste management and transportation services. These services can be especially helpful for small-quantity tritiated-waste generators, such as universities, research institutions, medical facilities, and some industries. The information contained in this report covers general capabilities and requirements for the various disposal/processing facilities and brokerage companies, but is not considered exhaustive. Typically, each facility has extensive waste acceptance criteria and will require a generator to thoroughly characterize their wastes. Then a contractual agreement between the waste generator and the disposal/processing/broker entity must be in place before waste is accepted. Costs for tritiated waste

  8. Pathways for Disposal of Commercially-Generated Tritiated Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halverson, Nancy V.

    2016-01-01

    From a waste disposal standpoint, tritium is a major challenge. Because it behaves like hydrogen, tritium exchanges readily with hydrogen in the ground water and moves easily through the ground. Land disposal sites must control the tritium activity and mobility of incoming wastes to protect human health and the environment. Consequently, disposal of tritiated low-level wastes is highly regulated and disposal options are limited. The United States has had eight operating commercial facilities licensed for low-level radioactive waste disposal, only four of which are currently receiving waste. Each of these is licensed and regulated by its state. Only two of these sites accept waste from states outside of their specified regional compact. For waste streams that cannot be disposed directly at one of the four active commercial low-level waste disposal facilities, processing facilities offer various forms of tritiated low-level waste processing and treatment, and then transport and dispose of the residuals at a disposal facility. These processing facilities may remove and recycle tritium, reduce waste volume, solidify liquid waste, remove hazardous constituents, or perform a number of additional treatments. Waste brokers also offer many low-level and mixed waste management and transportation services. These services can be especially helpful for small-quantity tritiated-waste generators, such as universities, research institutions, medical facilities, and some industries. The information contained in this report covers general capabilities and requirements for the various disposal/processing facilities and brokerage companies, but is not considered exhaustive. Typically, each facility has extensive waste acceptance criteria and will require a generator to thoroughly characterize their wastes. Then a contractual agreement between the waste generator and the disposal/processing/broker entity must be in place before waste is accepted. Costs for tritiated waste

  9. Food waste from Danish households: Generation and composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edjabou, Maklawe Essonanawe; Petersen, Claus; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    waste was divided into six fractions according to avoidability, suitability for home-composting and whether or not it was cooked, prepared or had been served within the household. The results showed that the residual household waste generation rate was 434 ± 18 kg per household per year, of which 183...

  10. Flexural Toughness of Ring-Shaped Waste Bottle Fiber Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene terephthalate (PET bottles are plastic containers that are typically discarded, and thus, cause environmental pollution. To solve this problem, PET bottles are recycled incorporating with concrete. A ring-shaped PET (RPET fiber are introduced in this study and designed with a special shape to mobilize fiber yielding rather than fiber pullout. Therefore, aim of this paper is to investigate the influence of RPET bottles fibre in terms of toughness strength. The width of RPET fibers is fixed at 5 and 10 mm and the loads were applied to the third points of the specimen. The experiment indicates that RPET-5 and RPET-10 FC presented an increase in the toughness index of I20 on averages of 23.1% and 39.9% respectively, compared to normal specimens. It can conclude that incorporating RPET fiber in concrete presents significant improved of concrete properties.

  11. Characterization Of Solid Wastes Generated By A Community In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    on and organic fertilizers from household wastes could be transferred to the community to create jobs and gener-ate income. Landfills and relocation of refuse dumps far from the community were suggested as alternative disposal methods to ...

  12. Adverse Effects of Waste Generation in Calabar Urban, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adverse Effects of Waste Generation in Calabar Urban, Nigeria. ... degradation, blocking of drainage and emission of greenhouse gases. We found a number of health hazards, ranging from pollution to diseases on both human and animals.

  13. analysis of the measured medical waste generation at amana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kagonji

    2011-08-16

    Aug 16, 2011 ... In this study the medical waste generation rates at Amana and Ligula hospitals ...... making the situation difficult to administrators to plan and budget. ..... Management Meeting, Peacock Hotel, Dar es Salaam, 9th-11th June,.

  14. Study of distributed fiber-optic laser-ultrasound generation based on ghost-mode of tilted fiber Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jiajun; Zhang, Qi; Han, Ming

    2013-05-01

    Fiber-optic ultrasonic transducers are an important component of an active ultrasonic testing system for structural health monitoring. Fiber-optic transducers have several advantages such as small size, light weight, and immunity to electromagnetic interference that make them much more attractive than the current available piezoelectric transducers, especially as embedded and permanent transducers in active ultrasonic testing for structural health monitoring. In this paper, a distributed fiber-optic laser-ultrasound generation based on the ghost-mode of tilted fiber Bragg gratings is studied. The influences of the laser power and laser pulse duration on the laser-ultrasound generation are investigated. The results of this paper are helpful to understand the working principle of this laser-ultrasound method and improve the ultrasonic generation efficiency.

  15. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This Report summarizes the waste generation and pollution prevention activities of the major operational sites in the Department of Energy (DOE). We are witnessing progress in waste reduction from routine operations that are the focus of Department-wide reduction goals set by the Secretary on May 3,1996. The goals require that by the end of 1999, we reduce, recycle, reuse, and otherwise avoid waste generation to achieve a 50 percent reduction over 1993 levels. This Report provides the first measure of our progress in waste reduction and recycling against our 1993 waste generation baseline. While we see progress in reducing waste from our normal operations, we must begin to focus attention on waste generated by cleanup and facilities stabilization activities that are the major functions of the Office of Environmental Management. Reducing the generation of waste is one of the seven principles that I have established for the Office of Environmental Management Ten Year Plan. As part of our vision to complete a major portion of the environmental cleanup at DOE sites over the next ten years, we must utilize the potential of the pollution prevention program to reduce the cost of our cleanup program. We have included the Secretarial goals as part of the performance measures for the Ten Year Plan, and we are committed to implementing pollution prevention ideas. Through the efforts of both Federal and contractor employees, our pollution prevention program has reduced waste and the cost of our operations. I applaud their efforts and look forward to reporting further waste reduction progress in the next annual update of this Report.

  16. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    This Report summarizes the waste generation and pollution prevention activities of the major operational sites in the Department of Energy (DOE). We are witnessing progress in waste reduction from routine operations that are the focus of Department-wide reduction goals set by the Secretary on May 3,1996. The goals require that by the end of 1999, we reduce, recycle, reuse, and otherwise avoid waste generation to achieve a 50 percent reduction over 1993 levels. This Report provides the first measure of our progress in waste reduction and recycling against our 1993 waste generation baseline. While we see progress in reducing waste from our normal operations, we must begin to focus attention on waste generated by cleanup and facilities stabilization activities that are the major functions of the Office of Environmental Management. Reducing the generation of waste is one of the seven principles that I have established for the Office of Environmental Management Ten Year Plan. As part of our vision to complete a major portion of the environmental cleanup at DOE sites over the next ten years, we must utilize the potential of the pollution prevention program to reduce the cost of our cleanup program. We have included the Secretarial goals as part of the performance measures for the Ten Year Plan, and we are committed to implementing pollution prevention ideas. Through the efforts of both Federal and contractor employees, our pollution prevention program has reduced waste and the cost of our operations. I applaud their efforts and look forward to reporting further waste reduction progress in the next annual update of this Report

  17. Soliton-effect generation of Raman pulses in optical fibers with slowly decreasing dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenhua Cao; Youwei Zhang

    1995-01-01

    We suggested that single-mode fibers with slowly decreasing dispersion (FSDD) should be used for the generation of tunable ultrashort RAman pulses. A mathematical model is obtained for the description of ultrafast stimulated Raman scattering in optical fibers with slowly decreasing dispersion. Numerical simulations show that, under identical pump conditions, Raman pulse generated from this kind of fiber is shorter with a higher peak power than that generated from conventional fibers. This means that the Raman threshold of fibers with slowly decreasing dispersion may be lower than that of conventional fibers. Given pump conditions, we found that the highest peak power and narrowest width of the Raman pulse correspond to an optimal decrement velocity of the fiber dispersion

  18. Radiolytic gas generation from cement-based waste hosts for DOE low-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dole, L.R.; Friedman, H.A.

    1986-01-01

    Using cement-based immobilization binders with simulated radioactive waste containing sulfate, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, and fluoride anions, the gamma- and alpha-radiolytic gas generation factors (G/sub t/, molecules/100 eV) and gas compositions were measured on specimens of cured grouts. These tests studied the effects of; (1) waste composition; (2) the sample surface-to-volume ratio; (3) the waste slurry particle size; and (4) the water content of the waste host formula. The radiolysis test vessels were designed to minimize the ''dead'' volume and to simulate the configuration of waste packages

  19. Utilization of Aluminum Waste with Hydrogen and Heat Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buryakovskaya, O. A.; Meshkov, E. A.; Vlaskin, M. S.; Shkolnokov, E. I.; Zhuk, A. Z.

    2017-10-01

    A concept of energy generation via hydrogen and heat production from aluminum containing wastes is proposed. The hydrogen obtained by oxidation reaction between aluminum waste and aqueous solutions can be supplied to fuel cells and/or infrared heaters for electricity or heat generation in the region of waste recycling. The heat released during the reaction also can be effectively used. The proposed method of aluminum waste recycling may represent a promising and cost-effective solution in cases when waste transportation to recycling plants involves significant financial losses (e.g. remote areas). Experiments with mechanically dispersed aluminum cans demonstrated that the reaction rate in alkaline solution is high enough for practical use of the oxidation process. In theexperiments aluminum oxidation proceeds without any additional aluminum activation.

  20. Management of radioactive wastes with negligible heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alter, U.

    1990-01-01

    In the Federal Republic of Germany only one company is responsible for the management of radioactive wastes with negligible heat generations. This is the Company for Nuclear Service (GNS mbH). It was the intention of the competent authorities of the FRG to intensify state control during conditioning, intermediate storage and transport of low- and medium level radioactive waste. A guideline provides that the responsibility of the waste producers and of those concerned with conditioning, storage and transport of radioactive waste is assigned in the individual case and that the qualitative and quantitative registration of all waste streams will be ensured. An overview of the radioactive waste management within the last two years in the FRG is presented. (orig./DG)

  1. Management of low level waste generated from ISER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizushina, Tomoyuki

    1987-01-01

    Low level wastes are generated during nuclear power plant operation. In the case of ISER, low level wastes from the reactor are basically the same as of existing light water reactors. Various low level wastes, including solid, liquid and gaseous, are listed and discussed. In normal operation, high-activity wastes are not subjected to any treatment. For contaminated equipment or reactor parts, it may be desirable to transfer most of the activity to liquid phase through an appropriate decontamination procedure. Highly active solid wastes are usually fixed in a solid form through incorporation into either concrete or asphalt as containment material. Decantation and filtration treatments are usually sufficient before dilution and release of liquid wastes into the environment. Except for ordinary gas filtration, there in normally no other treatment. Under certain circumstances, however, it may be important to apply the decay storage before release to the atmosphere. In accidental circumstances, specific filtration is recommended or even sometimes needed. There are some alternatives for storage and-or disposal of low level wastes. In many cases, shallow land burial is chosen as a realistic method for storage and-or disposal of solid waste. In chosing a disposal method, the radiation dose rate from solid wastes or the specific activity should be taken into account. Boric acid is a retarder for cement setting. This effect of boric acid is inhibited by adding a complexing agent before mixing the waste with cement. (Nogami, K.)

  2. Safe Management of Waste Generated during Shale Gas Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukulska-Zając, Ewa; Król, Anna; Holewa-Rataj, Jadwiga

    2017-04-01

    Exploration and exploitation of hydrocarbon deposits, regardless of their type, are connected with the generation of waste, which may have various environmental effects. Such wastes may pose a serious risk to the surrounding environment and public health because they usually contain numerous potentially toxic chemicals. Waste associated with exploration and exploitation of unconventional hydrocarbon deposits is composed of a mixture of organic and inorganic materials, the qualitative and quantitative composition of which changes widely over time, depending on numerous factors. As a result the proper characteristic of this type of waste is very important. Information gained from detailed chemical analyses of drilling chemicals, drilling wastes, and flowback water can be used to manage shale gas-related wastes more appropriately, to develop treatment methods, to store the waste, and assess the potential environmental and health risk. The following paper will focus mainly on the results of research carried out on waste samples coming from the unconventional hydrogen exploration sites. Additionally, regulatory frameworks applicable to the management of wastes produced during this type of works will be discussed. The scope of research concerning physicochemical parameters for this type of wastes will also be presented. The presented results were obtained during M4ShaleGas project realization. The M4ShaleGas project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement no. 640715.

  3. Data analytics approach to create waste generation profiles for waste management and collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niska, Harri; Serkkola, Ari

    2018-04-30

    Extensive monitoring data on waste generation is increasingly collected in order to implement cost-efficient and sustainable waste management operations. In addition, geospatial data from different registries of the society are opening for free usage. Novel data analytics approaches can be built on the top of the data to produce more detailed, and in-time waste generation information for the basis of waste management and collection. In this paper, a data-based approach based on the self-organizing map (SOM) and the k-means algorithm is developed for creating a set of waste generation type profiles. The approach is demonstrated using the extensive container-level waste weighting data collected in the metropolitan area of Helsinki, Finland. The results obtained highlight the potential of advanced data analytic approaches in producing more detailed waste generation information e.g. for the basis of tailored feedback services for waste producers and the planning and optimization of waste collection and recycling. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Layout of NALM fiber laser with adjustable peak power of generated pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Sergey; Kobtsev, Sergey; Ivanenko, Alexey; Kokhanovskiy, Alexey; Kemmer, Anna; Gervaziev, Mikhail

    2017-05-01

    The Letter proposes a new layout of a passively mode-locked fiber laser based on a nonlinear amplifying loop mirror (NALM) with two stretches of active fiber and two independently controlled pump modules. In contrast with conventional NALM configurations using a single piece of active fiber that yields virtually constant peak power, the proposed novel laser features larger than a factor of 2 adjustment range of peak power of generated pulses. The proposed layout also provides independent adjustment of duration and peak power of generated pulses as well as power-independent control of generated pulse spectral width impossible in NALM lasers with a single piece of active fiber.

  5. Bare Fiber Bragg Gratings embedded into concrete buffer Supercontainer concept for nuclear waste storage [ANIMMA--2015-IO-337

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinet, Damien; Chah, Karima; Megret, Patrice; Caucheteur, Christophe [University of Mons, Boulevard Dolez 31, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Gusarov, Andrei [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Faustov, Alexey [University of Mons, Boulevard Dolez 31, 7000 Mons (Belgium); SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Areias, Lou [Department Mechanics of Materials and Constructions - MeMC, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); EIG EURIDICE - European Underground Research Infrastructure for Disposal of nuclear waste In Clay Environment, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear power plants have been generating electricity for more than 50 years. In Belgium, 55% of the current energy supply comes from nuclear power. Providing for the safe storage of nuclear waste, including spent fuel (SF) and vitrified high level radioactive waste (HLW), remains an important challenge in the life cycle of nuclear fuel. In this context, the Belgian Agency for Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Materials (ONDRAF/NIRAS) is investigating a reference conceptual design called the Supercontainer (SC) for the packaging of SF and HLW. This conceptual design is based on a multiple-barrier system consisting of a hermetically-sealed carbon steel overpack and a surrounding highly-alkaline concrete buffer. The first one is developed to retain the radionuclides. The two main functions of the buffer are (a) to create a high pH environment around the carbon steel overpack in order to passivate the metal surface and so to slow down the corrosion propagation during the thermal phase and (b) to provide a radiological shielding during the construction and the handling of the Supercontainer. A recent test has been performed to investigate the feasibility to construct the SC. This test incorporated several kinds of sensors including Digital Image Correlation (DIC), Acoustic Emission (AE), corrosion sensing techniques and optical fibers with and without fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). In particular, several single-mode optical fibers with 4 mm long FBGs with different Bragg wavelengths and distributed along the optical fibers were used. For casting and curing condition monitoring, a number of gratings were incorporated inside the concrete buffer during the first stage of construction. Then other sensors were embedded near a heat source installed in the second stage to simulate the effects of heat generated by radioactive waste. The FBGs were designed to measure both temperature and strain effects in the concrete. To discriminate between these effects special packaging

  6. Municipal solid waste generation in municipalities: quantifying impacts of household structure, commercial waste and domestic fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebersorger, S; Beigl, P

    2011-01-01

    Waste management planning requires reliable data concerning waste generation, influencing factors on waste generation and forecasts of waste quantities based on facts. This paper aims at identifying and quantifying differences between different municipalities' municipal solid waste (MSW) collection quantities based on data from waste management and on socio-economic indicators. A large set of 116 indicators from 542 municipalities in the Province of Styria was investigated. The resulting regression model included municipal tax revenue per capita, household size and the percentage of buildings with solid fuel heating systems. The model explains 74.3% of the MSW variation and the model assumptions are met. Other factors such as tourism, home composting or age distribution of the population did not significantly improve the model. According to the model, 21% of MSW collected in Styria was commercial waste and 18% of the generated MSW was burned in domestic heating systems. While the percentage of commercial waste is consistent with literature data, practically no literature data are available for the quantity of MSW burned, which seems to be overestimated by the model. The resulting regression model was used as basis for a waste prognosis model (Beigl and Lebersorger, in preparation). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Municipal solid waste generation in municipalities: Quantifying impacts of household structure, commercial waste and domestic fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebersorger, S.; Beigl, P.

    2011-01-01

    Waste management planning requires reliable data concerning waste generation, influencing factors on waste generation and forecasts of waste quantities based on facts. This paper aims at identifying and quantifying differences between different municipalities' municipal solid waste (MSW) collection quantities based on data from waste management and on socio-economic indicators. A large set of 116 indicators from 542 municipalities in the Province of Styria was investigated. The resulting regression model included municipal tax revenue per capita, household size and the percentage of buildings with solid fuel heating systems. The model explains 74.3% of the MSW variation and the model assumptions are met. Other factors such as tourism, home composting or age distribution of the population did not significantly improve the model. According to the model, 21% of MSW collected in Styria was commercial waste and 18% of the generated MSW was burned in domestic heating systems. While the percentage of commercial waste is consistent with literature data, practically no literature data are available for the quantity of MSW burned, which seems to be overestimated by the model. The resulting regression model was used as basis for a waste prognosis model (Beigl and Lebersorger, in preparation).

  8. Can we always ignore ship-generated food waste?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polglaze, John

    2003-01-01

    Considerable quantities of food waste can be generated at a rapid rate in ships, particularly those with large numbers of people onboard. By virtue of the amounts involved and its nature, food waste is potentially the most difficult to manage component of a ship's garbage stream, however, in most sea areas it may be dealt with by the simple expedient of direct discharge to sea. As a consequence, only minimal attention is paid to food waste management by many ship and port operators and advisory bodies, and there is a paucity of information in the available literature. The determination that management of ships' food waste is inconsequential is, however, incorrect in many circumstances. Disposal to sea is not always possible due to restrictions imposed by MARPOL 73/78 and other marine pollution control instruments. Effective management of food waste can be critical for ships that operate in areas where disposal is restricted or totally prohibited

  9. Next-generation fiber lasers enabled by high-performance components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliner, D. A. V.; Victor, B.; Rivera, C.; Fanning, G.; Balsley, D.; Farrow, R. L.; Kennedy, K.; Hampton, S.; Hawke, R.; Soukup, E.; Reynolds, M.; Hodges, A.; Emery, J.; Brown, A.; Almonte, K.; Nelson, M.; Foley, B.; Dawson, D.; Hemenway, D. M.; Urbanek, W.; DeVito, M.; Bao, L.; Koponen, J.; Gross, K.

    2018-02-01

    Next-generation industrial fiber lasers enable challenging applications that cannot be addressed with legacy fiber lasers. Key features of next-generation fiber lasers include robust back-reflection protection, high power stability, wide power tunability, high-speed modulation and waveform generation, and facile field serviceability. These capabilities are enabled by high-performance components, particularly pump diodes and optical fibers, and by advanced fiber laser designs. We summarize the performance and reliability of nLIGHT diodes, fibers, and next-generation industrial fiber lasers at power levels of 500 W - 8 kW. We show back-reflection studies with up to 1 kW of back-reflected power, power-stability measurements in cw and modulated operation exhibiting sub-1% stability over a 5 - 100% power range, and high-speed modulation (100 kHz) and waveform generation with a bandwidth 20x higher than standard fiber lasers. We show results from representative applications, including cutting and welding of highly reflective metals (Cu and Al) for production of Li-ion battery modules and processing of carbon fiber reinforced polymers.

  10. Waste container weighing data processing to create reliable information of household waste generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Pirjo; Kaila, Juha

    2015-05-01

    Household mixed waste container weighing data was processed by knowledge discovery and data mining techniques to create reliable information of household waste generation. The final data set included 27,865 weight measurements covering the whole year 2013 and it was selected from a database of Helsinki Region Environmental Services Authority, Finland. The data set contains mixed household waste arising in 6m(3) containers and it was processed identifying missing values and inconsistently low and high values as errors. The share of missing values and errors in the data set was 0.6%. This provides evidence that the waste weighing data gives reliable information of mixed waste generation at collection point level. Characteristic of mixed household waste arising at the waste collection point level is a wide variation between pickups. The seasonal variation pattern as a result of collective similarities in behaviour of households was clearly detected by smoothed medians of waste weight time series. The evaluation of the collection time series against the defined distribution range of pickup weights on the waste collection point level shows that 65% of the pickups were from collection points with optimally dimensioned container capacity and the collection points with over- and under-dimensioned container capacities were noted in 9.5% and 3.4% of all pickups, respectively. Occasional extra waste in containers occurred in 21.2% of the pickups indicating the irregular behaviour of individual households. The results of this analysis show that processing waste weighing data using knowledge discovery and data mining techniques provides trustworthy information of household waste generation and its variations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Renewable High-Performance Fibers from the Chemical Recycling of Cotton Waste Utilizing an Ionic Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaadi, Shirin; Hummel, Michael; Hellsten, Sanna; Härkäsalmi, Tiina; Ma, Yibo; Michud, Anne; Sixta, Herbert

    2016-11-23

    A new chemical recycling method for waste cotton is presented that allows the production of virgin textile fibers of substantially higher quality than that from the mechanical recycling methods that are used currently. Cotton postconsumer textile wastes were solubilized fully in the cellulose-dissolving ionic liquid 1,5-diazabicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-enium acetate ([DBNH]OAc) to be processed into continuous filaments. As a result of the heterogeneous raw material that had a different molar mass distribution and degree of polymerization, pretreatment to adjust the cellulose degree of polymerization by acid hydrolysis, enzyme hydrolysis, or blending the waste cotton with birch prehydrolyzed kraft pulp was necessary to ensure spinnability. The physical properties of the spun fibers and the effect of the processing parameters on the ultrastructural changes of the fibers were measured. Fibers with a tenacity (tensile strength) of up to 58 cN tex -1 (870 MPa) were prepared, which exceeds that of native cotton and commercial man-made cellulosic fibers. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. The Immobilisation of Krom and Stronsium Waste Using Natural Fiber Reinforced Cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susetyo Haria Putero; Nunung Prabaningrum; Widya Rosita

    2007-01-01

    Cementation of hazardous liquid waste is one of the methods to minimize its detrimental effect on the environmental quality and human health. This research purpose was to study the effect of natural fiber composition and temperature on quality of the cement block reinforced by coconut (Cocos nucifera) fiber and bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris) fiber. This research was pursued by adsorbing stronsium waste and krom using zeolite. Thirteen percent volume of zeolite was mixed with 0.3 of water/cement ratio. Composition of natural fiber was varied by 0.00v/o, 0.05v/o, 0.10v/o, 0.25v/o, 0.50v/o, 0.75v/o and 1.00v/o. The cement blocks produced were heated at 0℃, 50℃, 100℃, 150℃, 200℃ and 250℃ for 10 minutes and then determined their compressive strength and leaching rate. The optimum composition of natural fiber causing increasing of mechanical strength has been founded at 0.50% v/o of fiber. On that composition the axial force resistance of fiber is higher than the radial one. The hydration reaction completely works when cement block is heated until certain temperature that results in the increasing of its compressive strength. However, the compressive strength of cement block heated up to 250℃ is still beyond the standard. Based on its compressive strength, the bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris) fiber is more feasible than coconut (Cocos nucifera) fiber for reinforcing cement block. Heating just influences on the physics properties of cement block. But, the ability of block cement to immobilize a matter is affected by properties of matters. (author)

  13. Optical pulse generation using fiber lasers and integrated optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilcox, R.B.; Browning, D.F.; Burkhart, S.C.; VanWonterghem, B.W.

    1995-01-01

    We have demonstrated an optical pulse forming system using fiber and integrated optics, and have designed a multiple-output system for a proposed fusion laser facility. Our approach is an advancement over previous designs for fusion lasers, and an unusual application of fiber lasers and integrated optics

  14. Evaluation and development of a policy for waste generation control - electric and electronic waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwang Im [Korea Environment Institute, Seoul (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    Although a policy to reduce waste amount and promote recycling for large electric appliances was introduced, it is still in the initial stage operated in a form of recommendation and the general management system of electric and electronic waste has not established yet. In this study, the generation and disposal of electric and electronic waste were examined and the effectiveness of present policy was evaluated. Based on the analysis, a policy for the more appropriate electric and electronic waste management was presented. 34 refs., 4 figs., 51 tabs.

  15. Generation and management of medical waste in Serbia: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šerović Radmila M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents generation, quantities and medical waste (MW management in Serbia. It represents assessment methods and total annual MW generation by categories. It was concluded that pharmaceutical (64% and infectious (32% MW production is the largest. According to available data, MW management in Serbia is currently at low level, except when it comes to infectious waste. Research proposed simpler treatment methods in existing autoclaves and complex methods (incineration and plasma-pyrolysis, as well as short-term and long-term solutions. Predicted MW growing amount requires existing capacity increase for processing and new solutions application. Installed autoclaves capacity could be increased by increasing working time, in order to avoid additional investment. However, treatment in autoclave is only suitable for infectious MW. For other medical waste, which main fractions are pharmaceutical and chemical waste, there is no infrastructure. As temporary solution, pharmaceutical waste is treated abroad which in longer period is not financially feasible. Considering that MW treatment in Serbia currently is based on health facilities network equipped with autoclaves, as central (CTF and local (LTF treatments facilities for infectious waste treatment, it is recommended additional capacity implementation for treatment of non-infectious waste to this network, with simultaneous management level optimization of whole MW.

  16. Generation of spirally polarized propagation-invariant beam using fiber microaxicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Geo M; Viswanathan, Nirmal K

    2011-10-01

    We present here a fiber microaxicon (MA)based method to generate spirally polarized propagation-invariant optical beam. MA chemically etched in the tip of a two-mode fiber efficiently converts the generic cylindrically polarized vortex fiber mode into a spirally polarized propagation-invariant (Bessel-type) beam via radial dependence of polarization rotation angle. The combined roles of helico-conical phase and nonparaxial propagation in the generation and characteristics of the output beam from the fiber MA are discussed. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  17. Extreme E-waste generated from successful Operations Management?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Erik Skov; Zhilyaev, Dmitry; Parajuly, Keshav

    This paper identifies how research in the field of Operations Management (OM) has been extremely successful in reducing costs for the manufacturing of electrical and electronic equipment by focusing on design for assembly and manufacturing. The downside is the generation of extreme amounts of e......-waste. Based on a literature survey, 2251 kg of e-waste and on case study, this research identifies the need to extend product lifetimes to drive down e-waste. The study concludes that more research is needed on designs for disassembly, repair, refurbishment, and remanufacturing to meet future requirements...

  18. The effects of adding waste plastic fibers on some properties of roller compacted concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abed Adil

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An attempt to produce of roller compacted concrete (RCC improved by adding waste plastic fibers (WPFs resulting from cutting the PET beverage bottles was recorded in this study. The method which is used for production of RCC is an approved design method for ACI committee (5R-207,1980[1]. WPF was added by volumetric percentages ranging between (0.5 to 2 % and reference concrete mix was produced for comparison reason. Many tests were conducted on the models produced by rolling compacted concrete like compressive strength, flexural strength, modulus of elasticity, dry density, water absorption and ultrasonic pulse velocity. The analysis of the results showed that the use of plastic waste fibers (1% had led to improvement in the properties of each of the compressive strength and flexural strength compared with reference concrete. Results also showed that the addition of these, fibers increase water absorption and reduce the speed of Ultrasonic pulse velocity.

  19. In situ chemical characterization of waste sludges using FTIR-based fiber optic sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebagay, T.V.; Dodd, D.A.; Jeppson, D.W.; Lockrem, L.L.; Blewett, G.R.

    1994-02-01

    The characterization of unknown mixed wastes is a mandatory step in today's climate of strict environmental regulations. Cleaning up the nuclear and chemical wastes that have accumulated for 50 years at the Hanford Site is the largest single cleanup task in the United States today. The wastes are stored temporarily in carbon steel single- and double-shell tanks that are buried in tank farms at the Site. In the 1950s, a process to scavenge radioactive cesium and other soluble radionuclides in the wastes was developed to create additional tank space for waste storage. This scavenging process involved treatment of the wastes with alkali cyanoferrates and nickel sulfate to precipitate 137 Cs in the presence of nitrate oxidant. Recent safety issues have focused on the stability of cyanoferrate-bearing wastes with large quantities of nitrates and nitrites. Nitrate has been partially converted to nitrite as a result of radiolysis during more than 35 years of storage. The major safety issue is the possibility of the presence of local hot spots enriched in 137 Cs and 90 Sr that under optimum conditions can self-heat causing dry out and a potential runaway reaction of the cyanoferrates with the nitrates/nitrites). For waste tank safety, accurate data of the concentration and distribution of cyanoferrates in the tanks are needed. Because of the extensive sampling required and the highly restricted activities allowed in the tank farms, simulated tank wastes are used to provide an initial basis for identifying and quantifying realistic concerns prior to waste remediation. Fiber optics provide a tool for the remote and in situ characterization of hazardous and toxic materials. This study is focused on near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) fiber optic sensors for in situ chemical characterization of Hanford Site waste sludges

  20. Static third-harmonic lines in widely variable fiber continuum generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Haohua; Zhao, Youbo; Liu, Yuan; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    An intriguing phenomenon of third-harmonic generation under fiber continuum generation is the emission of an anharmonic signal. One popular interpretation of this effect has developed into a general theory of fiber third-harmonic generation. Here we produce "static" third-harmonic lines dictated fully by fiber properties independent of pump parameters, in contrast to the signals of all known phase-matched nonlinear optical processes that vary dynamically with these parameters. We argue that the anharmonic signal is an illusion of the continuum generation, that it is in fact harmonic, and that this theory should be reevaluated.

  1. Food waste generation and industrial uses: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotto, Francesca; Alibardi, Luca; Cossu, Raffaello

    2015-11-01

    Food waste is made up of materials intended for human consumption that are subsequently discharged, lost, degraded or contaminated. The problem of food waste is currently on an increase, involving all sectors of waste management from collection to disposal; the identifying of sustainable solutions extends to all contributors to the food supply chains, agricultural and industrial sectors, as well as retailers and final consumers. A series of solutions may be implemented in the appropriate management of food waste, and prioritised in a similar way to waste management hierarchy. The most sought-after solutions are represented by avoidance and donation of edible fractions to social services. Food waste is also employed in industrial processes for the production of biofuels or biopolymers. Further steps foresee the recovery of nutrients and fixation of carbon by composting. Final and less desirable options are incineration and landfilling. A considerable amount of research has been carried out on food waste with a view to the recovery of energy or related products. The present review aims to provide an overview of current debate on food waste definitions, generation and reduction strategies, and conversion technologies emerging from the biorefinery concept. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. TRU waste transportation -- The flammable gas generation problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, M.J.; Kosiewicz, S.T.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has imposed a flammable gas (i.e., hydrogen) concentration limit of 5% by volume on transuranic (TRU) waste containers to be shipped using the TRUPACT-II transporter. This concentration is the lower explosive limit (LEL) in air. This was done to minimize the potential for loss of containment during a hypothetical 60 day period. The amount of transuranic radionuclide that is permissible for shipment in TRU waste containers has been tabulated in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP, 1) to conservatively prevent accumulation of hydrogen above this 5% limit. Based on the SARP limitations, approximately 35% of the TRU waste stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab (INEEL), Los Alamos National Lab (LANL), and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) cannot be shipped in the TRUPACT-II. An even larger percentage of the TRU waste drums at the Savannah River Site (SRS) cannot be shipped because of the much higher wattage loadings of TRU waste drums in that site's inventory. This paper presents an overview of an integrated, experimental program that has been initiated to increase the shippable portion of the Department of Energy (DOE) TRU waste inventory. In addition, the authors will estimate the anticipated expansion of the shippable portion of the inventory and associated cost savings. Such projection should provide the TRU waste generating sites a basis for developing their TRU waste workoff strategies within their Ten Year Plan budget horizons

  3. Waste generation comparison: Coal-fired versus nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaGuardia, T.S.

    1998-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste generation and disposal attract a great deal of attention whenever the nuclear industry is scrutinized by concerned parties, be it the media, the public, or political interests. It is therefore important to the nuclear industry that this issue be put into perspective relative to other current forms of energy production. Most of the country's fossil-fueled power comes from coal-fired plants, with oil and gas as other fuel sources. Most of the generated waste also comes from coal plants. This paper, therefore, compares waste quantities generated by a typical (1150-MW(electric)) pressurized water reactor (PWR) to that of a comparably sized coal-fired power plant

  4. Radioactive waste generated from JAERI partitioning-transmutation cycle system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinichi, Nakayama; Yasuji, Morita; Kenji, Nishihara [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Production of lower-level radioactive wastes, as well as the reduction in radioactivity of HLW, is an important performance indicator in assessing the viability of a partitioning-transmutation system. We have begun to identify the chemical compositions and to quantify the amounts of radioactive wastes that may be generated by JAERI processes. Long-lived radionuclides such as {sup 14}C and {sup 59}Ni and spallation products of Pb-Bi coolants are added to the existing inventory of these nuclides that are generated in the current fuel cycle. Spent salts of KCl-LiCl, which is not generated from the current fuel cycle, will be introduced as a waste. (author)

  5. Radioactive Wastes Generated From JAERI Partitioning-Transmutation Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Shinichi; Morita, Yasuji; Nishihara, Kenji

    2003-01-01

    Production of lower-level radioactive wastes, as well as the reduction in radioactivity of HLW, is an important performance indicator in assessing the viability of a partitioning-transmutation system. We have begun to identify the chemical compositions and to quantify the amounts of radioactive wastes that may be generated by JAERI's processes. Long-lived radionuclides such as 14 C and 59 Ni and spallation products of Pb-Bi coolants are added to the existing inventory of these nuclides that are generated in the current fuel cycle. Spent salts of KCl-LiCl, which is not generated from the current fuel cycle, will be introduced as a waste. (authors)

  6. Gain-switched all-fiber lasers and quasi-continuous wave supercontinuum generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Casper

    The extreme broadening phenomenon of supercontinuum (SC) generation in optical fibers is the basis of SC laser sources. These sources have numerous applications in areas, such as spectroscopy and microscopy due to the unique combination of extremely broad spectral bandwidths, high spectral power...... densities, and high spatial coherence. In this work the feasibility of applying gain-switched all-fiber lasers to SC generation is investigated. It is motivated by the simplicity of the architecture and the ability to scale the optical output power of such fiber lasers. The physics of fiber lasers......-switching of fiber lasers with a variety of different configurations are carried out. The peak power, pulse duration, bandwidth, and scaling with repetition rate are thoroughly described. General guidelines are submitted to enable designing of gainswitched fiber lasers with specifically tailored properties...

  7. Electrical and Electronical Waste Generation in Turkey: Bursa Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güray SALİHOĞLU

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Electrical and electronical equipment that gradually take more place in our daily life, spend their service life in short times and become an e-waste problem to be solved.  Because of the hazardous components they contain, e-waste can cause environmental and human health threats if they are not properly managed. If they are managed properly, they can be a valuable raw material source, since they contain valuable metals such as copper, silver, gold, palladium and recyclable components such as plastics and metals. According to a research conducted in 2014, the global e-waste amount accounts to a source worth 52 billion $; however, only 16% of this source has been properly recycled. It is important to know the potential e-waste amount and the behaviors of people in the production of e-waste to realize a proper e-waste management in our country. The amount and property of electrical and electronic equipment and e-waste generation potential per person in Bursa was investigated in this study. A questionnaire was prepared and applied to a group of people including 31 families (100 person. The questions were to investigate the behaviors in the use, replacement, and management of electrical and electronical equipment. The findings showed that usage of lamps (fluorescent and others were higher than the other equipment, and usage of mobile phones were found to be highest in terms of devices. It was also found that when the mobiles become e-waste since the owners do not want to use them, they are not just thrown away and kept at homes instead. E-waste generation potential of a person from the families investigated was estimated to be 8.14 kg/year.

  8. Mid-infrared supercontinuum generation in tapered ZBLAN fiber with a standard Erbium mode-locked fiber laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubat, Irnis; Moselund, Peter M.; Bang, Ole

    2013-01-01

    to generate a broadband SC using direct pumping with commercially available Erbium (Er) mode-locked fiber lasers at 1550 nm. Formation of SC is manipulated both in the UV and IR by changing the fiber dispersion and nonlinearity using tapers. This has been much studied in various silica fiber designs...... and is now also becoming used in ZBLAN [2], and other soft glasses such as chalcogenide [3] and tellurite [4]. The aim of this nummerical work is to show how pumping tapered commercially available ZBLAN fibers with an Er mode-locked fiber laser can generate a broadband SC approaching the ZBLAN long....... commercially available), core diameter Dc=7 μm, and ZDW=1.5 μm, is pumped with TFWHM=10 ps and P0=10 kW pulses from an Er mode-locked laser with a 40 MHz repetition rate and 4W average power. The resulting MIR SC seen in Fig. 1(b) is based on Modulation Instability breakup of the pump pulse, which generates...

  9. Current Status of Municipal Solid Waste Generation in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Budhiarta, Iwan; Siwar, Chamhuri; Basri, Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Recent investigations in 2010 resulted information that population of Kuala Lumpur City Area has reached 1.66 million people (JPM, 2009). With the population growth rate of 6.1 percent, then the population in the year 2010 can be estimated at least to 1.69 million people. The number of municipal solid waste generated from Kuala Lumpur State Territory and delivered to TBTS was recorded of 2,000 tonnes per day. Accordingly, the solid waste generation average for any person is 1.2 kilograms a da...

  10. Glass and Process Development for the Next Generation of Optical Fibers: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ballato

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Applications involving optical fibers have grown considerably in recent years with intense levels of research having been focused on the development of not only new generations of optical fiber materials and designs, but also on new processes for their preparation. In this paper, we review the latest developments in advanced materials for optical fibers ranging from silica, to semi-conductors, to particle-containing glasses, to chalcogenides and also in process-related innovations.

  11. Tapered photonic crystal fibers for blue-enhanced supercontinuum generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Uffe; Sørensen, Simon Toft; Larsen, Casper

    2012-01-01

    Tapering of photonic crystal fibers is an effective way of shifting the blue edge of a supercontinuum spectrum down in the deep-blue. We discuss the optimum taper profile for enhancing the power in the blue edge....

  12. Using Nonuniform Fiber to Generate Slow Light via SBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhai Li

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The data pulse delay based on slow light induced by stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS in a nonuniform dispersion decreasing fiber (DDF is demonstrated experimentally, and the distortions of data pulses at different beat frequencies are studied. We found that a delay exceeding a pulse width can be achieved at particular beat frequency, and the DDF has larger delay versus gain slope coefficient with much better output pulse quality than single-mode fiber.

  13. Methodologies for estimating one-time hazardous waste generation for capacity generation for capacity assurance planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonn, B.; Hwang, Ho-Ling; Elliot, S.; Peretz, J.; Bohm, R.; Hendrucko, B.

    1994-04-01

    This report contains descriptions of methodologies to be used to estimate the one-time generation of hazardous waste associated with five different types of remediation programs: Superfund sites, RCRA Corrective Actions, Federal Facilities, Underground Storage Tanks, and State and Private Programs. Estimates of the amount of hazardous wastes generated from these sources to be shipped off-site to commercial hazardous waste treatment and disposal facilities will be made on a state by state basis for the years 1993, 1999, and 2013. In most cases, estimates will be made for the intervening years, also

  14. Waste minimization for commercial radioactive materials users generating low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, D.K.; Gitt, M.; Williams, G.A.; Branch, S.; Otis, M.D.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Schurman, D.L.

    1991-07-01

    The objective of this document is to provide a resource for all states and compact regions interested in promoting the minimization of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). This project was initiated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and Massachusetts waste streams have been used as examples; however, the methods of analysis presented here are applicable to similar waste streams generated elsewhere. This document is a guide for states/compact regions to use in developing a system to evaluate and prioritize various waste minimization techniques in order to encourage individual radioactive materials users (LLW generators) to consider these techniques in their own independent evaluations. This review discusses the application of specific waste minimization techniques to waste streams characteristic of three categories of radioactive materials users: (1) industrial operations using radioactive materials in the manufacture of commercial products, (2) health care institutions, including hospitals and clinics, and (3) educational and research institutions. Massachusetts waste stream characterization data from key radioactive materials users in each category are used to illustrate the applicability of various minimization techniques. The utility group is not included because extensive information specific to this category of LLW generators is available in the literature

  15. Radioactive waste assessment using 'minimum waste generation' scenario - summary report March 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, J.A.; Goodill, D.R.; Tymons, B.J.

    1984-11-01

    This report describes an assessment of radioactive waste management arisings from a defined nuclear power generation - Scheme 1. Scheme 1 assumes a minimum waste generation scenario with raw waste arisings from 3 main groups; (i) existing and committed commercial reactors; (ii) fuel reprocessing plants, (iii) research, industry and medicine. No decommissioning wastes are considered except for arisings from the final fuel cores from decommissioned reactors. The study uses the SIMULATION2 code which models waste material flows through the system. With a knowledge of the accumulations and average production rates of the raw wastes and their isotopic compositions (or total activities), the rates at which conditioned wastes become available for transportation and disposal are calculated, with specific activity levels. The data bases for the inventory calculations and the assumptions concerning future operation of nuclear facilities were those current in 1983. Both the inventory data and plans for the future of existing nuclear installations have been updated since these calculations were completed. Therefore the results from this assessment do not represent the most up-to-date information available. The report does, however, illustrate the methodology of assessment and indicates the type of information that can be generated. (author)

  16. A comparative study on per capita waste generation according to a waste collecting system in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jung Hwan; Lee, Eui-Jong; Oh, Jeong Ik; Kim, Jong-Oh; Jang, Am

    2016-04-01

    As cities are becoming increasingly aware of problems related to conventional mobile collection systems, automated pipeline-based vacuum collection (AVAC) systems have been introduced in some densely populated urban areas. The reasons are that in addition to cost savings, AVAC systems can be efficient, hygienic, and environmentally friendly. Despite difficulties in making direct comparisons of municipal waste between a conventional mobile collection system and an AVAC system, it is meaningful to measure the quantities in each of these collection methods either in total or on a per capita generation of waste (PCGW, g/(day*capita)) basis. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the difference in per capita generation of household waste according to the different waste collection methods in Korea. Observations on household waste show that there were considerable differences according to waste collection methods. The value of per capita generation of food waste (PCGF) indicates that a person in a city using AVAC produces 60 % of PCGF (109.58 g/(day*capita)), on average, compared with that of a truck system (173.10 g/(day*capita)) as well as 23 %p less moisture component than that with trucks. The value of per capita generation of general waste (PCGG) in a city with an AVAC system showed 147.73 g/(day*capita), which is 20 % less than that with trucks delivered (185 g/(day*capita)). However, general waste sampled from AVAC showed a 35 %p increased moisture content versus truck delivery.

  17. Prediction of municipal solid waste generation using nonlinear autoregressive network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, Mohammad K; Nopiah, Z M; Basri, N E Ahmad; Basri, H; Abushammala, Mohammed F M; Maulud, K N A

    2015-12-01

    Most of the developing countries have solid waste management problems. Solid waste strategic planning requires accurate prediction of the quality and quantity of the generated waste. In developing countries, such as Malaysia, the solid waste generation rate is increasing rapidly, due to population growth and new consumption trends that characterize society. This paper proposes an artificial neural network (ANN) approach using feedforward nonlinear autoregressive network with exogenous inputs (NARX) to predict annual solid waste generation in relation to demographic and economic variables like population number, gross domestic product, electricity demand per capita and employment and unemployment numbers. In addition, variable selection procedures are also developed to select a significant explanatory variable. The model evaluation was performed using coefficient of determination (R(2)) and mean square error (MSE). The optimum model that produced the lowest testing MSE (2.46) and the highest R(2) (0.97) had three inputs (gross domestic product, population and employment), eight neurons and one lag in the hidden layer, and used Fletcher-Powell's conjugate gradient as the training algorithm.

  18. Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leigh, Christi D.; Hansen, Francis D.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from United

  19. Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, Christi D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Hansen, Francis D.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from

  20. Radioactive Waste Generation in Pyro-SFR Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Fanxing; Park, Byung Heung; Ko, Won Il

    2011-01-01

    Which nuclear fuel cycle option to deploy is of great importance in the sustainability of nuclear power. SFR fuel cycle employing pyroprocessing (named as Pyro- SFR Cycle) is one promising fuel cycle option in the near future. Radioactive waste generation is a key criterion in nuclear fuel cycle system analysis, which considerably affects the future development of nuclear power. High population with small territory is one special characteristic of ROK, which makes the waste management pretty important. In this study, particularly the amount of waste generation with regard to the promising advanced fuel cycle option was evaluated, because the difficulty of deploying an underground repository for HLW disposal requires a longer time especially in ROK

  1. 40 CFR 273.8 - Applicability-household and conditionally exempt small quantity generator waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... conditionally exempt small quantity generator waste. 273.8 Section 273.8 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL....8 Applicability—household and conditionally exempt small quantity generator waste. (a) Persons... universal wastes defined at § 273.9; and/or (2) Conditionally exempt small quantity generator wastes that...

  2. Steam generation by combustion of processed waste fats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pudel, F.; Lengenfeld, P. [OEHMI Forschung und Ingenieurtechnik GmbH, Magdeburg (Germany)

    1993-12-31

    The use of specially processed waste fats as a fuel oil substitute offers, at attractive costs, an environmentally friendly alternative to conventional disposal like refuse incineration or deposition. For that purpose the processed fat is mixed with EL fuel oil and burned in a standard steam generation plant equipped with special accessories. The measured emission values of the combustion processes are very low.

  3. Healthcare waste generation and its management system: the case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Healthcare waste generation and its management system: the case of health ... of an environmental risk to health care workers, the public and the environment at large. ... Only four out of ten health centers used local type of incinerators, while ...

  4. Assessment of healthcare waste generation rate and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of healthcare waste generation rate and its management system in health centers of Bench Maji Zone. ... Background: It is known that the basic role of healthcare system is to preserve the health of patients and protect the public from diseases. However, in the process of performing these activities, health ...

  5. Hazardous Waste Management for the Small Quantity Generator. Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This instructional package for teaching about the regulations imposed on small quantity generators by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the Resource Conservation Recovery Act is organized around ll program objectives: students will be able to (l) determine a hazardous waste from lists or by identifying characteristics; (2) identify…

  6. Optimization of Tapered Photonic Crystal Fibers for Blue-Enhanced Supercontinuum Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Uffe; Sørensen, Simon Toft; Larsen, Casper

    2012-01-01

    Tapering of photonic crystal fibers is an effective way of shifting the dispersive wavelength edge of a supercontinuum spectrum down in the deep-blue. We discuss the optimum taper profile for blue-enhanced supercontinuum generation....

  7. Terahertz Generation in an Electrically Biased Optical Fiber: A Theoretical Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montasir Qasymeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose and theoretically investigate a novel approach for generating terahertz (THz radiation in a standard single-mode fiber. The optical fiber is mediated by an electrostatic field, which induces an effective second-order nonlinear susceptibility via the Kerr effect. The THz generation is based on difference frequency generation (DFG. A dispersive fiber Bragg grating (FBG is utilized to phase match the two interacting optical carriers. A ring resonator is utilized to boost the optical intensities in the biased optical fiber. A mathematical model is developed which is supported by a numerical analysis and simulations. It is shown that a wide spectrum of a tunable THz radiation can be generated, providing a proper design of the FBG and the optical carriers.

  8. Next generation wireless communications using radio over fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Gomes, Nathan J; Gameiro, Atilio

    2012-01-01

    Taking a coherent and logical approach, this book describes the potential use of co-ordinated multipoint systems supported by radio over fiber. It covers an impressive breadth of topics, ranging from components, subsystem and system architecture, to network management and business perspectives. The authors show the importance of radio over fiber in eliminating or mitigating against the current, perceived barriers to the use of co-ordinated multipoint, and the drivers for standardisation activities in future mobile/wireless systems over the next few years. The book brings together the

  9. Development of fiber product recycling technology in fiscal 1998. Achievement report on developing woven product technology utilizing 'waste selvages' generated from weaving process; 1998 nendo sen'i seihin recycle gijutsu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Seishoku no sai ni hasseisuru 'sutemimi' wo sairiyoshita orimono seihin gijutsu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Researches have been made to develop a technology to re-utilize 'waste selvages' generated from weaving process as weaving yarn, and recycle it into toiletry related products such as bath mats and toilet mats. In developing a technology to unify the waste selvage widths, such a research achievement was obtained that one side of the waste selvage width of 19 to 25 mm is most suitable for making the selvages into yarn, whereas the 'waste yarn standard' was established. In the waste selvage winding technology, development was achieved on a dedicated winder which is interlocked with the waste selvage roller on the yarn feeding side. In developing the technologies for waste selvage starching, twisting, and heating, a double twister that can handle very large yarn number counts was developed. For the winding device that can handle yarns of large counts, a re-winder was developed to rewind the yarn by rotating a dying bobbin of the up-twister system. In the weaving technology dealing large count yarns, the tension device and the pile forming device were developed. Twenty-seven kinds of prototype bath mats were fabricated through the experimental production, whose prospect of commercialization has come into the realization range. (NEDO)

  10. A comparison of electrical and photonic pulse generation for IR-UWB on fiber links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodes Lopez, Roberto; Caballero Jambrina, Antonio; Yu, Xianbin

    2010-01-01

    We present and compare experimental results for electrical and photonic generation of 2-Gb/s pulses for impulse radio ultra-wideband on fiber transmission systems based on direct current modulation of a semiconductor laser diode and external optical injection of a semiconductor laser diode......, respectively. We assess the performance of the two generation approaches in terms of bit-error rate after propagation over 20 km of optical fiber followed by wireless transmission....

  11. Next generation of high-efficient waste incinerators. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jappe Frandsen, F.

    2010-11-15

    Modern society produces increasing amounts of combustible waste which may be utilized for heat and power production, at a lower emission of CO{sub 2}, e.g. by substituting a certain fraction of energy from fossil fuel-fired power stations. In 2007, 20.4 % of the district heating and 4.5 % of the power produced in Denmark came from thermal conversion of waste, and waste is a very important part of a future sustainable, and independent, Danish energy supply [Frandsen et al., 2009; Groen Energi, 2010]. In Denmark, approx 3.3 Mtons of waste was produced in 2005, an amount predicted to increase to 4.4 Mtons by the year 2030. According to Affald Danmark, 25 % of the current WtE plant capacity in Denmark is older than 20 years, which is usually considered as the technical and economical lifetime of WtE plants. Thus, there is a need for installation of a significant fraction of new waste incineration capacity, preferentially with an increased electrical efficiency, within the next few years. Compared to fossil fuels, waste is difficult to handle in terms of pre-treatment, combustion, and generation of reusable solid residues. In particular, the content of inorganic species (S, Cl, K, Na, etc.) is problematic, due to enhanced deposition and corrosion - especially at higher temperatures. This puts severe constraints on the electrical efficiency of grate-fired units utilizing waste, which seldom exceeds 26-27%, campared to 46-48 % for coal combustion in suspension. The key parameters when targeting higher electrical efficiency are the pressure and temperature in the steam cycle, which are limited by high-temperature corrosion, boiler- and combustion-technology. This report reviews some of the means that can be applied in order to increase the electrical efficiency in plants firing waste on a grate. (Author)

  12. Gas generation and migration analysis for TRU waste disposal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Kenichi; Noda, Masaru; Yamamoto, Mikihiko; Mihara, Morihiro

    2005-09-01

    In TRU waste disposal system, significant quantities of gases may be generated due to metal corrosion, radiolysis effect and microorganism activities. It is therefore recommended that the potential impact of gas generation and migration on TRU waste repository should be evaluated. In this study, gas generation rates were calculated in the repository and gas migration analysis in the disposal system were carried out using two phase flow model with results of gas generation rates. First, the time dependencies of gas generation rate in each TRU waste repositories were evaluated based on amounts of metal, organic matter and radioactivity. Next, the accumulation pressure of gases and expelled pore water volume nuclides in the repository were calculated by TOUGH2 code. After that, the results showed that the increase of gas pressure was the range of 1.3 to 1.4 MPa. In the repository with and without buffer, the rate of expelled pore water was 0.006 - 0.009 m 3 /y and 0.018 - 0.24m 3 /y, respectively. In addition, the radioactive gas migration through the repository and geosphere are evaluated. And re-saturation analysis is also performed to evaluate the initial condition of the system. (author)

  13. Environmental impact statement on management of commercially generated radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shupe, M.W.; Kreiter, M.R.

    1979-01-01

    This report describes the generic environmental impact statement on the management of generated high-level and transuranic radioactive wastes. The contents of the statement are summarized. The alternatives considered include: geologic disposal; chemical resynthesis; very deep hole disposal; rock melting concept; island disposal; subseabed disposal; icesheet disposal; reverse well disposal; transmutation treatment; and space disposal concepts. The types and quantities of wastes considered are from 3 different fuel cycles for the LWR reactor: once through; uranium-only recycle; and uranium and platinum recycle

  14. Effect of Rayleigh-scattering distributed feedback on multiwavelength Raman fiber laser generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Taher, A E; Harper, P; Babin, S A; Churkin, D V; Podivilov, E V; Ania-Castanon, J D; Turitsyn, S K

    2011-01-15

    We experimentally demonstrate a Raman fiber laser based on multiple point-action fiber Bragg grating reflectors and distributed feedback via Rayleigh scattering in an ~22-km-long optical fiber. Twenty-two lasing lines with spacing of ~100 GHz (close to International Telecommunication Union grid) in the C band are generated at the watt level. In contrast to the normal cavity with competition between laser lines, the random distributed feedback cavity exhibits highly stable multiwavelength generation with a power-equalized uniform distribution, which is almost independent on power.

  15. High power supercontinuum generation in tapered photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Uffe; Sørensen, Simon Toft; Larsen, Casper

    2012-01-01

    the concept of a group-acceleration mismatch, that for a given taper length, the downtapering section should be as long as possible to enhance the amount of blueshifted light. We also discuss the noise properties of supercontinuum in uniform and tapered fibers and we demonstrate that the amplitude noise...

  16. Picosecond anti-Stokes generation in a photonic-crystal fiber for interferometric CARS microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Søren Rud

    2006-01-01

    We generate tunable picosecond anti-Stokes pulses by four-wave mixing of two picosecond pump and Stokes pulse trains in a photonic-crystal fiber. The visible, spectrally narrow anti-Stokes pulses with shifts over 150 nm are generated without generating other spectral features. As a demonstration,...

  17. Water and waste water management Generation Victoria - Latrobe Valley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longmore, G. [Hazelwood Power Corporation, VIC (Australia); Pacific Power (International) Pty. Ltd., Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    1995-12-31

    Water is a necessary resource for coal fired power plant and waste water is generated. The efficient management of water and waste water systems becomes an important operational environmental factor. This paper describes the development and implementation of a ten year water and waste water management strategy for the Latrobe Valley Group of brown coal fired power stations in Victoria. In early 1991, a team was put together of representatives from each power site to develop the strategy entitled `SECV Latrobe Valley Water and Wastewater Management Strategy`. The strategy was developed with extensive public consultation, which was a factor in protracting the process such that the final document was not promulgated until late 1992. However, the final comprehensive document endorsed and agreed by management, has since attracted favourable comment as a model of its type. (author). 2 figs.

  18. Continuous organic waste digester and methane gas generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araneta, V.A.

    1979-01-01

    A patent on the construction of a utility model of an industrial product of a continuous organic-waste digester and methane-gas generator is described. It comprises an airtight chamber to receive slurry of organic waste; a gas-water scrubber to purge carbon dioxide, odor-omitting gases and froth or scrum from newly formed methane gas evolving from said slurry of organic wastes; and two dually functioning slurry-feed and -discharge pipes connected to a reversible pump. It has one pipe with an opening at the base of an airtight chamber and the other pipe with up-ended openings below the fluid level of the slurry to be accumulated in the airtight chamber.

  19. Water and waste water management Generation Victoria - Latrobe Valley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longmore, G.

    1995-01-01

    Water is a necessary resource for coal fired power plant and waste water is generated. The efficient management of water and waste water systems becomes an important operational environmental factor. This paper describes the development and implementation of a ten year water and waste water management strategy for the Latrobe Valley Group of brown coal fired power stations in Victoria. In early 1991, a team was put together of representatives from each power site to develop the strategy entitled 'SECV Latrobe Valley Water and Wastewater Management Strategy'. The strategy was developed with extensive public consultation, which was a factor in protracting the process such that the final document was not promulgated until late 1992. However, the final comprehensive document endorsed and agreed by management, has since attracted favourable comment as a model of its type. (author). 2 figs

  20. UTILIZATION OF MINERAL FIBER WASTE IN THE PRODUCTION OF GYPSUM PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solov'ev Vitaliy Nikolaevich

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Subject: the effectiveness of using compositions with the use of basalt fibers is proven, but the composition must be selected depending on the binder and additives chosen. Research objectives: we examine the possibility of waste recycling of basalt fiber production during manufacturing of modified gypsum composite material with improved characteristics. Materials and methods: as a raw material, a gypsum binder of Samara production was used. As a reinforcement additive, a disperse waste of basalt fiber production of Tver region was used. Studying characteristics of the gypsum binder and modified mixture, and also comparative analysis of these characteristics by average density, total porosity, strength in compression and flexure of the gypsum composite were carried out using standard techniques. Results: dependence of physical and mechanical properties of the modified gypsum material on the content of the basalt fiber additive is established. It was found that an increase in concentration of the additive requires an increased water content or additional use of plasticizer. Conclusions: modification of gypsum stone with a mineral basalt additive will increase the strength, density and durability of thin-walled gypsum products, and, consequently, the demand for products due to ensuring their high quality in transportation and installation.

  1. ANALYZING CERTAIN CHRACTERISTICS OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE GENERATION IN THE PROCES S OF WASTE MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábriel Györgyi T #336;ZSÉR

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the regulations of Act XLIII/2000 on Waste Management to implement the strategic objectives and targets in the Act for the prevalence of the basic waste management principles a National Waste Management Plan II will be worked out and then accepted by the Parliament as part of the National Environmental Protection Programme. On the basis of the national plan the administrative bodies of environmental protection in accordance with the regional settlement and d evelopment programmes make a regional waste management project with the inclusion of the regional, local authorities, and other authorities concerned as well as the non governmental organisations for environmental protection. In our research we analyze the correlation between municipal solid waste per capita and urbanisation level. We have conducted similar calculations in the filed of population density and income. The study was carried out on a micro region level. Our analysis can help determine the framework conditions and factors that influence waste generation, and therefore should be taken into consideration when designing waste policies .

  2. Entropy Generation of Desalination Powered by Variable Temperature Waste Heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Warsinger

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Powering desalination by waste heat is often proposed to mitigate energy consumption and environmental impact; however, thorough technology comparisons are lacking in the literature. This work numerically models the efficiency of six representative desalination technologies powered by waste heat at 50, 70, 90, and 120 °C, where applicable. Entropy generation and Second Law efficiency analysis are applied for the systems and their components. The technologies considered are thermal desalination by multistage flash (MSF, multiple effect distillation (MED, multistage vacuum membrane distillation (MSVMD, humidification-dehumidification (HDH, and organic Rankine cycles (ORCs paired with mechanical technologies of reverse osmosis (RO and mechanical vapor compression (MVC. The most efficient technology was RO, followed by MED. Performances among MSF, MSVMD, and MVC were similar but the relative performance varied with waste heat temperature or system size. Entropy generation in thermal technologies increases at lower waste heat temperatures largely in the feed or brine portions of the various heat exchangers used. This occurs largely because lower temperatures reduce recovery, increasing the relative flow rates of feed and brine. However, HDH (without extractions had the reverse trend, only being competitive at lower temperatures. For the mechanical technologies, the energy efficiency only varies with temperature because of the significant losses from the ORC.

  3. Sodium alginate adhesives as binders in wood fibers/textile waste fibers biocomposites for building insulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, Clément; El Hage, Roland; Bergeret, Anne; Corn, Stéphane; Lacroix, Patrick

    2018-03-15

    Alginate derived from seaweed is a natural polysaccharide able to form stable gel through carbohydrate functional groups largely used in the food and pharmaceutical industry. This article deals with the use of sodium alginate as an adhesive binder for wood fibres/textile waste fibres biocomposites. Several aldehyde-based crosslinking agents (glyoxal, glutaraldehyde) were compared for various wood/textile waste ratios (100/0, 50/50, 60/40, 70/30 and 0/100 in weight). The fully biomass derived composites whose properties are herewith described satisfy most of the appropriate requirements for building materials. They are insulating with a thermal conductivity in the range 0.078-0.089 W/m/K for an average density in the range 308-333 kg/m3 according to the biocomposite considered. They are semi-rigid with a maximal mechanical strength of 0.84 MPa under bending and 0.44 MPa under compression for 60/40 w/w wood/textile waste biocomposites with a glutaraldehyde crosslinking agent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessment of plastic waste generation and its potential recycling of household solid waste in Can Tho City, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh, Nguyen Phuc; Matsui, Yasuhiro; Fujiwara, Takeshi

    2011-04-01

    Plastic solid waste has become a serious problem when considering the disposal alternatives following the sequential hierarchy of sound solid waste management. This study was undertaken to assess the quantity and composition of household solid waste, especially plastic waste to identify opportunities for waste recycling. A 1-month survey of 130 households was carried out in Can Tho City, the capital city of the Mekong Delta region in southern Vietnam. Household solid waste was collected from each household and classified into ten physical categories; especially plastic waste was sorted into 22 subcategories. The average household solid waste generation rate was 281.27 g/cap/day. The compostable and recyclable shares respectively accounted for high percentage as 80.74% and 11%. Regarding plastic waste, the average plastic waste generation rate was 17.24 g/cap/day; plastic packaging and plastic containers dominated with the high percentage, 95.64% of plastic waste. Plastic shopping bags were especially identified as the major component, accounting for 45.72% of total plastic waste. Relevant factors such as household income and household size were found to have an existing correlation to plastic waste generation in detailed composition. The household habits and behaviors of plastic waste discharge and the aspects of environmental impacts and resource consumption for plastic waste disposal alternatives were also evaluated.

  5. Reducing waste generation and radiation exposure by analytical method modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    The primary goal of an analytical support laboratory has traditionally been to provide accurate data in a timely and cost effective fashion. Added to this goal is now the need to provide the same high quality data while generating as little waste as possible. At the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), we have modified and reengineered several methods to decrease generated waste and hence reduce radiation exposure. These method changes involved improving detection limits (which decreased the amount of sample required for analysis), decreasing reaction and analysis time, decreasing the size of experimental set-ups, recycling spent solvent and reagents, and replacing some methods. These changes had the additional benefits of reducing employee radiation exposure and exposure to hazardous chemicals. In all cases, the precision, accuracy, and detection limits were equal to or better than the replaced method. Most of the changes required little or no expenditure of funds. This paper describes these changes and discusses some of their applications

  6. The Potential in Bioethanol Production From Waste Fiber Sludges in Pulp Mill-Based Biorefineries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöde, Anders; Alriksson, Björn; Jönsson, Leif J.; Nilvebrant, Nils-Olof

    Industrial production of bioethanol from fibers that are unusable for pulp production in pulp mills offers an approach to product diversification and more efficient exploitation of the raw material. In an attempt to utilize fibers flowing to the biological waste treatment, selected fiber sludges from three different pulp mills were collected, chemically analyzed, enzymatically hydrolyzed, and fermented for bioethanol production. Another aim was to produce solid residues with higher heat values than those of the original fiber sludges to gain a better fuel for combustion. The glucan content ranged between 32 and 66% of the dry matter. The lignin content varied considerably (1-25%), as did the content of wood extractives (0.2-5.8%). Hydrolysates obtained using enzymatic hydrolysis were found to be readily fermentable using Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Hydrolysis resulted in improved heat values compared with corresponding untreated fiber sludges. Oligomeric xylan fragments in the solid residue obtained after enzymatic hydrolysis were identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight and their potential as a new product of a pulp mill-based biorefinery is discussed.

  7. Bioconversion of Waste Fiber Sludge to Bacterial Nanocellulose and Use for Reinforcement of CTMP Paper Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genqiang Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Utilization of bacterial nanocellulose (BNC for large-scale applications is restricted by low productivity in static cultures and by the high cost of the medium. Fiber sludge, a waste stream from pulp and paper mills, was enzymatically hydrolyzed to sugar, which was used for the production of BNC by the submerged cultivation of Komagataeibacter xylinus. Compared with a synthetic glucose-based medium, the productivity of purified BNC from the fiber sludge hydrolysate using shake-flasks was enhanced from 0.11 to 0.17 g/(L × d, although the average viscometric degree of polymerization (DPv decreased from 6760 to 6050. The cultivation conditions used in stirred-tank reactors (STRs, including the stirring speed, the airflow, and the pH, were also investigated. Using STRs, the BNC productivity in fiber-sludge medium was increased to 0.32 g/(L × d and the DPv was increased to 6650. BNC produced from the fiber sludge hydrolysate was used as an additive in papermaking based on the chemithermomechanical pulp (CTMP of birch. The introduction of BNC resulted in a significant enhancement of the mechanical strength of the paper sheets. With 10% (w/w BNC in the CTMP/BNC mixture, the tear resistance was enhanced by 140%. SEM images showed that the BNC cross-linked and covered the surface of the CTMP fibers, resulting in enhanced mechanical strength.

  8. Myoglobin plasma level related to muscle mass and fiber composition: a clinical marker of muscle wasting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Marc-André; Kinscherf, Ralf; Krakowski-Roosen, Holger; Aulmann, Michael; Renk, Hanna; Künkele, Annette; Edler, Lutz; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Hildebrandt, Wulf

    2007-08-01

    Progressive muscle wasting is a central feature of cancer-related cachexia and has been recognized as a determinant of poor prognosis and quality of life. However, until now, no easily assessable clinical marker exists that allows to predict or to track muscle wasting. The present study evaluated the potential of myoglobin (MG) plasma levels to indicate wasting of large locomotor muscles and, moreover, to reflect the loss of MG-rich fiber types, which are most relevant for daily performance. In 17 cancer-cachectic patients (weight loss 22%) and 27 age- and gender-matched healthy controls, we determined plasma levels of MG and creatine kinase (CK), maximal quadriceps muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) by magnetic resonance imaging, muscle morphology and fiber composition in biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle, body cell mass (BCM) by impedance technique as well as maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2)max). In cachectic patients, plasma MG, muscle CSA, BCM, and VO(2)max were 30-35% below control levels. MG showed a significant positive correlation to total muscle CSA (r = 0.65, p max as an important functional readout. CK plasma levels appear to be less reliable because prolonged increases are observed in even subclinical myopathies or after exercise. Notably, cancer-related muscle wasting was not associated with increases in plasma MG or CK in this study.

  9. Self-disposal option for heat-generating waste - 59182

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojovan, Michael I.; Poluektov, Pavel P.; Kascheev, Vladimir A.

    2012-01-01

    Self-descending heat generating capsules can be used for disposal of dangerous radioactive wastes in extremely deep layers of the Earth preventing any release of radionuclides into the biosphere. Self-disposal option for heat-generating radioactive waste such as spent fuel, high level reprocessing waste or spent sealed radioactive sources, known also as rock melting concept, was considered in the 70's as a viable alternative disposal option by both Department of Energy in the USA and Atomic Industry Ministry in the USSR. Self-disposal is currently reconsidered as a potential alternative route to existing options for solving the nuclear waste problem and is associated with the renaissance of nuclear industry. Self- disposal option utilises the heat generated by decaying radionuclides of radioactive waste inside a heavy and durable capsule to melt the rock on its way down. As the heat from radionuclides within the capsule partly melts the enclosing rock, the relatively low viscosity and density of the silicate melt allow the capsule to be displaced upwards past the heavier capsule as it sinks. Eventually the melt cools and solidifies (e.g. vitrifies or crystallizes), sealing the route along which the capsule passed. Descending or self-disposal continues until enough heat is generated by radionuclides to provide partial melting of surrounding rock. Estimates show that extreme depths of several tens and up to hundred km can be reached by capsules which could never be achieved by other techniques. Self- disposal does not require complex and expensive disposal facilities and provides a minimal footprint used only at operational stage. It has also an extremely high non- proliferation character and degree of safety. Utilisation of heat generated by relatively short-lived radionuclides diminishes the environmental uncertainties of self-disposal and increases the safety of this concept. Self-sinking heat-generating capsules could be launched from the bottom of the sea as

  10. Steam generators lay-up optimization and derived wastes reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabeau, A.M.; Viricel, L.; Foct, F.; Lemaire, P.; Moreaux, D.

    2002-01-01

    Today, EDF plants face a new release permit after a steam generators (SGs) wet lay-up, so that the legal authorizations for wastes release to the environment, renewed or being renewed by the safety authorities, allow smallest quantities of wastes than earlier. In this context, EDF studies the optimization of SGs lay-up conditions, and especially of the hydrazine concentration, in order to reduce the liquid wastes releases to the environment, while keeping low corrosion conditions. At the same time, EDF examines a treatment for hydrazine elimination in liquid wastes before their releases. An experimental study has been conducted in order to evaluate the efficiency of hydrazine to control materials corrosion and of nitrogen gas phase to deaerate water. The consequences of lay-up conditions on carbon steel corrosion has also been studied. In the absence of an efficient alternative reagent, hydrazine remains necessary but implies a great care due to its carcinogenic risks and to its toxicity for aquatic organisms. This choice implies studying a method for hydrazine elimination before its release to the environment. The hydrazine elimination from SGs lay-up wastes could be achieved within about one day, by adding about 700 to 800 liters of 30% hydrogen peroxide solution to eliminate 100 kg hydrazine. Copper sulfate would have to be added if copper is not present in the wastes; the copper content in the wastes should be around 100 to 200 μg/kg for the reaction to be fast enough, which is consistent with the legal authorization for copper release to the environment. The nuclear power plants would have to adjust the quantity of hydrogen peroxide to add to the wastes to be treated, based on the quantity of hydrazine to eliminate, in order to avoid any excess of hydrogen peroxide in the wastes at the end of the treatment, since this species is not allowed to be released to the environment. Moreover, the hydrogen peroxide treatment should not have any significant impact on

  11. The CANDU-PHW generating system waste arisings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, G.R.

    1979-03-01

    In this report, the volume of material and level of contained radioactive nuclides are tabulated for wastes arising from four fuel cycles which might be operated in CANDU-PHW (CANada Deuterium Uranium - Pressurized Heavy Water) reactors. The data presented, based on Canadian experience and/or studies, cover the range of conditioned waste volumes which could be expected from steady-state (no growth), CANDU-PHW-powered electrical generating systems. The wastes arising from operation and decommissioning of facilities in each phase of each fuel cycle are estimated. Each fuel cycle is considered to operate in isolation with the data given in terms of quantities per gigawatt-year of electricity produced. Three of the fuel cycles for which data are presented, the natural uranium once-through cycle, the plutonium-enriched uranium cycle (plutonium recycle) and the low-burnup uranium-enriched thorium cycle (thorium and uranium recycle), were studied by INFCE WG.7 (the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation, Working Group 7) as fuel cycles 4, 5 and 6. The high-burnup uranium-enriched thorium cycle is included for comparison. INFCE WG.7 selected many common reference parameters which are applied uniformly to all seven INFCE WG.7 reference fuel cycles in determining waste arisings. Where these parameters differ from the data of Canadian origin given in the body of this report, the INFCE WG.7 data are given in an appendix. The waste management costs associated with operation of each INFCE WG.7 reference fuel cycle were calculated and compared by the working group. An arbitrary set of costing parameters and disposal technologies was selected by the working group for application to each of the reference fuel cycles. The waste management and disposal costs for the PHW reactor fuel cycles based on these arbitrary cost parameters are given in an appendix. (author)

  12. Gas Generation in Radioactive Wastes - MAGGAS Predictive Life Cycle Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streatfield, R.E.; Hebditch, D.J.; Swift, B.T.; Hoch, A.R.; Constable, M.

    2006-01-01

    Gases may form from radioactive waste in quantities posing different potential hazards throughout the waste package life cycle. The latter includes surface storage, transport, placing in an operating repository, storage in the repository prior to backfill, closure and the post-closure stage. Potentially hazardous situations involving gas include fire, flood, dropped packages, blocked package vents and disruption to a sealed repository. The MAGGAS (Magnox Gas generation) model was developed to assess gas formation for safety assessments during all stages of the waste package life cycle. This is a requirement of the U.K. regulatory authorities and Nirex and progress in this context is discussed. The processes represented in the model include: Corrosion, microbial degradation, radiolysis, solid-state diffusion, chemico-physical degradation and pressurisation. The calculation was split into three time periods. First the 'aerobic phase' is used to model the periods of surface storage, transport and repository operations including storage in the repository prior to backfill. The second and third periods were designated 'anaerobic phase 1' and 'anaerobic phase 2' and used to model the waste packages in the post-closure phase of the repository. The various significant gas production processes are modeled in each phase. MAGGAS (currently Version 8) is mounted on an Excel spreadsheet for ease of use and speed, has 22 worksheets and is operated routinely for assessing waste packages (e.g. for ventilation of stores and pressurisation of containers). Ten operational and decommissioning generic nuclear power station waste streams were defined as initial inputs, which included ion exchange materials, sludges and concentrates, fuel element debris, graphite debris, activated components, contaminated items, desiccants and catalysts. (authors)

  13. A Survey of Municipal Solid Waste Generation in 22 Regions of Tehran With Solid Waste Reduction Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Abduli

    2015-07-01

    Methods: The study was a descriptive cross-sectional one conducted from 2010 to 2014. Relevant officials of the waste recovery in 22 regions of Tehran were approached in order to collect data about municipal solid waste generation through interviewing, filling out questionnaires, conducting field visits from Aradkooh Disposal and Processing Complex and collecting information on disposal and destiny of wastes. Then the data were compiled and analyzed. Results: Total solid waste generation in Tehran from 2010 to 2014 amounted to respectively 3389662, 3399344, 3449338 and 3245157 Metric Tons, categorized into three groups of municipal, companies and townships and hospital wastes. Most of the generated waste produced in Tehran was that of households and commercial (known as municipal waste from 22 Regions of Tehran. Based on the surveys conducted, per capita solid waste generation of 11 regions of Tehran ranged from 550 to 1000 grams and in other 11 ones from 1000 to 1521 grams per capita per day. The lowest and highest waste generation rate belonged respectively to region 13 with 556 grams and region 12 with 1521 grams per capita per day in 2011. Conclusion: Comparing per capita generation of municipal solid waste in different municipal regions in Tehran with maximum acceptable capacity of waste generation indicates the deviation of waste generation of all Tehran regions from the standard acceptable amount. Therefore, not only is it necessary to plan and take strategic measures to reduce Tehran waste generation but also these programs and measures should be specific to each region considering its specifications and solid waste quality and quantity.

  14. Advanced power generation using biomass wastes from palm oil mills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, Muhammad; Kurniawan, Tedi; Oda, Takuya; Kashiwagi, Takao

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the energy-efficient utilization of both solid and liquid wastes from palm oil mills, particularly their use for power generation. It includes the integration of a power generation system using empty fruit bunch (EFB) and palm oil mill effluent (POME). The proposed system mainly consists of three modules: EFB gasification, POME digestion, and additional organic Rankine cycle (ORC). EFBs are dried and converted into a syngas fuel with high calorific value through integrated drying and gasification processes. In addition, POME is converted into a biogas fuel for power generation. Biogas engine-based cogenerators are used for generating both electricity and heat. The remaining unused heat is recovered by ORC module to generate electricity. The influences of three EFB gasification temperatures (800, 900 and 1000 °C) in EFB gasification module; and working fluids and pressure in ORC module are evaluated. Higher EFB gasification leads to higher generated electricity and remaining heat for ORC module. Power generation efficiency increases from 11.2 to 24.6% in case of gasification temperature is increased from 800 to 1000 °C. In addition, cyclohexane shows highest energy efficiency compared to toluene and n-heptane in ORC module. Higher pressure in ORC module also leads to higher energy efficiency. Finally, the highest total generated power and power generation efficiency obtained by the system are 8.3 MW and 30.4%, respectively.

  15. High-power, cladding-pumped all-fiber laser with selective transverse mode generation property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Wang, Meng; Liu, Tong; Leng, Jinyong; Zhou, Pu; Chen, Jinbao

    2017-06-10

    We demonstrate, to the best of our knowledge, the first cladding-pumped all-fiber oscillator configuration with selective transverse mode generation based on a mode-selective fiber Bragg grating pair. Operating in the second-order (LP 11 ) mode, maximum output power of 4.2 W is obtained with slope efficiency of about 38%. This is the highest reported output power of single higher-order transverse mode generation in an all-fiber configuration. The intensity distribution profile and spectral evolution have also been investigated in this paper. Our work suggests the potential of realizing higher power with selective transverse mode operation based on a mode-selective fiber Bragg grating pair.

  16. Distributed optical fiber vibration sensing using phase-generated carrier demodulation algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhihua; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Mingyu; Dai, Haolong; Zhang, Jingjing; Liu, Li; Zhang, Lijun; Jin, Xing; Wang, Gaifang; Qi, Guang

    2018-05-01

    A novel optical fiber-distributed vibration-sensing system is proposed, which is based on self-interference of Rayleigh backscattering with phase-generated carrier (PGC) demodulation algorithm. Pulsed lights are sent into the sensing fiber and the Rayleigh backscattering light from a certain position along the sensing fiber would interfere through an unbalanced Michelson interferometry to generate the interference light. An improved PGC demodulation algorithm is carried out to recover the phase information of the interference signal, which carries the sensing information. Three vibration events were applied simultaneously to different positions over 2000 m sensing fiber and demodulated correctly. The spatial resolution is 10 m, and the noise level of the Φ-OTDR system we proposed is about 10-3 rad/\\surd {Hz}, and the signal-to-noise ratio is about 30.34 dB.

  17. Recycled fiber quality from a laboratory-scale blade separator/blender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei-Hong Liang; Stephen M. Shaler; Laurence Mott; Leslie Groom

    1994-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive fiber separator/blender was developed to generate useful secondary fibers from hydropulped waste paper. Processing wet hydropulped fiber resulted in a furnish with no change in average fiber length in three out of four types of recycled fibers tested. In all cases, the canadian standard freeness increased after processing compared to...

  18. Recycled fiber quality from a laboratory-scale blade separator/blend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei-Hong Liang; Stephen M. Shaler; Laurence Mott; Leslie Groom

    1994-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive fiber separator/blender was developed to generate useful secondary fibers from hydropulped waste paper. Processing wet hydropulped fiber resulted in a furnish with no change in average fiber length in three out of four types of recycled fibers tested. In all cases, the Canadian Standard freeness increased after processing compared to...

  19. Two Octaves Supercontinuum Generation in Lead-Bismuth Glass Based Photonic Crystal Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Buczynski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report a two octave spanning supercontinuum generation in a bandwidth of 700–3000 nm in a single-mode photonic crystal fiber made of lead-bismuth-gallate glass. To our knowledge this is the broadest supercontinuum reported in heavy metal oxide glass based fibers. The fiber was fabricated using an in-house synthesized glass with optimized nonlinear, rheological and transmission properties in the range of 500–4800 nm. The photonic cladding consists of 8 rings of air holes. The fiber has a zero dispersion wavelength (ZDW at 1460 nm. Its dispersion is determined mainly by the first ring of holes in the cladding with a relative hole size of 0.73. Relative hole size of the remaining seven rings is 0.54, which allows single mode performance of the fiber in the infrared range and reduces attenuation of the fundamental mode. The fiber is pumped into anomalous dispersion with 150 fs pulses at 1540 nm. Observed spectrum of 700–3000 nm was generated in 2 cm of fiber with pulse energy below 4 nJ. A flatness of 5 dB was observed in 950–2500 nm range.

  20. Electrically conducting nanobiocomposites using carbon nanotubes and collagen waste fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meiyazhagan, Ashokkumar; Thangavel, Saravanamoorthy; Hashim, Daniel P.; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Palanisamy, Thanikaivelan

    2015-01-01

    Electrically conducting hybrid biocomposite films were prepared using a simple and cost-effective method by incorporating different types of carbon nanotubes (XCNTs) viz., few walled carbon nanotube (FWCNT) and boron doped carbon nanotube (BCNT) into biopolymers. Collagen extracted from animal skin wastes was blended with guar gum and XCNTs in varying proportions to form flexible and electrically conducting hybrid films. We found that the electrical conductivity of both types of hybrid films increases radically as the XCNT loading increases. BCNT incorporated hybrid films show better electrical conductivity (3.0 × 10 −1 S/cm) than their FWCNT loaded counter parts (4.8 × 10 −4 S/cm) at a dosage of 2 wt.%. On the other hand, mechanical and other physical properties such as transparency, flexibility and surface smoothness of the developed hybrid films were affected as a function of XCNT concentration. We also demonstrated that the developed hybrid films lit up a LED lamp when inserted between batteries and the brightness of the emitted light depended on the XCNT loading. These results suggest a new way to transform an industrial biowaste into innovative advanced materials for applications in fields related to biomedicine, biosensors and electronics. - Highlights: • Hybrid nanobiocomposite films prepared using collagen, guar gum and CNTs. • Examined the effect of CNT doping on the properties of hybrid biocomposite films. • Higher CNT loading improved the conductivity radically, especially for BCNT. • The ability of developed hybrid films to lit up a LED lamp was demonstrated. • The results suggest a new way to transform biowaste into advanced materials

  1. The global economic and regulatory determinants of household food waste generation: A cross-country analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalak, Ali; Abou-Daher, Chaza; Chaaban, Jad; Abiad, Mohamad G

    2016-02-01

    Food is generally wasted all along the supply chain, with an estimated loss of 35percent generated at the consumer level. Consequently, household food waste constitutes a sizable proportion of the total waste generated throughout the food supply chain. Yet such wastes vary drastically between developed and developing countries. Using data collected from 44 countries with various income levels, this paper investigates the impact of legislation and economic incentives on household food waste generation. The obtained results indicate that well-defined regulations, policies and strategies are more effective than fiscal measures in mitigating household food waste generation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Industrial Qualification Process for Optical Fibers Distributed Strain and Temperature Sensing in Nuclear Waste Repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Delepine-Lesoille

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and strain monitoring will be implemented in the envisioned French geological repository for high- and intermediate-level long-lived nuclear wastes. Raman and Brillouin scatterings in optical fibers are efficient industrial methods to provide distributed temperature and strain measurements. Gamma radiation and hydrogen release from nuclear wastes can however affect the measurements. An industrial qualification process is successfully proposed and implemented. Induced measurement uncertainties and their physical origins are quantified. The optical fiber composition influence is assessed. Based on radiation-hard fibers and carbon-primary coatings, we showed that the proposed system can provide accurate temperature and strain measurements up to 0.5 MGy and 100% hydrogen concentration in the atmosphere, over 200 m distance range. The selected system was successfully implemented in the Andra underground laboratory, in one-to-one scale mockup of future cells, into concrete liners. We demonstrated the efficiency of simultaneous Raman and Brillouin scattering measurements to provide both strain and temperature distributed measurements. We showed that 1.3 μm working wavelength is in favor of hazardous environment monitoring.

  3. Radiolytic gas generation in plutonium contaminated waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazanjian, A.R.

    1976-01-01

    Many plutonium contaminated waste materials decompose into gaseous products because of exposure to alpha radiation. The gases generated (usually hydrogen) over long-storage periods may create hazardous conditions. To determine the extent of such hazards, knowing the gas generation yields is necessary. These yields were measured by contacting some common Rocky Flats Plant waste materials with plutonium and monitoring the enclosed atmospheres for extensive periods of time. The materials were Plexiglas, polyvinyl chloride, glove-box gloves, machining oil, carbon tetrachloride, chlorothene VG solvent, Kimwipes (dry and wet), polyethylene, Dowex-1 resin, and surgeon's gloves. Both 239 Pu oxide and 238 Pu oxide were used as radiation sources. The gas analyses were made by mass spectrometry and the results obtained were the total gas generation, the hydrogen generation, the oxygen consumption rate, and the gas composition over the entire storage period. Hydrogen was the major gas produced in most of the materials. The total gas yields varied from 0.71 to 16 cm 3 (standard temperature pressure) per day per curie of plutonium. The oxygen consumption rates varied from 0.0088 to 0.070 millimoles per day per gram of plutonium oxide-239 and from 0.0014 to 0.0051 millimoles per day per milligram 238 Pu

  4. Disposal and handling of nuclear steam generator chemical cleaning wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larrick, A.P.; Schneidmiller, D.

    1978-01-01

    A large number of pressurized water nuclear reactor electrical generating plants have experienced a corrosion-related problem with their steam generators known as denting. Denting is a mechanical deformation of the steam generator tubes that occurs at the tube support plates. Corrosion of the tube support plates occurs within the annuli through which the tubes pass and the resulting corrosion oxides, which are larger in volume than the original metal, compress and deform the tubes. In some cases, the induced stresses have been severe enough to cause tube and/or support cracking. The problem was so severe at the Turkey Point and Surrey plants that the tubing is being replaced. For less severe cases, chemical cleaning of the oxides, and other materials which deposit in the annuli from the water, is being considered. A Department of Energy-sponsored program was conducted by Consolidated Edison Co. of New York which identified several suitable cleaning solvents and led to in-plant chemical cleaning pilot demonstrations in the Indian Point Unit 1 steam generators. Current programs to improve the technology are being conducted by the Electric Power Research Institute, and the three PWR NSSS vendors with the assistance of numerous consultants, vendors, and laboratories. These programs are expected to result in more effective, less corrosive solvents. However, after a chemical cleaning is conducted, a large problem still remains- that of disposing of the spent wastes. The paper summarizes some of the methods currently available for handling and disposal of the wastes

  5. FRIDA: A model for the generation and handling of solid waste in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Helge V.; Møller Andersen, Frits

    2012-01-01

    Since 1994, Danish waste treatment plants have been obliged to report to the Danish EPA the annual amounts of waste treated. Applying these data, we analyse the development, link amounts of waste to economic and demographic variables, and present a model for the generation and treatment of waste...... in Denmark. Using the model and official projections of the economic development, a baseline projection for the generation and treatment of waste is presented. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  6. Prediction of combustible waste generation and estimate of potential energy by applying waste to energy technologies in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jang-Soo; Cho, Sung-Jin; Jung, Hae-Young; Lee, Ki-Bae; Seo, Yong-Chil

    2010-01-01

    In 2007 total waste generation rate in Korea was 318,670 ton,day. In general waste generation rate shows rising trend since 2000. Wastes are composed of municipal waste 14.9 % industrial waste 34.1 % and construction waste 51.0 %. Treatment of wastes by recycling was 81.1 % landfill 11.1 % incineration 5.3 % and ocean dumping 2.4 %. National waste energy policies have been influenced by various factors such as environmental problem economy technology level (could be made energy), and so on. Korea has the worlds third dense population density environmental pollution load per unit land area is the highest in OECD countries caused due to the fast development in economy, industrialization and urbanization in recent. Also, land area per person is just 2,072 m 2 . Landfill capacity reaches the upper limit, industrial waste generation is increasing. Searching new-renewable energy is vital to substitute fossil fuel considering its increasing price. Korea is the world's 10th biggest energy consuming country and 97% of energy depends on importing. Korea aims to increases supply of new-renewable energy by 5% until the 2011. In this study, we computed the amount of combustible waste from municipality generated by the multiple regression analysis. The existing technologies for converting waste to energy were surveyed and the technologies under development or utilizing in future were also investigated. Based on the technology utilization, the amount of energy using waste to energy technology could be estimated in future. (author)

  7. Air filtration media from electrospun waste high-impact polystyrene fiber membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulfi, Akmal; Miftahul Munir, Muhammad; Hapidin, Dian Ahmad; Rajak, Abdul; Edikresnha, Dhewa; Iskandar, Ferry; Khairurrijal, Khairurrijal

    2018-03-01

    Nanofiber membranes were synthesized from waste high-impact polystyrene (HIPS) using electrospinning method and then applied as air filtration media. The waste HIPS precursor solution with the concentration of 20 wt.% was prepared by dissolving waste HIPS into the mixture of d-limonene and DMF solvents. Beaded or fine nanofibers could be achieved by adjusting the ratio of solvents mixture (d-limonene and DMF). Using the ratios of solvents (d-limonene: DMF) of 3:1, 1:1, and 1:3, it was obtained beaded HIPS nanofibers with the average diameter of 272 nm, beaded HIPS nanofibers with the average diameter of 937, and fine HIPS nanofibers with the average diameter of 621 nm, respectively. From the FTIR spectral analysis, it was found that the FTIR peaks of the HIPS nanofiber membranes are the same as those of the cleaned waste HIPS and there are no FTIR peaks of DMF and d-limonene solvents. These findings implied that the electrospinning process allows the recycling of waste HIPS into HIPS nanofibers without any trapped solvent phases or apparent degradation of the original material. From the contact angle measurement, it was confirmed that the HIPS nanofiber membranes are hydrophobic and the presence of the beads in the HIPS nanofiber membranes varies their contact angles. From the air-filtration test, it was shown that the fiber morphology (beaded or fine nanofibers) considerably affects the filtration performance of the membranes. The presence of beads increased the distance between the fibers so that the pressure drop decreased. Moreover, the basis weight of the membrane greatly affected the filtration efficiency. The HIPS nanofiber membrane with the basis weight of 12.22 g m‑2 had the efficiency greater than 99.999%, which was equivalent to that of the HEPA filter.

  8. Reduction of waste solution volume generated on electrokinetic remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gye-Nam; Koo, Dae-Seo; Kim, Seung-Soo; Jeong, Jung-Whan; Han, Gyu-Seong; Moon, Jei-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In this study, for the reduction of volume of metal oxides generated in cathode chamber, the optimum pH of waste electrolyte in cathode chamber were drawn out through several experiments with the manufactured electrokinetic decontamination equipment. Also, the required time to reach to below the clearance concentration level for self- disposal was estimated through experiments using the manufactured electrokinetic decontamination equipment. A diagram of soil decontamination process for the removal of uranium from contaminated soil was drawn out. The optimum pH of waste electrolyte in cathode chamber for the reduction of volume of metal oxides was below 2.35. Also, when the initial uranium concentration of the soils were 7-20 Bq/g, the required times to reach to below the clearance concentration level for self- disposal were 25-40 days. A diagram of soil decontamination process for the removal of uranium from contaminated soil was drawn out.

  9. Radioactive wastes: a problem of morality between generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLean, D.

    1984-01-01

    Nowhere are the intergenerational moral issues posed more explicitly that in debates over nuclear power and the disposal of radioactive wastes. A survey of some of the ethical issues covers energy supply and risk and the problem of determining a cost-benefit of resources use and conservation that maximizes supply and minimizes risk. The author identifies three arguments against energy policy based on cost-benefit analysis: 1 reliability, 2 fairness, and 3 the lack of subjective value. All three suggest the need to determine not only what our obligations to future generations are, but also the underlying basis of these obligations in our system of values. The radioactive waste issue has an urgency, for options are opening and closing. 13 references

  10. Investigation of Waste Paper Cellulosic Fibers Utilization into Cement Based Building Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola Hospodarova

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the utilization of renewable natural cellulosic materials, such as wood, plants, and waste paper in the preparation of building materials has attracted significant interest. This is due to their advantageous properties, low environmental impact and low cost. The objective of this paper is to investigate the influence of recycled cellulosic fibers (in the amount 0.5 wt % of the filler and binder weight and superplasticizer (in the amount 0.5 wt % of the cement weight on the resulting properties of cement composites (consistency of fresh mixture, density, thermal conductivity, and compressive and flexural strength for hardening times of 1, 3, 7, 28, and 90 days. Plasticizer use improved the workability of fresh cement mixture. In comparison to the reference sample, the results revealed a decrease in density of 6.8% and in the thermal conductivity of composites with cellulosic fibers of 34%. The highest values of compressive (48.4 MPa and flexural (up to 7 MPa strength were achieved for hardened fiber cement specimens with plasticizer due to their significantly better dispersion of cement particles and improved bond strength between fibers and matrix.

  11. Dual comb generation from a mode-locked fiber laser with orthogonally polarized interlaced pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akosman, Ahmet E; Sander, Michelle Y

    2017-08-07

    Ultra-high precision dual-comb spectroscopy traditionally requires two mode-locked, fully stabilized lasers with complex feedback electronics. We present a novel mode-locked operation regime in a thulium-holmium co-doped fiber laser, a frequency-halved state with orthogonally polarized interlaced pulses, for dual comb generation from a single source. In a linear fiber laser cavity, an ultrafast pulse train composed of co-generated, equal intensity and orthogonally polarized consecutive pulses at half of the fundamental repetition rate is demonstrated based on vector solitons. Upon optical interference of the orthogonally polarized pulse trains, two stable microwave RF beat combs are formed, effectively down-converting the optical properties into the microwave regime. These co-generated, dual polarization interlaced pulse trains, from one all-fiber laser configuration with common mode suppression, thus provide an attractive compact source for dual-comb spectroscopy, optical metrology and polarization entanglement measurements.

  12. Basic diagnosis of solid waste generated at Agua Blanca State Park to propose waste management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laines Canepa, José Ramón; Zequeira Larios, Carolina; Valadez Treviño, Maria Elena Macías; Garduza Sánchez, Diana Ivett

    2012-03-01

    State parks are highly sensitive areas of great natural importance and tourism value. Herein a case study involving a basic survey of solid waste which was carried out in 2006 in Agua Blanca State Park, Macuspana, Tabasco, Mexico with two sampling periods representing the high and low tourist season is presented. The survey had five objectives: to find out the number of visitors in the different seasons, to consider the daily generation of solid waste from tourist activities, to determine bulk density, to select and quantify sub-products; and to suggest a possible treatment. A daily average of 368 people visited the park: 18,862 people in 14 days during the high season holiday (in just one day, Easter Sunday, up to 4425 visitors) and 2092 visitors in 43 days during the low season. The average weight of the generated solid waste was 61.267 kg day(-1) and the generated solid waste average per person was 0.155 kg person(-1 ) day(-1). During the high season, the average increased to 0.188 kg person(-1 ) day(-1) and during the low season, the average decreased to 0.144 kg person(-1 ) day(-1). The bulk density average was 75.014 kg m(-3), the maximum value was 92.472 kg m(-3) and the minimum was 68.274 kg m(-3). The sub-products comprised 54.52% inorganic matter; 32.03% organic matter, 10.60% non-recyclable and 2.85% others. Based on these results, waste management strategies such as reuse/recycling, aerobic and anaerobic digestion, the construction of a manual landfill and the employment of a specialist firm were suggested.

  13. Development of a testing method for asbestos fibers in treated materials of asbestos containing wastes by transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Takashi, E-mail: tyama@nies.go.jp [Center for Material Cycles and Waste Management Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Kida, Akiko [Faculty of Agriculture, Ehime University, 3-5-7 Tarumi, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8566 (Japan); Noma, Yukio [Department of Environmental Science, Fukuoka Womens University, 1-1-1 Kasumigaoka, Higashiku, Fukuoka 813-8529 (Japan); Terazono, Atsushi [Center for Material Cycles and Waste Management Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Sakai, Shin-ichi [Environmental Preservation Research Center, Kyoto University, Yoshidahonmachi, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • A high sensitive and selective testing method for asbestos in treated materials of asbestos containing wastes was developed. • Asbestos can be determined at a limits are a few million fibers per gram and a few μg g{sup −1}. • High temperature melting treatment samples were determined by this method. Asbestos fiber concentration were below the quantitation limit in all samples, and total fiber concentrations were determined as 47–170 × 10{sup 6} g{sup −1}. - Abstract: Appropriate treatment of asbestos-containing wastes is a significant problem. In Japan, the inertization of asbestos-containing wastes based on new treatment processes approved by the Minister of the Environment is promoted. A highly sensitive method for testing asbestos fibers in inertized materials is required so that these processes can be approved. We developed a method in which fibers from milled treated materials are extracted in water by shaking, and are counted and identified by transmission electron microscopy. Evaluation of this method by using asbestos standards and simulated slag samples confirmed that the quantitation limits are a few million fibers per gram and a few μg/g in a sample of 50 mg per filter. We used this method to assay asbestos fibers in slag samples produced by high-temperature melting of asbestos-containing wastes. Fiber concentrations were below the quantitation limit in all samples, and total fiber concentrations were determined as 47–170 × 10{sup −6} f/g. Because the evaluation of treated materials by TEM is difficult owing to the limited amount of sample observable, this testing method should be used in conjunction with bulk analytical methods for sure evaluation of treated materials.

  14. Future trends in computer waste generation in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedy, Maheshwar; Mittal, R K

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to estimate the future projection of computer waste in India and to subsequently analyze their flow at the end of their useful phase. For this purpose, the study utilizes the logistic model-based approach proposed by Yang and Williams to forecast future trends in computer waste. The model estimates future projection of computer penetration rate utilizing their first lifespan distribution and historical sales data. A bounding analysis on the future carrying capacity was simulated using the three parameter logistic curve. The observed obsolete generation quantities from the extrapolated penetration rates are then used to model the disposal phase. The results of the bounding analysis indicate that in the year 2020, around 41-152 million units of computers will become obsolete. The obsolete computer generation quantities are then used to estimate the End-of-Life outflows by utilizing a time-series multiple lifespan model. Even a conservative estimate of the future recycling capacity of PCs will reach upwards of 30 million units during 2025. Apparently, more than 150 million units could be potentially recycled in the upper bound case. However, considering significant future investment in the e-waste recycling sector from all stakeholders in India, we propose a logistic growth in the recycling rate and estimate the requirement of recycling capacity between 60 and 400 million units for the lower and upper bound case during 2025. Finally, we compare the future obsolete PC generation amount of the US and India. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Fiber-Optic System Generating Pulses of High Spectral Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, A. S.; Zolotovskii, I. O.; Korobko, D. A.; Fotiadi, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    A cascade fiber-optic system that generates pulses of high spectral density by using the effect of nonlinear spectral compression is proposed. It is demonstrated that the shape of the pulse envelope substantially influences the degree of compression of its spectrum. In so doing, maximum compression is achieved for parabolic pulses. The cascade system includes an optical fiber exhibiting normal dispersion that decreases along the fiber length, thereby ensuring that the pulse envelope evolves toward a parabolic shape, along with diffraction gratings and a fiber spectral compressor. Based on computer simulation, we determined parameters of cascade elements leading to maximum spectral density of radiation originating from a subpicosecond laser pulse of medium energy.

  16. Mixed waste treatment options for wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, E.C.

    1991-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has generated mixed wastes (MWs) during its daily operations. MWs contain both radioactive and hazardous components, as defined by the Department of Energy and the Environmental Protection Agency. Treatment and disposal of stored MWs, as well as future generated MWs, are required to meet all regulations specified by the regulating agencies. This report reviews proven and emerging technologies that can treat MWs. It also provides a method for selection of the appropriate technology for treatment of a particular waste stream. The report selects for further consideration various treatments that can be used to treat MWs that fall under Land Disposal Restrictions. The selection methodology was used to arrive at these treatments. 63 refs., 7 figs., 23 tabs

  17. Development and assessment of a fiber reinforced HPC container for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roulet, A.; Pineau, F.; Chanut, S.; Thibaux, Th.

    2007-01-01

    As part of its research into solutions for concrete disposal containers for long-lived radioactive waste, Andra defined requirements for high-performance concretes with enhanced porosity, diffusion, and permeability characteristics. It is the starting point for further research into severe conditions of containment and durability. To meet these objectives, Eiffage TP consequently developed a highly fibered High Performance Concrete (HPC) design mix using CEM V cement and silica fume. Then, mockups were produced to characterize the performance various concepts of containers with this new concrete mix. These mockups helped to identify possible manufacturing problems, and particularly the risk of cracking due to restrained shrinkage. (authors)

  18. Facility for generating crew waste water product for ECLSS testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitekant, Alan; Roberts, Barry C.

    1990-01-01

    An End-use Equipment Facility (EEF) has been constructed which is used to simulate water interfaces between the Space Station Freedom Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) and man systems. The EEF is used to generate waste water to be treated by ECLSS water recovery systems. The EEF will also be used to close the water recovery loop by allowing test subjects to use recovered hygiene and potable water during several phases of testing. This paper describes the design and basic operation of the EEF.

  19. Effect of liquid waste discharges from steam generating facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, H.E. Jr.

    1977-09-01

    This report contains a summary of the effects of liquid waste discharges from steam electric generating facilities on the environment. Also included is a simplified model for use in approximately determining the effects of these discharges. Four basic fuels are used in steam electric power plants: three fossil fuels--coal, natural gas, and oil; and uranium--presently the basic fuel of nuclear power. Coal and uranium are expected to be the major fuels in future years. The following power plant effluents are considered: heat, chlorine, copper, total dissolved solids, suspended solids, pH, oil and grease, iron, zinc, chrome, phosphorus, and trace radionuclides.

  20. Effect of liquid waste discharges from steam generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, H.E. Jr.

    1977-09-01

    This report contains a summary of the effects of liquid waste discharges from steam electric generating facilities on the environment. Also included is a simplified model for use in approximately determining the effects of these discharges. Four basic fuels are used in steam electric power plants: three fossil fuels--coal, natural gas, and oil; and uranium--presently the basic fuel of nuclear power. Coal and uranium are expected to be the major fuels in future years. The following power plant effluents are considered: heat, chlorine, copper, total dissolved solids, suspended solids, pH, oil and grease, iron, zinc, chrome, phosphorus, and trace radionuclides

  1. Characterization of 618-11 solid waste burial ground, disposed waste, and description of the waste generating facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hladek, K.L.

    1997-10-07

    The 618-11 (Wye or 318-11) burial ground received transuranic (TRTJ) and mixed fission solid waste from March 9, 1962, through October 2, 1962. It was then closed for 11 months so additional burial facilities could be added. The burial ground was reopened on September 16, 1963, and continued operating until it was closed permanently on December 31, 1967. The burial ground received wastes from all of the 300 Area radioactive material handling facilities. The purpose of this document is to characterize the 618-11 solid waste burial ground by describing the site, burial practices, the disposed wastes, and the waste generating facilities. This document provides information showing that kilogram quantities of plutonium were disposed to the drum storage units and caissons, making them transuranic (TRU). Also, kilogram quantities of plutonium and other TRU wastes were disposed to the three trenches, which were previously thought to contain non-TRU wastes. The site burial facilities (trenches, caissons, and drum storage units) should be classified as TRU and the site plutonium inventory maintained at five kilograms. Other fissile wastes were also disposed to the site. Additionally, thousands of curies of mixed fission products were also disposed to the trenches, caissons, and drum storage units. Most of the fission products have decayed over several half-lives, and are at more tolerable levels. Of greater concern, because of their release potential, are TRU radionuclides, Pu-238, Pu-240, and Np-237. TRU radionuclides also included slightly enriched 0.95 and 1.25% U-231 from N-Reactor fuel, which add to the fissile content. The 618-11 burial ground is located approximately 100 meters due west of Washington Nuclear Plant No. 2. The burial ground consists of three trenches, approximately 900 feet long, 25 feet deep, and 50 feet wide, running east-west. The trenches constitute 75% of the site area. There are 50 drum storage units (five 55-gallon steel drums welded together

  2. Characterization of 618-11 solid waste burial ground, disposed waste, and description of the waste generating facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hladek, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    The 618-11 (Wye or 318-11) burial ground received transuranic (TRTJ) and mixed fission solid waste from March 9, 1962, through October 2, 1962. It was then closed for 11 months so additional burial facilities could be added. The burial ground was reopened on September 16, 1963, and continued operating until it was closed permanently on December 31, 1967. The burial ground received wastes from all of the 300 Area radioactive material handling facilities. The purpose of this document is to characterize the 618-11 solid waste burial ground by describing the site, burial practices, the disposed wastes, and the waste generating facilities. This document provides information showing that kilogram quantities of plutonium were disposed to the drum storage units and caissons, making them transuranic (TRU). Also, kilogram quantities of plutonium and other TRU wastes were disposed to the three trenches, which were previously thought to contain non-TRU wastes. The site burial facilities (trenches, caissons, and drum storage units) should be classified as TRU and the site plutonium inventory maintained at five kilograms. Other fissile wastes were also disposed to the site. Additionally, thousands of curies of mixed fission products were also disposed to the trenches, caissons, and drum storage units. Most of the fission products have decayed over several half-lives, and are at more tolerable levels. Of greater concern, because of their release potential, are TRU radionuclides, Pu-238, Pu-240, and Np-237. TRU radionuclides also included slightly enriched 0.95 and 1.25% U-231 from N-Reactor fuel, which add to the fissile content. The 618-11 burial ground is located approximately 100 meters due west of Washington Nuclear Plant No. 2. The burial ground consists of three trenches, approximately 900 feet long, 25 feet deep, and 50 feet wide, running east-west. The trenches constitute 75% of the site area. There are 50 drum storage units (five 55-gallon steel drums welded together

  3. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Newly Generated Liquid Waste Demonstration Project Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, A.K.

    2000-01-01

    A research, development, and demonstration project for the grouting of newly generated liquid waste (NGLW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center is considered feasible. NGLW is expected from process equipment waste, decontamination waste, analytical laboratory waste, fuel storage basin waste water, and high-level liquid waste evaporator condensate. The potential grouted waste would be classed as mixed low-level waste, stabilized and immobilized to meet RCRA LDR disposal in a grouting process in the CPP-604 facility, and then transported to the state

  4. Construction and demolition waste generation rates for high-rise buildings in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Chooi Mei; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Ho, Chin Siong

    2016-12-01

    Construction and demolition waste continues to sharply increase in step with the economic growth of less developed countries. Though the construction industry is large, it is composed of small firms with individual waste management practices, often leading to the deleterious environmental outcomes. Quantifying construction and demolition waste generation allows policy makers and stakeholders to understand the true internal and external costs of construction, providing a necessary foundation for waste management planning that may overcome deleterious environmental outcomes and may be both economically and environmentally optimal. This study offers a theoretical method for estimating the construction and demolition project waste generation rate by utilising available data, including waste disposal truck size and number, and waste volume and composition. This method is proposed as a less burdensome and more broadly applicable alternative, in contrast to waste estimation by on-site hand sorting and weighing. The developed method is applied to 11 projects across Malaysia as the case study. This study quantifies waste generation rate and illustrates the construction method in influencing the waste generation rate, estimating that the conventional construction method has a waste generation rate of 9.88 t 100 m -2 , the mixed-construction method has a waste generation rate of 3.29 t 100 m -2 , and demolition projects have a waste generation rate of 104.28 t 100 m -2 . © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. TRU [transuranic] waste certification compliance requirements for acceptance of newly generated contact-handled wastes to be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Compliance requirements are presented for certifying that unclassified, newly generated (NG), contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU) solid wastes from defense programs meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Where appropriate, transportation and interim storage requirements are incorporated; however, interim storage sites may have additional requirements consistent with these requirements. All applicable Department of Energy (DOE) orders must continue to be met. The compliance requirements for stored or buried waste are not addressed in this document. The compliance requirements are divided into four sections, primarily determined by the general feature that the requirements address. These sections are General Requirements, Waste Container Requirements, Waste Form Requirements, and Waste Package Requirements. The waste package is the combination of waste container and waste. 10 refs., 1 fig

  6. Removal of cesium using coconut fiber in raw and modified forms for the treatment of radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus, Nella N.M. de; Nobre, Vanessa B.; Potiens Junior, Ademar J.; Sakata, Solange K.; Di Vitta, Patricia B.

    2013-01-01

    Sorption is one of the most studied methods to reduce the volume of radioactive waste streams. Cesium-137 is a radioisotope formed by the fission of uranium and it can cause health problems due to its easy assimilation by cells. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential of coconut fiber in removing cesium from radioactive liquid wastes; this process can help in disposing radioactive waste. The experiments were performed in batch and the particle size of the fiber ranged between 0.30 mm and 0.50 mm. The fiber was treated with hydrogen peroxide in alkaline medium. The following parameters were analyzed: contact time, pH and concentration of cesium ions in aqueous solution. After the experiments the samples were filtered and cesium remaining in solution was quantified by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. (author)

  7. Removal of cesium using coconut fiber in raw and modified forms for the treatment of radioactive liquid wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus, Nella N.M. de; Nobre, Vanessa B.; Potiens Junior, Ademar J.; Sakata, Solange K., E-mail: sksakata@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Di Vitta, Patricia B. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica

    2013-07-01

    Sorption is one of the most studied methods to reduce the volume of radioactive waste streams. Cesium-137 is a radioisotope formed by the fission of uranium and it can cause health problems due to its easy assimilation by cells. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential of coconut fiber in removing cesium from radioactive liquid wastes; this process can help in disposing radioactive waste. The experiments were performed in batch and the particle size of the fiber ranged between 0.30 mm and 0.50 mm. The fiber was treated with hydrogen peroxide in alkaline medium. The following parameters were analyzed: contact time, pH and concentration of cesium ions in aqueous solution. After the experiments the samples were filtered and cesium remaining in solution was quantified by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. (author)

  8. Tungsten disulphide based all fiber Q-switching cylindrical-vector beam generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, J.; Yan, K.; Zhou, Y. [Department of Optics and Optical Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Xu, L. X., E-mail: xulixin@ustc.edu.cn; Gu, C. [Department of Optics and Optical Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Haixi Collaborative Innovation Center for New Display Devices and Systems Integration, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Zhan, Q. W. [Electro-Optics Program, University of Dayton, Dayton, Ohio 45469 (United States)

    2015-11-09

    We proposed and demonstrated an all fiber passively Q-switching laser to generate cylindrical-vector beam, a two dimensional material, tungsten disulphide (WS{sub 2}), was adopted as a saturable absorber inside the laser cavity, while a few-mode fiber Bragg grating was used as a transverse mode-selective output coupler. The repetition rate of the Q-switching output pulses can be varied from 80 kHz to 120 kHz with a shortest duration of 958 ns. Attributed to the high damage threshold and polarization insensitivity of the WS{sub 2} based saturable absorber, the radially polarized beam and azimuthally polarized beam can be easily generated in the Q-switching fiber laser.

  9. Recycling of concrete waste generated from nuclear power plant dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Hideo; Nagase, Takahiro; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Nawa, Toyoharu

    2012-01-01

    Non-radioactive concrete waste generated from dismantling of a standard large nuclear power plant is estimated to be about 500,000 tons in weight. Using such waste as recycled aggregate within the enclosure of the plant requires a new manufacturing technology that generates a minimal amount of by-product powder. Recycled aggregate has brittle parts with defects such as cracks, pores, and voids in residual paste from original concrete. This study presents a method of selectively removing the defective parts during manufacture to improve the quality of the recycled fine aggregate. With this selective removal method used, the amount of by-product powder can be reduced by half as compared to that by a conventional method. The influences of the characteristics of the recycled fine aggregate on the flowability and strength of the mortar using recycled fine aggregate were evaluated by multiple linear regression analysis. The results clearly showed that the flowability was primarily affected by the filling fraction of recycled fine aggregate, while the compressive strength of mortar was primarily affected by the fraction of defects in the aggregate. It was also found that grains produced by a granulator have more irregularities in the surfaces than those produced by a ball mill, providing an increased mortar strength. Using these findings from this study, efforts are also being made to develop a mechanical technology that enables simultaneous processing of decontamination and recycling. The granulator under consideration is capable of grinding the surfaces of irregularly shaped particles and may be used successfully, under optimal conditions, for the surface decontamination of concrete waste contaminated with radioactive materials. (author)

  10. Development of low grade waste heat thermoelectric power generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvit Punnachaiya

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to develop a 50 watt thermoelectric power generator using low grade waste heat as a heat source,in order to recover and utilize the excess heat in cooling systems of industrial processes and high activity radioisotope sources. Electricity generation was based on the reverse operation of a thermoelectric cooling (TEC device. The TEC devices weremodified and assembled into a set of thermal cell modules operating at a temperature less than 100°C. The developed powergenerator consisted of 4 modules, each generating 15 watts. Two cascade modules were connected in parallel. Each modulecomprised of 96 TEC devices, which were connected in series. The hot side of each module was mounted on an aluminumheat transfer pipe with dimensions 12.212.250 cm. Heat sinks were installed on the cold side with cooling fans to provideforced air cooling.To test electricity generation in the experiment, water steam was used as a heat source instead of low grade waste heat.The open-circuit direct current (DC of 250 V and the short-circuit current of 1.2 A was achieved with the following operatingconditions: a hot side temperature of 96°C and a temperature difference between the hot and cold sides of 25°C. The DC poweroutput was inverted to an AC power source of 220 V with 50 Hz frequency, which can continuously supply more than 50 wattsof power to a resistive load as long as the heat source was applied to the system. The system achieved an electrical conversionefficiency of about 0.47 percent with the capital cost of 70 US$/W.

  11. Thermodynamic analysis of waste heat power generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Jiangfeng; Xu, Mingtian; Cheng, Lin

    2010-01-01

    In the present work, a waste heat power generation system is analyzed based on the criteria with and without considering the heat/exergy loss to the environment. For the criteria without considering the heat/exergy loss to the environment, the first- and second-law efficiencies display different tendencies with the variations of some system parameters. When the heat/exergy loss to the environment is taken into consideration, the first and second law efficiencies display the same tendency. Thus, choosing the appropriate expressions for the performance criteria is crucial for the optimization design of the waste heat power generation system. It is found that there are two approaches to improving the system performance: one is to improve the heat/exergy input; the other is to enhance the heat-work conversion ability of the system. The former would deteriorate the environment if the heat-work conversion ability of the system remains unchanged; the latter could reduce the environmental impact but it's restricted by the heat/exergy input. Therefore, the optimal operation condition should be achieved at the trade-off between the heat/exergy input and the heat-work conversion ability of the system.

  12. Developing models for the prediction of hospital healthcare waste generation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfahun, Esubalew; Kumie, Abera; Beyene, Abebe

    2016-01-01

    An increase in the number of health institutions, along with frequent use of disposable medical products, has contributed to the increase of healthcare waste generation rate. For proper handling of healthcare waste, it is crucial to predict the amount of waste generation beforehand. Predictive models can help to optimise healthcare waste management systems, set guidelines and evaluate the prevailing strategies for healthcare waste handling and disposal. However, there is no mathematical model developed for Ethiopian hospitals to predict healthcare waste generation rate. Therefore, the objective of this research was to develop models for the prediction of a healthcare waste generation rate. A longitudinal study design was used to generate long-term data on solid healthcare waste composition, generation rate and develop predictive models. The results revealed that the healthcare waste generation rate has a strong linear correlation with the number of inpatients (R(2) = 0.965), and a weak one with the number of outpatients (R(2) = 0.424). Statistical analysis was carried out to develop models for the prediction of the quantity of waste generated at each hospital (public, teaching and private). In these models, the number of inpatients and outpatients were revealed to be significant factors on the quantity of waste generated. The influence of the number of inpatients and outpatients treated varies at different hospitals. Therefore, different models were developed based on the types of hospitals. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Forecasting municipal solid waste generation using prognostic tools and regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghinea, Cristina; Drăgoi, Elena Niculina; Comăniţă, Elena-Diana; Gavrilescu, Marius; Câmpean, Teofil; Curteanu, Silvia; Gavrilescu, Maria

    2016-11-01

    For an adequate planning of waste management systems the accurate forecast of waste generation is an essential step, since various factors can affect waste trends. The application of predictive and prognosis models are useful tools, as reliable support for decision making processes. In this paper some indicators such as: number of residents, population age, urban life expectancy, total municipal solid waste were used as input variables in prognostic models in order to predict the amount of solid waste fractions. We applied Waste Prognostic Tool, regression analysis and time series analysis to forecast municipal solid waste generation and composition by considering the Iasi Romania case study. Regression equations were determined for six solid waste fractions (paper, plastic, metal, glass, biodegradable and other waste). Accuracy Measures were calculated and the results showed that S-curve trend model is the most suitable for municipal solid waste (MSW) prediction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Trans generational ethics: protecting future generations against nuclear waste hazards. Some ethical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornelis, G.C.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the activities launched at SCK x CEN, intended to explore ethical and other non-technical aspects when dealing with the time scales considered in the high-level waste disposal program. Especially the issues of retrievability and precaution will be focused on which will be philosophically contextualised. Many questions will be raised in order to sensitize all stakeholders for the trans-disciplinary character of the trans-generational problem at hand. (author)

  15. Scaling relations for soliton compression and dispersive-wave generation in tapered optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, scaling relations for soliton compression in tapered optical fibers are derived and discussed. The relations allow simple and semi-accurate estimates of the compression point and output noise level, which is useful, for example, for tunable dispersive-wave generation with an agile ...

  16. High-speed ultra-wideband wireless signals over fiber systems: Photonic generation and DSP detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xianbin; Gibbon, Timothy Braidwood; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2009-01-01

    We firstly review the efforts in the literature on UWB over-fiber systems. Secondly, we present experimental results on photonic generation of high-speed UWB signals by both direct modulation and external optical injecting an uncooled semiconductor laser. Furthermore, we introduce the use of digi...

  17. Generating broadband vortex modes in ring-core fiber by using a plasmonic q-plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jingfu; Li, Yan; Han, Yanhua; Deng, Duo; Su, Xiaoya; Song, He; Gao, Jianmin; Qu, Shiliang

    2017-08-15

    A mode convertor was proposed and investigated for generating vortex modes in a ring-core fiber based on a plasmonic q-plate (PQP), which is composed of specially organized L-shaped resonator (LSR) arrays. A multicore fiber was used to transmit fundamental modes, and the LSR arrays were used to modulate phases of these fundamental modes. Behind the PQP, the transmitted fundamental modes with gradient phase distribution can be considered as the incident lights for generating broadband vortex modes in the ring-core fiber filter. The topological charges of generated vortex modes can be various by using an optical PQP with different q, and the chirality of the generated vortex mode can be controlled by the sign of q and handedness of the incident circularly polarized light. The operation bandwidth is 800 nm in the range of 1200-2000 nm, which covers six communication bands from the O band to the U band. The separation of vortex modes also was addressed by using a dual ring-core fiber. The mode convertor is of potential interest for connecting a traditional network and vortex communication network.

  18. Two-octave mid-infrared supercontinuum generation in As-Se suspended core fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Uffe Visbech; Petersen, Christian Rosenberg; Kubat, Irnis

    2015-01-01

    A more than two-octave mid-infrared supercontinuum with an average output power of 15.6 mW covering 1.7-7.5 μm (1,333-5,900 cm-1) is generated in a low-loss As38Se62 suspended core fiber with core diameter of 4.5 μm....

  19. Westinghouse Hanford Company plan for certifying newly generated contact-handled transuranic waste for emplacement in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, R.M.; Sheehan, J.S.

    1992-07-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) currently manages an interim storage site for Westinghouse Hanford and non-Westinghouse Hanford-generated transuranic (TRU) waste and operates TRU waste generating facilities within the Hanford Site in Washington State. Approval has been received from the Waste Acceptance Criteria Certification Committee (WACCC) and Westinghouse Hanford TRU waste generating facilities to certify newly generated contact-handled TRU (CH-TRU) solid waste to meet the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). This document describes the plan for certifying newly generated CH-TRU solid waste to meet the WAC requirements for storage at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site. Attached to this document are facility-specific certification plans for the Westinghouse Hanford TRU waste generators that have received WACCC approval. The certification plans describe operations that generate CH-TRU solid waste and the specific procedures by which these wastes will be certified and segregated from uncertified wastes at the generating facilities. All newly generated CH-TRU solid waste is being transferred to the Transuranic Storage and Assay Facility (TRUSAF) and/or a controlled storage facility. These facilities will store the waste until the certified TRU waste can be sent to the WIPP site and the non-certified TRU waste can be sent to the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility. All non-certifiable TRU waste will be segregated and clearly identified

  20. Just-in-time characterization and certification of DOE-generated wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrenholz, D.A.; Primozic, F.J.; Robinson, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    Transportation and disposal of wastes generated by Department of Energy (DOE) activities, including weapons production and decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of facilities, require that wastes be certified as complying with various regulations and requirements. These certification requirements are typically summarized by disposal sites in their specific waste acceptance criteria. Although a large volume of DOE wastes have been generated by past activities and are presently in storage awaiting disposal, a significant volume of DOE wastes, particularly from D ampersand D projects. have not yet been generated. To prepare DOE-generated wastes for disposal in an efficient manner. it is suggested that a program of just-in-time characterization and certification be adopted. The goal of just-in-time characterization and certification, which is based on the just-in-time manufacturing process, is to streamline the certification process by eliminating redundant layers of oversight and establishing pro-active waste management controls. Just-in-time characterization and certification would rely on a waste management system in which wastes are characterized at the point of generation, precertified as they are generated (i.e., without iterative inspections and tests subsequent to generation and storage), and certified at the point of shipment, ideally the loading dock of the building from which the wastes are generated. Waste storage would be limited to accumulating containers for cost-efficient transportation

  1. Just-in-time characterization and certification of DOE-generated wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrenholz, D.A.; Primozic, F.J. [Benchmark Environmental Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Robinson, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Transportation and disposal of wastes generated by Department of Energy (DOE) activities, including weapons production and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities, require that wastes be certified as complying with various regulations and requirements. These certification requirements are typically summarized by disposal sites in their specific waste acceptance criteria. Although a large volume of DOE wastes have been generated by past activities and are presently in storage awaiting disposal, a significant volume of DOE wastes, particularly from D&D projects. have not yet been generated. To prepare DOE-generated wastes for disposal in an efficient manner. it is suggested that a program of just-in-time characterization and certification be adopted. The goal of just-in-time characterization and certification, which is based on the just-in-time manufacturing process, is to streamline the certification process by eliminating redundant layers of oversight and establishing pro-active waste management controls. Just-in-time characterization and certification would rely on a waste management system in which wastes are characterized at the point of generation, precertified as they are generated (i.e., without iterative inspections and tests subsequent to generation and storage), and certified at the point of shipment, ideally the loading dock of the building from which the wastes are generated. Waste storage would be limited to accumulating containers for cost-efficient transportation.

  2. High-speed ultra-wideband wireless signals over fiber systems: photonic generation and DSP detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xianbin; Gibbon, Timothy Braidwood; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2009-01-01

    We firstly review the efforts in the literature on ultra-wideband (UWB)-over-fiber systems. Secondly, we present experimental results on photonic generation of high-speed UWB signals by both direct modulation and external optical injecting an uncooled semiconductor laser. Furthermore, we introduce...... the use of digital signal processing (DSP) technology to receive the generated UWB signal at 781.25 Mbit/s. Error-free transmission is achieved....

  3. Managing California's low-level waste: state policy and waste generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasternak, A.D.; Cramer, E.N.

    1985-01-01

    Since 1982, public and private organizations in California that use radioactive materials and generate low-level radioactive waste have worked together through the California Radioactive Materials Management Forum (CRMMF) to assure the continued safe disposal of low-level waste (LLW). The forum's corporate and institutional members include electric utilities, universities, hospitals, industries, professional societies, and firms engaged in biological research and the manufacture of radiopharmaceuticals. In addition, over 200 individuals are members. The objectives of CRMMF are: (a) establishing a disposal facility for LLW in California and (b) maintaining access to the existing disposal sites in Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina until a California site is licensed and operating. This paper describes the forum's programs in the areas of legislation, litigation, and public information that contribute to the achievement of these objectives

  4. Activated Carbon Fibers with Hierarchical Nanostructure Derived from Waste Cotton Gloves as High-Performance Electrodes for Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chao; Yu, Jianlin; Yang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Guoqing

    2017-12-01

    One of the most challenging issues that restrict the biomass/waste-based nanocarbons in supercapacitor application is the poor structural inheritability during the activating process. Herein, we prepare a class of activated carbon fibers by carefully selecting waste cotton glove (CG) as the precursor, which mainly consists of cellulose fibers that can be transformed to carbon along with good inheritability of their fiber morphology upon activation. As prepared, the CG-based activated carbon fiber (CGACF) demonstrates a surface area of 1435 m 2  g -1 contributed by micropores of 1.3 nm and small mesopores of 2.7 nm, while the fiber morphology can be well inherited from the CG with 3D interconnected frameworks created on the fiber surface. This hierarchically porous structure and well-retained fiber-like skeleton can simultaneously minimize the diffusion/transfer resistance of the electrolyte and electron, respectively, and maximize the surface area utilization for charge accumulation. Consequently, CGACF presents a higher specific capacitance of 218 F g -1 and an excellent high-rate performance as compared to commercial activated carbon.

  5. Activated Carbon Fibers with Hierarchical Nanostructure Derived from Waste Cotton Gloves as High-Performance Electrodes for Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chao; Yu, Jianlin; Yang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Guoqing

    2017-06-01

    One of the most challenging issues that restrict the biomass/waste-based nanocarbons in supercapacitor application is the poor structural inheritability during the activating process. Herein, we prepare a class of activated carbon fibers by carefully selecting waste cotton glove (CG) as the precursor, which mainly consists of cellulose fibers that can be transformed to carbon along with good inheritability of their fiber morphology upon activation. As prepared, the CG-based activated carbon fiber (CGACF) demonstrates a surface area of 1435 m2 g-1 contributed by micropores of 1.3 nm and small mesopores of 2.7 nm, while the fiber morphology can be well inherited from the CG with 3D interconnected frameworks created on the fiber surface. This hierarchically porous structure and well-retained fiber-like skeleton can simultaneously minimize the diffusion/transfer resistance of the electrolyte and electron, respectively, and maximize the surface area utilization for charge accumulation. Consequently, CGACF presents a higher specific capacitance of 218 F g-1 and an excellent high-rate performance as compared to commercial activated carbon.

  6. Research of hydroelectric generating set low-frequency vibration monitoring system based on optical fiber sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Li; Zhang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Faxiang; Sun, Zhihui; Li, ShuJuan; Wang, Meng; Wang, Chang

    2017-10-01

    In order to satisfy hydroelectric generating set low-frequency vibration monitoring, the design of Passive low-frequency vibration monitoring system based on Optical fiber sensing in this paper. The hardware of the system adopts the passive optical fiber grating sensor and unbalanced-Michelson interferometer. The software system is used to programming by Labview software and finishing the control of system. The experiment show that this system has good performance on the standard vibration testing-platform and it meets system requirements. The frequency of the monitoring system can be as low as 0.2Hz and the resolution is 0.01Hz.

  7. Generating and measuring photochemical changes inside the brain using optical fibers: exploring stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiminis, Georgios; Klarić, Thomas S; Schartner, Erik P; Warren-Smith, Stephen C; Lewis, Martin D; Koblar, Simon A; Monro, Tanya M

    2014-11-01

    We report here on the development of a method for inducing a stroke in a specific location within a mouse brain through the use of an optical fiber. By capturing the emitted fluorescence signal generated using the same fiber it is possible to monitor photochemical changes within the brain in real-time, and directly measure the concentration of the stroke-inducing dye, Rose Bengal, at the infarct site. This technique reduces the requirement for post-operative histology to determine if a stroke has successfully been induced within the animal, and therefore opens up the opportunity to explore the recovery of the brain after the stroke event.

  8. Domain-Reversed Lithium Niobate Single-Crystal Fibers are Potentially for Efficient Terahertz Wave Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalin Lu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear frequency conversion remains one of the dominant approaches to efficiently generate THz waves. Significant material absorption in the THz range is the main factor impeding the progress towards this direction. In this research, a new multicladding nonlinear fiber design was proposed to solve this problem, and as the major experimental effort, periodic domain structure was introduced into lithium niobate single-crystal fibers by electrical poling. The introduced periodic domain structures were nondestructively revealed using a crossly polarized optical microscope and a confocal scanning optical microscope for quality assurance.

  9. Selection of efficient options for processing and storage of radioactive waste in countries with small amounts of waste generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-09-01

    The report is intended to assist decision makers in countries using nuclear energy for non-power applications to organize their waste management practices. It describes methodologies, criteria and options for the selection of appropriate technologies for processing and storage of low and intermediate level radioactive waste from different nuclear applications. The report reviews both technical and non-technical factors important for decision making and planning, and for implementation of waste management activities at the country and facility levels. It makes practical recommendations for the selection of particular technologies for different scales of waste generation. These wastes may arise from production of radionuclides and their application in industry, agriculture, medicine, education and research. The report also considers waste generated at research reactors, research centers and research laboratories using radioisotopes, as well as waste from decommissioning of research reactors and small nuclear facilities such as hot cells, laboratories and irradiation facilities. Management of uranium mining and milling waste and management of spent fuel from research reactors are not considered in this report. Discussed in detail are: the basic legal, regulatory, administrative and technical requirements set up in a national waste management system and review of the factors and components affecting the selection of an appropriate national waste management system. the origins and characteristics of radioactive waste from different nuclear applications. the technical factors that might affect the selection of waste processing and storage technologies, the main waste management steps, information on available technologies, the basis for planning of waste processing and storage and the selection of a particular option for radioactive waste processing and storage in countries with a different scale of nuclear applications

  10. Selection of efficient options for processing and storage of radioactive waste in countries with small amounts of waste generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-09-01

    The report is intended to assist decision makers in countries using nuclear energy for non-power applications to organize their waste management practices. It describes methodologies, criteria and options for the selection of appropriate technologies for processing and storage of low and intermediate level radioactive waste from different nuclear applications. The report reviews both technical and non-technical factors important for decision making and planning, and for implementation of waste management activities at the country and facility levels. It makes practical recommendations for the selection of particular technologies for different scales of waste generation. These wastes may arise from production of radionuclides and their application in industry, agriculture, medicine, education and research. The report also considers waste generated at research reactors, research centers and research laboratories using radioisotopes, as well as waste from decommissioning of research reactors and small nuclear facilities such as hot cells, laboratories and irradiation facilities. Management of uranium mining and milling waste and management of spent fuel from research reactors are not considered in this report. Discussed in detail are: the basic legal, regulatory, administrative and technical requirements set up in a national waste management system and review of the factors and components affecting the selection of an appropriate national waste management system. the origins and characteristics of radioactive waste from different nuclear applications. the technical factors that might affect the selection of waste processing and storage technologies, the main waste management steps, information on available technologies, the basis for planning of waste processing and storage and the selection of a particular option for radioactive waste processing and storage in countries with a different scale of nuclear applications.

  11. Characteristics of radioactive waste streams generated in HTGR fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, K.H.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented of a study concerned with identification and characterization of radioactive waste streams from an HTGR fuel reprocessing plant. Approximate quantities of individual waste streams as well as pertinent characteristics of selected streams have been estimated. Most of the waste streams are unique to HTGR fuel reprocessing. However, waste streams from the solvent extraction system and from the plant facilities do not differ greatly from the corresponding LWR fuel reprocessing wastes

  12. Estimation of centerline temperature of the waste form for the rare earth waste generated from pyrochemical process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jung-Hoon, E-mail: mrchoijh@kaeri.re.kr; Eun, Hee-Chul; Lee, Tae-Kyo; Lee, Ki-Rak; Han, Seung-Youb; Jeon, Min-Ku; Park, Hwan-Seo; Ahn, Do-Hee

    2017-01-15

    Estimation of centerline temperature of nuclear glass waste form for each waste stream is very essential in the period of storage because the centerline temperature being over its glass transition temperature results in the increase of leaching rate of radioactive nuclides due to the devitrification of glass waste form. Here, to verify the effects of waste form diameter and transuranic element content in the rare earth waste on the centerline temperature of the waste form, the surrogate rare earth glass waste generated from pyrochemical process was immobilized with SiO{sub 2}−Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}−B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass frit system, and thermal properties of the rare earth glass waste form were determined by thermomechanical analysis and thermal conductivity analysis. The estimation of centerline temperature was carried out using the experimental thermal data and steady-state conduction equation in a long and solid cylinder type waste form. It was revealed that thermal stability of waste form in case of 0.3 m diameter was not affected by the TRU content even in the case of 80% TRU recovery ratio in the electrowinning process, meaning that the waste form of 0.3 m diameter is thermally stable due to the low centerline temperature relative to its glass transition temperature of the rare earth glass waste form.

  13. Application of Glass Fiber Waste Polypropylene Aggregate in Lightweight Concrete – thermal properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citek, D.; Rehacek, S.; Pavlik, Z.; Kolisko, J.; Dobias, D.; Pavlikova, M.

    2018-03-01

    Actual paper focus on thermal properties of a sustainable lightweight concrete incorporating high volume of waste polypropylene aggregate as partial substitution of natural aggregate. In presented experiments a glass fiber reinforced polypropylene (GFPP) which is a by-product of PP tubes production, partially substituted fine natural silica aggregate in 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 mass %. Results were compared with a reference concrete mix without plastic waste in order to quantify the effect of GFPP use on concrete properties. Main material physical parameters were studied (bulk density, matrix density without air content, and particle size distribution). Especially a thermal transport and storage properties of GFPP were examined in dependence on compaction time. For the developed lightweight concrete, thermal properties were accessed using transient impulse technique, where the measurement was done in dependence on moisture content (from the fully water saturated state to dry state). It was found that the tested lightweight concrete should be prospective construction material possessing improved thermal insulation function and the reuse of waste plastics in concrete composition was beneficial both from the environmental and financial point of view.

  14. Separation efficiency of two waste polymer fibers for oily water treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokolović Dunja S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is concerned with the efficiency of two different waste polymeric materials as the filter media in a laboratory-scale bed coalescer in the horizontal fluid flow mode, operating in a steady-state regime. The applied materials are: waste polyethylene terephthalate from textile industry, BA1 and waste polypropylene from carpet industry, PP. Using these compressible fiber polymeric materials, high bed porosity (up to 98% could be obtained. The investigation was carried out over a wide range of working conditions. Bed permeability was varied in the range from 0.18•10-9 to 5.389•10-9 m2. Operating fluid velocity was varied from 19 to 80 m/h, until the critical velocity was reached. Different oily wastewaters were used in the experiments. Oily wastewater is defined as the oil-inwater emulsion model prepared using mineral oils of different physico-chemical characteristics: crude oil (A from Vojvodina region, two vacuum distillation fractions (A1, A4, and blended petroleum product with a high paraffinic content (P1. Both applied polymeric materials, BA1 and PP, showed high separation efficiency for treatment of all investigated oily wastewater. However, the BA1 material showed higher efficiency in a wider range of bed permeability and physico-chemical characteristics of oil. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172022

  15. Thirty-year solid waste generation forecast for facilities at SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    The information supplied by this 30-year solid waste forecast has been compiled as a source document to the Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement (WMEIS). The WMEIS will help to select a sitewide strategic approach to managing present and future Savannah River Site (SRS) waste generated from ongoing operations, environmental restoration (ER) activities, transition from nuclear production to other missions, and decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) programs. The EIS will support project-level decisions on the operation of specific treatment, storage, and disposal facilities within the near term (10 years or less). In addition, the EIS will provide a baseline for analysis of future waste management activities and a basis for the evaluation of the specific waste management alternatives. This 30-year solid waste forecast will be used as the initial basis for the EIS decision-making process. The Site generates and manages many types and categories of waste. With a few exceptions, waste types are divided into two broad groups-high-level waste and solid waste. High-level waste consists primarily of liquid radioactive waste, which is addressed in a separate forecast and is not discussed further in this document. The waste types discussed in this solid waste forecast are sanitary waste, hazardous waste, low-level mixed waste, low-level radioactive waste, and transuranic waste. As activities at SRS change from primarily production to primarily decontamination and decommissioning and environmental restoration, the volume of each waste s being managed will change significantly. This report acknowledges the changes in Site Missions when developing the 30-year solid waste forecast

  16. Savannah River Certification Plan for newly generated, contact-handled transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wierzbicki, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    This Certification Plan document describes the necessary processes and methods for certifying unclassified, newly generated, contact-handled solid transuranic (TRU) waste at the Savannah River Plant and Laboratory (SRP, SRL) to comply with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC). Section 2 contains the organizational structure as related to waste certification including a summary of functional responsibilities, levels of authority, and lines of communication of the various organizations involved in certification activities. Section 3 describes general plant operations and TRU waste generation. Included is a description of the TRU Waste classification system. Section 4 contains the SR site TRU Waste Quality Assurance Program Plan. Section 5 describes waste container procurement, inspection, and certification prior to being loaded with TRU waste. Certification of waste packages, after package closure in the waste generating areas, is described in Section 6. The packaging and certification of individual waste forms is described in Attachments 1-5. Included in each attachment is a description of controls used to ensure that waste packages meet all applicable waste form compliance requirements for shipment to the WIPP. 3 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Multi-wavelength Brillouin Raman erbium-doped fiber laser generation in a linear cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirazi, M R; Harun, S W; Ahmad, H

    2014-01-01

    A multi-wavelength Brillouin Raman erbium-doped fiber laser is proposed and demonstrated. The setup uses a 7.7 km dispersion compensating fiber simultaneously as the Brillouin and Raman nonlinear gain media and operates in conjunction with a 3 m erbium-doped fiber as the linear gain medium. At a Brillouin pump (BP) wavelength of 1530 nm, where Raman and erbium gains overlap each other, 34 Brillouin Stokes lines having line spacing of 0.075 nm are created by using a Raman pump power of only 24.1 dBm, an erbium pump power of about 22.1 dBm, and a BP power of 6.5 dBm in the proposed linear cavity. The system is highly efficient and is able to generate many comparable peak-power lines at a low pump power. (paper)

  18. High efficiency, monolithic fiber chirped pulse amplification system for high energy femtosecond pulse generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiang; Kim, Kyungbum; Mielke, Michael; Jennings, Stephen; Masor, Gordon; Stohl, Dave; Chavez-Pirson, Arturo; Nguyen, Dan T; Rhonehouse, Dan; Zong, Jie; Churin, Dmitriy; Peyghambarian, N

    2013-10-21

    A novel monolithic fiber-optic chirped pulse amplification (CPA) system for high energy, femtosecond pulse generation is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. By employing a high gain amplifier comprising merely 20 cm of high efficiency media (HEM) gain fiber, an optimal balance of output pulse energy, optical efficiency, and B-integral is achieved. The HEM amplifier is fabricated from erbium-doped phosphate glass fiber and yields gain of 1.443 dB/cm with slope efficiency >45%. We experimentally demonstrate near diffraction-limited beam quality and near transform-limited femtosecond pulse quality at 1.55 µm wavelength. With pulse energy >100 µJ and pulse duration of 636 fs (FWHM), the peak power is estimated to be ~160 MW. NAVAIR Public Release Distribution Statement A-"Approved for Public release; distribution is unlimited".

  19. Design Curve Generation for 3D SiC Fiber Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jerry; Dicarlo, James A.

    2014-01-01

    The design tool provides design curves that allow a simple and quick way to examine multiple factors that can influence the processing and key properties of the preforms and their final SiC-reinforced ceramic composites without over obligating financial capital for the fabricating of materials. Tool predictions for process and fiber fraction properties have been validated for a HNS 3D preform.The virtualization aspect of the tool will be used to provide a quick generation of solid models with actual fiber paths for finite element evaluation to predict mechanical and thermal properties of proposed composites as well as mechanical displacement behavior due to creep and stress relaxation to study load sharing characteristic between constitutes for better performance.Tool predictions for the fiber controlled properties of the SiCSiC CMC fabricated from the HNS preforms will be valuated and up-graded from the measurements on these CMC

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF CURRENTLY GENERATED TRANUSRANIC WASTE AT THE LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY'S PLUTONIUM PRODUCTION FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodge, Robert L.; Montoya, Andy M.

    2003-01-01

    By the time the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) completes its Disposal Phase in FY 2034, the Department of Energy (DOE) will have disposed of approximately 109,378 cubic meters (m3) of Transuranic (TRU) waste in WIPP (1). If DOE adheres to its 2005 Pollution Prevention Goal of generating less than 141m3/yr of TRU waste, approximately 5000 m3 (4%) of that TRU waste will be newly generated (2). Because of the overwhelming majority (96%) of TRU waste destined for disposal at WIPP is legacy waste, the characterization and certification requirements were developed to resolve those issues related to legacy waste. Like many other DOE facilities Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has a large volume (9,010m3) of legacy Transuranic Waste in storage (3). Unlike most DOE facilities LANL will generate approximately 140m3 of newly generated TRU waste each year3. LANL's certification program was established to meet the WIPP requirements for legacy waste and does not take advantage of the fundamental differences in waste knowledge between newly generated and legacy TRU waste

  1. Medium term municipal solid waste generation prediction by autoregressive integrated moving average

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younes, Mohammad K.; Nopiah, Z. M.; Basri, Noor Ezlin A.; Basri, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Generally, solid waste handling and management are performed by municipality or local authority. In most of developing countries, local authorities suffer from serious solid waste management (SWM) problems and insufficient data and strategic planning. Thus it is important to develop robust solid waste generation forecasting model. It helps to proper manage the generated solid waste and to develop future plan based on relatively accurate figures. In Malaysia, solid waste generation rate increases rapidly due to the population growth and new consumption trends that characterize the modern life style. This paper aims to develop monthly solid waste forecasting model using Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA), such model is applicable even though there is lack of data and will help the municipality properly establish the annual service plan. The results show that ARIMA (6,1,0) model predicts monthly municipal solid waste generation with root mean square error equals to 0.0952 and the model forecast residuals are within accepted 95% confident interval

  2. Medium term municipal solid waste generation prediction by autoregressive integrated moving average

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, Mohammad K.; Nopiah, Z. M.; Basri, Noor Ezlin A.; Basri, Hassan

    2014-09-01

    Generally, solid waste handling and management are performed by municipality or local authority. In most of developing countries, local authorities suffer from serious solid waste management (SWM) problems and insufficient data and strategic planning. Thus it is important to develop robust solid waste generation forecasting model. It helps to proper manage the generated solid waste and to develop future plan based on relatively accurate figures. In Malaysia, solid waste generation rate increases rapidly due to the population growth and new consumption trends that characterize the modern life style. This paper aims to develop monthly solid waste forecasting model using Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA), such model is applicable even though there is lack of data and will help the municipality properly establish the annual service plan. The results show that ARIMA (6,1,0) model predicts monthly municipal solid waste generation with root mean square error equals to 0.0952 and the model forecast residuals are within accepted 95% confident interval.

  3. Medium term municipal solid waste generation prediction by autoregressive integrated moving average

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younes, Mohammad K.; Nopiah, Z. M.; Basri, Noor Ezlin A.; Basri, Hassan [Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-12

    Generally, solid waste handling and management are performed by municipality or local authority. In most of developing countries, local authorities suffer from serious solid waste management (SWM) problems and insufficient data and strategic planning. Thus it is important to develop robust solid waste generation forecasting model. It helps to proper manage the generated solid waste and to develop future plan based on relatively accurate figures. In Malaysia, solid waste generation rate increases rapidly due to the population growth and new consumption trends that characterize the modern life style. This paper aims to develop monthly solid waste forecasting model using Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA), such model is applicable even though there is lack of data and will help the municipality properly establish the annual service plan. The results show that ARIMA (6,1,0) model predicts monthly municipal solid waste generation with root mean square error equals to 0.0952 and the model forecast residuals are within accepted 95% confident interval.

  4. Production patterns of packaging waste categories generated at typical Mediterranean residential building worksites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González Pericot, N., E-mail: natalia.gpericot@upm.es [Escuela Técnica Superior de Edificación, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Calle Juan de Herrera n°6, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Villoria Sáez, P., E-mail: paola.villoria@upm.es [Escuela Técnica Superior de Edificación, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Calle Juan de Herrera n°6, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Del Río Merino, M., E-mail: mercedes.delrio@upm.es [Escuela Técnica Superior de Edificación, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Calle Juan de Herrera n°6, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Liébana Carrasco, O., E-mail: oscar.liebana@uem.es [Escuela de Arquitectura, Universidad Europea de Madrid, Calle Tajo s/n, 28670 Villaviciosa de Odón (Spain)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • On-site segregation level: 1.80%; training and motivation strategies were not effective. • 70% Cardboard waste: from switches and sockets during the building services stage. • 40% Plastic waste: generated during structures and partition works due to palletizing. • >50% Wood packaging waste, basically pallets, generated during the envelope works. - Abstract: The construction sector is responsible for around 28% of the total waste volume generated in Europe, which exceeds the amount of household waste. This has led to an increase of different research studies focusing on construction waste quantification. However, within the research studies made, packaging waste has been analyzed to a limited extent. This article focuses on the packaging waste stream generated in the construction sector. To this purpose current on-site waste packaging management has been assessed by monitoring ten Mediterranean residential building works. The findings of the experimental data collection revealed that the incentive measures implemented by the construction company to improve on-site waste sorting failed to achieve the intended purpose, showing low segregation ratios. Subsequently, through an analytical study the generation patterns for packaging waste are established, leading to the identification of the prevailing kinds of packaging and the products responsible for their generation. Results indicate that plastic waste generation maintains a constant trend throughout the whole construction process, while cardboard becomes predominant towards the end of the construction works with switches and sockets from the electricity stage. Understanding the production patterns of packaging waste will be beneficial for adapting waste management strategies to the identified patterns for the specific nature of packaging waste within the context of construction worksites.

  5. Production patterns of packaging waste categories generated at typical Mediterranean residential building worksites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González Pericot, N.; Villoria Sáez, P.; Del Río Merino, M.; Liébana Carrasco, O.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • On-site segregation level: 1.80%; training and motivation strategies were not effective. • 70% Cardboard waste: from switches and sockets during the building services stage. • 40% Plastic waste: generated during structures and partition works due to palletizing. • >50% Wood packaging waste, basically pallets, generated during the envelope works. - Abstract: The construction sector is responsible for around 28% of the total waste volume generated in Europe, which exceeds the amount of household waste. This has led to an increase of different research studies focusing on construction waste quantification. However, within the research studies made, packaging waste has been analyzed to a limited extent. This article focuses on the packaging waste stream generated in the construction sector. To this purpose current on-site waste packaging management has been assessed by monitoring ten Mediterranean residential building works. The findings of the experimental data collection revealed that the incentive measures implemented by the construction company to improve on-site waste sorting failed to achieve the intended purpose, showing low segregation ratios. Subsequently, through an analytical study the generation patterns for packaging waste are established, leading to the identification of the prevailing kinds of packaging and the products responsible for their generation. Results indicate that plastic waste generation maintains a constant trend throughout the whole construction process, while cardboard becomes predominant towards the end of the construction works with switches and sockets from the electricity stage. Understanding the production patterns of packaging waste will be beneficial for adapting waste management strategies to the identified patterns for the specific nature of packaging waste within the context of construction worksites

  6. Flat Supercontinuum Generation within the Telecommunication Wave Bands in a Photonic Crystal Fiber with Central Holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Ying; Hou Lan-Tian; Zhou Gui-Yao; Xia Chang-Ming; Wang Wei; Wang Chao; Hou Zhi-Yun; Yuan Jin-Hui

    2012-01-01

    Flat supercontinuum in the telecommunication wave bands of E+S+C is generated by coupling a train of femtosecond pulses generated by a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser into the fundamental mode of a photonic crystal fiber with central holes fabricated in our lab. The pulse experiences the anomalous dispersion regime, and the soliton dynamic effect plays an important role in supercontinuum generation. The output spectrum in the wavelength range of 1360–1565 nm does not include significant ripples due to higher pump peak power, and the normalized intensity shows less fluctuation. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  7. The current waste generation and management trends in South Africa: A Review

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nkosi, N

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper, a continuation and expansion of the work of Muzenda et al, 2012 [1] looks at the current waste generation and management trends in South Africa. The waste tyre problem in South Africa is also briefly discussed. Solid waste management...

  8. Alternatives generation and analysis for phase I intermediate waste feed staging system design requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, M.D.

    1996-10-02

    This document provides; a decision analysis summary; problem statement; constraints, requirements, and assumptions; decision criteria; intermediate waste feed staging system options and alternatives generation and screening; intermediate waste feed staging system design concepts; intermediate waste feed staging system alternative evaluation and analysis; and open issues and actions.

  9. Management of radioactive waste generated from nuclear power reactors in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong-Mook Kim

    2000-01-01

    Fundamental objectives and efforts to safely manage radioactive wastes generating from the expanding nuclear power industry in the Republic of Korea are described. Management, treatment and storage of radioactive wastes arising in different form are addressed. A long tern plan to reduce the volume of solid waste is outlined. (author)

  10. Conceptual framework for the study of food waste generation and prevention in the hospitality sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papargyropoulou, Effie; Wright, Nigel; Lozano, Rodrigo|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/36412380X; Steinberger, Julia; Padfield, Rory; Ujang, Zaini

    2016-01-01

    Food waste has significant detrimental economic, environmental and social impacts. The magnitude and complexity of the global food waste problem has brought it to the forefront of the environmental agenda; however, there has been little research on the patterns and drivers of food waste generation,

  11. Evaluation of Solid Waste Generation, Categories and Disposal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management ... collection service and waste management regulations, respectively; while 28.4% separated their solid wastes at source ...

  12. 1994 Annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress as required by DOE Order 5400.1, Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Many Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention successes at the Hanford Site occur every day without formal recognition. A few of the successful projects are: T-Plant helps facilities reuse equipment by offering decontamination services for items such as gas cylinders, trucks, and railcars, thus saving disposal and equipment replacement costs. Custodial Services reviewed its use of 168 hazardous cleaning products, and, through a variety of measures, replaced them with 38 safer substitutes, one for each task. Scrap steel contaminated with low level radioactivity from the interim stabilization of 107-K and 107-C was decontaminated and sold to a vendor for recycling. Site-wide programs include the following: the Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (P2OA) program at the Hanford site was launched during 1994, including a training class, a guidance document, technical assistance, and goals; control over hazardous materials purchased was achieved by reviewing all purchase requisitions of a chemical nature; the Office Supply Reuse Program was established to redeploy unused or unwanted office supply items. In 1994, pollution prevention activities reduced approximately 274,000 kilograms of hazardous waste, 2,100 cubic meters of radioactive and mixed waste, 14,500,000 kilograms of sanitary waste, and 215,000 cubic meters off liquid waste and waste water. Pollution Prevention activities also saved almost $4.2 million in disposal, product, and labor costs. Overall waste generation increased in 1994 due to increased work and activity typical for a site with an environmental restoration mission. However, without any Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention activities, solid radioactive waste generation at Hanford would have been 25% higher, solid hazardous waste generation would have been 30% higher, and solid sanitary waste generation would have been 60% higher

  13. Optical property of few-mode fiber with non-uniform refractive index for cylindrical vector beam generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongye; Wan, Hongdan; Zhang, Zuxing; Sun, Bing; Zhang, Lin

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates optical properties of few-mode fiber with non-uniform refractive index, namely: the few mode fiber with U-shape refractive index and the two-mode and four-mode few-mode fiber with bent radius. Finite element method is used to analyze the mode distributions based on their non-uniform refractive index. Effective mode control can be achieved through these few mode fibers to achieve vector beam generation. Finally, reflection spectra of a few-mode fiber Bragg grating are calculated theoretically and then measured under different bending conditions. Experimental results are in good accordance with the theoretical ones. These few mode fibers show potential applications in generation of cylindrical vector beam both for optical lasing and sensing systems.

  14. A Study of Hospital Waste Generation and Management Practice in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out in Akure, the capital of Ondo State, Nigeria to assess the current practice of hospital wastes management, the magnitude and variety of wastes and the awareness of the stakeholders on the implications of their activities. The composition of wastes found in the 20 healthcare facilities visited ...

  15. Evaluation of Absorbents for Compatibility with Site Generated Hazardous and Mixed Liquid Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oji, L.N.

    2002-01-01

    SRS Solid Waste requested SRTC to perform a literature-based evaluation of sorbents, which are compatible with hazardous mixed waste being generated on site. Polypropylene-based materials and ground corn cob (Toxi-dry), because of their compatibility with the Consolidated Incinerator Facility (CIF) process, are the only two spill stabilization agents which are recommended for use on site (IS manual, Waste Acceptance Criteria 3.18). While ensuring minimal potential for undesired reactions between spills and spill control agents, Solid Waste wants to increase the number of site approved absorbents to give waste generators more flexibility in choosing liquid spill immobilization agents

  16. Conceptual framework for the study of food waste generation and prevention in the hospitality sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papargyropoulou, Effie; Wright, Nigel; Lozano, Rodrigo; Steinberger, Julia; Padfield, Rory; Ujang, Zaini

    2016-03-01

    Food waste has significant detrimental economic, environmental and social impacts. The magnitude and complexity of the global food waste problem has brought it to the forefront of the environmental agenda; however, there has been little research on the patterns and drivers of food waste generation, especially outside the household. This is partially due to weaknesses in the methodological approaches used to understand such a complex problem. This paper proposes a novel conceptual framework to identify and explain the patterns and drivers of food waste generation in the hospitality sector, with the aim of identifying food waste prevention measures. This conceptual framework integrates data collection and analysis methods from ethnography and grounded theory, complemented with concepts and tools from industrial ecology for the analysis of quantitative data. A case study of food waste generation at a hotel restaurant in Malaysia is used as an example to illustrate how this conceptual framework can be applied. The conceptual framework links the biophysical and economic flows of food provisioning and waste generation, with the social and cultural practices associated with food preparation and consumption. The case study demonstrates that food waste is intrinsically linked to the way we provision and consume food, the material and socio-cultural context of food consumption and food waste generation. Food provisioning, food consumption and food waste generation should be studied together in order to fully understand how, where and most importantly why food waste is generated. This understanding will then enable to draw detailed, case specific food waste prevention plans addressing the material and socio-economic aspects of food waste generation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Extraction of zirconium from simulated acidic nitrate waste using liquid membrane in hollow fiber contactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, G.; Chinchale, R.; Renjith, A.U.; Dixit, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Shenoy, K.T.; Ghosh, S.K.

    2015-01-01

    The acidic waste raffinate stream of zirconium (Zr) purification plant contains about 2 gpl of Zr in about 2M free nitric acid. TBP, which is the most commonly used solvent in the nuclear industry, is not suitable for the extraction of Zr from this lean solution as its distribution coefficient is less than one. In house synthesized Mixed Alkyl Phosphine Oxide (MAPO) is a potential extractant for Zr from this lean stream. Intensification of this process for recovery of Zr has been attempted through use of efficient contactor, namely, hollow fiber module and efficient process, namely, simultaneous extraction and stripping across liquid membrane containing MAPO. Based on batch equilibrium studies selection of suitable concentration of extractant, composition of diluent, selection and concentration of strippant for the proposed liquid membrane system was made. The selected organic and strippant concentration was used to study suitability of application of Dispersion Liquid Membrane (DLM) in hollow fiber contactor for recovery Zr from solution simulated to Zr plant raffinate. Challenges related to stable operation of the liquid membrane system like stability of the organic phase in the micropores of lumen and stability of the dispersion during the pertraction were addressed through pressure balance across the lumen and choice of adequate dispersion condition respectively. (author)

  18. Supercontinuum generation from 437 to 2850 nm in a tapered fluorotellurite microstructured fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F.; Jia, Z. X.; Yao, C. F.; Wang, S. B.; Hu, M. L.; Wu, C. F.; Ohishi, Y.; Qin, W. P.; Qin, G. S.

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrated supercontinuum (SC) generation in a tapered fluorotellurite microstructured fiber (MF) with a sub-micrometer core diameter. Fluorotellurite MFs based on TeO2-BaF2-Y2O3 glasses were fabricated by using a rod-in-tube method and a tapered fluorotellurite MF with a minimum core diameter of ~0.65 µm was prepared by employing a tapering system. A 1560 nm femtosecond fiber laser was used as the pumping source. With increasing the peak power of the launched pump laser to ~11 kW, SC light expanding from 437 to 2850 nm was generated in the tapered fluorotellurite MF. In addition, relatively strong blue-shifted dispersive wave at ~489 nm was also observed from the tapered fluorotellurite MF.

  19. Optical Fiber Demodulation System with High Performance for Assessing Fretting Damage of Steam Generator Tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peijian; Wang, Ning; Li, Junying; Zhu, Yong; Zhang, Jie; Xi, Zhide

    2018-01-12

    In order to access the fretting damage of the steam generator tube (SGT), a fast fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P) non-scanning correlation demodulation system based on a super luminescent light emitting diode (SLED) was performed. By demodulating the light signal coming out from the F-P force sensor, the radial collision force between the SGT and the tube support plate (TSP) was interrogated. For higher demodulation accuracy, the effects of the center wavelength, bandwidth, and spectrum noise of SLED were discussed in detail. Specially, a piezoelectric ceramic transducer (PZT) modulation method was developed to get rid of the interference of mode coupling induced by different types of fiber optics in the demodulation system. The reflectivity of optical wedge and F-P sensor was optimized. Finally, the demodulation system worked well in a 1:1 steam generator test loop and successfully demodulated a force signal of 32 N with a collision time of 2 ms.

  20. Release protocol to address DOE moratorium on shipments of waste generated in radiologically controlled areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathbun, L.A.; Boothe, G.F.

    1992-10-01

    On May 17, 1991 the US DOE Office of Waste Operations issued a moratorium on the shipment of hazardous waste from radiologically contaminated or potentially contaminated areas on DOE sites to offsite facilities not licensed for radiological material. This document describes a release protocol generated by Westinghouse Hanford submitted for US DOE approval. Topics considered include designating Radiological Materials Management Areas (RMMAs), classification of wastes, handling of mixed wastes, detection limits

  1. The impact of regulatory compliance behavior on hazardous waste generation in European private healthcare facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Botelho, Anabela

    2013-01-01

    Along with the increased provision of healthcare by private outpatient healthcare facilities within the EU countries, there is also an increase on waste generation from these facilities. A significant fraction of this waste is amongst the most hazardous of all wastes arising in communities, posing significant risks to people and the environment if inappropriately managed. The growing awareness that mismanagement of healthcare waste has serious environmental and public health consequences is r...

  2. 1993 Annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress as required by DOE Order 5400.1, Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkendall, J.R.; Engel, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    More important than waste generation numbers, the pollution prevention and waste minimization successes achieved at Hanford in 1993 have reduced waste and improved operations at the Site. Just a few of these projects are: A small research nuclear reactor, unused and destined for disposal as low level radioactive waste, was provided to a Texas University for their nuclear research program, avoiding 25 cubic meters of waste and saving $116,000. By changing the slope on a asphalt lot in front of a waste storage pad, run-off rainwater was prevented from becoming mixed low level waste water, preventing 40 cubic meters of waste and saving $750,000. Through more efficient electrostatic paint spraying equipment and a solvent recovery system, a paint shop reduced hazardous waste by 3,500 kilograms, saving $90,800. During the demolition of a large decommissioned building, more than 90% of the building's material was recycled by crushing the concrete for use on-Site and selling the steel to an off-Site recycler, avoiding a total of 12,600 metric tons of waste and saving $450,000. Additionally, several site-wide programs have avoided large quantities of waste, including the following: Through expansion of the paper and office waste recycling program which includes paper, cardboard, newspaper, and phone books, 516 metric tons of sanitary waste was reduced, saving $68,000. With the continued success of the excess chemicals program, which finds on-Site and off-Site customers for excess chemical materials, hazardous waste was reduced by 765,000 liters of liquid chemicals and 50 metric tons of solid chemicals, saving over $700,000 in disposal costs

  3. Flat-top pulse generation based on a fiber Bragg grating in transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preciado, Miguel A; Muriel, Miguel A

    2009-03-15

    We propose and analyze a flat-top pulse generator based on a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) in transmission. As is shown in the examples, a uniform period FBG properly designed can exhibit a spectral response in transmission close to sinc function (in amplitude and phase) in a certain bandwidth, because of the logarithm Hilbert transform relations, which can be used to reshape a Gaussian-like input pulse into a flat-top pulse.

  4. Fracture strengths of chair-side-generated veneers cemented with glass fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkaslan, S; Bagis, B; Akan, E; Mutluay, M M; Vallittu, P K

    2015-01-01

    CAD/CAM (computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing) systems have refreshed the idea of chair-side production of restorations, but the fracture of ceramic veneers remains a problem. Cementation with glass fibers may improve the fracture strengths and affect the failure modes of CAD/CAM-generated ceramic veneers. Therefore, this study compared the fracture strengths of ceramic veneers produced at chair side and cemented with or without glass fibers with those of composite veneers. Thirty intact mandibular incisors were randomly divided into three groups ( n = 10) and treated with CAD/CAM-fabricated veneers cemented with dual-cure composite resin luting cement (CRLC; Group 1), CAD/CAM-fabricated veneers cemented with a glass fiber network (GFN) and dual-cure CRLC (Group 2), and a direct particulate filler composite veneer constructed utilizing fiber and a restorative composite resin (Group 3). The specimens were tested with a universal testing machine after thermal cycling treatment. The loads at the start of fracture were the lowest for traditionally fabricated composite veneers and higher for CAD/CAM-generated. Veneers cemented either without or with the GFN. The failure initiation loads (N) for the veneers were 798.92 for Group 1, 836.27 for Group 2, and 585.93 for Group 3. The predominant failure mode is adhesive failure between the laminates and teeth for Group 1, cohesive failure in the luting layer for Group 2, and cohesive laminate failure for Group 3, which showed chipping and small fractures. Ceramic material is a reliable alternative for veneer construction at chair side. Fibers at the cementation interface may improve the clinical longevity and provide higher fracture strength values.

  5. High efficiency fourth-harmonic generation from nanosecond fiber master oscillator power amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xiaodong; Steinvurzel, Paul; Rose, Todd S.; Lotshaw, William T.; Beck, Steven M.; Clemmons, James H.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate high power, deep ultraviolet (DUV) conversion to 266 nm through frequency quadrupling of a nanosecond pulse width 1064 nm fiber master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA). The MOPA system uses an Yb-doped double-clad polarization-maintaining large mode area tapered fiber as the final gain stage to generate 0.5-mJ, 10 W, 1.7- ns single mode pulses at a repetition rate of 20 kHz with measured spectral bandwidth of 10.6 GHz (40 pm), and beam qualities of Mx 2=1.07 and My 2=1.03, respectively. Using LBO and BBO crystals for the second-harmonic generation (SHG) and fourth-harmonic generation (FHG), we have achieved 375 μJ (7.5 W) and 92.5 μJ (1.85 W) at wavelengths of 532 nm and 266 nm, respectively. To the best of our knowledge these are the highest narrowband infrared, green and UV pulse energies obtained to date from a fully spliced fiber amplifier. We also demonstrate high efficiency SHG and FHG with walk-off compensated (WOC) crystal pairs and tightly focused pump beam. An SHG efficiency of 75%, FHG efficiency of 47%, and an overall efficiency of 35% from 1064 nm to 266 nm are obtained.

  6. Radioactive Waste Management Produced from the Generator Tc-99m Products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhaedi Muhammad; Rimin Sumantri; Affan Ahmad; Tuyono

    2012-01-01

    Generator Tc-99m product is used in hospitals will result in radioactive waste both solid waste in the form of a column compacted Tc-99m Generator, bottles vials and bottles of saline fluid path series: burning of solid waste in the form of paper straw, hand gloves, and cardboard (vial packing boxes and wrapping Generator) and liquid waste form leaching results lead pot and enclosure. So that these wastes pose no radiological consequences for both humans and the environment, it must be properly managed in accordance with the provisions. In order to realize these expectations should be made so that the radioactive waste management system can be handled effectively, optimal, economical, safe and secure and in accordance with applicable regulations. Management system is in it include: procedures for handling radioactive waste, solid waste compacted, burning of solid waste management, liquid waste handling, shipment of radioactive waste and determination of the amount of radiation doses received by workers who handle radioactive waste. (author)

  7. Removal of heavy metals from aqueous phases using chemically modified waste Lyocell fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bediako, John Kwame; Wei, Wei; Kim, Sok; Yun, Yeoung-Sang, E-mail: ysyun@jbnu.ac.kr

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Waste Lyocell fiber was chemically modified into cellulose xanthate. • The sorbent showed high affinity for Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II) ions. • The sorbent also showed strong Cu(II) selectivity in Pb(II)–Cd(II)–Cu(II) ternary metal solutions. - Abstract: In this study, an outstanding performance of chemically modified waste Lyocell for heavy metals treatment is reported. The sorbent, which was prepared by a simple and concise method, was able to bind heavy metals such as Pb(II), Cu(II) and Cd(II), with very high efficiencies. The binding mechanisms were studied through adsorption and standard characterization tests such as scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analyses. Adsorption kinetics was very fast and attained equilibrium within 5 min in all metals studied. The maximum single metal uptakes were 531.29 ± 0.28 mg/g, 505.64 ± 0.21 mg/g, and 123.08 ± 0.26 mg/g for Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II), respectively. In ternary metal systems, Cu(II) selectivity was observed and the underlying factors were discussed. The sorbent by its nature, could be very effective in treating large volumes of wastewater with the contact of very little amount.

  8. Policy and practices in the United States of America for DOE-generated nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, F.C.

    1984-01-01

    Throughout the history of attempts to utilize atomic power in the USA, health and safety have been primary considerations in programme policy formulation. A brief historical review of the US nuclear waste management policy formulation over the years aids understanding of our current management strategy for government-generated (primarily defence-related) nuclear wastes. Scientists involved in the Manhattan project during World War II were aware of the dangers of radioactive wastes. The first reaction to this concern was the establishment of a health physics programme to monitor radioactive hazards in Manhattan District Laboratories. The Atomic Energy Act of 1946, which established the Atomic Energy Commission, called for protection of the health and safety of the public as well as atomic workers. That concept has been continued and strengthened, throughout the history of nuclear waste management in the USA. Passage of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 required consideration of radioactive wastes generated by private industry as well as those produced by the Manhattan projects. Commercial waste management policy was based on the already established policy for management of government-generated wastes and is the subject of a separate paper at this symposium. Current US policy is to maintain separate but complementary programmes for nuclear wastes generated by government activities and those from commercial sources. US policy and practices for management of government-generated radioactive waste are summarized. Key organizational structure relating to waste management responsibility is presented. (author)

  9. Evaluation of site-generated radioactive waste treatment and disposal methods for the Yucca Mountain repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, C.V.; Jardine, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    This study identifies the sources of radioactive wastes that may be generated at the proposed high-level waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain, NV, estimates the waste quantities and characteristics, compares technologies available for waste treatment and disposal, and develops recommended concepts for site-generated waste treatment and disposal. The scope of this study is limited to operations during the emplacement phase, in which 70,000 MTU of high-level waste will be received and emplaced at the proposed repository. The evaluations consider all radioactive wastes generated during normal operations in surface and underground facilities. Wastes generated as a result of accidents are not addressed; accidents that could result in large quantities of radioactive waste are expected to occur very infrequently and temporary, portable systems could be used for any necessary cleanup. The results of this study can be used to develop more definitive plans for managing the site-generated wastes and as a basis for the design of associated facilities at the proposed repository

  10. Standard data report. 1997 annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilburn, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Laboratory's central mission of Reducing the Global Nuclear Danger supports core competencies that enable the Laboratory to contribute to defense, civilian, and industrial needs. In turn, the intellectual challenges of civilian and industrial problems strengthen and help support the core competencies required for the national security mission. The ability to do great science underpins all of the applied work. There are five core competencies which support this mission: (1) Stockpile Stewardship ensures the US has safe, secure and reliable nuclear weapons; (2) Stockpile Management provides capabilities ranging from dismantling to remanufacturing of the enduring stockpile; (3) Nuclear Materials Management ensures the availability and safe disposition of plutonium, highly enriched uranium, and tritium; (4) Nonproliferation and Counterproliferation help to deter, detect, and respond to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction; and (5) Environmental Stewardship provides for the remediation and reduction of wastes from the nuclear weapons complex. This report contains data on volumes of waste generated as part of routine and cleanup/stabilization activities of the lab

  11. Methodology for quantification of waste generated in Spanish railway construction works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzmán Báez, Ana de; Villoria Sáez, Paola; Río Merino, Mercedes del; García Navarro, Justo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Two equations for C and D waste estimation in railway construction works are developed. ► Mixed C and D waste is the most generated category during railway construction works. ► Tunnel construction is essential to quantify the waste generated during the works. ► There is a relationship between C and D waste generated and railway functional units. ► The methodology proposed can be used to obtain new constants for other areas. - Abstract: In the last years, the European Union (EU) has been focused on the reduction of construction and demolition (C and D) waste. Specifically, in 2006, Spain generated roughly 47 million tons of C and D waste, of which only 13.6% was recycled. This situation has lead to the drawing up of many regulations on C and D waste during the past years forcing EU countries to include new measures for waste prevention and recycling. Among these measures, the mandatory obligation to quantify the C and D waste expected to be originated during a construction project is mandated. However, limited data is available on civil engineering projects. Therefore, the aim of this research study is to improve C and D waste management in railway projects, by developing a model for C and D waste quantification. For this purpose, we develop two equations which estimate in advance the amount, both in weight and volume, of the C and D waste likely to be generated in railway construction projects, including the category of C and D waste generated for the entire project.

  12. Materials and wastes from power generation of nuclear origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dessus, Benjamin; Guillemette, Andre; Laponche, Bernard; Zerbib, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    In most countries, spent nuclear fuel is directly stored in pools and constitute the bulk of highly radioactive waste. In France, reprocessing separates spent fuel into three categories: uranium, plutonium, minor actinides and fission products. Hence, a vast amount of very diverse radioactive materials are stored in various sites and conditions, under two denominations: 'nuclear materials' (which can be or are partly recycled) and 'radioactive waste' which should be permanently disposed of. The production of highly radioactive and long-lived waste raise legitimate questions on the use of nuclear energy for power production and many people think that it's a sufficient reason for giving up this technique. Concerning existing radioactive waste, the alternative to deep disposal should be: a) dry storage of spent fuel and other existing waste in protected sites (bunkers or hills), and b) more active research on the possibilities to reduce both radioactivity and the lifetime of radioactive waste. (authors)

  13. Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... meals instead of white rice. Add beans (kidney, black, navy, and pinto) to rice dishes for even more fiber. Spice up salads with berries and almonds, chickpeas, cooked artichokes, and beans (kidney, black, navy, or pinto). Use whole-grain (corn or ...

  14. An empirical investigation of construction and demolition waste generation rates in Shenzhen city, South China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Weisheng; Yuan Hongping; Li Jingru; Hao, Jane J.L.; Mi Xuming; Ding Zhikun

    2011-01-01

    The construction and demolition waste generation rates (C and D WGRs) is an important factor in decision-making and management of material waste in any construction site. The present study investigated WGRs by conducting on-site waste sorting and weighing in four ongoing construction projects in Shenzhen city of South China. The results revealed that WGRs ranged from 3.275 to 8.791 kg/m 2 and miscellaneous waste, timber for formwork and falsework, and concrete were the three largest components amongst the generated waste. Based on the WGRs derived from the research, the paper also discussed the main causes of waste in the construction industry and attempted to connect waste generation with specific construction practices. It was recommended that measures mainly including performing waste sorting at source, employing skilful workers, uploading and storing materials properly, promoting waste management capacity, replacing current timber formwork with metal formwork and launching an incentive reward program to encourage waste reduction could be potential solutions to reducing current WGRs in Shenzhen. Although these results were derived from a relatively small sample and so cannot justifiably be generalized, they do however add to the body of knowledge that is currently available for understanding the status of the art of C and D waste management in China.

  15. An empirical investigation of construction and demolition waste generation rates in Shenzhen city, South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Weisheng; Yuan, Hongping; Li, Jingru; Hao, Jane J L; Mi, Xuming; Ding, Zhikun

    2011-04-01

    The construction and demolition waste generation rates (C&D WGRs) is an important factor in decision-making and management of material waste in any construction site. The present study investigated WGRs by conducting on-site waste sorting and weighing in four ongoing construction projects in Shenzhen city of South China. The results revealed that WGRs ranged from 3.275 to 8.791 kg/m(2) and miscellaneous waste, timber for formwork and falsework, and concrete were the three largest components amongst the generated waste. Based on the WGRs derived from the research, the paper also discussed the main causes of waste in the construction industry and attempted to connect waste generation with specific construction practices. It was recommended that measures mainly including performing waste sorting at source, employing skilful workers, uploading and storing materials properly, promoting waste management capacity, replacing current timber formwork with metal formwork and launching an incentive reward program to encourage waste reduction could be potential solutions to reducing current WGRs in Shenzhen. Although these results were derived from a relatively small sample and so cannot justifiably be generalized, they do however add to the body of knowledge that is currently available for understanding the status of the art of C&D waste management in China. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantitative assessment of medical waste generation in the capital city of Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patwary, Masum A.; O'Hare, William Thomas; Street, Graham; Maudood Elahi, K.; Hossain, Syed Shahadat; Sarker, Mosharraf H.

    2009-01-01

    There is a concern that mismanagement of medical waste in developing countries may be a significant risk factor for disease transmission. Quantitative estimation of medical waste generation is needed to estimate the potential risk and as a basis for any waste management plan. Dhaka City, the capital of Bangladesh, is an example of a major city in a developing country where there has been no rigorous estimation of medical waste generation based upon a thorough scientific study. These estimates were obtained by stringent weighing of waste in a carefully chosen, representative, sample of HCEs, including non-residential diagnostic centres. This study used a statistically designed sampling of waste generation in a broad range of Health Care Establishments (HCEs) to indicate that the amount of waste produced in Dhaka can be estimated to be 37 ± 5 ton per day. The proportion of this waste that would be classified as hazardous waste by World Health Organisation (WHO) guidelines was found to be approximately 21%. The amount of waste, and the proportion of hazardous waste, was found to vary significantly with the size and type of HCE.

  17. Medical and Biohazardous Waste Generator's Guide (Revision2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waste Management Group

    2006-11-29

    These guidelines describe procedures to comply with all Federal and State laws and regulations and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) policy applicable to State-regulated medical and unregulated, but biohazardous, waste (medical/biohazardous waste). These guidelines apply to all LBNL personnel who: (1) generate and/or store medical/biohazardous waste, (2) supervise personnel who generate medical/biohazardous waste, or (3) manage a medical/biohazardous waste pickup location. Personnel generating biohazardous waste at the Joint Genome Institute/Production Genomics Facility (JGI/PGF) are referred to the guidelines contained in Section 9. Section 9 is the only part of these guidelines that apply to JGI/PGF. Medical/biohazardous waste referred to in this Web site includes biohazardous, sharps, pathological and liquid waste. Procedures for proper storage and disposal are summarized in the Solid Medical/Biohazardous Waste Disposal Procedures Chart. Contact the Waste Management Group at 486-7663 if you have any questions regarding medical/biohazardous waste management.

  18. Conversion of finished leather waste incorporated with plant fibers into value added consumer products - An effort to minimize solid waste in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teklay, A; Gebeyehu, G; Getachew, T; Yaynshet, T; Sastry, T P

    2017-10-01

    Presently, the leftovers from leather product industries are discarded as waste in Ethiopia. The objective of the present study was therefore, to prepare composite sheets by incorporating various plant fibers like enset (Ensete ventricosum), hibiscus (Hibiscus cannabinus), jute (Corchorus trilocularis L.), palm (Phoenix dactylifera) and sisal (Agave sisal) in various proportions into the leather waste. Resin binder (RB) and natural rubber latex (NRL) were used as binding agents for the preparation of the composite sheets. The composite sheets prepared were characterized for their physicochemical properties (tensile strength, elongation at break, stitch tear strength, water absorption, water desorption and flexing strength). Composite sheets prepared using RB having 10% hibiscus, 20% palm and 40% sisal fibers showed better mechanical properties than their respective controls. In composite sheets prepared using NRL having 30% jute fiber exhibited better mechanical properties than its control. Most of the plant fibers used in this study played a role in increasing the performance of the sheets. However, as seen from the results, the contribution of these plant fibers on performance of the composite sheets prepared is dependent on the ratio used and the nature of binder. The SEM studies have exhibited the composite nature of the sheets and FTIR studies have shown the functional groups of collagen protein, cellulose and binders. The prepared sheets were used as raw materials for preparation of items like stiff hand bags, ladies' purse, keychain, chappal upper, wallet, wall cover, mouse pad and other interior decorating products. By preparing such value added products, we can reduce solid waste; minimize environmental pollution and thereby securing environmental sustainability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Plasma destruction of North Carolina's hazardous waste based of hazardous waste generated between the years of 1989 and 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to analyze the applicability of the plasma waste destruction technology to North Carolina hazardous waste streams. This study outlines the current regulations, existing technologies, and innovative technologies being considered as hazardous waste treatment alternatives. From this foundation, the study proceeds to identify the superiority of the plasma waste destruction technology. Specific areas of discussion include: temperature capabilities, waste residence time requirements, destruction removal efficiencies, operational efficiencies, economic issues, safety, and maintenance. This study finds the plasma destruction technology to be fully effective and superior to conventional facilities. The technology completely destroys hydrocarbons and can reduce the volume of many other hazardous wastes on the order of one part per million. The required residence time of waste in a plasma facility for effective destruction is a fraction of a second, while the rotary kiln incinerator maintains an average residence time of approximately 5 seconds. Also mass and heat balance calculations are performed to quantify the effectiveness and efficiency of this technology. It is found that one day's average amount of hazardous waste generated in the state of North Carolina can be destroyed in approximately thirty seconds using a standard one megawatt power source. Yet, before this technology is adopted as North Carolina's primary hazardous waste destruction technology, further study is needed so that all issues considered in this research can be conducted in great detail

  20. Effect of pulse width on near-infrared supercontinuum generation in nonlinear fiber amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Rui; Lei, Cheng-Min; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Wang, Ze-Feng; Hou, Jing

    2015-08-01

    The effect of pulse width on near-infrared supercontinuum generation in nonlinear fiber amplifier is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The complex Ginzburg-Landau equation and adaptive split-step Fourier method are used to simulate the propagation of pulses with different pulse widths in the fiber amplifier, and the results show that a longer pulse is more profitable in near-infrared supercontinuum generation if the central wavelength of the input laser lies in the normal dispersion region of the gain fiber. A four-stage master oscillator power amplifier configuration is adopted and the output spectra under picosecond and nanosecond input pulses are compared with each other. The experimental results are in good accordance with the simulations which can provide some guidance for further optimization of the system. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11404404 and 11274385) and the Outstanding Youth Fund Project of Hunan Province and the Fund of Innovation of National University of Defense Technology, China (Grant No. B120701).

  1. Planning for the Management and Disposition of Newly Generated TRU Waste from REDC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, D. E.; Forrester, T. W.; Krause, T.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the waste characteristics of newly generated transuranic waste from the Radiochemical Engineering and Development Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the basic certification structure that will be proposed by the University of Tennessee-Battelle and Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for this waste stream. The characterization approach uses information derived from the active production operations as acceptable knowledge for the Radiochemical Engineering and Development Center transuranic waste. The characterization approach includes smear data taken from processing and waste staging hot cells, as well as analytical data on product and liquid waste streams going to liquid waste disposal. Bechtel Jacobs Company and University of Tennessee-Battelle are currently developing the elements of a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-compliant program with a plan to be certified by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for shipment of newly generated transuranic waste in the next few years. The current activities include developing interface plans, program documents, and waste stream specific procedures

  2. Second-harmonic generation in second-harmonic fiber Bragg gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, M J; de Sterke, C M

    1996-06-20

    We consider the production of second-harmonic light in gratings resonant with the generated field, through a Green's function approach. We recover some standard results and obtain new limits for the uniform grating case. With the extension to nonuniform gratings, we find the Green's function for the second harmonic in a grating with an arbitrary phase shift at some point. We then obtain closed form approximate expressions for the generated light for phase shifts close to π/2 and at the center of the grating. Finally, comparing the uniform and phase-shifted gratings with homogeneous materials, we discuss the enhancement in generated light and the bandwidth over which it occurs, and the consequences for second-harmonic generation in optical fiber Bragg gratings.

  3. Ultrabroadband, Midinfrared Supercontinuum Generation in Dispersion Engineered As2Se3-Based Chalcogenide Photonic Crystal Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rim Cherif

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small core As2Se3-based photonic crystal fibers (PCFs are accurately characterized for compact, high power, ultrabroadband, and coherent supercontinuum generation within few millimeters fiber length. Bandwidths of ~5.3 μm, 5 μm, and 3.2 μm were calculated for hole-to-hole spacings Λ= 3.5 μm, 4.5 μm, and 5.5 μm, respectively. The spectral broadening in the chalcogenide PCF is mainly caused by self-phase modulation and Raman-induced soliton self-frequency shift. The results show that small core As2Se3 PCFs are a promising candidate for mid-IR SCG up to ~8 μm.

  4. Fiber-wireless convergence in next-generation communication networks systems, architectures, and management

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Gee-Kung; Ellinas, Georgios

    2017-01-01

    This book investigates new enabling technologies for Fi-Wi convergence. The editors discuss Fi-Wi technologies at the three major network levels involved in the path towards convergence: system level, network architecture level, and network management level. The main topics will be: a. At system level: Radio over Fiber (digitalized vs. analogic, standardization, E-band and beyond) and 5G wireless technologies; b. Network architecture level: NGPON, WDM-PON, BBU Hotelling, Cloud Radio Access Networks (C-RANs), HetNets. c. Network management level: SDN for convergence, Next-generation Point-of-Presence, Wi-Fi LTE Handover, Cooperative MultiPoint. • Addresses the Fi-Wi convergence issues at three different levels, namely at the system level, network architecture level, and network management level • Provides approaches in communication systems, network architecture, and management that are expected to steer the evolution towards fiber-wireless convergence • Contributions from leading experts in the field of...

  5. Broadband pulsed difference frequency generation laser source centered 3326 nm based on ring fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guangwei; Li, Wenlei

    2018-03-01

    A broadband pulsed mid-infrared difference frequency generation (DFG) laser source based on MgO-doped congruent LiNbO3 bulk is experimentally demonstrated, which employs a homemade pulsed ytterbium-doped ring fiber laser and a continuous wave erbium-doped ring fiber laser to act as seed sources. The experimental results indicate that the perfect phase match crystal temperature is about 74.5∘C. The maximum spectrum bandwidth of idler is about 60 nm with suitable polarization states of fundamental lights. The central wavelength of idlers varies from 3293 nm to 3333 nm over the crystal temperature ranges of 70.4-76∘C. A jump of central wavelength exists around crystal temperature of 72∘C with variation of about 30 nm. The conversion efficiency of DFG can be tuned with the crystal temperature and polarization states of fundamental lights.

  6. Microfiber-based gold nanorods as saturable absorber for femtosecond pulse generation in a fiber laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xu-De [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, School of Information and Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006 (China); School of Physics and Electronic Information, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei, Anhui 235000 (China); Luo, Zhi-Chao; Liu, Hao; Liu, Meng; Luo, Ai-Ping, E-mail: luoaiping@scnu.edu.cn; Xu, Wen-Cheng, E-mail: xuwch@scnu.edu.cn [Laboratory of Nanophotonic Functional Materials and Devices, School of Information and Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006 (China)

    2014-10-20

    We reported on the femtosecond pulse generation from an erbium-doped fiber (EDF) laser by using microfiber-based gold nanorods (GNRs) as saturable absorber (SA). By virtue of the geometric characteristic of microfiber-based GNRs, the optical damage threshold of GNRs-SA could be greatly enhanced. The microfiber-based GNRs-SA shows a modulation depth of 4.9% and a nonsaturable loss of 21.1%. With the proposed GNRs-SA, the fiber laser emitted a mode-locked pulse train with duration of ∼887 fs. The obtained results demonstrated that the GNRs deposited microfiber could indeed serve as a high-performance SA towards the practical applications in the field of ultrafast photonics.

  7. Estimating the magnitude of food waste generated in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oelofse, Suzanna HH

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the developed world, food is treated as a disposable commodity. Between one third and half of all food produced for human consumption globally is estimated to be wasted. However, attempts to quantify the actual magnitude of food wasted...

  8. A Study of Hospital Waste Generation and Management Practice in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    The composition of wastes found in the 20 healthcare facilities visited included garbage, ... and allied, clothing materials, wastewater with blood traces and the likes. ... personally controlled. ... containers or recapped and stored in a special safety box kept ... Finally disinfection of waste before any kind of contact was done.

  9. Wastes power generation introduction manual. Main edition; Haikibutsu hatsuden donyu manual. Honpen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    A practical and specific working manual was prepared that satisfies the standards and criteria defined in the relevant law such as the Sanitation and Environment Ordinance No. 249, the guideline for generation of dioxins caused by refuse disposal, and that enables the reports evaluating the wastes quantitatively to be submitted to heads of the local governments when persons in charge of planning the introduction of wastes power generation at local governments discuss the wastes power generation systems. Taking general combustible wastes and sewage sludge treatments as the object, this paper details from the economic performance to size of wastes treatment at the priority limit for the power generation facility introduction. The subject power generation systems include the following: the stoker furnace/separation type ash melting furnace power generation system, the fluidized bed/separation type ash melting furnace power generation system, and the direct type gasification melting furnace power generation system, whose establishment of safety, reliability and stability have been verified by full-size system operation record available at the local governments, the gas turbine re-powering composite type power generation system (gas turbine power plants are installed beside the incineration furnaces) that makes high-efficiency power generation possible, and the RDF power generation system (power generation by mixed combustion with general refuses, and power generation using RDF (refuse derived fuel) exclusive combustion). Other important discussion and assessment items include environment and resource utilization performances. (NEDO)

  10. Slurry growth, gas retention, and flammable gas generation by Hanford radioactive waste tanks: Synthetic waste studies, FY 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Ryan, J.L.; Scheele, R.D.; Tingey, J.M.

    1992-08-01

    Of 177 high-level waste storage tanks on the Hanford Site, 23 have been placed on a safety watch list because they are suspected of producing flammable gases in flammable or explosive concentrate. One tankin particular, Tank 241-SY-101 (Tank 101-SY), has exhibited slow increases in waste volume followed by a rapid decrease accompanied by venting of large quantities of gases. The purpose of this study is to help determine the processes by which flammable gases are produced, retained, and eventually released from Tank 101-SY. Waste composition data for single- and double-shell waste tanks on the flammable gas watch listare critically reviewed. The results of laboratory studies using synthetic double-shell wastes are summarized, including physical and chemical properties of crusts that are formed, the stoichiometry and rate ofgas generation, and mechanisms responsible for formation of a floating crust

  11. Digestive and functional properties of a partially hydrolyzed cassava solid waste with high insoluble fiber concentration Propriedades funcionais-digestivas do concentrado de fibra alimentar obtido de mandioca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorivaldo da Silva Raupp

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Starch factories generate large amounts of cassava solid waste. A small amount is utilized for animal feed but most of it is discharged with deleterious effects to the envirounment. A edible food with a high content of insoluble dietary fiber (60.9%, named "partially hidrolyzed cassava waste" (PHCW, was prepared from industrial cassava solid waste by an enzymatic process. PHCW or wheat bran (WB were fed to model rats and both promoted digestive function effects, but PHCW produced the greatest effect. The insoluble fiber constituent from PHCW (and not the soluble fiber, promoted the greatest fecal bulking, fecal weight and defecation frequency in rats, as compared to WB. Such results indicate that the partially hydrolyzed cassava waste presents digestive function properties which allow it to be used as an adequate source of insoluble dietary fiber in the formulation of functional food for human nutrition.As fecularias e polvilheiras produzem grandes quantidades de bagaço de mandioca. A proposta dessa pesquisa consistiu determinar, em ratos modelo, a propriedade funcional-digestiva do produto alimentício bagaço de mandioca hidrolisado (BMH, um concentrado de fibra alimentar (60,9%, peso seco que foi obtido a partir do bagaço de mandioca da polvilheira e através de processo de hidrólise enzimática. O BMH produziu efeitos fisiológicos no trato digestivo dos ratos modelos mais acentuados que os efeitos produzidos pelo farelo de trigo (FT. Foram os componentes insolúveis da fibra alimentar do BMH, e não a fração solúvel, os que mais contribuíram para o maior volume e peso das fezes e, por conseguinte, para o maior número de defecações. Por isso, o BMH pode ser usado como fonte alternativa de fibra alimentar para a formulação de alimentos, principalmente os consumidos por indivíduos com a finalidade de regular ou manter normal a funcionalidade digestiva.

  12. Commercially Available Activated Carbon Fiber Felt Enables Efficient Solar Steam Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haoran; He, Yurong; Hu, Yanwei; Wang, Xinzhi

    2018-03-21

    Sun-driven steam generation is now possible and has the potential to help meet future energy needs. Current technologies often use solar condensers to increase solar irradiance. More recently, a technology for solar steam generation that uses heated surface water and low optical concentration is reported. In this work, a commercially available activated carbon fiber felt is used to generate steam efficiently under one sun illumination. The evaporation rate and solar conversion efficiency reach 1.22 kg m -2 h -1 and 79.4%, respectively. The local temperature of the evaporator with a floating activated carbon fiber felt reaches 48 °C. Apart from the high absorptivity (about 94%) of the material, the evaporation performance is enhanced thanks to the well-developed pores for improved water supply and steam escape and the low thermal conductivity, which enables reduced bulk water temperature increase. This study helps to find a promising material for solar steam generation using a water evaporator that can be produced economically (∼6 $/m 2 ) with long-term stability.

  13. Waste generated in high-rise buildings construction: a quantification model based on statistical multiple regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi Kern, Andrea; Ferreira Dias, Michele; Piva Kulakowski, Marlova; Paulo Gomes, Luciana

    2015-05-01

    Reducing construction waste is becoming a key environmental issue in the construction industry. The quantification of waste generation rates in the construction sector is an invaluable management tool in supporting mitigation actions. However, the quantification of waste can be a difficult process because of the specific characteristics and the wide range of materials used in different construction projects. Large variations are observed in the methods used to predict the amount of waste generated because of the range of variables involved in construction processes and the different contexts in which these methods are employed. This paper proposes a statistical model to determine the amount of waste generated in the construction of high-rise buildings by assessing the influence of design process and production system, often mentioned as the major culprits behind the generation of waste in construction. Multiple regression was used to conduct a case study based on multiple sources of data of eighteen residential buildings. The resulting statistical model produced dependent (i.e. amount of waste generated) and independent variables associated with the design and the production system used. The best regression model obtained from the sample data resulted in an adjusted R(2) value of 0.694, which means that it predicts approximately 69% of the factors involved in the generation of waste in similar constructions. Most independent variables showed a low determination coefficient when assessed in isolation, which emphasizes the importance of assessing their joint influence on the response (dependent) variable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Utilization of bagasse and coconut fibers waste as fillers of sandwich composite for bridge railway sleepers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soehardjo, K. A.; Basuki, A.

    2017-07-01

    The bridge railway sleepers is an essential component in the construction of railways, as the foundation of the rail support in order to withstand the load a train that runs above it. Sleepers used in bridge construction are expected to have a longer service life, lighter weight and durable so that can be used more efficient. This research was carried out to create a model of bridges railway sleepers made of sandwich structured composite from fiber glass, epoxy resin with fillers waste of bagasse (sugar cane pulp mill) or coconut fiberboard (copra industry) that using polyurethane as an adhesive. The process of making was conditioned for small and medium industrial applications. Railway sleepers’ specifications adapted to meet the requirements of end user. The process steps in this research include; lay-up fiberglass combined with bagasse/coconut fiberboard (as fillers), gluing with epoxy resin, molded it with pressure to be solid, curing after solidification process. The specimens of composite, bagasse and coconut fiber board were tested for tensile and compressive strength. The prototype were tested of mechanical test: flexural moment test to the stand rail, flexural moment test to the middle of the sleepers and tensile strength test on one side of the sleepers, in accordance to SNI 11-3388-1994 Method testing of single block concrete sleepers and bearing single rail fastening systems. The results of mechanical testing all variations meet the technical specifications of end user such as test results for flexural moment on all prototypes, after load test, there is no visible crack. While in the tensile strength test, it seem the prototype with coconut fiberboard filler, shows better performance than bagasse fiberboard filler, the decisions is just depended on techno economic and lifetime.

  15. An overview of the transportation of radioactive waste at Ontario Power Generation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, P.

    2006-01-01

    The Radioactive Material Transportation Department (RMT) ensures regulatory compliance in radioactive material shipping within Ontario Power Generation (OPG). OPG provides a radioactive shipping program, high quality carrier service, stringent packaging maintenance, and quality assurance oversight to the corporation's nuclear facilities and its customers. This paper will speak to the transport of radioactive waste in Ontario Power Generation. It will also mention non-waste shipments and the quality assurance programme used at Ontario Power Generation to ensure a high quality transportation system. (author)

  16. Power generation using the solid wastes in Eskisehir, Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakis, R.; Kurban, M. [Anadolu Univ., Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2007-07-01

    Non-renewable fossil-fuel energy resources such as petroleum, coal and natural gas cause environmental damage as a result of carbon dioxide emissions. Due to the trend of increasing energy consumption, air pollution is becoming a significant environmental concern for the future. In order to protect the ecological equilibrium of the natural environment, alternative energy sources must be sought and further developed. In Turkey, hydraulic, solar, and geothermal and biomass (wood, animal and plant wastes and solid wastes), biogas (methane) are potential renewable energy resources. Turkey does not have enough energy resources and is in need of a solution to reduce, re-use or recycle solid wastes. This paper evaluated the amount of solid wastes in Eskisehir, Turkey for producing electricity using the build, operate and transfer (BOT) model. The purpose of the study was to develop an economically useful approach to using wastes while preventing harmful effects on the environment. The paper discussed the burning waste situation in Turkey and other countries and the costs of establishing burning garbage foundations. It was concluded that electricity production from Eskisehir's garbage wastes with benefit the community from both a health angle and economical angle. 17 refs., 8 tabs., 2 figs.

  17. Healthcare waste generation and management practice in government health centers of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadesse, Menelik Legesse; Kumie, Abera

    2014-11-25

    Healthcare wastes are hazardous organic and inorganic wastes. The waste disposal management in Addis Ababa city is seen unscientific manner. The waste management practice in the health facilities are poor and need improvement. This study will help different organizations, stakeholders and policy makers to correct and improve the existing situation of healthcare waste legislation and enforcement and training of staff in the healthcare facilities in Addis Ababa. The study aimed to assess the existing generation and management practice of healthcare waste in selected government health centers of Addis Ababa. The cross-sectional study was conducted to quantify waste generation rate and evaluate its management system. The study area was Addis Ababa. The sample size was determined by simple random sampling technique, the sampling procedure involved 10 sub-cities of Addis Ababa. Data were collected using both waste collecting and measuring equipment and check list. The Data was entered by EPI INFO version 6.04d and analyzed by and SPSS for WINDOW version15. The mean (±SD) healthcare waste generation rate was 9.61 ± 3.28 kg/day of which (38%) 3.64 ± 1.45 kg/day was general or non-hazardous waste and (62%) 5.97 ± 2.31 kg/day was hazardous. The mean healthcare waste generation rate between health centers was a significant different with Kurskal-Wallis test (χ2 = 21.83, p-value = 0.009). All health centers used safety boxes for collection of sharp wastes and all health centers used plastic buckets without lid for collection and transportation of healthcare waste. Pre treatment of infectious wastes was not practiced by any of the health centers. All health centers used incinerators and had placenta pit for disposal of pathological waste however only seven out of ten pits had proper covering material. Segregation of wastes at point of generation with appropriate collection materials and pre- treatment of infectious waste before disposal should be practiced

  18. Evaluation of alternatives for a second-generation transportation system for Department of Energy transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) waste storage sites will ship their contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) beginning FY 1989. The CH-TRU waste will be shipped in the Transuranic Package Transported (TRUPACT-I), a new packaging being developed by Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque/Transportation Technology Center. Some of the DOE TRU waste, however, might be unsuitable for shipment in TRUPACT-I, and is designated special-shipped (SS) TRU waste. The purposes of this study were to: (1) identify the quantity and characteristics of SS-TRU waste stored and generated at DOE facilities; (2) identify alternatives for managing the SS-TRU waste; and (3) make overall recommendations for managing the SS-TRU waste. Data on quantity and characteristics were gathered through coordinating visits to the sites and extracting information from each site's records. Representatives of DOE organizations and contractors set objectives for managing the SS-TRU waste. Alternative shipping systems were then identified for CH SS-TRU waste and RH SS-TRU waste. Evaluations of these alternatives considered how well they would satisfy each objective, and associated potential problems. The study recommends delaying the decision on how best to transport the CH SS-TRU waste to WIPP until the amount of SS-TRU processed waste in heavy drums is known. These conditions and choices are presented: a relatively small number of processed, heavy drums could be shipped most economically via TRUPACT-I, mixed with lighter drums of unprocessed waste. If a large number of heavy drums is to be shipped, a shorter and narrower version of TRUPACT-I would be preferred alternative. The Defense High-Level Waste cask is the recommended alternative system for shipping RH SS-TRU waste. 12 references, 15 figures, 22 tables

  19. Study of physical properties, gas generation and gas retention in simulated Hanford waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Scheele, R.D.

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the chemical and physical processes responsible for the generation and retention of gases within high-level waste from Tank 101-SY on the Hanford Site. This research, conducted using simulated waste on a laboratory scale, supports the development of mitigation/remediation strategies for Tank 101-SY. Simulated waste formulations are based on actual waste compositions. Selected physical properties of the simulated waste are compared to properties of actual Tank 101-SY waste samples. Laboratory studies using aged simulated waste show that significant gas generation occurs thermally at current tank temperatures (∼60 degrees C). Gas compositions include the same gases produced in actual tank waste, primarily N 2 , N 2 O, and H 2 . Gas stoichiometries have been shown to be greatly influenced by several organic and inorganic constituents within the simulated waste. Retention of gases in the simulated waste is in the form of bubble attachment to solid particles. This attachment phenomenon is related to the presence of organic constituents (HEDTA, EDTA, and citrate) of the simulated waste. A mechanism is discussed that relates the gas bubble/particle interactions to the partially hydrophobic surface produced on the solids by the organic constituents

  20. The effect of gender and age structure on municipal waste generation in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talalaj, Izabela Anna; Walery, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An effect of gender and age structure on municipal waste generation was presented. • The waste accumulation index is influenced by a number of unemployed women. • Greater share of women in society contributes to greater waste production. • A model describing the analyzed dependences was determined. - Abstract: In this study the effect of gender and age structure on municipal waste generation was investigated. The data from 10-year period, from 2001 to 2010 year, were taken into consideration. The following parameters of gender and age structure were analyzed: men and woman quantity, female to male ratio, number of working, pre-working and post-working age men/women, number of unemployed men/women. The results have showed a strong correlation of annual per capita waste generation rate with number of unemployed women (r = 0.70) and female to male ratio (r = 0.81). This indicates that waste generation rate is more depended on ratio of men and women that on quantitative size of each group. Using the regression analysis a model describing the dependence between female to male ratio, number of unemployed woman and waste quantity was determined. The model explains 70% of waste quantity variation. Obtained results can be used both to improve waste management and to a fuller understanding of gender behavior

  1. The effect of gender and age structure on municipal waste generation in Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talalaj, Izabela Anna, E-mail: izabela.tj@gmail.com; Walery, Maria, E-mail: m.walery@pb.edu.pl

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • An effect of gender and age structure on municipal waste generation was presented. • The waste accumulation index is influenced by a number of unemployed women. • Greater share of women in society contributes to greater waste production. • A model describing the analyzed dependences was determined. - Abstract: In this study the effect of gender and age structure on municipal waste generation was investigated. The data from 10-year period, from 2001 to 2010 year, were taken into consideration. The following parameters of gender and age structure were analyzed: men and woman quantity, female to male ratio, number of working, pre-working and post-working age men/women, number of unemployed men/women. The results have showed a strong correlation of annual per capita waste generation rate with number of unemployed women (r = 0.70) and female to male ratio (r = 0.81). This indicates that waste generation rate is more depended on ratio of men and women that on quantitative size of each group. Using the regression analysis a model describing the dependence between female to male ratio, number of unemployed woman and waste quantity was determined. The model explains 70% of waste quantity variation. Obtained results can be used both to improve waste management and to a fuller understanding of gender behavior.

  2. The concept of responsibility to future generations for the management and storage of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vial, E.

    2004-01-01

    Recognition of the concept of responsibility to future generations seems, to imply the need to assume responsibility today for radioactive waste legacy of the past as well as for the waste that is currently being generated. However, this view of things, or more precisely this interpretation, is clouded by the lack of a clear definition of the concept of responsibility towards future generations. The concept has been used mainly in connection with long-lived radioactive wastes, which pose the greatest management problem as it so so far exceeds any human scale of reference. Consideration for future generations has to be a factor in the management of all types of radioactive waste, be it short, medium or long-lived waste or very low, low, intermediate or highly radioactive waste. As a general rule the concept of responsibility has made focus on long lived waste, whatever its level of radioactivity. The current alternatives for the management of radioactive waste may be: interim storage, final disposal, incineration, transmutation, to lower the radioactivity of the wastes. These different alternatives are discussed because they are not all genuine solutions and need to be deepened. (N.C.)

  3. Immobilized High-Level Waste (HLW) Interim Storage Alternative Generation and analysis and Decision Report - second Generation Implementing Architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CALMUS, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    Two alternative approaches were previously identified to provide second-generation interim storage of Immobilized High-Level Waste (IHLW). One approach was retrofit modification of the Fuel and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) to accommodate IHLW. The results of the evaluation of the FMEF as the second-generation IHLW interim storage facility and subsequent decision process are provided in this document

  4. Specifying the Concept of Future Generations for Addressing Issues Related to High-Level Radioactive Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermisch, Celine

    2016-12-01

    The nuclear community frequently refers to the concept of "future generations" when discussing the management of high-level radioactive waste. However, this notion is generally not defined. In this context, we have to assume a wide definition of the concept of future generations, conceived as people who will live after the contemporary people are dead. This definition embraces thus each generation following ours, without any restriction in time. The aim of this paper is to show that, in the debate about nuclear waste, this broad notion should be further specified and to clarify the related implications for nuclear waste management policies. Therefore, we provide an ethical analysis of different management strategies for high-level waste in the light of two principles, protection of future generations-based on safety and security-and respect for their choice. This analysis shows that high-level waste management options have different ethical impacts across future generations, depending on whether the memory of the waste and its location is lost, or not. We suggest taking this distinction into account by introducing the notions of "close future generations" and "remote future generations", which has important implications on nuclear waste management policies insofar as it stresses that a retrievable disposal has fewer benefits than usually assumed.

  5. Dynamics of Dispersive Wave Generation in Gas-Filled Photonic Crystal Fiber with the Normal Dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixiang Deng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The absence of Raman and unique pressure-tunable dispersion is the characteristic feature of gas-filled photonic crystal fiber (PCF, and its zero dispersion points can be extended to the near-infrared by increasing gas pressure. The generation of dispersive wave (DW in the normal group velocity dispersion (GVD region of PCF is investigated. It is demonstrated that considering the self-steepening (SS and introducing the chirp of the initial input pulse are two suitable means to control the DW generation. The SS enhances the relative average intensity of blue-shift DW while weakening that of red-shift DW. The required propagation distance of DW emission is markedly varied by introducing the frequency chirp. Manipulating DW generation in gas-filled PCF by the combined effects of either SS or chirp and three-order dispersion (TOD provides a method for a concentrated transfer of energy into the targeted wavelengths.

  6. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1998; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    This seventh Annual Report presents and analyzes DOE Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention activities at 45 reporting sites from 1993 through 1998. This section summarizes Calendar Year 1998 Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention accomplishments. More detailed information follows this section in the body of the Report. In May 1996, the Secretary of Energy established a 50 percent Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goal (relative to the 1993 baseline) for routine operations radioactive, mixed, and hazardous waste generation, to be achieved by December31, 1999. DOE has achieved its Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goals for routine operations based upon a comparison of 1998 waste generation to the 1993 baseline. Excluding sanitary waste, routine operations waste generation decreased 67 percent overall from 1993 to 1998. However, for the first time since 1994, the total amount of materials recycled by the Complex decreased from 109,600 metric tons in 1997 to 92,800 metric tons in 1998. This decrease is attributed to the fact that in 1997, several large ''one-time only'' recycling projects were conducted throughout the Complex. In order to demonstrate commitment to DOE's Complex-wide recycling goal, it is important for sites to identify all potential large-scale recycling/reuse opportunities

  7. Combined Multi-criteria Evaluation Stage Technique as an Agro Waste Evaluation Indicator for Polymeric Composites: Date Palm Fibers as a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faris M. AL-Oqla

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The final features of natural fiber composites (NFCs depend on the integrated characteristics of their constituents. In the industry today, natural agro waste fibers are evaluated using a limited number of criteria. In this work, a combined multi-criteria evaluation stage technique (CMCEST is introduced as a simple efficient systematic indicator to enhance evaluation of the available natural agro wastes for polymeric composites. In this proposed technique, criteria affecting the proper selection of natural agro waste fibers were combined and divided into sequence stages as follows: single-evaluation-criterion (SEC, combined-double-evaluation-criterion (CDEC, combined-triple-evaluation-criterion (CTEC, etc. These stages are based on combined physical, mechanical, and economic evaluation criteria and can be extended to several further stages to include other beneficial characteristics. The effectiveness of this technique was demonstrated by evaluating coir, date palm, jute, hemp, kenaf, and oil palm fibers simultaneously. This combined evaluation criteria can lead to more informative decisions regarding selection of the most suitable fiber type for polymeric composites. The CMCEST enhancements can reveal new potential fiber types through better evaluation schemes, help achieve clearer indications of the capabilities of available agro wastes to enhance composites, and determine proper ecological waste management practices. Utilizing the proposed technique, the date palm fiber type was found to be quite promising due to beneficial characteristics revealed in CTEC, which provides a reasonable, cheap, and eco-friendly alternative material suitable for different applications.

  8. Medical and biohazardous waste generator's guide: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This Guide describes the procedures required to comply with all federal and state laws and regulations and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) policy applicable to medical and biohazardous waste. The members of the LBL Biological Safety Subcommittee participated in writing these policies and procedures. The procedures and policies in this Guide apply to LBL personnel who work with infectious agents or potentially infectious agents, publicly perceived infectious items or materials (e.g., medical gloves, culture dishes), and sharps (e.g., needles, syringes, razor blades). If medical or biohazardous waste is contaminated or mixed with a hazardous chemical or material, with a radioactive material, or with both, the waste will be handled in accordance with the applicable federal and State of California laws and regulations for hazardous, radioactive, or mixed waste

  9. Assessment of Healthcare Waste Generation Rate and Its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-01

    Mar 1, 2018 ... reliable records of the quantity and nature of healthcare wastes ... construction, and 224 health posts, totally 272 health facilities ..... Procedia - Social and Behavioral. Sciences. 2012 ... Asian Journal Of Applied Science And.

  10. Estimation of construction and demolition waste volume generation in new residential buildings in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villoria Sáez, Paola; del Río Merino, Mercedes; Porras-Amores, César

    2012-02-01

    The management planning of construction and demolition (C&D) waste uses a single indicator which does not provide enough detailed information. Therefore the determination and implementation of other innovative and precise indicators should be determined. The aim of this research work is to improve existing C&D waste quantification tools in the construction of new residential buildings in Spain. For this purpose, several housing projects were studied to determine an estimation of C&D waste generated during their construction process. This paper determines the values of three indicators to estimate the generation of C&D waste in new residential buildings in Spain, itemizing types of waste and construction stages. The inclusion of two more accurate indicators, in addition to the global one commonly in use, provides a significant improvement in C&D waste quantification tools and management planning.

  11. Fast discharging homopolar drum-type generator with gas bearing and flexible copper-fiber brushes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibardin, A.S.; Komin, A.V.; Sojkin, V.F.; Frolkin, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    The description and results of testing schock-excited homopolar generator (SEHG) with a drum-type rotor, a gas bearing and flexible copper-fiber brushes are presented. SEHG has a magnetic core with two excitation coils with the designed field of 1.8-2 T in the gap. The drum-type titanium rotor has 80 kg, is 0.5 m in diameter, 0.25 m length and 0.05 m thick. SEHG power is 3.6 MJ, overall dimensions are 0.8x1 m. Single- and double-row bearings, representing an aluminium shell of 15 mm thick, established inside an external backward current lead and isolated from it, are used to control serviceability of a radial gas-static bearing, which is a support for an SEHG rotor. The bearing surface was covered with the colloidal graphite and had one or two rows by 24 openings for swelling. Brush units represent a bronze brush ring, containing 44 copper-fiber brushes. Tests results confirm serviceability of copper-fiber brushes with quite large dimensions and permit to count on producing the 2.4 MA electric discharge and 12 ms pulse rise time

  12. Tunable microwave signal generation based on an Opto-DMD processor and a photonic crystal fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Tao; Sang Xin-Zhu; Yan Bin-Bin; Li Yan; Song Fei-Jun; Zhang Xia; Wang Kui-Ru; Yuan Jin-Hui; Yu Chong-Xiu; Ai Qi; Chen Xiao; Zhang Ying; Chen Gen-Xiang; Xiao Feng; Kamal Alameh

    2014-01-01

    Frequency-tunable microwave signal generation is proposed and experimentally demonstrated with a dual-wavelength single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) erbium-doped fiber ring laser based on a digital Opto-DMD processor and four-wave mixing (FWM) in a high-nonlinear photonic crystal fiber (PCF). The high-nonlinear PCF is employed for the generation of the FWM to obtain stable and uniform dual-wavelength oscillation. Two different short passive sub-ring cavities in the main ring cavity serve as mode filters to make SLM lasing. The two lasing wavelengths are electronically selected by loading different gratings on the Opto-DMD processor controlled with a computer. The wavelength spacing can be smartly adjusted from 0.165 nm to 1.08 nm within a tuning accuracy of 0.055 nm. Two microwave signals at 17.23 GHz and 27.47 GHz are achieved. The stability of the microwave signal is discussed. The system has the ability to generate a 137.36-GHz photonic millimeter signal at room temperature

  13. Gain-switched CW fiber laser for improved supercontinuum generation in a PCF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Casper; Noordegraaf, Danny; Skovgaard, P.M.W.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate supercontinuum generation in a PCF pumped by a gain-switched high-power continuous wave (CW) fiber laser. The pulses generated by gain-switching have a peak power of more than 700 W, a duration around 200 ns, and a repetition rate of 200 kHz giving a high average power of almost 30 W....... By coupling such a pulse train into a commercial nonlinear photonic crystal fiber, a supercontinuum is generated with a spectrum spanning from 500 to 2250 nm, a total output power of 12 W, and an infrared flatness of 6 dB over a bandwidth of more than 1000 nm with a power density above 5 dBm/nm (3 m......W/nm). This is considerably broader than when operating the same system under CW conditions. The presented approach is attractive due to the high power, power scalability, and reduced system complexity compared to picosecond-pumped supercontinuum sources. © 2011 Optical Society of America....

  14. Theoretical analysis of a novel ultrasound generator on an optical fiber tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nan; Wang, Wenhui; Tian, Ye; Guthy, Charles; Wang, Xingwei

    2010-04-01

    A novel ultrasound generator consisting of a single mode optical fiber with a layer of gold nanoparticles on its tip has been designed. The generator utilizes the optical and photo-acoustic properties of gold nanoparticles. When heated by laser pulses, a thin absorption layer made up of these nanoparticles at the cleaved surface of a single mode fiber generates a mechanical shock wave caused by thermal expansion. Mie's theory was applied in a MATLAB simulation to determine the relationship between the absorption efficiency and the optical resonance wavelengths of a layer of gold nanospheres. Results showed that the absorption efficiency and related resonance wavelengths of gold nanospheres varied based on the size of the gold nanosphere particles. In order to obtain the bandwidths associated with ultrasound, another MATLAB simulation was run to study the relationship between the power of the laser being used, the size of the gold nanosphere, and the energy decay time. The results of this and the previous simulation showed that the energy decay time is picoseconds in length.

  15. Optical fiber sensor for the detection of laser-generated ultrasound in arterial tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Paul C.; Mills, Timothy N.

    1995-02-01

    Theoretical and experimental aspects of an extrinsic Fabry-Perot optical fiber ultrasound sensor for use in a photoacoustic-guided laser angioplasty system are described. The sensor has been characterized using laser generated thermoelastic waves as a source of wideband ultrasound. A system sensitivity of 25 mV/MPa and an acoustic noise floor of 2 Pa/Hz1/2 are reported using a transparent polymer film as the sensing element. The system demonstrates the required bandwidth for sensing thermoelastic waves containing frequency components up to 20 MHz.

  16. Decree 2211: Standards to control the generation and handling of dangerous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This Decree has for object to establish the conditions under which should be carried out the activities of generation and handling of dangerous waste, in order to prevent damages to health and to the atmosphere. It includes: definitions; a list of sources of waste; a list of constituent of dangerous waste; the characteristics of danger; a lists of maximum permissible concentrations in leachates, handling of dangerous waste, criterion for transport, monitoring form, storage areas, treatment and final disposition, storage, elimination, incineration, recycling, reuse and recovery, installation and operation of security backfilling, book of waste record, control of activities, obligations in charge of those who manage dangerous waste, and trans border movements of dangerous waste [es

  17. NOx reduction using amine reclaimer wastes (ARW) generated in post combustion CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Botheju, Deshai; Glarborg, Peter; Tokheim, Lars-Andre

    2012-01-01

    Amine reclaimer wastes (ARW) generated in CO2 capture processes demand suitable disposal means. Such wastes contain remaining amine, NH3 and other degradation compounds. This study investigated the potential of using ARW as a NOx reducing agent, under laboratory conditions in a flow reactor....../NO ratios (waste product, together with its demonstrated NOx reduction capability and its calorific value contribution, makes it attractive as an additive...

  18. Management and disposition of off-site laboratory-generated mixed/low level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.L.

    1993-10-01

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) is the first Department of Energy (DOE) site to take back mixed and low level waste generated at commercial laboratories from chemical analyses and treatability studies on samples taken from the site. This paper discusses the steps addressed and the issues resolved in order to initiate the task of taking back mixed/low level waste. Such issues included regulatory, waste management and contractual issues

  19. Baseline for food waste generation - A case study in Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia cafeterias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alias, A. R.; Mokhlis, N. A. Mohd; Zainun, N. Y.

    2017-11-01

    Increasing population and economy status have contributed to the increasing volume of solid wastes produced in Malaysia and it creates problems on the existing solid waste management system. Ineffective waste management system was one of the issues that often discussed. The purpose of this study was to suggest the best method for managing food waste in Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (UTHM) cafeterias. The scope of the study was to identify the type and quantity of waste generated in each cafeteria. The study area was carried out at six cafeteria in UTHM including residential college cafeteria which are Tun Dr. Ismail (TDI), Tun Fatimah (TF) and Tun Syed Nasir (TSN), G3’s cafeteria, Arked, and Dr. Munie’s cafeteria located at the Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering (FKAAS). In this study, food waste was quantified in unit of kilogram (kg). Results of the study showed that total food waste in selected UTHM’s cafeterias was 6197.5 kg for two months. Food waste generated in G3’s cafeteria was the highest value with 1823.5 kg among another cafeteria. This is due to strategic location for students and staff to take meals, the variety of food sold and reasonable price were major factors of generating food waste. Meanwhile, the Dr. Munie's Cafeteria located in FKAAS recorded the least total production of food waste as staffs and students take their meals at others cafeterias. Through literature review, there are list of methods on waste management were identified and composting method was suggested for food waste management in UTHM since the waste was produce in very large quantity.

  20. Outer-selective thin film composite (TFC) hollow fiber membranes for osmotic power generation

    KAUST Repository

    Le, Ngoc Lieu

    2016-01-14

    The pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) process is a green technique for power generation to respond the world\\'s need of energy sustainability. In this study, we have developed the vital component of the process, i.e. membrane, in the configuration of the outer-selective thin-film composite (TFC) hollow fiber, which is more practical than other configurations in the real applications. The support layer morphology and the formation of the selective polyamide layer have been optimized for a good PRO performance. The results show that the bore fluid with higher amount of the solvent N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone leads to full finger-like hollow fibers, which provide higher flux but lower pressure tolerance. The addition of higher amount of diethylene glycol into the dope solution, improves the pore formation and suppresses the macrovoid formation, while properly lowering the take-up speed increases their wall thickness and pressure tolerance. A simple alcohol-pre-wetting approach on the fiber support leads to a smooth and thin polyamide layer, which is favorable for a high water flux and power density. Its efficiency follows this order: n-propanol>ethanol>methanol>water. The n-propanol pre-wetted TFC membrane can tolerate 17 bar with a peak power density of 9.59 W/m2 at room temperature, using 1 M NaCl solution as the draw solution and DI water as feed. This work demonstrates the potential of outer-selective TFC hollow fiber membranes for energy conversion via PRO process, provides useful database to fabricate suitable support morphology and raise a simple technique to practically form a thin and smooth polyamide layer.

  1. Estimating maquiladora hazardous waste generation on the U.S./Mexico border

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Mace M.; Kontuly, Thomas; Hepner, George F.

    1995-03-01

    Maquiladoras, manufacturing plants that primarily assemble foreign components for reexport, are located in concentrations along the northern frontier of the US/Mexico border. These plants process a wide variety of materials using modern industrial technologies within the context of developing world institutions and infrastructure. Hazardous waste generation by maquiladoras represents a critical environmental management issue because of the spatial concentration of these plants in border municipalities where the infrastructure for waste management is nonexistent or poor. These border municipalities contain rapidly increasing populations, which further stress their waste handling infrastructure capacities while exposing their populations to greater contaminant risks. Limited empirical knowledge exists concerning hazardous waste types and generation rates from maquiladorsas. There is no standard reporting method for waste generation or methodology for estimating generation rates at this time. This paper presents a method that can be used for the rapid assessment of hazardous waste generation. A first approximation of hazardous waste generation is produced for maquiladoras in the three municipalities of Nogales, Sonora, Mexicali, Baja California, and Cd. Juarez, Chihuahua, using the INVENT model developed by the World Bank. In addition, our intent is to evaluate the potential of the INVENT model for adaptation to the US/Mexico border industrial situation. The press of border industrial development, especially with the recent adoption of the NAFTA, make such assessments necessary as a basis for the environmental policy formulation and management needed in the immediate future.

  2. Public comments on the draft generic environmental impact statement for management of commercially generated radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreiter, M.R.; Unruh, C.M.; McCallum, R.F.

    1980-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has the responsibility for developing the technology required for managing commercial radioactive wastes in an environmentally acceptable manner. As part of this responsibility, DOE has prepared a draft environmental impact statement on the management of commercially generated radioactive waste. The draft was issued for public comment in April of 1979; five public hearings were held. The draft GEIS is intended to provide environmental input for the selection of an appropriate program strategy for the permanent isolation of commercially generated high-level and transuranic wastes. The scope of such a strategy includes research and development into alternative treatment processes and emplacement media, site investigations into candidate media, and the examination of advanced waste management technologies. The draft statement describes the commercial radioactive wastes that would have to be managed for very long periods of time from an assumed nuclear generation scenario of 10,000 GWe-yr of power over a 65-year period ending in 2040

  3. Feasibility of deep ocean disposal of heat generating waste. V.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemming, C.R.

    1988-06-01

    This report summarises the research performed in the UK during the period 1977 to 1987 as part of the international programme investigating the feasibility of ocean disposal of heat generating radioactive waste. This study has involved: (i) the definition of the disposal operations needed to meet the minimum requirements for safely emplacing waste on or under the floor of the deep ocean; (ii) the identification and characterisation of areas of the deep ocean that might be suitable for containing heat generating waste; (iii) a study of the processes by which radionuclides might migrate through the multiple barriers that isolate the waste from man's environment; and (iv) a calculation of the radiological impact of the conceptual deep ocean repository. It is concluded that, from a technical and scientific viewpoint, disposal of heat generating waste in the deep ocean could provide a safe, economic and feasible alternative to deep disposal on land. (author)

  4. User's manual for applicants proposing on-site burial of self-generated radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolbert, M.E.M.; Loretan, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    This document describes, for medical and research institutions as well as industrial generators of low-level radioactive waste, the NRC or state submittal requirements for authorizing the on-site burial of self-generated radioactive waste. An important part of completing the license application for operation justifying this alternative for waste disposal over other alternatives. Reasons that might be considered acceptable might include the need to dispose of large volumes of low activity waste that would otherwise take up valuable space in commercial sites; the ability to demonstrate that this method of disposal will result in reduced exposures to the public; the ability to show that the prohibitive costs of other methods of disposal would be detrimental to the progress of significant research which generates radioactive waste. 19 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Regeneration of cello-oligomers via selective depolymerization of cellulose fibers derived from printed paper wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, Lee Ken; Pang, Suh Cem; Chin, Suk Fun

    2016-05-20

    Cellulose extracted from printed paper wastes were selectively depolymerized under controlled conditions into cello-oligomers of controllable chain lengths via dissolution in an ionic liquid, 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (AMIMCl), and in the presence of an acid catalyst, Amberlyst 15DRY. The depolymerization process was optimized against reaction temperature, concentration of acid catalyst, and reaction time. Despite rapid initial depolymerization process, the rate of cellulose depolymerization slowed down gradually upon prolonged reaction time, with 75.0 wt% yield of regenerated cello-oligomers (mean Viscosimetric Degree of Polymerization value of 81) obtained after 40 min. The depolymerization of cellulose fibers at 80 °C appeared to proceed via a second-order kinetic reaction with respect to the catalyst concentration of 0.23 mmol H3O(+). As such, the cellulose depolymerization process could afford some degree of control on the degree of polymerization or chain lengths of cello-oligomers formed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dual CARS and SHG image acquisition scheme that combines single central fiber and multimode fiber bundle to collect and differentiate backward and forward generated photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Sheng; Chen, Xu; Xu, Xiaoyun; Wong, Kelvin K.; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2016-01-01

    In coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging, backward and forward generated photons exhibit different image patterns and thus capture salient intrinsic information of tissues from different perspectives. However, they are often mixed in collection using traditional image acquisition methods and thus are hard to interpret. We developed a multimodal scheme using a single central fiber and multimode fiber bundle to simultaneously collect and differentiate images formed by these two types of photons and evaluated the scheme in an endomicroscopy prototype. The ratio of these photons collected was calculated for the characterization of tissue regions with strong or weak epi-photon generation while different image patterns of these photons at different tissue depths were revealed. This scheme provides a new approach to extract and integrate information captured by backward and forward generated photons in dual CARS/SHG imaging synergistically for biomedical applications. PMID:27375938

  7. Methodology for quantification of waste generated in Spanish railway construction works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guzmán Báez, Ana; Villoria Sáez, Paola; del Río Merino, Mercedes; García Navarro, Justo

    2012-05-01

    In the last years, the European Union (EU) has been focused on the reduction of construction and demolition (C&D) waste. Specifically, in 2006, Spain generated roughly 47million tons of C&D waste, of which only 13.6% was recycled. This situation has lead to the drawing up of many regulations on C&D waste during the past years forcing EU countries to include new measures for waste prevention and recycling. Among these measures, the mandatory obligation to quantify the C&D waste expected to be originated during a construction project is mandated. However, limited data is available on civil engineering projects. Therefore, the aim of this research study is to improve C&D waste management in railway projects, by developing a model for C&D waste quantification. For this purpose, we develop two equations which estimate in advance the amount, both in weight and volume, of the C&D waste likely to be generated in railway construction projects, including the category of C&D waste generated for the entire project. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Calcium Ion Removal by KMnO4 Modified Pineapple Leaf Waste Carbon Prepared from Waste of Pineapple Leaf Fiber Production Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumrit Mopoung

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pineapple leaf fiber waste carbon, modified with 3% KMnO4, was used for Ca2+ removal from aqueous solution. The effects of contact time, loading, water hardness, and isotherms on Ca2+ adsorption were studied. The results show that the Ca2+ ion removal by pineapple leaf fiber waste carbon could be improved by modification with KMnO4. The adsorption would reach equilibrium state at about 60 min for a water source with hardness values of 40-200 mg/dm3. Increases in total hardness (40 to 200 mg/dm3 lead to a decrease in Ca2+ ion removal efficiency (90.05% to 37.65% and an increase in Ca2+ ion adsorption capacity at equilibrium (4.37 mg/g to 8.95 mg/g. The Ca2+ removal efficiencies increase with increasing loading of modified waste carbon. The equilibrium data were fitted well by both the Langmuir isotherm and the Freundlich isotherm. For the Langmuir isotherm model, the values of the maximum Ca2+ adsorption capacity and Langmuir constant being 2.81 mg/g and 0.9262 dm3 /g, respectively. On the other hand for the Freundlich isotherm model, the KF and n values are 1.374 dm3 (1/n mg (1-1/n/g and 4.671, respectively. These results indicate that modified pineapple fiber waste carbon is a material with high Ca2+ ion adsorption capacity, heterogeneity, and high affinity.

  9. Program for certification of waste from contained firing facility: Establishment of waste as non-reactive and discussion of potential waste generation problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, L.; Garza, R.; Maienschein, J.; Pruneda, C.

    1997-01-01

    Debris from explosives testing in a shot tank that contains 4 weight percent or less of explosive is shown to be non-reactive under the specified testing protocol in the Code of Federal Regulations. This debris can then be regarded as a non-hazardous waste on the basis of reactivity, when collected and packaged in a specified manner. If it is contaminated with radioactive components (e.g. depleted uranium), it can therefore be disposed of as radioactive waste or mixed waste, as appropriate (note that debris may contain other materials that render it hazardous, such as beryllium). We also discuss potential waste generation issues in contained firing operations that are applicable to the planned new Contained Firing Facility (CFF). The goal of this program is to develop and document conditions under which shot debris from the planned Contained Firing Facility (CFF) can be handled, shipped, and accepted for waste disposal as non-reactive radioactive or mixed waste. This report fulfills the following requirements as established at the outset of the program: 1. Establish through testing the maximum level of explosive that can be in a waste and still have it certified as non-reactive. 2. Develop the procedure to confirm the acceptability of radioactive-contaminated debris as non-reactive waste at radioactive waste disposal sites. 3. Outline potential disposal protocols for different CFF scenarios (e.g. misfires with scattered explosive)

  10. Comparative assessment of the environmental impact of wastes from electricity generation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, C.; Smith, G.M.; Linsley, G.; Hossain, S.

    1994-01-01

    The paper describes an outline methodology for assessing and comparing the environmental impact arising from management of the wastes from nuclear and other electricity generation systems. The assessment framework is applicable to wastes from all generation systems, including nuclear, fossil and renewable fuel systems, and can also be applied to the management of mixed hazardous waste. The major energy technologies in terms of waste production can be classified according to three major categories of fuels: fossil, nuclear and renewable. The emphasis in this description is on nuclear utility low-level and mixed wastes and waste streams. The methodology may be used to support the project on Data Bases and Methodologies for Comparative Assessment of Different Energy Sources for Electricity Generation (DECADES project, (2)) which is being developed by the International Atomic Energy Agency in collaboration with other international agencies. The DECADES project has the overall objective to improve the abilities for comparative assessment of energy chains for electricity generation. The objective of a methodology such as that described here is to ensure that waste management aspects are included effectively in comparative assessments of energy systems. This paper discusses the waste strams arising from nuclear power plants

  11. Methodology of site generation for evaluation of the behaviour of radioactive waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz Rivas, C.; Eguilior Diez, S.

    1997-01-01

    The present report summarizes the purpose of methodology for the site generation in the evaluation of high-level radioactive waste storage for long-term. This work is developed into the project Safety analysis long-term of high-level radioactive waste. This project is carried on for CIEMAT and ENRESA

  12. Healthcare waste management in Uganda: management and generation rates in public and private hospitals in Kampala

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugambe, R.K.; Ssempebwa, J.C.; Tumwesigye, N.M.; Vliet, van B.J.M.; Adedimeji, A.

    2012-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to assess the management, characteristics and generation of healthcare waste (HCW) in public and private hospitals in Kampala City, Uganda. Methods We employed mainly qualitative methods through the use of a waste inventory, observations, document review and key

  13. The situation of generation, treatment and supervision of common industrial solid wastes in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shumin

    2018-02-01

    From the point of view of location and sources, an analysis is done for the generation, utilization, treatment and storage of common industrial solid wastes in China. Based on the current situations, suggestions are given to the treatment and supervision polices in China for the utilization of common industrial solid wastes.

  14. Generation of 70-fs pulses at 286 μm from a mid-infrared fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, R. I.; Hudson, D. D.; Fuerbach, A.; Jackson, S. D.

    2017-12-01

    We propose and demonstrate a simple route to few-optical-cycle pulse generation from a mid-infrared fiber laser through nonlinear compression of pulses from a holmium-doped fiber oscillator using a short length of chalcogenide fiber and a grating pair. Pulses from the oscillator with 265-fs duration at 2.86 {\\mu}m are spectrally broadened through self-phase modulation in step-index As2S3 fiber to 141-nm bandwidth and then re-compressed to 70 fs (7.3 optical cycles). These are the shortest pulses from a mid-infrared fiber system to date, and we note that our system is compact, robust, and uses only commercially available components. The scalability of this approach is also discussed, supported by numerical modeling.

  15. Mechanical and Morphological Properties of Waste Short Nylon Fibers and Nanoclay Reinforced NR/SBR Rubber Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Andideh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural rubber and styrene butadiene rubber (NR/SBR reinforced with short nylon fibers along with nanoclay (Cloisite 15A hybrid composites were prepared in an internal and a two roll-mill mixer by a three-step mixingprocess. The effects of fiber content at a constant loading of 3 wt% nanoclay were studied on the microstructure, mechanical and morphological properties of the prepared nanocomposites. The adhesion between the fiber and the rubber was enhanced by the addition of a dry bonding system consisting of resorcinol, hexamethylene tetramine and hydrated silica (HRH. The curing characteristics of the composites were determined and subsequently vulcanized at 150°C using a hot press. It was observed that the cure time and swelling index of the composites decreased while maximum torque, and cure rate increased with increasing of short fiber and nanoclay contents. Thestructure and fracture surface morphology of the nanocomposites were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction results of nanocomposites indicated that the interlayer distance of silicate layers increased. The mechanical properties (tensile, tear strength, elongation-at-break and hardness ofnanocomposites containing virgin and waste fibers in the longitudinal direction are compared.

  16. The S-curve for forecasting waste generation in construction projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Weisheng; Peng, Yi; Chen, Xi; Skitmore, Martin; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2016-10-01

    Forecasting construction waste generation is the yardstick of any effort by policy-makers, researchers, practitioners and the like to manage construction and demolition (C&D) waste. This paper develops and tests an S-curve model to indicate accumulative waste generation as a project progresses. Using 37,148 disposal records generated from 138 building projects in Hong Kong in four consecutive years from January 2011 to June 2015, a wide range of potential S-curve models are examined, and as a result, the formula that best fits the historical data set is found. The S-curve model is then further linked to project characteristics using artificial neural networks (ANNs) so that it can be used to forecast waste generation in future construction projects. It was found that, among the S-curve models, cumulative logistic distribution is the best formula to fit the historical data. Meanwhile, contract sum, location, public-private nature, and duration can be used to forecast construction waste generation. The study provides contractors with not only an S-curve model to forecast overall waste generation before a project commences, but also with a detailed baseline to benchmark and manage waste during the course of construction. The major contribution of this paper is to the body of knowledge in the field of construction waste generation forecasting. By examining it with an S-curve model, the study elevates construction waste management to a level equivalent to project cost management where the model has already been readily accepted as a standard tool. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Is It Better to Burn or Bury Waste for Clean Electricity Generation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The generation of electricity through renewables has increased 5% since 2002. Although considerably less prominent than solar and wind, the use of municipal solid waste (MSW) to generate electricity represents roughly 14 percent of U.S. non-hydro renewable electricity generation....

  18. Review, mapping and analysis of the agricultural plastic waste generation and consolidation in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briassoulis, Demetres; Babou, Epifania; Hiskakis, Miltiadis; Scarascia, Giacomo; Picuno, Pietro; Guarde, Dorleta; Dejean, Cyril

    2013-12-01

    A review of agricultural plastic waste generation and consolidation in Europe is presented. A detailed geographical mapping of the agricultural plastic use and waste generation in Europe was conducted focusing on areas of high concentration of agricultural plastics. Quantitative data and analysis of the agricultural plastic waste generation by category, geographical distribution and compositional range, and physical characteristics of the agricultural plastic waste per use and the temporal distribution of the waste generation are presented. Data were collected and cross-checked from a variety of sources, including European, national and regional services and organizations, local agronomists, retailers and farmers, importers and converters. Missing data were estimated indirectly based on the recorded cultivated areas and the characteristics of the agricultural plastics commonly used in the particular regions. The temporal distribution, the composition and physical characteristics of the agricultural plastic waste streams were mapped by category and by application. This study represents the first systematic effort to map and analyse agricultural plastic waste generation and consolidation in Europe.

  19. Generation of Electricity from Abattoir Waste Water with the Aid of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    Generation of Electricity from Abattoir Waste Water with the Aid of a Relatively Cheap. Source of Catholyte ... in recent times is the microbial fuel cell technology. This technology ..... fuel cell in the presence and absence of a proton exchange.

  20. Factors contributing to the waste generation in building projects of Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, N.A.; Memon, F.A.

    2016-01-01

    Generation of construction waste is a worldwide issue that concerns not only governments but also the building actors involved in construction industry. For developing countries like Pakistan, rising levels of waste generation, due to the rapid growth of towns and cities have become critical issue. Therefore this study is aimed to detect the factors, which are the main causes of construction waste generation. Questionnaire survey has been conducted to achieve this task and RIW (Relative Importance Weight) method has been used to analyze the results of this study. The important factors contributing to the generation of construction as identified in this study are: frequent changes/ revision in design during construction process; poor scheduling; unavailability of storage; poor workmanship; poor layout; inefficient planning and scheduling of resources and lack of coordination among supervision staff deployed at site. Based on the identified factors, the study also has presented some suggestions for the reduction of construction waste in building construction projects of Pakistan. (author)

  1. Optical Fiber Demodulation System with High Performance for Assessing Fretting Damage of Steam Generator Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peijian Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to access the fretting damage of the steam generator tube (SGT, a fast fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P non-scanning correlation demodulation system based on a super luminescent light emitting diode (SLED was performed. By demodulating the light signal coming out from the F-P force sensor, the radial collision force between the SGT and the tube support plate (TSP was interrogated. For higher demodulation accuracy, the effects of the center wavelength, bandwidth, and spectrum noise of SLED were discussed in detail. Specially, a piezoelectric ceramic transducer (PZT modulation method was developed to get rid of the interference of mode coupling induced by different types of fiber optics in the demodulation system. The reflectivity of optical wedge and F-P sensor was optimized. Finally, the demodulation system worked well in a 1:1 steam generator test loop and successfully demodulated a force signal of 32 N with a collision time of 2 ms.

  2. Gas generation by self-radiolysis of tritiated waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadlock, W.E.; Abell, G.C.; Steinmeyer, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Studies simulating the effect of self-radiolysis in disposal packages containing tritiated waste materials show hydrogen to be the dominant gas-phase product. Pressure buildup and gas composition over various tritiated octane and tritiated water samples are designed to give worst case results. One effect of tritium fixation agents is to reduce pressure buildup. The results show that development of explosive gas mixtures is unlikely and that maximum pressure buildup in typical Mound Facility waste packages can be expected to be <0.25 MPa

  3. Treatment systems for liquid wastes generated in chemical analysis laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linda Berrio; Oscar Beltran; Edison Agudelo; Santiago Cardona

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, handling of liquid wastes from chemical analysis laboratories is posing problems to different public and private organizations because of its requirements of an integrated management. This article reviews various treatment technologies and its removal efficiencies in order to establish criteria for selecting the system and the appropriate variables to achieve research objectives as well as environmental sustainability. Review begins with a description of the problem and continues with the study of treatments for laboratory wastes. These technologies are segregated into physicochemical and biological treatments that comprise a variety of processes, some of which are considered in this review.

  4. Newly invented biobased materials from low-carbon, diverted waste fibers: research methods, testing, and full-scale application in a case study structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julee A Herdt; John Hunt; Kellen Schauermann

    2016-01-01

    This project demonstrates newly invented, biobased construction materials developed by applying lowcarbon, biomass waste sources through the Authors’ engineered fiber processes and technology. If manufactured and applied large-scale the project inventions can divert large volumes of cellulose waste into high-performance, low embodied energy, environmental construction...

  5. Strategic analysis of biomass and waste fuels for electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiltsee, G.A. Jr.; Easterly, J.; Vence, T.

    1993-12-01

    In this report, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) intends to help utility companies evaluate biomass and wastes for power generation. These fuels may be alternatives or supplements to fossil fuels in three applications: (1) utility boiler coining; (2) dedicated combustion/energy recovery plants; and 3) dedicated gasification/combined cycle plants. The report summarizes data on biomass and waste properties, and evaluates the cost and performance of fuel preparation and power generation technologies. The primary biomass and waste resources evaluated are: (1) wood wastes (from forests, mills, construction/demolition, and orchards) and short rotation woody crops; (2) agricultural wastes (from fields, animals, and processing) and herbaceous energy crops; and (3) consumer or industrial wastes (e.g., municipal solid waste, scrap tires, sewage sludge, auto shredder waste). The major fuel types studied in detail are wood, municipal solid waste, and scrap tires. The key products of the project include the BIOPOWER model of biomass/waste-fired power plant performance and cost. Key conclusions of the evaluation are: (1) significant biomass and waste fuel resources are available; (2) biomass power technology cannot currently compete with natural gas-fired combined cycle technology; (3) coining biomass and waste fuels with coal in utility and industrial boilers is the most efficient, lowest cost, and lowest risk method of energy recovery from residual materials; (4) better biomass and waste fuel production and conversion technology must be developed, with the help of coordinated government energy and environmental policies and incentives; and (5) community partnerships can enhance the chances for success of a project

  6. Extension of supercontinuum spectrum, generated in polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber, using chirped femtosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengelis, Julius; Jarutis, Vygandas; Sirutkaitis, Valdas

    2018-01-01

    We present results of experimental and numerical investigation of supercontinuum (SC) generation in polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber (PCF) using chirped femtosecond pulses. The initial unchirped pump pulse source was a mode-locked Yb:KGW laser generating 52-nJ energy, 110-fs duration pulses at 1030 nm with a 76-MHz repetition rate. The nonlinear medium was a 32-cm-long polarization-maintaining PCF manufactured by NKT Photonics A/S. We demonstrated the influence of pump pulse chirp on spectral characteristics of a SC. We showed that by chirping pump pulses positively or negatively one can obtain a broader SC spectrum than in the case of unchirped pump pulses at the same peak power. Moreover, the extension can be controlled by changing the amount of pump pulse chirp. Numerical simulation results also indicated that pump pulse chirp yields an extension of SC spectrum.

  7. Comparative study of municipal solid waste generation and composition in Shiraz city (2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Norouzian Baghani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exponential growths of population and urbanization, and the development of social economy have resulted in an increase in the amount of MSW generation throughout the world. Objective: The present study aimed to survey qualitative and quantitative analysis of solid waste in Shiraz city and comparative these results with the world scenario of solid wastes generation for improving the sustainable management of solid waste. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 in nine municipality regions Shiraz with a total population of approximately 1,549,354 people. Basic data was gathered through Shiraz waste management organization. Then generation (per capita and constituent percent of the solid waste were evaluated based on the sampling and field analyzing from reliable guidelines. Data were analyzed with Stata-13 and Excel statistical software. Kolmogorov-Smirnov test used for the normality of variables. Means were compared by Student T test and Mann-Whitney test. Findings: The rate of solid waste generated in the Shiraz city was 222.65 kg per person per year in 2014. Statistical analysis showed that the variables of organic materials, paper and cardboard, glass and metal between developed and developing countries were a significant difference (P0.05. Conclusion: Solid waste per capita in Shiraz city (about 600 g/day was near to the average amount of solid waste generation in Iran and other developing countries. Due to the high content of organic material in municipal solid waste of Shiraz, minimization of these material and separation of dry and wet solid wastes must be noted from the people and municipalities.

  8. Testing various types of agricultural wastes for the production of generator gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjellstroem, B

    1982-05-08

    The aim of the project was to get an improved basis for the assessment of aretes which was required for use in a Swedish gas generator. It was found that waste which possessed high contents of ashes with a low melting point were unsuitable as a fuel. Four types of waste were tested. The shells of coconuts were applicable as fuel. The design of the generator had to be modified in order to use pellets of straw or compressed sugar-canes.

  9. Scheme for generating the singlet state of three atoms trapped in distant cavities coupled by optical fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dong-Yang [Department of Physics, College of Science, Yanbian University, Yanji, Jilin 133002 (China); Wen, Jing-Ji [College of Foundation Science, Harbin University of Commerce, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150028 (China); Bai, Cheng-Hua; Hu, Shi; Cui, Wen-Xue [Department of Physics, College of Science, Yanbian University, Yanji, Jilin 133002 (China); Wang, Hong-Fu, E-mail: hfwang@ybu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, College of Science, Yanbian University, Yanji, Jilin 133002 (China); Zhu, Ai-Dong [Department of Physics, College of Science, Yanbian University, Yanji, Jilin 133002 (China); Zhang, Shou, E-mail: szhang@ybu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, College of Science, Yanbian University, Yanji, Jilin 133002 (China)

    2015-09-15

    An effective scheme is proposed to generate the singlet state with three four-level atoms trapped in three distant cavities connected with each other by three optical fibers, respectively. After a series of appropriate atom–cavity interactions, which can be arbitrarily controlled via the selective pairing of Raman transitions and corresponding optical switches, a three-atom singlet state can be successfully generated. The influence of atomic spontaneous decay, photon leakage of cavities and optical fibers on the fidelity of the state is numerically simulated showing that the three-atom singlet state can be generated with high fidelity by choosing the experimental parameters appropriately.

  10. Generation of infrared supercontinuum radiation: spatial mode dispersion and higher-order mode propagation in ZBLAN step-index fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsay, Jacob Søndergaard; Dupont, Sune Vestergaard Lund; Johansen, Mikkel Willum

    2013-01-01

    Using femtosecond upconversion we investigate the time and wavelength structure of infrared supercontinuum generation. It is shown that radiation is scattered into higher order spatial modes (HOMs) when generating a supercontinuum using fibers that are not single-moded, such as a step-index ZBLAN...... fiber. As a consequence of intermodal scattering and the difference in group velocity for the modes, the supercontinuum splits up spatially and temporally. Experimental results indicate that a significant part of the radiation propagates in HOMs. Conventional simulations of super-continuum generation do...

  11. Evaluation of interim and final waste forms for the newly generated liquid low-level waste flowsheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abotsi, G.M.K.; Bostick, D.T.; Beck, D.E.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this review is to evaluate the final forms that have been proposed for radioactive-containing solid wastes and to determine their application to the solid wastes that will result from the treatment of newly generated liquid low-level waste (NGLLLW) and Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) supernate at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Since cesium and strontium are the predominant radionuclides in NGLLLW and MVST supernate, this review is focused on the stabilization and solidification of solid wastes containing these radionuclides in cement, glass, and polymeric materials-the principal waste forms that have been tested with these types of wastes. Several studies have shown that both cesium and strontium are leached by distilled water from solidified cement, although the leachabilities of cesium are generally higher than those of strontium under similar conditions. The situation is exacerbated by the presence of sulfates in the solution, as manifested by cracking of the grout. Additives such as bentonite, blast-furnace slag, fly ash, montmorillonite, pottery clay, silica, and zeolites generally decrease the cesium and strontium release rates. Longer cement curing times (>28 d) and high ionic strengths of the leachates, such as those that occur in seawater, also decrease the leach rates of these radionuclides. Lower cesium leach rates are observed from vitrified wastes than from grout waste forms. However, significant quantities of cesium are volatilized due to the elevated temperatures required to vitrify the waste. Hence, vitrification will generally require the use of cleanup systems for the off-gases to prevent their release into the atmosphere

  12. CAN WE CONSIDER WASTES GENERATED DURING RADIOIMMUNOASSAYS AS A RADIOACTIVE WASTE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Shapilov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The work presents issues of the radiation protection provision for the management of radioactive waste produced by the radioimmunological analysis with the use of 125I marker, calculated and experimental data on radioactive waste specific activities are analyzed.

  13. Generation of infrared supercontinuum radiation: spatial mode dispersion and higher-order mode propagation in ZBLAN step-index fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsay, Jacob Søndergaard; Dupont, Sune Vestergaard Lund; Johansen, Mikkel Willum

    2013-01-01

    Using femtosecond upconversion we investigate the time and wavelength structure of infrared supercontinuum generation. It is shown that radiation is scattered into higher order spatial modes (HOMs) when generating a supercontinuum using fibers that are not single-moded, such as a step-index ZBLAN...... not include scattering into HOMs, and including this provides an extra degree of freedom for tailoring supercontinuum sources....

  14. the development of new generation of solid waste refuse incinerators

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Apart from town refuse, there are wastes from agriculturally based industries especially ... depends on careful control of the 3T's (time, temperature and turbulence). ... These activities cause serious public health risks ... The modifications to the old bottle incinerators were developed by carefully assessing the failure modes.

  15. National profile on commercially generated low-level radioactive mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J.A.; Mrochek, J.E.; Jolley, R.L.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Francis, A.A.; Wright, T.

    1992-12-01

    This report details the findings and conclusions drawn from a survey undertaken as part of a joint US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and US Environmental Protection Agency-sponsored project entitled ''National Profile on Commercially Generated Low-Level Radioactive Mixed Waste.'' The overall objective of the work was to compile a national profile on the volumes, characteristics, and treatability of commercially generated low-level mixed waste for 1990 by five major facility categories-academic, industrial, medical, and NRC-/Agreement State-licensed goverment facilities and nuclear utilities. Included in this report are descriptions of the methodology used to collect and collate the data, the procedures used to estimate the mixed waste generation rate for commercial facilities in the United States in 1990, and the identification of available treatment technologies to meet applicable EPA treatment standards (40 CFR Part 268) and, if possible, to render the hazardous component of specific mixed waste streams nonhazardous. The report also contains information on existing and potential commercial waste treatment facilities that may provide treatment for specific waste streams identified in the national survey. The report does not include any aspect of the Department of Energy's (DOES) management of mixed waste and generally does not address wastes from remedial action activities

  16. National profile on commercially generated low-level radioactive mixed waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J.A.; Mrochek, J.E.; Jolley, R.L.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Francis, A.A.; Wright, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-12-01

    This report details the findings and conclusions drawn from a survey undertaken as part of a joint US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and US Environmental Protection Agency-sponsored project entitled ``National Profile on Commercially Generated Low-Level Radioactive Mixed Waste.`` The overall objective of the work was to compile a national profile on the volumes, characteristics, and treatability of commercially generated low-level mixed waste for 1990 by five major facility categories-academic, industrial, medical, and NRC-/Agreement State-licensed goverment facilities and nuclear utilities. Included in this report are descriptions of the methodology used to collect and collate the data, the procedures used to estimate the mixed waste generation rate for commercial facilities in the United States in 1990, and the identification of available treatment technologies to meet applicable EPA treatment standards (40 CFR Part 268) and, if possible, to render the hazardous component of specific mixed waste streams nonhazardous. The report also contains information on existing and potential commercial waste treatment facilities that may provide treatment for specific waste streams identified in the national survey. The report does not include any aspect of the Department of Energy`s (DOES) management of mixed waste and generally does not address wastes from remedial action activities.

  17. Fresh, frozen, or ambient food equivalents and their impact on food waste generation in Dutch households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Anke M; Nijenhuis-de Vries, Mariska A; Boer, Eric P J; Kremer, Stefanie

    2017-09-01

    In Europe, it is estimated that more than 50% of total food waste - of which most is avoidable - is generated at household level. Little attention has been paid to the impact on food waste generation of consuming food products that differ in their method of food preservation. This exploratory study surveyed product-specific possible impacts of different methods of food preservation on food waste generation in Dutch households. To this end, a food waste index was calculated to enable relative comparisons of the amounts of food waste from the same type of foods with different preservation methods on an annual basis. The results show that, for the majority of frozen food equivalents, smaller amounts were wasted compared to their fresh or ambient equivalents. The waste index (WI) proposed in the current paper confirms the hypothesis that it may be possible to reduce the amount of food waste at household level by encouraging Dutch consumers to use (certain) foods more frequently in a frozen form (instead of fresh or ambient). However, before this approach can be scaled to population level, a more detailed understanding of the underlying behavioural causes with regard to food provisioning and handling and possible interactions is required. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Westinghouse Hanford Company plan for certifying newly generated contact -- handled transuranic waste. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, R.M.; Backlund, E.G.

    1995-09-01

    All transuranic (TRU) waste generators are required by US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A to package their TRU waste in order to comply wit the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) -- Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) or keep non-certifiable containers segregated. The Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Transuranic Waste Certification Plan was developed to ensure that TRU newly generated waste at WHC meets the DOE Order 5820.2A and the WHC-WAC which includes the State of Washington Department of Ecology -- Washington Administrative Code (DOE-WAC). The metho used at WHC to package TRU waste are described in sufficient detail to meet the regulations. This document is organized to provide a brief overview of waste generation operations at WHC. The methods used to implement this plan are discussed briefly along with the responsibilities and authorities of applicable organizations. This plan describes how WHC complies with all applicable regulations and requirements set forth in the latest approved revision of WHC-EP-0063-4

  19. Status and integration of studies of gas generation in Hanford wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to review recent progress in determining the mechanism, kinetics, and stoichiometry of gas generation in Hanford waste tanks. Information has been gathered from the results of (1) laboratory studies with simulated wastes; (2) laboratory studies with actual waste core samples (Tanks SY-101 and SY-103); (3) studies of thermal and radiolytic reactions in the gas phase; (4) gas solubility evaluations; and (5) in-tank gas composition data. The results of laboratory studies using simulated wastes, which were aimed at determining chemical mechanisms responsible for gas generation, are summarized in Section 2. Emphasized are findings from work performed at the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), which was conducted under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and completed in FY 1996. Thermally activated pathways for the decomposition of hydroxyethylethylene-diaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA, trisodium salt) in simulated wastes were established by this work, among other accomplishments

  20. Generation of organic waste from institutions in Denmark: case study of the Technical University of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edjabou, Maklawe Essonanawe; Boldrin, Alessio; Scheutz, Charlotte

    at least 60% of organic waste – that cannot be prevented or reduced –generated by service sector, should be source-segregated and collected separately. In order to establish the baseline of the current situation, and to allow for any evaluation of performance against target indicators, data on solid waste...... generation and composition are required. The overall aim of this study was to quantify the potential for source-segregated organic waste as well as mixed waste from institution. This study was carried at the Department of Environmental Engineering at Technical University of Denmark. In the course...... and public holidays, when the offices were officially closed. Furthermore, the composition of source-segregated organic waste was analysed to investigate its purity. During the sampling period, the number of employees coming to work at the department was recorded. These data were used to investigate any...

  1. Modeling Hydrogen Generation Rates in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camaioni, Donald M.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Hallen, Richard T.; Sherwood, David J.; Stock, Leon M.

    2004-03-29

    This presentation describes a project in which Hanford Site and Environmental Management Science Program investigators addressed issues concerning hydrogen generation rates in the Hanford waste treatment and immobilization plant. The hydrogen generation rates of radioactive wastes must be estimated to provide for safe operations. While an existing model satisfactorily predicts rates for quiescent wastes in Hanford underground storage tanks, pretreatment operations will alter the conditions and chemical composition of these wastes. Review of the treatment process flowsheet identified specific issues requiring study to ascertain whether the model would provide conservative values for waste streams in the plant. These include effects of adding hydroxide ion, alpha radiolysis, saturation with air (oxygen) from pulse-jet mixing, treatment with potassium permanganate, organic compounds from degraded ion exchange resins and addition of glass-former chemicals. The effects were systematically investigated through literature review, technical analyses and experimental work.

  2. Status and integration of studies of gas generation in Hanford wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to review recent progress in determining the mechanism, kinetics, and stoichiometry of gas generation in Hanford waste tanks. Information has been gathered from the results of (1) laboratory studies with simulated wastes; (2) laboratory studies with actual waste core samples (Tanks SY-101 and SY-103); (3) studies of thermal and radiolytic reactions in the gas phase; (4) gas solubility evaluations; and (5) in-tank gas composition data. The results of laboratory studies using simulated wastes, which were aimed at determining chemical mechanisms responsible for gas generation, are summarized in Section 2. Emphasized are findings from work performed at the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), which was conducted under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and completed in FY 1996. Thermally activated pathways for the decomposition of hydroxyethylethylene-diaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA, trisodium salt) in simulated wastes were established by this work, among other accomplishments.

  3. A Basic Accounting of Variation in Municipal Solid-Waste Generation at the County Level in Texas, 2006: Groundwork for Applying Metabolic-Rift Theory to Waste Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Matthew Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Environmental social scientists debate whether or not modern development reduces society's impact on the biosphere. The empirical research informing the discussion has not yet adequately examined the social determinants of municipal solid-waste (MSW) generation, an increasingly relevant issue, both ecologically and sociologically. A primary…

  4. A model of gas generation and transport within TRU [transuranic] waste drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, F.G. III.

    1987-01-01

    Gas generation from the radiolytic decomposition of organic material contaminated with plutonium is modeled. Concentrations of gas throughout the waste drum are determined using a diffusional transport model. The model accurately reproduces experimentally measured gas concentrations. With polyethylene waste in unvented drums, the model predicts that hydrogen gas can accumulate to concentrations greater than 4 mole percent (lower flammable limit) with about 5 Ci of plutonium. Polyethylene provides a worst case for combustible waste material. If the drum liner is punctured and a carbon composite filter vent is installed in the drum lid, the plutonium loading can be increased to 240 Ci without generating flammable gas mixtures. 5 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Gas generation from radiolytic attack of TRU-contaminated hydrogenous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerwekh, A.

    1979-06-01

    In 1970, the Waste Management and Transportation Division of the Atomic Energy Commission ordered a segregation of transuranic (TRU)-contaminated solid wastes. Those below a contamination level of 10 nCi/g could still be buried; those above had to be stored retrievably for 20 y. The possibility that alpha-radiolysis of hydrogenous materials might produce toxic, corrosive, and flammable gases in retrievably stored waste prompted an investigation of gas identities and generation rates in the laboratory and field. Typical waste mixtures were synthesized and contaminated for laboratory experiments, and drums of actual TRU-contaminated waste were instrumented for field testing. Several levels of contamination were studied, as well as pressure, temperature, and moisture effects. G (gas) values were determined for various waste matrices, and degradation products were examined

  6. Consumption patterns and household hazardous solid waste generation in an urban settlement in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado Otoniel, Buenrostro; Liliana, Marquez-Benavides; Gaona Francelia, Pinette

    2008-01-01

    Mexico is currently facing a crisis in the waste management field. Some efforts have just commenced in urban and in rural settlements, e.g., conversion of open dumps into landfills, a relatively small composting culture, and implementation of source separation and plastic recycling strategies. Nonetheless, the high heterogeneity of components in the waste, many of these with hazardous properties, present the municipal collection services with serious problems, due to the risks to the health of the workers and to the impacts to the environment as a result of the inadequate disposition of these wastes. A generation study in the domestic sector was undertaken with the aim of finding out the composition and the generation rate of household hazardous waste (HHW) produced at residences. Simultaneously to the generation study, a socioeconomic survey was applied to determine the influence of income level on the production of HHW. Results from the solid waste generation analysis indicated that approximately 1.6% of the waste stream consists of HHW. Correspondingly, it was estimated that in Morelia, a total amount of 442 ton/day of domestic waste are produced, including 7.1 ton of HHW per day. Furthermore, the overall amount of HHW is not directly related to income level, although particular byproducts do correlate. However, an important difference was observed, as the brands and the presentation sizes of goods and products used in each socioeconomic stratum varied

  7. THE PILOT STUDY OF CHARACTERISTICS OF HOUSEHOLD WASTE GENERATED IN SUBURBAN PARTS OF RURAL AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Steinhoff-Wrześniewska

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the studies were waste generated in suburban households, in 3-bag system. The sum of wastes generated during the four analyzed seasons (spring, summer, autumn, winter – 1 year, in the households under study, per 1 person, amounted to 170,3 kg (in wet mass basis. For 1 person, most domestic waste was generated in autumn – 45,5 kg per capita and the least in winter – 39,0 kg per capita. The analysis performed of sieved composition (size fraction showed that fractions: >100 mm, 40–100 mm, 20–40 mm constituted totally 80% of the mass of wastes (average in a year. The lowest fraction (<10 mm, whose significant part constitutes ashes, varied depending on the season of year: from 3.5% to 12.8%. In the morphological composition of the households analyzed (on average in 4 seasons, biowastes totally formed over 53% of the whole mass of wastes. A significant part of waste generated were also glass waste (10,7% average per year and disposable nappies (8,3% average per year. The analysis of basic chemical components of biowastes showed that in case of utilizing them for production of compost, it would be necessary to modify (correct the ratios C/N and C/P. Analysis of the chemical composition showed that the biowastes were characterized by very high moisture content and neutral pH.

  8. Radioactive waste generation in the nuclear reactors in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, I.V.

    2002-01-01

    The successful use of nuclear fission as major source of energy for this century is based upon the technological capabilities acquired to face the issue of radioactive waste and spent fuel. The management of radioactive waste is complex and implies solving the following major problems: - isolation of the radioisotopes from the complex of effluents released in the environment; - processing the separated radioisotopes for subsequent storing and final disposal; - transport of processed and conditioned wastes towards disposal repository; - selecting the sites for storage and final disposal. During reactor operation liquid and gaseous effluents are released to the environment as well as radioactive materials. All these may have an dangerous impact upon the environment when the international regulations, i.e. the ALARA principle are not strictly observed. The maximal values for the radioactive release are established by national regulations which are concordant with the IAEA principles. The amount of radioactive materials released depends of the reactor type and the measures adopted to reduce these releases. The average values of these releases during the normal operation of the reactor constitute the 'source term'. Its calculation implies several factors such as: the reactor type; the radionuclide concentration in the primary cooling systems; the transport mechanisms and leaks resulting in liquid and gaseous radionuclide emissions; the efficiency of the barriers and engineered safety systems built to reduce the amounts of radionuclide in the effluents. The concentration of radionuclides in the primary cooling circuit depends on the reactor power level, fuel burnup, fuel sheath type, tightness of the fuel cans, impurity concentration, chemical additives in the fluid of the primary cooling system, the total volume of this fluid, as well as its purification system. The methods applied to facilitate the calculation of the source term are described. In 1998 the spent fuel

  9. Landfill gas generation and emission at danish waste disposal sites receiving waste with a low organic waste content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mou, Zishen; Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    and street cleansing waste) and temporarily stored combustible waste were sampled and characterized in terms of TS, VS, TC, TOC, and biochemical methane potential (BMP). Decay rates (k values), were determined by conducting anaerobic degradation experiments and applying FOD equations to the experimental...

  10. Kinetics of transit and degradation of the fiber from guinea grass silages enriched with waste from soybean pre-cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Ton Fialho

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to study the kinetics of transit and degradation of the fiber from guinea grass and the waste from soybean pre-cleaning (WSPC, ensiled with different proportions of mass (0, 100, 150, and 200 g WSPC/kg total mass. Four crossbred (Gyr × Holstein, fistulated cattle with an average body mass of 400±50 kg were organized in a 4 × 4 Latin square experimental design. The fiber utilized in the study of the transit kinetics was stained with chromium mordant, whereas the in situ technique was adopted for the degradation kinetics. The level of inclusion of WSPC only affected the true digestibility and the mean retention time. The addition of waste from soybean pre-cleaning to the silage of guinea grass is beneficial, in terms of kinetics of digestion and passage, at up to levels close to 100 g/kg, because after this quantity the fiber digestion and passage in and through the reticulo-rumen are impaired and there may be alterations in the ruminal environment that will affect the use of silage by animals.

  11. The thermo-mechanical behaviour of a salt dome with a heat-generating waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, L.G.J.; Prij, J.; Kevenaar, J.W.A.M.; Jong, C.J.T.; Klok, J.; Beemsterboer, C.

    1984-01-01

    This report reviews the analytical work on the disposal of radioactive waste in salt domes performed at ECN in the period 1 January 1980 to 31 December 1982. Chapter 4 in the main report covers the global temperature and deformation analyses of the salt dome and the surrounding rocks. The attached three topical reports cover self-contained parts of the study. The computer program TASTE developed to analyse, at acceptable cost and with, for engineering purposes, sufficient accuracies, the temperature rises in the salt dome due to the stored heat-generating waste is described in Annex 1. Annex 2 gives a description of the extended finite element program GOLIA. The program has been extended to make it suitable for the creep analysis of salt domes with repositories of heat-generating waste. The study on the closing and sealing of boreholes wit heat-generating waste is reported in Annex 3

  12. Second generation waste package design and storage concept for the Yucca Mountain Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armijo, Joseph Sam; Kar, Piyush; Misra, Manoranjan

    2006-01-01

    The reference waste package design and operating mode to be used in the Yucca Mountain Repository is reviewed. An alternate (second generation) operating concept and waste package design is proposed to reduce the risk of localized corrosion of waste packages and to reduce repository costs. The second generation waste package design and storage concept is proposed for implementation after the initial licensing and operation of the reference repository design. Implementation of the second generation concept at Yucca Mountain would follow regulatory processes analogous to those used successfully to extend the design life and uprate the power of commercial light water nuclear reactors in the United States. The second generation concept utilizes the benefits of hot dry storage to minimize the potential for localized corrosion of the waste package by liquid electrolytes. The second generation concept permits major reductions in repository costs by increasing the number of fuel assemblies stored in each waste package, by eliminating the need for titanium drip shields and by fabricating the outer container from corrosion resistant low alloy carbon steel

  13. Generation and management of solid waste resulting from tourist activities of the Porto de Galinhas - P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Guimarães Santos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The significant solid waste generation, coupled with the lack of proper management of the waste generated, has been one of the issues of concern and conducting research on the part of scholars in the field. Tourism as an activity that positively impacts and negativity a given location, has emerged as an activity that can generate a lot of waste, especially in periods of high season, considering the increase of people moving to the tourist destinations. Accordingly, this study aims to analyze the generation and management of solid waste resulting from tourism in Porto de Galinhas, PE. We performed an exploratory, descriptive, qualitative study, conducted in the form of a case study in Porto de Galinhas, PE. The data collection was done interviews together social actors, as well as non-participant observation during data collection. The results showed that tourism activities in Porto de Galinhas result in a high amount of solid waste, and these are directed to inappropriate places. Although fate presents a combination of recyclable materials, RECYCLE, reuses this not a significant amount, given the proportion of waste generated.

  14. Force generation and temperature-jump and length-jump tension transients in muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J S; Rodgers, M E

    1995-01-01

    Muscle tension rises with increasing temperature. The kinetics that govern the tension rise of maximally Ca(2+)-activated, skinned rabbit psoas fibers over a temperature range of 0-30 degrees C was characterized in laser temperature-jump experiments. The kinetic response is simple and can be readily interpreted in terms of a basic three-step mechanism of contraction, which includes a temperature-sensitive rapid preequilibrium(a) linked to a temperature-insensitive rate-limiting step and followed by a temperature-sensitive tension-generating step. These data and mechanism are compared and contrasted with the more complex length-jump Huxley-Simmons phases in which all states that generate tension or bear tension are perturbed. The rate of the Huxley-Simmons phase 4 is temperature sensitive at low temperatures but plateaus at high temperatures, indicating a change in rate-limiting step from a temperature-sensitive (phase 4a) to a temperature-insensitive reaction (phase 4b); the latter appears to correlate with the slow, temperature-insensitive temperature-jump relaxation. Phase 3 is absent in the temperature-jump, which excludes it from tension generation. We confirm that de novo tension generation occurs as an order-disorder transition during phase 2slow and the equivalent, temperature-sensitive temperature-jump relaxation. PMID:7612845

  15. A model for estimation of potential generation of waste electrical and electronic equipment in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araújo, Marcelo Guimarães; Magrini, Alessandra; Mahler, Cláudio Fernando; Bilitewski, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Literature of WEEE generation in developing countries is reviewed. ► We analyse existing estimates of WEEE generation for Brazil. ► We present a model for WEEE generation estimate. ► WEEE generation of 3.77 kg/capita year for 2008 is estimated. ► Use of constant lifetime should be avoided for non-mature market products. - Abstract: Sales of electrical and electronic equipment are increasing dramatically in developing countries. Usually, there are no reliable data about quantities of the waste generated. A new law for solid waste management was enacted in Brazil in 2010, and the infrastructure to treat this waste must be planned, considering the volumes of the different types of electrical and electronic equipment generated. This paper reviews the literature regarding estimation of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), focusing on developing countries, particularly in Latin America. It briefly describes the current WEEE system in Brazil and presents an updated estimate of generation of WEEE. Considering the limited available data in Brazil, a model for WEEE generation estimation is proposed in which different methods are used for mature and non-mature market products. The results showed that the most important variable is the equipment lifetime, which requires a thorough understanding of consumer behavior to estimate. Since Brazil is a rapidly expanding market, the “boom” in waste generation is still to come. In the near future, better data will provide more reliable estimation of waste generation and a clearer interpretation of the lifetime variable throughout the years.

  16. Mid-infrared supercontinuum generation in a suspended core chalcogenide fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Uffe Visbech; Yu, Yi; Gai, Xin

    The mid-infrared spectral region is of great interest because virtually all organic compounds display distinctive spectral fingerprints herein that reveal chemical information about them [1], and the mid-infrared region is therefore of key importance to many applications, including food quality...... control [2], gas sensing [3] and medical diagnostics [4] . We have used a low-loss suspended core As 38 Se 62 fiber with core diameter of 4.5 μ m and a zero - dispersion wavelength of 3.5 μ m to generate mid-infrared supercontinuum by pumping with an optical parametric amplifier delivering 320 fs pulses...... with a peak power of ~5.5 kW at a repetition rate of 21 MHz at different wavelengths from 3.3 to 4.7 μ m . By pumping at 4.4 μ m with a peak power of 5.2 kW coupled to the fiber a supercontinuum spanning from 1.7 to 7.5 μ m with an average output power of 15.6 mW was obtained. Figure 1 shows the results...

  17. On the possible ultrasonic inspection of micro-bubbles generated by the optical fiber tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kazakov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the possibility of detection and monitoring of bubbles emerging near the tip of an optical fiber by means of ultrasonic method. The excitation of bubbles at their resonant frequencies is performed using short ultrasonic pulses having a wide frequency range simultaneously with their modulation by means of a long pulse of a monochromatic frequency. This method allows detection of bubbles of various sizes. Used signal processing method, which allows increased bubble detection accuracy, is proposed for research in environments of biological-like medium which show continuous variations in structure and properties when exposed to optical emission. The method has been demonstrated on model objects: in a liquid and in a biological tissue phantom using various methods of bubble generation (hydrolysis and optical emission. We studied bubble formation by the tip of a fiber of the surgical laser LSP-007/10 “IRE Polus” with a wavelength of 0.97μm coated with a highly absorbing graphite layer.

  18. Generation and collection of restaurant waste: Characterization and evaluation at a case study in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatàno, Fabio; Caramiello, Cristina; Paolini, Tonino; Tripolone, Luca

    2017-03-01

    Because restaurants (as a division of the hospitality sector) contribute to the generation of commercial and institutional waste, thus representing both a challenge and an opportunity, the objective of the present study was to deepen the knowledge of restaurant waste in terms of the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of waste generation and the performance achievable by the implementation of a separate collection scheme. In this study, the generated waste was characterized and the implemented separate collection was evaluated at a relevant case study restaurant in a coastal tourist area of Central Italy (Marche Region, Adriatic Sea side). The qualitative (compositional) characterization of the generated total restaurant waste showed considerable incidences of, in decreasing order, food (28.2%), glass (22.6%), paper/cardboard (19.1%), and plastic (17.1%). The quantitative (parametric) characterization of the generated restaurant waste determined the unit generation values of total waste and individual fractions based on the traditional employee and area parameters and the peculiar meal parameter. In particular, the obtained representative values per meal were: 0.72kgmeal -1 for total waste, and ranging, for individual fractions, from 0.20 (for food) to 0.008kgmeal -1 (for textile). Based on the critical evaluation of some of the resulting unit waste generation values, possible influences of restaurant practices, conditions, or characteristics were pointed out. In particular, food waste generation per meal can likely be limited by: promoting and using local, fresh, and quality food; standardizing and limiting daily menu items; basing food recipes on consolidated cooking knowledge and experience; and limiting plate sizes. The evaluation of the monthly variation of the monitored separate collection, ranging from an higher level of 52.7% to a lower level of 41.4%, indicated the following: a reduction in the separate collection level can be expected at times of

  19. Novel Application of Glass Fibers Recovered From Waste Printed Circuit Boards as Sound and Thermal Insulation Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhixing; Shen, Zhigang; Ma, Shulin; Zhang, Xiaojing

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using glass fibers, a recycled material from waste printed circuit boards (WPCB), as sound absorption and thermal insulation material. Glass fibers were obtained through a fluidized-bed recycling process. Acoustic properties of the recovered glass fibers (RGF) were measured and compared with some commercial sound absorbing materials, such as expanded perlite (EP), expanded vermiculite (EV), and commercial glass fiber. Results show that RGF have good sound absorption ability over the whole tested frequency range (100-6400 Hz). The average sound absorption coefficient of RGF is 0.86, which is prior to those of EP (0.81) and EV (0.73). Noise reduction coefficient analysis indicates that the absorption ability of RGF can meet the requirement of II rating for sound absorbing material according to national standard. The thermal insulation results show that RGF has a fair low thermal conductivity (0.046 W/m K), which is comparable to those of some insulation materials (i.e., EV, EP, and rock wool). Besides, an empirical dependence of thermal conductivity on material temperature was determined for RGF. All the results showed that the reuse of RGF for sound and thermal insulation material provided a promising way for recycling WPCB and obtaining high beneficial products.

  20. 4.5 W supercontinuum generation from 1017 to 3438 nm in an all-solid fluorotellurite fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhixu; Yao, Chuanfei; Jia, Shijie; Wang, Fang; Wang, Shunbin; Zhao, Zhipeng; Qin, Guanshi; Ohishi, Yasutake; Qin, Weiping

    2017-06-01

    All-solid fluorotellurite fibers are fabricated by using a rod-in-tube method. The core and cladding materials are TeO2-BaF2-Y2O3 (TBY) and AlF3-based glasses, respectively. Since the refractive index (˜1.46) of AlF3-based glass is much lower than that (˜1.84) of TBY glass, the zero-dispersion-wavelength of the fabricated fiber can be tuned from 2145 to 1507 nm by varying the fiber core diameter from 50 to 3 μm. By using a 0.6 m long all-solid fluorotellurite fiber with a core diameter of ˜7 μm as the nonlinear medium and a 2 μm femtosecond fiber laser as the pump source, 4.5 W supercontinuum (SC) generation from 1017 to 3438 nm is obtained for a launched pump power of ˜10.48 W. The corresponding optical-to-optical conversion efficiency is about 42.9%. In addition, no any damage of the fluorotellurite fiber is observed during the operation of the above SC light source. Our results show that all-solid fluorotellurite fibers are promising nonlinear media for constructing high power mid-infrared SC light sources.

  1. Generation of and control measures for, e-waste in Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung Shanshan; Lau Kayan; Zhang Chan

    2011-01-01

    While accurately estimating electrical and electronic waste (e-waste) generation is important for building appropriate infrastructure for its collection and recycling, making reliable estimates of this kind is difficult in Hong Kong owing to the fact that neither accurate trade statistics nor sales data of relevant products are available. In view of this, data of e-products consumption at household level was collected by a tailor-made questionnaire survey from the public for obtaining a reasonable e-waste generation estimate. It was estimated that on average no more than 80,443 tonnes (11.5 kg/capita) of waste is generated from non-plasma and non-liquid crystal display televisions, refrigerators, washing machines, air-conditioners and personal computers each year by Hong Kong households. However, not more than 17% of this is disposed as waste despite a producer responsibility scheme (PRS) not being in place because of the existence of a vibrant e-waste trading sector. The form of PRS control that can possibly win most public support is one that would involve the current e-waste traders as a major party in providing the reverse logistics with a visible recycling charge levied at the point of importation. This reverse logistic service should be convenient, reliable and highly accessible to the consumers.

  2. Survey of a technology to introduce the waste-fueled power generation. Basic manual for introduction of the waste-fueled power generation; Haikibutsu hatsuden donyu gijutsu chosa. Haikibutsu hatsuden donyu kihon manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Local government offices, etc., which are expected to shoulder responsibility for introducing the waste-fueled power generation, want to need exact information on technical information concerning the waste-fueled power generation and the method to materialize the introduction plan, etc. Therefore, Electric Power Development Co. surveyed and studied it under the contract with NEDO. The results were collected together as a basic manual for introduction of the waste-fueled power generation. As an outline of the waste-fueled power generation, the manual explains the significance, the present situation and potentials, the waste-fueled power system, an outline of working out the waste-fueled power generation plan, an outline of construction and operation/maintenance of the waste-fueled power generation, an outline of various systems relating to the waste-fueled power generation, etc. As the items for the study of making a concrete plan for power generation equipment, the manual explains the amount of refuse to be incinerated, the present status of generation capacity as viewed from the quality of refuse, the quality of refuse and the design of power generation equipment, boiler efficiency, power generation efficiency, construction cost and operation cost, etc. In addition, the paper describes a case study of the waste-fueled power generation plan. 118 figs., 39 tabs.

  3. Exergetic life cycle assessment of cement production process with waste heat power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui, Xiuwen; Zhang, Yun; Shao, Shuai; Zhang, Shushen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Exergetic life cycle assessment was performed for the cement production process. • Each system’s efficiency before and after waste heat power generation was analyzed. • The waste heat power generation improved the efficiency of each production system. • It provided technical support for the implementation of energy-saving schemes. - Abstract: The cement industry is an industry that consumes a considerable quantity of resources and energy and has a very large influence on the efficient use of global resources and energy. In this study, exergetic life cycle assessment is performed for the cement production process, and the energy efficiency and exergy efficiency of each system before and after waste heat power generation is investigated. The study indicates that, before carrying out a waste heat power generation project, the objective energy efficiencies of the raw material preparation system, pulverized coal preparation system and rotary kiln system are 39.4%, 10.8% and 50.2%, respectively, and the objective exergy efficiencies are 4.5%, 1.4% and 33.7%, respectively; after carrying out a waste heat power generation project, the objective energy efficiencies are 45.8%, 15.5% and 55.1%, respectively, and the objective exergy efficiencies are 7.8%, 2.8% and 38.1%, respectively. The waste heat power generation project can recover 3.7% of the total input exergy of a rotary kiln system and improve the objective exergy efficiencies of the above three systems. The study can identify degree of resource and energy utilization and the energy-saving effect of a waste heat power generation project on each system, and provide technical support for managers in the implementation of energy-saving schemes

  4. Incorporation of waste and fiber kaolin caroa panels in Medium Density Fiberboard - MDF; Incorporacao de residuos de caulim e fibras de caroa em paineis de media densidade- MDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, A.F.C.; Santana, L.N.L.; Neves, G.A.; Carvalho, L.H. de; Lopes, F.F.M., E-mail: anaflavia.dema@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Medium-density panels are composites molded under high temperature and pressure which have physical and mechanical properties similar to those of solid wood. Their composition includes eucalyptus grandis fibers and pinus elliotii fibers, but other fibers can be used such as caroa fibers. The goal of this work was to manufacture panels which kaolin waste and caroa fibers and compare their physical, chemical and mechanical of these panels with a others. Both residue and the fibers were characterized by: differential thermal analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis and Xray diffraction. Through the process of pressing the test specimens were fabricated, test samples were evaluated by three point bending, internal bond, water absorption and swelling in thickness. The samples have low levels of thickness swelling, flexural strength and higher tensile and absorption content relative to commercial MDF. (author)

  5. Seasonal analysis of the generation and composition of solid waste: potential use--a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Virgen, Quetzalli; Taboada-González, Paul; Ojeda-Benítez, Sara

    2013-06-01

    Ensenada health officials lack pertinent information on the sustainable management of solid waste, as do health officials from other developing countries. The aims of this research are: (a) to quantify and analyze the household solid wastes generated in the city of Ensenada, Mexico, and (b) to project biogas production and estimate generation of electrical energy. The characterization study was conducted by socioeconomic stratification in two seasonal periods, and the biogas and electrical energy projections were performed using the version 2.0 Mexico Biogas Model. Per capita solid waste generation was 0.779 ± 0.019 kg per person per day within a 98 % confidence interval. Waste composition is composed mainly of food scraps at 36.25 %, followed by paper and cardboard at 21.85 %, plastic at 12.30 %, disposable diapers at 6.26 %, and textiles at 6.28 %. The maximum capacity for power generation is projected to be 1.90 MW in 2019. Waste generated could be used as an intermediate in different processes such as recycling (41.04 %) and energy recovery (46.63 %). The electrical energy that could be obtained using the biogas generated at the Ensenada sanitary landfill would provide roughly 60 % of the energy needed for street lighting.

  6. Considerations for reduction of gas generation in a low-level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Chan Hee; Son, Jung Kwon; Lee, Myung Chan; Song, Myung Jae

    1997-01-01

    In a low-level radioactive waste repository, H 2 , CO 2 , and CH 4 will be generated principally by the coupled processes of metal corrosion and microbial degradation of cellulosic waste. The metal corrosion model incorporates a three-stage process encompassing aerobic and anaerobic corrosion regimes; the microbial degradation model simulates the activities of eight different microbial populations, which are maintained as functions both of pH and of the concentrations of particular chemical species. A prediction is made for gas concentrations and generation rates over an assessment period of ten thousand years in a radioactive waste repository. The results suggest that H 2 is the principal gas generated within the radioactive waste cavern. The generation rates of CO 2 and CH 4 are likely to be insignificant by comparison with H 2 . Therefore, an effective way to decrease gas generation in a radioactive waste repository seems to be to reduce metal content since the generation rate of H 2 is most sensitive to the concentration of steel

  7. Optical stealth transmission based on super-continuum generation in highly nonlinear fiber over WDM network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huatao; Wang, Rong; Pu, Tao; Fang, Tao; Xiang, Peng; Zheng, Jilin; Chen, Dalei

    2015-06-01

    In this Letter, the optical stealth transmission carried by super-continuum spectrum optical pulses generated in highly nonlinear fiber is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the proposed transmission scheme, super-continuum signals are reshaped in the spectral domain through a wavelength-selective switch and are temporally spread by a chromatic dispersion device to achieve the same noise-like characteristic as the noise in optical networks, so that in both the time domain and the spectral domain, the stealth signals are hidden in public channel. Our experimental results show that compared with existing schemes where stealth channels are carried by amplified spontaneous emission noise, super-continuum signal can increase the transmission performance and robustness.

  8. Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 2. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This volume contains appendices of supplementary data on waste management systems, geologic disposal, radiological standards, radiation dose calculation models, related health effects, baseline ecology, socio-economic conditions, hazard indices, comparison of defense and commercial wastes, design considerations, and wastes from thorium-based fuel cycle alternatives. (DMC)

  9. Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 2. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This volume contains appendices of supplementary data on waste management systems, geologic disposal, radiological standards, radiation dose calculation models, related health effects, baseline ecology, socio-economic conditions, hazard indices, comparison of defense and commercial wastes, design considerations, and wastes from thorium-based fuel cycle alternatives

  10. Efficient 1.5-μm Raman generation in ethane-filled hollow-core fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yubin; Gu, Bo; Wang, Zefeng; Lu, Qisheng

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrated for the first time a novel and effective method for obtaining both high peak-power and narrow linewidth 1.5 μm fiber sources through gas Raman effect in hollow core fibers. An Ethane-filled ice-cream antiresonance hollow-core fiber is pumped with a high peak-power pulse 1064 nm microchip laser, generating 1552.7 nm Stokes wave by pure vibrational stimulated Raman scattering of ethane molecules. A maximum peak-power of about 400 kW is achieved with 6 meter fiber length at 2 bar pressure, and the linewidth is about 6.3 GHz. The maximum Raman conversion efficiency of 1064 nm to 1552.7 nm is about 38%, and the corresponding laser slope efficiency is about 61.5%.

  11. Generation of linearly polarized orbital angular momentum modes in a side-hole ring fiber with tunable topology numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ya; Liu, Yan-Ge; Huang, Wei; Wang, Zhi; Guo, Jun-Qi; Luo, Ming-Ming

    2016-07-25

    A refractive index (RI) tunable functional materials infiltrated side-hole ring fiber (SHRF) is proposed to generate 10 LP OAM states with 6 topology numbers. On the basis of perturbation theory, the basis of the SHRF is demonstrated to be the LP modes. After a fixed propagation distance of 0.03 m, 0.009 m and 0.012 m, the phase difference between the odd and even LP11x, LP21x,y, LP31x,y modes in the SHRF accumulate to ± π/2 respectively with na ranging from 1.412 to 1.44. Correspondingly, the output states are OAM ± 1x, OAM ± 2x,y, OAM ± 3x,y with a bandwidth of 380 nm, 100 nm and 80 nm respectively. The proposed fiber is easy to be fabricated with the mature fiber drawing technology and could facilitate the realization of all fiber based OAM system.

  12. Waste Generation Forecast for DOE-ORO's Environmental Restoration OR-1 Project: FY 1994--FY 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    This Waste Generation Forecast for DOE-ORO's Environmental Restoration OR-1 Project. FY 1994--FY 2001 is the third in a series of documents that report current estimates of the waste volumes expected to be generated as a result of Environmental Restoration activities at Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO), sites. Considered in the scope of this document are volumes of waste expected to be generated as a result of remedial action and decontamination and decommissioning activities taking place at these sites. Sites contributing to the total estimates make up the DOE-ORO Environmental Restoration OR-1 Project: the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and the off-site contaminated areas adjacent to the Oak Ridge facilities (collectively referred to as the Oak Ridge Reservation Off-Site area). Estimates are available for the entire fife of all waste generating activities. This document summarizes waste estimates forecasted for the 8-year period of FY 1994-FY 2001. Updates with varying degrees of change are expected throughout the refinement of restoration strategies currently in progress at each of the sites. Waste forecast data are relatively fluid, and this document represents remediation plans only as reported through September 1993

  13. Self-Shrinkage Behaviors of Waste Paper Fiber Reinforced Cement Paste considering Its Self-Curing Effect at Early-Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengwu Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to study how the early-age self-shrinkage behavior of cement paste is affected by the addition of the waste paper fibers under sealed conditions. Although the primary focus was to determine whether the waste paper fibers are suitable to mitigate self-shrinkage as an internal curing agent under different adding ways, evaluating their strength, pore structure, and hydration properties provided further insight into the self-cured behavior of cement paste. Under the wet mixing condition, the waste paper fibers could mitigate the self-shrinkage of cement paste and, at additions of 0.2% by mass of cement, the waste paper fibers were found to show significant self-shrinkage cracking control while providing some internal curing. In addition, the self-curing efficiency results were analyzed based on the strength and the self-shrinkage behaviors of cement paste. Results indicated that, under a low water cement ratio, an optimal dosage and adding ways of the waste paper fibers could enhance the self-curing efficiency of cement paste.

  14. Fiber-top cantilever: a new generation of micromachined sensors for multipurpose applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iannuzzi, D.; Deladi, S.; Schreuders, H.; Slaman, M.; Rector, J.H.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2006-01-01

    Fiber-top cantilevers are new monolithic devices obtained by carving a cantilever out of the edge of a single-mode optical fiber. Here we report evidences of their potential impact as sensing devices for multipurpose applications.

  15. Generation of transportation fuel from solid municipal waste plastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarker, Moinuddin

    2010-09-15

    Transportation fuels derived from fossil fuels are subjected to the price fluctuations of the global marketplace, and constitute a major expense in the operation of a vehicle. Emissions from the evaporation and combustion of these fuels contribute to a range of environmental problems, causing poor air quality and emitting greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming. Alternative fuels created from domestic sources have been proposed as a solution to these problems, and many fuels are being developed based on biomass and other renewable sources. Natural State Research, Inc. developed different alternative hydrocarbon fuel which is produced from waste plastic materials.

  16. Models of municipal solid waste generation and collection costs applicable to all municipalities in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chira Bureecam

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to identify and measure the variables which influence municipal solid waste (MSW generation and collection costs in Thai municipality. The empirical analysis is based on the information derived from a survey conducted in a sample size of 570 municipalities across the country. The results from the MSW generation model indicate that the population density, the household size and the size of municipality are the significant determinant of waste generation. Meanwhile, with regards to the MSW collection cost model, the results showed some existence of positive in the volume of MSW collected, population density, the distance between the center of municipality to the disposal site the hazardous sorting and the size of municipality whereas, there were no evidence of the frequency of collection and the ratio of recycled material to waste generation on cost.

  17. Green Nanotechnology from Waste Carbon-Polyaniline Composite: Generation of Wavelength-Independent Multiband Photoluminescence for Sensitive Ion Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Goswami, Sumita; Nandy, Suman; Deuermeier, Jonas; Marques, Ana C.; Nunes, Daniela; Patole, Shashikant P.; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.; Martins, Rodrigo; Fortunato, Elvira

    2017-01-01

    This study reports on the qualitative analysis of photoluminescence effect generated from waste carbon of cooking oven by facile cost-effective material engineering. The waste carbon product as a form of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) is incorporated

  18. The stress generated by non-Brownian fibers in turbulent channel flow simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillissen, J.J.J.; Boersma, B.J.; Mortensen, P.H.; Andersson, H.I.

    2007-01-01

    Turbulent fiber suspension channel flow is studied using direct numerical simulation. The effect of the fibers on the fluid mechanics is governed by a stress tensor, involving the distribution of fiber position and orientation. Properties of this function in channel flow are studied by computing the

  19. Removal of actinides from high-level wastes generated in the reprocessing of commercial fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, W.D.; Leuze, R.E.

    1975-09-01

    Progress is reported on a technical feasibility study of removing the very long-lived actinides (uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium) from high-level wastes generated in the commercial reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels. The study was directed primarily at wastes from the reprocessing of light water reactor (LWR) fuels and specifically to developing satisfactory methods for reducing the actinide content of these wastes to values that would make 1000-year-decayed waste comparable in radiological toxicity to natural uranium ore deposits. Although studies are not complete, results thus far indicate the most promising concept for actinide removal includes both improved recovery of actinides in conventional fuel reprocessing and secondary processing of the high-level wastes. Secondary processing will be necessary for the removal of americium and curium and perhaps some residual plutonium. Laboratory-scale studies of separations methods that appear most promising are reported and conceptual flowsheets are discussed. (U.S.)

  20. 1997 annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress as required by DOE Order 5400.1, Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segall, P.

    1998-01-01

    Hanford's missions are to safely clean up and manage the site's legacy wastes, and to develop and deploy science and technology. Through these missions Hanford will contribute to economic diversification of the region. Hanford's environmental management or cleanup mission is to protect the health and safety of the public, workers, and the environment; control hazardous materials; and utilize the assets (people, infra structure, site) for other missions. Hanford's science and technology mission is to develop and deploy science and technology in the service of the nation including stewardship of the Hanford Site. Pollution Prevention is a key to the success of these missions by reducing the amount of waste to be managed and identifying/implementing cost effective waste reduction projects. Hanford's original mission, the production of nuclear materials for the nation's defense programs, lasted more than 40 years, and like most manufacturing operations, Hanford's operations generated large quantities of waste and pollution. However, the by-products from Hanford operations pose unique problems like radiation hazards, vast volumes of contaminated water and soil, and many contaminated structures including reactors, chemical plants and evaporation ponds. The cleanup activity is an immense and challenging undertaking, which includes characterization and decommissioning of 149 single shell storage tanks, treating 28 double shell tanks, safely disposing of over 2,100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel stored on site, removing numerous structures, and dealing with significant solid waste, ground water, and land restoration issues

  1. Forecasting municipal solid waste generation in a fast-growing urban region with system dynamics modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyson, Brian; Chang, N.-B.

    2005-01-01

    Both planning and design of municipal solid waste management systems require accurate prediction of solid waste generation. Yet achieving the anticipated prediction accuracy with regard to the generation trends facing many fast-growing regions is quite challenging. The lack of complete historical records of solid waste quantity and quality due to insufficient budget and unavailable management capacity has resulted in a situation that makes the long-term system planning and/or short-term expansion programs intangible. To effectively handle these problems based on limited data samples, a new analytical approach capable of addressing socioeconomic and environmental situations must be developed and applied for fulfilling the prediction analysis of solid waste generation with reasonable accuracy. This study presents a new approach - system dynamics modeling - for the prediction of solid waste generation in a fast-growing urban area based on a set of limited samples. To address the impact on sustainable development city wide, the practical implementation was assessed by a case study in the city of San Antonio, Texas (USA). This area is becoming one of the fastest-growing regions in North America due to the economic impact of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The analysis presents various trends of solid waste generation associated with five different solid waste generation models using a system dynamics simulation tool - Stella[reg]. Research findings clearly indicate that such a new forecasting approach may cover a variety of possible causative models and track inevitable uncertainties down when traditional statistical least-squares regression methods are unable to handle such issues

  2. Systematic analysis method for radioactive wastes generated from nuclear research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameo, Yutaka; Ishimori, Ken-ichiro; Haraga, Tomoko; Shimada, Asako; Katayama, Atsushi; Nakashima, Mikio; Takahashi, Kuniaki

    2011-01-01

    Analytical methods have been developed for the simple and rapid determination of radioactive nuclides, which are selected as important nuclides for the safety assessment of the disposal of wastes generated from research facilities. We advanced the development of a high-efficiency nondestructive measurement technique for γ-ray-emitting nuclides, simple and rapid methods for the pretreatment of hard-to-dissolve samples and subsequent radiochemical separation, and rapid determination methods for long-lived nuclides. In order to establish a system to analyze the important nuclides in various kinds of sample, actual radioactive wastes such as concentrated liquid waste, activated concrete, and metal pipes were analyzed by the present method. The results showed that the present method was well suited for a rapid and simple determination of low-level radioactive wastes generated from research facilities. (author)

  3. Generation, on-site storage; handling and processing of industrial waste of Tehran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abduli, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes out the present status of generation, on-site handling, processing and storage of industrial waste in Tehran. In this investigation, 67 large scale factories of different industrial groups were randomly selected. Above cited functional elements of these factories were surveyed. In this investigation a close contact with each factory was required, thus a questionnaire was prepared and distributed among these factories. The relationship between daily weight of the industrial waste (Y) and number of employer of each factory (x) is found to be Y=547.4 + 0.58 x. The relationship between daily volume of industrial waste (V), and daily weight of waste generated in each factory (Y) can be described by V=1.56 + 0.00078 Y. About 68% of the factories have their own interim storage site and the rest of the factories do not possess any on-site storage facility

  4. Automatic deodorizing system for waste water from radioisotope facilities using an ozone generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hiroko; Hirata, Yasuki

    2002-01-01

    We applied an ozone generator to sterilize and to deodorize the waste water from radioisotope facilities. A small tank connected to the generator is placed outside of the drainage facility founded previously, not to oxidize the other apparatus. The waste water is drained 1 m 3 at a time from the tank of drainage facility, treated with ozone and discharged to sewer. All steps proceed automatically once the draining work is started remotely in the office. The waste water was examined after the ozone treatment for 0 (original), 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 h. Regarding original waste water, the sum of coliform groups varied with every examination repeated - probably depend on the colibacilli used in experiments; hydrogen sulfide, biochemical oxygen demand and the offensive odor increased with increasing coliform groups. The ozone treatment remarkably decreased hydrogen sulfide and the offensive odor, decreased coliform groups when the original water had rich coliforms. (author)

  5. Automatic deodorizing system for waste water from radioisotope facilities using an ozone generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Hiroko; Hirata, Yasuki [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Radioisotope Center; Taguchi, Kenji [Riken Co. Ltd., Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    We applied an ozone generator to sterilize and to deodorize the waste water from radioisotope facilities. A small tank connected to the generator is placed outside of the drainage facility founded previously, not to oxidize the other apparatus. The waste water is drained 1 m{sup 3} at a time from the tank of drainage facility, treated with ozone and discharged to sewer. All steps proceed automatically once the draining work is started remotely in the office. The waste water was examined after the ozone treatment for 0 (original), 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 h. Regarding original waste water, the sum of coliform groups varied with every examination repeated - probably depend on the colibacilli used in experiments; hydrogen sulfide, biochemical oxygen demand and the offensive odor increased with increasing coliform groups. The ozone treatment remarkably decreased hydrogen sulfide and the offensive odor, decreased coliform groups when the original water had rich coliforms. (author)

  6. Forecasting generation of urban solid waste in developing countries--a case study in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buenrostro, O; Bocco, G; Vence, J

    2001-01-01

    Based on a study of the composition of urban solid waste (USW) and of socioeconomic variables in Morelia, Mexico, generation rates were estimated. In addition, the generation of residential solid waste (RSW) and nonresidential solid waste (NRSW) was forecasted by means of a multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis. For residential sources, the independent variables analyzed were monthly wages, persons per dwelling, age, and educational level of the heads of the household. For nonresidential sources, variables analyzed were number of employees, area of facilities, number of working days, and working hours per day. The forecasted values for residential waste were similar to those observed. This approach may be applied to areas in which available data are scarce, and in which there is an urgent need for the planning of adequate management of USW.

  7. Purification and solidification of reactor wastes at a Canadian nuclear generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, L.P.; Burt, D.A.

    1981-06-01

    Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories are developing methods to condition power reactor wastes and to immobilize their radionuclides. Evaporation alone and combined with bituminization has been an important part of the program. After testing at the laboratories a 0.5 m 2 wiped-film evaporator was sent to the Douglas Point Nuclear Generating Station (220 MWe) to demonstrate its suitability to handle typical reactor liquid wastes. Two specific tasks undertaken with the wiped-film evaporator were successfully completed. The first was purification of contaminated heavy water which had leaked from the moderator circuit. The heavy water is normally recovered, cleaned by filters and ion-exchange resin and then upgraded by electrolysis. Cleaning the heavy water with the wiped-film evaporator produced better quality water for upgrading than had been achieved by any previous method and at much lower operating cost. The second task was to concentrate and immobilize a decontamination waste. The waste was generated from the decontamination of pump bowls used in the primary heat transport circuit. The simultaneous addition of the liquid waste and bitumen emulsion to the wiped-film evaporator produced a solid containing 30 wt% waste solids in a bitumen matrix. The volume reduction achieved was 16:1 based on the volumes of initial liquid waste and the final product generated. The quantity sent to storage was 20 times less than had the waste been immobilized in a cement matrix. The successful demonstration has resulted in a proposal to install a wiped-film evaporator at the station to clean heavy water and immobilize decontamination wastes. (author)

  8. Identification of influencing municipal characteristics regarding household waste generation and their forecasting ability in Biscay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oribe-Garcia, Iraia, E-mail: iraia.oribe@deusto.es; Kamara-Esteban, Oihane; Martin, Cristina; Macarulla-Arenaza, Ana M.; Alonso-Vicario, Ainhoa

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • We have modelled household waste generation in Biscay municipalities. • We have identified relevant characteristics regarding household waste generation. • Factor models are used in order to identify the best subset of explicative variables. • Biscay’s municipalities are grouped by means of hierarchical clustering. - Abstract: The planning of waste management strategies needs tools to support decisions at all stages of the process. Accurate quantification of the waste to be generated is essential for both the daily management (short-term) and proper design of facilities (long-term). Designing without rigorous knowledge may have serious economic and environmental consequences. The present works aims at identifying relevant socio-economic features of municipalities regarding Household Waste (HW) generation by means of factor models. Factor models face two main drawbacks, data collection and identifying relevant explanatory variables within a heterogeneous group. Grouping similar characteristics observations within a group may favour the deduction of more robust models. The methodology followed has been tested with Biscay Province because it stands out for having very different municipalities ranging from very rural to urban ones. Two main models are developed, one for the overall province and a second one after clustering the municipalities. The results prove that relating municipalities with specific characteristics, improves the results in a very heterogeneous situation. The methodology has identified urban morphology, tourism activity, level of education and economic situation as the most influencing characteristics in HW generation.

  9. Identification of influencing municipal characteristics regarding household waste generation and their forecasting ability in Biscay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oribe-Garcia, Iraia; Kamara-Esteban, Oihane; Martin, Cristina; Macarulla-Arenaza, Ana M.; Alonso-Vicario, Ainhoa

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We have modelled household waste generation in Biscay municipalities. • We have identified relevant characteristics regarding household waste generation. • Factor models are used in order to identify the best subset of explicative variables. • Biscay’s municipalities are grouped by means of hierarchical clustering. - Abstract: The planning of waste management strategies needs tools to support decisions at all stages of the process. Accurate quantification of the waste to be generated is essential for both the daily management (short-term) and proper design of facilities (long-term). Designing without rigorous knowledge may have serious economic and environmental consequences. The present works aims at identifying relevant socio-economic features of municipalities regarding Household Waste (HW) generation by means of factor models. Factor models face two main drawbacks, data collection and identifying relevant explanatory variables within a heterogeneous group. Grouping similar characteristics observations within a group may favour the deduction of more robust models. The methodology followed has been tested with Biscay Province because it stands out for having very different municipalities ranging from very rural to urban ones. Two main models are developed, one for the overall province and a second one after clustering the municipalities. The results prove that relating municipalities with specific characteristics, improves the results in a very heterogeneous situation. The methodology has identified urban morphology, tourism activity, level of education and economic situation as the most influencing characteristics in HW generation

  10. Management of waste generation in the oil refining industry. The PETROBRAS - Henrique Lage Refinery experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, J.I.; Machado, J.B.; Linhares, C.A.; Mazarino, P.R. [PETROBRAS, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). REVAP. Refinaria Henrique Lage

    1993-12-31

    The PETROBRAS - Henrique Lages Refinery - located in Sao Paulo State (Southeast Brazil), has been developing for many years a systematic program for solid, liquid and gaseous wastes generation reduction. The waste minimization management program success has been built due to the structure behavioural modifications due to the new environment protection and quality politics; the training and equipment investments, and operational procedures changes. (author). 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Incineration of hazardous and low-level radioactive waste by a small generator. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwight, C.C.

    1984-10-01

    The results from Arizona State University's study of the feasibility of a small generator incinerating low-level radioactive waste in a pathological incinerator are reported. The research included various aspects of environmental impact, public relations, cost versus benefit, and licensing procedures. Three years of work resulted in a license amendment authorizing the University to incinerate certain hazardous and low-level radioactive wastes. 13 references, 6 figures, 16 tables

  12. Co-generation potentials of municipal solid waste landfills in Serbia

    OpenAIRE

    Bošković Goran B.; Josijević Mladen M.; Jovičić Nebojša M.; Babić Milun J.

    2016-01-01

    Waste management in the Republic of Serbia is based on landfilling. As a result of such year-long practice, a huge number of municipal waste landfills has been created where landfill gas has been generated. Landfill gas, which is essentially methane (50-55%) and carbon dioxide (40-45%) (both GHGs), has a great environmental impact which can be reduced by using landfill gas in cogeneration plants to produce energy. The aim of this paper is to determine econo...

  13. Management of waste generation in the oil refining industry. The PETROBRAS - Henrique Lage Refinery experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, J I; Machado, J B; Linhares, C A; Mazarino, P R [PETROBRAS, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). REVAP. Refinaria Henrique Lage

    1994-12-31

    The PETROBRAS - Henrique Lages Refinery - located in Sao Paulo State (Southeast Brazil), has been developing for many years a systematic program for solid, liquid and gaseous wastes generation reduction. The waste minimization management program success has been built due to the structure behavioural modifications due to the new environment protection and quality politics; the training and equipment investments, and operational procedures changes. (author). 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Urban solid waste generation and disposal in Mexico: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buenrostro, O; Bocco, G; Bernache, G

    2001-04-01

    The adequate management of municipal solid waste in developing countries is difficult because of the scarcity of studies about their composition. This paper analyses the composition of urban solid waste (USW) in the city of Morelia, Michoacán, Mexico. Residential and non-residential waste sources were sampled, and a structured interview was made to evaluate the socioeconomic characteristics of the studied area. Also, to determine the seasonal patterns of solid waste generation and the efficiency level of the collection service, quantification of solid waste deposited in the dumping ground was measured. Our results show that the recorded amount of SW deposited in the municipal dumping-ground is less than the estimated amount of SW generated; for this reason, the former amount is not recommended as an unbiased indicator for planning public waste collection services. It is essential that dumping-grounds are permanently monitored and that the incoming waste be weighed in order to have a more efficient record of USW deposited in the dumping-ground per day; these data are fundamental for developing adequate managing strategies.

  15. Ozone pretreatment of process waste water generated in course of fluoroquinolone production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, Fares; Pelzer, David; Zuehlke, Sebastian; Spiteller, Michael; Kayser, Oliver

    2017-10-01

    During production of active pharmaceutical ingredients, process waste water is generated at several stages of manufacturing. Whenever possible, the resulting waste water will be processed by conventional waste water treatment plants. Currently, incineration of the process waste water is the method to eliminate compounds with high biological activity. Thus, ozone treatment followed by biological waste water treatment was tested as an alternative method. Two prominent representatives of the large group of fluoroquinolone antibiotics (ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin) were investigated, focussing on waste water of the bulk production. Elimination of the target compounds and generation of their main transformation products were determined by liquid chromatography - high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). The obtained results demonstrated, that the concentration of moxifloxacin and its metabolites can be effectively reduced (>99.7%) prior entering the receiving water. On the contrary, the concentration of ciprofloxacin and its metabolites remained too high for safe discharge, necessitating application of prolonged ozonation for its further degradation. The required ozonation time can be estimated based on the determined kinetics. To assure a low biological activity the ecotoxicity of the ozonated waste water was investigated using three trophic levels. By means of multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS n ) experiments several new transformation products of the fluoroquinolones were identified. Thus, previously published proposed structures could be corrected or confirmed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Purification and solidification of reactor wastes at a Canadian nuclear generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, L.P.; Burt, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The study aimed at development and demonstration of volume reduction and solidification of CANDU reactor wastes has been underway at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories in the Province of Ontario, Canada. The study comprises membrane separation processes, evaporator appraisal and immobilization of concentrated wastes in bitumen. This paper discusses the development work with a wiped-film evaporator and the successful completion of demonstration tests at Douglas Point Nuclear Generating Station. Heavy water from the moderator system was purified and wastes arising from pump bowl decontamination were immobilized in bitumen with the wiped-film evaporator that was used in the development tests at Chalk River

  17. Waste generation and pollution prevention progress fact sheet: Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site is responsible for maintaining nuclear testing capability, supporting science-based Stockpile Stewardship experiments, maintaining nuclear agency response capability, applying environmental restoration techniques to areas affected by nuclear testing, managing low-level and mixed radioactive waste, investigating demilitarization technologies, investigating counter- proliferation technologies, supporting work-for-others programs and special Department of Defense activities, operating a hazardous materials spill test center, and providing for the commercial development of the site. This fact sheet provides information on routine waste generation and projected reduction by waste type. Also, materials recycled by the Nevada Test Site in 1994 are listed

  18. Development of disposal technologies for radioactive waste generated from radioisotope users and research institutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Akihiro; Yoshimori, Michiro

    2001-01-01

    In order to safely dispose of a radioactive waste, which is generated from radioisotope users and research institutes, investigation of characteristics of the waste and conceptual design of disposal facility were carried out. As a result of investigating JAERI that the waste has mainly been stored, it became clear that radioactivities of 19 nuclides are important from the viewpoint of the safety of the disposal. And the result of the conceptual design of disposal facilities on the assumption of 3 kinds of sites, the differences on the safety could not be recognized in either case, though the installation depth to construct the facilities influenced the economical efficiency. (author)

  19. Mid-IR supercontinuum generation beyond 7 μm using a silica-fluoride-chalcogenide fiber cascade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christian Rosenberg; Moselund, Peter M.; Petersen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    and fluoride fibers by an amplified 1.55 μm nanosecond diode laser. By pumping a commercial Ge10As22Se68 single-material photonic crystal fiber with 135.7 mW of the pump continuum from 3.5- 4.4 μm, we obtained a continuum up to 7.2 μm with a total output power after the collimating lens of 54.5 mW, and 3.7 m......We report on an experimental demonstration of mid-infrared cascaded supercontinuum generation in commercial silica, fluoride, and chalcogenide fibers as a potentially cheap and practical alternative to direct pumping schemes. A pump continuum up to 4.4 μm was generated in cascaded silica...

  20. Q-switching and efficient harmonic generation from a single-mode LMA photonic bandgap rod fiber laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurila, Marko; Saby, Julien; Alkeskjold, Thomas T.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a Single-Mode (SM) Large-Mode-Area (LMA) ytterbium-doped PCF rod fiber laser with stable and close to diffraction limited beam quality with 110W output power. Distributed-Mode-Filtering (DMF) elements integrated in the cladding of the rod fiber provide a robust spatial mode...... with a Mode-Field-Diameter (MFD) of 59 mu m. We further demonstrate high pulse energy Second-Harmonic-Generation (SHG) and Third Harmonic Generation (THG) using a simple Q-switched single-stage rod fiber laser cavity architecture reaching pulse energies up to 1mJ at 515nm and 0.5mJ at 343nm. (C) 2011 Optical...

  1. New-Generation Aluminum Composite with Bottom Ash Industrial Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, A. K.; Sinha, O. P.

    2018-06-01

    Industrial waste bottom ash (BA) from a pulverized coal combustion boiler containing hard wear-resistant particles was utilized in this study to form an aluminum composite through a liquid metallurgy route. Composites comprising 5 wt.% and 10 wt.% bottom ash were characterized for their physiochemical, microstructural, mechanical, as well as tribological properties, along with pure aluminum. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) microstructure revealed uniform distribution of BA particles throughout the matrix of the composite, whereas x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed presence of aluminosilicate phase. Addition of 10 wt.% BA improved the Brinell hardness number (BHN) from 13 to 19 and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) from 71 MPa to 87 MPa, whereas ductility was adversely reduced after 5% BA addition. Incorporation of BA particles resulted in reduced dry sliding wear rates examined up to 80 N load compared with aluminum. Hence, such composites having lower cost could be applied as significantly hard, wear-resistant materials in applications in the automotive industry.

  2. A Short History of Hanford Waste Generation, Storage, and Release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gephart, Roy E.

    2003-01-01

    Nine nuclear reactors and four reprocessing plants at Hanford produced nearly two-thirds of the plutonium used in the United States for government purposes . These site operations also created large volumes of radioactive and chemical waste. Some contaminants were released into the environment, exposing people who lived downwind and downstream. Other contaminants were stored. The last reactor was shut down in 1987, and the last reprocessing plant closed in 1990. Most of the human-made radioactivity and about half of the chemicals remaining onsite are kept in underground tanks and surface facilities. The rest exists in the soil, groundwater, and burial grounds. Hanford contains about 40% of all the radioactivity that exists across the nuclear weapons complex. Today, environmental restoration activities are under way.

  3. New-Generation Aluminum Composite with Bottom Ash Industrial Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, A. K.; Sinha, O. P.

    2018-02-01

    Industrial waste bottom ash (BA) from a pulverized coal combustion boiler containing hard wear-resistant particles was utilized in this study to form an aluminum composite through a liquid metallurgy route. Composites comprising 5 wt.% and 10 wt.% bottom ash were characterized for their physiochemical, microstructural, mechanical, as well as tribological properties, along with pure aluminum. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) microstructure revealed uniform distribution of BA particles throughout the matrix of the composite, whereas x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed presence of aluminosilicate phase. Addition of 10 wt.% BA improved the Brinell hardness number (BHN) from 13 to 19 and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) from 71 MPa to 87 MPa, whereas ductility was adversely reduced after 5% BA addition. Incorporation of BA particles resulted in reduced dry sliding wear rates examined up to 80 N load compared with aluminum. Hence, such composites having lower cost could be applied as significantly hard, wear-resistant materials in applications in the automotive industry.

  4. Utilization of waste heat from electricity generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.F.S.

    1977-06-01

    Historically the nuclear power station has been designed solely as an electricity producer. But in Canada today only 15 percent of our energy consumption is as electricity. The non-electrical needs today are supplied almost entirely by natural gas and oil. There is an incentive to see whether a nuclear station could supply energy for some of these non-electrical needs, thus freeing gas and oil for uses for which they may be more valuable and suitable, especially in transportation. A group located at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment undertook a series of studies to examine this problem. These studies were done in sufficient depth to provide technological and economic answers, and as a result several reports have been published on various topics. In this report, the findings from these studies are drawn together in an assessment of the potential in Canada for using waste heat. (author)

  5. Volume reduction of radioactive concrete waste generated from KRR-2 and UCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B. Y.; Choi, W. K.; Park, J. W.; Lee, K. W.

    2009-01-01

    As a part of a technical development for the volume reduction and stabilization of contaminated concrete wastes generated by dismantling a research reactor and uranium conversion plant, we have developed the volume reduction technology and immobilization of fine powder applicable to an activated heavy weight concrete generated by dismantling KRR-2 and a uranium contaminated light weight concrete produced from a UCP decommissioning. During a decommissioning of nuclear plants and facilities, large quantities of contaminated concrete wastes are generated. The decommissioning of the retired TRIGA MARK II and III research reactors and a uranium conversion plant has been under way. In Korea, two decommissioning projects such as the decommissioning of the retired research reactors (KRR-1 and 2) and a uranium conversion plant (UCP) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been carried out. By dismantling KRR-2, more than 260 tons of radioactive concrete wastes are generated among the total 2,000 tons of concrete wastes and more than 60 tons of concrete wastes contaminated with uranium compounds are generated in UCP decommissioning up to now. The volume reduction and recycling of the wastes is essential to reduce the waste management cost with expecting that an approximate disposal cost for low level radioactive waste will be more than 5,000 US dollars per 200 liter waste drum in Korea. It is well known that most of the radioactivity exist in cement mortar and paste composed of concrete. In this context, the volume reduction of concrete waste is based on the separation of radioactive concrete into a clean recyclable aggregates and a radioactive fine cement powder, which can be readily performed by heating to weaken the adherence force between the cement matrix and the aggregates followed by mechanical crushing and milling processes. In this study, we have investigated the characteristics of separation of aggregates and the distribution of radioactivity into

  6. The impact of socioeconomic factors on municipal solid waste generation in São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Victor H Argentino de Morais; Matheus, Dácio R

    2018-01-01

    Social factors have not been sufficiently explored in municipal solid waste management studies. Latin America has produced even fewer studies with this approach; technical and economic investigations have prevailed. We explored the impacts of socioeconomic factors on municipal solid waste generation in Greater Sao Paulo, which includes 39 municipalities. We investigated the relations between municipal solid waste generation and social factors by Pearson's correlation coefficient. The Student's t-test (at p ← 0.01) proved significance, and further regression analysis was performed with significant factors. We considered 10 socioeconomic factors: population, rural population, density, life expectancy, education (secondary, high and undergraduate level), income per capita, inequality and human development. A later multicollinearity analysis resulted in the determination of inequality (r p = 0.625) and income per capita (r p = 0.607) as major drivers. The results showed the relevance of considering social aspects in municipal solid waste management and isolated inequality as an important factor in planning. Inequality must be used as a complementary factor to income, rather than being used exclusively. Inequality may explain differences of waste generation between areas with similar incomes because of consumption patterns. Therefore, unequal realities demand unequal measures to avoid exacerbation, for example, pay-as-you-throw policies instead of uniform fees. Unequal realities also highlight the importance of tiering policies beyond the waste sector, such as sustainable consumption.

  7. Major factors contributing to the construction waste generation in building projects of Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaleel Tareq

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the economic growth and improvement of the construction industry witnessed by most countries, there has become a crucial need for employing modern possibilities in the construction sector to build taller, longer and deeper structures. However, one aspect that heads forward with the same intensity is the generation of 100 million tons of construction waste every year. This generation has occurred due to several factors with different levels of importance. Hence, this study reveals 15 factors influencing construction waste generation and categorizes them into 3 groups, (materials management on site, (materials handling, transportation and storage and (site management and practices. A questionnaire survey of 100 respondents was distributed among different engineers to assess the construction waste factors. Results showed that damage of materials on site, double handling of materials and incompetent contractor’s technical staff were the most significant factors of each category with Relative Importance Indexes (RII of 0.866, 0.844 and 0.83, respectively. These findings will help the practitioners to reduce construction waste quantities in sites and improve waste management performance factors to control the construction waste problems.

  8. Assessment of municipal solid waste generation and recyclable materials potential in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Mohamed Osman; Hassan, Mohd Nasir; Mujeebu, M Abdul

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a forecasting study of municipal solid waste generation (MSWG) rate and potential of its recyclable components in Kuala Lumpur (KL), the capital city of Malaysia. The generation rates and composition of solid wastes of various classes such as street cleansing, landscape and garden, industrial and constructional, institutional, residential and commercial are analyzed. The past and present trends are studied and extrapolated for the coming years using Microsoft office 2003 Excel spreadsheet assuming a linear behavior. The study shows that increased solid waste generation of KL is alarming. For instance, the amount of daily residential SWG is found to be about 1.62 kg/capita; with the national average at 0.8-0.9 kg/capita and is expected to be increasing linearly, reaching to 2.23 kg/capita by 2024. This figure seems reasonable for an urban developing area like KL city. It is also found that, food (organic) waste is the major recyclable component followed by mix paper and mix plastics. Along with estimated population growth and their business activities, it has been observed that the city is still lacking in terms of efficient waste treatment technology, sufficient fund, public awareness, maintaining the established norms of industrial waste treatment etc. Hence it is recommended that the concerned authority (DBKL) shall view this issue seriously.

  9. Radioactive waste assessment using 'moderate growth in nuclear electricity generation' scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, J.A.; Goodill, D.R.; Tymons, B.J.

    1985-05-01

    This report describes an assessment of radioactive waste management arisings from a defined nuclear power generation scenario -Scheme 3. Scheme 3 assumes a moderate growth in nuclear generation scenario with raw waste arisings from 3 main groups: (i) existing and committed commercial reactors; (ii) fuel reprocessing plants; (iii) research, industry and medicine. No decommissioning wastes are considered except for arisings from the final fuel cores from decommissioned reactors. The study uses the SIMULATION2 code which models waste material flows through the system. With a knowledge of the accumulations and average production rates of the raw wastes and their isotopic compositions (or total activities), the rates at which conditioned wastes become available for transportation and disposal are calculated, with specific activity levels. The data bases for the inventory calculations and the assumptions concerning future operation of nuclear facilities were those current in 1983. Both the inventory data and plans for the future of existing nuclear installations have been updated since these calculations were completed. Therefore the results from this assessment do not represent the most up-to-date information available. The report does, however, illustrate the methodology of assessment, and indicates the type of information that can be generated. (author)

  10. NEXT GENERATION MELTER(S) FOR VITRIFICATION OF HANFORD WASTE: STATUS AND DIRECTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, W.G.; Gray, M.F.; Calmus, R.B.; Edge, J.A.; Garrett, B.G.

    2011-01-01

    Vitrification technology has been selected to treat high-level waste (HLW) at the Hanford Site, the West Valley Demonstration Project and the Savannah River Site (SRS), and low activity waste (LAW) at Hanford. In addition, it may potentially be applied to other defense waste streams such as sodium bearing tank waste or calcine. Joule-heated melters (already in service at SRS) will initially be used at the Hanford Site's Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to vitrify tank waste fractions. The glass waste content and melt/production rates at WTP are limited by the current melter technology. Significant reductions in glass volumes and mission life are only possible with advancements in melter technology coupled with new glass formulations. The Next Generation Melter (NGM) program has been established by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's), Environmental Management Office of Waste Processing (EM-31) to develop melters with greater production capacity (absolute glass throughput rate) and the ability to process melts with higher waste fractions. Advanced systems based on Joule-Heated Ceramic Melter (JHCM) and Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) technologies will be evaluated for HLW and LAW processing. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), DOE's tank waste contractor, is developing and evaluating these systems in cooperation with EM-31, national and university laboratories, and corporate partners. A primary NGM program goal is to develop the systems (and associated flowsheets) to Technology Readiness Level 6 by 2016. Design and testing are being performed to optimize waste glass process envelopes with melter and balance of plant requirements. A structured decision analysis program will be utilized to assess the performance of the competing melter technologies. Criteria selected for the decision analysis program will include physical process operations, melter performance, system compatibility and other parameters.

  11. Systematic evaluation of options to avoid generation of noncertifiable transuranic (TRU) waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boak, J.M.; Kosiewicz, S.T.; Triay, I.; Gruetzmacher, K.; Montoya, A.

    1998-03-01

    At present, >35% of the volume of newly generated transuranic (TRU) waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory is not certifiable for transport to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Noncertifiable waste would constitute 900--1,000 m 3 of the 2,600 m 3 of waste projected during the period of the Environmental Management (EM) Accelerated Cleanup: Focus on 2006 plan (DOE, 1997). Volume expansion of this waste to meet thermal limits would increase the shipped volume to ∼5,400 m 3 . This paper presents the results of efforts to define which TRU waste streams are noncertifiable at Los Alamos, and to prioritize site-specific options to reduce the volume of certifiable waste over the period of the EM Accelerated Cleanup Plan. A team of Los Alamos TRU waste generators and waste managers reviewed historic generation rates and thermal loads and current practices to estimate the projected volume and thermal load of TRU waste streams for Fiscal Years 1999--2006. These data defined four major problem TRU waste streams. Estimates were also made of the volume expansion that would be required to meet the permissible wattages for all waste. The four waste streams defined were: (1) 238 Pu-contaminated combustible waste from production of Radioactive Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) with 238 Pu activity which exceeds allowable shipping limits by 10--100X. (2) 241 Am-contaminated cement waste from plutonium recovery processes (nitric and hydrochloric acid recovery) are estimated to exceed thermal limits by ∼3X. (3) 239 Pu-contaminated combustible waste, mainly organic waste materials contaminated with 239 Pu and 241 Am, is estimated to exceed thermal load requirements by a factor of ∼2X. (4) Oversized metal waste objects, (especially gloveboxes), cannot be shipped as is to WIPP because they will not fit in a standard waste box or drum

  12. A Planning Tool for Estimating Waste Generated by a Radiological Incident and Subsequent Decontamination Efforts - 13569

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boe, Timothy; Lemieux, Paul; Schultheisz, Daniel; Peake, Tom; Hayes, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Management of debris and waste from a wide-area radiological incident would probably constitute a significant percentage of the total remediation cost and effort. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Waste Estimation Support Tool (WEST) is a unique planning tool for estimating the potential volume and radioactivity levels of waste generated by a radiological incident and subsequent decontamination efforts. The WEST was developed to support planners and decision makers by generating a first-order estimate of the quantity and characteristics of waste resulting from a radiological incident. The tool then allows the user to evaluate the impact of various decontamination/demolition strategies on the waste types and volumes generated. WEST consists of a suite of standalone applications and Esri R ArcGIS R scripts for rapidly estimating waste inventories and levels of radioactivity generated from a radiological contamination incident as a function of user-defined decontamination and demolition approaches. WEST accepts Geographic Information System (GIS) shape-files defining contaminated areas and extent of contamination. Building stock information, including square footage, building counts, and building composition estimates are then generated using the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA's) Hazus R -MH software. WEST then identifies outdoor surfaces based on the application of pattern recognition to overhead aerial imagery. The results from the GIS calculations are then fed into a Microsoft Excel R 2007 spreadsheet with a custom graphical user interface where the user can examine the impact of various decontamination/demolition scenarios on the quantity, characteristics, and residual radioactivity of the resulting waste streams. (authors)

  13. Formic Acid Free Flowsheet Development To Eliminate Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In The Defense Waste Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, Dan P.; Stone, Michael E.; Newell, J. David; Fellinger, Terri L.; Bricker, Jonathan M.

    2012-09-14

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) processes legacy nuclear waste generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during production of plutonium and tritium demanded by the Cold War. The nuclear waste is first treated via a complex sequence of controlled chemical reactions and then vitrified into a borosilicate glass form and poured into stainless steel canisters. Converting the nuclear waste into borosilicate glass canisters is a safe, effective way to reduce the volume of the waste and stabilize the radionuclides. Testing was initiated to determine whether the elimination of formic acid from the DWPF's chemical processing flowsheet would eliminate catalytic hydrogen generation. Historically, hydrogen is generated in chemical processing of alkaline High Level Waste sludge in DWPF. In current processing, sludge is combined with nitric and formic acid to neutralize the waste, reduce mercury and manganese, destroy nitrite, and modify (thin) the slurry rheology. The noble metal catalyzed formic acid decomposition produces hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Elimination of formic acid by replacement with glycolic acid has the potential to eliminate the production of catalytic hydrogen. Flowsheet testing was performed to develop the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet as an alternative to the nitric-formic flowsheet currently being processed at the DWPF. This new flowsheet has shown that mercury can be reduced and removed by steam stripping in DWPF with no catalytic hydrogen generation. All processing objectives were also met, including greatly reducing the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product yield stress as compared to the baseline nitric/formic flowsheet. Ten DWPF tests were performed with nonradioactive simulants designed to cover a broad compositional range. No hydrogen was generated in testing without formic acid.

  14. A Planning Tool for Estimating Waste Generated by a Radiological Incident and Subsequent Decontamination Efforts - 13569

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boe, Timothy [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Lemieux, Paul [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Schultheisz, Daniel; Peake, Tom [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Hayes, Colin [Eastern Research Group, Inc, Morrisville, NC 26560 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Management of debris and waste from a wide-area radiological incident would probably constitute a significant percentage of the total remediation cost and effort. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Waste Estimation Support Tool (WEST) is a unique planning tool for estimating the potential volume and radioactivity levels of waste generated by a radiological incident and subsequent decontamination efforts. The WEST was developed to support planners and decision makers by generating a first-order estimate of the quantity and characteristics of waste resulting from a radiological incident. The tool then allows the user to evaluate the impact of various decontamination/demolition strategies on the waste types and volumes generated. WEST consists of a suite of standalone applications and Esri{sup R} ArcGIS{sup R} scripts for rapidly estimating waste inventories and levels of radioactivity generated from a radiological contamination incident as a function of user-defined decontamination and demolition approaches. WEST accepts Geographic Information System (GIS) shape-files defining contaminated areas and extent of contamination. Building stock information, including square footage, building counts, and building composition estimates are then generated using the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA's) Hazus{sup R}-MH software. WEST then identifies outdoor surfaces based on the application of pattern recognition to overhead aerial imagery. The results from the GIS calculations are then fed into a Microsoft Excel{sup R} 2007 spreadsheet with a custom graphical user interface where the user can examine the impact of various decontamination/demolition scenarios on the quantity, characteristics, and residual radioactivity of the resulting waste streams. (authors)

  15. Broadband generation by multiple four-wave mixing process due to ASE Q-switching in high-power double-clad ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Sourav D.; Shekhar, Nishant; Saha, Maitreyee; Sen, Ranjan; Pal, Mrinmay

    2014-11-01

    Broadband output from 1060nm to 1700nm and cascaded four-wave mixing generated red light pulsing is observed in a fiber amplifier set up consisting of a 5.5m double clad, double D shaped Ytterbium doped fiber, a single clad passive fiber for excess pump absorption and a splitter, both with and without a CW seed. Self-pulsing occurs from ASE due to passive Q-switching by saturable absorption effect of the active fiber and also depends on splice loss. The pulses generate broadband output by multiple four-wave mixing process with maximum broadening efficiency near 1300nm which is the zero dispersion wavelength for silica fiber. Pulses traveling both in forward and backward direction have enough peak power and energy to damage splice points and fiber components. When seeded the self-pulsing and broadband generation is often suppressed but again generate at increased pump powers.

  16. Thermoelectric as recovery and harvesting of waste heat from portable generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, S. N.; Kamarrudin, N. S.; Hashim, M. S. M.; Bakar, S. A.; Razlan, Z. M.; Harun, A.; Ibrahim, I.; Faizi, M. K.; Saad, M. A. M.; Zunaidi, I.; Wan, W. K.; Desa, H.

    2017-10-01

    Generation of waste heat was ineluctable especially during energy producing process. Waste heat falls into low temperature grade make it complicated to utilize. Thermoelectric generator (TEG) offers opportunity to harvest any temperature grade heat into useful electricity. This project is covered about recovery and utilizing waste heat from portable electric generator by using a TEG which placed at exhaust surface. Temperature difference at both surfaces of TEG was enhanced with supplying cold air from a wind blower. It is found that, even at low air speed, the TEG was successfully produced electricity with aid from DC-DC booster. Results shows possibility to harvest low temperature grade heat and still exist areas for continual improvement.

  17. Characteristics and Generation of Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) in Semarang City Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikri, Elanda; Purwanto; Sunoko, Henna Rya

    2018-02-01

    Most of Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) is currently mixed with domestics waste. So that, it can impact human health and environmental quality. One important aspect in the management strategy is to determine the quantity generated and characteristics of HHW. The method used to determine the characteristics HHW refers to SNI 19-2454-2002, while the HHW generation refers to the SNI 19-3694-1994 calculated based on weight and volume. Research was conducted in four districts of Semarang. The samples used in this study were 400 families calculated based on the proportion of Slovin Formula. The characteristic of HHW in Semarang City is mainly infectious (79%), then poisonous (13%), combustible (6%) and corrosive materials (2%). The quantity HHW generated is 0.01 kg/person/day equivalent with 5.1% of municipal solid waste (MSW) in Semarang (linear equations : y=1,278x+82,00 (volume), y=0,216x+13,89 (weight).

  18. Extension of supercontinuum spectrum generated in photonic crystal fiber by using chirped femtosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengelis, Julius; Jarutis, Vygandas; Sirutkaitis, Valdas

    2017-08-01

    We present results of experimental and numerical investigation of supercontinuum generation in polarization maintaining photonic crystal fiber (PCF) using chirped femtosecond pulses. The initial unchirped pump pulse source was a mode-locked Yb:KGW laser generating 52 nJ energy 110 fs duration pulses at 1030 nm with 76 MHz repetition rate. The nonlinear medium was a 32 cm long polarization maintaining PCF manufactured by NKT Photonics A/S. We demonstrated the influence of pump pulse chirp on spectral characteristics of supercontinuum. We showed that by chirping pump pulses positively or negatively one can obtain broader supercontinuum spectrum than in case of unchirped pump pulses at the same peak power. Moreover, the extension can be controlled by changing the amount of pump pulse chirp. In our case the supercontinuum spectrum width was extended by up to 115 nm (at maximum chirp value of +10500 fs2 that we could achieve in our setup) compared to the case of unchirped pump at the same peak power.

  19. Efficient third harmonic generation of a CW-fibered 1.5 µm laser diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Charles; Chea, Erick; Nishida, Yoshiki; du Burck, Frédéric; Acef, Ouali

    2016-10-01

    We report on frequency tripling of CW-Telecom laser diode using two cascaded PPLN ridge nonlinear crystals, both used in single-pass configuration. All optical components used for this development are fibered, leading to a very compact and easy to use optical setup. We have generated up to 290 mW optical power in the green range, from 800 mW only of infrared power around 1.54 µm. This result corresponds to an optical conversion efficiency P 3 ω / P ω > 36 %. To our knowledge, this is best value ever demonstrated up today for a CW-third harmonic generation in single-pass configuration. This frequency tripling experimental setup was tested over more than 2 years of continuous operation, without any interruption. The compactness and the reliability of our device make it very suitable as a transportable optical oscillator. In particular, it paves the way for embedded applications thanks to the high level of long-term stability of the optical alignments.

  20. Fiber-Based, Double-Sided, Reduced Graphene Oxide Films for Efficient Solar Vapor Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ankang; Ming, Xin; Fu, Yang; Wang, Gang; Wang, Xianbao

    2017-09-06

    Solar vapor generation is a promising and whole new branch of photothermal conversion for harvesting solar energy. Various materials and devices for solar thermal conversion were successively produced and reported for higher solar energy utilization in the past few years. Herein, a compact device of reduced graphene oxides (rGO) and paper fibers was designed and assembled for efficient solar steam generation under light illumination, and it consists of water supply pipelines (WSP), a thermal insulator (TI) and a double-sided absorbing film (DSF). Heat localization is enabled by the black DSF due to its broad absorption of sunlight. More importantly, the heat transfer, from the hot DSF to the cold base fluid (water), was suppressed by TI with a low thermal conductivity. Meanwhile, bulk water was continuously transported to the DSF by WSP through TI, which was driven by the surface energy and surface tension based on the capillary effect. The effects of reduction degrees of rGO on the photothermal conversion were explored, and the evaporation efficiency reached 89.2% under one sun with 60 mg rGO. This new microdevice provided a basic technical support for distillation, desalination, sewage treatment, and related technologies.

  1. Evaluation of Wear on Macro-Surface Textures Generated by ns Fiber Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harish, V.; Soundarapandian, S.; Vijayaraghavan, L.; Bharatish, A.

    2018-03-01

    The demand for improved performance and long term reliability of mechanical systems dictate the use of advanced materials and surface engineering techniques. A small change in the surface topography can lead to substantial improvements in the tribological behaviour of the contact surfaces. One way of altering the surface topography is by surface texturing by introducing dimples or channels on the surfaces. Surface texturing is already a successful technique which finds a wide area of applications ranging from heavy industries to small scale devices. This paper reports the effect of macro texture shapes generated using a nanosecond fiber laser on wear of high carbon chromium steel used in large size bearings having rolling contacts. Circular and square shaped dimples were generated on the surface to assess the effect of sliding velocities on friction coefficient. Graphite was used as solid lubricant to minimise the effect of wear on textured surfaces. The laser parameters such as power, scan speed and passes were optimised to obtain macro circular and square dimples which was characterised using a laser confocal microscope. The friction coefficients of the circular and square dimples were observed to lie in the same range due to minimum wear on the surface. On the contrary, at medium and higher sliding velocities, square dimples exhibited lower friction coefficient values compared to circular dimples. The morphology of textured specimen was characterised using Scanning Electron Microscope.

  2. Bare Fiber Bragg Gratings embedded into concrete buffer Supercontainer concept for nuclear waste storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinet, Damien; Chah, Karima; Megret, Patrice; Caucheteur, Christophe [Electromagnetism and Telecommunications Department of the University of Mons, 31 Boulevard Dolez, 7000 Mons, (Belgium); Gusarov, Andrei [Belgian Nuclear Research Center, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol, (Belgium); Faustov, Alexey [Belgian Nuclear Research Center, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol, (Belgium); Electromagnetisme and Telecommunication Department of the University of Mons, 31 Boulevard Dolez, 7000 Mons, (Belgium); Areias, Lou [Mechanics of Materials and Constructions Department of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels, (Belgium); European Underground Research Infrastructure for Disposal of nuclear waste In Clay Environment, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol, (Belgium)

    2015-07-01

    We present the preliminary results obtained with bare fiber Bragg grating-based sensors embedded into half-scale Belgian Supercontainer concept. Being temperature and strain sensitive, some sensors were placed into aluminum tubes to monitor only temperature and results were compared with thermocouples data. The utility of using bare fiber Bragg gratings, knowing that these ones are very fragile, is to have a direct contact between the high alkaline environment of the concrete and silica fibers and to determine its impact over a very long time. (authors)

  3. Environmental justice implications of industrial hazardous waste generation in India: a national scale analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Pratyusha; Chakraborty, Jayajit

    2016-12-01

    While rising air and water pollution have become issues of widespread public concern in India, the relationship between spatial distribution of environmental pollution and social disadvantage has received less attention. This lack of attention becomes particularly relevant in the context of industrial pollution, as India continues to pursue industrial development policies without sufficient regard to its adverse social impacts. This letter examines industrial pollution in India from an environmental justice (EJ) perspective by presenting a national scale study of social inequities in the distribution of industrial hazardous waste generation. Our analysis connects district-level data from the 2009 National Inventory of Hazardous Waste Generating Industries with variables representing urbanization, social disadvantage, and socioeconomic status from the 2011 Census of India. Our results indicate that more urbanized and densely populated districts with a higher proportion of socially and economically disadvantaged residents are significantly more likely to generate hazardous waste. The quantity of hazardous waste generated is significantly higher in more urbanized but sparsely populated districts with a higher proportion of economically disadvantaged households, after accounting for other relevant explanatory factors such as literacy and social disadvantage. These findings underscore the growing need to incorporate EJ considerations in future industrial development and waste management in India.

  4. Systematic characterization of generation and management of e-waste in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Huabo; Hu, Jiukun; Tan, Quanyin; Liu, Lili; Wang, Yanjie; Li, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, there has been much effort to promote the management of e-waste in China. Policies have been affected to prohibit imports and to control pollution. Research has been conducted in laboratories and on large-scale industrial operations. A subsidy system to support sound e-waste recycling has been put in place. However, the handling of e-waste is still a concern in China and the issue remains unresolved. There has been relatively little work to follow up this issue or to interpret continuing problems from the perspective of sustainable development. This paper first provides a brief overview of conventional and emerging environmental pollution in Chinese "famous" e-waste dismantling areas, including Guiyu in Guangdong and Wenling in Zhejiang. Environmentalists have repeatedly proven that these areas are significantly polluted. Importing and backyard recycling are decreasing but are ongoing. Most importantly, no work is being done to treat or remediate the contaminated environmental media. The situation is exacerbated by the rising tide of e-waste generated by domestic update of various electronics. This study, therefore, employs a Sales Obsolescence Model approach to predict the generation of e-waste. When accounting for weight, approximately 8 million tons of e-waste will be generated domestically in 2015, of which around 50% is ferrous metals, followed by miscellaneous plastic (30%), copper metal and cables (8%), aluminum (5%), and others (7%). Of this, 3.6% will come from scrap PCBs and 0.2% from lead CRT glass. While more and more end-of-life electronics have been collected and treated by formal or licensed recyclers in China in terms of our analysis, many of them only have dismantling and separation activities. Hazardous e-wastes, including those from PCBs, CRT glass, and brominated flame retardant (BFR) plastics, have become problematic and probably flow to small or backyard recyclers without environmentally sound management. Traditional

  5. Preliminary investigation on the suitablity of using fiber reinforced concrete in the construction of a hazardous waste disposal vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramey, M.R.; Daie-e, G.

    1988-07-01

    There are certain hazardous wastes that must be contained in an extremely secure vessel for transportation and disposal. The vessel, among other things, must be able to withstand relatively large impacts without rupturing. Such containment vessels therefore must be able to absorb substantial amounts of energy during an impact and still perform their function. One of the impacts that the vessel must withstand is a 30-foot fall onto an unyielding surface. For some disposal scenarios it is proposed to encase the waste in a steel enclosure which is to be surrounded by a thick layer of concrete which, in turn, is encased by a relatively thin steel shell. Tests on concrete in compression and flexure, including static, dynamic and impact tests, have shown that low modulus concretes tend to behave in a less brittle manner than higher modulus concretes. Tests also show that fiber reinforced concretes have significantly greater ductility, crack propagation resistance and toughness than conventional concretes. Since it is known that concrete is a reasonably brittle material, it is necessary to do impact tests on sample containment structures consisting of thin-walled metal containers having closed ends which are filled with concrete, grout, or fiber reinforced concrete. This report presents the results of simple tests aimed at observing the behavior of sample containment structures subjected to impacts due to a fall from 30 feet. 8 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Particle passage kinetics and neutral detergent fiber degradability of silage of pineapple waste (aerial parts under different packing densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciele Araújo de Oliveira Caetano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics of in situ degradability parameters of the dry matter (DM and neutral detergent fiber (NDF and the passage of materials originating from the ensilage of the waste from pineapple cultivation (aerial parts. The four treatments utilized were silage of pineapple waste compacted at 600, 700, 900 and 1000 kg/m³. After ensiling the material from the pineapple cultivation, the particle-transit and rumen-degradation kinetics were analyzed. For the analysis of particle transit, chromium was utilized as a marker to mark the fiber. Passage rates were determined by retrieving the markers in the feces of the animals. In the degradation assay, samples were incubated in nylon bags for 0, 6, 18, 48 and 96 hours. The behavior observed in the regression curves of the variables analyzed describes high correlation between them, i.e., the time during which the silage is retained in the rumen influences its digestibility and its degradation rate. Although the silage compacted at 900 kg/m³ shows a larger potentially digestible fraction, it is recommended that it be ensiled at a compaction density of approximately 750 kg/m³ due to the lower cost and shorter mean retention time in the rumen-reticulum and rumen fill, thereby increasing the ruminal degradation and passage dynamics.

  7. Treatment of Lagoon sludge waste generated from Uranium Conversion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, D.S.; Oh, J.H.; Lee, K.I.; Choi, Y.D.; Hwang, S.T.; Park, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the dissolution property of nitrate salts in the desalination process by water and the drying property of residual solid after separating nitrates in a series of processes for the sludge treatment. Desalination was carried out with the adding ratio of water and drying property was analyzed by TG/DTA, FTIR, and XRD. Nitrate salts involved in the sludge were separated over 97 % at the water adding ratio of 2.5. But a small quantity of calcium and sodium nitrate remained in the residue. These were decomposed over 600 deg. C while calcium carbonate, which was a main compound of residual solid, was decomposed into calcium oxide over 750 deg. C. The residual solid has to be decomposed over 800 deg. C to converse uranyl nitrate of six values into the stable U 3 O 8 of four values. As a result of removing the nitrates at the adding ratio of 2.5 and drying the residue over 900 deg. C, volume of the sludge waste decreased over 80 %. (authors)

  8. Developments in, and environmental impacts of, electricity generation from municipal solid waste and landfill gas combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porteous, A.

    1993-01-01

    The 1991 NFFO allocations for renewable energy generation are reviewed with emphasis on electricity from municipal solid waste (MSW) and landfill gas (LFG) combustion tranches. The implications of materials recovery on the calorific value of MSW are considered, as are the environmental impacts of both MSW and LFG combustion with special reference to air pollutant emissions. The performance and economics of state of the art incineration and LFG power generating plants are examined. It is shown that energy recovery from these wastes can be both cost effective and environmentally desirable. (Author)

  9. Steam generators and waste heat boilers for process and plant engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Ganapathy, V

    2014-01-01

    Incorporates Worked-Out Real-World ProblemsSteam Generators and Waste Heat Boilers: For Process and Plant Engineers focuses on the thermal design and performance aspects of steam generators, HRSGs and fire tube, water tube waste heat boilers including air heaters, and condensing economizers. Over 120 real-life problems are fully worked out which will help plant engineers in evaluating new boilers or making modifications to existing boiler components without assistance from boiler suppliers. The book examines recent trends and developments in boiler design and technology and presents novel idea

  10. Preparation and Characterization of UPR/ LNR/ Glass Fiber Composite by using Unsaturated Polyester Resin (PET) from PET Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Farhana Hisham; Ishak Ahmad; Rusli Daik

    2011-01-01

    UPR/ LNR/ glass fibre composite had been prepared by using unsaturated polyester resin (UPR) based from recycled PET product. PET waste was recycled by glycolysis process and the glycides product was then reacted with maleic anhydride to produce unsaturated polyester resin. The preparation of UPR/ LNR blends were conducted by varying the amount of LNR addition to the resin ranging from 0-7.5 % (wt). The composition of UPR/LNR blend with good mechanical properties had been selected as a matrix of the glass fiber reinforced composite. Glass fibre was also treated by (3-Amino propil)triethoxysilane as a coupling agent. From the result, the addition of 2.5 % LNR in UPR had showed the optimum mechanical and morphological properties where the elastomer particle's were well dispersed in the matrix with smaller size. The silane treatment on the glass fiber increased the tensile and impact strength values of the UPR/ LNR/ GF composite compared to untreated fiber reinforcement. (author)

  11. Investigation of hydrolyzed polyacrylonitrile fibers utilization for the removal of strontium from liquid nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, U.; Altas, Y.

    2009-01-01

    In this study polyacrylonitrile fiber (PANF) was hydrolyzed both with sodium and potassium hydroxide solutions using alkali hydrolysing method and hydrolyzed polyacrylonitrile fibers (HPANF) were obtained. These two types of hydrolyzed fibers were compared taking into consideration strontium adsorption capacities and it was decided that the hydrolysis with KOH solution is more convenient. The hydrolyzed polyacrylonitrile fiber was characterized by DTA/TGA, FTIR and SEM analysis. The adsorption behaviors of HPANF towards Sr ions was investigated by batch technique, the parameters affect the strontium adsorption such as the initial pH of the solution, Sr concentration, temperature, shaking time, adsorbent dose (V/m ratio) were determined. The adaptation of the obtained adsorption equilibrium data to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were investigated and some of the thermodynamic values of the system (ΔGo, ΔHo, ΔSo) were calculated.

  12. Regulatory and management requirements for investigation-derived waste generated during environmental investigations and cleanups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clary, M.B.

    1994-01-01

    Environmental cleanup efforts often result in the generation of waste materials, such as soil samples, drill cuttings, decontamination water, drilling muds, personal protective equipment, and disposable sampling equipment. The management of associated with site characterization and remediation issues is a complicated issue at many CERCLA/RCRA facilities throughout the country, primarily because of the federal hazardous waste regulations. The hazardous waste regulations were intended to apply to the active generation of hazardous waste at industrial facilities and do not often make sense when applied to sites con by poor disposal practices of the past. In order to manage investigation derived waste in a more rational, logical manner, EPA issued guidance on the management of investigation-derived waste (IDW) at Superfund sites in January, 1992. The basic intent of the EPA guidance is to provide Superfund Site Managers with options for handling, managing, and disposing of IDW. The second part of this paper provides a detailed analysis of current IDW practices at various Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and Superfund sites across the nation. Some sites, particularly the DOE facilities, with more complicated on-going cleanup efforts have developed site-specific written procedures for managing IDW, often incorporating risk assessment. In come cases, these site-specific policies are going farther than the current EPA and Colorado policies in terms of conservatively managing IDW

  13. Hydrogen sulfide generation in shipboard oily-water waste. Part 3. Ship factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgeman, D.K.; Fletcher, L.E.; Upsher, F.J.

    1995-04-01

    The chemical and microbiological composition of bilge-water in ships of the Royal Australian Navy has been investigated in relation to the formation of hydrogen sulfide by sulfate-reducing bacteria. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were found in most ships in populations up to 800,000 per mL. Sulfate in the wastes is provided by sea-water. Sea-water constitutes up to 60% (median 20%) of the wastes analysed. Evidence for generation of hydrogen sulfide in the ships was found directly as sulfide or indirectly as depressed sulfate concentrations. The low levels of sulfide found in bilge-water from machinery spaces suggested the ventilation systems were effectively removing the gas from the working area. The effect of storage of the wastes under conditions which simulated the oily- water holding tanks of ships were also investigated. Some wastes were found to produce large quantities of hydrogen sulfide on storage. The wastes that failed to produce hydrogen sulfide were investigated to identify any specific nutritional deficiencies. Some organic substances present in bilge-water, such as lactate or biodegradable cleaning agents, and phosphate strongly influenced the generation of hydrogen sulfide in stored oily-water wastes.

  14. Automated methodology for estimating waste streams generated from decommissioning contaminated facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, J.J.; King, D.A.; Humphreys, K.K.; Haffner, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the DOE Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS), a viable way to determine aggregate waste volumes, cost, and direct labor hours for decommissioning and decontaminating facilities is required. In this paper, a methodology is provided for determining waste streams, cost and direct labor hours from remediation of contaminated facilities. The method is developed utilizing U.S. facility remediation data and information from several decommissioning programs, including reactor decommissioning projects. The method provides for rapid, consistent analysis for many facility types. Three remediation scenarios are considered for facility D ampersand D: unrestricted land use, semi-restricted land use, and restricted land use. Unrestricted land use involves removing radioactive components, decontaminating the building surfaces, and demolishing the remaining structure. Semi-restricted land use involves removing transuranic contamination and immobilizing the contamination on-site. Restricted land use involves removing the transuranic contamination and leaving the building standing. In both semi-restricted and restricted land use scenarios, verification of containment with environmental monitoring is required. To use the methodology, facilities are placed in a building category depending upon the level of contamination, construction design, and function of the building. Unit volume and unit area waste generation factors are used to calculate waste volumes and estimate the amount of waste generated in each of the following classifications: low-level, transuranic, and hazardous waste. Unit factors for cost and labor hours are also applied to the result to estimate D ampersand D cost and labor hours

  15. Supercontinuum generation covering the entire 0.4-5 µm transmission window in a tapered ultra-high numerical aperture all-solid fluorotellurite fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Z. X.; Yao, C. F.; Jia, S. J.; Wang, F.; Wang, S. B.; Zhao, Z. P.; Liao, M. S.; Qin, G. S.; Hu, L. L.; Ohishi, Y.; Qin, W. P.

    2018-02-01

    Enormous efforts have been made to realize supercontinuum (SC) generation covering the entire transmission window of fiber materials for their wide applications in many fields. Here we demonstrate ultra-broadband SC generation from 400 to 5140 nm in a tapered ultra-high numerical aperture (NA) all-solid fluorotellurite fiber pumped by a 1560 nm mode-locked fiber laser. The fluorotellurite fibers are fabricated using a rod-in-tube method. The core and cladding materials are TeO2-BaF2-Y2O3- and TeO2-modified fluoroaluminate glasses, respectively, which have large refractive index contrast and similar thermal expansion coefficients and softening temperatures. The NA at 3200 nm of the fluorotellurite fiber is about 1.11. Furthermore, tapered fluorotellurite fibers are prepared using an elongation machine. SC generation covering the entire 0.4-5 µm transmission window is achieved in a tapered fluorotellurite fiber for a pumping peak power of ~10.5 kW through synergetic control of dispersion, nonlinearity, confinement loss and other unexpected effects (e.g. the attachment of dust or water to the surface of the fiber core) of the fiber. Our results show that tapered ultra-high NA all-solid soft glass fibers have a potential for generating SC light covering their entire transmission window.

  16. Potential ability of zeolite to generate high-temperature vapor using waste heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukai, Jun; Wijayanta, Agung Tri

    2018-02-01

    In various material product industries, a large amount of high temperature steam as heat sources are produced from fossil fuel, then thermal energy retained by condensed water at lower than 100°C are wasted. Thermal energies retained by exhaust gases at lower than 200°C are also wasted. Effective utilization of waste heat is believed to be one of important issues to solve global problems of energy and environment. Zeolite/water adsorption systems are introduced to recover such low-temperature waste heats in this study. Firstly, an adsorption steam recovery system was developed to generate high temperature steam from unused hot waste heat. The system used a new principle that adsorption heat of zeolite/water contact was efficiently extracted. A bench-scaled system was constructed, demonstrating contentious generation of saturated steam nearly 150°C from hot water at 80°C. Energy conservation is expected by returning the generated steam to steam lines in the product processes. Secondly, it was demonstrated that superheated steam/vapor at higher than 200°C could be generated from those at nearly 120°C using a laboratory-scaled setup. The maximum temperature and the time variation of output temperature were successfully estimated using macroscopic heat balances. Lastly, the maximum temperatures were estimated whose saturate air at the relative humidity 20-80% were heated by the present system. Theoretically, air at higher than 200°C was generated from saturate air at higher than 70°C. Consequently, zeolite/water adsorption systems have potential ability to regenerate thermal energy of waste water and exhaust gases.

  17. Assessment and quantification of plastics waste generation in major 60 cities of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalini, R; Srinivasulu, B; Shit, Subhas C; Nigam, Suneel Kumar; Akolkar, A B; Dwivedfi, R K

    2013-04-01

    Polymers or plastics materials registered rapid growth in 1970s, 1980s and 1990s at the rate of 2-2.5 times the GDP growth in India. The demand for plastic raw material got more than doubled from 3.3 Million Metric Ton to 6.8 Million Metric Tons in 2010 attributed mainly to rapid urbanization, spread of retail chains, plastics based packaging from grocery to food and vegetable products to cosmetics and consumer items. Plastics packages have its merits over many of conventional materials in the related sector but unless they are collected back effectively after their use to go into recycling process, they become an eyesore in the stream of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) due to high visibility. As the synthetic and conventional plastics are non-biodegradable in nature, these remain in the dump yards/ landfills for several years, if not collected properly. Due to non- biodegradability, plastics waste remains in the environment for several years, if not collected and disposing plastics wastes at landfills are unsafe since toxic chemicals leach out into the soil and as they contaminate soil and underground water quality. The municipal solid waste also increasing day-by-day due to the inefficient source collection, segregation and transmission of plastics waste for recycling and reusing. In order to find out the realistic plastics waste generation, a study on assessment and quantification of plastics waste has been carried out by CPCB in collaboration with CIPET on selected 60 major cities of India.

  18. Extraction of lead from waste CRT funnel glass by generating lead sulfide - An approach for electronic waste management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Biao; Hui, Wenlong

    2017-09-01

    Waste cathode ray tube (CRT) funnel glass is the key and difficult points in waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) disposal. In this paper, a novel and effective process for the detoxification and reutilization of waste CRT funnel glass was developed by generating lead sulfide precipitate via a high-temperature melting process. The central function in this process was the generation of lead sulfide, which gathered at the bottom of the crucible and was then separated from the slag. Sodium carbonate was used as a flux and reaction agent, and sodium sulfide was used as a precipitating agent. The experimental results revealed that the lead sulfide recovery rate initially increased with an increase in the amount of added sodium carbonate, the amount of sodium sulfide, the temperature, and the holding time and then reached an equilibrium value. The maximum lead sulfide recovery rate was approximately 93%, at the optimum sodium carbonate level, sodium sulfide level, temperature, and holding time of 25%, 8%, 1200°C, and 2h, respectively. The glass slag can be made into sodium and potassium silicate by hydrolysis in an environmental and economical process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Generation, transport and conduct of radioactive wastes of low and intermediate level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizcano, D.; Jimenez, J.

    2005-01-01

    The technological development of the last decades produced an increment in the application of the radiations in different human activities. The effect of it has been it the production of radioactive wastes of all the levels. In Mexico, some of the stages of the administration of the waste of low and intermediate level have not been completely resolved, as the case of the treatment and the final storage. In this work aspects of the generation, the transport and the administration of radioactive waste of low and intermediate level produced in the non energy applications from the radioactive materials to national level, indicating the generated average quantities, transported and tried annually by the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ). The main generators of wastes in Mexico, classified according to the activity in which the radioactive materials are used its are listed. Some of the main processes of treatment of radioactive wastes broadly applied in the world and those that are used at the moment in our country are also presented. (Author)

  20. Lixiviation of plutonium contaminated solid wastes by aqueous solution of electro-generated reducing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarande, Michelle

    1991-01-01

    This study concerns the development of the new concept for the decontamination of plutonium bearing solid wastes, based on the lixiviation of the wastes using electro-generated reducing agents. First, a comparative study of the kinetics of the dissolution of pure PuO 2 (prepared by calcination of Pu (IV) oxalate at 450 C) in sulfuric acid media, with different reducing agents, was realized. Qualitatively these reagents can be sorted in three groups: 1 / fast kinetics for Cr(II), V(II) and U(III); 2 / slow kinetics for Ti(III); 3 / very slow kinetics for V(III) and U(VI). In order to contribute to the design of an electrochemical reactor for the generation of the reducing agents usable for the lixiviation of plutonium bearing solid wastes, the study of the diffusion coefficients of both oxidized and reduced forms of different redox couples, at different temperatures, was undertaken. The results of this study also permits, from the knowledge of the diffusional activation energy of the ions, to conclude that the dissolution of pure plutonium dioxide under the action of these reducing agents is not diffusion limited. The feasibility of the plutonium decontamination treatment of synthetic or real solid wastes was then studied at laboratory scale using electro-generated V(II), which is with Cr(II) among the best reagents. The efficiency of the treatment was good, (80 pc Pu solubilisation yield), especially in the case of cellulosic or miscellaneous organic wastes. (author) [fr