WorldWideScience

Sample records for waste fermentation effluent

  1. Development of bioelectrochemical systems using various biogas fermenter effluents as inocula and municipal waste liquor as adapting substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakonyi, Péter; Koók, László; Keller, Enikő; Bélafi-Bakó, Katalin; Rózsenberszki, Tamás; Saratale, Ganesh Dattatraya; Nguyen, Dinh Duc; Banu, J Rajesh; Nemestóthy, Nándor

    2018-07-01

    The purpose of this research was to improve microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance - treating landfill-derived waste liquor - by applying effluents of various biogas fermenters as inocula. It turned out that the differences of initial microbial community profiles notably influenced the efficiency of MFCs. In fact, the adaptation time (during 3 weeks of operation) has varied significantly, depending on the source of inoculum and accordingly, the obtainable cumulative energy yields were also greatly affected (65% enhancement in case of municipal wastewater sludge inoculum compared to sugar factory waste sludge inoculum). Hence, it could be concluded that the capacity of MFCs to utilize the complex feedstock was heavily dependent on biological factors such as the origin/history of inoculum, the microbial composition as well as proper acclimation period. Therefore, these parameters should be of primary concerns for adequate process design to efficiently generate electricity with microbial fuel cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Incorporation of whey permeate, a dairy effluent, in ethanol fermentation to provide a zero waste solution for the dairy industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashar, Archana; Jin, Yiqiong; Mason, Beth; Chae, Michael; Bressler, David C

    2016-03-01

    This study proposes a novel alternative for utilization of whey permeate, a by-product stream from the dairy industry, in wheat fermentation for ethanol production using Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Whey permeates were hydrolyzed using enzymes to release fermentable sugars. Hydrolyzed whey permeates were integrated into wheat fermentation as a co-substrate or to partially replace process water. Cold starch hydrolysis-based simultaneous saccharification and fermentation was done as per the current industrial protocol for commercial wheat-to-ethanol production. Ethanol production was not affected; ethanol yield efficiency did not change when up to 10% of process water was replaced. Lactic acid bacteria in whey permeate did not negatively affect the co-fermentation or reduce ethanol yield. Whey permeate could be effectively stored for up to 4 wk at 4 °C with little change in lactose and lactic acid content. Considering the global abundance and nutrient value of whey permeate, the proposed strategy could improve economics of the dairy and biofuel sectors, and reduce environmental pollution. Furthermore, our research may be applied to fermentation strategies designed to produce value-added products other than ethanol. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Waste monitoring system for effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, J.M.; Gomez, B.; Trujillo, L.; Malcom, J.E.; Nekimken, H.; Pope, N.; Bibeau, R.

    1995-07-01

    The waste monitoring system in use at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Plutonium Facility, TA-55, is a computer-based system that proves real-time information on industrial effluents. Remote computers monitor discharge events and data moves from one system to another via a local area network. This report describes the history, system design, summary, instrumentation list, displays, trending screens, and layout of the waste monitoring system

  4. Waste Treatment Plant Liquid Effluent Treatability Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LUECK, K.J.

    2001-01-01

    Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) provided a forecast of the radioactive, dangerous liquid effluents expected to be generated by the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The forecast represents the liquid effluents generated from the processing of 25 distinct batches of tank waste through the WTP. The WTP liquid effluents will be stored, treated, and disposed of in the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) and the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) evaluated the treatability of the WTP liquid effluents in the LERFIETF. The evaluation was conducted by comparing the forecast to the LERFIETF treatability envelope, which provides information on the items that determine if a liquid effluent is acceptable for receipt and treatment at the LERFIETF. The WTP liquid effluent forecast is outside the current LERFlETF treatability envelope. There are several concerns that must be addressed before the WTP liquid effluents can be accepted at the LERFIETF

  5. A comprehensive review on two-stage integrative schemes for the valorization of dark fermentative effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivagurunathan, Periyasamy; Kuppam, Chandrasekhar; Mudhoo, Ackmez; Saratale, Ganesh D; Kadier, Abudukeremu; Zhen, Guangyin; Chatellard, Lucile; Trably, Eric; Kumar, Gopalakrishnan

    2017-12-21

    This review provides the alternative routes towards the valorization of dark H 2 fermentation effluents that are mainly rich in volatile fatty acids such as acetate and butyrate. Various enhancement and alternative routes such as photo fermentation, anaerobic digestion, utilization of microbial electrochemical systems, and algal system towards the generation of bioenergy and electricity and also for efficient organic matter utilization are highlighted. What is more, various integration schemes and two-stage fermentation for the possible scale up are reviewed. Moreover, recent progress for enhanced performance towards waste stabilization and overall utilization of useful and higher COD present in the organic source into value-added products are extensively discussed.

  6. Effects of pH control and concentration on microbial oil production from Chlorella vulgaris cultivated in the effluent of a low-cost organic waste fermentation system producing volatile fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun Uk; Kim, Young Mo; Choi, Yun-Nam; Xu, Xu; Shin, Dong Yun; Park, Jong Moon

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of applying volatile fatty acids (VFAs) produced from low-cost organic waste to the major carbon sources of microalgae cultivation for highly efficient biofuel production. An integrated process that consists of a sewage sludge fermentation system producing VFAs (SSFV) and mixotrophic cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) was operated to produce microbial lipids economically. The effluents from the SSFV diluted to different concentrations at the level of 100%, 50%, and 15% were prepared for the C. vulgaris cultivation and the highest biomass productivity (433±11.9 mg/L/d) was achieved in the 100% culture controlling pH at 7.0. The harvested biomass included lipid contents ranging from 12.87% to 20.01% under the three different effluent concentrations with and without pH control. The composition of fatty acids from C. vulgaris grown on the effluents from the SSFV complied with the requirements of high-quality biodiesel. These results demonstrated that VFAs produced from the SSFV are favorable carbon sources for cultivating C. vulgaris. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Potential use of thermophilic dark fermentation effluents in photofermentative hydrogen production by Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozgura, E.; Afsar, N.; Eroglu, I. [Middle East Technical University, Department of Chemical Engineering, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); De Vrije, T.; Claassen, P.A.M. [Wageningen UR, Agrotechnology and Food Sciences Group, Wageningen UR, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Yucel, M.; Gunduz, U. [Middle East Technical University, Department of Biology, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-12-15

    Biological hydrogen production by a sequential operation of dark and photofermentation is a promising route to produce hydrogen. The possibility of using renewable resources, like biomass and agro-industrial wastes, provides a dual effect of sustainability in biohydrogen production and simultaneous waste removal. In this study, photofermentative hydrogen production on effluents of thermophilic dark fermentations on glucose, potato steam peels (PSP) hydrolysate and molasses was investigated in indoor, batch operated bioreactors. An extreme thermophile Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus was used in the dark fermentation step, and Rhodobacter capsulatus (DSM1710) was used in the photofermentation step. Addition of buffer, Fe and Mo to dark fermentor effluents (DFEs) improved the overall efficiency of hydrogen production. The initial acetate concentration in the DFE needed to be adjusted to 30-40 mM by dilution to increase the yield of hydrogen in batch light-supported fermentations. The thermophilic DFEs are suitable for photofermentative hydrogen production, provided that they are supplemented with buffer and nutrients. The overall hydrogen yield of the two-step fermentations was higher than the yield of single step dark fermentations.

  8. Effects of methanogenic effluent recycle on fermentative hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, J.T.; Bagley, D.M. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2004-07-01

    Most research on fermentative hydrogen production has focused on optimizing the process and not on the practicalities of pH control although active pH control in a hydrogen reactor is necessary for stable and efficient performance. Batch experiments have shown that hydrogen ceases to be produced when there is no pH control. This study determined if recycle effluent from the methane reactor of a two-phase hydrogen-producing system would reduce the external alkali needed for pH control in a hydrogen reactor. It also determined if recycle affected the performance of the hydrogen reactor and the overall two-phase system. This paper describes the experimental laboratory-scale, two-phase hydrogen producing system which was operated alternately with and without effluent recycle from a methane reactor to the hydrogen reactor. The two-phase hydrogen producing system yielded 5.7 times more energy recovery than that obtained by the fermentative hydrogen producing reactor alone. The use of effluent from the methane reactor can reduce the operational cost of external alkali for pH control. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Wastes, effluents and pollution. impact on environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, Ch.; Regent, A.

    2008-01-01

    From concrete examples, the authors explain the nature, and the place of different pollution and wastes sources in our environment and the risks that make run. They bring some tracks to our modern communities that must react and imagine remedial actions to manage wastes, effluents and pollutions in order to make them harmless; this new edition enriches of a chapter on health and hygiene problems induced by the different contaminations of environment. (N.C.)

  10. Biogasification of solid wastes by two-phase anaerobic fermentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, S.; Vieitez, E.R.; Liu, T.; Kato, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Municipal, industrial and agricultural solid wastes, and biomass deposits, cause large-scale pollution of land and water. Gaseous products of waste decomposition pollute the air and contribute to global warming. This paper describes the development of a two-phase fermentation system that alleviates methanogenic inhibition encountered with high-solids feed, accelerates methane fermentation of the solid bed, and captures methane (renewable energy) for captive use to reduce global warming. The innovative system consisted of a solid bed reactor packed with simulated solid waste at a density of 160 kg/m 3 and operated with recirculation of the percolated culture (bioleachate) through the bed. A rapid onset of solids hydrolysis, acidification, denitrification and hydrogen gas formation was observed under these operating conditions. However, these fermentative reactions stopped at a total fatty acids concentration of 13,000 mg/l (as acetic) at pH 5, with a reactor head-gas composition of 75 percent carbon dioxide, 20 percent nitrogen, 2 percent hydrogen and 3 percent methane. Fermentation inhibition was alleviated by moving the bioleachate to a separate methane-phase fermenter, and recycling methanogenic effluents at pH 7 to the solid bed. Coupled operation of the two reactors promoted methanogenic conversion of the high-solids feed. (author)

  11. Bioremediation of the textile waste effluent by Chlorella vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    El-Kassas, Hala Yassin; Mohamed, Laila Abdelfattah

    2014-01-01

    The microalgae biomass production from textile waste effluent is a possible solution for the environmental impact generated by the effluent discharge into water sources. The potential application of Chlorella vulgaris for bioremediation of textile waste effluent (WE) was investigated using 22 Central Composite Design (CCD). This work addresses the adaptation of the microalgae C. vulgaris in textile waste effluent (WE) and the study of the best dilution of the WE for maximum biomass production...

  12. Effluent treatment and waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    In recent years there has been a great increase in the attention given to environmental matters by the public, media and Government. This has been reflected in the increased stature of environmental pressure groups and the introduction of new regulatory bodies and procedures. However, the satisfactory treatment and disposal of waste depends ultimately upon the development and employment of efficient low cost processes, and the enforcement of effective legislation. This Conference organised by the Yorkshire Branch of IChemE in association with the Institution's Environmental Protection Subject Group, will address the areas of waste monitoring, developments in pollution control processes and process economics and will look forward to future trends in waste disposal. It will also consider the impact of recent legislation upon the process industries. (author)

  13. Solidification of radioactive waste effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mergan, L.M.; Cordier, J.-P.

    1981-01-01

    A process and apparatus for solidifying radioactive waste liquid containing dissolved and/or suspended solids is disclosed. The process includes chemically treating for pH adjustment and precipitation of solids, concentrating solids with a thin-film evaporator to provide liquid concentrate containing about 50% solids, and drying the concentrate with a heated mixing apparatus. The heated mixing apparatus includes a heated wall and working means for shearing dried concentrate from internal surfaces and subdividing dry concentrate into dry, powdery particles. The working means includes a rotor and helical means for positively advancing the concentrate and resulting dry particles from inlet to outlet of the mixing apparatus. The dry particles may also be encapsulated in a matrix material. Entrained particles in the vapor stream from the evaporator and mixer are removed in an integral particle separator and the vapor is subsequently condensed and may be recycled upstream of the thin-film evaporator. A section of the mixer may be used for mixing dry particles with the matrix material in a continuous drying and mixing sequence. A section of the mixer also may be used for mixing the treating chemical with the waste liquid

  14. Liquid effluent retention facility dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    This appendix to the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application contains pumps, piping, leak detection systems, geomembranes, leachate collection systems, earthworks and floating cover systems

  15. Solvent Fermentation From Palm Oil Mill Effluent Using Clostridium acetobutylicum In Oscillatory Flow Bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takriff, M.S.; Masngut, N.; Kadhum, A.A.H.; Kalil, M.S.; Mohammad, A.W.

    2009-01-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation from Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME) by C. acetobutylicum NCIMB 13357 in an oscillatory flow bioreactor was investigated. Experimental works were conducted in a U-shaped stainless steel oscillatory flow bioreactor at oscillation frequency between 0.45-0.78 Hz and a constant amplitude of 12.5 mm. Fermentations were carried out for 72 hr at 35 degree Celsius using palm oil mill effluent and reinforced clostridia medium as a growth medium in batch culture. Result of this investigation showed that POME is a viable media for ABE fermentation and oscillatory flow bioreactor has an excellent potential as an alternative fermentation device. (author)

  16. Fungal protein from corn waste effluents : a model study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the microbiological aspects of the production of microbial protein ('single cell protein'; SCP) from corn waste effluents with simultaneous reduction of the COD of these effluents.

    For practical reasons the corn waste water itself was

  17. Hydrogen production using Rhodopseudomonas palustris WP 3-5 with hydrogen fermentation reactor effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi-Mei Lee; Kuo-Tsang Hung

    2006-01-01

    The possibility of utilizing the dark hydrogen fermentation stage effluents for photo hydrogen production using purple non-sulfur bacteria should be elucidated. In the previous experiments, Rhodopseudomonas palustris WP3-5 was proven to efficiently produce hydrogen from the effluent of hydrogen fermentation reactors. The highest hydrogen production rate was obtained at a HRT value of 48 h when feeding a 5 fold effluent dilution from anaerobic hydrogen fermentation. Besides, hydrogen production occurred only when the NH 4 + concentration was below 17 mg-NH 4 + /l. Therefore, for successful fermentation effluent utilization, the most important things were to decrease the optimal HRT, increase the optimal substrate concentration and increase the tolerable ammonia concentration. In this study, a lab-scale serial photo-bioreactor was constructed. The reactor overall hydrogen production efficiency with synthetic wastewater exhibiting an organic acid profile identical to that of anaerobic hydrogen fermentation reactor effluent and with effluent from two anaerobic hydrogen fermentation reactors was evaluated. (authors)

  18. Hydrogen production from palm oil mill effluent by fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanisho, S.; Shimazaki, T. [Yokohama National Univ., Shigeharu TANISHO and Tsuruyo SHIMAZAKI, Yokohama (Japan)

    2003-09-01

    Hydrogen production by fermentation was examined by using palm oil mill effluent. Clostridium butyricum produced more than 2.2 NL of hydrogen from 1 L of raw POME at pH 5.0, and Enterobacter aerogenes produced ca. 1.9 NL at pH 6.0. While from the culture liquid added 1% of peptone on the raw POME, C. butyricum produced more than 3.3 NL and also E. aerogenes 3.4 NL at pH 6.0 and 5.0, respectively. In this manner, the addition of nitrogen source to the POME liquid exerted an influence on the volume of hydrogen production. Since Aspergillus niger has ability to produce cellulase, co-cultivation of C.butyricum with A. niger was tried to utilize celluloses in the POME. Against our expectations, however, the results were lower productivities than pure cultivation's. We analyzed the components of POME by liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis before and after cultivation. The main substrate for hydrogen production was found to be glycerol. (authors)

  19. Bioremediation of the textile waste effluent by Chlorella vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Yassin El-Kassas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The microalgae biomass production from textile waste effluent is a possible solution for the environmental impact generated by the effluent discharge into water sources. The potential application of Chlorella vulgaris for bioremediation of textile waste effluent (WE was investigated using 22 Central Composite Design (CCD. This work addresses the adaptation of the microalgae C. vulgaris in textile waste effluent (WE and the study of the best dilution of the WE for maximum biomass production and for the removal of colour and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD by this microalga. The cultivation of C. vulgaris, presented maximum cellular concentrations Cmax and maximum specific growth rates μmax in the wastewater concentration of 5.0% and 17.5%, respectively. The highest colour and COD removals occurred with 17.5% of textile waste effluent. The results of C. vulgaris culture in the textile waste effluent demonstrated the possibility of using this microalga for the colour and COD removal and for biomass production. There was a significant negative relationship between textile waste effluent concentration and Cmax at 0.05 level of significance. However, sodium bicarbonate concentration did not significantly influence the responses of Cmax and the removal of colour and COD.

  20. Potential use and the energy conversion efficiency analysis of fermentation effluents from photo and dark fermentative bio-hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiping; Li, Yameng; Zhang, Huan; He, Chao; Zhang, Quanguo

    2017-12-01

    Effluent of bio-hydrogen production system also can be adopted to produce methane for further fermentation, cogeneration of hydrogen and methane will significantly improve the energy conversion efficiency. Platanus Orientalis leaves were taken as the raw material for photo- and dark-fermentation bio-hydrogen production. The resulting concentrations of acetic, butyric, and propionic acids and ethanol in the photo- and dark-fermentation effluents were 2966mg/L and 624mg/L, 422mg/L and 1624mg/L, 1365mg/L and 558mg/L, and 866mg/L and 1352mg/L, respectively. Subsequently, we calculated the energy conversion efficiency according to the organic contents of the effluents and their energy output when used as raw material for methane production. The overall energy conversion efficiencies increased by 15.17% and 22.28%, respectively, when using the effluents of photo and dark fermentation. This two-step bio-hydrogen and methane production system can significantly improve the energy conversion efficiency of anaerobic biological treatment plants. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Waste analysis plan for the 200 area effluent treatment facility and liquid effluent retention facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballantyne, N.A.

    1995-01-01

    This waste analysis plan (WAP) has been prepared for startup of the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) and operation of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF), which are located on the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. This WAP documents the methods used to obtain and analyze representative samples of dangerous waste managed in these units, and of the nondangerous treated effluent that is discharged to the State-Approved Land Disposal System (SALDS). Groundwater Monitoring at the SALDS will be addressed in a separate plan

  2. Mixotrophic Chlorella sp. UJ-3 cultivation in the typical anaerobic fermentation effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Shuhao; Kong, Miao; Zhu, Feifei; Zou, Bin; Wang, Feng; Xu, Ling; Zhang, Cunsheng; Huang, Daming

    2018-02-01

    The growth of mixotrophic Chlorella sp. UJ-3 cultivated in the three typical anaerobic fermentation effluents was investigated in this paper. The results showed that the microalgae grew best under intermediate light intensity for all the types of fermentation effluents. The butyrate type fermentation effluents induced the fastest growth rate for Chlorella sp. UJ-3, with a maximal cell concentration of 3.8×10 7  cells/mL. Under intermediate light intensity, the volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were almost depleted on the fifth day of the cultivation for all the three types of fermentation systems. The ratios of chlorophyll a/b were all increased for the three systems, indicating enhanced energy-capturing capability of the microalgae for photosynthesis after the VFAs were depleted. The highest lipid content was 25.4%dwt achieved in the butyrate type fermentation, and the fatty acid compositions were found to be considerably different for these three types of fermentation systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The impact of anode acclimation strategy on microbial electrolysis cell treating hydrogen fermentation effluent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaohu; Zhang, Ruizhe; Qian, Yawei

    2017-01-01

    The impact of different anode acclimation methods for enhancing hydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) was investigated in this study. The anodes were first acclimated in microbial fuel cells using acetate, butyrate and corn stalk fermentation effluent (CSFE) as substrate before...

  4. WASTE TREATMENT PLANT (WTP) LIQUID EFFLUENT TREATABILITY EVALUATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LUECK, K.J.

    2004-01-01

    A forecast of the radioactive, dangerous liquid effluents expected to be produced by the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) was provided by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI 2004). The forecast represents the liquid effluents generated from the processing of Tank Farm waste through the end-of-mission for the WTP. The WTP forecast is provided in the Appendices. The WTP liquid effluents will be stored, treated, and disposed of in the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) and the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Both facilities are located in the 200 East Area and are operated by Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) for the US. Department of Energy (DOE). The treatability of the WTP liquid effluents in the LERF/ETF was evaluated. The evaluation was conducted by comparing the forecast to the LERF/ETF treatability envelope (Aromi 1997), which provides information on the items which determine if a liquid effluent is acceptable for receipt and treatment at the LERF/ETF. The format of the evaluation corresponds directly to the outline of the treatability envelope document. Except where noted, the maximum annual average concentrations over the range of the 27 year forecast was evaluated against the treatability envelope. This is an acceptable approach because the volume capacity in the LERF Basin will equalize the minimum and maximum peaks. Background information on the LERF/ETF design basis is provided in the treatability envelope document

  5. Studies on biochemical changes in maize wastes fermented with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In an attempt to transform the agricultural waste products of maize cobs and shafts into useful products such as animal feeds and reduce the pollution effects of these wastes during maize seasons, they were fermented using Aspergillus niger for 72 hours. The fermented residues were analyzed with regard to proximate ...

  6. Biohydrogen production from combined dark-photo fermentation under a high ammonia content in the dark fermentation effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chun-Yen [National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan, Taiwan (China). Sustainable Environment Research Center; Lo, Yung-Chung; Yeh, Kuei-Ling [National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Chang, Jo-Shu [National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan, Taiwan (China). Sustainable Environment Research Center; National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan, Taiwan (China). Microalgae Biotechnology and Bioengineering Lab.

    2010-07-01

    Integrated dark and photo (two-stage) fermentation was employed to enhance the performance of H{sub 2} production. First, the continuous dark fermentation using indigenous Clostridium butyricum CGS5 was carried out at 12 h HRT and fed with sucrose at a concentration of 18750 mg/l. The overall H{sub 2} production rate and H{sub 2} yield were fairly stable with a mean value of 87.5 ml/l/h and 1.015 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose, respectively. In addition, a relatively high ammonia nitrogen content (574 mg/l) in the dark fermentation effluent was observed. The soluble metabolites from dark fermentation, consisting mainly of butyric, lactic and acetic acids, were directly used as the influent of continuous photo-H{sub 2} production process inoculated with Rhodopseudomonas palutris WP 3-5 under the condition of 35oC, 10000 lux irradiation, pH 7.0 and 48 h HRT. The maximum overall hydrogen production rate from photo fermentation was 16.4 ml H{sub 2}/l/h, and the utilization of the soluble metabolites could reach 90%. The maximum H{sub 2} yield dramatically increased from 1.015 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose (in dark fermentation only) to 6.04 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose in the combined dark and photo fermentation. Surprisingly, the operation strategy applied in this work was able to attain an average NH{sub 3}-N removal efficiency of 92%, implying that our photo-H{sub 2} production system has a higher NH{sub 3}-N tolerance, demonstrating its high applicability in an integrated dark-photo fermentation system. (orig.)

  7. Citric acid fermentation medium from sugar waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, S.; Yarita, K.; Uchio, R.; Kikuchi, K.

    1977-11-02

    Wastes from a sugar refinery are hydrolyzed to yield fructose and glucose; a part of the fructose is removed from the hydrolyzate by treating with lime and the remaining hydrolyzate is used as a C source for citric acid fermentation. Thus, 1 kg beet molasses was dissolved in 2.5 L water, adjusted to pH 1.5, hydrolyzed at 60/sup 0/ for 4 h, neutralized with Ca(OH)/sub 2/, and the precipitate was removed. The hydrolyzate was cooled to 0/sup 0/, mixed with a solution containing 205 g Ca(OH)/sub 2/, seeded with fructose, and allowed to stand. The precipitate was suspended in cold water, neutralized with H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, and filtered to obtain a solution containing 169 g fructose and 6.3 g glucose. The filtrate from the Ca(OH)/sub 2/ precipitation was neutralized with H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and removal of precipitate yielded a solution containing 87 g fructose and 220 g glucose, which was used as a C source for citric acid fermentation with Aspergillus niger AJ7015.

  8. Biohydrogen production by anaerobic fermentation of waste. Final project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karakashev, D.; Angelidaki, I.

    2009-01-15

    The objective of this project was to investigate and increase dark fermentative hydrogen production from organic wastes by optimizing important process parameters (reactor type, pH, temperature, organic loading, retention time, inoculation strategy, microbial composition). Labscale experiments were carried out at the Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark. A two steps process for hydrogen production in the first step and methane production in the second step in serial connected fully mixed reactors was developed and could successfully convert organic matter to approx. 20-25 % hydrogen and 15-80 % to methane. Sparging with methane produced in the second stage could significantly increase the hydrogen production. Additionally it was shown that upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor system was very promising for high effective biohydrogen production from glucose at 70 deg C. Glucose-fed biofilm reactors filled with plastic carriers demonstrated high efficient extreme thermophilic biohydrogen production with mixed cultures. Repeated batch cultivations via exposure of the cultures to increased concentrations of household solid waste was found to be most useful method to enhance hydrogen production rate and reduce lag phase of extreme thermophilic fermentation process. Low level of pH (5.5) at 3-day HRT was enough to inhibit completely the methanogenesis and resulted in stable extreme thermophilic hydrogen production. Homoacetogenisis was proven to be an alternative competitor to biohydrogen production from organic acids under thermophilic (55 deg. C) conditions. With respect to microbiology, 16S rRNA targeted oligonucleotide probes were designed to monitor the spatial distribution of hydrogen producing bacteria in sludge and granules from anaerobic reactors. An extreme thermophilic (70 deg. C), strict anaerobic, mixed microbial culture with high hydrogen producing potential was enriched from digested household waste. Culture

  9. Biological Hydrogen Production: Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation with Nitrogen and Phosphorus Removal from Wastewater Effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    process.7 The reaction is of great economic importance given that the world’s industrial production of nitrogenous fertilizer increased 27-fold between... Enzymatic Saccharification and Fermentation of Paper and Pulp Industry Effluent for Biohydrogen Production . Int. J. Hydrogen Energy 2010, 35, pp...Reactor Setup and Operation 11 4.2 Operational Comparison: SBR and CBR 12 4.3 Effect of pH and Loading on Hydrogen Production 13 4.4 Enzymatic Source

  10. Methane and organic fertilizers from wood waste and manure fermentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romashkevich, I F; Karelina, G N

    1961-01-01

    Fermentation of sawdust of foliate trees by mesophyllic microflora is feasible, producing CH/sub 4/; the yield of gas is 500 cu m/ton, which surpasses that from manure and other agricultural wastes. Preliminary acid hydrolysis is unnecessary. At 5% organic matter, sawdust fermentation proceeds normally and with good yield, but 10% initial concentration of organic matter results in poor performance. Fermentation of common manure, that of sawdust and manure, or that of sawdust alone yields essentially the same gases. Fir sawdust does not ferment, but it does not stop manure or ash sawdust from fermenting if mixed with these. Fermented sawdust behaves like a fertilizer; it is beneficial to plants and crops. Nonfermented sawdust does not. Lupine N content is increased by both fermented and nonfermented sawdusts.

  11. Hanford Facility dangerous waste permit application, liquid effluent retention facility and 200 area effluent treatment facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coenenberg, J.G.

    1997-08-15

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to 10 be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document 11 number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the 12 Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation 13 submitted for individual, `operating` treatment, storage, and/or disposal 14 units, such as the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 15 Treatment Facility (this document, DOE/RL-97-03). 16 17 Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford 18 Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B 19 permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of 20 Ecology (Ecology 1987 and 1996) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 21 (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needs 22 defined by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of 23 Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington 24 State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit 25 application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the 26 chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is 27 contained in the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 28 Treatment Facility permit application documentation, in relation to the 29 Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents 30 Section. 31 32 Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in 33 nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units 34 (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever 35 appropriate, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 36 Treatment Facility permit application documentation makes cross-reference to 37 the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating

  12. Hanford Facility dangerous waste permit application, liquid effluent retention facility and 200 area effluent treatment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coenenberg, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to 10 be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document 11 number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the 12 Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation 13 submitted for individual, 'operating' treatment, storage, and/or disposal 14 units, such as the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 15 Treatment Facility (this document, DOE/RL-97-03). 16 17 Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford 18 Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B 19 permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of 20 Ecology (Ecology 1987 and 1996) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 21 (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needs 22 defined by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of 23 Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington 24 State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit 25 application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the 26 chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is 27 contained in the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 28 Treatment Facility permit application documentation, in relation to the 29 Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents 30 Section. 31 32 Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in 33 nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units 34 (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever 35 appropriate, the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and 200 Area Effluent 36 Treatment Facility permit application documentation makes cross-reference to 37 the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating

  13. Management of effluents and radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Management of effluents and radioactive waste from nuclear power plants, from the viewpoint of radiological protection, basically consists of three main themes: 1) developing and implementing actions that minimize, or where possible, eliminate generation. These actions ranging from simple awareness of people involved with the work on project modifications; 2) maintain a system of accounting and control that allows to know the characteristics of effluents and wastes, charting indicators that reveal the performance and trends of plant, and supplying data proving the compliance of national regulatory body standards; 3) Storing the solid waste generated in a safe manner, ensuring that the physical integrity of the packaged is maintained and that there is no impact to the population and the environment

  14. Studies on biochemical changes in maize wastes fermented with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JTEkanem

    In an attempt to transform the agricultural waste products of maize cobs and shafts into useful products such as ... with transforming organic matter in the nature .... cerevisae Solid Media Fermentation. Food. Chemistry 82 (4) 599-602. 6.AOAC ...

  15. Fermentation for Disinfesting Fruit Waste From Drosophila Species (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, R; Dobrovin-Pennington, A; Shaw, B; Buss, D S; Cross, J V; Fountain, M T

    2017-08-01

    Economic losses in a range of fruit crops due to the Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) have become severe. Removal and treatment of fruit waste, which may harbor D. suzukii, is a key step in preventing reinfestation of fruit production. Natural fermentation for disinfesting fruit wastes from D. suzukii was examined at ambient air temperatures of 12-20 °C. Soft and stone fruit wastes infested with eggs, larvae, and pupae of Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen) or D. suzukii were placed in sealed vessels containing fruit wastes, and samples were retrieved at intervals and tested for the emergence of adults. Mean temperatures of the fruit waste in the sealed vessels during fermentation were 15-23 °C. Fermentation for 3 d was effective in disinfesting waste from different life stages of D. suzukii. Treatment for 4 d also ensured that the waste was free of viable life stages of D. melanogaster, which could be used as an indicator species for disinfestation of waste from D. suzukii owing to its greater tolerance of fermentation. The O2 concentration of the headspace air in the vessels became undetectable after 13-16 h, with a corresponding increase in CO2 concentration, which exceeded 80% vol/vol. The resulting hypoxia and hypercapnia may explain the efficacy of the fermentation treatment in disinfesting the waste. Fermented fruit remained attractive to D. suzukii and retained its capacity to rear a life cycle. Covering or mixing fermented fruit with a sufficient depth (0.1 m) or volume (×9) of soil or coir prevented the reinfestation of treated waste. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Radioactive wastes and effluents in hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlier, V.

    2000-01-01

    Out of sealed sources that have a particular management and regulation, the hospitals and laboratories use radioisotopes in liquid unsealed sources. The radioisotopes receive a particular surveillance, as well for their use as for the wastes they produce. At each step of their use, a follow up of these products and induced wastes is going to be made in a rigorous way, and their noxiousness taken into account. Whatever can be the product, the aim is the same: the matter is to preserve man and his environment from noxious effects of these products. (N.C.)

  17. Fermentative biohydrogen and biomethane co-production from mixture of food waste and sewage sludge: Effects of physiochemical properties and mix ratios on fermentation performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Jun; Ding, Lingkan; Lin, Richen; Yue, Liangchen; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Microanalyses revealed food waste had more gelatinized organics and less mineral ash. • Mixed food waste and sewage sludge at 5 ratios were used for H_2 and CH_4 co-production. • Highest H_2 yield of 174.6 mL/gVS was achieved when food waste:sewage sludge was 3:1. • Co-fermentation enhanced carbon conversion by strengthening hydrolysis of substrates. • Energy yield rose from 1.9 kJ/gVS in H_2 to 11.3 kJ/gVS in H_2 and CH_4 co-production. - Abstract: The accumulation of increasingly generated food waste and sewage sludge is currently a heavy burden on environment in China. In this study, the physiochemical properties of food waste and sewage sludge were identified using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to investigate the effects on the fermentation performance in the co-fermentation of food waste and sewage sludge for biohydrogen production. The high gelatinized organic components in food waste, the enhanced bioaccessibility due to the dilution of mineral compounds in sewage sludge, and the balanced C/N ratio synergistically improved the fermentative biohydrogen production through the co-fermentation of food waste and sewage sludge at a volatile solids (VS) mix ratio of 3:1. The biohydrogen yield of 174.6 mL/gVS was 49.9% higher than the weighted average calculated from mono-fermentation of food waste and sewage sludge. Co-fermentation also strengthened the hydrolysis and acidogenesis of the mixture, resulting in a total carbon conversion efficiency of 63.3% and an energy conversion efficiency of 56.6% during biohydrogen production. After the second-stage anaerobic digestion of hydrogenogenic effluent, the energy yield from the mixed food waste and sewage sludge significantly increased from 1.9 kJ/gVS in the first-stage biohydrogen production to 11.3 kJ/gVS in the two-stage fermentative biohydrogen and biomethane co-production.

  18. Coculture fermentation of banana agro-waste to ethanol by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Banana is a major cash crop of many regions generating good amount of waste after harvest. This agro waste which is left for natural degradation is used as substrate for single step ethanol fermentation by thermophilic, cellulolytic, ethanologenic Clostridium thermocellum CT2, a new culture isolated from elephant ...

  19. Fermentation of household wastes and industrial waste water; Vergaerung von haeuslichen Abfaellen und Industrieabwaessern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelmann, W [Arbeitsgemeinschaft Bioenergie ' arbi' , Maschwanden (Switzerland); Engeli, H [Probag AG, Dietikon (Switzerland); Glauser, M [Biol-Conseils SA, Neuchatel (Switzerland); Hofer, H [HTH-Verfahrenstechnik, Winterthur (Switzerland); Membrez, Y [EREP SA, Aclens (Switzerland); Meylan, J -H [Lausanne (Switzerland); Schwitzguebel, J -P [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Genie biologique, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1993-07-01

    This comprehensive brochure reviews various technologies for the environment-friendly treatment of organic wastes and residues. The principles of anaerobic digestion are discussed. Authorities, planners and engineers concerned with waste treatment are provided with an overview of current technology in the organic wastes area. The brochure emphasises the importance of fermentation processes in waste treatment, discusses the legal pre-requisites for biogas production, lists the biological and process-oriented fundamentals of fermentation and examines the energy potential of biogenic wastes and waste water. Further, details are given on the treatment of both industrial waste water and solid organic wastes and, finally, the economics of fermentation is examined. Useful data is presented in table form and the various processes described are illustrated by schematics and flow diagrams. An appendix lists suggestions for further reading on the subject.

  20. Method and apparatus for treating gaseous effluents from waste treatment systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Philip A.; Kujawa, Stephan T.

    2000-01-01

    Effluents from a waste treatment operation are incinerated and oxidized by passing the gases through an inductively coupled plasmas arc torch. The effluents are transformed into plasma within the torch. At extremely high plasma temperatures, the effluents quickly oxidize. The process results in high temperature oxidation of the gases without addition of any mass flow for introduction of energy.

  1. Mono-fermentation of shea waste in anaerobic digesters - laboratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For the purpose of understanding the characteristics in performance of the shea waste and to provide the necessary input parameters towards the design of biogas plants, mono-fermentation as an option in anaerobic digestion for energy (methane) generation was investigated. Six horizontal reactors with a liquid volume of ...

  2. Biotransformation of the fish waste by fermentation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2006-10-02

    Oct 2, 2006 ... 1920, Virtanen used a sulphuric and hydrochloric acid mixture for the ... investment and by using acidifying microorganisms and molasses (source of carbon) ... The yeast was isolated from sugar-based juice. Their selection is ... agitated medium leads to a reduction of the length of fermentation to three days ...

  3. The deep processing of seaweed industrial waste--Influence of several fermentation on seaweed waste of feed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shipeng; Zhang, Shuping

    2018-02-01

    This paper focuses on several factors on the effects of fermented seaweed feed, and obtains the optimal fermentation process through the analysis of nutrients. Through the experiment we can get, Seaweed waste fermented the best feed when adding 1% of microbial agents and 0.5% of corn powder, fermenting for 15 days.

  4. Enhanced fermentable sugar production from kitchen waste using various pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafid, Halimatun Saadiah; Rahman, Nor'Aini Abdul; Md Shah, Umi Kalsom; Baharudin, Azhari Samsu

    2015-06-01

    The kitchen waste fraction in municipal solid waste contains high organic matter particularly carbohydrate that can contribute to fermentable sugar production for subsequent conversion to bioethanol. This study was carried out to evaluate the influence of single and combination pretreatments of kitchen waste by liquid hot water, mild acid pretreatment of hydrochloric acid (HCl) and sulphuric acid (H2SO4) and enzymatic hydrolysis (glucoamylase). The maximum total fermentable sugar produced after combination pretreatment by 1.5% HCl and glucoamylase consisted of 93.25 g/L glucose, 0.542 g/L sucrose, 0.348 g/L maltose, and 0.321 g/L fructose. The glucose released by the combination pretreatment method was 0.79 g glucose/g KW equivalent to 79% of glucose conversion. The effects of the pre-treatment on kitchen waste indicated that the highest solubilization was 40% by the combination method of 1.5% HCl and glucoamylase. The best combination pre-treatment gave concentrations of lactic acid, acetic acid, and propionic acid of 11.74 g/L, 6.77 g/L, and 1.02 g/L, respectively. The decrease of aliphatic absorbance bands of polysaccharides at 2851 and 2923 cm(-1) and the increase on structures of carbonyl absorbance bands at 1600 cm(-1) reflects the progress of the kitchen waste hydrolysis to fermentable sugars. Overall, 1.5% HCl and glucoamylase treatment was the most profitable process as the minimum selling price of glucose was USD 0.101/g kitchen waste. Therefore, the combination pretreatment method was proposed to enhance the production of fermentable sugar, particularly glucose from kitchen waste as the feedstock for bioethanol production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effluent Management Facility Evaporator Bottom-Waste Streams Formulation and Waste Form Qualification Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saslow, Sarah A.; Um, Wooyong; Russell, Renee L.

    2017-08-02

    This report describes the results from grout formulation and cementitious waste form qualification testing performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS). These results are part of a screening test that investigates three grout formulations proposed for wide-range treatment of different waste stream compositions expected for the Hanford Effluent Management Facility (EMF) evaporator bottom waste. This work supports the technical development need for alternative disposition paths for the EMF evaporator bottom wastes and future direct feed low-activity waste (DFLAW) operations at the Hanford Site. High-priority activities included simulant production, grout formulation, and cementitious waste form qualification testing. The work contained within this report relates to waste form development and testing, and does not directly support the 2017 Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) performance assessment (PA). However, this work contains valuable information for use in PA maintenance past FY 2017 and future waste form development efforts. The provided results and data should be used by (1) cementitious waste form scientists to further the understanding of cementitious leach behavior of contaminants of concern (COCs), (2) decision makers interested in off-site waste form disposal, and (3) the U.S. Department of Energy, their Hanford Site contractors and stakeholders as they assess the IDF PA program at the Hanford Site. The results reported help fill existing data gaps, support final selection of a cementitious waste form for the EMF evaporator bottom waste, and improve the technical defensibility of long-term waste form risk estimates.

  6. Investigation on the Influence of Bio-catalytic Enzyme Produced from Fruit and Vegetable Waste on Palm Oil Mill Effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasit, Nazaitulshila; Chee Kuan, Ooi

    2018-04-01

    Pre-consumer waste from supermarkets, such as vegetables and fruits dreg are always discarded as solid waste and disposed to landfill. Implementing waste recovery method as a form of waste management strategy will reduce the amount of waste disposed. One of the ways to achieve this goal is through fermentation of the pre-consumer supermarket waste to produce a solution known as garbage enzyme. This study has been conducted to produce and characterize biocatalytic garbage enzyme and to evaluate its influence on palm oil mill effluent as a pre-treatment process before further biological process takes place. Garbage enzyme was produced by three-month long fermentation of a mixture of molasses, pre-consumer supermarket residues, and water in the ratio of 1:3:10. Subsequently, the characterization of enzyme was conducted based on pH, total solids (TS), total suspended solids (TSS), total dissolved solids (TDS), chemical oxygen demand (COD), and enzyme activities. The influence of produced enzyme was evaluated on oil & grease (O&G), TSS and COD of palm oil mill effluent (POME). Different levels of dilution of garbage enzyme to POME samples (5%, 10%, 15%) were explored as pre-treatment (duration of six days) and the results showed that the garbage enzyme contained bio-catalytic enzyme such as amylase, protease, and lipase. The pre-treatment showed removal of 90% of O&G in 15% dilution of garbage enzyme. Meanwhile, reduction of TSS and COD in dilution of 10% garbage enzyme were measured at 50% and 25% respectively. The findings of this study are important to analyse the effectiveness of pre-treatment for further improvement of anaerobic treatment process of POME, especially during hydrolysis stage.

  7. Utilization of cassava waste through fermentation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotong, N.

    1991-01-01

    Over 400 isolates of molds were screened for raw starch digesting enzymes and aspergillus J8 ad Rhizopus N37 were selected for further investigations. Crude enzymes obtained from wheat bran was higher than from rice bran. Crude enzymes from Aspergillus is active at pH 4.0, whereas that from Rhizopus is active at pH 5.0. Aspergillus J8 gave higher yield of silage fermentation. Selection of yeast strain was accomplished, it was found that Saccharomyces cerevisiae SC90, the local commercial strain (non-flocculent) performed best in fermentation of cassava mash. Another strain AM12, a flocculent fusant strain derived from fusion between flocculent strain and sake brewing strain was comparable to that of commercial strain at normal temperature but performed better at higher temperature up to 40 deg C. It is unlikely that fuel alcohol produced from raw cassava will be able to compete with petroleum fuel at this moment. However, silage fermentation to increase nutritional quality of the silage through selected strains of microorganisms has a good prospect to pursue. (author)

  8. Converting the organic fraction of solid waste from the city of Abu Dhabi to valuable products via dark fermentation – Economic and energy assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonk, Fabian; Bastidas-Oyanedel, Juan-Rodrigo; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The cost and energy demand for dark fermentation using OFMSW were established. • Dark fermentation using OFMSW can produce a carbon source for bioprocesses of about 330 USD/t COD . • A maximum purification cost of VFAs from dark fermentation using OFMSW was established to 15 USD/m 3 . • Replacing fossil fuel based products by dark fermentation will probably lead to net energy savings. - Abstract: Landfilling the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) leads to greenhouse gas emissions and loss of valuable resources. Sustainable and cost efficient solutions need to be developed to solve this problem. This study evaluates the feasibility of using dark fermentation (DF) to convert the OFMSW to volatile fatty acids (VFAs), fertilizer and H 2 . The VFAs in the DF effluent can be used directly as substrate for subsequent bioprocesses or purified from the effluent for industrial use. DF of the OFMSW in Abu Dhabi will be economically sustainable once VFA purification can be accomplished on large scale for less than 15 USD/m 3 effluent . With a VFA minimum selling price of 330 USD/t COD , DF provides a competitive carbon source to sugar. Furthermore, DF is likely to use less energy than conventional processes that produce VFAs, fertilizer and H 2 . This makes DF of OFMSW a promising waste treatment technology and biorefinery platform

  9. Converting the organic fraction of solid waste from the city of Abu Dhabi to valuable products via dark fermentation – Economic and energy assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonk, Fabian, E-mail: fbonk@masdar.ac.ae; Bastidas-Oyanedel, Juan-Rodrigo, E-mail: jbastidas@masdar.ac.ae; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye, E-mail: jschmidt@masdar.ac.ae

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The cost and energy demand for dark fermentation using OFMSW were established. • Dark fermentation using OFMSW can produce a carbon source for bioprocesses of about 330 USD/t{sub COD}. • A maximum purification cost of VFAs from dark fermentation using OFMSW was established to 15 USD/m{sup 3}. • Replacing fossil fuel based products by dark fermentation will probably lead to net energy savings. - Abstract: Landfilling the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) leads to greenhouse gas emissions and loss of valuable resources. Sustainable and cost efficient solutions need to be developed to solve this problem. This study evaluates the feasibility of using dark fermentation (DF) to convert the OFMSW to volatile fatty acids (VFAs), fertilizer and H{sub 2}. The VFAs in the DF effluent can be used directly as substrate for subsequent bioprocesses or purified from the effluent for industrial use. DF of the OFMSW in Abu Dhabi will be economically sustainable once VFA purification can be accomplished on large scale for less than 15 USD/m{sup 3}{sub effluent}. With a VFA minimum selling price of 330 USD/t{sub COD}, DF provides a competitive carbon source to sugar. Furthermore, DF is likely to use less energy than conventional processes that produce VFAs, fertilizer and H{sub 2}. This makes DF of OFMSW a promising waste treatment technology and biorefinery platform.

  10. Waste Management Effluent Treatment Facility: Phase I. CAC basic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemar, D.W.; O'Leary, C.D.

    1984-01-01

    In order to expedite design and construction of the Waste Management Effluent Treatment Facility (WMETF), the project has been divided into two phases. Phase I consists of four storage basins and the associated transfer lines, diversion boxes, and control rooms. The design data pertaining to Phase I of the WMETF project are presented together with general background information and objectives for both phases. The project will provide means to store and decontaminate wastewater streams that are currently discharged to the seepage basins in F Area and H Area. This currently includes both routine process flows sent directly to the seepage basins and diversions of contaminated cooling water or storm water runoff that are stored in the retention basins before being pumped to the seepage basins

  11. Remediation of textile dye waste water using a white-rot fungus Bjerkandera adusta through solid-state fermentation (SSF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tim; Nigam, Poonam Singh

    2008-12-01

    A strict screening strategy for microorganism selection was followed employing a number of white-rot fungi for the bioremediation of textile effluent, which was generated from one Ireland-based American textile industry. Finally, one fungus Bjerkandera adusta has been investigated in depth for its ability to simultaneously degrade and enrich the nutritional quality of highly coloured textile effluent-adsorbed barley husks through solid-state fermentation (SSF). Certain important parameters such as media requirements, moisture content, protein/biomass production and enzyme activities were examined in detail. A previously optimised method of dye desorption was employed to measure the extent of dye remediation through effluent decolorisation achieved as a result of fungal activity in SSF. B. adusta was capable of decolourising a considerable concentration of the synthetic dye effluent (up to 53%) with a moisture content of 80-85%. Protein enrichment of the fermented mass was achieved to the extent of 229 g/kg dry weight initial substrate used. Lignin peroxidase and laccase were found to be the two main enzymes produced during SSF of the dye-adsorbed lignocellulosic waste residue.

  12. Methane production from fermentation of winery waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, K V; Liao, P H

    1986-01-01

    A laboratory-scale reactor receiving a mixture of screened dairy manure and winery waste was studied at 35 degrees C and a hydraulic retention time of 4 days. The maximum methane production rate of 8.14 liter CH/sub 4//liter/day was achieved at a loading rate of 7.78 g VS/liter/day (VS = volatile solids). The corresponding methane yield was 1.048 liter CH/sub 4//g VS added. Using a mixture of winery wastes and screened dairy manure as the feed material to anaerobic reactor resulted in a significant increase in total methane production compared to that from screened dairy manure alone. The biodegradation efficiency increased with the addition of winery wastes to screened dairy manure. 18 references.

  13. Recovery of nitrogen and phosphorus from alkaline fermentation liquid of waste activated sludge and application of the fermentation liquid to promote biological municipal wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Juan; Chen, Yinguang

    2009-07-01

    In previous publications we reported that by controlling the pH at 10.0 the accumulation of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) during waste activated sludge (WAS) fermentation was remarkably improved [Yuan, H., Chen, Y., Zhang, H., Jiang, S., Zhou, Q., Gu, G., 2006. Improved bioproduction of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) from excess sludge under alkaline conditions. Environ. Sci. Technol. 40, 2025-2029], but significant ammonium nitrogen (NH(4)-N) and soluble ortho-phosphorus (SOP) were released [Chen, Y., Jiang, S., Yuan, H., Zhou, Q., Gu, G., 2007. Hydrolysis and acidification of waste activated sludge at different pHs. Water Res. 41, 683-689]. This paper investigated the simultaneous recovery of NH(4)-N and SOP from WAS alkaline fermentation liquid and the application of the fermentation liquid as an additional carbon source for municipal wastewater biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal. The central composite design (CCD) of the response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to optimize and model the simultaneous NH(4)-N and SOP recovery from WAS alkaline fermentation liquid. Under the optimum conditions, the predicted and experimental recovery efficiency was respectively 73.4 and 75.7% with NH(4)-N, and 82.0 and 83.2% with SOP, which suggested that the developed models described the experiments well. After NH(4)-N and SOP recovery, the alkaline fermentation liquid was added to municipal wastewater, and the influence of volume ratio of fermentation liquid to municipal wastewater (FL/MW) on biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal was investigated. The addition of fermentation liquid didn't significantly affect nitrification. Both SOP and total nitrogen (TN) removal were increased with fermentation liquid, but there was no significant increase at FL/MW greater than 1/35. Compared to the blank test, the removal efficiency of SOP and TN at FL/MW=1/35 was improved from 44.0 to 92.9%, and 63.3 to 83.2%, respectively. The enhancement of phosphorus and nitrogen

  14. Optimization of Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Waste Bread before Fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Hudečková, Helena; Šupinová, Petra; Ing. Mgr. Libor Babák, Ph.D., MBA

    2017-01-01

    Finding of optimal hydrolysis conditions is important for increasing the yield of saccharides. The higher yield of saccharides is usable for increase of the following fermentation effectivity. In this study optimal conditions (pH and temperature) for amylolytic enzymes were searched. As raw material was used waste bread. Two analytical methods for analysis were used. Efficiency and process of hydrolysis was analysed spectrophotometrically by Somogyi-Nelson method. Final yields of glucose were...

  15. Hydrogen production with effluent from an ethanol–H2-coproducing fermentation reactor using a single-chamber microbial electrolysis cell

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Lu; Ren, Nanqi; Xing, Defeng; Logan, Bruce E.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen can be produced by bacterial fermentation of sugars, but substrate conversion to hydrogen is incomplete. Using a single-chamber microbial electrolysis cell (MEC), we show that additional hydrogen can be produced from the effluent

  16. Comment on 'evaluation of dechlorination mechanisms during anaerobic fermentation of blached kraft mill effluent by W.J. Parker, E.R. Hall and G.J. Farquhar'

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    Comment on "Evaluation of dechlorination mechanisms during anaerobic fermentation of bleached kraft mill effluent", is put forth. The data reproduced in Table 1 does not seem to be authentic as the method of preprationo of the chlorinated organic...

  17. Stabilization and Solidification of Nitric Acid Effluent Waste at Y-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Dileep [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lorenzo-Martin, Cinta [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-12-16

    Consolidated Nuclear Security, LLC (CNS) at the Y-12 plant is investigating approaches for the treatment (stabilization and solidification) of a nitric acid waste effluent that contains uranium. Because the pH of the waste stream is 1-2, it is a difficult waste stream to treat and stabilize by a standard cement-based process. Alternative waste forms are being considered. In this regard, Ceramicrete technology, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, is being explored as an option to solidify and stabilize the nitric acid effluent wastes.

  18. Method for removing and decolorizing aqueous waste effluents containing dissolved or dispersed organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Case, F.N.; Ketchen, E.E.

    1975-01-01

    A method is provided for treating organic waste material dissolved or dispersed in an aqueous effluent, which comprises contacting the effluent with an inert particulate carbonaceous sorbent at an oxygen pressure up to 2000 psi, irradiating the resultant mixture with high energy radiation until a decolorized liquid is produced, and then separating the decolorized liquid

  19. Waste characterization for the F/H Effluent Treatment Facility in support of waste certification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.F.

    1994-01-01

    The Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) procedures define the rules concerning packages of solid Low Level Waste (LLW) that are sent to the E-area vaults (EAV). The WACs tabulate the quantities of 22 radionuclides that require manifesting in waste packages destined for each type of vault. These quantities are called the Package Administrative Criteria (PAC). If a waste package exceeds the PAC for any radionuclide in a given vault, then specific permission is needed to send to that vault. To avoid reporting insignificant quantities of the 22 listed radionuclides, the WAC defines the Minimum Reportable Quantity (MRQ) of each radionuclide as 1/1000th of the PAC. If a waste package contains less than the MRQ of a particular radionuclide, then the package's manifest will list that radionuclide as zero. At least one radionuclide has to be reported, even if all are below the MRQ. The WAC requires that the waste no be ''hazardous'' as defined by SCDHEC/EPA regulations and also lists several miscellaneous physical/chemical requirements for the packages. This report evaluates the solid wastes generated within the F/H Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) for potential impacts on waste certification

  20. Screening for crude oil degrading bacteria in liquid organic waste (effluent samples)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akpe, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    The screening for crude oil degrading bacteria in some liquid organic wastes (cassava mill effluents, rubber effluents and oil palm mill effluents) was carried out. Hydrocarbon utilising bacteria were isolated on mineral salt agar using vapour phase technique. The samples yielded 20 bacterial isolates from 13 different genera. Cassava mill effluent and rubber effluent had the highest number (7), while oil palm effluent had the least number (6) of bacterial isolates. The isolates that had the highest occurrence (occurring in all samples) were Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. Of these 13 genera 9 were gram negative, while only 4 were gram positive. The total heterotrophic bacterial (THB) count and total hydrocarbon utilisers (THU) from all the effluent samples ranged from 3.0 * 10/sup 4/ to 6.0* 10/sup 7/ cfu/mL and 2.3 *10/sup 2/ to 4.2*10/sup 3/ cfu/mL, respectively. The counts of hydrocarbon utilisers were obviously lower than the heterotrophic counts, although the differences in counts were found to be statistically non-significant (P > 0.05). Rubber effluents and oil palm mill effluents had the highest number of hydrocarbon utilisers with three isolates each. The active hydrocarbon utilisers encountered in this study included Serratia marscescens, Bacillus cereus, P. aeruginosa, Enterobacter aerogenes and Bacillus subtilis. Presence of nutrients and crude oil degrading bacteria in these effluents suggests that these effluents can be used to enhance bioremediation through their use as biostimulation and bioaugmentation agents. (author)

  1. Eco-friendly process combining physical-chemical and biological technics for the fermented dairy products waste pretreatment and reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasmi, Mariam; Hamdi, Moktar; Trabelsi, Ismail

    2017-01-01

    Residual fermented dairy products resulting from process defects or from expired shelf life products are considered as waste. Thus, dairies wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) suffer high input effluents polluting load. In this study, fermented residuals separation from the plant wastewater is proposed. In the aim to meet the municipal WWTP input limits, a pretreatment combining physical-chemical and biological processes was investigated to reduce residual fermented dairy products polluting effect. Yoghurt (Y) and fermented milk products (RL) were considered. Raw samples chemical oxygen demand (COD) values were assessed at 152 and 246 g.L -1 for Y and RL products, respectively. Following the thermal coagulation, maximum removal rates were recorded at 80 °C. Resulting whey stabilization contributed to the removal rates enhance to reach 72% and 87% for Y and RL samples; respectively. Residual whey sugar content was fermented using Candida strains. Bacterial growth and strains degrading potential were discussed. C. krusei strain achieved the most important removal rates of 78% and 85% with Y and RL medium, respectively. Global COD removal rates exceeded 93%.

  2. The impact of anode acclimation strategy on microbial electrolysis cell treating hydrogen fermentation effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohu; Zhang, Ruizhe; Qian, Yawei; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    2017-07-01

    The impact of different anode acclimation methods for enhancing hydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) was investigated in this study. The anodes were first acclimated in microbial fuel cells using acetate, butyrate and corn stalk fermentation effluent (CSFE) as substrate before moving into MECs, respectively. Subsequently, CSFE was used as feedstock in all the three MECs. The maximum hydrogen yield with the anode pre-acclimated with butyrate (5.21±0.24L H 2 /L CSFE) was higher than that pre-acclimated with acetate (4.22±0.19L H 2 /L CSFE) and CSFE (4.55±0.14L H 2 /L CSFE). The current density (480±11A/m 3 ) and hydrogen production rate (4.52±0.13m 3 /m 3 /d) with the anode pre-acclimated with butyrate were also higher that another two reactors. These results demonstrated that the anode biofilm pre-acclimated with butyrate has significant advantages in CSFE treatment and could improve the performance of hydrogen production in MEC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Biological production of hydrogen by dark fermentation of OFMSW and co-fermentation with slaughterhouse wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, A.; Gomez, X.; Cuestos, M. J.

    2005-07-01

    Hydrogen is an ideal, clean and sustainable energy source for the future because of its high conversion and nonpolluting nature (Lin and Lay, 2003). There are different methods for the production of hydrogen, the traditional ones, are the production from fossil fuels. Aiming to reach a development based on sustainable principles the production of hydrogen from renewable sources is a desirable goal. Among the environmental friendly alternatives for the production of hydrogen are the biological means. Dark fermentation as it is known the process when light is not used; it is a preferable option thanks to the knowledge already collected from its homologous process, the anaerobic digestion for the production of methane. There are several studies intended to the evaluation of the production of hydrogen, many are dedicated to the use of pure cultures or the utilization of basic substrates as glucose or sucrose (Lin and Lay, 2003; Chang et al., 2002, Kim et al., 2005). This study is performed to evaluate the fermentation of a mixture of wastes for the production of hydrogen. It is used as substrate the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes (OFMSW) and a mixture of this residue with slaughterhouse waste. (Author)

  4. Optimization of Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Waste Bread before Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Hudečková

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Finding of optimal hydrolysis conditions is important for increasing the yield of saccharides. The higher yield of saccharides is usable for increase of the following fermentation effectivity. In this study optimal conditions (pH and temperature for amylolytic enzymes were searched. As raw material was used waste bread. Two analytical methods for analysis were used. Efficiency and process of hydrolysis was analysed spectrophotometrically by Somogyi-Nelson method. Final yields of glucose were analysed by HPLC. As raw material was used waste bread from local cafe. Waste bread was pretreated by grinding into small particles. Hydrolysis was performed in 100 mL of 15 % (w/v waste bread particles in the form of water suspension. Waste bread was hydrolysed by two commercial enzymes. For the liquefaction was used α‑amylase (BAN 240 L. The saccharification was performed by glucoamylase (AMG 300 L. Optimal conditions for α‑amylase (pH 6; 80 °C were found. The yield of total sugars was 67.08 g∙L-1 (calculated to maltose. As optimal conditions for glucoamylase (pH 4.2; 60 °C were found. Amount of glucose was 70.28 g∙L1. The time of waste bread liquefaction was 180 minutes. The time of saccharification was 90 minutes. The results were presented at the conference CECE Junior 2014.

  5. State waste discharge permit application: 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (Project W-049H)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    As part of the original Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Concent Order negotiations, US DOE, US EPA and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground to the Hanford Site are subject to permitting in the State Waste Discharge Permit Program (SWDP). This document constitutes the SWDP Application for the 200 Area TEDF stream which includes the following streams discharged into the area: Plutonium Finishing Plant waste water; 222-S laboratory Complex waste water; T Plant waste water; 284-W Power Plant waste water; PUREX chemical Sewer; B Plant chemical sewer, process condensate, steam condensate; 242-A-81 Water Services waste water

  6. State waste discharge permit application: 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (Project W-049H)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    As part of the original Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Concent Order negotiations, US DOE, US EPA and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground to the Hanford Site are subject to permitting in the State Waste Discharge Permit Program (SWDP). This document constitutes the SWDP Application for the 200 Area TEDF stream which includes the following streams discharged into the area: Plutonium Finishing Plant waste water; 222-S laboratory Complex waste water; T Plant waste water; 284-W Power Plant waste water; PUREX chemical Sewer; B Plant chemical sewer, process condensate, steam condensate; 242-A-81 Water Services waste water.

  7. Waste Load Allocation for Whole Effluent Toxicity to Protect Aquatic Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, M. R.

    1992-11-01

    A process is developed to determine a waste load allocation that will implement the narrative criteria for fish and wildlife propagation found in states' water quality standards. The waste load allocation to implement the narrative chronic criterion is determined to be percent effluent at a location in the receiving stream, as opposed to an effluent concentration derived from the numerical waste load allocation process. A typical narrative chronic criterion is "receiving streams shall not exhibit chronic toxicity outside the mixing zone," while a typical numerical chronic criterion is "receiving stream concentration shall not exceed 0.005 μg/L of chlordane outside the mixing zone." Toxicity tests are used to implement narrative criteria, while compliance with numerical criteria involves concentration measurements. It is shown that the appropriate percent effluent is inversely proportional to the dilution factor for chronic toxicity. An appropriate waste load allocation to implement the narrative acute criterion is 100% effluent. Waste load allocation for whole effluent toxicity is feasible. The required independent variables are available to regulatory agencies, and toxicity testing has become routine.

  8. Radionuclide content of wastewater and solid waste from a low-level effluent treatment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhamat Omar; Zalina Laili; Nik Marzukee Nik Ibrahim; Mat Bakar Mahusin

    2010-01-01

    A study on radioactivity levels of wastewater and solid waste from a Low-level Effluent Treatment Plant has been carried out. The measurement of radionuclide concentration was carried out using gamma spectrometry. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides were detected in solid radioactive waste recovered from the treatment plant. The presence of radionuclides in waste water varies depending on activities carried out in laboratories and facilities connected to the plant. (author)

  9. The influence of slaughterhouse waste on fermentative H2 production from food waste: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boni, Maria Rosaria; Sbaffoni, Silvia; Tuccinardi, Letizia

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of slaughterhouse waste (SHW; essentially the skin, fats, and meat waste of pork, poultry, and beef) in a fermentative co-digestion process for H2 production from pre-selected organic waste taken from a refectory (food waste [FW]). Batch tests under mesophilic conditions were conducted in stirred reactors filled with different proportions of FW and SHW. The addition of 60% and 70% SHW to a mixture of SHW and FW improved H2 production compared to that in FW only, reaching H2-production yields of 145 and 109 ml g VS 0(-1), respectively, which are 1.5-2 times higher than that obtained with FW alone. Although the SHW ensured a more stable fermentative process due to its high buffering capacity, a depletion of H2 production occurred when SHW fraction was higher than 70%. Above this percentage, the formation of foam and aggregated material created non-homogenous conditions of digestion. Additionally, the increasing amount of SHW in the reactors may lead to an accumulation of long chain fatty acids (LCFAs), which are potentially toxic for anaerobic microorganisms and may inhibit the normal evolution of the fermentative process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Engineering strategies for the enhanced photo-H{sub 2} production using effluents of dark fermentation processes as substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chun-Yen; Chang, Jo-Shu [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (China); Sustainable Environment Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (China); Yeh, Kuei-Ling; Lo, Yung-Chung [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (China); Wang, Hui-Min [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetic Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung (China)

    2010-12-15

    The major obstacle of combining dark and photo fermentation for high-yield biohydrogen production is substrate inhibition while using dark fermentation effluent as the sole substrate. To solve this problem, the dark fermentation broth was diluted with different dilution ratio to improve photo-H{sub 2} production performance of an indigenous purple nonsulfur bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris WP3-5. The best photo-H{sub 2} production performance occurred at a dilution ratio of 1:2, giving a highest overall H{sub 2} production rate of 10.72 ml/l/h and a higher overall H{sub 2} yield of 6.14 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose. The maximum H{sub 2} content was about 88.1% during the dilution ratio of 1:2. The photo-H{sub 2} production performance was further improved by supplying yeast extract and glutamic acid as the nutrient. The results indicate that the overall H{sub 2} production rate and H{sub 2} yield increased to 17.02 ml/l/h and 10.25 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose, respectively. Using a novel solar-energy-excited optical fiber photobioreactor (SEEOFP) with supplementing tungsten filament lamp (TL) irradiation, the overall H{sub 2} production rate was improved to 17.86 ml/l/h. Meanwhile, the power consumption by combining SEEOFP and TL was about 37.1% lower than using TL alone. This study demonstrates that using optimal light sources and proper dilution of dark fermentation effluent, the performance of photo-H{sub 2} production can be markedly enhanced along with a reduction of power consumption. (author)

  11. Impact of pulp and paper mill effluents and solid wastes on soil mineralogical and physicochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Gopi; Bhattacharyya, Krishna G

    2015-03-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the impact of the effluents and the solid wastes generated by a giant pulp and paper mill in the northeastern part of India on soil mineralogy of the area. The impacts were monitored by analysis of soil samples from seven sites located in the potential impact zone and a control site where any kind of effluent discharge or solid waste dumping was absent. The soil belonged to medium texture type (sandy clay loam, sandy loam, loamy sand, and silt loam), and the soil aggregate analysis indicated higher levels of organic carbon, pH, electrical conductivity, effective cation exchange capacity, and mean weight diameter at sites receiving effluents and solid wastes from the pulp and paper mill. Depletion in soil silica level and in feldspar and quartz contents and rise in iron and calcium contents at the sites receiving effluents from the pulp and paper mill indicated significant influence on soil mineralogy. The soil contained a mixture of minerals consisting of tectosilicates (with silicate frameworks as in quartz or feldspar), phylosilicates (layered clays like kaolinite, smectite, chlorite, illite, etc.), and carbonates. Absence of pure clay minerals indicated a state of heterogeneous intermediate soil clay transformation. The significance of the mixed mineralogy in relation to the disposal of effluents and dumping of solid wastes is discussed in details.

  12. Design parameters for waste effluent treatment unit from beverages production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona A. Abdel-Fatah

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on a successful experimental result from laboratory and bench scale for treatment of wastewater from beverages industry, an industrial and efficient treatment unit is designed and constructed. The broad goal of this study was to design and construct effluent, cost effective and high quality treatment unit. The used technology is the activated sludge process of extended aeration type followed by rapid sand filters and chlorination as tertiary treatment. Experimental results have been considered as the basis for full scale design of the industrial capacity of 1600 m3/day treatment plant. Final effluent characteristics after treatment comply with Egyptian legalizations after reducing COD and BOD5 by about 97% and 95% respectively. So it is recommended to reuse treated effluent in textile industry in dyeing process.

  13. The influence of slaughterhouse waste on fermentative H2 production from food waste: Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boni, Maria Rosaria; Sbaffoni, Silvia; Tuccinardi, Letizia

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Co-digestion process finalized to bio-H 2 production was tested in batch tests. • Slaughterhouse waste (SHW) and food waste (FW) were co-digested in different proportions. • The presence of SHW affected the H 2 production from FW. • When SHW ranging between 50% and 70% the H 2 production is improved. • SHW percentages above 70%, led to a depletion in H 2 production. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of slaughterhouse waste (SHW; essentially the skin, fats, and meat waste of pork, poultry, and beef) in a fermentative co-digestion process for H 2 production from pre-selected organic waste taken from a refectory (food waste [FW]). Batch tests under mesophilic conditions were conducted in stirred reactors filled with different proportions of FW and SHW. The addition of 60% and 70% SHW to a mixture of SHW and FW improved H 2 production compared to that in FW only, reaching H 2 -production yields of 145 and 109 ml gVS 0 -1 , respectively, which are 1.5–2 times higher than that obtained with FW alone. Although the SHW ensured a more stable fermentative process due to its high buffering capacity, a depletion of H 2 production occurred when SHW fraction was higher than 70%. Above this percentage, the formation of foam and aggregated material created non-homogenous conditions of digestion. Additionally, the increasing amount of SHW in the reactors may lead to an accumulation of long chain fatty acids (LCFAs), which are potentially toxic for anaerobic microorganisms and may inhibit the normal evolution of the fermentative process

  14. Hydrogen production with effluent from an ethanol–H2-coproducing fermentation reactor using a single-chamber microbial electrolysis cell

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Lu

    2009-06-01

    Hydrogen can be produced by bacterial fermentation of sugars, but substrate conversion to hydrogen is incomplete. Using a single-chamber microbial electrolysis cell (MEC), we show that additional hydrogen can be produced from the effluent of an ethanol-type dark-fermentation reactor. An overall hydrogen recovery of 83 ± 4% was obtained using a buffered effluent (pH 6.7-7.0), with a hydrogen production rate of 1.41 ± 0.08 m3 H2/m3 reactor/d, at an applied voltage of Eap = 0.6 V. When the MEC was combined with the fermentation system, the overall hydrogen recovery was 96%, with a production rate of 2.11 m3 H2/m3/d, corresponding to an electrical energy efficiency of 287%. High cathodic hydrogen recoveries (70 ± 5% to 94 ± 4%) were obtained at applied voltages of 0.5-0.8 V due to shorter cycle times, and repression of methanogen growth through exposure of the cathode to air after each cycle. Addition of a buffer to the fermentation effluent was critical to MEC performance as there was little hydrogen production using unbuffered effluent (0.0372 m3 H2/m3/d at Eap = 0.6 V, pH 4.5-4.6). These results demonstrate that hydrogen yields from fermentation can be substantially increased by using MECs. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Fermentative conversion of swine and poultry wastes into nitrogen-enriched feedstuff for ruminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, C A; Erdman, M D

    1979-01-01

    Swine and poultry wastes, augmented with carbohydrate-rich agroindustrial residues, were fermentatively converted into N-enriched feeds for ruminants. There was little increase in total N (TN) when unsupplemented swine waste filtrate (SWF) was fermented at pH 5.5, but considerable increase in TN was observed during fermentation of carbohydrate-supplemented SWF. The crude protein (CP) of the products ranged from 26-39%. Supplementation with cheese whey powder (CWP), potato starch, corn starch, or corn molasses gave 48, 33, 72, and 28% increases in TN respectively. Fermentation of CWP-supplemented SWF at pH 7.0 resulted in approximately 90% utilization of the added lactose within 8 hours and the product has a CP content of 47%. Fermentation of unsupplemented poultry waste filtrate (PWF) resulted in little increase in TN, while ammonia-N (AN) increased 5.5-fold and contributed 50% of the CP in the product obtained at the end of 8 hours of fermentation. In CWP-supplemented PWF fermentation 92% of the added whey lactose was metabolized, TN increased by 35%, and AN accounted for 63% of the TN. Thus, ammoniated fermentation of individual or mixed animal wastes, supplemented with a carbohydrate-rich agricultural residue can be conducted efficiently, batchwise, at pH 7.0 and 43 degrees, by indigenous microbial flora in the respective waste. The products obtained in each case are enriched in CP and organic acids.

  16. Evaporation Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Direct Feed Low Activity Waste Effluent Management Facility Core Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Mcclane, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate, LMOGC) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream during full WTP operations is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation, and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. However, during the Direct Feed LAW (DFLAW) scenario, planned disposition of this stream is to evaporate it in a new evaporator, in the Effluent Management Facility (EMF), and then return it to the LAW melter. It is important to understand the composition of the effluents from the melter and new evaporator, so that the disposition of these streams can be accurately planned and accommodated. Furthermore, alternate disposition of the LMOGC stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would reduce the need for closely integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Long-term implementation of this option after WTP start-up would decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste, amongst the other operational complexities such a recycle stream presents. In order to accurately plan for the disposition path, it is key to experimentally determine the fate of contaminants. To do this, testing is needed to accurately account for the buffering chemistry of the components, determine the achievable evaporation end point, identify insoluble solids that form, and determine the distribution of key regulatory-impacting constituents. The LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate stream will contain components that are volatile at melter temperatures, have limited solubility in the glass waste form, and represent a materials corrosion concern, such as halides and sulfate. Because this stream will recycle within WTP, these components will accumulate in the Melter Condensate

  17. Application of waste stabilization pond's effluent on cultivation of roses (rosa damascena mill)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.; Shaukat, S.; Shahzad, A.; Ahmed, W.

    2011-01-01

    The study focuses on the use of Waste Stabilization Ponds (WSP) effluent for irrigation and also aims to compare the efficiency of effluent with the Hoagland solution. Results revealed that the number of flowers, size of flower and the petals per flower increased by the use of both Hoagland solution and treated effluent while the height of plant and the fresh weight of flowers were increased significantly by the Hoagland solution only. Moreover, the leaves showed high concentration of reducing and non-reducing sugars as compared to flowers whereas, only the leaves of plants which were treated by the ponds effluent had low content of reducing sugars as compared to leaves of untreated plants serving as controls. The variation in chlorophyll content was similar to that of reducing and non-reducing sugars. In addition, leaves of plants that were treated by pond's effluent showed highest concentration of total phenol content. It is concluded that treated effluent is as effective as Hoagland for the irrigation of rose. Additionally, the use of treated effluent for irrigation reduces the demand of fresh water and the use of inorganic fertilizers for the commercial production of roses. (author)

  18. An example of toxic effluents treatment: nuclear waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncouyoux, J.P.; Teulon, F.

    1993-01-01

    The management of radioactive waste has to aim to avoid to bring nuisances to future generations whom industrial people, public authorities would be responsible. The French way of doing in radioactive waste storage is called multi-barriers, to forbid or limit radionuclides migration to the biosphere. This containment system is composed of three barriers: the waste packaging, the storage and the site or geological barrier. This way of doing can also be used for toxic industrial waste. 4 refs

  19. A system for destroying mixed and hazardous wastes with no gas or liquid effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, D.W.; Upadhye, R.S.

    1992-04-01

    We developed a conceptual design for a processing system in which the organic components of hazardous or mixed waste would be destroyed, while discharging virtually no gaseous or liquid effluents. Only solid products would be produced. For mixed waste feeds these could then be transported and disposed as low level waste. This system would oxidize the organics using any one of several destruction processes adapted to replace air with a mixture of O 2 and recycled CO 2 . Net production Of CO 2 , HC1, and H 2 O in the dosed recycle system would be scrubbed or reacted to solid products such as CaCO 3 , NaCl, and concrete. This no-effluent design may improve community acceptance of a waste destruction system

  20. Valorization of Pectin-rich Agroindustrial Wastes by Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Serrat-Díaz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The search of the biotechnological ways to the integral use of the wastes generated by the coffee and citric agroindustries, is a current problem. The biotransformation of coffee pulp and orange mesocarp during aerobic and anoxic fermentation with the pectinolític yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus CCEBI 2011 was studied in this research. It was found that coffee pulp is a better substrate to yeast growth, which was evidenced throughout a better conversion of the carbon and energy source. The yeast used in 24 h the reducing and neutral sugars from substrates efficiently, either under aerobic or oxygen-limited cultures. The excretion of the polygalacturonase enzyme by the yeast lead to the increasing in the pectic substances extraction, which reached the 225 % and 33 % for coffee pulp and orange mesocarp, respectively, compared with the amounts which were extracted during substrates sterilization. The enzyme production by the microorganism presented not significantly differences in relation to the substrate used, but the contrary occurred with respect to glucose concentration in the medium. These results point to the promissory use of the K. marxianus CCEBI 2011 yeast strain in the valorization of pectin-rich agricultural wastes by means of their conversion in potential plant elicitors and prebiotics oligogalacturonides-based.

  1. Efficiency of 72h- fermented corn waste liquor as a potential source for

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    okafor

    tests. Equal concentrations of the LAB isolates at their determined peak ... Key Words: Probiotics, Lactic acid bacteria, Fermentation, Corn waste-liquor. ... diary products, decaying plants, intestinal tract and mucous membranes of animals and ...

  2. SOLID AND LIQUID PINEAPPLE WASTE UTILIZATION FOR LACTIC ACID FERMENTATION USING Lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The liquid and solid  pineapple wastes contain mainly sucrose, glucose, fructose and other nutrients. It therefore can potentially be used as carbon source for fermentation to produce organic acid. Recently, lactic acid has been considered to be an important raw material for production of biodegradable lactate polymer. The experiments were  carried out in batch fermentation using  the  liquid and solid pineapple wastes to produce lactic acid. The anaerobic fermentation of lactic acid were performed at 40 oC, pH 6, 5% inocolum and  50 rpm. Initially  results show that the liquid pineapple waste by  using Lactobacillus delbrueckii can be used as carbon source  for lactic acid fermentation. The production of lactic acid  are found to be 79 % yield, while only  56% yield was produced by using solid waste

  3. Design parameters for waste effluent treatment unit from beverages production

    OpenAIRE

    Mona A. Abdel-Fatah; H.O. Sherif; S.I. Hawash

    2017-01-01

    Based on a successful experimental result from laboratory and bench scale for treatment of wastewater from beverages industry, an industrial and efficient treatment unit is designed and constructed. The broad goal of this study was to design and construct effluent, cost effective and high quality treatment unit. The used technology is the activated sludge process of extended aeration type followed by rapid sand filters and chlorination as tertiary treatment. Experimental results have been con...

  4. Chemical composition and fermentative parameters of heart of palm waste produced from Alexander Palm ensiled with chemical additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Fábio Viana Bayão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition and the fermentative parameters of heart of palm waste produced from Alexander Palm, ensiled with chemical additives. Treatments consisted of silage of the sheath with or without calcium oxide. In the silage without calcium oxide, we evaluated the control silage (without additive and the silage enriched with 5.0 g kg−1 urea (urea. In the silage with calcium oxide, we evaluated the silage enriched with 5.0 g kg−1 calcium oxide (control and the silage enriched with 5.0 g kg−1 urea and 5.0 g kg−1 calcium oxide (urea. Experimental silos were distributed in a completely randomized design in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement (inclusion or lack of lime × inclusion or lack of urea, with four replicates. Crude protein concentration was greater in the silages that received urea, whereas in the case of neutral detergent fiber and acid detergent fiber, the lowest levels were found in the control silage. Control silage had the lowest pH (3.75 and the silages that received lime displayed the lowest lactic acid content. Effluent losses were greater in the control silage and in the silage with lime (56.1 kg t−1 and 58.4 kg t−1, respectively. Silages prepared with waste from heart of palm production and enriched only with urea showed a better chemical composition and improved fermentation parameter estimates. We recommend the use of this waste only with additives that can improve the chemical characteristics of the forage. Without additives, unwanted fermentation processes may occur and compromise the quality of the silage.

  5. Thermophilic Dry Methane Fermentation of Distillation Residue Eluted from Ethanol Fermentation of Kitchen Waste and Dynamics of Microbial Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Lian; Tan, Li; Wang, Ting-Ting; Sun, Zhao-Yong; Tang, Yue-Qin; Kida, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Thermophilic dry methane fermentation is advantageous for feedstock with high solid content. Distillation residue with 65.1 % moisture content was eluted from ethanol fermentation of kitchen waste and subjected to thermophilic dry methane fermentation, after adjusting the moisture content to 75 %. The effect of carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratio on thermophilic dry methane fermentation was investigated. Results showed that thermophilic dry methane fermentation could not be stably performed for >10 weeks at a C/N ratio of 12.6 and a volatile total solid (VTS) loading rate of 1 g/kg sludge/d; however, it was stably performed at a C/N ratio of 19.8 and a VTS loading rate of 3 g/kg sludge/d with 83.4 % energy recovery efficiency. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the number of bacteria and archaea decreased by two orders of magnitude at a C/N ratio of 12.6, whereas they were not influenced at a C/N ratio of 19.8. Microbial community analysis revealed that the relative abundance of protein-degrading bacteria increased and that of organic acid-oxidizing bacteria and acetic acid-oxidizing bacteria decreased at a C/N ratio of 12.6. Therefore, there was accumulation of NH 4 + and acetic acid, which inhibited thermophilic dry methane fermentation.

  6. Distribution of 137Cs Radionuclide in Industrial Wastes Effluents of Gresik, East Java, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muslim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of anthropogenic radionuclides 137Cs was measured from industrial waste effluent of Gresik to Gresik Sea in east Java, Indonesia. The activity of 37Cs detected at all stations was much lower than in northeast Japan both before and after NPP Fukushima accident. This indicated that in Gresik industrials waste did not consist of 137Cs. The lowest activity 137Cs occurred at the station nearest to the industrial waste effluent that contained some particle ions that were able to scavenge 137Cs and then precipate this radionuclide. Furthermore, the greatest 137Cs occured at the station that has high current speeds that stirred up sediment to release 137Cs in seawater as a secondary source. The lowest salinity did not effect on the activity of 137Cs even though the lowest salinity and activity 137Cs occured at the same station

  7. Parameter Estimation for Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation of Food Waste Into Ethanol Using Matlab Simulink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Rebecca Anne

    The increase in waste disposal and energy costs has provided an incentive to convert carbohydrate-rich food waste streams into fuel. For example, dining halls and restaurants discard foods that require tipping fees for removal. An effective use of food waste may be the enzymatic hydrolysis of the waste to simple sugars and fermentation of the sugars to ethanol. As these wastes have complex compositions which may change day-to-day, experiments were carried out to test fermentability of two different types of food waste at 27° C using Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast (ATCC4124) and Genencor's STARGEN™ enzyme in batch simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) experiments. A mathematical model of SSF based on experimentally matched rate equations for enzyme hydrolysis and yeast fermentation was developed in Matlab Simulink®. Using Simulink® parameter estimation 1.1.3, parameters for hydrolysis and fermentation were estimated through modified Michaelis-Menten and Monod-type equations with the aim of predicting changes in the levels of ethanol and glycerol from different initial concentrations of glucose, fructose, maltose, and starch. The model predictions and experimental observations agree reasonably well for the two food waste streams and a third validation dataset. The approach of using Simulink® as a dynamic visual model for SSF represents a simple method which can be applied to a variety of biological pathways and may be very useful for systems approaches in metabolic engineering in the future.

  8. Stillage reflux in food waste ethanol fermentation and its by-product accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongzhi; Yang, Jian; Jia, Yan; Wang, Qunhui; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-06-01

    Raw materials and pollution control are key issues for the ethanol fermentation industry. To address these concerns, food waste was selected as fermentation substrate, and stillage reflux was carried out in this study. Reflux was used seven times during fermentation. Corresponding ethanol and reducing sugar were detected. Accumulation of by-products, such as organic acid, sodium chloride, and glycerol, was investigated. Lactic acid was observed to accumulate up to 120g/L, and sodium chloride reached 0.14mol/L. Other by-products did not accumulate. The first five cycles of reflux increased ethanol concentration, which prolonged fermentation time. Further increases in reflux time negatively influenced ethanol fermentation. Single-factor analysis with lactic acid and sodium chloride demonstrated that both factors affected ethanol fermentation, but lactic acid induced more effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An integrated biohydrogen refinery: synergy of photofermentation, extractive fermentation and hydrothermal hydrolysis of food wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwood, Mark D; Orozco, Rafael L; Majewski, Artur J; Macaskie, Lynne E

    2012-09-01

    An Integrated Biohydrogen Refinery (IBHR) and experimental net energy analysis are reported. The IBHR converts biomass to electricity using hydrothermal hydrolysis, extractive biohydrogen fermentation and photobiological hydrogen fermentation for electricity generation in a fuel cell. An extractive fermentation, developed previously, is applied to waste-derived substrates following hydrothermal pre-treatment, achieving 83-99% biowaste destruction. The selective separation of organic acids from waste-fed fermentations provided suitable substrate for photofermentative hydrogen production, which enhanced the gross energy generation up to 11-fold. Therefore, electrodialysis provides the key link in an IBHR for 'waste to energy'. The IBHR compares favourably to 'renewables' (photovoltaics, on-shore wind, crop-derived biofuels) and also emerging biotechnological options (microbial electrolysis) and anaerobic digestion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Determination of iron 55 in nuclear wastes and effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, A.; Revy, D.

    1989-01-01

    The methods for iron 55 analysis, described in this report allows measurement in different types of radioactive wastes after a specific chemical separation. Detection limit is near 1 Bq/l and the concentration factor can reach 100. Activity level found show that iron 55 is a major activation product, then the chemical determination is indispensable for a complete inventory of radionuclides in radioactive wastes [fr

  11. Production of proteases from organic wastes by solid-state fermentation: downstream and zero waste strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Maria; Artola, Adriana; Sánchez, Antoni

    2018-04-01

    Production of enzymes through solid-state fermentation (SSF) of agro-industrial wastes reports high productivity with low investment. The extraction of the final product from the solid waste and solid disposal represent the main cost of the process. In this work, the complete downstream processes of SSF of two industrial residues for the production of proteases, soy fibre (SF) and a mixture of hair and sludge (HS), were studied in terms of activity recovery, using different extraction parameters (extracting solvent, ratio solid: solvent and extraction mode). Activity after lyophilisation was tested. Solid waste valorisation after extraction was studied using respiration techniques and biogas production tests, as part of a zero waste strategy. Results showed a maximum extraction yield of 91% for SF and 121% for HS, both in agitated mode and distilled water as extraction agent. An average activity recovery of 95 ± 6 and 94 ± 6% for SF and HS, respectively, was obtained after lyophilisation and redissolution. To reduce the cost of extraction, a ratio 1:3 w : v solid-solvent in static mode is advised for SF, and 1:2 w : v extraction ratio in agitated mode for HS, both with distilled water as extracting agent. Both composting and anaerobic digestion are suitable techniques for valorisation of the waste material.

  12. Radioactivity distribution in phosphate products, by-products, effluents, and wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimond, R.J.; Windham, S.T.

    1975-08-01

    Phosphate rock throughout the world contains uranium in concentrations ranging from a few ppM to a few hundred ppM. In the United States, phosphate rock normally contains between 100 to 150 ppM uranium. Mining and processing of these ores redistributes much of the uranium daughters among the various products, by-products, and wastes. These materials are then widely dispersed throughout the environment. This redistribution may lead to increased exposure of the public to these naturally-occurring radionuclides. In determining the magnitude of the population exposure caused by this redistribution and in developing environmental standards and controls to prevent contamination of the biosphere from these naturally-occurring radionuclides it is necessary to determine the concentrations and total quantities of these radionuclides in the products, by-products, effluents and wastes of phosphate mining and manufacturing. Samples of phosphate ores, products, by-products, effluents, and wastes were obtained and analyzed for their radioactivity content. Quantities of radioactivity entering the environment through various products, by-products, effluents, and wastes were estimated

  13. Co-fermentation of sewage sludge and organic waste; CO-Vergaerung von Klaerschlamm und Bioabfaellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmelz, K.G. [Emschergenossenschaft und Lippeverband, Essen (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    The processes taking place in sewage sludge digestion and organic waste fermentation are identical. It therefore seems obvious to treat organic waste and sewage sludge jointly. In contrast to organic waste fermentation plants to be newly erected, co-fermentation permits making use of anaerobic treatment systems that are already installed at sewage treatment plants. At these plants, in principle only the sections responsible for acceptance and conditioning of organic waste need to be retrofitted. Apart from the possibility to treat organic waste very inexpensively, the co-fermentation process offers a number of other advantages. For this reason, the Emschergenossenschaft and Lippeverband carried out extensive semi-technical scale tests in co-fermentation of organic waste and sewage sludge. (orig.) [German] Die ablaufenden biologischen Prozesse sind bei der Klaerschlammfaulung und der Bioabfallvergaerung gleich. Es liegt daher nahe, Bioabfaelle und Klaerschlaemme gemeinsam zu behandeln. Gegenueber neu zu errichtenden Bioabfall-Vergaerungsanlagen kann bei der Co-Vergaerung auf die bereits installierte Anaerobtechnik auf den Klaeranlagen zurueckgegriffen werden. Dort muss im wesentlichen nur der Annahme- und Aufbereitungsbereich fuer die Bioabfaelle nachgeruestet werden. Das Verfahren der Co-Vergaerung bietet ausser einer sehr kostenguenstigen Behandlungsmoeglichkeit fuer Bioabfaelle eine Reihe weiterer Vorteile. Aus diesem Grund wurden bei Emschergenossenschaft und Lippeverband umfangreiche halbtechnische Versuche zur Co-Vergaerung von Bioabfaellen und Klaerschlamm durchgefuehrt. (orig.)

  14. Lactic acid fermentation of dahlia tuber starch and waste using Lactobacillus bulgaricus: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praputri, E.; Sundari, E.; Martynis, M.; Agenta, P.

    2018-03-01

    Lactic acid fermentation of dahlia tuber starch and waste was performed by means of Lactobacillus bulgaricus through enzymatic hydrolysis followed by fermentation process. The effect of pH condition on lactic acid production was investigated during the process. The selected bacteria produced lactic acid after 24 hours of fermentation and the productivity was increase after 24 hours of fermentation. After 120 hours of fermentation, it was found that dahlia tuber starch can produce up to 16.18% of lactic acid, whereas lactic acid produced from dahlia tuber waste was only 0.40% at pH of 4. The lactic acid production increase significantly for pH 3.5 and 4 until 96 hours of fermentation, then slowed down. On the other hand, for pH 4.5 the lactic acid production increase until 48 hours of fermentation and then slowed down. The identification of fermentation product indicated that the lactic acid produced in this study was 16.20%, acidic, yellow and cloudy with pH 3.4 – 4.2. The density of lactic acid produced ranged between 1.21 to 1.25 gr/ml.

  15. Fermentation of solid wastes in Switzerland; Feststoff-Vergaerung in der Schweiz. Schlussbericht 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liesch, B.; Mueller, C.

    2007-06-15

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a study on dry fermentation technologies. Information on the state-of-the-art of current dry fermentation systems is presented and the potential of implementing dry fermentation in Swiss agriculture is discussed. The study reveals that the current dry fermentation technologies provided by various enterprises are partly not suitable (complex, continuous operating digestion reactors, developed for handling municipal solid waste). Batch digestion reactors, however, are said by the authors to be mature for application in the Swiss agricultural area. Wet fermentation technologies are also quoted as being able to utilise organic substrates with high dry-matter content and are thus said to be economically more competitive than dry fermentation systems. Dry fermentation is quoted as being a technology with a high development potential. Details are presented on several continuous and non-continuous processes used. Also, the potential for the fermentation of solid wastes in Switzerland is reviewed. Experience made in Germany is also examined.

  16. A toxicity reduction evaluation for an oily waste treatment plant exhibiting episodic effluent toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erten-Unal, M; Gelderloos, A B; Hughes, J S

    1998-07-30

    A Toxicity Reduction Evaluation (TRE) was conducted on the oily wastewater treatment plant (Plant) at a Naval Fuel Depot. The Plant treats ship and ballast wastes, berm water from fuel storage areas and wastes generated in the fuel reclamation plant utilizing physical/chemical treatment processes. In the first period of the project (Period I), the TRE included chemical characterization of the plant wastewaters, monitoring the final effluent for acute toxicity and a thorough evaluation of each treatment process and Plant operating procedures. Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) procedures were performed as part of the overall TRE to characterize and identify possible sources of toxicity. Several difficulties were encountered because the effluent was saline, test organisms were marine species and toxicity was sporadic and unpredictable. The treatability approach utilizing enhancements, improved housekeeping, and operational changes produced substantial reductions in the acute toxicity of the final effluent. In the second period (Period II), additional acute toxicity testing and chemical characterization were performed through the Plant to assess the long-term effects of major unit process improvements for the removal of toxicity. The TIE procedures were also modified for saline wastewaters to focus on suspected class of toxicants such as surfactants. The TRE was successful in reducing acute toxicity of the final effluent through process improvements and operational modifications. The results indicated that the cause of toxicity was most likely due to combination of pollutants (matrix effect) rather than a single pollutant.

  17. Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    The 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application documentation consists of both Part A and a Part B permit application documentation. An explanation of the Part A revisions associated with this treatment and storage unit, including the current revision, is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. Once the initial Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit is issued, the following process will be used. As final, certified treatment, storage, and/or disposal unit-specific documents are developed, and completeness notifications are made by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Washington State Department of Ecology, additional unit-specific permit conditions will be incorporated into the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit through the permit modification process. All treatment, storage, and/or disposal units that are included in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application will operate under interim status until final status conditions for these units are incorporated into the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit. The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility contains information current as of May 1, 1993

  18. Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    The 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application documentation consists of both Part A and a Part B permit application documentation. An explanation of the Part A revisions associated with this treatment and storage unit, including the current revision, is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. Once the initial Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit is issued, the following process will be used. As final, certified treatment, storage, and/or disposal unit-specific documents are developed, and completeness notifications are made by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Washington State Department of Ecology, additional unit-specific permit conditions will be incorporated into the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit through the permit modification process. All treatment, storage, and/or disposal units that are included in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application will operate under interim status until final status conditions for these units are incorporated into the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit. The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility contains information current as of May 1, 1993.

  19. Assessing Waste Water Treatment Plant Effluent for Thyroid Hormone Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Much information has been coming to light on the estrogenic and androgenic activity of chemicals present in the waste water stream and in surface waters, but much less is known about the presence of chemicals with thyroid activity. To address this issue, we have utilized two assa...

  20. EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY (ETF) WASTE STREAM STABILIZATION TESTING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COOKE; LOCKREM; AVILA; KOCI

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site, the location of plutonium production for the US nuclear weapons program, is the focal point of a broad range of waste remediation efforts. This presentation will describe the development of cementitious waste forms for evaporated Hanford waste waters from several sources. Basin 42 waste water and simulants of proposed Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant secondary wastes and Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System secondary wastes were solidified in cementitious matrices termed ''dry cementitious formulation.'' Solidification of these brines was difficult to deal with because of high sulfate contents. Two approaches were explored. The first was based on compositions similar to sulphoaluminate-belite cements. The main component of these cements is 4CaO · 2Al 2 O 3 · SO 4 . When hydrating in the presence of sulfate, these cements rapidly form ettringite. The goal was to consume the sulfate by rapidly forming ettringite. Forming ettringite before the mixture has filly set minimizes the potential for deleterious expansion at a later date. These formulations were developed based on mixtures of calcium-aluminate cement, a glassy blast-furnace slag, class F fly ash, and Portland cement. A second approach was based on using high alumina cement like ciment fondu. In this case the grout was a mixture of ciment fondu, a glassy blast-furnace slag, class f fly ash, and Portland cement. The literature shows that for concretes based on equal amounts of ciment fondu and blast furnace slag, cured at either 20 C or 38 C, the compressive strength increased continuously over a period of 1 year. In this second approach, enough reactive calcium aluminate was added to fully consume the sulfate at an early age. The results of this study will be presented. Included will be results for expansion and bleed water testing, adiabatic temperature rise, microstructure development, and the phase chemistry of the hydrated materials. The results of

  1. Lactic acid fermentation from refectory waste: Factorial design analysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-04-12

    Apr 12, 2012 ... method. At the end of the fermentation process, lactic acid exists in the complex medium of fermentation broth that contains whey proteins, biomass, salts and other impurities. Lactic acid is then recovered from this complex medium. Since the high cost of lactic acid purification process limits the utilization of ...

  2. Discussion of 10 CRF 20 rules for waste of effluents in sanitary sewerage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, A.C.S. da; Pina, J.L.S.

    1986-12-01

    An interpretation of the Code of Federal Regulations, volume 10 part 20 (10 CFR 20) from Nuclear Regulatory Commission is proposed, aiming at his easier use in waste of radioactive liquid effluents to the environment, by sanitary sewerage. The study is based on recommendations of International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICPR 2) and International Atomic Energy Agency (Basic Safety Standards for Radiation Protection). (M.A.C.) [pt

  3. Enzymatic saccharification and fermentation of paper and pulp industry effluent for biohydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakshmidevi, Rajendran; Muthukumar, Karuppan [Department of Chemical Engineering, Alagappa College of Technology Campus, Anna University Chennai, Chennai 600 025 (India)

    2010-04-15

    Paper and pulp industry effluent was enzymatically hydrolysed using crude cellulase enzyme (0.8-2.2FPU/ml) obtained from Trichoderma reesei and from the hydrolysate biohydrogen was produced using Enterobacter aerogenes. The influence of temperature and incubation time on enzyme production was studied. The optimum temperature for the growth of T. reesei was found to be around 29 C. The enzyme activity of 2.5 FPU/ml was found to produce about 22 g/l of total sugars consisting mainly of glucose, xylose and arabinose. Relevant kinetic parameters with respect to sugars production were estimated using two fraction model. The enzymatic hydrolysate was used for the biohydrogen production using E. aerogenes. The growth data obtained for E. aerogenes were fitted well with Monod and Logistic equations. The maximum hydrogen yield of 2.03 mol H{sub 2}/mol sugar and specific hydrogen production rate of 225 mmol of H{sub 2}/g cell/h were obtained with an initial concentration of 22 g/l of total sugars. The colour and COD of effluent was also decreased significantly during the production of hydrogen. The results showed that the paper and pulp industry effluent can be used as a substrate for biohydrogen production. (author)

  4. Economic and ecologic considerations for bidding procedures and contracting for bio-waste fermentation plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raussen, Thomas; Lootsma, Auke; Oldhafer, Nils

    2013-01-01

    The use of the energetic and mass potentials of biological wastes in an integrated fermentation and composting plant needs extensive conceptual and planning activities. The call for tenders for the construction of plants is an EU-wide open procedure. Public waste management organizations are interested to receive profitable solutions with reliable operation and minimized ecological impacts. The minimum requirements and technical aspects are defined by the public waste management organizations.

  5. Preservation of hatchery waste by lactic acid fermentation. 2. Large-scale fermentation and feeding trial to evaluate feeding value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, A C; Patterson, P H

    1997-09-01

    Two waste streams from a Leghorn hatchery were preserved and recycled by fermentation with a by-product carbohydrate and extrusion processing into new feed ingredients that were evaluated with broiler chickens. Cockerel chicks (CC) and a 60:40 ratio of CC:shell waste (CC:SW) were fermented in 189-L barrels for 21 d following grinding, then mixing with a liquid culture (0.2%) and carbohydrate source at 15 and 16.66%, respectively. At 2 wk, pH was 4.44 and 5.09 for the CC and CC:SW products compared with higher values of 6.54 and 6.98 for the raw ingredients at the onset. Negligible hydrogen sulfide and no ammonia gas were recorded during the fermentation period. At 21 d, the fermented CC and CC:SW were extruded, dried, and ground to meals containing CP and TMEn levels of 47.4%, 3,187 kcal/kg, and 33.1%, 2,696 kcal/kg, respectively. Broiler chickens were fed a control diet and the CC (5 and 10%) and CC:SW (2.5 and 5%) ingredient diets with corn and soybean meal for 6 wk to evaluate feeding value and carcass yield. Body weight, gain and feed conversion at 42 d for birds fed diets supplemented with CC or CC:SW at all levels were comparable to those of the control. Diets supplemented with hatchery by-product had no negative effect on carcass measurements except ready to cook carcass and wing yield, which were significantly greater for the 10% CC:SW birds than for the control. These data indicate that nutrient dense hatchery by-products can be preserved with fermentation up to 21 d and support broiler live performance and carcass yield as dietary ingredients equal to or better than a corn-soybean meal control.

  6. Production of ethanol from a mixture of waste paper and kitchen waste via a process of successive liquefaction, presaccharification, and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Hiroto; Tan, Li; Kira, Noriko; Tomiyama, Shigeo; Yamada, Kazuo; Sun, Zhao-Yong; Tang, Yue-Qin; Morimura, Shigeru; Kida, Kenji

    2017-09-01

    Efficient ethanol production from waste paper requires the addition of expensive nutrients. To reduce the production cost of ethanol from waste paper, a study on how to produce ethanol efficiently by adding kitchen waste (potentially as a carbon source, nutrient source, and acidity regulator) to waste paper was performed and a process of successive liquefaction, presaccharification, and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (L+PSSF) was developed. The individual saccharification performances of waste paper and kitchen waste were not influenced by their mixture. Liquefaction of kitchen waste at 90°C prior to presaccharification and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (PSSF) was essential for efficient ethanol fermentation. Ethanol at concentrations of 46.6 or 43.6g/l was obtained at the laboratory scale after fermentation for 96h, even without pH adjustment and/or the addition of extra nutrients. Similarly, ethanol at a concentration of 45.5g/l was obtained at the pilot scale after fermentation for 48h. The ethanol concentration of L+PSSF of the mixture of waste paper and kitchen waste was comparable to that of PSSF of waste paper with added nutrients (yeast extract and peptone) and pH adjustment using H 2 SO 4 , indicating that kitchen waste is not only a carbon source but also an excellent nutrient source and acidity regulator for fermentation of the mixture of waste paper and kitchen waste. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Treatment and processing of the effluents and wastes (other than fuel) produced by a 900 MWe nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud

    1983-01-01

    Effluents produced by a 900 MWe power plant, are of three sorts: gaseous, liquid and solid. According to their nature, effluents are either released or stored for decaying before being released to the atmosphere. The non-contaminated reactor coolant effluents are purified (filtration, gas stripping) and treated by evaporation for reuse. Depending upon their radioactive level, liquid waste is either treated by evaporation or discharged after filtration. Solid waste issuing from previous treatments (concentrates, resins, filters) is processed in concrete drums using an encapsulation process. The concrete drum provides biological self-protection consistent with the national and international regulations pertaining to the transport of radioactive substance. Finally, the various low-level radioactive solid waste collected throughout the plant, is compacted into metal drums. Annual estimates of the quantity of effluents (gaseous, liquid) released in the environment and the number of drums (concrete, metal) produced by the plant figure in the conclusion

  8. A study conducted on the impact of effluent waste from machining process on the environment by water analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovoor, Punnose P.; Idris, Mohd Razif [Kuala Lumpur Univ. (Malaysia). Inst. of Product Design and Manufacturing, IPROM; Hassan, Masjuki Haji [Univ. of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Tengku Yahya, Tengku Fazli [Kuala Lumpur Univ., Melaka (Malaysia). Malaysian Inst. of Chemical and Bio Engineering Technology, MICET

    2012-11-01

    Ferrous block metals are used frequently in large quantities in various sectors of industry for making automotive, furniture, electrical and mechanical items, body parts for consumables, and so forth. During the manufacturing stage, the block metals are subjected to some form of material removal process either through turning, grinding, milling, or drilling operations to obtain the final product. Wastes are generated from the machining process in the form of effluent waste, solid waste, atmospheric emission, and energy emission. These wastes, if not recycled or treated properly before disposal, will have a detrimental impact on the environment through air, water, and soil pollution. The purpose of this paper is to determine the impact of the effluent waste from the machining process on the environment through water analysis. A twofold study is carried out to determine the impact of the effluent waste on the water stream. The preliminary study consists of a scenario analysis where five scenarios are drawn out using substances such as spent coolant, tramp oil, solvent, powdered chips, and sludge, which are commonly found in the effluent waste. The wastes are prepared according to the scenarios and are disposed through the Institute of Product Design and Manufacturing (IPROM) storm water drain. Samples of effluent waste are collected at specific locations according to the APHA method and are tested for parameters such as pH, ammoniacal nitrogen, dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, and total suspended solids. A subsequent study is done by collecting 30 samples of the effluent waste from the machining operations from two small- and medium-scale enterprise locations and the IPROM workshop to test the quality of water. The results obtained from the tests showed high values of chemical oxygen demand, ammoniacal nitrogen, and total suspended solids when compared with the Standard B specification for inland water bodies as specified by the

  9. Batch dark fermentation from enzymatic hydrolyzed food waste for hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei; Ye, Min; Zhu, Ai Jun; Zhao, Hong Ting; Li, Yong Feng

    2015-09-01

    A combination bioprocess of solid-state fermentation (SSF) and dark fermentative hydrogen production from food waste was developed. Aspergillus awamori and Aspergillus oryzae were utilized in SSF from food waste to generate glucoamylase and protease which were used to hydrolyze the food waste suspension to get the nutrients-rich (glucose and free amino nitrogen (FAN)) hydrolysate. Both glucose and FAN increased with increasing of food waste mass ratio from 4% to 10% (w/v) and the highest glucose (36.9 g/L) and FAN (361.3mg/L) were observed at food waste mass ratio of 10%. The food waste hydrolysates were then used as the feedstock for dark fermentative hydrogen production by heat pretreated sludge. The best hydrogen yield of 39.14 ml H2/g food waste (219.91 ml H2/VSadded) was achieved at food waste mass ratio of 4%. The proposed combination bioprocess could effectively accelerate the hydrolysis rate, improve raw material utilization and enhance hydrogen yield. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Effect of Fe Concentration on the Quality and Quantity of Biogas Produced From Fermentation of Palm Oil Mill Effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irvan Matseh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to study the effect of Fe concentration as a trace metal on the quality and quantity of biogas produced from the fermentation of palm oil mill effluent (POME. Raw POME as feed was obtained from one of the palm oil mills belong to PTPN IV, other materials used were hydrochloric acid, sodium bicarbonate, and trace metals. Observed variables were volume of biogas, concentration of Fe in raw POME and biodigester, degradation rate of total solid (TS and volatile solid (VS, M-Alkalinity, pH, H2S and CO2 concentration in biogas at hydraulic retention time (HRT 6 days. Before HRT of 6 days reached, initial trace metal compositions were 25.2 mg/L of Fe, 0.42 mg/L of Co, and 0.49 mg/L of Ni. After that, composition of trace metal were consisted only Co and Ni. The results showed that Fe as a trace metal did not affect the production or quantity of biogas. When Fe concentration reached over to 330 mg/L then concentration of CH4, total solid (TS and volatile solid (VS decreased. Moreover, the higher the Fe contents the smaller of H2S production. Fe content in POME from the same mill had different concentration, as the consequence biogas with different H2S concentrations were produced as well. Thus, Fe in the trace metals is no longer required if high concentration of Fe already existed in POME because it can reduce the formation of H2S. In addition, too high concentration of Fe in POME can be toxic for microorganism in the fermentation of biogas.

  11. Waste minimization methods for treating analytical instrumentation effluents at the source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, J.A.; Barnhart, C.

    1995-01-01

    The primary goal of this project was to reduce the amount of hazardous waste being generated by the Savannah River Siste Defense Waste Processing Technology-analytical Laboratory (DWPT-AL). A detailed characterization study was performed on 12 of the liquid effluent streams generated within the DWPT-AL. Two of the streams were not hazardous, and are now being collected separately from the 10 hazardous streams. A secondary goal of the project was to develop in-line methods using primarily adsorption/ion exchange columns to treat liquid effluent as it emerges from the analytical instrument as a slow, dripping flow. Samples from the 10 hazardous streams were treated by adsorption in an experimental apparatus that resembled an in-line or at source column apparatus. The layered adsorbent bed contained activated carbon and ion exchange resin. The column technique did not work on the first three samples of the spectroscopy waste stream, but worked well on the next three samples which were treated in a different column. It was determined that an unusual form of mercury was present in the first three samples. Similarly, two samples of a combined waste stream were rendered nonhazardous, but the last two samples contained acetylnitrile that prevented analysis. The characteristics of these streams changed from the initial characterization study; therefore, continual, in-deptch stream characterization is the key to making this project successful

  12. Magnox Swarf Storage Silo Liquor Effluent Management -Sellafield Site, Cumbria, UK - Legacy radioactive waste storage - 59271

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Clere, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The Sellafield Magnox Swarf Storage Silo (MSSS) was constructed to provide an underwater storage facility for irradiated magnox cladding metal Swarf, as well as miscellaneous beta-gamma waste from several sources. Liquid effluent arisings from hazard reduction activities at this facility represent the toughest effluent treatment challenge within the company's Legacy Ponds and Silos portfolio. The key requirement for hazard reduction has generated many substantial challenges as the facility is readied for decommissioning. This has demanded the production of carefully thought out strategies for managing, and overcoming, the key difficulties to be encountered as hazard reduction progresses. The complexity associated with preparing for waste retrievals from the Magnox Swarf Storage Silo, has also generated the demand for a mix of creativity and perseverance to meet the challenges and make progress. Challenging the status quo and willingness to accept change is not easy and the road to overall hazard reduction for the high hazard MSSS facility will demand the skills and investment of individuals, teams, and entire facility work-forces. The first steps on this road have been taken with the successful introduction of liquor management operations, however much more is yet to be achieved. Clear communication, investing in stakeholder management, perseverance in the face of difficulty and a structured yet flexible programme delivery approach, will ensure the continued success of tackling the complex challenges of treating liquid effluent from a legacy fuel storage silo at the Sellafield Site. (authors)

  13. Converting the organic fraction of solid waste from the city of Abu Dhabi to valuable products via dark fermentation--Economic and energy assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonk, Fabian; Bastidas-Oyanedel, Juan-Rodrigo; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2015-06-01

    Landfilling the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) leads to greenhouse gas emissions and loss of valuable resources. Sustainable and cost efficient solutions need to be developed to solve this problem. This study evaluates the feasibility of using dark fermentation (DF) to convert the OFMSW to volatile fatty acids (VFAs), fertilizer and H2. The VFAs in the DF effluent can be used directly as substrate for subsequent bioprocesses or purified from the effluent for industrial use. DF of the OFMSW in Abu Dhabi will be economically sustainable once VFA purification can be accomplished on large scale for less than 15USD/m(3)(effluent). With a VFA minimum selling price of 330 USD/tCOD, DF provides a competitive carbon source to sugar. Furthermore, DF is likely to use less energy than conventional processes that produce VFAs, fertilizer and H2. This makes DF of OFMSW a promising waste treatment technology and biorefinery platform. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Remediation of lead from lead electroplating industrial effluent using sago waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyanthi, G P; Shanthi, G

    2007-01-01

    Heavy metals are known toxicants, which inflict acute disorders to the living beings. Electroplating industries pose great threat to the environment through heavy load of metals in the wastewater discharged on land and water sources. In the present study, sago processing waste, which is both a waste and a pollutant, was used to adsorb lead ions from lead electroplating industrial effluent. Two types of sago wastes, namely, coarse sago waste and fine sago waste were used to study their adsorption capacity with the batch adsorption and Freundlich adsorption isotherm. The parameters that were considered for batch adsorption were pH (4, 5 and 6), time of contact (1, 2 and 3 hrs), temperature (30, 37 and 45 degrees C) and dosage of the adsorbent (2,4 and 6 g/L). The optimal condition for the effective removal of lead was found to be pH 5, time of contact 3 hrs, temperature 30 degrees C and dosage 4 g/L with coarse sago waste than fine sago waste.

  15. Management of regenerant effluent waste at reprocessing plant, Tarapur- a new approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Munish; Bajpai, D D; Mudaiya, Avinash; Varadarajan, N [Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant, Tarapur (India)

    1994-06-01

    Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing (PREFRE) Plant, Tarapur has been processing zircaloy clad spent fuel arising from PHWR namely RAPS and MAPS. The plant has been provided with a water pool to receive and store the irradiated fuel assemblies from the reactor site for an interim period before they are taken up for chop-leach and further reprocessing by PUREX process. This paper highlights the important and innovative modifications like introduction of a cation exchanger for water polishing and using nitric acid as regenerant. The regenerant effluent (nitric acid) is recycled to the main process cells where it is mixed and further treated along with process waste stream. This is a step towards minimising effluent generation. The paper describes the advantages of modified system like operational simplification, manpower, man-rem saving and minimising release of activity to environment. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. French practice and trends in the treatment and conditioning of PWR liquid effluents and solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celeri, J.J.; Pottier, P.; Sousselier, Y.

    1982-01-01

    From the early stages of the development of the nuclear industry in France, it has been decided to avoid radioactive effluent release by treatment, conditioning and storage of the wastes. It was not possible, when choosing this option, to reach the optimum from the beginning for the whole management system. The selection of a treatment process requires a precise knowledge of the nature, the composition and the arisings of radioactive wastes and these data are only available when commercial size reactors are in operation. To solve this problem, a close collaboration has been developed between the nuclear station operators and the R and D laboratories in charge of studying new treatment methods. This cooperation is a fruitful permanent exchange giving precise data about the waste, results of treatment operation on the industrial units, allowing modification in the installations to improve their efficiency and sometimes, resulting in new trends for the research program

  17. Purification of waste effluents from uranium mines and mills in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezrodny, S.; Bakarzhiyev, Y.; Pesmenny, B.

    2002-01-01

    Development of Nuclear Energy Industry, which is foundation for energy supplying and economic independence of the country, based on increasing our own uranium resources. Reserves of uranium ore have explored by SGS Kirovgeology show the possibility to supply the nuclear fuel on the Atomic Power Stations for many years. From other side, mining of uranium ore and producing the uranium concentrate have a range of environmental problems. Successful solution of those problems can make the Atomic Energy Industry one of the environmentally safe producer of electric energy. Mining of uranium ore creates large volume of radioactive waste effluents. Presents of the uranium and natural radioactive elements (NRE) in concentration that is higher than in the hydrographic net, require effective treatment technologies to separate the radio-elements from waste effluents. During the last years specialists from VOSTGOK (Zholty Wody), Chemistry Institute (Kiev), Institute of Industrial Technology (Zholty Wody) and SGS Kirovgeology designed a reliable and simple technology for purification of mining water. This technology is based on the process of co-precipitation uranium, natural radioelements, beryllium and heavy metals with mixed collector by hydroxide magnesium and carbonate calcium. Advantage of this technology is the possibility to extend its by second stage - desalting of effluents up to necessary concentration. Second stage does not require essential changes of the process. All sediments which are created after purification are the material for secondary extraction of uranium. The technology was tested at one of the VOSTGOK mines. The achieved results have shown that effluents can be purified from radio-elements up to necessary requirements. According to proposed technology, treatment of radioactive contaminated mining water allows to exclude negative influents of uranium mining on the environment. (author)

  18. Livestock Feed Production from Sago Solid Waste by Pretreatment and Anaerobic Fermentation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumardiono Siswo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Food needs in Indonesia is increasing, including beef. Today, Indonesia has problem to do self-sufficiency in beef. The cause of the problem is the quality of local beef is still lower compared with imported beef due to the quality of livestock feed consumed. To increase the quality of livestock is through pretreatment and fermentation. Source of livestock feed that processed is solid sago waste (Arenga microcarpa, because in Indonesia that is relatively abundant and not used optimally. Chemical pretreatment process for delignification is by using NaOH solution. The purposes of this research are to study NaOH pretreatment, the addition of Trichoderma sp, and fermentation time to improve the quality of sago solid waste as livestock feed through anaerobic fermentation. The variables used are addition or without addition (4%w NaOH solution and Trichoderma sp 1%w and fermentation time (7, 14 and 21 days, with the response of crude fiber and protein. The result of this research shows that the pretreatment with soaking of NaOH solution, addition of Trichoderma sp and 14 days of fermentation was more effective to improve the quality of solid sago waste with decrease of crude fiber from 33.37% to 17.36% and increase of crude protein from 4.00% to 7.96%.

  19. Gas production in anaerobic dark-fermentation processes from agriculture solid waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriwuryandari, L.; Priantoro, E. A.; Sintawardani, N.

    2017-03-01

    Approximately, Bandung produces agricultural solid waste of 1549 ton/day. This wastes consist of wet-organic matter and can be used for bio-gas production. The research aimed to apply the available agricultural solid waste for bio-hydrogen. Biogas production was done by a serial of batches anaerobic fermentation using mix-culture bacteria as the active microorganism. Fermentation was carried out inside a 30 L bioreactor at room temperature. The analyzed parameters were of pH, total gas, temperature, and COD. Result showed that from 3 kg/day of organic wastes, various total gases of O2, CH4, H2, CO2, and CnHn,O2 was produced.

  20. Conversion of lignocellulosic waste by gamma irradiation and fungal fermentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Xuan Tham; Nguyen Duy Hang; Tran Huu Do; Hoang Thi My Linh; Nguyen Duy Lam

    2000-01-01

    Effects of microbial elimination (initially contaminated bacteria and fungi) were confirmed at wide range of irradiation doses (15-30 kGy) with gamma rays of Co-60 for substrates with sawdusts, sugar cane baggasse, rice straw, oil palm fibre and others. Some changes of main components of basic polysaccharides and nitrogen sources in substrates under irradiation and fermentations have been examined to confirm effective conversions and assimilations of inorganic nitrogen into protein, particularly using N-15 tracer techniques. Biomass obtained by fungal fermentations would be used for animal feed and spent compots were useful for biofertilizer production. (author)

  1. Hydrogen production characteristics of the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes by anaerobic mixed culture fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Li; Yu, Zhang [Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)]|[Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhenhong, Yuan; Yongming, Sun; Xiaoying, Kong [Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2009-01-15

    The hydrogen production from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) by anaerobic mixed culture fermentation was investigated using batch experiments at 37 C. Seven varieties of typical individual components of OFMSW including rice, potato, lettuce, lean meat, oil, fat and banyan leaves were selected to estimate the hydrogen production potential. Experimental results showed that the boiling treated anaerobic sludge was effective mixed inoculum for fermentative hydrogen production from OFMSW. Mechanism of fermentative hydrogen production indicates that, among the OFMSW, carbohydrates is the most optimal substrate for fermentative hydrogen production compared with proteins, lipids and lignocelluloses. This conclusion was also substantiated by experimental results of this study. The hydrogen production potentials of rice, potato and lettuce were 134 mL/g-VS, 106 mL/g-VS, and 50 mL/g-VS respectively. The hydrogen percentages of the total gas produced from rice, potato and lettuce were 57-70%, 41-55% and 37-67%. (author)

  2. Formulation and preparation of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant direct feed low activity waste Effluent Management Facility core simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, Charles A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL; Adamson, Duane J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL

    2016-05-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate, LMOGC) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream during full WTP operations is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. However, during the Direct Feed LAW (DFLAW) scenario, planned disposition of this stream is to evaporate it in a new evaporator in the Effluent Management Facility (EMF) and then return it to the LAW melter. It is important to understand the composition of the effluents from the melter and new evaporator so that the disposition of these streams can be accurately planned and accommodated. Furthermore, alternate disposition of the LMOGC stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable less integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Alternate disposition would also eliminate this stream from recycling within WTP when it begins operations and would decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste, amongst the other problems such a recycle stream present. This LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate stream will contain components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form, such as halides and sulfate. Because this stream will recycle within WTP, these components accumulate in the Melter Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Diverting the stream reduces the halides and sulfate in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. This overall program examines the potential treatment and immobilization of this stream to enable alternative disposal. The objective of this task was to formulate and prepare a simulant of the LAW Melter

  3. fermentation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-05-17

    May 17, 2012 ... genes in glycolysis pathway, trehalose and steroid biosynthesis and heat shock proteins (HSP) in .... com) and prepared for microarray construction and analysis. .... a single time point of the late stage of VHG fermentation.

  4. Effluent testing for the Oak Ridge Mixed Waste Incinerator: Emissions test for August 27, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, W.D.; Bunch, D.H.; Gibson, L.V.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Shoemaker, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    On August 27, 1990, a special emissions test was performed at the K-1435 Toxic Substance Control Act Mixed Waste Incinerator. A sampling and analysis plan was implemented to characterize the incinerator waste streams during a 6 hour burn of actual mixed waste. The results of this characterization are summarized in the present report. Significant among the findings is the observation that less than 3% of the uranium fed to the incinerator kiln was discharged as stack emission. This value is consistent with the estimate of 4% or less derived from long-term mass balance of previous operating experience and with the value assumed in the original Environmental Impact Statement. Approximately 1.4% of the total uranium fed to the incinerator kiln appeared in the aqueous scrubber blowdown; about 85% of the total uranium in the aqueous waste was insoluble (i.e., removable by filtration). The majority of the uranium fed to the incinerator kiln appeared in the ash material, apparently associated with phosphorous as a sparingly-soluble species. Many other metals of potential regulatory concern also appeared to concentrate in the ash as sparingly-soluble species, with minimal partition to the aqueous waste. The aqueous waste was discharged to the Central Neutralization Facility where it was effectively treated by coprecipitation with iron. The treated, filtered aqueous effluent met Environmental Protection Agency interim primary drinking water standards for regulated metals. 4 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs

  5. Effluent testing for the Oak Ridge mixed waste incinerator: Emissions test for August 27, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, W.D.; Bunch, D.H.; Gibson, L.V.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Shoemaker, J.L.

    1990-12-01

    On August 27, 1990, a special emissions test was performed at the K-1435 Toxic Substance Control Act Mixed Waste Incinerator. A sampling and analysis plan was implemented to characterize the incinerator waste streams during a 6 hour burn of actual mixed waste. The results of this characterization are summarized in the present report. Significant among the findings is the observation that less than 3% of the uranium fed to the incinerator kiln was discharged as stack emission. This value is consistent with the estimate of 4% or less derived from long-term mass balance of previous operating experience and with the value assumed in the original Environmental Impact Statement. Approximately 1.4% of the total uranium fed to the incinerator kiln appeared in the aqueous scrubber blowdown; about 85% of the total uranium in the aqueous waste was insoluble (i.e., removable by filtration). The majority of the uranium fed to the incinerator kiln appeared in the ash material, apparently associated with phosphorous as a sparingly-soluble species. Many other metals of potential regulatory concern also appeared to concentrate in the ash as sparingly-soluble species, with minimal partition to the aqueous waste. The aqueous waste was discharged to the Central Neutralization Facility where it was effectively treated by coprecipitation with iron. The treated, filtered aqueous effluent met Environmental Protection Agency interim primary drinking water standards for regulated metals

  6. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 23. Environmental effluent analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Y/OWI/TM-36/23, ''Environmental Effluent Analysis,'' is one of a 23-volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-36, which supplements the ''Contribution to Drat Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-44. The series provides a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. This volume discusses the releases to the environment of radioactive and non-radioactive materials that arise during facility construction and waste handling operations, as well as releases that could occur in the event of an operational accident. The results of the analyses are presented along with a detailed description of the analytical methodologies employed

  7. Mesophilic and thermophilic alkaline fermentation of waste activated sludge for hydrogen production: Focusing on homoacetogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wan, Jingjing; Jing, Yuhang; Zhang, Shicheng

    2016-01-01

    The present study compared the mesophilic and thermophilic alkaline fermentation of waste activated sludge (WAS) for hydrogen production with focus on homoacetogenesis, which mediated the consumption of H2 and CO2 for acetate production. Batch experiments showed that hydrogen yield of WAS increased...

  8. Bioethanol production from date palm fruit waste fermentation using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CDPW is a renewable and sustainable resource of energy that is not greatly used in industries. The date is rich in biodegradable sugars, providing bioethanol after fermentation during 72 h at 30°C in the presence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and the distillation of date's juice obtained. In the first experience, a solar ...

  9. Toxicity regulation of radioactive liquid waste effluent from CANDU stations - lessons from Ontario's MISA program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    Toxicity testing became an issue for Ontario's CANDU stations, when it was required under Ontario's MISA regulations for the Electricity Generation Sector. In initial tests, radioactive liquid waste (RLW) effluent was intermittently toxic to both rainbow trout and Daphnia. Significant differences in RLW toxicity were apparent among stations and contributing streams. Specific treatment systems were designed for three stations, with the fourth electing to use existing treatment systems. Stations now use a combination of chemical analysis and treatment to regulate RLW toxicity. Studies of Ontario CANDU stations provide a basis for minimizing costs and environmental effects of new nuclear stations. (author)

  10. Survey of tritium wastes and effluents in near-term fusion-research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, W.E.; Dingee, D.A.; Willingham, C.E.

    1981-08-01

    The use of tritium control technology in near-term research facilities has been studied for both the magnetic and inertial confinement fusion programs. This study focused on routine generation of tritium wastes and effluents, with little referene to accidents or facility decommissioning. This report serves as an independent review of the effectiveness of planned control technology and radiological hazards associated with operation. The facilities examined for the magnetic fusion program included Fusion Materials Irradiation Testing Facility (FMIT), Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA), and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in the magnetic fusion program, while NOVA and Antares facilities were examined for the inertial confinement program

  11. The main rules regarding the management of solid waste and liquid effluent contaminated during use at nuclear medicine departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudouin, E.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the key requirements applicable to the management of contaminated medical waste and effluent from hospitals and health care centres, and more especially from nuclear medicine departments that use radionuclides for the purposes of diagnosis (in vivo or in vitro) or in patient treatment. It also presents the key management regulations, making a distinction between contaminated solid waste and contaminated liquid waste from such nuclear medicine departments. (author)

  12. Glucoamylase production from food waste by solid state fermentation and its evaluation in the hydrolysis of domestic food waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Uçkun Kiran

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, food wastes such as waste bread, savory, waste cakes, cafeteria waste, fruits, vegetables and potatoes were used as sole substrate for glucoamylase production by solid state fermentation. Response surface methodology was employed to optimize the fermentation conditions for improving the production of high activity enzyme. It was found that waste cake was the best substrate for glucoamylase production. Among all the parameters studied, glucoamylase activity was significantly affected by the initial pH and incubation time. The highest glucoamylase activity of 108.47 U/gds was achieved at initial pH of 7.9, moisture content of 69.6% wt., inoculum loading of 5.2×105 cells/gram substrate (gs and incubation time of 6 d. The enzyme preparation could effectively digest 50% suspension of domestic food waste in 24 h with an almost complete saccharification using an enzyme dose of only 2U/g food waste at 60°C.

  13. ENGINEERING STUDY FOR THE 200 AREA EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY (ETF) SECONDARY WASTE TREATMENT OF PROJECTED FUTURE WASTE FEEDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LUECK, K.J.

    2004-01-01

    This report documents an engineering study conducted to evaluate alternatives for treating secondary waste in the secondary treatment train (STT) of the Hanford Site 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). The study evaluates ETF STT treatment alternatives and recommends preferred alternatives for meeting the projected future missions of the ETF. The preferred alternative(s) will process projected future ETF influents to produce a solid waste acceptable for final disposal on the Hanford Site. The main text of this report summarizes the ETF past and projected operations, lists the assumptions about projected operations that provide the basis for the engineering evaluation, and summarizes the evaluation process. The evaluation process includes identification of available modifications to the current ETF process, screens those modifications for technical viability, evaluates the technically viable alternatives, and provides conclusions and recommendations based on that evaluation

  14. DETERMINATION OF AMMONIA MASS EMISSION FLUX FROM HOG WASTE EFFLUENT SPRAYING OPERATION USING OPEN PATH TUNABLE DIODE LASER SPECTROSCOPY WITH VERTICAL RADIAL PLUME MAPPING ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emission of ammonia from concentrated animal feeding operations represents an increasingly important environmental issue. Determination of total ammonia mass emission flux from extended area sources such as waste lagoons and waste effluent spraying operations can be evaluated usi...

  15. Free Moisture in GT-73 Resin Waste Generated from the Effluent Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, D.I.

    2002-01-01

    Solid Waste Division is presently evaluating whether to transfer spent resin generated from the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) to the Nevada Test Site (NTS). One of the criteria for the waste to be accepted at the NTS is that the waste must not contain more than 1 vol-percent free liquid. This criterion reduces the amount of liquid, a primary vector for subsurface contaminant migration (along with colloids), introduced into the repository. This criterion also serves to reduce the chance of an accidental spill during transport of the waste to the NTS. On December 15, 1997, a shipment from Fernald to the NTS leaked some liquid waste onto a highway in Kingman, Arizona, resulting in a Type B Accident Investigation. The direct cause of the leak was attributed to broken welds related to the use of substandard containers. The overall objective of this study was to provide guidance as to whether the spent GT-73 resin would meet the free moisture WAC set by the NTS

  16. Upgrading of oil palm wastes to animal feeds by radiation and fermentation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Tamikazu; Ito, Hitoshi; Hashimoto, Shoji; Mutaat, H.H.; Awang, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    Upgrading of oil palm cellulosic wastes to animal feeds by radiation and fermentation treatment has been investigated in order to recycle the agro-resources and to reduce the smoke pollution. The process is as follows; decontamination of microorganisms in fermentation media using oil palm wastes by irradiation, inoculation of useful microorganisms, and subsequent microbial digestion of cellulosic materials as well as production of proteins. The dose of 25 kGy was required to sterilize the contaminated bacteria whereas the dose of 5 - 10 kGy was enough to eliminate the fungi. Among many kinds of fungi tested, C. cinereus was selected as the most suitable seed microorganism for the fermentation of EFB (Empty Fruit Bunch of oil palm). The protein content increased to 13 % and the crude fiber content decreased to 20 % after 30 days incubation with C. cinereus at 30degC in solid state fermentation. It is considered that these fermented products can be used for the ruminant animal feeds. (author)

  17. Evaluation of Fermentative Hydrogen Production from Single and Mixed Fruit Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Akinbomi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The economic viability of employing dark fermentative hydrogen from whole fruit wastes as a green alternative to fossil fuels is limited by low hydrogen yield due to the inhibitory effect of some metabolites in the fermentation medium. In exploring means of increasing hydrogen production from fruit wastes, including orange, apple, banana, grape and melon, the present study assessed the hydrogen production potential of singly-fermented fruits as compared to the fermentation of mixed fruits. The fruit feedstock was subjected to varying hydraulic retention times (HRTs in a continuous fermentation process at 55 °C for 47 days. The weight distributions of the first, second and third fruit mixtures were 70%, 50% and 20% orange share, respectively, while the residual weight was shared equally by the other fruits. The results indicated that there was an improvement in cumulative hydrogen yield from all of the feedstock when the HRT was five days. Based on the results obtained, apple as a single fruit and a fruit mixture with 20% orange share have the most improved cumulative hydrogen yields of 504 (29.5% of theoretical yield and 513 mL/g volatile solid (VS (30% of theoretical yield , respectively, when compared to other fruits.

  18. SECONDARY WASTE/ETF (EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY) PRELIMINARY PRE-CONCEPTUAL ENGINEERING STUDY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, T.H.; Gehner, P.D.; Stegen, Gary; Hymas, Jay; Pajunen, A.L.; Sexton, Rich; Ramsey, Amy

    2009-01-01

    This pre-conceptual engineering study is intended to assist in supporting the critical decision (CD) 0 milestone by providing a basis for the justification of mission need (JMN) for the handling and disposal of liquid effluents. The ETF baseline strategy, to accommodate (WTP) requirements, calls for a solidification treatment unit (STU) to be added to the ETF to provide the needed additional processing capability. This STU is to process the ETF evaporator concentrate into a cement-based waste form. The cementitious waste will be cast into blocks for curing, storage, and disposal. Tis pre-conceptual engineering study explores this baseline strategy, in addition to other potential alternatives, for meeting the ETF future mission needs. Within each reviewed case study, a technical and facility description is outlined, along with a preliminary cost analysis and the associated risks and benefits.

  19. Study on the correlation between volatile fatty acids and gas production in dry fermentation of kitchen waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiangqiang; Ma, Yunfeng; Du, Boying; Wang, Qi; Hu, Qiongqiong; Bian, Yushan

    2018-02-01

    In this study, continuous kitchen waste fermentation and anaerobic digestion experiments were conducted to analyze the gas production potential, and to study the correlation between gas production rate and volatile fatty acid (VFAs) and its component concentration. During the experiment, the total solid(TS) concentration of the reaction system was increased by adding the kitchen waste, analysis of kitchen waste dry fermentation process to start, run, imbalance and imbalance after recovery and the parameters in the process of realizing the change trend and influencing factors of dry fermentation process, pH and ammonia concentration.

  20. Production of a ruminant protein supplement by anaerobic fermentation of feedlot waste filtrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, C.A.; Erdman, M.D.

    1977-01-01

    In studies initiated to develop simple and efficient procedures for the production of feed supplements, it was shown that the filtrate from feedlot wastes diluted with water and filtered could be fermented under anaerobic conditions by mixed rumen bacteria, Lactobacilli, or natural microflora from the feedlot wastes to produce a protein-rich feed supplement. The filtrate is low in carbohydrate and therefore supplemental carbohydrate in the form of whey, molasses, starch from potato processing wastes, or corn starch is necessary. Rigid anaerobic conditions need not be maintained nor must aseptic conditions be observed. (JSR)

  1. Preparation and evaporation of Hanford Waste treatment plant direct feed low activity waste effluent management facility simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Howe, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-07

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate, LMOGC) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream during full WTP operations is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation, and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. However, during the Direct Feed LAW (DFLAW) scenario, planned disposition of this stream involves concentrating the condensate in a new evaporator at the Effluent Management Facility (EMF) and returning it to the LAW melter. The LMOGC stream will contain components, e.g. halides and sulfates, that are volatile at melter temperatures, have limited solubility in glass waste forms, and present a material corrosion concern. Because this stream will recycle within WTP, these components are expected to accumulate in the LMOGC stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Diverting the stream reduces the halides and sulfates in the glass and is a key objective of this program. In order to determine the disposition path, it is key to experimentally determine the fate of contaminants. To do this, testing is needed to account for the buffering chemistry of the components, determine the achievable evaporation end point, identify insoluble solids that form, determine the formation and distribution of key regulatoryimpacting constituents, and generate an aqueous stream that can be used in testing of the subsequent immobilization step. This overall program examines the potential treatment and immobilization of the LMOGC stream to enable alternative disposal. The objective of this task was to (1) prepare a simulant of the LAW Melter Off-gas Condensate expected during DFLAW operations, (2) demonstrate evaporation in order to predict the final composition of the effluents from the EMF

  2. Coffee husk waste for fermentation production of mosquitocidal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poopathi, Subbiah; Abidha, S

    2011-12-01

    Coffee husk waste (CHW) discarded as bio-organic waste, from coffee industries, is rich in carbohydrates. The current study emphasizes the management of solid waste from agro-industrial residues for the production of biopesticides (Bacillus sphaericus, and B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis), to control disease transmitting mosquito vectors. An experimental culture medium was prepared by extracting the filtrates from coffee husk. A conventional culture medium (NYSM) also was prepared. The studies revealed that the quantity of mosquitocidal toxins produced from CHW is at par with NYSM. The bacteria produced in these media, were bioassayed against mosquito vectors (Culex quinquefasciatus, Anopheles stephensi, and Aedes aegypti) and it was found that the toxic effect was statistically comparable. Cost-effective analysis have revealed that, production of biopesticides from CHW is highly economical. Therefore, the utilization of CHW provides dual benefits of effective utilization of environmental waste and efficient production of mosquitocidal toxins.

  3. The influence of slaughterhouse waste on fermentative H{sub 2} production from food waste: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boni, Maria Rosaria; Sbaffoni, Silvia; Tuccinardi, Letizia, E-mail: letizia.tuccinardi@uniroma1.it

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • Co-digestion process finalized to bio-H{sub 2} production was tested in batch tests. • Slaughterhouse waste (SHW) and food waste (FW) were co-digested in different proportions. • The presence of SHW affected the H{sub 2} production from FW. • When SHW ranging between 50% and 70% the H{sub 2} production is improved. • SHW percentages above 70%, led to a depletion in H{sub 2} production. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of slaughterhouse waste (SHW; essentially the skin, fats, and meat waste of pork, poultry, and beef) in a fermentative co-digestion process for H{sub 2} production from pre-selected organic waste taken from a refectory (food waste [FW]). Batch tests under mesophilic conditions were conducted in stirred reactors filled with different proportions of FW and SHW. The addition of 60% and 70% SHW to a mixture of SHW and FW improved H{sub 2} production compared to that in FW only, reaching H{sub 2}-production yields of 145 and 109 ml gVS{sub 0}{sup -1}, respectively, which are 1.5–2 times higher than that obtained with FW alone. Although the SHW ensured a more stable fermentative process due to its high buffering capacity, a depletion of H{sub 2} production occurred when SHW fraction was higher than 70%. Above this percentage, the formation of foam and aggregated material created non-homogenous conditions of digestion. Additionally, the increasing amount of SHW in the reactors may lead to an accumulation of long chain fatty acids (LCFAs), which are potentially toxic for anaerobic microorganisms and may inhibit the normal evolution of the fermentative process.

  4. Solid state fermentation for extracellular polysaccharide production by Lactobacillus confusus with coconut water and sugar cane juice as renewable wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seesuriyachan, Phisit; Techapun, Charin; Shinkawa, Hidenori; Sasaki, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production by Lactobacillus confusus in liquid and solid state fermentation was carried out using coconut water and sugarcane juice as renewable wastes. High concentrations of EPS of 62 (sugarcane juice) and 18 g/l of coconut water were produced in solid state fermentation when nitrogen sources were reduced 5-fold from the original medium.

  5. Physico-chemical studies on amylases from fermented cassava waste water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oboh, G.; Akindahunsi, A.A.

    2001-09-01

    Waste water from cassava mash fermented with pure strain of Saccharomycees cerevisae together with Lactobacillus delbruckii and Lactobacillus coryneformis (3 days) was assayed for amylase activity. The result of the study indicated that the fermentation waste water had amylase activity, the unit activity and the specific activity of the amylase in the waste water was 0.22μmole/min and 0.06μmole/min/mg, respectively. The amylase was partially purified using Gel filtration (Sephadex-G150). The partially purified enzyme was maximally activity at pH 6.0 and 60 deg. C temperature. It had its maximum stability between pH 6-7 for 4hr, and 30 deg. C for 50 mins. NaCl, NH 4 Cl, FeCl 3 , KCl, NaNO 3 activates the enzyme activity while CUSO 4 and HgCl 2 inhibit the activity of the amylase. It could be concluded that these amylases from the fermented cassava waste amylase were active at wide temperature and pH ranges, this quality could be explored in the industrial sector (most especially food industry) as a source of industrial amylase that requires a wide range of conditions (temperature and pH). (author)

  6. Pretreatment of grass waste using combined ionizing radiation-acid treatment for enhancing fermentative hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Wang, Jianlong

    2018-05-01

    In this study, the combined ionizing radiation-acid pretreatment process was firstly applied to enhance hydrogen fermentation of grass waste. Results showed that the combined pretreatment synergistically enhanced hydrogen fermentation of grass waste. The SCOD and soluble polysaccharide contents of grass waste increased by 1.6 and 2.91 times after the combined pretreatment, respectively. SEM observation and crystallinity test showed the combined pretreatment effectively disrupted the grass structure. Owing to the more favorable substrate conditions, the hydrogen yield achieved 68 mL/g-dry grass added after the combined pretreatment, which was 161.5%, 112.5% and 28.3% higher than those from raw, ionizing radiation pretreated and acid pretreated grass waste, respectively. The VS removal also increased from 13.9% to 25.6% by the combined pretreatment. Microbial community analysis showed that the abundance of dominant hydrogen producing genus Clostridium sensu stricto 1 increased from 37.9% to 69.4% after the combined pretreatment, which contributed to more efficient hydrogen fermentation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ethanol fermentation of beet molasses by a yeast resistant to distillery waste water and 2-deoxyglucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadenuma, Makoto; Shimoi, Hitoshi; Sato, Shun' ichi; Moriya, Kazuhito; Saito, Kazuo [National Research Inst. of Brewing, Tokyo, Japan Hokkaido Sugar Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan) Sendai Regional Taxation Bureau, Sendai (Japan)

    1989-05-25

    A flocculent killer yeast, strain H-1 selected for ethanol fermentation of beet molasses, has a tendency to lose its viability in distillery waste water (DWW) of beet molasses mash after ethanol fermentation. Through acclimations of strain H-1 in DWW, strain W-9, resistant to DWW, was isolated. Strain M-9, resistant to 2-deoxyglucose was further isolated through acclimations of strain W-9 in medium containing 150 ppm 2-deoxyglucose. A fermentaion test of beet molasses indicated that the ethanol productivity and suger consumption were improved by strain M-9 compared with the parental strain H-1 and strain W-9. The concentration of ethanol produced by strain M-9 was 107.2 g/1, and concentration of residual sugars, which were mainly composed of sucrose and fructose, were lower than those produced by the parental strain H-9 and strain W-9 at the end of fermentation of beet molasses. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Extraction of glutathione from EFB fermentation waste using methanol with sonication process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muryanto, Muryanto; Alvin, Nurdin, Muhammad; Hanifah, Ummu; Sudiyani, Yanni

    2017-11-01

    Glutathione is important compound on the human body. Glutathione have a widely use at pharmacy and cosmetics as detoxification, skin whitening agent, antioxidant and many other. This study aims to obtain glutathione from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in fermentation waste of second generation bioethanol. The remaining yeast in the empty fruit bunch (EFB) fermentation was separated from the fermentation solution use centrifugation process and then extracted using a methanol-water solution. The extraction process was done by maceration which was assisted by sonication process. Solvent concentration and time of sonication were varied to see its effect on glutathione concentration. The concentration of glutathione from the extraction process was analyzed using alloxan method with UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The results show that the highest glutathione concentration was approximately 1.32 g/L obtained with methanol solvent at 90 minutes of maceration following with 15 minutes sonication.

  9. Lactic acid production from acidogenic fermentation of fruit and vegetable wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuanyuan; Ma, Hailing; Zheng, Mingyue; Wang, Kaijun

    2015-09-01

    This work focused on the lactic acid production from acidogenic fermentation of fruit and vegetable wastes treatment. A long term completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) lasting for 50 days was operated at organic loading rate (OLR) of 11 gVS/(L d) and sludge retention time (SRT) of 3 days with pH controlled at 4.0 (1-24 day) and 5.0 (25-50 day). The results indicated that high amount of approximately 10-20 g/L lactic acid was produced at pH of 4.0 and the fermentation type converted from coexistence of homofermentation and heterofermentation into heterofermentation. At pH of 5.0, the hydrolysis reaction was improved and the total concentration of fermentation products increased up to 29.5 g COD/L. The heterofermentation was maintained, however, bifidus pathway by Bifidobacterium played an important role. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of household detergent on anaerobic fermentation of kitchen wastewater from food waste disposer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K H; Park, K Y; Khanal, S K; Lee, J W

    2013-01-15

    This study examines the effects of household detergent on anaerobic methane fermentation of wastewater from food waste disposers (FWDs). Anaerobic toxicity assay (ATA) demonstrated that methane production substantially decreased at a higher detergent concentration. The Gompertz three-parameter model fitted well with the ATA results, and both the extent of methane production (M) and methane production rate (R(m)) obtained from the model were strongly affected by the concentration of the detergent. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of the detergent was 603 mg/L based on R(m). Results from fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) analysis of microbial culture revealed that deterioration of methane fermentation was attributed to impaired structure of anaerobic microbial membrane due to detergent. This study suggests that wastewater from FWD could be used for methane production, but it is necessary to reduce the concentration of detergent prior to anaerobic fermentation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Valorization of Waste Obtained from Oil Extraction in Moringa Oleifera Seeds: Coagulation of Reactive Dyes in Textile Effluents

    OpenAIRE

    Vilaseca, Merc?; L?pez-Grimau, V?ctor; Guti?rrez-Bouz?n, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Moringa oleifera seeds contain about 40% of highly valued oil due to its wide range of applications, from nutritional issues to cosmetics or biodiesel production. The extraction of Moringa oil generates a waste (65%–75% of seeds weight) which contains a water soluble protein able to be used either in drinking water clarification or wastewater treatment. In this paper, the waste of Moringa oleifera extraction was used as coagulant to remove five reactive dyes from synthetic textile effluents. ...

  12. Effect of food to microorganism ratio on biohydrogen production from food waste via anaerobic fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Jinming [Department of Biosystems Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, University of California at Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Zhang, Ruihong; Sun, Huawei [Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, University of California at Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); El-Mashad, Hamed M. [Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, University of California at Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Agricultural Engineering, Mansoura University, El-Mansoura (Egypt); Ying, Yibin [Department of Biosystems Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)

    2008-12-15

    The effect of different food to microorganism ratios (F/M) (1-10) on the hydrogen production from the anaerobic batch fermentation of mixed food waste was studied at two temperatures, 35 {+-} 2 C and 50 {+-} 2 C. Anaerobic sludge taken from anaerobic reactors was used as inoculum. It was found that hydrogen was produced mainly during the first 44 h of fermentation. The F/M between 7 and 10 was found to be appropriate for hydrogen production via thermophilic fermentation with the highest yield of 57 ml-H{sub 2}/g VS at an F/M of 7. Under mesophilic conditions, hydrogen was produced at a lower level and in a narrower range of F/Ms, with the highest yield of 39 ml-H{sub 2}/g VS at the F/M of 6. A modified Gompertz equation adequately (R{sup 2} > 0.946) described the cumulative hydrogen production yields. This study provides a novel strategy for controlling the conditions for production of hydrogen from food waste via anaerobic fermentation. (author)

  13. Production of hydrogen from fermentation of pina agroindustrial waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya Perez, Luisa

    2012-01-01

    The performance of biohydrogen production was assesed a laboratory level, by anaerobic fermentation using agroindustrial residue of pineapple heart and employing microorganisms own of sludges from the bottom of an anaerobic digester belonging to a wastewater treatment plant from a seafood processor. Residue of pineapple heart was characterized physicochemically. The amounts were quantified: moisture, ashes, crude fiber, glucose, reducing sugars, hydrogen potential, soluble solids (Brix grades), boron, nitrogen, phosphorus, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sulfur, zinc, iron, copper and manganese. Per gram of pineapple heart is obtained 0,113 g of reducing sugars and 0,0114 g of glucose, which has made it a carbohydrate rich material that could ferment and produce hydrogen or other metabolites of commercial interest. A maximum yield was obtained of 0,0484 mol H 2 / mol of glucose consumed with a hydrogen maximum output of 1,260 mmol, at a maximum production rate of 0.070 mmol/h with a time lag in the production of hydrogen to 7,833 h under the following conditions: initial pH of 5,5, substrate initial concentration of 5 g/L and using a medium of mineral formulation based on sodium, calcium, iodine, zinc, nickel and molybdenum, in a container 125 mL where was consumed 88,4% of the initial glucose. A maximum yield of 1,541 mol H 2 / mol of consumed glucose was obtained, in a fermentation time of 30 h, with a maximum hydrogen production of 41,227 mmol, at a maximum production rate of 6,740 mmol/h with a lag time in the production of hydrogen for 16 h, under the following conditions: initial pH of 5,5, substrate initial concentration of 5 g/L and using a middle of mineral formulation based on sodium, calcium, iodine, zinc, nickel and molybdenum in a fermentor of 5 L where 96,39% was consumed of the initial glucose. The maximum yield from 1,541 mol H 2 / mol of glucose consumed has corresponded to 38% of the target value of the United States Department of Energy equivalent

  14. Alkaline fermentation of waste sludge causes a significant reduction of antibiotic resistance genes in anaerobic reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haining; Zheng, Xiong; Chen, Yinguang; Liu, Hui; Wan, Rui; Su, Yinglong

    2017-02-15

    Alkaline fermentation has been reported to be an effective method to recover valuable products from waste sludge. However, to date, the potential effect of alkaline pH on the fate of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during anaerobic fermentation of sludge has never been documented. In this study, the target ARGs in sludge was observed to be removed effectively and stably when sludge was anaerobically fermented at pH10. Compared with the control (without pH adjustment), the abundances of target ARGs at pH10 were reduced by 0.87 (sulI), 1.36 (sulII), 0.42 (tet(O)), 1.11 (tet(Q)), 0.79 (tet(C)) and 1.04 (tet(X)) log units. Further investigations revealed that alkaline fermentation shifted the community structures of potential ARGs hosts. Moreover, alkaline fermentation remarkably decreased the quantities and the ARGs-possessing ability of genetic vectors (plasmid DNA, extracellular DNA and phage DNA), which might limit the transfer of ARGs via conjugation, transformation and transduction. These results suggest that the shifted compositions of gene hosts and restricted gene transfer potential might be the critical reasons for the attenuation of ARGs at pH10. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Land Application of Wastes: An Educational Program. Treatment Systems, Effluent Qualities, and Costs - Module 4, Objectives, Script, and Booklet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, W. W.; And Others

    This module describes the following conventional treatment systems and evaluates their use as pretreatment steps for land application: preliminary, primary, secondary, disinfection, and advanced waste treatment. Effluent qualities are summarized, a brief discussion of application systems is given, and cost comparisons are discussed in some detail.…

  16. Bio-hydrogen production from waste fermentation. Mixing and static conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, X.; Cuetos, M.J.; Prieto, J.I.; Moran, A. [Chemical Engineering Dept. IRENA, University of Leon, Avda. de Portugal 41, 24071 Leon (Spain)

    2009-04-15

    One of the main disadvantages of the dark fermentation process is the cost associated with the stages needed for obtaining H{sub 2} producing microorganisms. Using anaerobic microflora in fermentation systems directly is an alternative which is gaining special interest when considering the implementation of large-scale plants and the use of wastes as substrate material. The performance of two H{sub 2} producing microflora obtained from different anaerobic cultures was studied in this paper. Inoculum obtained from a waste sludge digester and from a laboratory digester treating slaughterhouse wastes were used to start up H{sub 2} fermentation systems. Inoculum acclimatized to slaughterhouse wastes gave better performance in terms of stability. However, due to the limited availability of this seed material, further work was performed to study the behaviour of the inoculum obtained from the municipal wastewater treatment plant. The process was evaluated under static and mixing conditions. It was found that application of a low organic loading rate favoured the performance of the fermentation systems, and that agitation of the reacting mass could alleviate unsteady performance. Specific H{sub 2} production obtained was in the range of 19-26 L/kg SV{sub fed} with maximum peak production of 38-67 L/kg SV{sub fed}. Although the performance of the systems was unsteady, recovery could be achieved by suspending the feeding process and controlling the pH in the range of 5.0-5.5. Testing the recovery capacity of the systems under temperature shocks resulted in total stoppage of H{sub 2} production. (author)

  17. Fermentation of feedlot waste filtrate by fungi and streptomycetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiner, B A; Rhodes, R A

    1974-11-01

    Laboratory experiments demonstrated that cattle feedlot waste, rich in nitrogen, sustained growth of streptomycetes better than fungi. Addition of whey or glucose as a carbon source increased microbial growth (almost 6-fold) and nitrogen utilization (3-fold) but increased COD (0 to 33%).

  18. Control of Effluent Gases from Solid Waste Processing using Impregnated Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Fisher, John; Wignarajah, Kanapathipillai

    2005-01-01

    One of the major problems associated with solid waste processing technologies is effluent contaminants that are released in gaseous forms from the processes. This is a concern in both biological as well as physicochemical solid waste processing. Carbon dioxide (CO2), the major gas released, does not present a serious problem and there are currently in place a number of flight-qualified technologies for CO2 removal. However, a number of other gases, in particular NOx, SO2, NH3, and various hydrocarbons (e.g. CH4) do present health hazards to the crew members in space habitats. In the present configuration of solid waste processing in the International Space Station (ISS), some of these gases are removed by the Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS), demands a major resupply. Reduction of the resupply can be effective by using catalyst impregnated carbon nanotubes. For example, NO decomposition to N2 and O2 is thermodynamically favored. Data showing decomposition of NO on metal impregnated carbon nanotubes is presented. Comparisons are made of the existing TCCS systems with the carbon nanotube based technology for removing NOx based on mass/energy penalties.

  19. Development of analytical techniques in support of waste and effluent characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    The Analytical Services Group within Sellafield Technical Department has been established for >40 yr and employs >150 analysts. The group operates >400 analytical methods across a wide range of techniques and has a yearly workload of ∼250,000 determinations. The group operates under a quality system based on statistical process control that has achieved national recognition through the accreditation of its mass spectrometry and radiochemical services to the standard of national testing laboratories. The group offers services ranging from the characterization of highly active wastes to trace elemental and radiochemical measurements in environmental, biological, and effluent streams. The group has vast experience in the management of analytical services to tight time scales and has pioneered developments not only in analytical instrumentation, but also in the adaptation of equipment to radioactive environments and the design of dedicated analytical facilities

  20. Managing medical treatment waste and effluent: the point of view of a nuclear medicine practitioner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karcher, G.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear medicine department of the Nancy CHU hospital is one of the largest in France: 16.000 patients are welcomed each year and 4.000 persons undergo a tomography there. 5 shielded and isolated rooms, dedicated to Iodine 131 treatment, allow the care of 150 to 200 patients each year. The head of the nuclear medicine department gives his meaning about the new regulation on the management of radioactive effluents. According to him, regulations are necessary but the values of the imposed thresholds have to be scientifically justified. Another point is that a lot of money is spent on radiation protection issues while the radioactive risks are almost null, which leads to wasting money. The elaboration of the radioprotection regulations must be made not as a whole but on a specific basis according to the domain: nuclear power plants, research reactors or nuclear medicine, it applies. (A.C.)

  1. Solid-State Fermentation as a Novel Paradigm for Organic Waste Valorization: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noraziah Abu Yazid

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The abundance of organic solid waste throughout the world has become a common issue that needs complete management at every level. Also, the scarcity of fuel and the competition between food and substance as an alternative to a petroleum-based product has become a major problem that needs to be properly handled. An urge to find renewable substances for sustainable development results in a strategy to valorize organic solid waste using solid state fermentation (SSF and to manage the issue of solid wastes in a green approach. This paper reviews management of solid wastes using SSF, with regard to its current application, advantages and challenges, downstream processing in SSF, economic viewpoint, and future perspectives.

  2. Performance of continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) on fermentative biohydrogen production from melon waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahyari, K.; Sarto; Syamsiah, S.; Prasetya, A.

    2016-11-01

    This research was meant to investigate performance of continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) as bioreactor for producing biohydrogen from melon waste through dark fermentation method. Melon waste are commonly generated from agricultural processing stages i.e. cultivation, post-harvesting, industrial processing, and transportation. It accounted for more than 50% of total harvested fruit. Feedstock of melon waste was fed regularly to CSTR according to organic loading rate at value 1.2 - 3.6 g VS/ (l.d). Optimum condition was achieved at OLR 2.4 g VS/ (l.d) with the highest total gas volume 196 ml STP. Implication of higher OLR value is reduction of total gas volume due to accumulation of acids (pH 4.0), and lower substrate volatile solid removal. In summary, application of this method might valorize melon waste and generates renewable energy sources.

  3. Exploitation of dark fermented effluent of cheese whey by co-culture of Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Bacillus firmus for photo-hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, A; Pandey, A

    2017-07-31

    In this study photo-hydrogen production from cheese whey dark fermentation (DF) effluent by the co-culture of Rhodobacter sphaeroides -NMBL-01 and Bacillus firmus - NMBL-03 has been reported. The effect of pH, initial chemical oxygen demand (COD) and the concentration effect of FeSO4.7H2O on photo-hydrogen production have been investigated. The end products of dark fermentation effluent of cheese whey were mainly comprised of soluble organic acids, i.e. butyric acid and lactic acid. The batch process was carried out under light intensity of 2.5 kLux at 32 ± 2oC without any addition of extra carbon and nitrogen source. The single parameter optimization studies revealed optimum pH 6.5, initial COD 4.71 g/L and supplementation of Fe2+ concentration 100 mg/L. The maximum cumulative hydrogen production and yield were found to be 469 ± 45.8 ml H2/L and 146.56 ± 14.31 ml H2/g COD reduced (67.9% reduction in COD) respectively. The mutual interactions among the process parameters were also investigated by three factorial Box-Behnken design of response surface methodology. The optimized experimental values were found concurrent with the calculated values obtained from the theoretical model.

  4. Effluents and Solid Waste Analysis in a Petrochemical Company- A Case Study of Eleme Petrochemical Company Ltd, Port Harcourt, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. U. Israel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Effluents and soil samples where sediments from the treated effluents are dumped were analyzed for physicochemical properties, metallic and non-metallic ions. These parameters were compared with established international standard (FEPA. Effluents were classified as process waste water (PWW, clarified water (CW, and final discharge (FD. The petrochemical effluents contained very high concentration of TDS (284.00±014 mg/L and significant concentrations of TSS (78.89±0.01 mg/L, COD (30.10±0.02 mg/L, DO (13.20±0.01 mg/L, BOD (6.12±0.00 mg/L, PO43- (4.34±0.00 mg/L, SO42- (3.59±0.00 mg/L, Cl- (55.52±0.01 mg/L and NO3- (8.40±0.01 mg/L. Low concentrations of iron, zinc, copper, cadmium, lead, nickel and cobalt was also observed. Some heavy metals were not detected at all in some of the effluent samples analyzed. Apart from temperature and total dissolved solid TDS, all the other parameters were below FEPA effluent limitations for guidelines for Petroleum Refinery, Fuel/Gasoline oil category in Nigeria.

  5. State waste discharge permit application for the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility and the State-Approved Land Disposal Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    Application is being made for a permit pursuant to Chapter 173--216 of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC), to discharge treated waste water and cooling tower blowdown from the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) to land at the State-Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS). The ETF is located in the 200 East Area and the SALDS is located north of the 200 West Area. The ETF is an industrial waste water treatment plant that will initially receive waste water from the following two sources, both located in the 200 Area on the Hanford Site: (1) the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) and (2) the 242-A Evaporator. The waste water discharged from these two facilities is process condensate (PC), a by-product of the concentration of waste from DSTs that is performed in the 242-A Evaporator. Because the ETF is designed as a flexible treatment system, other aqueous waste streams generated at the Hanford Site may be considered for treatment at the ETF. The origin of the waste currently contained in the DSTs is explained in Section 2.0. An overview of the concentration of these waste in the 242-A Evaporator is provided in Section 3.0. Section 4.0 describes the LERF, a storage facility for process condensate. Attachment A responds to Section B of the permit application and provides an overview of the processes that generated the wastes, storage of the wastes in double-shell tanks (DST), preliminary treatment in the 242-A Evaporator, and storage at the LERF. Attachment B addresses waste water treatment at the ETF (under construction) and the addition of cooling tower blowdown to the treated waste water prior to disposal at SALDS. Attachment C describes treated waste water disposal at the proposed SALDS

  6. treatment of waste effluents using active carbon prepared from AGRO-residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakout, S.M.E.

    2006-01-01

    the main goal of the investigation is to improve the efficiency of adsorption of radionuclides and anions from liquid waste by modifying sorption properties of adsorbents . thus, the present study is directed towards investigating the feasibility of using agricultural wastes and locally available materials in such a manner as to treat waste effluents. activated carbons derived from rice straw were prepared by one-step steam pyrolysis. the activated rice straw was subjected to liquid-phase oxidation by different modifying agents include KOH, HNO 3 .H 2 So 4 , H 2 O 2 , and kMno 4 to obtain carbon with various surface characters. the prepared carbon samples were characterized using various techniques: x-ray diffraction, pore parameters analysis, point of zero charge pHpzc, FTIR. Boehm titration method. elemental analysis, iodine number, methylene blue, and phenol index. the prepared carbon samples were tested for removal of certain cation pollutants of nuclear interest from waste solutions such as uranium and thorium as well as anion pollutants such as fluoride, nitrate and nitrite.factors affecting the sorption behaviour e.g. carbon properties . contact time ,initial concentration of the solute, mass of adsorbent, ph of solution and temperature were studied by applying batch technique.thorium. fluoride, and nitrate sorption are better occurred at lower temperature while uranium is favoured at higher temperature. the adsorption followed the langmuir adsorption isotherm model in case of uranium and thorium while anions followed langmuir-freundlich isotherm . the ability of RS 2 /kMno 4 to remove F-from egyptian crude phosphoric acid (P 2 O 5 =48.42%) was tested and the adsorption capacity of F - in H 3 PO 4 was greater than that in distilled water due to lower ph enhances f-adsorption onto RS 2 /kMnO 4 carbon

  7. Westinghouse Hanford Company effluent discharges and solid waste management report for calendar year 1989: 200/600 Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.J.; P'Pool, R.K.; Thomas, S.P.

    1990-05-01

    This report presents calendar year 1989 radiological and nonradiological effluent discharge data from facilities in the 200 Areas and the 600 Area of the Hanford Site. Both summary and detailed effluent data are presented. In addition, radioactive and nonradioactive solid waste storage and disposal data for calendar year 1989 are furnished. Where appropriate, comparisons to previous years are made. The intent of the report is to demonstrate compliance of Westinghouse Hanford Company-operated facilities with administrative control values for radioactive constituents and applicable guidelines and standards (including Federal permit limits) for nonradioactive constituents. 11 refs., 20 tabs

  8. Utility of Rice Bran Mixed with Fermentation Extract of Vegetable Waste Unconditioned as Probiotics from Vegetable Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahya Setya Utama

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aimed of the study was to enhance utilization of Lactobacillus Sp. and Saccharomyces sp. as starter for fermentation of waste cabbage and green mustard to enhance the utility of rice bran as an ingredient of poultry feed. The first stage of the study was to characterize the extract of fermented wasted vegetable with difference concentration of glucose and different period of time for incubation. Completely randomized design using 3 x 3 factorial with three replications was used for the first stage of the study. The second stage of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the extract of fermented wasted vegetable to improve the quality and utility of rice bran. Completely randomized design with four treatments and 4 replications. The third stage of the study was to obtain the value of nitrogen, calcium and phosphorus retention, as well as metabolic energy of rice bran after fermentation in broiler hatching. The third stage analysis was conducted by t-test analysis. The results of the study showed that the microbial characteristics on the extract of fermented wasted vegetable in two days incubation time and 2% concentration of glucose was able to produce pH of 3.80, log of total lactic acid bacteria 7.38 and types of microbes that grow predominantly were Lactobacillus Sp. and Saccharomyces Sp. The effectiveness of the extract fermented wasted vegetable for the fermentation of rice bran were shown in additional concentration of extract wasted vegetable of 40% with a moisture content of  toluene 65.24%, 13.36% ash, 14.93% protein, 7.61% crude fat, 12.39% crude fiber, nitrogen free extract material (NFE 51.59% and 0.07% biomass. The biological value and the availability of fermented rice bran were higher than unfermented rice bran on the broiler chickens after hatching. The values were justified from nitrogen, calcium and phosphorus retention also metabolic energy. The study concluded that the benefits and utility of rice bran could

  9. Improving production of volatile fatty acids from food waste fermentation by hydrothermal pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Wang, Kun; Yang, Yuqiang; Shen, Dongsheng; Wang, Meizhen; Mo, Han

    2014-11-01

    Food waste (FW) was pretreated by a hydrothermal method and then fermented for volatile fatty acid (VFAs) production. The soluble substance in FW increased after hydrothermal pretreatment (⩽200 °C). Higher hydrothermal temperature would lead to mineralization of the organic compounds. The optimal temperature for organic dissolution was 180 °C, at which FW dissolved 42.5% more soluble chemical oxygen demand than the control. VFA production from pretreated FW fermentation was significantly enhanced compared with the control. The optimal hydrothermal temperature was 160 °C with a VFA yield of 0.908 g/g VSremoval. Butyrate and acetate were the prevalent VFAs followed by propionate and valerate. FW fermentation was inhibited after 200 °C pretreatment. The VFAs were extracted from the fermentation broth by liquid-liquid extraction. The VFA recovery was 50-70%. Thus, 0.294-0.411 g VFAs could be obtained per gram of hydrothermally pretreated FW (in dry weight) by this method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Fermentative Hydrogen Production from Combination of Tofu processing and anaerobic digester sludge wastes using a microbial consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You-Kwan, O.; Mi-Sun, K.

    2009-01-01

    The combination of Tofu manufacturing waste and anaerobic digester sludge was studied for fermentative H 2 production in batch and continuous modes using a mixed culture originated from sewage. In order to increase the solubilization of organic substrates from Tofu waste, various pretreatments including heat-treatment, acid/alkali treatment, and sonication were examined alone or in combination with others. (Author)

  11. Production and immobilization of enzymes by solid-state fermentation of agroindustrial waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo Sánchez, Sheila; Gil Sánchez, Irene; Arévalo-Villena, María; Briones Pérez, Ana

    2015-03-01

    The recovery of by-products from agri-food industry is currently one of the major challenges of biotechnology. Castilla-La Mancha produces around three million tons of waste coming from olive oil and wine industries, both of which have a pivotal role in the economy of this region. For this reason, this study reports on the exploitation of grape skins and olive pomaces for the production of lignocellulosic enzymes, which are able to deconstruct the agroindustrial waste and, therefore, reuse them in future industrial processes. To this end, solid-state fermentation was carried out using two local fungal strains (Aspergillus niger-113 N and Aspergillus fumigatus-3). In some trials, a wheat supplementation with a 1:1 ratio was used to improve the growth conditions, and the particle size of the substrates was altered through milling. Separate fermentations were run and collected after 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 15 days to monitor enzymatic activity (xylanase, cellulase, β-glucosidase, pectinase). The highest values were recorded after 10 and 15 days of fermentation. The use of A. niger on unmilled grape skin yielded the best outcomes (47.05 U xylanase/g by-product). The multi-enzymatic extracts obtained were purified, freeze dried, and immobilized on chitosan by adsorption to assess the possible advantages provided by the different techniques.

  12. Soaking assisted thermal pretreatment of cassava peels wastes for fermentable sugar production: Process modelling and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aruwajoye, Gabriel S.; Faloye, Funmilayo D.; Kana, Evariste Gueguim

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Soaking Assisted Thermal Pretreatment (SATP) of Cassava Peels’ waste is reported. • Maximum fermentable sugar of 0.93 g/g and 90.90% sugar recovery was achieved. • This technique gave a 31% sugar yield improvement over enzymatic pretreatment. • SEM and FTIR analysis confirms the efficiency of SATP. - Abstract: This study reports a hybrid pretreatment strategy for optimum fermentable sugar (FS) release from cassava peels waste. The Response Surface design method was used to investigate the effect of soaking temperature, soaking duration, autoclave duration, acid concentration and solid loading on reducing sugar yield. The model gave a coefficient of determination (R 2 ) of 0.87. The optimum pretreatment conditions of 69.62 °C soaking temperature, 2.57 h soaking duration, 5 min autoclave duration, 3.68 v/v acid concentration and 9.65% w/v solid loading were obtained. Maximum reducing sugar of 89.80 ± 2.87 g/L corresponding to a fermentable sugar yield of 0.93 ± 0.03 g/g cassava peels was achieved upon model validation. A percentage sugar recovery of 90.79% was achieved with a 31% improvement in the FS yield from the enzyme pretreatment. The combined severity factor (CSF) of 0.77 and the low concentration of inhibitory compounds achieved further demonstrates the efficiency of this technique.

  13. The Utilization of Banana Peel in the Fermentation Liquid in Food Waste Composting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, A. A.; Rahman, N. A.; Azhari, N. W.

    2016-07-01

    Municipal solid waste in Malaysia contains a high amount of organic matters, particularly food waste. Food waste represents almost 60% from the total municipal solid waste disposed in the landfill. Food waste can be converted into useful materials such as compost. However, source separation of food waste for recycling is not commonly practiced in Malaysia due to various constraints. These constraints include low awareness among the waste generators and low demand of the products produced from the food waste such as composts. Composting is one of the alternatives that can be used in food waste disposal from Makanan Ringan Mas. The aim of the study is to convert food waste generated from Makanan Ringan Mas which is a medium sale industry located at Parit Kuari Darat, Batu Pahat by using composting method. The parameters which include temperature, pH value, NPK (Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Potassium) values has been examined. Banana peel is being used as the fermentation liquid whilst soil and coconut husk were used as the composting medium. Based on the results during the composting process, most of the pH value in each reactor is above 5 and approximately at neutral. This shown that the microbial respiration in the well controlled composting reactor was inhibited and had approached the mature phase. On the other hand, during the period of composting, the overall temperature range from 25 °C to 47 °C which shown the active phase for composting will occoured. As for NPK content Nitrogen value range is 35325 mg/L to 78775 mg/L, Phosphorus, 195.83 mg/L to 471 mg/L and potassium is 422.3 mg/L to 2046 mg/L which is sufficient to use for agricultural purpose. The comparison was made with available organic compost in the market and only showed slightly difference. Nevertheless, in comparison with common fertilizer, the NPK value of organic compost are considerably very low.

  14. Using a macroalgal δ15N bioassay to detect cruise ship waste water effluent inputs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaldy, James

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Green macroalgae exposed to nutrient solutions exhibited changes in tissue 15 N signatures. → Macroalgae exhibited no fractionation with NO 3 and slight fractionation with NH 4 . → Algae exposed to cruise ship waste water had increased tissue δ 15 N indicating a heavy N source. → Field bioassays exhibited decreased δ 15 N indicating isotopically light riverine δ 15 N-NO 3 was likely the dominant N source. → Algal bioassays could not detect a δ 15 N cruise ship waste water signal in this system. - Abstract: Green macroalgae bioassays were used to determine if the δ 15 N signature of cruise ship waste water effluent (CSWWE) could be detected in a small harbor. Opportunistic green macroalgae (Ulva spp.) were collected, cultured under nutrient depleted conditions and characterized with regard to N content and δ 15 N. Samples of algae were used in controlled incubations to evaluate the direction of isotope shift from exposure to CSWWE. Algae samples exposed to CSWWE exhibited an increase of 1-2.5 per mille in δ 15 N values indicating that the CSWWE had an enriched isotope signature. In contrast, algae samples exposed to field conditions exhibited a significant decrease in the observed δ 15 N indicating that a light N source was used. Isotopically light, riverine nitrogen derived from N 2 -fixing trees in the watershed may be a N source utilized by algae. These experiments indicate that the δ 15 N CSWWE signature was not detectable under the CSWWE loading conditions of this experiment.

  15. Rapid production of organic fertilizer by dynamic high-temperature aerobic fermentation (DHAF) of food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yang; Ju, Meiting; Li, Weizun; Ren, Qingbin; Liu, Le; Chen, Yu; Yang, Qian; Hou, Qidong; Liu, Yiliang

    2015-12-01

    Keep composting matrix in continuous collision and friction under a relatively high-temperature can significantly accelerate the progress of composting. A bioreactor was designed according to the novel process. Using this technology, organic fertilizer could be produced within 96h. The electric conductivity (EC) and pH value reached to a stable value of 2.35mS/cm and 7.7 after 96h of fermentation. The total carbon/total nitrogen (TC/TN) and dissolved carbon/dissolved nitrogen (DC/DN) ratio was decrease from 27.3 and 36.2 to 17.4 and 7.6 respectively. In contrast, it needed 24days to achieve the similar result in traditional static composting (TSC). Compost particles with different size were analyzed to explore the rapid degradation mechanism of food waste. The evidence of anaerobic fermentation was firstly discovered in aerobic composting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dark fermentative hydrogen production by defined mixed microbial cultures immobilized on ligno-cellulosic waste materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Sanjay K.S. [Microbial Biotechnology and Genomics, Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology (IGIB), CSIR, Delhi University Campus, Mall Road, Delhi 110007 (India); Department of Biotechnology, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Purohit, Hemant J. [Environmental Genomics Unit, National Environmental Engineering Research Institute (NEERI), CSIR, Nehru Marg, Nagpur 440020 (India); Kalia, Vipin C. [Microbial Biotechnology and Genomics, Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology (IGIB), CSIR, Delhi University Campus, Mall Road, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2010-10-15

    Mixed microbial cultures (MMCs) based on 11 isolates belonging to Bacillus spp. (Firmicutes), Bordetella avium, Enterobacter aerogenes and Proteus mirabilis (Proteobacteria) were employed to produce hydrogen (H{sub 2}) under dark fermentative conditions. Under daily fed culture conditions (hydraulic retention time of 2 days), MMC6 and MMC4, immobilized on ligno-cellulosic wastes - banana leaves and coconut coir evolved 300-330 mL H{sub 2}/day. Here, H{sub 2} constituted 58-62% of the total biogas evolved. It amounted to a H{sub 2} yield of 1.54-1.65 mol/mol glucose utilized over a period of 60 days of fermentation. The involvement of various Bacillus spp. -Bacillus sp., Bacillus cereus, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus pumilus and Bacillus thuringiensis as components of the defined MMCs for H{sub 2} production has been reported here for the first time. (author)

  17. Hydrogen and methane production from household solid waste in the two-stage fermentation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lui, D.; Liu, D.; Zeng, Raymond Jianxiong

    2006-01-01

    A two-stage process combined hydrogen and methane production from household solid waste was demonstrated working successfully. The yield of 43 mL H-2/g volatile solid (VS) added was generated in the first hydrogen production stage and the methane production in the second stage was 500 mL CH4/g VS...... added. This figure was 21% higher than the methane yield from the one-stage process, which was run as control. Sparging of the hydrogen reactor with methane gas resulted in doubling of the hydrogen production. PH was observed as a key factor affecting fermentation pathway in hydrogen production stage....... Furthermore, this study also provided direct evidence in the dynamic fermentation process that, hydrogen production increase was reflected by acetate to butyrate ratio increase in liquid phase. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  18. Evaluation of waste stabilization ponds effluent efficiency on the growth and nutritive characteristics of cluster beans (cyamopsis tetragonoloba l.) taub

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.; Shaukat, S.S.; Alamgir, A.; Hasan, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    South Asian countries including Pakistan are facing chronic shortage of water supply which is anticipated to be aggravated in future. These countries are agribased where the continued water supply is crucial for sustainable economy. One of the possible alternatives to overcome the problems of water scarcity is the used of treated wastewater which is gaining much importance even in the western world. The treated wastewater can be used as a liquid fertilizer which could provide dual benefits both in terms of saving of fresh water as well as inorganic fertilizers. The potential of treated effluent from waste stabilization ponds (WSP) and equivalent basal fertilizer on growth and nutritive quality of cluster beans (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba L.) Taub. was investigated under field conditions. Treated effluent significantly increased fresh weight of leaves and stems. Dry weight of stem was also significantly higher with the treatment of WSP effluent as compared to the use of basal fertilizer and fresh water. Fresh and dry fruit weights, number of seeds per fruit and fruit length were also significantly increased in WSP effluent treatment as compared to other two treatments. Treatment with WSP effluent also improved the nutritive characteristics such as crude proteins and total carbohydrates. However, total fat and ash content percentage of Cyamopsis tetragonoloba remained unaltered. The application of WSP effluent also increased NPK and organic matter content of the soil after harvesting the crop which would be helpful for succeeding crop. The study demonstrated that treated effluent can be successfully used for unrestricted irrigation in the water deficient areas of Pakistan thereby saving huge quantities of fresh water. (author)

  19. Improving bioavailability of fruit wastes using organic acid: An exploratory study of biomass pretreatment for fermentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Shouvik; Kurade, Mayur B.; El-Dalatony, Marwa M.; Chatterjee, Pradip K.; Lee, Dae Sung; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Maximum sugar recovery was achieved with 100 °C/1 h treatment in 0.2 M acetic acid. • C/N ratios (41–47) were retained in all FPWs after the acetic acid treatment. • Combined severity (−0.83) of acetic acid enhanced the bioavailability of the FPWs. • Acetic acid pretreatment is advantageous over mineral acid to curtail sugar loss. • Estimated methane yields are promising for the industrial feasibility. - Abstract: Maximizing the bioavailability of fermentable biomass components is a key challenge in biomass pretreatment due to the loss of sugars during conventional pretreatment approaches. Pretreatment of fruit peels and wastes (FPWs) with dilute acetic acid assisted in maximizing sugar recovery. Optimized conditions (0.2 M acetic acid, 100 °C, 1 h) at 10% substrate loading resulted in enhanced sugar recovery from banana peels (99.9%), pineapple wastes (99.1%), grape pomace (98.8%), and orange peels (97.9%). These high sugar recoveries retained the high C/N ratios (41–47) suitable for effective bioenergy production through the fermentation of these pretreated biomasses. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated considerable disruption of biomass structural integrity during acetic acid treatment, enhancing the surface area available for better microbial attachment. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed that the acetic acid pretreatment yielded only minor changes to the functional groups in the biomasses, strongly suggesting minimal loss of fermentable sugars. Thus, acetic acid pretreatment aids in enhancing the bioavailability of fermentable sugars from these FPWs biomass, enabling improvements in bioenergy production.

  20. A review of dark fermentative hydrogen production from biodegradable municipal waste fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Gioannis, G., E-mail: degioan@unica.it [DICAAR – Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Architecture, University of Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); IGAG-CNR, Environmental Geology and Geoengineering Institute of the National Research Council (Italy); Muntoni, A. [DICAAR – Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Architecture, University of Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); IGAG-CNR, Environmental Geology and Geoengineering Institute of the National Research Council (Italy); Polettini, A.; Pomi, R. [Department of Hydraulics, Transportation and Roads, University of Rome “La Sapienza” (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ► A large number of factors affect fermentative hydrogen production. ► Harmonization and systematic comparison of results from different literature sources are needed. ► More than 80 publications on H{sub 2} production from food waste and OFMSW have been examined. ► Experimental data from the reviewed literature were analyzed using statistical tools. ► For a reliable assessment of the process performance, the use of multiple parameters appears to be recommended. - Abstract: Hydrogen is believed to play a potentially key role in the implementation of sustainable energy production, particularly when it is produced from renewable sources and low energy-demanding processes. In the present paper an attempt was made at critically reviewing more than 80 recent publications, in order to harmonize and compare the available results from different studies on hydrogen production from FW and OFMSW through dark fermentation, and derive reliable information about process yield and stability in view of building related predictive models. The review was focused on the effect of factors, recognized as potentially affecting process evolution (including type of substrate and co-substrate and relative ratio, type of inoculum, food/microorganisms [F/M] ratio, applied pre-treatment, reactor configuration, temperature and pH), on the fermentation yield and kinetics. Statistical analysis of literature data from batch experiments was also conducted, showing that the variables affecting the H{sub 2} production yield were ranked in the order: type of co-substrate, type of pre-treatment, operating pH, control of initial pH and fermentation temperature. However, due to the dispersion of data observed in some instances, the ambiguity about the presence of additional hidden variables cannot be resolved. The results from the analysis thus suggest that, for reliable predictive models of fermentative hydrogen production to be derived, a high level of consistency between data is

  1. A review of dark fermentative hydrogen production from biodegradable municipal waste fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Gioannis, G.; Muntoni, A.; Polettini, A.; Pomi, R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A large number of factors affect fermentative hydrogen production. ► Harmonization and systematic comparison of results from different literature sources are needed. ► More than 80 publications on H 2 production from food waste and OFMSW have been examined. ► Experimental data from the reviewed literature were analyzed using statistical tools. ► For a reliable assessment of the process performance, the use of multiple parameters appears to be recommended. - Abstract: Hydrogen is believed to play a potentially key role in the implementation of sustainable energy production, particularly when it is produced from renewable sources and low energy-demanding processes. In the present paper an attempt was made at critically reviewing more than 80 recent publications, in order to harmonize and compare the available results from different studies on hydrogen production from FW and OFMSW through dark fermentation, and derive reliable information about process yield and stability in view of building related predictive models. The review was focused on the effect of factors, recognized as potentially affecting process evolution (including type of substrate and co-substrate and relative ratio, type of inoculum, food/microorganisms [F/M] ratio, applied pre-treatment, reactor configuration, temperature and pH), on the fermentation yield and kinetics. Statistical analysis of literature data from batch experiments was also conducted, showing that the variables affecting the H 2 production yield were ranked in the order: type of co-substrate, type of pre-treatment, operating pH, control of initial pH and fermentation temperature. However, due to the dispersion of data observed in some instances, the ambiguity about the presence of additional hidden variables cannot be resolved. The results from the analysis thus suggest that, for reliable predictive models of fermentative hydrogen production to be derived, a high level of consistency between data is strictly

  2. Feasibility of converting lactic acid to ethanol in food waste fermentation by immobilized lactate oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Hong-zhi; Xing, Yi; Yu, Miao; Wang, Qunhui

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Residue lactic acid in food waste could be converted to pyruvic acid. • Calcium alginate immobilized the lactate oxidase with high pH and thermal stability. • Immobilized enzyme could convert 70% lactic acid to pyruvic acid. • Ethanol yield could be increased by 20% with lactate oxidase added. - Abstract: Adoption of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) into ethanol fermentation from food waste can replace the sterilization process. However, LAB inoculation will convert part of the substrate into lactic acid (LA), not ethanol. This study adopted lactate oxidase to convert the produced LA to pyruvate, and then ethanol fermentation was carried out. The immobilization enzyme was utilized, and corresponding optimum conditions were determined. Results showed that calcium alginate could successfully immobilize the enzyme and improve pH and thermal stability. The optimum pH and temperature were 6.2 and 55 °C, respectively. The utilization of immobilized enzyme with catalytic time of 5 h could convert 70% LA to pyruvate, and the addition of enzyme increased the ethanol yield by 20% more than that of the control. The process could be applied in food waste storage and can help in reducing carbon source consumption

  3. Effects of brown sugar and calcium superphosphate on the secondary fermentation of green waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Sun, Xiangyang; Tian, Yun; Gong, Xiaoqiang

    2013-03-01

    The generation of green waste is increasing rapidly with population growth in China, and green waste is commonly treated by composting. The objective of this work was to study the physical and chemical characteristics of composted green waste as affected by a two-stage composting process and by the addition of brown sugar (at 0.0%, 0.5%, and 1%) and calcium superphosphate (Ca(H2PO4)2·H2O) (at 0%, 3%, and 6%) during the second stage. With or without these additives, all the composts displayed two peaks in fermentation temperature and matured in only 30days. Compared to traditional industrial composting, the composting method described here increased the duration of high-temperature fermentation period, reduced the maturity time, and reduced costs. Addition of 0.5% brown sugar plus 6% calcium superphosphate produced the highest quality compost with respect to C/N ratio, pH, organic matter content, electrical conductivity, particle-size distribution, and other characteristics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dynamic metabolic modeling of heterotrophic and mixotrophic microalgal growth on fermentative wastes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Baroukh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are promising microorganisms for the production of numerous molecules of interest, such as pigments, proteins or triglycerides that can be turned into biofuels. Heterotrophic or mixotrophic growth on fermentative wastes represents an interesting approach to achieving higher biomass concentrations, while reducing cost and improving the environmental footprint. Fermentative wastes generally consist of a blend of diverse molecules and it is thus crucial to understand microalgal metabolism in such conditions, where switching between substrates might occur. Metabolic modeling has proven to be an efficient tool for understanding metabolism and guiding the optimization of biomass or target molecule production. Here, we focused on the metabolism of Chlorella sorokiniana growing heterotrophically and mixotrophically on acetate and butyrate. The metabolism was represented by 172 metabolic reactions. The DRUM modeling framework with a mildly relaxed quasi-steady-state assumption was used to account for the switching between substrates and the presence of light. Nine experiments were used to calibrate the model and nine experiments for the validation. The model efficiently predicted the experimental data, including the transient behavior during heterotrophic, autotrophic, mixotrophic and diauxic growth. It shows that an accurate model of metabolism can now be constructed, even in dynamic conditions, with the presence of several carbon substrates. It also opens new perspectives for the heterotrophic and mixotrophic use of microalgae, especially for biofuel production from wastes.

  5. Efficient production of ethanol from waste paper and the biochemical methane potential of stillage eluted from ethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Hiroto; Tan, Li; Sun, Zhao-Yong; Tang, Yue-Qin; Kida, Kenji; Morimura, Shigeru

    2016-02-01

    Waste paper can serve as a feedstock for ethanol production due to being rich in cellulose and not requiring energy-intensive thermophysical pretreatment. In this study, an efficient process was developed to convert waste paper to ethanol. To accelerate enzymatic saccharification, pH of waste paper slurry was adjusted to 4.5-5.0 with H2SO4. Presaccharification and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (PSSF) with enzyme loading of 40 FPU/g waste paper achieved an ethanol yield of 91.8% and productivity of 0.53g/(Lh) with an ethanol concentration of 32g/L. Fed-batch PSSF was used to decrease enzyme loading to 13 FPU/g waste paper by feeding two separate batches of waste paper slurry. Feeding with 20% w/w waste paper slurry increased ethanol concentration to 41.8g/L while ethanol yield decreased to 83.8%. To improve the ethanol yield, presaccharification was done prior to feeding and resulted in a higher ethanol concentration of 45.3g/L, a yield of 90.8%, and productivity of 0.54g/(Lh). Ethanol fermentation recovered 33.2% of the energy in waste paper as ethanol. The biochemical methane potential of the stillage eluted from ethanol fermentation was 270.5mL/g VTS and 73.0% of the energy in the stillage was recovered as methane. Integrating ethanol fermentation with methane fermentation, recovered a total of 80.4% of the energy in waste paper as ethanol and methane. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A novel process for volatile fatty acids production from syngas by integrating with mesophilic alkaline fermentation of waste activated sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rao, Yue; Wan, Jingjing; Liu, Yafeng

    2018-01-01

    The present study proposed and demonstrated a novel process for the bioconversion of syngas (mainly CO and H2) to valuable volatile fatty acids (VFA) by integrating with mesophilic alkaline fermentation of waste activated sludge (WAS). The results showed that although pH 9 was suitable for VFA...... to the mesophilic alkaline fermentation of WAS at pH 10 not only resulted in the enrichment of some known bacteria related with syngas conversion, but also changed the microbial community compositions for the fermentation of WAS....

  7. Batch Fermentative Biohydrogen Production Process Using Immobilized Anaerobic Sludge from Organic Solid Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick T. Sekoai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the potential of organic solid waste for biohydrogen production using immobilized anaerobic sludge. Biohydrogen was produced under batch mode at process conditions of 7.9, 30.3 °C and 90 h for pH, temperature and fermentation time, respectively. A maximum biohydrogen fraction of 48.67%, which corresponded to a biohydrogen yield of 215.39 mL H2/g Total Volatile Solids (TVS, was achieved. Therefore, the utilization of immobilized cells could pave the way for a large-scale biohydrogen production process.

  8. Modeling of pretreatment and acidogenic fermentation of the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beccari, M; Longo, G; Majone, M; Rolle, E; Scarinci, A [Rome ' ' La Sapienza' ' Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-01-01

    The organic fraction of municipal solid waste represents a potential feedstock to be treated through biorefining. However, the process feasibility strongly depends on the effectiveness of a chemical pretreatment. Consequently, experimentation aimed at choosing the optimal type of reagent (alkali or acids) and optimal operating conditions was carried out. The best results were obtained using NaOH at room temperature. Solubilization data are in good agreement with a kinetics based on two competing reactions. Simulation of the overall process (pretreatment and acidogenic fermentation) taking place in two CFSTR reactors shows that an optimum ratio exists between the hydraulic residence times of the two stages of the process. (author)

  9. Study on NPK Performance in Food Waste Composting by Using Agricultural Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamaludin Siti Noratifah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Food waste represents almost 60% from the total municipal solid waste disposed in the landfill. Alternative disposal method for food waste could be conducted by using composting method. In this study, investigationon food waste composting by using agricultural fermentation was carried out to find out the performance of the compost. Two types of compost were produced which were commercial compost and research compost and total of 8 reactors were tested during this study. Research compost consist of coconut fiber (decomposing medium and the combination of salt and breadfruit peels as the fermentation liquid, while rice husk was used as decomposing medium for commercial compost along with fermented soybeanand brown sugar as fermentation liquid. Physical and chemical parameters which are temperature, pH value, moisture content, Total Nitrogen (N, Total Phosphorus (P and Potassium (K concentration were determined. Based on the results of 20 weeks composting, the overall temperature range from 27 °C to 45 °C which shown the active phase for composting occurred. On the other hand, during the period of composting, most of the pH value in each reactor is above 5 and approximately at neutral. This shown that the microbial respiration in the composting reactor was inhibited and had approached the mature phase. As for NPK content, Total Nitrogen value range from 98 ppm to 2268 ppm for commercial compost, while 84 ppm to 2240 ppm for research compost. Total Phosphorus has the values of0.871 ppm to 11.615 ppm for commercial compost and 1.785 ppm to 14.143 ppm for research compost. On the other hand, result for potassium is from 91.85 ppm to 645.55 ppm for commercial compost and from 133.95 ppm to 686.2 ppm for research compost. As a conclusion from the results obtained, the compost in this study is sufficient to be use for agricultural purposes and the best performance of NPK value was demonstrated by Reactor C2 from research compost.

  10. The main rules regarding the management of solid waste and liquid effluent contaminated during use at nuclear medicine departments; Les principales regles de gestion des dechets solides et des effluents liquides contamines dans les services de medecine nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudouin, E. [Autorite de Surete Nucleaire, Direction des rayonnements ionisants et de la sante, 75 - Paris (France)

    2011-02-15

    This article describes the key requirements applicable to the management of contaminated medical waste and effluent from hospitals and health care centres, and more especially from nuclear medicine departments that use radionuclides for the purposes of diagnosis (in vivo or in vitro) or in patient treatment. It also presents the key management regulations, making a distinction between contaminated solid waste and contaminated liquid waste from such nuclear medicine departments. (author)

  11. Control of Effluent Gases from Solid Waste Processing Using Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John; Cinke, Martin; Wignarajab, Kanapathipillai

    2005-01-01

    One of the major problems associated with solid waste processing technologies is the release of effluent gases and contaminants that are in gaseous formed from the processes. A number of other gases, in particular NO(x), SO2, NH3, Hydrocarbons (e.g. CH4) do present hazards to the crew in space habitats. Reduction of mass, power, volume and resupply can be achieved by using catalyst impregnated carbon nanotubes as compared to other catalytic systems. The development and characterization of an innovative approach for the control and elimination of gaseous toxins using single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) promise superior performance over conventional approaches. This is due to the ability to direct the selective uptake of gaseous species based on their controllable pore size, high adsorptive capacity and the effectiveness of carbon nanotubes as catalyst supports for gaseous conversion. For example, SWNTs have high adsorptive capacity for NO and the adsorbed NO can be decomposed to N2 and O2 . Experimental results showing the decomposition of NO on metal impregnated carbon nanotubes is presented. Equivalent System Mass (ESM) comparisons are made of the existing TCCS systems with the carbon nanotube technology for removing NO(x). The potential for methane decomposition using carbon nanotubes catalysts is also discussed.

  12. Boosting dark fermentation with co-cultures of extreme thermophiles for biohythane production from garden waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Angela A; Tavares, Fábio; Alves, Maria Madalena; Pereira, Maria Alcina

    2016-11-01

    Proof of principle of biohythane and potential energy production from garden waste (GW) is demonstrated in this study in a two-step process coupling dark fermentation and anaerobic digestion. The synergistic effect of using co-cultures of extreme thermophiles to intensify biohydrogen dark fermentation is demonstrated using xylose, cellobiose and GW. Co-culture of Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus and Thermotoga maritima showed higher hydrogen production yields from xylose (2.7±0.1molmol(-1) total sugar) and cellobiose (4.8±0.3molmol(-1) total sugar) compared to individual cultures. Co-culture of extreme thermophiles C. saccharolyticus and Caldicellulosiruptor bescii increased synergistically the hydrogen production yield from GW (98.3±6.9Lkg(-1) (VS)) compared to individual cultures and co-culture of T. maritima and C. saccharolyticus. The biochemical methane potential of the fermentation end-products was 322±10Lkg(-1) (CODt). Biohythane, a biogas enriched with 15% hydrogen could be obtained from GW, yielding a potential energy generation of 22.2MJkg(-1) (VS). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Lactic acid production with undefined mixed culture fermentation of potato peel waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shaobo; McDonald, Armando G; Coats, Erik R

    2014-11-01

    Potato peel waste (PPW) as zero value byproduct generated from food processing plant contains a large quantity of starch, non-starch polysaccharide, lignin, protein, and lipid. PPW as one promising carbon source can be managed and utilized to value added bioproducts through a simple fermentation process using undefined mixed cultures inoculated from wastewater treatment plant sludge. A series of non-pH controlled batch fermentations under different conditions such as pretreatment process, enzymatic hydrolysis, temperature, and solids loading were studied. Lactic acid (LA) was the major product, followed by acetic acid (AA) and ethanol under fermentation conditions without the presence of added hydrolytic enzymes. The maximum yields of LA, AA, and ethanol were respectively, 0.22 g g(-1), 0.06 g g(-1), and 0.05 g g(-1). The highest LA concentration of 14.7 g L(-1) was obtained from a bioreactor with initial solids loading of 60 g L(-1) at 35°C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, C.J.

    1995-10-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure lonq-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years

  15. 40 CFR 426.113 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GLASS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Television Picture... applicable to the abrasive polishing and acid polishing waste water streams. Effluent characteristic Effluent...

  16. Optimization of fermentative hydrogen production from palm oil mill effluent in an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket fixed film bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Mohammadi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Response surface methodology with a central composite design was applied to optimize fermentative hydrogen production from palm oil mill effluent (POME in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket fixed film reactor. In this study, the concurrent effects of up-flow velocity (Vup and feed flow rate (QF as independent operating variables on biological hydrogen production were investigated. A broad range of organic loading rate between 10 and 60 g COD L−1 d−1 was used as the operating variables. The dependent parameters as multiple responses were evaluated. Experimental results showed the highest value of yield at 0.31 L H2 g−1 COD was obtained at Vup and QF of 0.5 m h−1 and 1.7 L d−1, respectively. The optimum conditions for the fermentative hydrogen production using pre-settled POME were QF = 2.0–3.7 L d−1 and Vup = 1.5–2.3 m h−1. The experimental results agreed very well with the model prediction.

  17. Bacterial community dynamics and product distribution during pH-adjusted fermentation of vegetable wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, N-F; Lü, F; Shao, L-M; Godon, J-J; He, P-J

    2007-10-01

    To estimate the effect of pH on the structures of bacterial community during fermentation of vegetable wastes and to investigate the relationship between bacterial community dynamics and product distribution. The bacterial communities in five batch tests controlled at different pH values [uncontrolled (about pH 4), 5, 6, 7 and 8] were monitored by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). The two fingerprinting methods provided consistent results and principal component analysis indicated a close similarity of bacterial community at pH 7 and 8 in addition to those at pH 4-6. This clustering also corresponded to dominant metabolic pathway. Thus, pH 7-8 shifted from alcohol-forming to acid-forming, especially butyric acid, whereas both alcohol-forming and acid-forming dominated at pH 5-6, and at pH 4, fermentation was inhibited. Shannon-weaver index was calculated to analyse the DGGE profiles, which revealed that the bacterial diversities at pH 7 and 8 were the highest while those at pH 5 and 4 (uncontrolled) were the lowest. According to sequencing results of the bands excised from DGGE gels, lactic acid bacteria and Clostridium sp. were predominant at all pH values, but varieties in species were observed as pH changed and time prolonged. The bacterial community during fermentation was materially influenced by pH and the diverse product distribution was related to the shift of different bacterial population. The study reveals that the impact of pH on fermentation product distribution is implemented primarily by changes of bacterial community. It also provides information about the comparison of two fingerprinting methods, DGGE and SSCP.

  18. Gaseous emissions during the solid state fermentation of different wastes for enzyme production at pilot scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulini-Duran, Caterina; Abraham, Juliana; Rodríguez-Pérez, Sheila; Cerda, Alejandra; Jiménez-Peñalver, Pedro; Gea, Teresa; Barrena, Raquel; Artola, Adriana; Font, Xavier; Sánchez, Antoni

    2015-03-01

    The emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC), CH4, N2O and NH3 during the solid state fermentation process of some selected wastes to obtain different enzymes have been determined at pilot scale. Orange peel+compost (OP), hair wastes+raw sludge (HW) and winterization residue+raw sludge (WR) have been processed in duplicate in 50 L reactors to provide emission factors and to identify the different VOC families present in exhaust gaseous emissions. Ammonia emission from HW fermentation (3.2±0.5 kg Mg(-1) dry matter) and VOC emission during OP processes (18±6 kg Mg(-1) dry matter) should be considered in an industrial application of these processes. Terpenes have been the most emitted VOC family during all the processes although the emission of sulphide molecules during HW SSF is notable. The most emitted compound was dimethyl disulfide in HW and WR processes, and limonene in the SSF of OP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimization of Laccase Production using White Rot Fungi and Agriculture Wastes in Solid State Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendro Risdianto

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Laccase has been produced in a solid state fermentation (SSF using white rot fungi and various lignocellulosic based substrates. White rot fungi used were Marasmius sp, Trametes hirsuta, Trametes versicolor and Phanerochaete crysosporium. The solid substrates employed in this research were collected from agriculture waste which were empty fruit bunches (EFB, rice straw, corn cob, and rice husk. The objective of this research was to determine the most promising fungus, the best solid substrate and the optimal conditions for the production of laccase. The results showed that Marasmius sp. on all solid substrates displayed higher laccase activity than that of any other strain of white rot fungi. Marasmius sp. and solid substrate of rice straw demonstrated the highest laccase activity of 1116.11 U/L on day 10. Three significant factors, i.e. pH, temperature and yeast extract concentration were studied by response surface method on laccase production using Marasmius sp and rice straw. The optimized conditions were pH, temperature and yeast extract concentration of 4.9, 31ºC and 0.36 g/L respectively. The fermentation of Marasmius sp. in SSF on agricultural waste shows a great potential for the production of laccase.

  20. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVIS, W.E.

    2000-03-08

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee public safety, or the environment. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan ensures long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and must be updated, as a minimum, every 3 years.

  1. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DAVIS, W.E.

    2000-01-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee public safety, or the environment. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan ensures long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and must be updated, as a minimum, every 3 years

  2. Wet oxidation treatment of organic household waste enriched with wheat straw for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation into ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissens, G.; Klinke, H.B.; Verstraete, W.

    2004-01-01

    Organic municipal solid waste enriched with wheat straw was subjected to wet-oxidation as a pre-treatment for subsequent enzymatic conversion and fermentation into bio-ethanol. The effect of tempera (185-195degrees C), oxygen pressure (3-12) and sodium carbonate (0-2 g l(-1)) addition on enzymatic...... in the treated waste could be converted into respectively hexose and pentose sugars compared to 46% for cellulose and 36% for hemicellulose in the raw waste. For all wet oxidation conditions tested, total carbohydrate recoveries were high (> 89%) and 44-66% of the original lignin could be converted into non......-toxic carboxylic acids mainly (2.2-4.5 % on DS basis). Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of the treated waste at 10% DS by Saccharomyces cerevisae yielded average ethanol concentrations of 16.5 to 22 g l(-1) for enzyme loadings of 5 and 25 FPU g(-1) DS, respectively. The cellulose to ethanol...

  3. Recovery of carboxylic acids produced during dark fermentation of food waste by adsorption on Amberlite IRA-67 and activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousuf, Ahasa; Bonk, Fabian; Bastidas-Oyanedel, Juan-Rodrigo; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2016-10-01

    Amberlite IRA-67 and activated carbon were tested as promising candidates for carboxylic acid recovery by adsorption. Dark fermentation was performed without pH control and without addition of external inoculum at 37°C in batch mode. Lactic, acetic and butyric acids, were obtained, after 7days of fermentation. The maximum acid removal, 74%, from the Amberlite IRA-67 and 63% from activated carbon was obtained from clarified fermentation broth using 200gadsorbent/Lbroth at pH 3.3. The pH has significant effect and pH below the carboxylic acids pKa showed to be beneficial for both the adsorbents. The un-controlled pH fermentation creates acidic environment, aiding in adsorption by eliminating use of chemicals for efficient removal. This study proposes simple and easy valorization of waste to valuable chemicals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The utilization of coconut waste fermentated by aspergillus niger and saccharomyces cerevisiae on meat quality of weaning males rex rabbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyuni, T. H.; Ginting, N.; Yunilas; Hasnudi; Mirwandono, E.; Siregar, G. A.; Sinaga, I. G.; Sembiring, I.

    2018-02-01

    Coconut waste (CW) could be applied for animal feed while its nutrition quality were low. This study aims to investigate fermented CW effect on meat quality of Rex rabbit which feed by fermented CW either by Aspergillus niger or Tape Yeast. This research was conducted in rabbit farm Brastagi, using 24 male Rex rabbits with initial weight 1012 ± 126.67 gram in July-October 2016. The design used was complete randomized design : 6 treatment 4 replications. Treatment were T1 (unfermented 10%); T2 (unfermented 20%); T3 (a.niger fermentation 10%); T4 (a niger fermentation 20%); T5 (tape yeast fermentation 10%) and T6 (tape yeast fermentation 20%). The parameters were pH, meat texture either raw or cooked, water content, fat content, protein content of meat and cooking loss. The results showed that effect of treatment was not significantly different (P>0.05) on pH and raw meat texture, but significantly different (Pmeat cooked and meat fat content and very significantly different effect ( P> 0,01) on cooking loss, water content and protein content of meat. The conclusion of this research was the utilization of fermented CW by Aspergillius niger and Tape Yeast improved the quality of Rex rabbit meat

  5. Modification of Oil Palm Plantation Wastes as Oil Adsorbent for Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noraisah Jahi; Ling, E.S.; Rizafizah Othaman; Suria Ramli

    2015-01-01

    This research was conducted to modify oil palm solid wastes chemically to become oil adsorbent for palm oil mill effluent (POME). The purpose of modification on oil palm leaves (OPL) and oil palm frond (OPF) was to change the hydrophilic nature to a more hydrophobic character. This study also exploited the production of sorbent materials with high efficiency in the oil uptake for POME from OPL and OPF. Chemical modification was carried out using 200 mL of 1.0 M lauric acid solution for 6 hrs at room temperature. The modified OPL and OPF were preceded to adsorption test for POME and the capacity of oil adsorbed was compared between them. FTIR analysis supported the modification to occur with the increase in a peak of C-H group and the presence of C=O originated from lauric acid structure chain. The hydrophobicity of modified OPL and OPF samples was supported by XRD and contact angle analysis with modified OPL became more hydrophobic than the modified OPF, which had been 38.15 % and 24.67 % respectively. Both the analyses proved that the result from the oil adsorption test on POME showed the presence of a new peak attribute at C=C stretching of aromatics for the oil in POME proved that it was attached on the sorbent materials. Based on SEM analysis, the perforated and rough surface had been observed on modified OPL and OPF samples because oil layers on OPL and OPF surfaces were observed on the modified samples after the adsorption test. All the analyses in the study agreed that the results from oil adsorption test showed that the modified OPL had higher adsorption capacity than the modified OPF with the percentage of oil uptake at 83.74 % and 39.84 % respectively. The prepared adsorbent showed the potential to be used as a low-cost adsorbent in oil for POME. (author)

  6. Effects of operational parameters on dark fermentative hydrogen production from biodegradable complex waste biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Anish; Sposito, Fabio; Frunzo, Luigi; Trably, Eric; Escudié, Renaud; Pirozzi, Francesco; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    This work aimed to investigate the effect of the initial pH, combination of food to microorganism ratio (F/M) and initial pH, substrate pre-treatment and different inoculum sources on the dark fermentative biohydrogen (H2) yields. Three model complex waste biomasses (food waste, olive mill wastewater (OMWW) and rice straw) were used to assess the effect of the aforementioned parameters. The effect of the initial pH between 4.5 and 7.0 was investigated in batch tests carried out with food waste. The highest H2 yields were shown at initial pH 4.5 (60.6 ± 9.0 mL H2/g VS) and pH 5.0 (50.7 ± 0.8 mL H2/g VS). Furthermore, tests carried out with F/M ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 at initial pH 5.0 and 6.5 revealed that a lower F/M ratio (0.5 and 1.0) favored the H2 production at an initial pH 5.0 compared to pH 6.5. Alkaline pre-treatment of raw rice straw using 4% and 8% NaOH at 55°C for 24h, increased the H2 yield by 26 and 57-fold, respectively. In the dark fermentation of OMWW, the H2 yield was doubled when heat-shock pre-treated activated sludge was used as inoculum in comparison to anaerobic sludge. Overall, this study shows that the application of different operating parameters to maximize the H2 yields strongly depends on the biodegradability of the substrate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of microbial community variation during the mixed culture fermentation of agricultural peel wastes to produce lactic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shaobo; Gliniewicz, Karol; Gerritsen, Alida T; McDonald, Armando G

    2016-05-01

    Mixed cultures fermentation can be used to convert organic wastes into various chemicals and fuels. This study examined the fermentation performance of four batch reactors fed with different agricultural (orange, banana, and potato (mechanical and steam)) peel wastes using mixed cultures, and monitored the interval variation of reactor microbial communities with 16S rRNA genes using Illumina sequencing. All four reactors produced similar chemical profile with lactic acid (LA) as dominant compound. Acetic acid and ethanol were also observed with small fractions. The Illumina sequencing results revealed the diversity of microbial community decreased during fermentation and a community of largely lactic acid producing bacteria dominated by species of Lactobacillus developed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of steam explosion on waste copier paper alone and in a mixed lignocellulosic substrate on saccharification and fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliston, Adam; Wilson, David R.; Wellner, Nikolaus; Collins, Samuel R.A.; Roberts, Ian N.; Waldron, Keith W.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated steam (SE) explosion on the saccharification and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of waste copier paper. SE resulted in a colouration, a reduction in fibre thickness and increased water absorption. Changes in chemical composition were evident at severities greater than 4.24 resulting in a loss of xylose and the production of breakdown products known to inhibit fermentation (particularly formic acid and acetic acid). SE did not improve final yields of glucose or ethanol, and at severities 4.53 and 4.83 reduced yields probably due to the effect of breakdown products and fermentation inhibitors. However, at moderate severities of 3.6 and 3.9 there was an increase in initial rates of hydrolysis which may provide a basis for reducing processing times. Co-steam explosion of waste copier paper and wheat straw attenuated the production of breakdown products, and may also provide a basis for improving SSF of lignocellulose. PMID:25846183

  9. Valorization of Waste Obtained from Oil Extraction in Moringa Oleifera Seeds: Coagulation of Reactive Dyes in Textile Effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaseca, Mercè; López-Grimau, Víctor; Gutiérrez-Bouzán, Carmen

    2014-09-12

    Moringa oleifera seeds contain about 40% of highly valued oil due to its wide range of applications, from nutritional issues to cosmetics or biodiesel production. The extraction of Moringa oil generates a waste (65%-75% of seeds weight) which contains a water soluble protein able to be used either in drinking water clarification or wastewater treatment. In this paper, the waste of Moringa oleifera extraction was used as coagulant to remove five reactive dyes from synthetic textile effluents. This waste constitutes a natural coagulant which was demonstrated to be effective for the treatment of industrial reactive dyestuff effluents, characterized by alkaline pH, high NaCl content and hydrolyzed dyes. The coagulation yield increased at high NaCl concentration, whereas the pH did not show any significant effect on dye removal. Moringa oleifera showed better results for dye removal than the conventional treatment of coagulation-flocculation with FeCl₃ and polyelectrolyte. Treated water can be reused in new dyeing processes of cotton fabrics with high quality results.

  10. Valorization of Waste Obtained from Oil Extraction in Moringa Oleifera Seeds: Coagulation of Reactive Dyes in Textile Effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercè Vilaseca

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Moringa oleifera seeds contain about 40% of highly valued oil due to its wide range of applications, from nutritional issues to cosmetics or biodiesel production. The extraction of Moringa oil generates a waste (65%–75% of seeds weight which contains a water soluble protein able to be used either in drinking water clarification or wastewater treatment. In this paper, the waste of Moringa oleifera extraction was used as coagulant to remove five reactive dyes from synthetic textile effluents. This waste constitutes a natural coagulant which was demonstrated to be effective for the treatment of industrial reactive dyestuff effluents, characterized by alkaline pH, high NaCl content and hydrolyzed dyes. The coagulation yield increased at high NaCl concentration, whereas the pH did not show any significant effect on dye removal. Moringa oleifera showed better results for dye removal than the conventional treatment of coagulation-flocculation with FeCl3 and polyelectrolyte. Treated water can be reused in new dyeing processes of cotton fabrics with high quality results.

  11. Biorefinery production of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate using waste office paper hydrolysate as feedstock for microbial fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelamegam, Annamalai; Al-Battashi, Huda; Al-Bahry, Saif; Nallusamy, Sivakumar

    2018-01-10

    Waste paper, a major fraction of municipal solid waste, has a potential to serve as renewable feedstock for the biorefineries of fuels, chemicals and materials due to rich in cellulose and abundant at low cost. This study evaluates the possibility of waste office paper (WOP) to serve as a potential feedstock for the biorefinery production of poly (3-hydroxybutyrate). In this study, the WOP was pretreated, enzymatically saccharified and the hydrolysate was used for PHB production. The hydrolysate mainly consists of glucose (22.70g/L) and xylose (1.78g/L) and the corresponding sugar yield was about 816mg/g. Ammonium sulphate and C/N ratio 20 were identified as most favorable for high yield of PHB. The batch fermentation of Cupriavidus necator using the pretreated WOP hydrolysate resulted in cell biomass, PHB production and PHB content of 7.74g/L, 4.45g/L and 57.52%, respectively. The volumetric productivity and yield achieved were 0.061g/L/h and 0.210g/g sugar, respectively. The results suggested that WOP could be a potential alternative feedstock for the biorefinery production of bioplastics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The fermentation technology in biological waste treatment; Die Vergaerungstechnologie bei der biologischen Abfallbehandlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Torsten [STRABAG Umweltanlagen GmbH, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Anaerobic treatment of organic waste is getting increasingly important, and there is also increasing acceptance for combining waste management with power generation. Anaerobic processes have long been competing with composting of native organic waste materials. While they are technically more complex, they have advantages over composting. They are climate-neutral with regard to CO{sub 2} emissions. This supports the intention of the German government, i.e. to reduce climate-relevant gaseous emissions by 40% by 2020 as compared to 1990, and to have a 35% share of renewable energy sources in electric power supply by 2020. The German Renewables Act (EEG) provided a basis for the establishment and further development of fermentation technology since 2004. (orig.) [German] Die anaerobe Behandlung von organischen Abfaellen gewinnt immer mehr an Bedeutung. Die Entsorgungsaufgabe mit der Erzeugung von Energie zu verbinden wird dabei zunehmend akzeptiert. Vergaerungsverfahren lagen dabei lange Zeit im wirtschaftlichen Wettbewerb zur Kompostierung von nativ-organischen Abfaellen. Anaerobe Verfahren sind technisch aufwendiger, haben jedoch gegenueber der Kompostierung deutliche Vorteile. Sie arbeiten bezueglich der CO{sub 2}-Emissionen klimaneutral. Dies unterstuetzt die Vorgabe der Bundesregierung bis 2020 die treibhausrelevanten Gase gegenueber 1990 um 40% zu reduzieren sowie bis 2020 35% der Stromversorgung durch erneuerbare Energien bereitzustellen. Das Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz (EEG) hat seit 2004 die Etablierung und Weiterentwicklung der Vergaerungstechnologie dabei wesentlich gepraegt. (orig.)

  13. Waste activated sludge fermentation: effect of solids retention time and biomass concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Q; Sparling, R; Oleszkiewicz, J A

    2009-12-01

    Laboratory scale, room temperature, semi-continuous reactors were set-up to investigate the effect of solids retention time (SRT, equal to HRT hydraulic retention time) and biomass concentration on generation of volatile fatty acids (VFA) from the non-methanogenic fermentation of waste activated sludge (WAS) originating from an enhanced biological phosphorus removal process. It was found that VFA yields increased with SRT. At the longest SRT (10d), improved biomass degradation resulted in the highest soluble to total COD ratio and the highest VFA yield from the influent COD (0.14g VFA-COD/g TCOD). It was also observed that under the same SRT, VFA yields increased when the biomass concentration decreased. At a 10d SRT the VFA yield increased by 46%, when the biomass concentration decreased from 13g/L to 4.8g/L. Relatively high nutrient release was observed during fermentation. The average phosphorus release was 17.3mg PO(4)-P/g TCOD and nitrogen release was 25.8mg NH(4)-N/g TCOD.

  14. Lactic acid production from potato peel waste by anaerobic sequencing batch fermentation using undefined mixed culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shaobo; McDonald, Armando G; Coats, Erik R

    2015-11-01

    Lactic acid (LA) is a necessary industrial feedstock for producing the bioplastic, polylactic acid (PLA), which is currently produced by pure culture fermentation of food carbohydrates. This work presents an alternative to produce LA from potato peel waste (PPW) by anaerobic fermentation in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) inoculated with undefined mixed culture from a municipal wastewater treatment plant. A statistical design of experiments approach was employed using set of 0.8L SBRs using gelatinized PPW at a solids content range from 30 to 50 g L(-1), solids retention time of 2-4 days for yield and productivity optimization. The maximum LA production yield of 0.25 g g(-1) PPW and highest productivity of 125 mg g(-1) d(-1) were achieved. A scale-up SBR trial using neat gelatinized PPW (at 80 g L(-1) solids content) at the 3 L scale was employed and the highest LA yield of 0.14 g g(-1) PPW and a productivity of 138 mg g(-1) d(-1) were achieved with a 1 d SRT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of a Solid-State Fermentation System for Producing Bioethanol from Food Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Hiroaki; Ohnishi, Akihiro; Fujimoto, Naoshi; Suzuki, Masaharu

    Liquid fermentation is the a conventional method of producing bioethanol. However, this method results in the formation of high concentrations waste after distillation and futher treatment requires more energy and is costly(large amounts of costly energy).Saccharification of dried raw garbage was tested for 12 types of Koji starters under the following optimum culture conditions: temperature of 30°C and initial moisture content of 50%.Among all the types, Aspergillus oryzae KBN650 had the highest saccharifying power. The ethanol-producing ability of the raw garbage was investigated for 72 strains of yeast, of which Saccharomyces cerevisiae A30 had the highest ethanol production(yield)under the following optimum conditions: 1 :1 ratio of dried garbage and saccharified garbage by weight, and initial moisture content of 60%. Thus, the solid-state fermentation system consisted of the following 4 processes: moisture control, saccharification, ethanol production and distillation. This system produced 0.6kg of ethanol from 9.6kg of garbage. Moreover the ethanol yield from all sugars was calculated to be 0.37.

  16. Management of effluents and waste from pharmaceutical industry in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Deschamps

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Today the management of solid waste and wastewater is a major concern for humanity. In the last decade, traces of pharmaceuticals have been reported in the water cycle and have raised concerns among regulators, water suppliers and the public regarding the potential risks to human health. This study evaluated solid waste management in the state of Minas Gerais and concluded that the main fate of hazardous waste has been incineration, while the non-hazardous waste has been recycled or sent to landfills. However, complaints to the Environmental Agency - FEAM have indicated that a significant number of companies just send their hazardous wastes to landfills or even to garbage dumps, thus highlighting the urgent need for adequate waste management in Minas Gerais. Most of the pharmaceutical companies in Minas Gerais use conventional wastewater treatment. Mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization (ESI-MS showed that the treatment routes adopted by the two 2 selected pharmaceutical industries were not effective enough since residues and degradation products of antibiotics were detected. The physicochemical analysis of the effluents showed variability in their characteristics, which may influence their treatability. The degradation assay with Fenton's reagent stood out as a promising route in achieving a higher removal capacity compared to the conventional treatment. This study contributes to enhancing our knowledge of the management of wastewater as well as of solid waste from the pharmaceutical industry in Minas Gerais and points out the need for further research.Atualmente, a gestão de resíduos sólidos e águas residuais é uma grande preocupação para a humanidade. Na ultima década, a detecção de traços de medicamentos no ciclo da água tem sido reportada e tem gerado preocupação entre os agentes reguladores, fornecedores de água e público devido os riscos potenciais para a saúde humana. As empresas farmacêuticas, em Minas Gerais

  17. The production of chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator. Annual progress report, January 1993--March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, H.; Salicetti-Piazza, L.; Borgos-Rubio, N.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

    1994-03-15

    The basic objective of this project is to convert waste streams from the food processing industry to usable fuels and chemicals using novel bioreactors. These bioreactors should allow economical utilization of waste (whey, waste sugars, waste starch, bottling wastes, candy wastes, molasses, and cellulosic wastes) by the production of ethanol, acetone/butanol, organic acids (acetic, lactic, and gluconic), yeast diacetyl flavor, and antifungal compounds. Continuous processes incorporating various processing improvements such as simultaneous product separation and immobilized cells are being developed to allow commercial scale utilization of waste stream. The production of ethanol by a continuous reactor-separator is the process closest to commercialization with a 7,500 liter pilot plant presently sited at an Iowa site to convert whey lactose to ethanol. Accomplishments during 1993 include installation and start-up of a 7,500 liter ICRS for ethanol production at an industry site in Iowa; Donation and installation of a 200 liter yeast pilot Plant to the project from Kenyon Enterprises; Modeling and testing of a low energy system for recovery of ethanol from vapor is using a solvent absorption/extractive distillation system; Simultaneous saccharification/fermentation of raw corn grits and starch in a stirred reactor/separator; Testing of the ability of `koji` process to ferment raw corn grits in a `no-cook` process.

  18. Microbial culture selection for bio-hydrogen production from waste ground wheat by dark fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argun, Hidayet; Kargi, Fikret; Kapdan, Ilgi K. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Dokuz Eylul University, Buca, Izmir (Turkey)

    2009-03-15

    Hydrogen formation performances of different anaerobic bacteria were investigated in batch dark fermentation of waste wheat powder solution (WPS). Serum bottles containing wheat powder were inoculated with pure cultures of Clostridium acetobutylicum (CAB), Clostridium butyricum (CB), Enterobacter aerogenes (EA), heat-treated anaerobic sludge (ANS) and a mixture of those cultures (MIX). Cumulative hydrogen formation (CHF), hydrogen yield (HY) and specific hydrogen production rate (SHPR) were determined for every culture. The heat-treated anaerobic sludge was found to be the most effective culture with a cumulative hydrogen formation of 560 ml, hydrogen yield of 223 ml H{sub 2} g{sup -1} starch and a specific hydrogen production rate of 32.1 ml H{sub 2} g{sup -1} h{sup -1}. (author)

  19. Amylase production by solid-state fermentation of agro-industrial wastes using Bacillus sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajshree Saxena

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Solid state fermentation was carried out using various agro- industrial wastes with the best amylase producing strain isolated from soil. Different physicochemical conditions were varied for maximum enzyme production. The strain produced about 5400 units/g of amylase at 1:3 moisture content, 20% inoculum, after 72 h of incubation with Mustard Oil seed cake as the substrate. The optimum temperature and pH of the enzyme activity were found to be 50ºC and 6 respectively. The enzyme was found to be thermostable at 70ºC for about 2 h without any salt. It showed stability at pH range 5-7. The metal ions as Na+, Ca++, Mg++ and Co++ enhanced the enzyme activity.

  20. Pt20RuxSny nanoparticles dispersed on mesoporous carbon CMK-3 and their application in the oxidation of 2-carbon alcohols and fermentation effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, An-Ya; Chung, Yi-Chen; Hung, Wei-Hsuan; Hsu, Yun-Chi; Tseng, Chuan-Ming; Zhang, Wei-Lun; Wang, Fu-Kai; Lin, Chiu-Yue

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Pt 20 Ru x Sn y @C catalysts are formed by dispersing Pt-Sn and Pt-Ru-Sn NPs on CMK-3. • They are tested in fuel cells using ethanol, ethylene glycol, and CFHPE as fuels. • Higher Sn contents improve catalytic efficiency of Pt 20 Ru x Sn y when x = 0 or x = 10. • Role of Sn in C−C bond cleavage and improving poisoning tolerance is explained. • Pt 20 Ru 10 Sn 15 @C is used to show feasibility of using bioalcohol from CFHPE as fuel. - Abstract: We report the synthesis of Pt-Sn binary and Pt-Ru-Sn ternary alloy nanoparticles (NPs) dispersed on mesoporous carbon CMK-3 for bioalcohol fuel cell applications where ethanol, ethylene glycol, and fermentative hydrogen production effluent were used as the fuels. The proposed alloy electrocatalysts, denoted as Pt 20 Ru x Sn y @C (where 20, x, and y represent the weight fractions of Pt, Ru, and Sn, respectively), were examined using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping, transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurements, X-ray diffraction analysis, and electrochemical measurements, in order to determine their morphologies, microstructures, compositions, phase structures, and electrochemical characteristics. The effects of the Sn content on the following factors were examined: 1) average particle size of the alloy NPs, 2) mesoporosity, 3) electrochemically active surfaces of Pt 20 Ru x Sn y @C, and 4) ethanol oxidation reaction and ethylene glycol oxidation reaction activities. Higher Sn contents improved the catalytic efficiency of Pt 20 Ru x Sn y when x = 0 or x = 10, with the optimized compositions being Pt 20 Sn 30 and Pt 20 Ru 10 Sn 15 for the binary and ternary alloys, respectively. Based on the ethanol and ethylene glycol oxidation reactions, we explain the role of Sn in promoting C−C bond cleavage and in improving catalyst tolerance against poisoning. Overall, for both the ethanol system and the ethylene glycol system, the catalytic

  1. Value addition of vegetable wastes by solid-state fermentation using Aspergillus niger for use in aquafeed industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, N; Imelda-Joseph; Raj, R Paul

    2010-11-01

    Vegetable waste typically has high moisture content and high levels of protein, vitamins and minerals. Its value as an agricultural feed can be enhanced through solid-state fermentation (SSF). Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the nutritional status of the products derived by SSF of a mixture of dried vegetable waste powder and oil cake mixture (soybean flour, wheat flour, groundnut oil cake and sesame oil cake at 4:3:2:1 ratio) using fungi Aspergillus niger S(1)4, a mangrove isolate, and A. niger NCIM 616. Fermentation was carried out for 9 days at 35% moisture level and neutral pH. Significant (p<0.05) increase in crude protein and amino acids were obtained in both the trials. The crude fat and crude fibre content showed significant reduction at the end of fermentation. Nitrogen free extract (NFE) showed a gradual decrease during the fermentation process. The results of the study suggest that the fermented product obtained on days 6 and 9 in case of A. niger S(1)4 and A. niger NCIM 616 respectively contained the highest levels of crude protein. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of feeding system and fermented sago waste on performance of broiler chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Putu Kompiang

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available An experiment, with a split plot experimental design, was conducted to determine the effect of feeding system (full vs choice feeding and fermented sago waste (AST 5 vs 0% on the performance of broiler chickens. Complete feed was formulated tocontain 21% crude protein, 2900 kcal ME/kg, without or with 5% AST. Feed for choice feeding was formulated to contain 2900 kcal ME/kg, without or with 5% AST with crude protein 23 or 17%. Four hundreds DOC broilers were used for each treatment divided into 4 replicates (100 birds/replicate on litter system. Feed and water were given ad lib. during the 4 weeks trial. Data collected included feed consumption (weekly, body weight (bi-weekly, feed conversion ratio (FCR and protein efficiency ratio (PER were calculated biweekly. Feeding system has no significant effect on total feed/energy consumption. Choice feeding reduced total protein consumption (P<0.01; 323.5 vs 354.9 gram/head/4weeks, increased body weight gained (P<0.01; 889.5 vs 835 gram/head/4weeks, improved FCR (P<0.05; 1.90 vs 2.03, and PER (P<0.001; 0.37 vs 0.43. Fermented sago waste (AST had no significant effect on total feed/energy consumption (P<0.05, reduced total protein consumption (P<0.05; 333.6 vs 349.8 gram/head/4weeks, increased body weight gained (P<0.05; 887.5 vs 837 gram/head/4weeks, improved FCR (P<0.05; 1.88 vs 2.06 and PER (P<0.05; 0.38 vs 0.42. It is concluded that broiler chicken had an ability to determine its protein requirement, and AST supplementation significantly improved performance of the birds.

  3. Operation of a two-stage continuous fermentation process producing hydrogen and methane from artificial food wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagai, Kohki; Mizuno, Shiho; Umeda, Yoshito; Sakka, Makiko [Toho Gas Co., Ltd. (Japan); Osaka, Noriko [Tokyo Gas Co. Ltd. (Japan); Sakka, Kazuo [Mie Univ. (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    An anaerobic two-stage continuous fermentation process with combined thermophilic hydrogenogenic and methanogenic stages (two-stage fermentation process) was applied to artificial food wastes on a laboratory scale. In this report, organic loading rate (OLR) conditions for hydrogen fermentation were optimized before operating the two-stage fermentation process. The OLR was set at 11.2, 24.3, 35.2, 45.6, 56.1, and 67.3 g-COD{sub cr} L{sup -1} day{sup -1} with a temperature of 60 C, pH5.5 and 5.0% total solids. As a result, approximately 1.8-2.0 mol-H{sub 2} mol-hexose{sup -1} was obtained at the OLR of 11.2-56.1 g-COD{sub cr} L{sup -1} day{sup -1}. In contrast, it was inferred that the hydrogen yield at the OLR of 67.3 g-COD{sub cr} L{sup -1} day{sup -1} decreased because of an increase in lactate concentration in the culture medium. The performance of the two-stage fermentation process was also evaluated over three months. The hydraulic retention time (HRT) of methane fermentation was able to be shortened 5.0 days (under OLR 12.4 g-COD{sub cr} L{sup -1} day{sup -1} conditions) when the OLR of hydrogen fermentation was 44.0 g-COD{sub cr} L{sup -1} day{sup -1}, and the average gasification efficiency of the two-stage fermentation process was 81% at the time. (orig.)

  4. Biohydrogen production from organic waste and wastewater by dark fermentation. A promising module for renewable energy production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupp, M.

    2007-07-01

    Fossil fuels are limited and global warming due to increased CO{sub 2}-emissions may lead to worldwide environmental disasters. Therefore energy production from renewable sources is the most important task in the future. In the contribution under consideration, the author reports on biohydrogen production from organic waste and wastewater by dark fermentation.An engineered approach was chosen to get more information about the technical feasibility of a process which has been studied intensively in the current century. The developed test method represents a functional tool for determination of the biohydrogen production potential of a wide variety of different substances. The implementation of the 'glucose equivalent' for estimation of the biohydrogen potential of a certain substrate was a successfull approach. With this parameter, the biohydrogen potential could be evaluated properly without severe influence from the boundary conditions. Within the continuous test trials it could be found that continuous biohydrogen production in a 30 L-scale is feasible without costly regulation and control mechanisms. The further test series conducted in 30 L-scale gave important results for pilot plant design. One main result of the test runs is that it was shown that the control mechanisms could be reduced to a simple pH-regulation by addition of sodium hydroxide. Other parameters like organic loading rate (OLR) and hydraulic retention time (HRT) were clearly more important to ensure a stable continuous process. A HRT of 15-20 hours combined with an OLR of up to 14 kg VS/(d m{sup 3}) resulted in very high hydrogen yields of 2.14-2.56 mol H{sub 2}/mol glucose. Another important result for pilot plant construction was the necessity of input cooling. Due to ambient temperatures in the input vessels the substrate tests failed. Hydrolysis took place in the input vessels, not in the reactors. Gas upgrading by membrane systems was tested as well as post-methanisation or

  5. Waste and effluent management: Experience of the plutonium fuel element fabrication complex at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnal, T.; Bailly, H.

    1981-01-01

    Since the start of its activities in 1963, the Cadarache Fuel Fabrication Complex has paid particular attention, in its production balances, to identifiable plutonium losses. These losses are divided into three main components, namely: solid waste, liquid effluents and losses due to the conversion of 241 Pu into 241 Am. The paper briefly deals with the origin of the identifiable losses and the procedures which are being gradually implemented to optimize identification of these losses; first, physical identification (sorting of waste at the source and appropriate training of personnel) and second, analytical identification (non-destructive tests). The identifiable losses are then evaluated quantitatively on the basis of technological improvements of the production lines and measurement equipment. (author)

  6. BIODEGRADATION OF DIESEL OIL IN SOIL AND ITS ENHANCEMENT BY APPLICATION OF BIOVENTING AND AMENDMENT WITH BREWERY WASTE EFFLUENTS AS BIOSTIMULATION-BIOAUGMENTATION AGENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Agarry

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate and evaluate the effects of natural bioattenuation, bioventing, and brewery waste effluents amendment as biostimulation-bioaugmentation agent on biodegradation of diesel oil in unsaturated soil. A microcosm system was constructed consisting of five plastic buckets containing 1 kg of soil, artificially contaminated or spiked with 10% w/w of diesel oil. Biodegradation was monitored over 28 days by determining the total petroleum hydrocarbon content of the soil and total hydrocarbon degrading bacteria. The results showed that combination of brewery waste effluents amendment and bioventing technique was the most effective, reaching up to 91.5% of diesel removal from contaminated soil; with the brewery waste effluents amendment (biostimulation-bioaugmentation, the percentage of diesel oil removal was 78.7%; with bioventing, diesel oil percentage degradation was 61.7% and the natural bioattenuation technique resulted in diesel oil removal percentage be not higher than 40%. Also, the total hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria (THDB count in all the treatments increased throughout the remediation period. The highest bacterial growth was observed for combined brewery waste effluents amendment with bioventing treatment strategy. A first-order kinetic model was fitted to the biodegradation data to evaluate the biodegradation rate and the corresponding half-life time was estimated. The model revealed that diesel oil contaminated-soil microcosms under combined brewery waste effluents amendment with bioventing treatment strategy had higher biodegradation rate constants, k as well as lower half-life times, t1/2 than other remediation systems. This study showed that the microbial consortium, organic solids, nitrogen and phosphorus present in the brewery waste effluents proved to be efficient as potential biostimulation-bioaugmentation agents for bioremediation processes of soils contaminated with diesel oil

  7. Re-fermentation os spent solids from dark fermentation allows for a substantial increase of hydrogen production from the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz-Paez, K. M.; Pareja-Camacho, J.; Rios-Leal, E.; Valdez-Vazquez, I.; Poggi Varaldo, H. M.

    2009-01-01

    In the last 10 years, interest on bio hydrogen has resurrected, particularly the research on dark fermentation of solid wastes. In effect, in a context of scarce and expensive fossil fuels, hydrogen can be considered the best energy alternative because it can be produced by biological means, it has the highest energy density, it is versatile since can be used both as a primary or secondary energy source, it is compatible with electrochemical and combustion-based energy conversion processes, and it is environmentally-friendly since water is its main combustion product and no aggressive pollutants are generated. (Author)

  8. Re-fermentation os spent solids from dark fermentation allows for a substantial increase of hydrogen production from the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Paez, K. M.; Pareja-Camacho, J.; Rios-Leal, E.; Valdez-Vazquez, I.; Poggi Varaldo, H. M.

    2009-07-01

    In the last 10 years, interest on bio hydrogen has resurrected, particularly the research on dark fermentation of solid wastes. In effect, in a context of scarce and expensive fossil fuels, hydrogen can be considered the best energy alternative because it can be produced by biological means, it has the highest energy density, it is versatile since can be used both as a primary or secondary energy source, it is compatible with electrochemical and combustion-based energy conversion processes, and it is environmentally-friendly since water is its main combustion product and no aggressive pollutants are generated. (Author)

  9. Effect of light-dark cycles on hydrogen and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production by a photoheterotrophic culture and Rhodobacter capsulatus using a dark fermentation effluent as substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel Corona, Virginia; Le Borgne, Sylvie; Revah, Sergio; Morales, Marcia

    2017-02-01

    A Rhodobacter capsulatus strain and a photoheterotrophic culture (IZT) were cultivated to produce hydrogen under different light-dark cycles. A dark fermentation effluent (DFE) was used as substrate. It was found that IZT culture had an average cumulative hydrogen production (Paccum H 2 ) of 1300±43mLH 2 L -1 under continuous illumination and light-dark cycles of 30 or 60min. In contrast, R. capsulatus reduced its Paccum H 2 by 20% under 30:30min light-dark cycles, but tripled its poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) content (308±2mgPHB gdw -1 ) compared to continuous illumination. The highest PHB content by IZT culture was 178±10mgPHB gdw -1 under 15:15min light-dark cycles. PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that the IZT culture was mainly composed of Rhodopseudomonas palustris identified with high nucleotide similarity (99%). The evaluated cultures might be used for hydrogen and PHB production. They might provide energy savings by using light-dark cycles and DFE valorization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Initial integration of accident safety, waste management, recycling, effluent, and maintenance considerations for low-activation materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, S.J.; Herring, J.S.; Cheng, E.T.; Fetter, S.

    1991-01-01

    A true low-activation material should ideally achieve all of the following objectives: 1. The possible prompt dose at the site boundary from 100% release of the inventory should be <2 Sv (200 rem); hence, the design would be inherently safe in that no possible accident could result in prompt radiation fatalities. 2. The possible cancers from realistic releases should be limited such that the accident risk is <0.1%/yr of the existing background cancer risk to local residents. This includes consideration of elemental volatility. 3. The decay heat should be limited so that active mitigative measures are not needed to protect the investment from cooling transients; hence, the design would be passively safe with respect to decay heat. 4. Used materials could be either recycled or disposed of as near- surface waste. 5. Hands-on maintenance should be possible around coolant system piping and components such as the heat exchanger. 6. Effluent of activation products should be minor compared to the major challenge of limiting tritium effluents. The most recent studies in these areas are used to determine which individual elements and engineering materials are low activation. Grades from A (best) to G (worst) are given to each element in the areas of accident safety, recycling, and waste management. Structure/fluid combinations are examined for low-activation effluents and out-of-blanket maintenance. The lowest activation structural materials are silicon carbide, vanadium alloys, and ferritic steels. Impurities and minor alloying constituents must be carefully considered. The lowest activation coolants are helium, water, FLiBe, and lithium. The lowest activation breeders are lithium, lithium oxide, lithium silicate, and FLiBe. Designs focusing on these truly low-activation materials will help achieve the excellent safety and environmental potential of fusion energy

  11. Effect of long-term industrial waste effluent pollution on soil enzyme activities and bacterial community composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subrahmanyam, Gangavarapu; Shen, Ju-Pei; Liu, Yu-Rong; Archana, Gattupalli; Zhang, Li-Mei

    2016-02-01

    Although numerous studies have addressed the influence of exogenous pollutants on microorganisms, the effect of long-term industrial waste effluent (IWE) pollution on the activity and diversity of soil bacteria was still unclear. Three soil samples characterized as uncontaminated (R1), moderately contaminated (R2), and highly contaminated (R3) receiving mixed organic and heavy metal pollutants for more than 20 years through IWE were collected along the Mahi River basin, Gujarat, western India. Basal soil respiration and in situ enzyme activities indicated an apparent deleterious effect of IWE on microbial activity and soil function. Community composition profiling of soil bacteria using 16S rRNA gene amplification and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method indicated an apparent bacterial community shift in the IWE-affected soils. Cloning and sequencing of DGGE bands revealed that the dominated bacterial phyla in polluted soil were affiliated with Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria, indicating that these bacterial phyla may have a high tolerance to pollutants. We suggested that specific bacterial phyla along with soil enzyme activities could be used as relevant biological indicators for long-term pollution assessment on soil quality. Graphical Abstract Bacterial community profiling and soil enzyme activities in long-term industrial waste effluent polluted soils.

  12. Extra-cellular isoamylase production by Rhizopus oryzae in solid-state fermentation of agro wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnita Ghosh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Extra-cellular isoamylase was produced by Rhizopus oryzae PR7 in solid-state fermentations of various agro wastes, among which millet, oat, tapioca, and arum (Colocasia esculenta showed promising results. The highest amount of enzyme production was obtained after 72 h of growth at 28°C. The optimum pH for enzyme production was - 8.0. Among the various additives tested, enzyme production increased with ions such as Ca2+, Mg2+ and also with cysteine, GSH, and DTT. The enzyme synthesis was reduced in the presence of thiol inhibitors like Cu2+ and pCMB. The surfactants like Tween-40, Tween-80 and Triton X-100 helped in enhancing the enzyme activity. The production could be further increased by using the combinations of substrates. The ability to produce high amount of isoamylase within a relatively very short period and the capability of degrading wastes could make the strain suitable for commercial production of the enzyme.

  13. Utilization of ultraviolet radiation in effluent disinfestation of domestic waste treatment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho, P.R.R.; Andrade e Silva, L.G. de

    1995-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation disinfection of Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Biodigestor (UASB) and UASB with aerated lagoon pos-treatment effluents is possible to be reached utilizing a single low pressure mercury lamp arc (15 W nominal power) in a shell tube flow through reactor (1.2 L useful volume). Fecal coliforms, total coliforms and colifages were used as microbiological parameters. For fecal coliforms, about 3 logarithmic units (log. un.) was removed from UASB with aerated lagoon pos-treatment effluent and 4 log. un. from UASB effluent with 7 and 30 seconds of hydraulic retention time, respectively. Good empirical correlations were obtained between microbiological parameters and hydraulic retention times. (author). 4 refs, 1 fig, 3 tabs

  14. Identification of fuel effluents in waste water. Its influence in depuration process by active sludges. Identificacion de vertidos combustibles en agua residual. Su influencia en el proceso de depuracion por fongos activos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parody, F.; Rebollo, M.C.; Azcarate, J.; Sammillan, I.; Beltran, V.M. (Ayuntamiento de Madrid (Spain))

    1994-01-01

    Frequently, fuel effluents are found in treatment water plants. This effluents are nocives for the biologic process. In this work the authors present an easy method for characterizing the fuel wastes in waste water and its chromatografic characterization in the water treatment plant in Madrid (Spain).

  15. Order of the 10 january 2003 authorizing the national agency for the radioactive wastes management to follow the gaseous and liquid effluents release for the exploitation of the radioactive wastes storage center of the Manche

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This document, took out from the Official Journal, is the law text relative to the order of the 10 january 2003 authorizing the national agency for the radioactive wastes management to follow the gaseous and liquid effluents release for the exploitation of the radioactive wastes storage center of the Manche. (A.L.B.)

  16. Nutrition quality test of fermented waste vegetables by bioactivator local microorganisms (MOL) and effective microorganism (EM4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirwandono, E.; Sitepu, M.; Wahyuni, T. H.; Hasnudi; Ginting, N.; Siregar, G. AW; Sembiring, I.

    2018-02-01

    Livestock feed mostly used waste which has low nutrition content and one way to improve feed content by fermentation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of bioactifator types on fermented vegetables waste for animal feed.The research was conducted in Nutrition and Animal Feed Laboratory, Universitas Sumatera Utara from May until July 2016. The research was factorial completely randomized design of 3 x 3 with 3 replications. Factor I were bioactivator types which were control, local bioactivator and EM4 (Effective Microorganisms 4). Factor II were time of incubation 3, 5 and 7 days. Parameters were moisture content, ash, Nitrogen Free Extract (NFE) and Total Digestible Nutrient (TDN). The results showed that bioactivator types either local activator or EM4 has highly significantly different effect (P<0,01) on water content, NFE and TDN on vegetables waste while there was no different between local bioactifator with EM4 on all parameters. Time of incubation 7 days has highly significantly different effect (P<0,01) on NFE, TDN and significant different (P<0,05) on water content and ash. In conclusion local bioactifators could improve animal feed by fermenting vegetables waste and it is more available for livestockers.

  17. Vine-shoot waste aqueous extract applied as foliar fertilizer to grapevines: Effect on amino acids and fermentative volatile content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Gómez, R; Garde-Cerdán, T; Zalacain, A; Garcia, R; Cabrita, M J; Salinas, M R

    2016-04-15

    The aim of this work was to study the influence of foliar applications of different wood aqueous extracts on the amino acid content of musts and wines from Airén variety; and to study their relationship with the volatile compounds formed during alcoholic fermentation. For this purpose, the foliar treatments proposed were a vine-shoot aqueous extract applied in one and two times, and an oak extract which was only applied once. Results obtained show the potential of Airén vine-shoot waste aqueous extracts to be used as foliar fertilizer, enhancing the wine amino acid content especially when they were applied once. Similar results were observed with the aqueous oak extract. Regarding wine fermentative volatile compounds, there is a close relationship between musts and their wines amino acid content allowing us to discuss about the role of proline during the alcoholic fermentation and the generation of certain volatiles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Batch tests of a microbial fuel cell for electricity generation from spent organic extracts from hydrogenogenic fermentation of organic solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmona-Martinez, A.; Solorza-Feria, O.; Poggi-Varaldo, H. M.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogenogenic fermentative processes of organic solid wastes produce spent solids that contain substantial concentrations of low molecular weight organic acids and solvents. The spent solids can be extracted with wastewater to give a stream containing concentrated, degradable organic compounds. (Author)

  19. THE ISOLATION OF COMPOUND POLYPHENOL FROM WAJO DISTRICT CACAO BEAN AND CACAO WASTE THROUGH FERMENTATION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Wijaya

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to utilize the liquid smoke, charcoal, oil and gas that have been produced from cocoa waste shell from fast pyrolysis technology at 125-500 oC. The charcoal of the cocoa waste was analyzed using a bomb calorimeter at 5925 cal/g showed that it contains 52.02% of lignin; 17.27% of alpha cellulose and 19.56% of hemicellulose, respectively. The HPLC analysis of Wajo district cacao bean resulted in polyphenol compound as 308.35. GC-MS analysis of cocoa shell liquid smoke that pyrolized at 125-500 oC produces severals compounds such as acetic acid, n-buthane, methyl esther, propanoac acid, butanoac acid, methyl pyridine, 1-hydroxy-2-propanone, and mequinol. The FTIR analysis of cocoa bean showed a hydroxyl group at 3450.65 cm-1, carbonyl group at 1730.15 cm-1, CH group at 719.45-607.58 cm-1. The crystallinity degree of Wajo District cocoa shell analyzed using XRD was 26,50%. The existence of chemical compounds in liquid smoke products have been found as raw chemicals.  Content of biomass carbon at these cacao waste increased according to the increase of pyrolisis temperature, while the carbon emission of these three materials decreased as the temperature increased. Compound polyphenol from cacao bean has a potent as anti oxidant that is friendly  for environmental and healthy.   Keywords: cacao  bean, fermentation,  polyphenol,  and  chemical

  20. Effect of feeding cassava bioethanol waste on nutrient intake, digestibility, and rumen fermentation in growing goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherdthong, Anusorn; Pornjantuek, Boonserm; Wachirapakorn, Chalong

    2016-10-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of various levels of cassava bioethanol waste (CBW) on nutrient intake, digestibility, rumen fermentation, and blood metabolites in growing goats. Twelve crossbred, male (Thai Native × Anglo Nubian) growing goats with initial body weight (BW) of 20±3 kg were randomly assigned according to a completely randomized design (CRD). The dietary treatments were total mixed ration (TMR) containing various levels of CBW at 0, 10, and 20 % dry matter (DM). CBW contained crude protein (CP), neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF), and acid detergent lignin (ADL) at 11, 69, 47, and 23 % DM, respectively. The TMR diets were offered ad libitum and contained CP at 15 % DM. Inclusion of CBW at 10 % DM in TMR did not alter feed intake (g DM and g/kg BW(0.75)) and CP intake when compared to the control fed group (0 % CBW). Total OM intake was lower in the 20 % CBW group than in the others (P  0.05) whereas when 20 % CBW was incorporated to diet, intermediate digestibility coefficients were decreased. Average ruminal pH values ranged from 6-7. Rumen NH3-N and PUN concentration at 0, 3, and 6 h post-feeding were not significantly different among treatments (P > 0.05). Thus, inclusion of 10 % CBW in TMR diets does not adversely affect nutrient intake, digestibility, rumen fermentation, and blood metabolite in fattening goats, and CBW may be effectively used as an alternative roughage source in the diets of goats.

  1. CONVERSION OF PINEAPPLE JUICE WASTE INTO LACTIC ACID IN BATCH AND FED – BATCH FERMENTATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Mochamad Busairi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pineapple juice waste contains valuable components, which are mainly sucrose, glucose, and fructose. Recently, lactic acid has been considered to be an important raw material for the production of biodegradable lactide polymer. The fermentation experiments were carried out in a 3 litres fermentor (Biostat B Model under anaerobic condition with stirring speed of 50 rpm, temperature at 40oC, and pH of 6.00. Effect of feed concentration on lactic acid production, bacterial growth, substrate utilisation and productivity was studied. The results obtained from fed- batch culture fermentation showed that the maximum lactic acid productivity was 0.44 g/L.h for feed concentration of 90 g/L at 48 hours. Whereas the lactic acid productivity obtained from fed-batch culture was twice and half fold higher than that of batch culture productivity.  Buangan jus nanas mengandung komponen yang berharga terutama sukrosa, glukosa, dan fruktosa. Asam laktat adalah bahan baku yang terbaru dan penting untuk dibuat sebagai polimer laktat yang dapat terdegradasi oleh lingkungan. Percobaan dilakukan pada fermentor 3 liter (Model Biostat B di bawah kondisi anaerob dengan kecepatan pengadukan 50 rpm, temperatur 40oC, dan pH 6,00. Pengaruh konsentrasi umpan terhadap produksi asam laktat, pertumbuhan mikroba, pengggunaan substrat dan produktivitas telah dipelajari. Hasil yang didapatkan pada fermentasi dengan menggunakan sistem fed-batch menunjukkan bahwa produktivitas asam laktat maksimum adalah 0.44 g/L,jam dengan konsentrasi umpan, 90 g/L pada waktu 48 jam. Bahkan produktivitas asam laktat yang didapat pada kultur fed-batch lebih tinggi 2,5 kali dari pada proses menggunakan sistem batch

  2. Fertilizer potential of liquid and solid effluent from thermophilic anaerobic digestion of poultry waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedl, B E; Bombardiere, J; Chaffield, J M

    2006-01-01

    Thermophilic anaerobic treatment of poultry litter produces an effluent stream of digested materials that can be separated into solid and liquid fractions for use as a crop fertilizer. The majority of the phosphorus is partitioned into the solid fraction while the majority of the nitrogen is present in the liquid fraction in the form of ammonium. These materials were tested over six years as an alternative fertilizer for the production of vegetable, fruit, and grassland crops. Application of the solids as a field crop fertilizer for vegetables and blueberries resulted in lower yields than the other fertilizer treatments, but an increase in soil phosphorus over a four-year period. Application of the digested liquids on grass and vegetable plots resulted in similar or superior yields to plots treated with commercially available nitrogen fertilizers. Hydroponic production of lettuce using liquid effluent was comparable to a commercial hydroponic fertilizer regime; however, the effluent treatment for hydroponic tomato production required supplementation and conversion of ammonium to nitrate. While not a total fertilizer solution, our research shows the effectiveness of digested effluent as part of a nutrient management program which could turn a livestock residuals problem into a crop nutrient resource.

  3. Cardboard proportions and total solids contents as driving factors in dry co-fermentation of food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capson-Tojo, Gabriel; Trably, Eric; Rouez, Maxime; Crest, Marion; Bernet, Nicolas; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Delgenès, Jean-Philippe; Escudié, Renaud

    2018-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of the co-substrate proportions (0-60% of cardboard in dry basis) and the initial total solid contents (20-40%) on the batch fermentation performance. Maximum hydrogen yields were obtained when mono-fermenting food waste at high solids contents (89mlH 2 ·gVS -1 ). The hydrogen yields were lower when increasing the proportions of cardboard. The lower hydrogen yields at higher proportions of cardboard were translated into higher yields of caproic acid (up to 70.1gCOD·kgCOD bio -1 ), produced by consumption of acetic acid and hydrogen. The highest substrate conversions were achieved at low proportions of cardboard, indicating a stabilization effect due to higher buffering capacities in co-fermentation. Clostridiales were predominant in all operational conditions. This study opens up new possibilities for using the cardboard proportions for controlling the production of high added-value products in dry co-fermentation of food waste. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Enzymes catalyzing pre-hydrolysis facilitated the anaerobic fermentation of waste activated sludge with acidogenic and microbiological perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xiaodong; He, Junguo; Li, Lin; Qiu, Wei

    2018-02-01

    This study investigated acidogenic and microbiological perspectives in the anaerobic fermentation (AF) of waste activated sludge (WAS) pre-hydrolyzed by enzymes catalysis. The enzymes catalysis boosted WAS biodegradability dramatically with nearly 8500 mg/L soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) increase just within 4 h. The volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in the acidogenesis were accumulated effectively with over 3200 mg COD/L in 12 d, which reached 0.687 kWh/kg VSS electricity conversion efficiency (2.5 times higher than the control test). The fermentation process favored the compression of fermentative sludge with the distribution spread index (DSI) rising. The core populations of bacteria and archaea shifting enlarged the dissimilarity of communities at different fermentation stages. Increase of community diversity contributed to VFAs accumulation stability. Moreover, the intermediate bacterial community evenness favored VFAs accumulation potentially. The enzymes catalysis might be a promising solution for strengthening VFAs accumulation in the WAS fermentation with boosting the electricity conversion potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhancing phosphorus release from waste activated sludge containing ferric or aluminum phosphates by EDTA addition during anaerobic fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jinte; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Lin; Li, Yongmei

    2017-03-01

    The effect of ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) addition on phosphorus release from biosolids and phosphate precipitates during anaerobic fermentation was investigated. Meanwhile, the impact of EDTA addition on the anaerobic fermentation process was revealed. The results indicate that EDTA addition significantly enhanced the release of phosphorus from biosolids, ferric phosphate precipitate and aluminum phosphate precipitate during anaerobic fermentation, which is attributed to the complexation of metal ions and damage of cell membrane caused by EDTA. With the optimal EDTA addition of 19.5 mM (0.41 gEDTA/gSS), phosphorus release efficiency from biosolids was 82%, which was much higher than that (40%) without EDTA addition. Meanwhile, with 19.5 mM EDTA addition, almost all the phosphorus in ferric phosphate precipitate was released, while only 57% of phosphorus in aluminum phosphate precipitate was released. This indicates that phosphorus in ferric phosphate precipitate was much easier to be released than that in aluminum phosphate precipitate during anaerobic fermentation of sludge. In addition, proper EDTA addition facilitated the production of soluble total organic carbon and volatile fatty acids, as well as solid reduction during sludge fermentation, although methane production could be inhibited. Therefore, EDTA addition can be used as an alternative method for recovering phosphorus from waste activated sludge containing ferric or aluminum precipitates, as well as recovery of soluble carbon source. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mitigation of solid waste and reuse of effluent from paint and varnish automotive and industrial treated by irradiation at electron beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Fernando C.; Ribeiro, Marcia A.; Duarte, Celina Lopes; Minamidani, Pedro T.; Guzella, Catia C.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most representative industrial segments is the polymeric coatings for house paint, automotive, industrial, marine, maintenance, and repainting markets. The general consumption of paint market in 2010 was 438,364 10 3 gallons of paint, in Brazil. However, when produce paints and varnishes, various kinds of solid wastes and liquid effluent are generated. The present research focus on the effluent from resins, water base paint and paint for electrophoresis, automotive industry, and general industrial coatings. The goal of this study is to use ionizing radiation to destroy the pollutants allowing the use of part of effluent as reuse water, and the rest discarded within the specified requirements. Actual industrial effluent samples were irradiated at Electron beam Accelerator applying absorbed doses of 10 kGy, 30 kGy and 50 kGy. The results, in this preliminary stage, showed a reduction of organic compounds and suspended solids. (author)

  7. Acidulocompost, a food waste compost with thermophilic lactic acid fermentation: its effects on potato production and weed growth

    OpenAIRE

    Naomi Asagi; Keisuke Minamide; Toru Uno; Masanori Saito; Toyoaki Ito

    2016-01-01

    Acidulocomposting recycles food wastes by means of thermophilic lactic acid fermentation. This process can decrease ammonia volatilization and odor emission during processing and produce compost with high nitrogen (N) content. To compare the yield of potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L. ‘Dansyakuimo’) and the suppression of weeds with acidulocompost (AC) and those with conventional composts and inorganic fertilizer (IF), we conducted field experiments in Miyagi Prefecture, northeastern Japan. Potat...

  8. Low cost methods of treatment of agricultural effluents in warm climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, C.D.

    Treatment of effluents by anaerobic-aerobic lagoons, flood and spray irrigation and grass filtration is outlined and there are 4 examples of plants disposing respectively of waste from a domestic population with a cannery, vegetable and milk processing plants and a slaughterhouse; 2 wineries and a brandy distillery; a milk processing plant; and a potato processing plant. In the 3rd example high-strength dairy factory effluent (12,000 mg BOD/1) is fermented to methane and CO/sub 2/ with a daily yield of 59,000 cubic feet gas from 35,000 gal of waste; the outflow from fermenters and low strength waste (2500 mg BOD/1) is treated in a lagoon which removes greater than 90% BOD and passes to an oxidation ditch before irrigating pasture. A cost comparison of the various systems is included.

  9. Enhancement of nutritive value of tea leaf waste by solid-state fermentation with Lentinus sajor–caju

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah-Al-Mahin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional value of tea leaf waste was improved significantly (p<0.05 by solid-state fermentation for 8 weeks with a white rot fungus, Pleurotus sajor-caju. The proximate analysis revealed that crude protein, ash, cellulose-lignin ratio and reducing sugar contents were increased by 2001.53, 117.62, 31.38, and 619.10%, respectively. In contrary, crude fiber, lipid, carbohydrate, lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses contents were decreased by 40.70, 71.87, 47.65, 35.63, 15.26, and 61.03%, respectively. Ascorbic acid and carotenoid were also increased by 129.17 and 398.79%, respectively. At 7 weeks of fermentation, the crude tea leaf waste extract showed very high CMCase, avicelase, cellobiase and amylase activity, moderate pectinase and poor xylanase activity. Furthermore, In-vitro dry matter digestibility was increased by 50.35% at the end of fermentation. Therefore, it was concluded that P. sajor-caju efficiently degraded tea leaf waste and improved its nutritive value.

  10. Comparison of fermented animal feed and mushroom growth media as two value-added options for waste Cassava pulp management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakulvichean, Sivalee; Chaiprasert, Pawinee; Otmakhova, Julia; Songkasiri, Warinthorn

    2017-12-01

    Cassava is one of the main processed crops in Thailand, but this generates large amounts (7.3 million tons in 2015) of waste cassava pulp (WCP). The solid WCP is sold directly to farmers or pulp-drying companies at a low cost to reduce the burden of on-site waste storage. Using an integrated direct and environmental cost model, fermented animal feed and mushroom growth media were compared as added-value waste management alternatives for WCP to mitigate environmental problems. Primary and secondary data were collected from the literature, field data, and case studies. Data boundaries were restricted to a gate-to-gate scenario with a receiving capacity of 500 t WCP/d, and based on a new production unit being set up at the starch factory. The total production cost of each WCP utilization option was analyzed from the economic and environmental costs. Fermented animal feed was an economically attractive scenario, giving a higher net present value (NPV), lower investment cost and environmental impact, and a shorter payback period for the 10-year operational period. The selling price of mushrooms was the most sensitive parameter regarding the NPV, while the NPV for the price of fermented animal feed had the highest value in the best-case scenario.

  11. Comparing removal efficiency and reaction rates of organic micro-pollutants during ozonation from different municipal waste water treatment plants effluents in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-taliawy, Haitham; Ekblad, Maja; Nilsson, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The Removal of about 50 micro-pollutants from 7 waste water treatment plant effluents –in Sweden- was tested on pilot scale. Different ozone doses and two different pilots with different reactor sizes and retention times were tested. Ozone reaction rates depended on DOC concentration in the water...

  12. The presence of bromuconazole fungicide pollutant in organic waste anaerobic fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariyadi, H. R.

    2017-03-01

    The presence of bromuconazole fungicide pollutant in organic waste anaerobic fermentation was carried out as well as the influence phenol and benzoate, and biodegradation of bromuconazole. Bromuconazole is a fungicide effective against Ascomycetes, Basidiomycetes and fungi imperfecti in cereals, grapes, top fruits and vegetables. It is also effective against Alternaria and Fusarium sp. The remaining fungicide in leaves might contaminates landfill. One month of organic waste added with bromuconazole was anaerobically incubated in 500 mL bottles at 30°C without shaking in dark room. High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) with UV detector and a 100 RP 185μm Lichrosphere column was used to determine bromuconazole concentration. Methane content was determined by Gas Chromatography (GC) method equipped with a flame ionization detector and a metal column packed with 5% neopentyl glycol sebacate and 1% H3PO4 on Chromosorb W-AW (mesh 80-100). After incubation for 225 days, bromuconazole of 200 mg/L inhibited the production of methane (99.5 mM) significantly, but did not inhibit the production of volatile fatty acids. The addition of 100 mg/L phenol or 146 mg/L benzoate increased the production of methane, 143 mM and 135.2 mM, respectively compared with control (121.8 mM). In anaerobic conditions, the presence of toxic pollutants such as fungicide bromuconazole in landfills sites may cause further problems with the accumulation of volatile fatty acids in leachate. Further study to determine the threshold, the presence of bromconazole in low concentration (less than 200 mg/L) on the methane production is recommended.

  13. Synthesis of hydrophilic and hydrophobic carbon quantum dots from waste of wine fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varisco, Massimo; Zufferey, Denis; Ruggi, Albert; Zhang, Yucheng; Erni, Rolf; Mamula, Olimpia

    2017-12-01

    Wine lees are one of the main residues formed in vast quantities during the fermentation of wine. While toxic when applied to plants and wetlands, it is a biodegradable material, and several alternatives have been proposed for its valorization as: dietary supplement in animal feed, source for various yeast extracts and bioconversion feedstock. The implementation of stricter environment protection regulations resulted in increasing costs for wineries as their treatment process constitutes an unavoidable and expensive step in wine production. We propose here an alternative method to reduce waste and add value to wine production by exploiting this rich carbon source and use it as a raw material for producing carbon quantum dots (CQDs). A complete synthetic pathway is discussed, comprising the carbonization of the starting material, the screening of the most suitable solvent for the extraction of CQDs from the carbonized mass and their hydrophobic or hydrophilic functionalization. CQDs synthesized with the reported procedure show a bright blue emission (λmax = 433 ± 13 nm) when irradiated at 366 nm, which is strongly shifted when the wavelength is increased (e.g. emission at around 515 nm when excited at 460 nm). Yields and luminescent properties of CQDs, obtained with two different methods, namely microwave and ultrasound-based extraction, are discussed and compared. This study shows how easy a residue can be converted into an added-value material, thus not only reducing waste and saving costs for the wine-manufacturing industry but also providing a reliable, affordable and sustainable source for valuable materials.

  14. Biochemicals from food waste and recalcitrant biomass via syngas fermentation: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainaina, Steven; Horváth, Ilona Sárvári; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2018-01-01

    An effective method for the production of value-added chemicals from food waste and lignocellulosic materials is a hybrid thermal-biological process, which involves gasification of the solid materials to syngas (primarily CO and H 2 ) followed by fermentation. This paper reviews the recent advances in this process. The special focus is on the cultivation methods that involve the use of single strains, defined mixed cultures and undefined mixed cultures for production of carboxylic acids and higher alcohols. A rate limiting step in these processes is the low mass transfer between the gas and the liquid phases. Therefore, novel techniques that can enhance the gas-liquid mass transfer including membrane- and trickle-bed bioreactors were discussed. Such bioreactors have shown promising results in increasing the volumetric mass transfer coefficient (k L a). High gas pressure also influences the mass transfer in certain batch processes, although the presence of impurities in the gas would impede the process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Antibiotics production of cellulosic waste with solid state fermentation by Streptomyces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S S [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-09-01

    Cellulosic waste, corncob, was used as a substrate in the production of oxytetracycline by Streptomyces rimosus TM-55 in solid state fermentation. Oxytetracycline was detected on the fourth day, and reached its maximum on the eighth day. During cultivation, the moisture content of substrate increased as incubation being, and pH value increased slightly. Optimal conditions for oxytetracycline production were an initial pH of 5.2 to 6.3, an initial moisture content of 64 to 67%, supplemented with 20% (w/w) rice bran or 1.5 to 2.5% (NH{sub 42} SO{sub 4}) as the sole nitrogen source, 1.0% CaCO{sub 3}, 2% MgSO{sub 4} 7H{sub 2}O, 0.5% KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, and 0.6 to 0.8% aspartic acid or lysine, with incubation for 8 days at 25 to 30{sup o}C. Each gram of substrate produced 10 to 11 mg of oxytetracycline. (Author)

  16. Production of itaconic acid by Ustilago maydis from agro wastes in solid state fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOKULA MD. RAFI

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Itaconic acid (IA is one of the hopeful substances within the cluster of organic acids. IA is used in artificial glass, bioactive compounds in pharmacy, medicine, agriculture, for the synthesis of fiber, resin, plastic, rubber, paints, surfactant, ion-exchange resins and lubricant. Most recurrently used microorganism for commercial production of IA is Aspergillus terreus. Some filamentous fungi belonging to Ustilaginales also produce IA. In the present work, an attempt was made to produce IA by Ustilago maydis employing Solid State Fermentation (SSF from various agro wastes like ground nut shells, rice bran, rice husk, orange pulp, ground nut oil cake, orange pulp and sugarcane bagasse as carbon substrates, which were used after pretreatment. 10 g of each substrate was taken in a 500 ml conical flasks separately and supplemented with 20 mL nutrient solution containing glucose, at pH 3. One milliliter inoculum containing 1×107 spores was added and moisture was maintained at 60%. After incubation at 32°C for 5 days, the acid production was estimated by spectrophotometric method and by HPLC analysis. Interestingly, the yield of itaconic acid was promising with all the above substrates, where orange pulp, sugarcane bagasse and rice bran supported higher yields.

  17. Pretreatment and hydrolysis methods for recovery of fermentable sugars from de-oiled Jatropha waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gopalakrishnan; Sen, Biswarup; Lin, Chiu-Yue

    2013-10-01

    The release of reducing sugars (RS) upon various pretreatments and hydrolysis methods from de-oiled Jatropha waste (DJW) was studied. The highest RS concentration of 12.9 g/L was observed at 10% enzyme hydrolysis. The next highest RS of 8.0 g/L and 7.8 g/L were obtained with 10% HCl and 2.5% H2SO4, respectively. The NaOH (2.5%), ultrasonication and heat (90°C for 60 min) treatments showed the RS concentration of 2.5 g/L, 1.1 g/L and 2.0 g/L, respectively. Autoclave treatment slightly enhanced the sugar release (0.9 g/L) compared to no treatment (0.7 g/L). Glucose release (11.4 g/L) peaked in enzyme hydrolysis. Enzyme treated acid unhydrolysed biomass showed 11.1 g/L RS. HCl and H2SO4 pretreatment gave maximal xylose (6.89 g/L and 6.16 g/L, respectively). Combined (acid and enzyme) hydrolysis employed was efficient and its subsequent batch hydrogen fermentation showed a production 3.1 L H2/L reactor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of alkali types on waste activated sludge (WAS) fermentation and microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoling; Peng, Yongzhen; Li, Baikun; Wu, Changyong; Zhang, Liang; Zhao, Yaqian

    2017-11-01

    The effects of two alkali agents, NaOH and Ca(OH) 2 , on enhancing waste activated sludge (WAS) fermentation and short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) accumulation were studied in semi-continuous stirred tank reactors (semi-CSTR) at different sludge retention time (SRT) (2-10 d). The optimum SRT for SCFAs accumulation of NaOH and Ca(OH) 2 adding system was 8 d and 10 d, respectively. Results showed that the average organics yields including soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD), protein, and carbohydrate in the NaOH system were as almost twice as that in the Ca(OH) 2 system. For Ca(OH) 2 system, sludge hydrolysis and protein acidification efficiencies were negatively affected by Ca 2+ precipitation, which was revealed by the decrease of Ca 2+ concentration, the rise of zeta potential and better sludge dewaterability in Ca(OH) 2 system. In addition, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were the main microbial functional groups in both types of alkali systems. NaOH system obtained higher microbial quantities which led to better acidification. For application, however, Ca(OH) 2 was more economically feasible owning to its lower price and better dewaterability of residual sludge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Administrative instruction D.G.S./S.D. 7 D./D.H.O.S./E. 4 n. 2001-323 of the 9 july 2001 relative to the management of effluents and wastes from treatment activity and contaminated by radioisotopes; Circulaire D.G.S./S.D. 7 D./D.H.O.S./E. 4 n. 2001-323 du 9 juillet 2001 relative a la gestion des effluents et des dechets d'activites de soins contamines par des radionucleides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The three parts for this administrative instruction are general principles of management of effluents and waste at radioactive character, management individualized plan for effluents and wastes, articulation with regulation relative to classified installations for the environmental protection. (N.C.)

  20. Valorization of industrial waste and by-product streams via fermentation for the production of chemicals and biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutinas, Apostolis A; Vlysidis, Anestis; Pleissner, Daniel; Kopsahelis, Nikolaos; Lopez Garcia, Isabel; Kookos, Ioannis K; Papanikolaou, Seraphim; Kwan, Tsz Him; Lin, Carol Sze Ki

    2014-04-21

    The transition from a fossil fuel-based economy to a bio-based economy necessitates the exploitation of synergies, scientific innovations and breakthroughs, and step changes in the infrastructure of chemical industry. Sustainable production of chemicals and biopolymers should be dependent entirely on renewable carbon. White biotechnology could provide the necessary tools for the evolution of microbial bioconversion into a key unit operation in future biorefineries. Waste and by-product streams from existing industrial sectors (e.g., food industry, pulp and paper industry, biodiesel and bioethanol production) could be used as renewable resources for both biorefinery development and production of nutrient-complete fermentation feedstocks. This review focuses on the potential of utilizing waste and by-product streams from current industrial activities for the production of chemicals and biopolymers via microbial bioconversion. The first part of this review presents the current status and prospects on fermentative production of important platform chemicals (i.e., selected C2-C6 metabolic products and single cell oil) and biopolymers (i.e., polyhydroxyalkanoates and bacterial cellulose). In the second part, the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of waste and by-product streams from existing industrial sectors are presented. In the third part, the techno-economic aspects of bioconversion processes are critically reviewed. Four case studies showing the potential of case-specific waste and by-product streams for the production of succinic acid and polyhydroxyalkanoates are presented. It is evident that fermentative production of chemicals and biopolymers via refining of waste and by-product streams is a highly important research area with significant prospects for industrial applications.

  1. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF PALM OIL MILL EFFLUENT AND OIL PALM FROND WASTE MIXTURE AS AN ALTERNATIVE BIOMASS FUEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. HASSAN, L. S. KEE

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Palm oil mill effluent (POME sludge generated from palm oil mill industry and oil palm frond (OPF from oil palm plantation are considered biomass wastes that can be fully utilized as a renewable energy sources. In this study, an attempt has been made to convert these residues into solid biomass fuel. The study was conducted by developing experimental testing on the POME and OPF mixture. The performance of each sample with different weight percentage was investigated using standard tests. The biomass mixture was converted into compressed form of briquette through a simple process. The properties of the briquettes were observed and compared at different weight percentage following standard testing methods included ultimate and proximate analyses, burning characteristics, dimensional stability and crack analysis. Experimental results showed that POME sludge and OPF mixture is feasible as an alternative biomass fuel, with briquette of 90:10 POME sludge to OPF ratio has a good combination of properties as an overall.

  2. Investigation of hydrogenase molecular marker to optimize hydrogen production from organic wastes and effluents of agro-food industries [abstract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton, C.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years policy makers have started looking for alternatives to fossil fuels, not only to counter the threat of global warming, but also to reduce the risk of overdependence on imported oil and gas supplies. By contrast with hydrocarbon fuels, hydrogen (H2, whether burned directly or used in fuel cells, is intrinsically a clean energy vector with near zero emission. However the main current method of producing hydrogen, steam reforming of methane, involves the release of large quantities of greenhouse gases. So although hydrogen already accounts for around 2% of world consumption of energy, its more widespread adoption is limited by several challenges. Therefore new processes are investigated, especially those using renewable raw material, e.g. woods and organic wastes, and/or involving microorganisms. Indeed, for some algae and bacteria, the generation of molecular hydrogen is an essential part of their energy metabolism. The approach with the greatest commercial potential is fermentative hydrogen generation (dark fermentation by bacteria from the Clostridium genus. This biological process, as a part of the methane-producing anaerobic digestion process, is very promising since it allows the production of hydrogen from a wide variety of renewable resources such as carbohydrate waste from the agricultural and agro-food industries or processed urban waste and sewage. To date most publications on hydrogen production by Clostridium strains have focused on the effects of operating parameters (such as temperature, pH, dilution rate, etc.. We now need to extend this knowledge by identifying and monitoring the various different metabolic agents involved in high H2 activity. Consequently the aim of this research at the CWBI in the University of Liege is to investigate the role of [Fe] hydrogenases, the key enzymes that remove excess electrons accumulating during fermentation. Clostridium butyricum CWBI1009, the strain used for these investigations

  3. Biogas plants: Utilization of microorganisms for waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadlbauer, E A; Trieu, C

    1984-05-01

    The continuous realisation of the basic principles of environmental conservation and compatability demands concern about the problems of eliminating wastes in an industrialised society. Biogas- and therefore technical plants for methane generation by anaerobic fermentation have promoted to effective means of environmental protection and sources of alternate energy from organic wastes. Methane fermentation has been employed for the stabilisation of sludges at municipal waste treatment plants for decades. However, the anaerobic digestion process shows promising applications both for industrial effluents and agricultural wastes as well as municipal solid wastes and covered waste deposits. In view of the advances achieved interdisciplinary cooperation the actual potential and perspective of methane fermentation technology with respect to the solution of the increasing problems of waste management and energy supply is discussed.

  4. Effect of fermentation time of mixture of solid and liquid wastes from tapioca industry to percentage reduction of TSS (Total Suspended Solids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandia, S.; Tanata, S.; Rachel, M.; Octiva, C.; Sialagan, N.

    2018-02-01

    The waste from tapioca industry is as an organic waste that contains many important compounds such as carbohydrate, protein, and glucose. This research as aimed to know the effect of fermentation time from solid waste combined with waste-water from the tapioca industry to percentage reduction of TSS. The study was started by mixing the solid and liquid wastes from tapioca industry at a ratio of 70:30, 60:40, 50:50, 40:60, and 30:70 (w/w) with a starter from solid waste of cattle in a batch anaerobic digester. The percentage reduction of TSS was 72.2289 at a ratio by weight of the composition of solid and liquid wastes from tapioca industry was 70:30 after 30 days of fermentation time.

  5. Thermophilic bio-energy process study on hydrogen fermentation with vegetable kitchen waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ze-Kun; Li, Shiue-Lin; Kuo, Pei-Chen; Chen, I.-Chieh; Tien, Yu-Min; Huang, Yu-Jung; Chuang, Chung-Po; Wong, Son-Chi; Cheng, Sheng-Shung [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng Kung University No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701, ROC (China)

    2010-12-15

    An intermittent-continuous stirred tank reactor (I-CSTR) was evaluated for thermophilic anaerobic hydrogen fermentation with vegetable kitchen waste (VKW). The seeding sludge was enriched from kitchen waste compost. Because of different seasonal dietary habits, the quality of vegetable kitchen waste was unstable, and all variations of composition were in the range from 20 to 40%. The I-CSTR process was conducted under different volumetric loading rates (VLR) with different VKW-diluted concentrations. The hydrogen production rate and yield in Run 2 (VLR as 28 g-COD L{sup -1} day{sup -1}) were 1.0 L-H{sub 2} L{sup -1} day{sup -1} and 1.7 mmol-H{sub 2} g-COD{sup -1}, which were higher than those in Run1 (VLR as 19 g-COD/L-day). The hydrolysis efficiency of organic solids (VSS) was about 45% in Run 1 better than the 32% in Run 2. The carbohydrate component of VKW was clearly degraded with the accumulation of butyrate, while the organic nitrogen component was converted to ammonia. The vegetable cellulose was degraded from 3.2 g L{sup -1} and 3.6-1.8 and 3.2 g L{sup -1} in Runs 1 and 2, respectively. In addition, the high concentration of lactate from the acidified VKW could be degraded completely both in Runs 1 and 2. According to the results of the time series profile in day 59, oil and grease were not degraded significantly. The removal of oil and grease was superficially caused by stacking on the wall, pipe, and propeller of the reactor, or by floating on the liquid surface. The 16S rDNA cloning library and sequence were applied for analyzing microbial communities. The dominant OTU was closely affiliated to Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum, which is considered as the predominant hydrogen-producing bacteria. The OTUs closely related to Moorella thermoacetica and Clostridiaceae bacterium FH052 were considered as acetogenic bacterium and hydrogen-producing bacteria in the I-CSTR system. (author)

  6. Solidification of Simulated Liquid Effluents Originating From Sodium-Bearing Waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, FY-03 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. V. Raman; A. K. Herbst; B. A. Scholes; S. H. Hinckley; R. D. Colby

    2003-09-01

    In this report, the mechanism and methods of fixation of acidic waste effluents in grout form are explored. From the variations in the pH as a function of total solids addition to acidic waste effluent solutions, the stages of gellation, liquefaction, slurry formation and grout development are quantitatively revealed. Experimental results indicate the completion of these reaction steps to be significant for elimination of bleed liquid and for setting of the grout to a dimensionally stable and hardened solid within a reasonable period of about twenty eight days that is often observed in the cement and concrete industry. The reactions also suggest increases in the waste loading in the direction of decreasing acid molarity. Consequently, 1.0 molar SBW-180 waste is contained in higher quantity than the 2.8 molar SBW-189, given the same grout formulation for both effluents. The variations in the formulations involving components of slag, cement, waste and neutralizing agent are represented in the form of a ternary formulation map. The map in turn graphically reveals the relations among the various formulations and grout properties, and is useful in predicting the potential directions of waste loading in grouts with suitable properties such as slurry viscosity, Vicat hardness, and mechanical strength. A uniform formulation for the fixation of both SBW-180 and SBW-189 has emerged from the development of the formulation map. The boundaries for the processing regime on this map are 100 wt% cement to 50 wt% cement / 50 wt% slag, with waste loadings ranging from 55 wt% to 68 wt%. Within these compositional bounds all the three waste streams SBW-180, SBW-189 and Scrub solution are amenable to solidification. A large cost advantage is envisaged to stem from savings in labor, processing time, and processing methodology by adopting a uniform formulation concept for fixation of compositionally diverse waste streams. The experimental efforts contained in this report constitute the

  7. Production and Characterization of a Distilled Alcoholic Beverage Obtained by Fermentation of Banana Waste (Musa cavendishii from Selected Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Eli de Matos

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Banana is one of the most important fruits in the Brazilian diet and is mainly consumed naturally. Losses from crop to final consumer are high and estimated in about 30%. The aim of this work was to elaborate a distilled alcoholic beverage from discarded banana and to compare with commercial trademarks. Initially, yeast strains were isolated from banana fruit and characterized by their production of volatile aroma compounds. The highest aroma-producing yeast isolate was identified by ITS-rRNA gene sequencing as Pichia kluyveri. Pasteurized banana pulp and peel was fermented by the selected P. kluyveri at approximately 107 cells/mL. The sugars were converted quickly, and a high ethanol concentration (413 mg/L was achieved after 24 h of fermentation. The fermented banana must was distilled in a Femel Alambic, and the head, heart and tail fractions were collected. The banana brandy produced had highest concentration of volatile compounds compared to trademarks, such as isoamyl acetate (13.5 mg/L, ethyl hexanoate (0.8 mg/L and others. The results showed that whole banana must could be a good substrate for fermentation and distillation, and the sensory analysis performed revealed that the produced beverage had good acceptance by the tasters. This study demonstrates the potential of banana as a possible alternative to reduce waste and increase income to farmers.

  8. Fermentation of sugar beet waste by ¤Aspergillus niger¤ facilitates growth and P uptake of external mycelium of mixed populations of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medina, A.; Jakobsen, Iver; Vassilev, N.

    2007-01-01

    Sugar beet waste has potential value as a soil amendment and this work studied whether fermentation of the waste by Aspergillus niger would influence the growth and P uptake of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Plants were grown in compartmentalised growth units, each with a root compartment (RC...

  9. Re-fermentation of washed spent solids from batch hydrogenogenic fermentation for additional production of biohydrogen from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Páez, Karla M; Ríos-Leal, Elvira; Valdez-Vazquez, Idania; Rinderknecht-Seijas, Noemí; Poggi-Varaldo, Héctor M

    2012-03-01

    In the first batch solid substrate anaerobic hydrogenogenic fermentation with intermittent venting (SSAHF-IV) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), a cumulative production of 16.6 mmol H(2)/reactor was obtained. Releases of hydrogen partial pressure first by intermittent venting and afterward by flushing headspace of reactors with inert gas N(2) allowed for further hydrogen production in a second to fourth incubation cycle, with no new inoculum nor substrate nor inhibitor added. After the fourth cycle, no more H(2) could be harvested. Interestingly, accumulated hydrogen in 4 cycles was 100% higher than that produced in the first cycle alone. At the end of incubation, partial pressure of H(2) was near zero whereas high concentrations of organic acids and solvents remained in the spent solids. So, since approximate mass balances indicated that there was still a moderate amount of biodegradable matter in the spent solids we hypothesized that the organic metabolites imposed some kind of inhibition on further fermentation of digestates. Spent solids were washed to eliminate organic metabolites and they were used in a second SSAHF-IV. Two more cycles of H(2) production were obtained, with a cumulative production of ca. 2.4 mmol H(2)/mini-reactor. As a conclusion, washing of spent solids of a previous SSAHF-IV allowed for an increase of hydrogen production by 15% in a second run of SSAHF-IV, leading to the validation of our hypothesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Effect of Supplementation Urea and Sulfur in Mixed Cassava Waste Fermented and Soyabean Cake Waste on Digestibility of Protein and Blood Urea Male Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Bata

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen local male sheep were divided into 3 groups I,II and III based on the body weight 18.55±1.27, 15.79±0.67 and 13.14±1.33 kg respectively. Two level urea (2 and 3% and three levels Sulfur (0.02 and 0.3% as treatment, so pattern factorial 2x3 with Randomized Block Design used this experiment. All of the treatment get a same basal feed namely land-grass and concentrate with dry matter ratio 70:30.  The total intake of  dry matter was 4 % of body weight. The concentrate consist of cassava waste fermented  and soyabean cake waste with dry matter  ratio 77.50 : 22.50. Supplementation of urea and sulfur shown not significant interaction, but supplementation urea had effect high significantly (P<0.01 on digestibility of protein and sulfur only had effect significant  (P<0.05 on blood urea. These result had indication that enriched urea in the diet could increase protein digestibility and sulfur level 0.2% could prevent NH3 absorption from rumen. (Animal Production 1(2: 75-81 (1999   Key Words: cassava waste, soyabean cake waste, fermentation, digestibility, urea blood.

  11. Elimination of effluents and wastes contaminated by radionuclides produced in installations authorized on the account of the Public Health Code - ASN guide nr 18 - Release of the 26/01/2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This document aims at specifying the modalities of application of a decision taken by the ASN in January 2008 regarding the technical rules which the elimination of effluents and wastes contaminated by radionuclides must comply with. First, it describes the objective of the 'waste zoning' concept. Then, it addresses the management of contaminated wastes: general rules, wastes contaminated by radionuclides of very short period (less than 100 days) and of period longer than 100 days, and the management of wastes with 'hybrid risks'. It addresses the management of contaminated effluents: radioactive liquid effluent with a period either shorter or longer than 100 days, radioactive gaseous effluents. It addresses the warehousing conditions (premise design, exploitation rules). The other parts deal with the convention between several establishments within a same site (notably in the case of nuclear medicine departments), with the management plan, and with the agenda for the implementation of the ASN decision

  12. Assessment of management alternatives for LWR wastes. Volume 5. Assessment of the radiological impact to the public resulting from discharges of radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Centner, B.

    1993-01-01

    This report deals with the assessment of the radiological impact to the public resulting from discharges of radioactive effluents (liquid and gaseous) in connection with the implementation of the Belgian scenario for the management of PWR waste. Both individual and collective doses have been estimated for a critical group of the population living around the nuclear power plants concerned. This study is part of an overall theoretical exercise aimed at evaluating a selection of management wastes for LWR waste based on economical and radiological criteria

  13. Exploring the selective lactic acid production from food waste in uncontrolled pH mixed culture fermentations using different reactor configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonk, Fabian; Bastidas-Oyanedel, Juan-Rodrigo; Yousef, Ahmed F; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2017-08-01

    Carboxylic acid production from food waste by mixed culture fermentation is an important future waste management option. Obstacles for its implementation are the need of pH control, and a broad fermentation product spectrum leading to increased product separation costs. To overcome these obstacles, the selective production of lactic acid (LA) from model food waste by uncontrolled pH fermentation was tested using different reactor configurations. Batch experiments, semi-continuously fed reactors and a percolation system reached LA concentrations of 32, 16 and 15gCOD LA /L, respectively, with selectivities of 93%, 84% and 75% on COD base, respectively. The semi-continuous reactor was dominated by Lactobacillales. Our techno-economic analysis suggests that LA production from food waste can be economically feasible, with LA recovery and low yields remaining as major obstacles. To solve both problems, we successfully applied in-situ product extraction using activated carbon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Over production of fermentable sugar for bioethanol production from carbohydrate-rich Malaysian food waste via sequential acid-enzymatic hydrolysis pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafid, Halimatun Saadiah; Nor 'Aini, Abdul Rahman; Mokhtar, Mohd Noriznan; Talib, Ahmad Tarmezee; Baharuddin, Azhari Samsu; Umi Kalsom, Md Shah

    2017-09-01

    In Malaysia, the amount of food waste produced is estimated at approximately 70% of total municipal solid waste generated and characterised by high amount of carbohydrate polymers such as starch, cellulose, and sugars. Considering the beneficial organic fraction contained, its utilization as an alternative substrate specifically for bioethanol production has receiving more attention. However, the sustainable production of bioethanol from food waste is linked to the efficient pretreatment needed for higher production of fermentable sugar prior to fermentation. In this work, a modified sequential acid-enzymatic hydrolysis process has been developed to produce high concentration of fermentable sugars; glucose, sucrose, fructose and maltose. The process started with hydrothermal and dilute acid pretreatment by hydrochloric acid (HCl) and sulphuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) which aim to degrade larger molecules of polysaccharide before accessible for further steps of enzymatic hydrolysis by glucoamylase. A kinetic model is proposed to perform an optimal hydrolysis for obtaining high fermentable sugars. The results suggested that a significant increase in fermentable sugar production (2.04-folds) with conversion efficiency of 86.8% was observed via sequential acid-enzymatic pretreatment as compared to dilute acid pretreatment (∼42.4% conversion efficiency). The bioethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae utilizing fermentable sugar obtained shows ethanol yield of 0.42g/g with conversion efficiency of 85.38% based on the theoretical yield was achieved. The finding indicates that food waste can be considered as a promising substrate for bioethanol production. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Metatranscriptomic and metagenomic description of the bacterial nitrogen metabolism in waste water wet oxidation effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Crovadore

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion is a common method for reducing the amount of sludge solids in used waters and enabling biogas production. The wet oxidation process (WOX improves anaerobic digestion by converting carbon into methane through oxidation of organic compounds. WOX produces effluents rich in ammonia, which must be removed to maintain the activity of methanogens. Ammonia removal from WOX could be biologically operated by aerobic granules. To this end, granulation experiments were conducted in 2 bioreactors containing an activated sludge (AS. For the first time, the dynamics of the microbial community structure and the expression levels of 7 enzymes of the nitrogen metabolism in such active microbial communities were followed in regard to time by metagenomics and metatranscriptomics. It was shown that bacterial communities adapt to the wet oxidation effluent by increasing the expression level of the nitrogen metabolism, suggesting that these biological activities could be a less costly alternative for the elimination of ammonia, resulting in a reduction of the use of chemicals and energy consumption in sewage plants. This study reached a strong sequencing depth (from 4.4 to 7.6 Gb and enlightened a yet unknown diversity of the microorganisms involved in the nitrogen pathway. Moreover, this approach revealed the abundance and expression levels of specialised enzymes involved in nitrification, denitrification, ammonification, dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA and nitrogen fixation processes in AS. Keywords: Applied sciences, Biological sciences, Environmental science, Genetics, Microbiology

  16. Treated Effluent Disposal Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Treated non-hazardous and non-radioactive liquid wastes are collected and then disposed of through the systems at the Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF). More...

  17. Effective method of fermentation of Riga hydrolyzates of corn cobs and other vegetable waste products for butanol and acetone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakhmanovich, B M; Kameneva, L; Kalnina, V

    1963-01-01

    A simplified method is described for the production of butanol and acetone. The acid mixture (H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/, 10 to 20%; H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, 90 to 80%) used to hydrolyze corn cobs and other vegetable waste products served also to invert the sugar of molasses which was added in 3 parts to 1 part hydrolyzate on the basis of reducing sugar content. The mixture was then diluted and neutralized with NH/sub 4/OH to pH 6.3 to 6.8. In this way a suitable hydrolyzate medium containing the appropriate amounts of mineral salts as well as invert sugar was provided for fermentation by Clostridium butyricum Prazmowsky. Lignin which precipitated during hydrolysis served as a solid phase which helped to accelerate fermentation. Combined yields of butanol, acetone, and small amounts of ethanol amounted to 30 to 38% of the available sugar; approximately 67% consisted of butanol.

  18. Microbial network for waste activated sludge cascade utilization in an integrated system of microbial electrolysis and anaerobic fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wenzong; He, Zhangwei; Yang, Chunxue

    2016-01-01

    in an integrated system of microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) and anaerobic digestion (AD) for waste activated sludge (WAS). Microbial communities in integrated system would build a thorough energetic and metabolic interaction network regarding fermentation communities and electrode respiring communities...... to Firmicutes (Acetoanaerobium, Acetobacterium, and Fusibacter) showed synergistic relationship with exoelectrogensin the degradation of complex organic matter or recycling of MEC products (H2). High protein and polysaccharide but low fatty acid content led to the dominance of Proteiniclasticum...... biofilm. The overall performance of WAS cascade utilization was substantially related to the microbial community structures, which in turn depended on the initial pretreatment to enhance WAS fermentation. It is worth noting that species in AD and MEC communities are able to build complex networks...

  19. Utilization of fermentation waste (Corynebacterium glutamicum) for biosorption of Reactive Black 5 from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayaraghavan, K.; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2007-01-01

    A fermentation waste, Corynebacterium glutamicum, was successfully employed as a biosorbent for Reactive Black 5 (RB5) from aqueous solution. This paper initially studied the effect of pretreatment on the biosorption capacity of C. glutamicum toward RB5, using several chemical agents, such as HCl, H 2 SO 4 , HNO 3 , NaOH, Na 2 CO 3 , CaCl 2 and NaCl. Among these reagents, 0.1 M HNO 3 gave the maximum enhancement of the RB5 uptake, exhibiting 195 mg/g at pH 1 with an initial RB5 concentration of 500 mg/l. The solution pH and temperature were found to affect the biosorption capacity, and the biosorption isotherms derived at different pHs and temperatures revealed that a low pH (pH 1) and high temperature (35 deg. C) favored biosorption. The biosorption isotherm was well represented using three-parameter models (Redlich-Peterson and Sips) compared to two-parameter models (Langmuir and Freundlich models). As a result, high correlation coefficients and low average percentage error values were observed for three-parameter models. A maximum RB5 uptake of 419 mg/g was obtained at pH 1 and a temperature of 35 deg. C, according to the Langmuir model. The kinetics of the biosorption process with different initial concentrations (500-2000 mg/l) was also monitored, and the data were analyzed using pseudo-first and pseudo-second order models, with the latter describing the data well. Various thermodynamic parameters, such as ΔG o , ΔH o and ΔS o , were calculated, indicating that the present system was a spontaneous and endothermic process. The use of a 0.1 M NaOH solution successfully desorbed almost all the dye molecules from dye-loaded C. glutamicum biomass at different solid-to-liquid ratios examined

  20. Economic and ecologic considerations for bidding procedures and contracting for bio-waste fermentation plants; Oekonomische und oekologische Gesichtspunkte bei Ausschreibung und Vergabe von Bioabfallvergaerungsanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raussen, Thomas; Lootsma, Auke [Witzenhausen-Institut fuer Abfall, Umwelt und Energie GmbH, Witzenhausen (Germany); Oldhafer, Nils [umwelttechnik und ingenieure GmbH, Hannvoer (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The use of the energetic and mass potentials of biological wastes in an integrated fermentation and composting plant needs extensive conceptual and planning activities. The call for tenders for the construction of plants is an EU-wide open procedure. Public waste management organizations are interested to receive profitable solutions with reliable operation and minimized ecological impacts. The minimum requirements and technical aspects are defined by the public waste management organizations.

  1. Solid-state fermentation and composting as alternatives to treat hair waste: A life-cycle assessment comparative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán, Eva; Komilis, Dimitrios; Sánchez, Antoni

    2017-07-01

    One of the wastes associated with leather production in tannery industries is the hair residue generated during the dehairing process. Hair wastes are mainly dumped or managed through composting but recent studies propose the treatment of hair wastes through solid-state fermentation (SSF) to obtain proteases and compost. These enzymes are suitable for its use in an enzymatic dehairing process, as an alternative to the current chemical dehairing process. In the present work, two different scenarios for the valorization of the hair waste are proposed and assessed by means of life-cycle assessment: composting and SSF for protease production. Detailed data on hair waste composting and on SSF protease production are gathered from previous studies performed by our research group and from a literature survey. Background inventory data are mainly based on Ecoinvent version 3 from software SimaPro® 8. The main aim of this study was to identify which process results in the highest environmental impact. The SSF process was found to have lower environmental impacts than composting, due to the fact that the enzyme use in the dehairing process prevents the use of chemicals traditionally used in the dehairing process. This permits to reformulate an industrial process from the classical approach of waste management to a novel alternative based on circular economy.

  2. Alleviation of harmful effect in stillage reflux in food waste ethanol fermentation based on metabolic and side-product accumulation regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongzhi; Yang, Jian; Jia, Yan; Wang, Qunhui; Ma, Xiaoyu; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    Stillage reflux fermentation in food waste ethanol fermentation could reduce sewage discharge but exert a harmful effect because of side-product accumulation. In this study, regulation methods based on metabolic regulation and side-product alleviation were conducted. Result demonstrated that controlling the proper oxidation-reduction potential value (-150mV to -250mV) could reduce the harmful effect, improve ethanol yield by 21%, and reduce fermentation time by 20%. The methods of adding calcium carbonate to adjust the accumulated lactic acid showed that ethanol yield increased by 17.3%, and fermentation time decreased by 20%. The accumulated glyceal also shows that these two methods can reduce the harmful effect. Fermentation time lasted for seven times without effect, and metabolic regulation had a better effect than side-product regulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of Samples from the Effluent Treatment Facility Evaporator Waste Concentrate Tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmarth, W.R.

    1998-01-01

    During October 1997, the ETF Evaporator Waste Concentrate Tank No. 2 was discovered to contain a significant accumulation of solid deposits. SRTC performed destructive and nondestructive examination of solid samples from the tank. The results of these tests indicate that the solids contain mixtures of sodium oxalate (65 percent), the sulfide enclathrated sodium aluminosilicate (30 percent), and iron oxide (5 percent)

  4. Characterization of Samples from the Effluent Treatment Facility Evaporator Waste Concentrate Tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmarth, W.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1998-01-31

    During October 1997, the ETF Evaporator Waste Concentrate Tank No. 2 was discovered to contain a significant accumulation of solid deposits. SRTC performed destructive and nondestructive examination of solid samples from the tank. The results of these tests indicate that the solids contain mixtures of sodium oxalate (65 percent), the sulfide enclathrated sodium aluminosilicate (30 percent), and iron oxide (5 percent).

  5. Rockwell Hanford Operations effluents and solid waste burials during calendar year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, D.B.; Aldrich, R.C.; Shay, R.S.; Voigt, L.J.

    1987-07-01

    The quantities of solid, liquid, or gaseous wastes buried or discharged during calendar year 1986 are monitored and reported in this document. Discharge concentrations were compared to more restrictive Rockwell administrative control values for compliance; two gaseous streams and two liquid streams exceeded Rockwell limits. 24 refs., 3 figs., 15 tabs

  6. Water recycling from mixed chromic acid waste effluents by membrane technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenzel, I.; Frenzel, I.; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Wessling, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    Approaching zero discharge waste on site requires economical treatment technologies for the plating industry, recovering high quality rinse water for reuse. The combination of membranes and evaporation could be an efficient way to downsize the cost and the energy intensive evaporation equipment. In

  7. Assessing Waste Water Treatment Plant Effluents For Thyroid Hormone Disrupting Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Much information has been coming to light on the estrogenic and androgenic activity of chemicals present in the waste water stream and in surface waters, but much less is known about the presence of chemicals with thyroid activity. To address this issue, we have utilized two ass...

  8. Changes in biochemical constituent of some organic waste materials under anaerobic methane fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, C R; Gulati, K C; Idnani, M A

    1970-10-01

    Changes in the percentage composition of holocellulose, cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, pentosans and methoxyl contents of organic materials after fermentation of various systems like cow dung alone, cowdung-gum arabic, cowdung-wheat straw, cowdung-groundnut shells and cowdung-sugarcane bagasse by methane organisms indicated that the systems which had holocellulose (lignin in a ratio of 3 : 1 or less before fermentation) showed a greater decrease of hemicellulose fraction than of cellulose fraction. The percentage of lignin (18.41-22.03) and pentosans (0.292-5.129) increased after fermentation, except in cowdung-gum arabic which showed decrease of pentosans content. Methoxyl contents also decreased after fermentation, indicating a positive role of methyl group of methoxyls in the formation of methane by methane formers.

  9. Genotoxicity of swine effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techio, V H; Stolberg, J; Kunz, A; Zanin, E; Perdomo, C C

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of genotoxic effects of swine effluents from different stages of a treatment system for swine wastes through bioassay of stamen hairs and micronuclei in Tradescantia (clone BNL 4430). No significant differences (p≥0.05) regarding the genic mutations were found in the bioassay of stamen hairs, independently of the effluent analysed. For the genotoxicity test with micronuclei, the plants exposed to raw wastes, to sludge, and to effluent of the biodigester have presented higher rates of chromosomal damages (micronuclei), with significant differences in relation to the control group and other effluent of the waste treatment system (p≤0.05). The association between the chemical parameters and the genotoxicity data have shown that the variables COD and TKN have presented significant correlation (p≤0.05) with the number of mutagenic events in the tetrads.

  10. Acidogenic fermentation characteristics of different types of protein-rich substrates in food waste to produce volatile fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Dongsheng; Yin, Jun; Yu, Xiaoqin; Wang, Meizhen; Long, Yuyang; Shentu, Jiali; Chen, Ting

    2017-03-01

    In this study, tofu and egg white, representing typical protein-rich substrates in food waste based on vegetable and animal protein, respectively, were investigated for producing volatile fatty acids (VFAs) by acidogenic fermentation. VFA production, composition, conversion pathways and microbial communities in acidogenesis from tofu and egg white with and without hydrothermal (HT) pretreatment were compared. The results showed HT pretreatment could improve the VFA production of tofu but not for egg white. The optimum VFA yields were 0.46g/gVS (tofu with HT) and 0.26g/gVS (egg white without HT), respectively. Tofu could directly produce VFAs through the Stickland reaction, while egg white was converted to lactate and VFAs simultaneously. About 30-40% of total protein remained in all groups after fermentation. Up to 50% of the unconverted soluble protein in the HT groups was protease. More lactate-producing bacteria, mainly Leuconostoc and Lactobacillus, were present during egg white fermentation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Facility effluent monitoring plan for WESF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    1999-09-01

    The FEMP for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) provides sufficient information on the WESF effluent characteristics and the effluent monitoring systems so that a compliance assessment against applicable requirements may be performed. Radioactive and hazardous material source terms are related to specific effluent streams that are in turn, related to discharge points and, finally are compared to the effluent monitoring system capability.

  12. Secondary wastes and treatment of effluents from leaching of uranium from soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ally, M.R.; Wilson, J.H.; Francis, C.W.

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Feed Materials and Production Center at Fernald, Ohio has over two million cubic meters of soil contaminated with Uranium which must be cleaned. Soil characterization studies show that Uranium is unevenly distributed between the clay, sand and silt fractions. This paper examines the option of using leaching agents to remove Uranium from the soil and the treatment of secondary wastes. Results of the effects of various leachants in removing Uranium and the complications of co-leaching minerals/organic matter that are important for maintaining soil integrity and structure shall be discussed. Candidate leachants must remove the Uranium level below 35pCi/g of soil and produce a secondary waste that is amenable to on-site treatment at reasonable cost

  13. Comparative Cost of Colour Removal from Textile Effluents Using Agriculture Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afifi, T.H.; Aboul Fetouh, M.S.; Nassar, F.A.; Riyad, Y.M.

    1999-01-01

    In recent years, investigations have been oriented towards practical use of low cost materials in the treatment of wastewater polluted by dyestuffs. The use of bagasse pith and maize cob as agricultural wastes for the colour removal of dyestuffs, namely, Direct Orange 34, Direct Red 23, Reactive Violet 2 and Reactive Blue 19 from aqueous solution at different concentrations has been investigated. The adsorption capacity for each dye- adsorbent system has been determined. The relative costs of dye removal were reported based on adsorption capacity only. The aim of the present work is to assess the feasibility of two low-cost agriculture-wastes materials to adsorb both direct and reactive dyestuffs on economic basis

  14. Study on fused/cast AZS refractories for deployment in vitrification of radioactive waste effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Pranesh, E-mail: praneshsengupta@gmail.com [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Mishra, R.K.; Soudamini, N. [Waste Management Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Sen, D.; Mazumder, S. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kaushik, C.P. [Waste Management Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Ajithkumar, T.G. [Central NMR Facility, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411 008 (India); Banerjee, K. [Nuclear Recycle Group, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2015-12-15

    ‘Fused/cast Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–ZrO{sub 2}–SiO{sub 2} (FC-AZS)’ is being considered as ‘glass contact refractory’ within ceramic melters, to be used for nuclear waste immobilization. Microstructural analyses reveal random distributions of baddeleyite (ZrO{sub 2}) within aluminosilicate (Al{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}) matrix. {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si NMR data suggest that within aluminosilicate matrix Al occurs in both 4- and 6-fold co-ordinations whereas Si prefers a 4-fold environment. Polydispersity of pores has been studied with small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique. Corrosion rates of FC-AZS within 6 M HNO{sub 3}, simulated wastes (500 h exposure), and borosilicate melt (975 °C, 800 h exposure) are found to be 0.38 × 10{sup 3} μmy{sup −1}, 0.13 × 10{sup 3} μmy{sup −1} and 4.75 × 10{sup 3} μmy{sup −1} respectively. A comparison of chemical interaction data clearly suggests that FC-AZS exhibits better chemical durability than AZC refractory (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–ZrO{sub 2}–Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, also used for similar purpose). Thermal cycling studies indicate that FC-AZS retains structural integrity (including compressive strength and density) even up to 20 cycles. - Highlights: • Vitrification of nuclear waste using AZS refractory within ceramic melter. • Microstructure of AZS refractory. • Interaction of AZS with simulated high level waste and glass.

  15. Enhanced volatile fatty acids production from anaerobic fermentation of food waste: A mini-review focusing on acidogenic metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Miaomiao; Yan, Binghua; Wong, Jonathan W C; Zhang, Yang

    2018-01-01

    Recently, efficient disposal of food waste (FW) with potential resource recovery has attracted great attentions. Due to its easily biodegradable nature, rich nutrient availability and high moisture content, FW is regarded as favorable substrate for anaerobic digestion (AD). Both waste disposal and energy recovery can be fulfilled during AD of FW. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) which are the products of the first-two stages of AD, are widely applied in chemical industry as platform chemicals recently. Concentration and distribution of VFAs is the result of acidogenic metabolic pathways, which can be affected by the micro-environment (e.g. pH) in the digester. Hence, the clear elucidation of the acidogenic metabolic pathways is essential for optimization of acidogenic process for efficient product recovery. This review summarizes major acidogenic metabolic pathways and regulating strategies for enhancing VFAs recovery during acidogenic fermentation of FW. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Decontamination of irradiated-fuel processing waste using manganese dioxide hydrate; Decontamination des effluents de traitement des combustibles irradies par le bioxyde de manganese hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auchapt, J M; Gaudier, J F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Chusclan (France). Centre de Production de Plutonium de Marcoule

    1969-07-01

    The 'manganese dioxide' process is designed to replace the 'calcium carbonate' treatment for low and medium activity wastes. The objective to attain during the research for a new process was the diminution of the volume of the sludge without decreasing the decontamination factor of the wastes. The new process involves addition in series of twice over 100 ppm of Mn{sup 2+} in the waste which has previously been made basic and oxidizing; the precipitate formed in situ is separated after each addition. The process has the advantage of increasing the decontamination of strontium. The treatment can be used in a plant including two decantation units and has given effective results when applied in such a plant. (author) [French] Le procede au ''bioxyde de manganese'' est destine a remplacer le traitement ''carbonate de calcium'' dans les effluents de moyenne activite. L'objectif poursuivi lors de la recherche d'un procede nouveau etait de diminuer le volume des boues sans diminuer le facteur de decontamination des effluents. Le nouveau traitement consiste a effectuer en cascade sur les effluents rendus basiques et oxydants une double precipitation de 100 ppm de Mn{sup 2+} avec separation intermediaire du precipite. Il presente en outre l'avantage d'ameliorer la decontamination en strontium. Le traitement est utilisable dans la chaine des deux decanteurs et a donne satisfaction lors de son exploitation industrielle. Le volume des boues seches a ete reduit d'un facteur 3 a 4 par rapport au traitement carbonate. (auteur)

  17. Rockwell Hanford Operations effluents and solid waste burials during calendar year 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boothe, G.F.; Aldrich, R.C.; Shay, R.S.; Stanfield, L.J.

    1986-07-01

    Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) operates facilities at the Hanford Site under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE). The facilities generate radioactive and nonradioactive solid, liquid, and airborne wastes that must be disposed of, stored, or discharged to the environment. No radioactive liquid or solid wastes are discharged or disposed of offsite. The quantities of solid, liquid, or gaseous wastes buried or discharged during calendar year (CY) 1985 are reported in this document in compliance with DOE Order 5484.1, ''Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information Reporting Requirements.'' In CY 1985, all liquid and airborne discharges of radioactive materials were in compliance with DOE requirements. The Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility ammonia scrubber discharge stack (296-A-24) exceeded the Rockwell administrative control value for 106 Ru by a factor of 1.17. All other radioactive airborne discharges were below control values. Two liquid streams exceeded Rockwell administrative control values. The PUREX process condensate stream exceeded the /sup 239,240/Pu control value by a factor of 2.7 and the 241 Pu control value by a factor of 1.6. The PUREX ammonia scrubber stream exceeded the /sup 89,90/Sr control value by a factor of 3.2. All other liquid streams were below control values. The 200 Area power plants operated in compliance with the requirements of the Benton-Franklin-Walla Walla County Air Pollution Control Authority. There were no opacity violations; all deviations from opacity guidelines were promptly reported. Six deviations were reported in CY 1985. Oxides of nitrogen (NO/sub x/) emissions from PUREX and the UO 3 Plant were below annual limits for CY 1985

  18. Fermentation Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, C. P. L., Jr.; Grady, J. K.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastes from the fermentation industry, covering publications of 1976-77. This review focuses on: (1) alcoholic beverage production; (2) pharmaceuticals and biochemicals production; and (3) biomass production. A list of 62 references is also presented. (HM)

  19. Study on upgrading of oil palm wastes to animal feeds by radiation and fermentation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Tamikazu; Matsuhashi, Shinpei; Ito, Hitoshi

    1998-03-01

    Upgrading of oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB), which is a main by-product of palm oil industry, to animal feeds by radiation pasteurization and fermentation was investigated for recycling the agro-resources and reducing the environmental pollution. The following results were obtained: 1) The necessary dose for pasteurization of EFB contaminated by various microorganisms including aflatoxin producing fungi was determined as 10 kGy. The chemical and biological properties of EFB were changed little by irradiation up to 50 kGy. 2) In the fermentation process, Pleurotus sajor-caju was selected as the most effective fungi and the optimum condition for fermentation was clarified. The process of fermentation in suspension was also established for the liquid seed preparation. 3) The digestibility and nutritional value of fermented products were evaluated as ruminant animal feeds and the mushroom can be produced as by-product. 4) The pilot plant named Sterifeed was built at MINT and a large volume production has been trying for animal feeding test and economical evaluation. It is expected to develop the process for the commercial use in Malaysia and to expand the technique to Asian region through UNDP/RCA/IAEA project. (author)

  20. Study on upgrading of oil palm wastes to animal feeds by radiation and fermentation processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kume, Tamikazu; Matsuhashi, Shinpei; Ito, Hitoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; and others

    1998-03-01

    Upgrading of oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB), which is a main by-product of palm oil industry, to animal feeds by radiation pasteurization and fermentation was investigated for recycling the agro-resources and reducing the environmental pollution. The following results were obtained: (1) The necessary dose for pasteurization of EFB contaminated by various microorganisms including aflatoxin producing fungi was determined as 10 kGy. The chemical and biological properties of EFB were changed little by irradiation up to 50 kGy. (2) In the fermentation process, Pleurotus sajor-caju was selected as the most effective fungi and the optimum condition for fermentation was clarified. The process of fermentation in suspension was also established for the liquid seed preparation. (3) The digestibility and nutritional value of fermented products were evaluated as ruminant animal feeds and the mushroom can be produced as by-product. (4) The pilot plant named Sterifeed was built at MINT and a large volume production has been trying for animal feeding test and economical evaluation. It is expected to develop the process for the commercial use in Malaysia and to expand the technique to Asian region through UNDP/RCA/IAEA project. (author)

  1. Study on fused/cast AZS refractories for deployment in vitrification of radioactive waste effluents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Pranesh; Mishra, R. K.; Soudamini, N.; Sen, D.; Mazumder, S.; Kaushik, C. P.; Ajithkumar, T. G.; Banerjee, K.

    2015-12-01

    'Fused/cast Al2O3-ZrO2-SiO2 (FC-AZS)' is being considered as 'glass contact refractory' within ceramic melters, to be used for nuclear waste immobilization. Microstructural analyses reveal random distributions of baddeleyite (ZrO2) within aluminosilicate (Al2SiO5) matrix. 27Al and 29Si NMR data suggest that within aluminosilicate matrix Al occurs in both 4- and 6-fold co-ordinations whereas Si prefers a 4-fold environment. Polydispersity of pores has been studied with small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique. Corrosion rates of FC-AZS within 6 M HNO3, simulated wastes (500 h exposure), and borosilicate melt (975 °C, 800 h exposure) are found to be 0.38 × 103 μmy-1, 0.13 × 103 μmy-1 and 4.75 × 103 μmy-1 respectively. A comparison of chemical interaction data clearly suggests that FC-AZS exhibits better chemical durability than AZC refractory (Al2O3-ZrO2-Cr2O3, also used for similar purpose). Thermal cycling studies indicate that FC-AZS retains structural integrity (including compressive strength and density) even up to 20 cycles.

  2. Using sorbent waste materials to enhance treatment of micro-point source effluents by constructed wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Verity; Surridge, Ben; Quinton, John; Matthews, Mike

    2014-05-01

    Sorbent materials are widely used in environmental settings as a means of enhancing pollution remediation. A key area of environmental concern is that of water pollution, including the need to treat micro-point sources of wastewater pollution, such as from caravan sites or visitor centres. Constructed wetlands (CWs) represent one means for effective treatment of wastewater from small wastewater producers, in part because they are believed to be economically viable and environmentally sustainable. Constructed wetlands have the potential to remove a range of pollutants found in wastewater, including nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and carbon (C), whilst also reducing the total suspended solids (TSS) concentration in effluents. However, there remain particular challenges for P and N removal from wastewater in CWs, as well as the sometimes limited BOD removal within these treatment systems, particularly for micro-point sources of wastewater. It has been hypothesised that the amendment of CWs with sorbent materials can enhance their potential to treat wastewater, particularly through enhancing the removal of N and P. This paper focuses on data from batch and mesocosm studies that were conducted to identify and assess sorbent materials suitable for use within CWs. The aim in using sorbent material was to enhance the combined removal of phosphate (PO4-P) and ammonium (NH4-N). The key selection criteria for the sorbent materials were that they possess effective PO4-P, NH4-N or combined pollutant removal, come from low cost and sustainable sources, have potential for reuse, for example as a fertiliser or soil conditioner, and show limited potential for re-release of adsorbed nutrients. The sorbent materials selected for testing were alum sludge from water treatment works, ochre derived from minewater treatment, biochar derived from various feedstocks, plasterboard and zeolite. The performance of the individual sorbents was assessed through

  3. Solid state fermentation (SSF): diversity of applications to valorize waste and biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizardi-Jiménez, M A; Hernández-Martínez, R

    2017-05-01

    Solid state fermentation is currently used in a range of applications including classical applications, such as enzyme or antibiotic production, recently developed products, such as bioactive compounds and organic acids, new trends regarding bioethanol and biodiesel as sources of alternative energy, and biosurfactant molecules with environmental purposes of valorising unexploited biomass. This work summarizes the diversity of applications of solid state fermentation to valorize biomass regarding alternative energy and environmental purposes. The success of applying solid state fermentation to a specific process is affected by the nature of specific microorganisms and substrates. An exhaustive number of microorganisms able to grow in a solid matrix are presented, including fungus such as Aspergillus or Penicillum for antibiotics, Rhizopus for bioactive compounds, Mortierella for biodiesel to bacteria, Bacillus for biosurfactant production, or yeast for bioethanol.

  4. Gas Fermentation-A Flexible Platform for Commercial Scale Production of Low-Carbon-Fuels and Chemicals from Waste and Renewable Feedstocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, FungMin; Martin, Michael E; Tappel, Ryan C; Heijstra, Björn D; Mihalcea, Christophe; Köpke, Michael

    2016-01-01

    There is an immediate need to drastically reduce the emissions associated with global fossil fuel consumption in order to limit climate change. However, carbon-based materials, chemicals, and transportation fuels are predominantly made from fossil sources and currently there is no alternative source available to adequately displace them. Gas-fermenting microorganisms that fix carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon monoxide (CO) can break this dependence as they are capable of converting gaseous carbon to fuels and chemicals. As such, the technology can utilize a wide range of feedstocks including gasified organic matter of any sort (e.g., municipal solid waste, industrial waste, biomass, and agricultural waste residues) or industrial off-gases (e.g., from steel mills or processing plants). Gas fermentation has matured to the point that large-scale production of ethanol from gas has been demonstrated by two companies. This review gives an overview of the gas fermentation process, focusing specifically on anaerobic acetogens. Applications of synthetic biology and coupling gas fermentation to additional processes are discussed in detail. Both of these strategies, demonstrated at bench-scale, have abundant potential to rapidly expand the commercial product spectrum of gas fermentation and further improve efficiencies and yields.

  5. Study the Growth of Microalgae in Palm Oil Mill Effluent Waste Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selmani, Nabila; Mirghani, Mohamed E S; Alam, Md Zahangir

    2013-01-01

    This paper emphasizes mainly on the biomass productivity and lipids content of two microalgae strains known by their high lipids content namely: Botryoccoccus sudeticus and Chlorella vulgaris. These strains were first screened for the highest biomass and lipids content, then Plackett–Burman design was used to evaluate the significant media for the growth when using POME waste water as culture medium. Results show that Botryoccocus sudeticus contains high content of biomass and lipids yield. Moreover, all the three factors have positive effect on the biomass productivity, while using one nutrient factor gives much lower biomass. These results can be used further as an insight for optimizing the biomass and the oil productivity of the microalgae.

  6. Proposal of law about the recovery and valorization of the gas coming from the anaerobic fermentation of organic wastes, renewable energy with a high potentiality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-12-01

    The goal of this proposal of law is the systematic and mandatory capture and valorization of the methane coming from the anaerobic fermentation of municipal and agricultural wastes, and more generally coming from any activity generating gases with at least 25% of methane. (J.S.)

  7. New process controls in the co-fermentation of organic waste and municipal sewage sludge; Neue Verfahrensfuehrungen bei der Co-Vergaerung von Bioabfaellen und kommunalen Klaerschlaemmen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaepers, D.; Schierholt, M.; Buer, T.; Risse, H. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (DE). Inst. fuer Siedlungswasserwirtschaft (ISA)

    1999-07-01

    For the co-fermentation of organic waste and sewage sludge in digester towers at municipal sewage treatment plant, mainly single-stage processes have so far been studied or are in use in part. Within the framework of a project sponsored by the foundation Oswald-Schulze-Stiftung, the use of a two-stage mode of operation (thermophilic/mesophilic) for co-fermenting organic waste and sewage sludge was investigated. By adding organic waste to the digester content, biogas production per reactor volume was more than doubled in comparison with exclusive sewage sludge fermentation. Because of the thermophilic stage for the conditioning of organic waste, specific biogas yield for an organic load of 1.5 kg organic dry residue TR/m{sup 3*}d was slightly enhanced in comparison with single-stage co-fermentation. (orig.) [German] Zur Co-Vergaerung von Bioabfaellen und Klaerschlamm in Faultuermen kommunaler Klaeranlagen werden bislang hauptsaechlich einstufige Verfahren untersucht und teilweise eingesetzt. Im Rahmen eines von der Oswald-Schulze-Stiftung gefoerderten Projektes wurde der Einsatz einer 2-stufigen Betriebsweise (thermophil/mesophil) bei der Co-Vergaerung von Bioabfaellen und Klaerschlamm untersucht. Die Biogasproduktion pro Reaktorvolumen konnte durch die Zugabe von Bioabfall in die Faulbehaelter gegenueber der reinen Klaerschlammfaulung mehr als verdoppelt werden. Durch die thermophile Stufe zur Vorbehandlung der Bioabfaelle konnte die spezifische Biogasausbeute bei einer organischen Raumbelastung von 1,5 kg o TR/m{sup 3*}d gegenueber der 1-stufigen Co-Vergaerung leicht erhoeht werden. (orig.)

  8. Recovery of phosphorus and volatile fatty acids from wastewater and food waste with an iron-flocculation sequencing batch reactor and acidogenic co-fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruo-Hong; Li, Xiao-Yan

    2017-12-01

    A sequencing batch reactor-based system was developed for enhanced phosphorus (P) removal and recovery from municipal wastewater. The system consists of an iron-dosing SBR for P precipitation and a side-stream anaerobic reactor for sludge co-fermentation with food waste. During co-fermentation, sludge and food waste undergo acidogenesis, releasing phosphates under acidic conditions and producing volatile fatty acids (VFAs) into the supernatant. A few types of typical food waste were investigated for their effectiveness in acidogenesis and related enzymatic activities. The results show that approximately 96.4% of total P in wastewater was retained in activated sludge. Food waste with a high starch content favoured acidogenic fermentation. Around 55.7% of P from wastewater was recovered as vivianite, and around 66% of food waste loading was converted into VFAs. The new integration formed an effective system for wastewater treatment, food waste processing and simultaneous recovery of P and VFAs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A review of dark fermentative hydrogen production from biodegradable municipal waste fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gioannis, G; Muntoni, A; Polettini, A; Pomi, R

    2013-06-01

    Hydrogen is believed to play a potentially key role in the implementation of sustainable energy production, particularly when it is produced from renewable sources and low energy-demanding processes. In the present paper an attempt was made at critically reviewing more than 80 recent publications, in order to harmonize and compare the available results from different studies on hydrogen production from FW and OFMSW through dark fermentation, and derive reliable information about process yield and stability in view of building related predictive models. The review was focused on the effect of factors, recognized as potentially affecting process evolution (including type of substrate and co-substrate and relative ratio, type of inoculum, food/microorganisms [F/M] ratio, applied pre-treatment, reactor configuration, temperature and pH), on the fermentation yield and kinetics. Statistical analysis of literature data from batch experiments was also conducted, showing that the variables affecting the H2 production yield were ranked in the order: type of co-substrate, type of pre-treatment, operating pH, control of initial pH and fermentation temperature. However, due to the dispersion of data observed in some instances, the ambiguity about the presence of additional hidden variables cannot be resolved. The results from the analysis thus suggest that, for reliable predictive models of fermentative hydrogen production to be derived, a high level of consistency between data is strictly required, claiming for more systematic and comprehensive studies on the subject. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Preliminary study of acrylamide monomer decomposition during methane fermentation of dairy waste sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroczek, Ewelina; Konieczny, Piotr; Lewicki, Andrzej; Waśkiewicz, Agnieszka; Dach, Jacek

    2016-07-01

    Polyacrylamide (PAM) used in sludge dewatering exists widely in high-solid anaerobic digestion. Acrylamide is registered in the list of chemicals demonstrating toxic, carcinogenic and mutagenic properties. Therefore, it is reasonable to ask about the mobility of such residual substances in the environment. The study was carried out to assess the impact of the mesophilic (39±1°C) and thermophilic (54±1°C) fermentation process on the level of acrylamide monomer (AMD) content in the dairy sludge. The material was analysed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for quantification of AMD. The results indicate that the process of methane fermentation continues regardless of the temperature effects on the degradation of AMD in dairy sludge. The degree of reduction of acrylamide monomer for thermophilic fermentation is 100%, while for mesophilic fermentation it is 91%. In practice, this means that biogas technology eliminates the risk of AMD migration to plant tissue. Moreover, it should be stressed that 90% of cumulative biogas and methane production was reached one week earlier under thermophilic conditions - the dynamics of the methanisation process were over 20% faster. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Influence of distillery effluent on germination and growth of mung bean (Vigna radiata) seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannan, A. [Biomembrane Toxicology Division, Industrial Toxicology Research Centre, Post Box No. 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226001 (India); Upreti, Raj K. [Biomembrane Toxicology Division, Industrial Toxicology Research Centre, Post Box No. 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226001 (India)], E-mail: upretirk@rediffmail.com

    2008-05-01

    Distillery effluent or spent wash discharged as waste water contains various toxic chemicals that can contaminate water and soil and may affect the common crops if used for agricultural irrigation. Toxic nature of distillery effluent is due to the presence of high amounts of organic and inorganic chemical loads and its high-acidic pH. Experimental effects of untreated (Raw) distillery effluent, discharged from a distillery unit (based on fermentation of alcohol from sugarcane molasses), and the post-treatment effluent from the outlet of conventional anaerobic treatment plant (Treated effluent) of the distillery unit were studied in mung bean (Vigna radiata, L.R. Wilczek). Mung bean is a commonly used legume crop in India and its neighboring countries. Mung bean seeds were presoaked for 6 h and 30 h, respectively, in different concentrations (5-20%, v/v) of each effluent and germination, growth characters, and seedling membrane enzymes and constituents were investigated. Results revealed that the leaching of carbohydrates and proteins (solute efflux) were much higher in case of untreated effluent and were also dependent to the presoaking time. Other germination characters including percentage of germination, speed of germination index, vigor index and length of root and embryonic axis revealed significant concentration-dependent decline in untreated effluent. Evaluation of seedlings membrane transport enzymes and structural constituents (hexose, sialic acid and phospholipids) following 6 h presoaking of seeds revealed concentration-dependent decline, which were much less in treated effluent as compared to the untreated effluent. Treated effluent up to 10% (v/v) concentration reflected low-observed adverse effect levels.

  12. Wheat straw, household waste and hay as a source of lignocellulosic biomass for bioethanol and biogas production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomczak, Anna; Bruch, Magdalena; Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2010-01-01

    To meet the increasing need for bioenergy three lignocellulosic materials: raw hay, pretreated wheat straw and pretreated household waste were considered for the production of bioethanol and biogas. Several mixtures of household waste supplemented with different fractions of wheat straw and hay...... in fermentation process with Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated. Wheat straw and household wastes were pretreated using IBUS technology, patented by Dong Energy, which includes milling, stem explosion treatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. Methane production was investigated using stillages, the effluents...... from bioethanol fermentation experiment. Previous trial of biogas production from above mentioned household wastes was enclosed....

  13. Struvite recovery from swine waste biogas digester effluent through a stainless steel device under constant pH conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, P W Anton; Wu, Wei-Xiang; Chen, Ying-Xu; Han, Zhi-Ying

    2009-06-01

    To investigate the struvite precipitation under constant and non-constant pH conditions and to test a stainless steel device under different operating regimes to maximize the recovery of struvite. The molar ratio of NH4+: Mg2+: PO4(3-) was adjusted to 1: 1.2: 1.2 and pH was elevated to 9.0. The absorbance measurement was used to trace the process of struvite crystallization. Wastewater and precipitate analysis was done by standard analytical methods. The pH constant experiment reported a significantly higher struvite precipitation (24.6 +/- 0.86 g) than the non-constant pH experiment (19.8 +/- 1.86 g). The SAR ranged from 5.6 to 8.2 g m(-2) h(-1) to 3.6-4.8 g m(-2) h(-1) in pH constant and non-constant experiments, respectively. The highest struvite deposit on the device was found in regime 3 followed by in regimes 2 and 4. The highest PO4(3-) (97.2%) and NH4+ (71%) removal was reported in the R1 regime. None of the influent Cu2+ or Zn2+ was precipitated on the device. A higher struvite yield is evident in pH constant experiments. Moreover, the stainless steel device facilitates the isolation of heavy metal free pure (around 96%) struvite from swine waste biogas digester effluent contaminated with cu2+ and Zn2+ and the highest yield is attainable with the device operating at 50 rpm with agitation by a magnetic stirrer.

  14. Organic acid production from potato starch waste fermentation by rumen microbial communities from Dutch and Thai dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palakawong Na Ayudthaya, Susakul; van de Weijer, Antonius H P; van Gelder, Antonie H; Stams, Alfons J M; de Vos, Willem M; Plugge, Caroline M

    2018-01-01

    Exploring different microbial sources for biotechnological production of organic acids is important. Dutch and Thai cow rumen samples were used as inocula to produce organic acid from starch waste in anaerobic reactors. Organic acid production profiles were determined and microbial communities were compared using 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid gene amplicon pyrosequencing. In both reactors, lactate was the main initial product and was associated with growth of Streptococcus spp. (86% average relative abundance). Subsequently, lactate served as a substrate for secondary fermentations. In the reactor inoculated with rumen fluid from the Dutch cow, the relative abundance of Bacillus and Streptococcus increased from the start, and lactate, acetate, formate and ethanol were produced. From day 1.33 to 2, lactate and acetate were degraded, resulting in butyrate production. Butyrate production coincided with a decrease in relative abundance of Streptococcus spp. and increased relative abundances of bacteria of other groups, including Parabacteroides , Sporanaerobacter , Helicobacteraceae, Peptostreptococcaceae and Porphyromonadaceae. In the reactor with the Thai cow inoculum, Streptococcus spp. also increased from the start. When lactate was consumed, acetate, propionate and butyrate were produced (day 3-4). After day 3, bacteria belonging to five dominant groups, Bacteroides, Pseudoramibacter _ Eubacterium , Dysgonomonas , Enterobacteriaceae and Porphyromonadaceae, were detected and these showed significant positive correlations with acetate, propionate and butyrate levels. The complexity of rumen microorganisms with high adaptation capacity makes rumen fluid a suitable source to convert organic waste into valuable products without the addition of hydrolytic enzymes. Starch waste is a source for organic acid production, especially lactate.

  15. Development of a Photosynthetic Microbial Electrochemical Cell (PMEC Reactor Coupled with Dark Fermentation of Organic Wastes: Medium Term Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Bensaid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the concept, the materials and the exploitation potential of a photosynthetic microbial electrochemical cell for the production of hydrogen driven by solar power are investigated. In a photosynthetic microbial electrochemical cell, which is based on photosynthetic microorganisms confined to an anode and heterotrophic bacteria confined to a cathode, water is split by bacteria hosted in the anode bioactive film. The generated electrons are conveyed through external “bio-appendages” developed by the bacteria to transparent nano-pillars made of indium tin oxide (ITO, Fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO or other conducting materials, and then transferred to the cathode. On the other hand, the generated protons diffuse to the cathode via a polymer electrolyte membrane, where they are reduced by the electrons by heterotrophic bacteria growing attached to a similar pillared structure as that envisaged for the anode and supplemented with a specific low cost substrate (e.g., organic waste, anaerobic digestion outlet. The generated oxygen is released to the atmosphere or stored, while the produced pure hydrogen leaves the electrode through the porous layers. In addition, the integration of the photosynthetic microbial electrochemical cell system with dark fermentation as acidogenic step of anaerobic digester, which is able to produce additional H2, and the use of microbial fuel cell, feed with the residues of dark fermentation (mainly volatile fatty acids, to produce the necessary extra-bias for the photosynthetic microbial electrochemical cell is here analyzed to reveal the potential benefits to this novel integrated technology.

  16. Ethanol prefermentation of food waste in sequencing batch methane fermentation for improved buffering capacity and microbial community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Miao; Wu, Chuanfu; Wang, Qunhui; Sun, Xiaohong; Ren, Yuanyuan; Li, Yu-You

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of ethanol prefermentation (EP) on methane fermentation. Yeast was added to the substrate for EP in the sequencing batch methane fermentation of food waste. An Illumina MiSeq high-throughput sequencing system was used to analyze changes in the microbial community. Methane production in the EP group (254mL/g VS) was higher than in the control group (35mL/g VS) because EP not only increased the buffering capacity of the system, but also increased hydrolytic acidification. More carbon source was converted to ethanol in the EP group than in the control group, and neutral ethanol could be converted continuously to acetic acid, which promoted the growth of Methanobacterium and Methanosarcina. As a result, the relative abundance of methane-producing bacteria was significantly higher than that of the control group. Kinetic modeling indicated that the EP group had a higher hydrolysis efficiency and shorter lag phase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Proteomic analysis of enzyme production by Bacillus licheniformis using different feather wastes as the sole fermentation media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrado, J; Rodriguez-Morgado, B; Tejada, M; Hernandez, T; Garcia, C

    2014-04-10

    This study evaluates the use of different types of feathers as fermentation media for enzyme production. Bacillus licheniformis was grown on the feathers, which lead to total biodegradation due to bacterial enzymatic hydrolytic excretion. B. licheniformis excretes protease and lipase activity, with feather concentration being the main parameter controlling their generation. Using a proteomic approach, the proteins excreted during fermentation were identified, and the influence of the chemical composition of the feathers on protein secretion was tested. The identified proteins are hydrolytic enzymes such as keratinase, gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, chitosanases, and glicosidases. The diversity of proteins is related to the chemical complexity of the feathers. Understanding the composition of a hydrolytic system, when B. licheniformis is cultured on different feathers, may assist in utilizing such a system for producing different hydrolytic enzymes. The data indicate that proteomics can be a valuable tool for describing the physiological state of B. licheniformis cell populations growing on different wastes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. EFFECT OF NITROGEN SOURCE AND INITIAL SUGAR CONCENTRATION ON LACTIC ACID FERMENTATION OF PINEAPPLE WASTE USING L.DELBRUECKII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Moch Busairi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The liquid pineapple waste contains mainly sucrose, glucose, fructose and other nutrients. It therefore can potentially be used as carbon source for lactic acid fermentation. The lactic acid is utilised in food technology as pH regulator, microbial preservative, buffering agent and in the chemical industry. Recently, lactic acid has been considered to be an important raw material for production of biodegradable lactate polymer. The experiments were carried out in batch fermentation at anaerobic condition with stirring speed: 50 rpm, temperature: 40 oC, pH: 6.0, and inoculum size: 5%. Effect of nitrogen source and initial sugar concentration were studied. The effect of nitrogen source on lactic acid production shows that the yeast extract is highest yield , followed by urea , corn steep liquor, malt sprout and ammonium sulphates with the yield of 78.52; 26.68; 19.14; 14.10 and 5.6 %, respectively. The highest yield of initial sugar concentration on lactic acid production obtained was 78.52 % (54.97 g/l at 70 g/l, if the concentration of sugar was increased to 110 g/l , the lactic acid production or yield decrease to51.53 g/l or 54.24%.

  19. Effect of total solids content on biohydrogen production and lactic acid accumulation during dark fermentation of organic waste biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Anish; Trably, Eric; Frunzo, Luigi; Pirozzi, Francesco; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni; Cazier, Elisabeth A; Escudié, Renaud

    2018-01-01

    Production of biohydrogen and related metabolic by-products was investigated in Solid State Dark Fermentation (SSDF) of food waste (FW) and wheat straw (WS). The effect of the total solids (TS) content and H 2 partial pressure (pp H2 ), two of the main operating factors of SSDF, were investigated. Batch tests with FW at 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30% TS showed considerable effects of the TS on metabolites distribution. H 2 production was strongly inhibited for TS contents higher than 15% with a concomitant accumulation of lactic acid and a decrease in substrate conversion. Varying the pp H2 had no significant effect on the conversion products and overall degradation of FW and WS, suggesting that pp H2 was not the main limiting factor in SSDF. This study showed that the conversion of complex substrates by SSDF depends on the substrate type and is limited by the TS content. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Order of the 10 january 2003 authorizing the national agency for the radioactive wastes management to follow the gaseous and liquid effluents release for the exploitation of the radioactive wastes storage center of the Manche; Arrete du 10 janvier 2003 autorisant l'Agence nationale pour la gestion des dechets radioactifs a poursuivre les rejets d'effluents gazeux et liquides pour l'exploitation du centre de stockage de dechets radioactifs de la Manche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-01-01

    This document, took out from the Official Journal, is the law text relative to the order of the 10 january 2003 authorizing the national agency for the radioactive wastes management to follow the gaseous and liquid effluents release for the exploitation of the radioactive wastes storage center of the Manche. (A.L.B.)

  1. Effective conversion of maize straw wastes into bio-hydrogen by two-stage process integrating H2 fermentation and MECs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Hong; Bai, Yan-Xia; Pan, Chun-Mei; Li, Wei-Wei; Zheng, Hui-Qin; Zhang, Jing-Nan; Fan, Yao-Ting; Hou, Hong-Wei

    2015-12-01

    The enhanced H2 production from maize straw had been achieved through the two-stage process of integrating H2 fermentation and microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) in the present work. Several key parameters affecting hydrolysis of maize straw through subcritical H2O were optimized by orthogonal design for saccharification of maize straw followed by H2 production through H2 fermentation. The maximum reducing sugar (RS) content of maize straw reached 469.7 mg/g-TS under the optimal hydrolysis condition with subcritical H2O combining with dilute HCl of 0.3% at 230 °C. The maximum H2 yield, H2 production rate, and H2 content was 115.1 mL/g-TVS, 2.6 mL/g-TVS/h, and 48.9% by H2 fermentation, respectively. In addition, the effluent from H2 fermentation was used as feedstock of MECs for additional H2 production. The maximum H2 yield of 1060 mL/g-COD appeared at an applied voltage of 0.8 V, and total COD removal reached about 35%. The overall H2 yield from maize straw reached 318.5 mL/g-TVS through two-stage processes. The structural characterization of maize straw was also carefully investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra.

  2. Influence of fermentation liquid from waste activated sludge on anoxic/oxic- membrane bioreactor performance: Nitrogen removal, membrane fouling and microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaomeng; Zhou, Zhen; Mei, Xiaojie; Ma, Yan; Xie, Zhenfang

    2018-02-01

    In order to investigate effects of waste activated sludge (WAS) fermentation liquid on anoxic/oxic- membrane bioreactor (A/O-MBR), two A/O-MBRs with and without WAS fermentation liquid addition were operated in parallel. Results show that addition of WAS fermentation liquid clearly improved denitrification efficiency without deterioration of nitrification, while severe membrane fouling occurred. WAS fermentation liquid resulted in an elevated production of proteins and humic acids in bound extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) and release of organic matter with high MW fractions in soluble microbial product (SMP) and loosely bound EPS (LB-EPS). Measurement of deposition rate and fluid structure confirmed increased fouling potential of SMP and LB-EPS. γ-Proteobacteria and Ferruginibacter, which can secrete and export EPS, were also found to be abundant in the MBR with WAS fermentation liquid. It is implied that when WAS fermentation liquid was applied, some operational steps to control membrane fouling should be employed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Automated system for the safe management of the radioactive wastes and liquid effluents in a Radiopharmaceutical an labelled compounds production center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amador B, Z.H.; Guerra V, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Center of Isotopes of the Republic of Cuba is a radioactive installation of first category that executes the administration of their radioactive waste under authorization of the National Regulatory Authority. The principles of the design and operation of the 'SADR' system for the safe administration of the radioactive waste and liquid effluents are presented. The Visual Basic 6 platform for the programming of the SADR is used and through of their schematic representation, the control flows and of data of the 7 modules that conform it are shown. For each module the functions are described and it presents an image of the corresponding interface. With the SADR its can be carried out the one registration and the upgrade of the inventory of radioactive waste, the planning of those disqualification operations, the annual consolidation of the volumes of waste generated and disqualified, the evaluation of specific and general indicators and the one tendencies analysis. The handling of the system through the intranet allows the enter of data from the operations place with the radioactive wastes. The results of the operation of the SADR show the utility of this work to elevate the efficiency of the administration of the radioactive wastes. (Author)

  4. Wastes treatment: Naskeo undertakes on the way of methanization; Traitement des effluents: Naskeo mise sur la methanisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2005-09-15

    Naskeo proposes to cleanse the organic effluents of the chemical or pharmaceutical firms by methanization. A process which produces a renewable biogas, directly valorizable at the level of the process of the manufacturer. (O.M.)

  5. Remaining Sites Verification Package for 132-D-3, 1608-D Effluent Pumping Station. Attchment to Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-033

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    Decommissioning and demolition of the 132-D-3 site, 1608-D Effluent Pumping Station was performed in 1986. Decommissioning included removal of equipment, water, and sludge for disposal as radioactive waste. The at- and below-grade structure was demolished to at least 1 m below grade and the resulting rubble buried in situ. The area was backfilled to grade with at least 1 m of clean fill and contoured to the surrounding terrain. Residual concentrations support future land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario and pose no threat to groundwater or the Columbia River based on RESRAD modeling

  6. Hybrid monitoring of environmental radioactivity as a perspective approach to rapid control and prediction of environmental contamination due to NPP wastes and effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremeev, I.S.; Eremenko, V.A.; Zhernov, V.S.; Makarov, Yu.A.; Matveev, V.V.; Ryzhov, N.V.; Ryazanov, V.V.; Skatkin, V.M.

    1985-01-01

    Conseptucal model of the system of hybride monitoring of environmental radioactivity due to NPP wastes and effluents is proposed. The model a combination of measuring and simulating monitoring, provides correlation of methods and aims of simulation of environmental contamination spread methods and means of monitoring of its factual distribution in space, methods of separation of technogeneous signals from natural radiation background and provision of the given degree of reliability of results of information processing, in particular periodic coorection, model adaptation according to the factual measurement data

  7. Source terms for airborne effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomeke, J.O.; Perona, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    The origin and nature of fuel cycle wastes are discussed with regard to high-level wastes, cladding, noble gases, iodine, tritium, 14 C, low-level and intermediate-level transuranic wastes, non-transuranic wastes, and ore tailings. The current practice for gaseous effluent treatment is described for light water reactors and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Other topics discussed are projections of nuclear power generation; projected accumulation of gaseous wastes; the impact of nuclear fuel cycle centers; and global buildup of airborne effluents

  8. Effects of crude glycerin from waste vegetable oil supplementation on feed intake, ruminal fermentation characteristics, and nitrogen utilization of goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanjula, Pin; Pongprayoon, Sahutaya; Kongpan, Sirichai; Cherdthong, Anusorn

    2016-06-01

    This experiment was evaluation of the effects of increasing concentrations of crude glycerin from waste vegetable oil (CGWVO) in diets on feed intake, digestibility, ruminal fermentation characteristics, and nitrogen balance of goats. Four crossbred male (Thai Native × Anglo Nubian) goats, with an average initial body weight (BW) of 31.5 ± 1.90 kg, were randomly assigned according to a 4 × 4 Latin square design. The dietary treatments contained 0, 2, 4, and 6 % of dietary dry matter (DM) of CGWVO. Based on this experiment, there were significantly different (P > 0.05) among treatment groups regarding DM intake and digestion coefficients of nutrients (DM, OM, CP, EE, NDF, and ADF), which goats receiving 6 % of CGWVO had lower daily DMI and nutrient intake than those fed on 0, 2, and 4 % of CGWVO. Ruminal pH, NH3-N, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) concentration were unchanged by dietary treatments, except that for 6 % of CGWVO supplementation, NH3-N, and BUN were lower (P goats. This study was a good approach in exploiting the use of biodiesel production from waste vegetable oil for goat production.

  9. Continuous fermentation of food waste leachate for the production of volatile fatty acids and potential as a denitrification carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hakchan; Kim, Jaai; Shin, Seung Gu; Hwang, Seokhwan; Lee, Changsoo

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the simultaneous effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and pH on the continuous production of VFAs from food waste leachate using response surface analysis. The response surface approximations (R(2)=0.895, p<0.05) revealed that pH has a dominant effect on the specific VFA production (PTVFA) within the explored space (1-4-day HRT, pH 4.5-6.5). The estimated maximum PTVFA was 0.26g total VFAs/g CODf at 2.14-day HRT and pH 6.44, and the approximation was experimentally validated by running triplicate reactors under the estimated optimum conditions. The mixture of the filtrates recovered from these reactors was tested as a denitrification carbon source and demonstrated superior performance in terms of reaction rate and lag length relative to other chemicals, including acetate and methanol. The overall results provide helpful information for better design and control of continuous fermentation for producing waste-derived VFAs, an alternative carbon source for denitrification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. High-solid mesophilic methane fermentation of food waste with an emphasis on Iron, Cobalt, and Nickel requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Hong; Lang, Dong-Li; Li, Yu-You

    2012-01-01

    The effect of trace metals on the mesophilic methane fermentation of high-solid food waste was investigated using both batch and continuous experiments. The continuous experiment was conducted by using a CSTR-type reactor with three run. During the first run, the HRT of the reactor was stepwise decreased from 100 days to 30 days. From operation day 50, the reactor efficiency deteriorated due to the lack of trace metals. The batch experiment showed that iron, cobalt, and nickel combinations had a significant effect on food waste. According to the results of the batch experiment, a combination of iron, cobalt, and nickel was added into the CSTR reactor by two different methods at run II, and III. Based on experimental results and theoretical calculations, the most suitable values of Fe/COD, Co/COD, and Ni/COD in the substrate were identified as 200, 6.0, and 5.7 mg/kg COD, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cellulase Production by Trichoderma koningii AS3.4262 in Solid-State Fermentation Using Lignocellulosic Waste from the Vinegar Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Liu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellulase production was carried out in solid-state fermentation using the waste from the vinegar industry as the substrate for Trichoderma koningii AS3.4262. This waste is porous and easy to degrade by cellulolytic fungi. The effects of water content, initial pH value in solid substrate and culture temperature on cellulase synthesis were observed for optimal production in flask fermentors. An orthogonal layout was employed in the statistical process and better cellulase activity was obtained in the fermentation batch. The optimal filter paper cellulase (FPAse activity of 6.90 IU/g of substrate dry matter (SDM, and carboxylmethyl cellulase (CMCase activity of 23.76 IU/g SDM were obtained after 84 h of incubation with media containing vinegar waste, with optimal moisture content of 50 %, pH=5.0, incubation temperature of 30 °C, and additional nutrients of inorganic salts in a certain amount. To produce cellulase on a larger scale, a deep trough fermentor with forced aeration was used, so that FPAse activity of 5.87 IU/g SDM and CMCase activity of 12.98 IU/g SDM were reached after 84 hours of solid-state fermentation. Results indicate the excellent scope of utilizing vinegar waste as solid substrate for commercial production of cellulase employing fungi.

  12. Bio-hydrogen production by dark fermentation from organic wastes and residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Dawei

    Der er stigende opmærksomhed omkring biohydrogen. Ved hydrogen fermentering kan kun en lille del af det organiske materiale eller COD i affald omdannes til hydrogen. Der findes endnu ingen full-skala bio-hydrogen anlæg, eftersom effektive rentable teknologier ikke er udviklet endnu. En to......-trins proces der kombinerer bio-hydrogen og bio-metan produktionen er en attraktiv mulighed til at øge det totale energi-udbytte af fermentering af organisk materiale. I en to-trins proces, med bio-hydrogen som første trin og bio-methan som andet trin, kunne der opnås 43mL-H2/gVSadded ved 37°C fra...... for en hurtig proces opstart og med højt brint effektivitet. Uden berigelseskulturer fejlede processen, på trods af gentagen genpodning. Optimale procesforhold for brint producerende processer blev bestemt. pH optimum af brintproducerende kulturer var 7.0 og acetat var hæmmende for brintproduktionen...

  13. Influence of the Fermentation of Pineapple Wastes with the Use of Methanobacterium Strains Separated in Vietnam on the Production of Biogas from them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nga, Nguyen Thuy; Trang, Nguyen The

    2015-03-01

    When pineapples are processed, the wastes obtained comprise 30-50% of the raw-material weight. These wastes contain sugar, albumins, lipids, and vitamins that decompose under the action of microorganisms existing in nature and, in so doing, pollute the environment. The use of wastes in plants operating on biogas makes it possible to obtain great economic benefits. It was established that the best conditions for the obtaining biogas from pineapple wastes are realized in the case where Methanobacterium strains are used for increasing the rate of fermentation of these wastes and the wastes have a temperature of 35-45oC, a pH index of 7-7.5 at the initial stage of their fermentation, and a C/N ratio of 30/1. Under these conditions, the MT3, MT5, and MT7 strains of Methanobacterium yield the maximum amounts of biogases containing, respectively, 57.4% of CH 4 and 36.1% of CO 2 , 57.2% of CH 4 and 36.3% of CO 2 , and 57.4% of CH 4 and 36.2% of CO 2 .

  14. Development of standardized bioassay protocols for the toxicity assessment of waste, manufactured products, and effluents in Latin America: Venezuela, a Case Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriquez-Grau, J.

    1993-01-01

    The present status of the toxicity assessment of industrial products in Latin America is well below North America/EC standards. As an example, most of Latin America regulatory laws regarding effluent discharge are still based upon concentration limits of certain major pollutants, and BOD/COD measurements; no reference is made to the necessity of aquatic bioassay toxicity data. Aware of this imperative need, the Venezuelan Petroleum Industry (PDVSA), through its R ampersand D Corporative branch (INTEVEP) gave priority to the development of standardized acute/sublethal toxicity test protocols as sound means of evaluating their products and wastes. Throughout this presentation, the Venezuelan case will be studied, showing strategies undertaken to accelerate protocol development. Results will show the assessment of 14 different protocols encompassing a variety of species of aquatic/terrestrial organisms, and a series of toxicity test endpoints including mortality, reproductive, biological and immunological measurements, most of which are currently in use or being developed. These protocols have already yielded useful results in numerous cases where toxicity assessment was required, including evaluations of effluent, oil dispersants, drilling fluids, toxic wastes, fossil fuels and newly developed products. The Venezuelan case demonstrates that the integration of Industry, Academia and Government, which is an essential part of SETAC's philosophy, is absolutely necessary for the successful advancement of environmental scientific/regulatory issues

  15. Insight into the applications of palm oil mill effluent: A renewable utilization of the industrial agricultural waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foo, K.Y.; Hameed, B.H.

    2010-01-01

    Water scarcity and pollution rank equal to climate change as the most intricate environmental turmoil for the 21st century. Today, the percolation of palm oil mill effluents into the waterways and ecosystems, remain a fastidious concern towards the public health and food chain interference. With the innovation of palm oil residue into a high valuable end commodity, there has been a steadily growing interest in this research field. Confirming the assertion, this paper presents a state of art review of palm oil mill effluent industry, its fundamental characteristics and environmental implications. Moreover, the key advance of its implementations, major challenges together with the future expectation are summarized and discussed. Conclusively, the expanding of palm oil mill effluent in numerous field of application represents a plausible and powerful circumstance, for accruing the worldwide environmental benefit and shaping the national economy. (author)

  16. Facility effluent monitoring plan for WESF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    1999-01-01

    The FEMP for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) provides sufficient information on the WESF effluent characteristics and the efferent monitoring systems so that a compliance assessment against applicable requirements may be performed. Radioactive and hazardous material source terms are related to specific effluent streams that are in turn, related to discharge points and, finally are compared to the effluent monitoring system capability

  17. Investigation of hydrolysis products in the acetone-butanol fermentation of vegetable agricultural waste materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakhmanovich, B M

    1960-01-01

    Determinations of the fundamental chemical composition of corn stalk, sunflower husk, and hemp scutch by chromatography were reported, e.g. pentoses (1.98, 1.98, 2.01%), hexoses (1.59, 1.72, 2.01% respectively.) and various amino acids (arginine, asparagine, histidine, glutamine, glycine, lysine, proline, serine, tyrosine, threonine, cysteine, cystine, alanine, and aspartic and glutamic acids). The sterilized products from the hydrolysis (pentoses, hexoses) in a combined mixture with a meal mash were normally fermented at 37/sup 0/ in the presence of acetone-butanol bacteria for 40 to 48 hours, yielding 10.46 to 12.50% of acetone, 15.09 to 18.0% of butanol, 3.79 to 6.08% of ethanol (a total yielding being 30 to 42% of solvents).

  18. Industrial scale garage-type dry fermentation of municipal solid waste to biogas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, M Y; Li, R H; Li, J; Wedwitschka, H; Nelles, M; Stinner, W; Zhou, H J

    2016-10-01

    The objectives of this study was to through monitoring the 1st industrial scale garage-type dry fermentation (GTDF) MSW biogas plant in Bin County, Harbin City, Heilongjiang Province, China, to investigate its anaerobic digestion (AD) performance and the stability of process. After a monitoring period of 180days, the results showed that the volumetric biogas production of the digesters and percolate tank was 0.72 and 2.22m(3) (m(3)d)(-1), respectively, and the specific biogas yield of the feedstock was about 270m(3)CH4tVS(-1), which indicated that the GTDF is appropriate for the Chinese MSW. This paper also raised some problems aimed at improving the process stability and AD efficiency. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Silver precipitation from electrolytic effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, I.; Patino, F.; Cruells, M.; Roca, A.; Vinals, J.

    2004-01-01

    The recovery of silver contained in electrolytic effluents is attractive due to its high economic value. These effluents are considered toxic wastes and it is not possible to dump them directly without any detoxification process. One of the most important way for silver recovery is the precipitation with sodium ditionite, sodium borohidride or hydrazine monohidrate. In this work, the most significant aspects related to the use of these reagents is presented. Results of silver precipitation with sodium ditionite from effluents containing thiosulfate without previous elimination of other species are also presented. silver concentration in the final effluents w <1 ppm. (Author) 15 refs

  20. Development of waste and effluents management on board in the seismic ship operating in Brazilian seas; Desenvolvimento do programa de gestao de residuos solidos e efluentes a bordo de um navio de sismica operando em aguas brasileiras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Mauricio Duppre de [Okeanos Consultoria e Meio Ambiente Ltda. (Brazil); Derntl, Jose Renato; Pereira, Edisio; Ribeiro, Camila Castroviejo da Silva [GEOCOOP Cooperativa de Trabalho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Uller, George Andre; Oliveira, Joao Luiz Martinez de [CGG do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Miranda, Cristina Maschio de [Nautilus Cooperativa de Trabalho (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    This work presents the results regarding CGG's Waste and Effluents Management Program between February 2003 and April 2004 on M/V CGG HARMATTAN. It main objective is to trace all waste and effluents since its generation until its final disposal. To implement this program CGG has two environmental technicians on board, whose are responsible for supervising the program, as well as educating, training, and optimizing waste and effluents segregation. Furthermore, the company also employs a consultant team to logistic management on shore; whose are responsible for executing, transferring, transporting and yours final disposing. Results show a monthly generation of 7.428 Kg and 97.3 m3 in average for waste and effluents respectively. Data indicates waste generation peaks during port calls. Waste tracing has improved along the year, allowing better control and resulting in value decreasing for port calls. Effluents are constantly generated in the same amount with monthly average of 50.2 m3 for bilge water, 41 m3 for sewage and 6.1 m3 for sludge. The percentage of non-recyclable waste sent to cleaner technology (co-processing and re-use) has been increasing along the year, replacing industrial landfill and incinerator use. Latest numbers already show the first results concerning it (2.2% re-used and 24,5% co-processed of total produced solid garbage). Re -used numbers are resulted from pioneer partnership between CGG and fishermen communities, for their original activity. The reached results and environmental indicators show that program efficiency has been evolving, considering logistic, economic, social and environmental aspects, constantly optimized with measures to increase control. (author)

  1. Development of waste and effluents management on board in the seismic ship operating in Brazilian seas; Desenvolvimento do programa de gestao de residuos solidos e efluentes a bordo de um navio de sismica operando em aguas brasileiras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Mauricio Duppre de [Okeanos Consultoria e Meio Ambiente Ltda. (Brazil); Derntl, Jose Renato; Pereira, Edisio; Ribeiro, Camila Castroviejo da Silva [GEOCOOP Cooperativa de Trabalho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Uller, George Andre; Oliveira, Joao Luiz Martinez de [CGG do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Miranda, Cristina Maschio de [Nautilus Cooperativa de Trabalho (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    This work presents the results regarding CGG's Waste and Effluents Management Program between February 2003 and April 2004 on M/V CGG HARMATTAN. It main objective is to trace all waste and effluents since its generation until its final disposal. To implement this program CGG has two environmental technicians on board, whose are responsible for supervising the program, as well as educating, training, and optimizing waste and effluents segregation. Furthermore, the company also employs a consultant team to logistic management on shore; whose are responsible for executing, transferring, transporting and yours final disposing. Results show a monthly generation of 7.428 Kg and 97.3 m3 in average for waste and effluents respectively. Data indicates waste generation peaks during port calls. Waste tracing has improved along the year, allowing better control and resulting in value decreasing for port calls. Effluents are constantly generated in the same amount with monthly average of 50.2 m3 for bilge water, 41 m3 for sewage and 6.1 m3 for sludge. The percentage of non-recyclable waste sent to cleaner technology (co-processing and re-use) has been increasing along the year, replacing industrial landfill and incinerator use. Latest numbers already show the first results concerning it (2.2% re-used and 24,5% co-processed of total produced solid garbage). Re -used numbers are resulted from pioneer partnership between CGG and fishermen communities, for their original activity. The reached results and environmental indicators show that program efficiency has been evolving, considering logistic, economic, social and environmental aspects, constantly optimized with measures to increase control. (author)

  2. Fermentative Polyhydroxybutyrate Production from a Novel Feedstock Derived from Bakery Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wan Chi; Han, Wei; Lau, Kin Yan; Lei, Ho Man; Lo, Kin Yu; Ng, Wai Yee; Melikoglu, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Halomonas boliviensis was cultivated on bakery waste hydrolysate and seawater in batch and fed-batch cultures for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) production. Results demonstrated that bakery waste hydrolysate and seawater could be efficiently utilized by Halomonas boliviensis while PHB contents between 10 and 30% (w/w) were obtained. Furthermore, three methods for bakery waste hydrolysis were investigated for feedstock preparation. These include: (1) use of crude enzyme extracts from Aspergillus awamori, (2) Aspergillus awamori solid mashes, and (3) commercial glucoamylase. In the first method, the resultant free amino nitrogen (FAN) concentration in hydrolysates was 150 and 250 mg L−1 after 20 hours at enzyme-to-solid ratios of 6.9 and 13.1 U g−1, respectively. In both cases, the final glucose concentration was around 130–150 g L−1. In the second method, the resultant FAN and glucose concentrations were 250 mg L−1 and 150 g L−1, respectively. In the third method, highest glucose and lowest FAN concentrations of 170–200 g L−1 and 100 mg L−1, respectively, were obtained in hydrolysates after only 5 hours. The present work has generated promising information contributing to the sustainable production of bioplastic using bakery waste hydrolysate. PMID:25136626

  3. Fermentative Polyhydroxybutyrate Production from a Novel Feedstock Derived from Bakery Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pleissner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Halomonas boliviensis was cultivated on bakery waste hydrolysate and seawater in batch and fed-batch cultures for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB production. Results demonstrated that bakery waste hydrolysate and seawater could be efficiently utilized by Halomonas boliviensis while PHB contents between 10 and 30% (w/w were obtained. Furthermore, three methods for bakery waste hydrolysis were investigated for feedstock preparation. These include: (1 use of crude enzyme extracts from Aspergillus awamori, (2 Aspergillus awamori solid mashes, and (3 commercial glucoamylase. In the first method, the resultant free amino nitrogen (FAN concentration in hydrolysates was 150 and 250 mg L−1 after 20 hours at enzyme-to-solid ratios of 6.9 and 13.1 U g−1, respectively. In both cases, the final glucose concentration was around 130–150 g L−1. In the second method, the resultant FAN and glucose concentrations were 250 mg L−1 and 150 g L−1, respectively. In the third method, highest glucose and lowest FAN concentrations of 170–200 g L−1 and 100 mg L−1, respectively, were obtained in hydrolysates after only 5 hours. The present work has generated promising information contributing to the sustainable production of bioplastic using bakery waste hydrolysate.

  4. Ferment first, then compost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dany, Christian

    2012-11-01

    If communal organic waste is simply dumped, it is harmful to the environment. But if it is used to produce biogas, it can become a significant source of energy. Currently, there are two dry fermentation processes available. (orig.)

  5. The influence of total solids content and initial pH on batch biohydrogen production by solid substrate fermentation of agroindustrial wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo-Narváez, Paula N; Muñoz-Páez, Karla M; Poggi-Varaldo, Hector M; Ríos-Leal, Elvira; Calva-Calva, Graciano; Ortega-Clemente, L Alfredo; Rinderknecht-Seijas, Noemí; Estrada-Vázquez, Carlos; Ponce-Noyola, M Teresa; Salazar-Montoya, J Alfredo

    2013-10-15

    Hydrogen is a valuable clean energy source, and its production by biological processes is attractive and environmentally sound and friendly. In México 5 million tons/yr of agroindustrial wastes are generated; these residues are rich in fermentable organic matter that can be used for hydrogen production. On the other hand, batch, intermittently vented, solid substrate fermentation of organic waste has attracted interest in the last 10 years. Thus the objective of our work was to determine the effect of initial total solids content and initial pH on H2 production in batch fermentation of a substrate that consisted of a mixture of sugarcane bagasse, pineapple peelings, and waste activated sludge. The experiment was a response surface based on 2(2) factorial with central and axial points with initial TS (15-35%) and initial pH (6.5-7.5) as factors. Fermentation was carried out at 35 °C, with intermittent venting of minireactors and periodic flushing with inert N2 gas. Up to 5 cycles of H2 production were observed; the best treatment in our work showed cumulative H2 productions (ca. 3 mmol H2/gds) with 18% and 6.65 initial TS and pH, respectively. There was a significant effect of TS on production of hydrogen, the latter decreased with initial TS increase from 18% onwards. Cumulative H2 productions achieved in this work were higher than those reported for organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and mixtures of OFMSW and fruit peels waste from fruit juice industry, using the same process. Specific energetic potential due to H2 in our work was attractive and fell in the high side of the range of reported results in the open literature. Batch dark fermentation of agrowastes as practiced in our work could be useful for future biorefineries that generate biohydrogen as a first step and could influence the management of this type of agricultural wastes in México and other countries and regions as well. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Formulation of an alginate-vineyard pruning waste composite as a new eco-friendly adsorbent to remove micronutrients from agroindustrial effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecino, X; Devesa-Rey, R; Moldes, A B; Cruz, J M

    2014-09-01

    The cellulosic fraction of vineyard pruning waste (free of hemicellulosic sugars) was entrapped in calcium alginate beads and evaluated as an eco-friendly adsorbent for the removal of different nutrients and micronutrients (Mg, P, Zn, K, N-NH4, SO4, TN, TC and PO4) from an agroindustrial effluent (winery wastewater). Batch adsorption studies were performed by varying the amounts of cellulosic adsorbent (0.5-2%), sodium alginate (1-5%) and calcium chloride (0.05-0.9M) included in the biocomposite. The optimal formulation of the adsorbent composite varied depending on the target contaminant. Thus, for the adsorption of cationic contaminants (Mg, Zn, K, N-NH4 and TN), the best mixture comprised 5% sodium alginate, 0.05M calcium chloride and 0.5% cellulosic vineyard pruning waste, whereas for removal of anionic compounds (P, SO4 and PO4), the optimal mixture comprised 1% sodium alginate, 0.9M calcium chloride and 0.5% cellulosic vineyard pruning waste. To remove TC from the winery wastewater, the optimal mixture comprised 3% of sodium alginate, 0.475M calcium chloride and 0.5% cellulosic vineyard pruning waste. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Acidulocompost, a food waste compost with thermophilic lactic acid fermentation: its effects on potato production and weed growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Asagi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acidulocomposting recycles food wastes by means of thermophilic lactic acid fermentation. This process can decrease ammonia volatilization and odor emission during processing and produce compost with high nitrogen (N content. To compare the yield of potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L. ‘Dansyakuimo’ and the suppression of weeds with acidulocompost (AC and those with conventional composts and inorganic fertilizer (IF, we conducted field experiments in Miyagi Prefecture, northeastern Japan. Potatoes were cultivated in 2008 and 2009 in an Andosol field treated with AC, conventional food waste compost (FWC, poultry manure compost (PMC, cattle manure compost (CMC, IF, or no fertilizer (NF. AC, but not the other treatments, delayed the emergence of potatoes, and suppressed the emergence of weeds, but it did not inhibit potato growth during the late growth stage or yield. Potato N uptake and tuber yield with AC were significantly higher than those with NF and similar to those with FWC, PMC, and IF. The N uptake efficiencies (ratio of difference between N uptake in the treatment and the control to added N for AC (10.4–12.7% in 2008 and 2009 were similar to those for FWC and PMC (10.2–13.1%, higher than those for CMC (–1.3 to 6.3%, but significantly lower than those for IF (30.2–42.3%. Our findings indicate that AC has an N supply capacity similar to those of FWC and PMC and additionally suppresses the emergence and growth of weeds.

  8. Effects of inclusion Aspergillus niger fermented shrimp waste meal in broiler diets on live performance and digestive organ weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan H. Djunaidi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of the inclusion of different levels of shrimp waste meal fermented with Aspergillus niger (LUF in diets on growth performance and digestive organ weight of broilers. A total of 75 d-old chicks were randomly allocated to 5 (five treatments in 3 replication pens of 5 birds each. Treatments consisted of LUF inclusion of 0 (control, and 5, 7.5, 10 and 12,5% (P0, P1, P2, P3 and P4 in the diets. Birds were raised under standard condition and provided with feed and water ad-libitum. Feed and birds were weighed weekly up to 35 days to determine body weight, feed intake and feed conversion. At the end of experimental period, the birds were slaughatered and dressed up to determine carcass percentage and digestive organ weight. There was a significant negative linear response in body weight, feed consumption and feed conversion with increase of LUF more than 7.5% in the diets until 35 days of age, but % carcass was almost the same for all treatment. There was no significant response in digestive organ weight with increasing levels of LUF. The present result indicated that LUF could be considered as a potential feed ingredient as protein source of broiler but its inclusion should be limited until 7.5% of the diet to maintain growth performance and digestive organ weight.

  9. Enhancement of acidogenic fermentation for volatile fatty acid production from food waste: Effect of redox potential and inoculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Yu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Yeer; Shen, Dongsheng; Wang, Meizhen; Long, Yuyang; Chen, Ting

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effects of redox potential (ORP) and inoculum on volatile fatty acids (VFAs) production from food waste by acidogenic fermentation. Four experimental conditions with two ORP levels were tested: limited aeration conditions with ORP level of -100 to -200mV inoculating anaerobic sludge (LA+AnS) or aerobic sludge (LA+AeS), and anaerobic conditions with ORP level of -200 to -300mV inoculating anaerobic sludge with 2-bromoethanosulfophate (AN+BES) and without BES (AN). The maximal VFA yield (0.79g COD/g VS) was attained in LA+AnS reactor due to enhanced hydrolysis of substrates, especially proteins (degradation efficiency 78.3%). A higher frequency of phylum Firmicutes under limited aeration conditions (42.2-48.2%) was observed than that under anaerobic conditions (21.1%). The microbial community was more diverse in LA+AnS reactors than LA+AeS. We conclude that appropriate ORP level (from -100 to -200mV) and inoculum play essential roles in VFA production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Enhancement of hydrogen production during waste activated sludge anaerobic fermentation by carbohydrate substrate addition and pH control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yinguang; Xiao, Naidong; Zhao, Yuxiao; Mu, Hui

    2012-06-01

    The effects of carbohydrate/protein ratio (CH/Pr) and pH on hydrogen production from waste activated sludge (WAS) were investigated. Firstly, the optimal pH value for hydrogen production was influenced by the CH/Pr ratio, which was pH 10, 9, 8, 8, 8 and 6 at the CH/Pr ratio (COD based) of 0.2 (sole sludge), 1, 2.4, 3.8, 5 and 6.6, respectively. The maximal hydrogen production (100.6 mL/g-COD) was achieved at CH/Pr of 5 and pH 8, which was due to the synergistic effect of carbohydrate addition on hydrogen production, the enhancement of sludge protein degradation and protease and amylase activities, and the suitable fermentation pathway for hydrogen production. As hydrogen consumption was observed at pH 8, in order to further increase hydrogen production a two-step pH control strategy (pH 8+pH 10) was developed and the hydrogen production was further improved by 17.6%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Utilization of inulin-containing waste in industrial fermentations to produce biofuels and bio-based chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen R; Qureshi, Nasib; López-Núñez, Juan Carlos; Jones, Marjorie A; Jarodsky, Joshua M; Galindo-Leva, Luz Ángela; Lindquist, Mitchell R

    2017-04-01

    Inulins are polysaccharides that belong to an important class of carbohydrates known as fructans and are used by many plants as a means of storing energy. Inulins contain 20 to several thousand fructose units joined by β-2,1 glycosidic bonds, typically with a terminal glucose unit. Plants with high concentrations of inulin include: agave, asparagus, coffee, chicory, dahlia, dandelion, garlic, globe artichoke, Jerusalem artichoke, jicama, onion, wild yam, and yacón. To utilize inulin as its carbon and energy source directly, a microorganism requires an extracellular inulinase to hydrolyze the glycosidic bonds to release fermentable monosaccharides. Inulinase is produced by many microorganisms, including species of Aspergillus, Kluyveromyces, Penicillium, and Pseudomonas. We review various inulinase-producing microorganisms and inulin feedstocks with potential for industrial application as well as biotechnological efforts underway to develop sustainable practices for the disposal of residues from processing inulin-containing crops. A multi-stage biorefinery concept is proposed to convert cellulosic and inulin-containing waste produced at crop processing operations to valuable biofuels and bioproducts using Kluyveromyces marxianus, Yarrowia lipolytica, Rhodotorula glutinis, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as well as thermochemical treatments.

  12. Performance and carcass quality of broiler chickens fed diet containing pineapple waste meal fermented by “ragi tape”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandey, J. S.; Tulung, B.; Leke, J. R.; Sondakh, B. F. J.

    2018-01-01

    The study was conducted to determine the effect of pineapple waste meal fermented by “ragi tape” (FPW) in diets on the performance and carcass quality of broilers. The “ragi tape” was a traditional commercial product of yeast. Five dietary treatments containing 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% levels of FPW with four replicates were fed to 250 broiler chickens for 42 days in a completely randomized design. Feed and water were provided ad libitum. The variables were performance parameters and carcass quality. Results showed that the performance in finisher, carcass percentage and abdominal fat percentage were significantly affected by dietary treatments. Carcass percentage and abdominal fat percentage were significantly decrease in the proportion of 20% of FPW. However, the carcass percentage in treatments R0 - R4 were still in a good category. The higher the levels of FPW the lower the abdominal fat percentage signed that FPW treatments up to 20% resulted good category of broiler carcass. Income over feed cost and broiler cost analysis in 20% FPW treatment obtained the highest income and the lowest was 0% FPW treatment. It can be concluded that FPW can be fed to broiler chickens at up to 20% level.

  13. Production of cellulases from Aspergillus niger NS-2 in solid state fermentation on agricultural and kitchen waste residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Namita; Tewari, Rupinder; Soni, Raman; Soni, Sanjeev Kumar

    2012-07-01

    Various agricultural and kitchen waste residues were assessed for their ability to support the production of a complete cellulase system by Aspergillus niger NS-2 in solid state fermentation. Untreated as well as acid and base-pretreated substrates including corn cobs, carrot peelings, composite, grass, leaves, orange peelings, pineapple peelings, potato peelings, rice husk, sugarcane bagasse, saw dust, wheat bran, wheat straw, simply moistened with water, were found to be well suited for the organism's growth, producing good amounts of cellulases after 96 h without the supplementation of additional nutritional sources. Yields of cellulases were higher in alkali treated substrates as compared to acid treated and untreated substrates except in wheat bran. Of all the substrates tested, wheat bran appeared to be the best suited substrate producing appreciable yields of CMCase, FPase and β-glucosidase at the levels of 310, 17 and 33 U/g dry substrate respectively. An evaluation of various environmental parameters demonstrated that appreciable levels of cellulases could be produced over a wide range of temperatures (20-50 °C) and pH levels (3.0-8.0) with a 1:1.5 to 1:1.75 substrate to moisture ratio. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Contamination of ground water as a consequence of land disposal of dye waste mixed sewage effluents: a case study of Panipat district of Haryana, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, S K; Yadav, Rashmi; Chaturvedi, R K; Yadav, R K; Sharma, V K; Minhas, P S

    2010-09-01

    Spatial samples of surface and ground water collected from land disposal site of dye waste mixed sewage effluents at Binjhole, in Haryana, India were analyzed to evaluate its effect on quality of pond, hand pumps and ground waters for human health and irrigation purposes. It was found that average COD and TDS of dye houses discharge (310 and 3,920 mg/L) and treated sewage (428 and 1,470 mg/L) on mixing acquired the values of 245 and 1,780 mg/L and only Pb (0.24 microg/L) was above the permissible limit for irrigation purpose. Disposal of this mixed water to village pond changes the COD and TDS to 428 and 1,470 mg/L, respectively. COD and TDS of hand pump water samples were 264 and 1,190 mg/L, where as in tube well water these values were 151 and 900 mg/L. Though the ground water contamination seemed to decrease with the increasing distance from the pond but COD, TDS and BOD values continued to be quite high in water samples drawn from the hand pumps up to a distance of 500 m from pond. However, the major cause of the concern in these waters was Pb (0.11-0.45 ppm). Crops grown with this water shows accumulation of heavy metals like Pb,Cd, Fe, Mn, Ni, Cu, and Zn but in few crops they (Zn, Pb and Cd) exceed the safe limits. Regular consumption of these crop products may lead heavy metal toxicity. It was concluded from this study that the deep seepage of effluents led to deterioration of ground water quality for drinking purposes and the well waters rendered unfit for irrigation purposes within a span of 2 years. This warrants appropriate disposal measures for sewage and dye industry effluents in order to prevent deterioration of ground water and health of human and animals.

  15. Citric acid production from orange peel wastes by solid-state fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Torrado

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Valencia orange (Citrus sinensis peel was employed in this work as raw material for the production of citric acid (CA by solid-state fermentation (SSF of Aspergillus niger CECT-2090 (ATCC 9142, NRRL 599 in Erlenmeyer flasks. To investigate the effects of the main operating variables, the inoculum concentration was varied in the range 0.5·10³ to 0.7·10(8 spores/g dry orange peel, the bed loading from 1.0 to 4.8 g of dry orange peel (corresponding to 35-80 % of the total volume, and the moisture content between 50 and 100 % of the maximum water retention capacity (MWRC of the material. Moreover, additional experiments were done adding methanol or water in different proportions and ways. The optimal conditions for CA production revealed to be an inoculum of 0.5·10(6 spores/g dry orange peel, a bed loading of 1.0 g of dry orange peel, and a humidification pattern of 70 % MWRC at the beginning of the incubation with posterior addition of 0.12 mL H2O/g dry orange peel (corresponding to 3.3 % of the MWRC every 12 h starting from 62 h. The addition of methanol was detrimental for the CA production. Under these conditions, the SSF ensured an effective specific production of CA (193 mg CA/g dry orange peel, corresponding to yields of product on total initial and consumed sugars (glucose, fructose and sucrose of 376 and 383 mg CA/g, respectively. These results, which demonstrate the viability of the CA production by SSF from orange peel without addition of other nutrients, could be of interest to possible, future industrial applications.

  16. Effluent testing for the Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act mixed waste incinerator emissions tests of January 16 and 18, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shor, J.T.; Bostick, W.D.; Coroneos, A.C.; Bunch, D.H.; Gibson, L.V.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Shoemaker, J.L.

    1992-02-01

    On January 16 and 18, 1991, special emissions tests were conducted at the Oak Ridge, K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator. Both tests were approximately 6 h long and were performed at TSCA temperatures [1200 degrees C, secondary combustion chamber (SSC)]. Liquid feed and effluent samples were collected every 30 min. A filter was used to collect particles from stack gases to study morphology and composition during the first test. Isokinetic air samples were also taken during the second test. Metals emissions from the second test were evaluated using the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 5 sampling train. The aqueous waste was collected and fed in batches to the Central Neutralization Facility (CNF), where it was treated by iron coprecipitation and polymer flocculation and data were collected. In the first test (1-16-91), the aqueous and organic wastes were fed directly to the kiln or primary combustion chamber (PCC). In the second test (1-18-91), the remaining organic waste from the first test was fed into the SSC, and other organic waste was fed into the PCC. One objective of the two tests was to determine if feeding the same organic waste into the two combustion chambers made a difference in a partitioning of uranium and other metals. No evaluation of radionuclides other than uranium was made. The partition coefficient of uranium to the quench water was 0.3 on January 16 and 0.35 on January 18; so directing Tank 306A to the feed to the primary vs the secondary combustion chamber appears to have made little difference. The partition coefficient of uranium to the stack on January 18 was 0.0039. 5 refs., 15 figs., 26 tabs

  17. The effect of mixing on fermentation of primary solids, glycerol, and biodiesel waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Marzieh; Randall, Andrew A

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the effect of mixing on volatile fatty acid (VFA) production and composition was investigated through running five identical bench-scale reactors that were filled with primary solid and dosed with either pure glycerol or biodiesel waste. Experimental results revealed that there was an inverse correlation between the mixing intensity and the VFA production. The total VFA production in the un-mixed reactor was 9,787 ± 3,601 mg COD/L, whereas in the reactor mixed at 100 rpm this dropped to 3,927 ± 1,175 mg COD/L, while both types of reactor were dosed with pure glycerol at the beginning of each cycle to reach the initial concentration of 1,000 mg/L (1,217 mg COD/L). Propionic acid was the dominant VFA in all the reactors except the reactor mixed at 30 rpm. It is hypothesized that low mixing facilitated hydrogen transfer between obligate hydrogen producing acetogens (OHPA) and hydrogen consuming acidogens in these non-methanogenic reactors. Also, in a narrower range of mixing (0 or 7 rpm), the total VFA production in biodiesel waste-fed reactors was considerably higher than that of pure glycerol-fed reactors.

  18. Bioconversion of fish solid waste into PHB using Bacillus subtilis based submerged fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, S; Sarkar, B; Samantaray, D P; Daware, A; Maity, S; Pattnaik, S; Bhattacharjee, S

    2017-12-01

    Currently, one of the major problem affecting the world is solid waste management, predominantly petroleum-based plastic and fish solid waste (FSW). However, it is very difficult to reduce the consumption of plastic as well as fish products, but it is promising to convert FSW to biopolymer to reduce eco-pollution. On account of that, the bioconversion of FSW extract to polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) was undertaken by using Bacillus subtilis (KP172548). Under optimized conditions, 1.62 g/L of PHB has been produced by the bacterium. The purified compound was further characterized by advanced analytical technologies to elucidate its chemical structure. Results indicated that the biopolymer was found to be PHB, the most common homopolymer of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). This is the first report demonstrating the efficacy of B. subtilis to utilize FSW extract to produce biopolymer. The biocompatibility of the PHB against murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 demonstrated that, it was comparatively less toxic, favourable for surface attachment and proliferation in comparison with poly-lactic acid (PLA) and commercially available PHB. Thus, further exploration is highly indispensable to use FSW extract as a substrate for production of PHB at pilot scale.

  19. Effect of organic loading rate on dark fermentative hydrogen production in the continuous stirred tank reactor and continuous mixed immobilized sludge reactor from waste pastry hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei; Hu, Yunyi; Li, Shiyi; Nie, Qiulin; Zhao, Hongting; Tang, Junhong

    2016-12-01

    Waste pastry (6%, w/v) was hydrolyzed by the produced glucoamylase and protease to obtain the glucose (19.8g/L) and free amino nitrogen (179mg/L) solution. Then, the effect of organic loading rate (OLR) (8-40kgCOD/(m 3 d)) on dark fermentative hydrogen production in the continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and continuous mixed immobilized sludge reactor (CMISR) from waste pastry hydrolysate was investigated and compared. The maximum hydrogen production rate of CSTR (277.76mL/(hL)) and CMISR (320.2mL/(hL)) were achieved at OLR of 24kgCOD/(m 3 d) and 32kgCOD/(m 3 d), respectively. Carbon recovery ranged from 75.2-84.1% in the CSTR and CMISR with the balance assumed to be converted to biomass. One gram waste pastry could produce 0.33g (1.83mmol) glucose which could be further converted to 79.24mL (3.54mmol) hydrogen in the CMISR or 91.66mL (4.09mmol) hydrogen in the CSTR. This is the first study which reports dark fermentative hydrogen production from waste pastry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nutritional value content, biomass production and growth performance of Daphnia magna cultured with different animal wastes resulted from probiotic bacteria fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endar Herawati, Vivi; Nugroho, R. A.; Pinandoyo; Hutabarat, Johannes

    2017-02-01

    Media culture is an important factor for the growth and quality of Daphnia magna nutrient value. This study has purpose to find the increasing of nutritional content, biomass production and growth performance of D. magna using different animal wastes fermented by probiotic bacteria. This study conducted using completely randomized experimental design with 10 treatments and 3 replicates. Those media used different animal manures such as chicken manure, goat manure and quail manure mixed by rejected bread and tofu waste fermented by probiotic bacteria then cultured for 24 days. The results showed that the media which used 50% chicken manure, 100% rejected bread and 50% tofu waste created the highest biomass production, population and nutrition content of D.magna about 2111788.9 ind/L for population; 342 grams biomass production and 68.85% protein content. The highest fatty acid profile is 6.37% of linoleic and the highest essential amino acid is 22.8% of lysine. Generally, the content of ammonia, DO, temperature, and pH during the study were in the good range of D. magna’s life. This research has conclusion that media used 50% chicken manure, 100% rejected bread and 50% tofu waste created the highest biomass production, population and nutrition content of D. magna.

  1. Kinetic studies for the use of fermented agricultural byproduct by fungi in removal of some toxic metals from their waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moloukhia, H.; Ouda, S.

    2010-01-01

    A new sorbent material has been developed that sesame stalks as agricultural byproduct which are available at very little or no cost was fermented by fungi to produce high quality sorbent material. Microbial biomass offers an economical option for removing heavy metals by the phenomenon of bio sorption. Fermented sesame stalks by the fungal biomass Aspergillus terreus (Thom), was tested for its ability to remove chromium and cadmium ions from waste solutions. Some significant parameters i.e., contact time, solution ph, mass of sorbent material and the effect of metal concentrations were investigated. Desorption studies were also performed. The kinetic of sorption was evaluated by applying the Lagergren equation. Results showed that the ph of the solution strongly affected the degree of bio sorption of metal ions by biomass. The metal ion sorption obeyed Freundlich isotherm. It was found that the exponent 1/n is in the range of 1> 1/n > 0, which signify that strong adsorptive forces are operative on the surface of the fermented sesame stalks by fungal biomass. The kinetics of sorption indicated that the removal of both chromium and cadmium ions from solution follows a first-order reaction with fast rate. It could be concluded that fermented sesame stalks by the fungal biomass Aspergillus terreus (Thom), can be considered as an economical alternative sorbent material for the removal of heavy metals from wastewater by the phenomenon of bio sorption

  2. Biochemical studies on the production of biofuel (bioethanol) from potato peels wastes by Saccharomyces cerevisiae: effects of fermentation periods and nitrogen source concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, Ryan A.; Al-Bar, Omar A.; Soliman, Youssri M. Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an interesting micro-organism with good prospects in the future of yeast bioethanol production. In this study, both commercial and genetically modified S. cerevisiae were obtained from the local shops in Jeddah - Saudi Arabia and the Microbial Biotechnology Department - National Research Center (Dokki - Egypt) respectively, and incubated at 25 °C before being acclimatized for the conditions of this research. In this work, the impact of two different biochemical conditions (fermentation periods and nitrogen source concentration) on the growth, carbohydrates yields, and mainly bioethanol productivity from potato peels wastes (PPW) were studied in both species. PPW were used as a solo carbon source in this study with HCl acidic pre-treatment method. When studying the impact of fermentation periods, the best fermentation periods were found to be between the third and the fourth day. Additionally, the optimal nitrogen source concentration added to the fermentation medium was 2 g/L. This study concludes with some suggestions for future work in an attempt to reach commercial production of bioethanol at the lowest possible costs

  3. Quantitative analysis of strontium 90 in the radioactive wastes by means of thenoyltrifluoroacetone; Dosage du strontium 90 dans les effluents radioactifs par le thenoyltrifluoroacetone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testemale, G; Leredde, J L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1970-07-01

    A simple method of analysing the quantity of {sup 90}Sr has been perfected. It consists in a double extraction of it by means of thenoyltrifluoroacetone and tributylphosphate in tetrachloride of carbon followed by eliminating yttrium 90 by means of thenoyltrifluoroacetone in the benzene. Numberings on aliquot parts of wastes make the determination of that element possible. The yield is about 97 per cent. (authors) [French] Une technique simple du dosage du {sup 90}Sr a ete mise au point. Elle consiste en une double extraction par le thenoyltrifluoroacetone et le tributylphosphate dans le tetrachlorure de carbone, suivie de l'elimination de l'yttrium 90 par le thenoyltrifluoroacetone dans le benzene, Des comptages sur des parties aliquotes d'effluents permettent la dermination de cet element. Rendement environ 97 pour cent. (auteurs)

  4. Response of microbial community of organic-matter-impoverished arable soil to long-term application of soil conditioner derived from dynamic rapid fermentation of food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jiaqi; Li, Mingxiao; Mao, Xuhui; Hao, Yan; Ding, Jie; Liu, Dongming; Xi, Beidou; Liu, Hongliang

    2017-01-01

    Rapid fermentation of food waste can be used to prepare soil conditioner. This process consumes less time and is more cost-effective than traditional preparation technology. However, the succession of the soil microbial community structure after long-term application of rapid fermentation-derived soil conditioners remains unclear. Herein, dynamic rapid fermentation (DRF) of food waste was performed to develop a soil conditioner and the successions and diversity of bacterial communities in an organic-matter-impoverished arable soil after six years of application of DRF-derived soil conditioner were investigated. Results showed that the treatment increased soil organic matter (SOM) accumulation and strawberry yield by 5.3 g/kg and 555.91 kg/ha, respectively. Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Firmicutes became the dominant phyla, occupying 65.95%-77.52% of the bacterial sequences. Principal component analysis (PCA) results showed that the soil bacterial communities were largely influenced by the treatment. Redundancy analysis (RDA) results showed that the relative abundances of Gemmatimonadetes, Chloroflexi, Verrucomicrobia, Nitrospirae, and Firmicutes were significantly correlated with soil TC, TN, TP, NH4+-N, NO3--N, OM, and moisture. These communities were all distributed in the soil samples collected in the sixth year of application. Long-term treatment did not enhance the diversity of bacterial species but significantly altered the distribution of major functional bacterial communities in the soils. Application of DRF-derived soil conditioner could improve the soil quality and optimize the microbial community, ultimately enhancing fruit yields.

  5. Acidogenic fermentation of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste and cheese whey for bio-plastic precursors recovery - Effects of process conditions during batch tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotto, Francesca; Lavagnolo, Maria Cristina; Pivato, Alberto; Cossu, Raffaello

    2017-12-01

    The problem of fossil fuels dependency is being addressed through sustainable bio-fuels and bio-products production worldwide. At the base of this bio-based economy there is the efficient use of biomass as non-virgin feedstock. Through acidogenic fermentation, organic waste can be valorised in order to obtain several precursors to be used for bio-plastic production. Some investigations have been done but there is still a lack of knowledge that must be filled before moving to effective full scale plants. Acidogenic fermentation batch tests were performed using food waste (FW) and cheese whey (CW) as substrates. Effects of nine different combinations of substrate to inoculum (S/I) ratio (2, 4, and 6) and initial pH (5, 7, and 9) were investigated for metabolites (acetate, butyrate, propionate, valerate, lactate, and ethanol) productions. Results showed that the most abundant metabolites deriving from FW fermentation were butyrate and acetate, mainly influenced by the S/I ratio (acetate and butyrate maximum productions of 21.4 and 34.5g/L, respectively, at S/I=6). Instead, when dealing with CW, lactate was the dominant metabolite significantly correlated with pH (lactate maximum production of 15.7g/L at pH = 9). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Producing methane, methanol and electricity from organic waste of fermentation reaction using novel microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiman, Saurabh Sudha; Shrestha, Namita; David, Aditi; Basotra, Neha; Johnson, Glenn R; Chadha, Bhupinder S; Gadhamshetty, Venkataramana; Sani, Rajesh K

    2018-06-01

    Residual solid and liquid streams from the one-pot CRUDE (Conversion of Raw and Untreated Disposal into Ethanol) process were treated with two separate biochemical routes for renewable energy transformation. The solid residual stream was subjected to thermophilic anaerobic digestion (TAD), which produced 95 ± 7 L methane kg -1 volatile solid with an overall energy efficiency of 12.9 ± 1.7%. A methanotroph, Methyloferula sp., was deployed for oxidation of mixed TAD biogas into methanol. The residual liquid stream from CRUDE process was used in a Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC) to produce electricity. Material balance calculations confirmed the integration of biochemical routes (i.e. CRUDE, TAD, and MFC) for developing a sustainable approach of energy regeneration. The current work demonstrates the utilization of different residual streams originated after food waste processing to release minimal organic load to the environment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The production of fuels and chemicals from food processing wastes using a novel fermenter separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, M.C.; Venkatesh, K.V.; Choi, Hojoon; Moelhman, M.; Saliceti, L.; Okos, M.R.; Wankat, P.C.

    1991-12-01

    During 1991, considerable progress was made on the waste utilization project. Two small Wisconsin companies have expressed an interest in promoting and developing the ICRS technology. Pilot plant sites at (1) Hopkinton, IA, for a sweet whey plant, and Beaver Dam WI, for an acid whey site have been under development siting ICRS operations. The Hopkinton, IA site is owned and operated by Permeate Refining Inc., who have built a batch ethanol plant across the street from Swiss Valley Farms cheddar cheese operations. Permeate from Swiss Valley is piped across to PRI. PRI has signed a contract to site a 300--500,000 gallon/yr to ICRS pilot plant. They feel that the lower labor, lower energy, continuous process offered by the ICRS will substantially improve their profitability. Catalytics, Inc, is involved with converting whey from a Kraft cream cheese operation to ethanol and yeast. A complete project including whey concentration, sterilization, and yeast growth has been designed for this site. Process design improvements with the ICRS focussed on ethanol recovery techniques during this year's project. A solvent absorption/extractive distillation (SAED) process has been developed which offers the capability of obtaining an anhydrous ethanol product from vapors off 3 to 9% ethanol solutions using very little energy for distillation. Work on products from waste streams was also performed. a. Diacetyl as a high value flavor compound was very successfully produced in a Stirred Tank Reactor w/Separation. b. Yeast production from secondary carbohydrates in the whey, lactic acid, and glycerol was studied. c. Lactic acid production from cellulose and lactose studies continued. d. Production of anti-fungal reagents by immobilized plant cells; Gossypol has antifungal properties and is produced by G. arboretum.

  8. Copper (II) addition to accelerate lactic acid production from co-fermentation of food waste and waste activated sludge: Understanding of the corresponding metabolisms, microbial community and predictive functional profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Tingting; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Ting; Su, Yinglong; Zhang, Wenjuan; Li, Jun; Gan, Yanfei; Zhang, Ai; Liu, Yanan; Xue, Gang

    2018-03-20

    Bio-refinery of food waste and waste activated sludge to high value-added chemicals, such as lactic acid, has attracted particular interest in recent years. In this paper, the effect of copper (II) dosing to the organic waste fermentation system on lactic acid production was evaluated, which proved to be a promising method to stimulate high yield of lactic acid (77.0% higher than blank) at dosage of 15 μM-Cu 2+ /g VSS. As mechanism study suggested, copper addition enhanced the activity of α-glycosidase and glycolysis, which increased the substrate for subsequent acidification; whereas, the high dosage (70 μM-Cu 2+ /g VSS) inhibited the conversion of lactic acid to VFA, thus stabilized lactic acid concentration. Microbial community study revealed that small amount of copper (II) at 15 μM/g VSS resulted in the proliferation of Lactobacillus to 82.6%, which mainly produced lactic acid. Finally, the variation of functional capabilities implied that the proposed homeostatic system II was activated at relatively low concentration of copper. Meanwhile, membrane transport function and carbohydrate metabolism were also strengthened. This study provides insights into the effect of copper (II) on the enhancement of lactic acid production from co-fermentation of food waste and waste activated sludge. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of Chitosan Produced from Fermented Shrimp Shell Waste by Bacillus subtilis NA12 Using Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashandy, A.S.; Raffat, E.A.; Ibrahim, H.M.M.; El Tayeb, T.S.; Gamal, R.F.

    2017-01-01

    This study focused on characterization of chitosan obtained in a previous study from fermented shrimp shell waste (SSW) by Bacillus subtilis NA12. Extracted chitin was exposed to different gamma radiation doses (5-35 kGy). The molecular weight of the resultant chitosan decreased constantly with increasing radiation dose from 1.9 × 10"6 (g/mol) (non-irradiated) to 3.7 ×10"4 (g/mol) (at 35 kGy). The degree of deacetylation (DDA %) was determined by using potentiometric titration. The structural properties of chitin and chitosan were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The prepared chitosan has higher solubility and DDA % compared to the standard chitosan. FT-IR analysis clearly confirmed the successful extraction of pure chitin and chitosan. TGA showed that chitin exhibited a stable structure toward thermal decomposition than chitosan. XRD analysis revealed that extracted chitin was more crystalline than prepared chitosan. Chitosan with different molecular weights was evaluated as an antibacterial agent against representative pathogenic bacterial strains. Chitosan obtained at 35 kGy, with molecular weight 3.7×10"4 (g/mol ) and DDA of 87.9 %, showed the highest antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella sp., Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It revealed inhibition zone diameter of 5.4 ± 0.2, 5.4 ± 0.12, 3.5 ± 0.21 and 1.4 ± 0.06 cm, respectively

  10. Effluents from a waste rock deposit of a former uranium mine in Saxony/Germany - Mass flow balance of water and dissolved solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biehler, D.

    2002-01-01

    Soon after uranium mining had ceased in eastern Germany in 1990, work for remediation of several mining sites began. The Wismut GmbH, owner of the Mine of Dresden-Gittersee's waste rock dump, introduced the concept of reducing the impact to the environment via water and air paths by implementing a multi-layer soil cover. The deposit consists mainly of waste rock (clastic sediments of Doehlener Becken, deep metamorphic rocks) but also of low-grade ore (U-rich coal) and tailing materials. At the time when remediation started, the effluents completely infiltrated the underground. Because of previous surface exfiltration activities, they were already known to be very rich in dissolved solids, especially in sulphate and uranium. As demanded by the state authorities, the owner funded a vast hydrogeological study of the site. In testing the efficiency of surface sealing, the study indicated a mass flow balance of water and dissolved solids for the current situation, and predicted emissions into the water path which would occur after realisation of the proposed soil cover. The field investigation program consisted of: measurements of flow, of concentrations of dissolved solids (esp. U and Ra-226) and of contents of environmental isotopes in precipitation, surface runoff, seepage water and groundwater in the current condition of the dump; the study of waste rock material (geochemistry, mineralogy); waste rock material elution tests; underground investigation by drilling boreholes up to 270 m in depth. The resulting data allowed for: a hydrogeological conceptual model of the site; a consistent mass flow balance for the current condition of the dump; a prediction of concentrations in groundwater resulting after the realisation of a soil cover. The predictions show that the concentrations of dissolved solids in the contaminated groundwater would be significantly decreased. Furthermore it would be possible to reach the standards for drinking water with respect to uranium

  11. Physicochemical Characteristics, in Vitro Fermentation Indicators, Gas Production Kinetics, and Degradability of Solid Herbal Waste as Alternative Feed Source for Ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Kisworo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this research were to study the nutrient and secondary metabolite contents of solid herbal wastes (SHW that were preserved by freeze drying, sun drying and silage, as well as to analyze their effects on in vitro fermentation indicators i.e., gas production kinetics and degradability of solid herbal waste. Physical and chemical properties on three forms of SHW (sun dry, freeze dry, and silage were characterized and then an in vitro gas production experiment was performed to determine the kinetics of gas production, methane production, NH3, microbial protein, and SHW degradability. Polyethylene glycol (PEG was added to the three treatments to determine the biological activity of tannins. Results showed that all three preparations of SHW still contained high nutrient and plant secondary metabolite contents. Gas production, methane, NH3, microbial protein, in vitro degradability of dry matter (IVDMD and organic matter (IVDOM of SHW silage were lower (P<0.05 compared to sun dry and freeze dry. These results were apparently due to the high content of secondary metabolites especially tannin. It can be concluded that solid herbal wastes (SHW can be used as an alternative feed ingredients for ruminants with attention to the content of secondary metabolites that can affect the process of fermentation and digestibility in the rumen.

  12. Solid phase microbial fuel cell (SMFC) for harnessing bioelectricity from composite food waste fermentation: influence of electrode assembly and buffering capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, S Venkata; Chandrasekhar, K

    2011-07-01

    Solid phase microbial fuel cells (SMFC; graphite electrodes; open-air cathode) were designed to evaluate the potential of bioelectricity production by stabilizing composite canteen based food waste. The performance was evaluated with three variable electrode-membrane assemblies. Experimental data depicted feasibility of bioelectricity generation from solid state fermentation of food waste. Distance between the electrodes and presence of proton exchange membrane (PEM) showed significant influence on the power yields. SMFC-B (anode placed 5 cm from cathode-PEM) depicted good power output (463 mV; 170.81 mW/m(2)) followed by SMFC-C (anode placed 5 cm from cathode; without PEM; 398 mV; 53.41 mW/m(2)). SMFC-A (PEM sandwiched between electrodes) recorded lowest performance (258 mV; 41.8 mW/m(2)). Sodium carbonate amendment documented marked improvement in power yields due to improvement in the system buffering capacity. SMFCs operation also documented good substrate degradation (COD, 76%) along with bio-ethanol production. The operation of SMFC mimicked solid-sate fermentation which might lead to sustainable solid waste management practices. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Westinghouse Hanford Company effluent releases and solid waste management report for 1987: 200/600/1100 Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coony, F.M.; Howe, D.B.; Voigt, L.J.

    1988-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to fulfill the reporting requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5484.1, Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information Reporting Requirements. Quantities of airborne and liquid wastes discharged by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) in the 200 Areas, 600 Area, and 1100 Area in 1987 are presented in this report. Also, quantities of solid wastes stored and buried by Westinghouse Hanford in the 200 Areas are presented in this report. The report is also intended to demonstrate compliance with Westinghouse Hanford administrative control limit (ACL) values for radioactive constituents and with applicable guidelines and standards for nonradioactive constituents. The summary of airborne release data, liquid discharge data, and solid waste management data for calendar year (CY) 1987 and CY 1986 are presented in Table ES-1. Data values for 1986 are cited in Table ES-1 to show differences in releases and waste quantities between 1986 and 1987. 19 refs., 3 figs., 19 tabs

  14. Ion exchange separation of plutonium and gallium (1) resource and inventory requirements, (2) waste, emissions, and effluent, and (3) facility size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMuth, S.

    1997-01-01

    The following report summarizes an effort intended to estimate within an order-of-magnitude the (1) resource and inventory requirements, (2) waste, emissions, and effluent amounts, and (3) facility size, for ion exchange (IX) separation of plutonium and gallium. This analysis is based upon processing 3.5 MT-Pu/yr. The technical basis for this summary is detailed in a separate document, open-quotes Preconceptual Design for Separation of Plutonium and Gallium by Ion Exchangeclose quotes. The material balances of this separate document are based strictly on stoichiometric amounts rather than details of actual operating experience, in order to avoid classification as Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information. This approximation neglets the thermodynamics and kinetics which can significantly impact the amount of reagents required. Consequently, the material resource requirements and waste amounts presented here would normally be considered minimums for processing 3.5 MT-Pu/yr; however, the author has compared the inventory estimates presented with that of an actual operating facility and found them similar. Additionally, the facility floor space presented here is based upon actual plutonium processing systems and can be considered a nominal estimate

  15. Synergetic effect of pH and biochemical components on bacterial diversity during mesophilic anaerobic fermentation of biomass-origin waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, F; Shao, L M; Bru, V; Godon, J J; He, P J

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the synergetic effect of pH and biochemical components on bacterial community structure during mesophilic anaerobic degradation of solid wastes with different origins, and under acidic or neutral conditions. The bacterial community in 16 samples of solid wastes with different biochemical compositions and origins was evaluated during mesophilic anaerobic degradation at acidic and neutral pH. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) were used to compare the communities. Multivariate analysis of the DGGE and SSCP results revealed that most of the dominant microbes were dependent on the content of easily degradable carbohydrates in the samples. Furthermore, the dominant microbes were divided into two types, those that preferred an acid environment and those that preferred a neutral environment. A shift in pH was found to change their preference for medium substrates. Although most of the substrates with similar origin and biochemical composition had similar microbial diversity during fermentation, some microbes were found only in substrates with specific origins. For example, two microbes were only found in substrate that contained lignocellulose and animal protein without starch. These microbes were related to micro-organisms that are found in swine manure, as well as in other intestinal or oral niches. In addition, the distribution of fermentation products was less sensitive to the changes in pH and biochemical components than the microbial community. Bacterial diversity during anaerobic degradation of organic wastes was affected by both pH and biochemical components; however, pH exerted a greater effect. The results of this study reveal that control of pH may be an effective method to produce a stable bacterial community and relatively similar product distribution during anaerobic digestion of waste, regardless of variation in the waste feedstocks.

  16. Effluent management and pollution control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananda Narayanan, R.; Vedamoorthy, S.

    2006-01-01

    Generation of waste/effluent has a direct impact on environment, the higher the generation of waste higher the environmental impact. Though complete prevention of radioactive waste generation is a difficult task, keeping the waste generation to the minimum practicable is essential objective of Radioactive Waste Management. In doing so, it is essential to minimize waste generation at all the stages of a Nuclear Plant Cycle. Waste minimization refers to both a) Waste generation by operational and maintenance activities of plant and b) Secondary waste resulting from predisposal management of Radioactive Waste. The management of the effluent can be done in efficient manner by better designs, improved procedure, periodic reviews and above all inculcate the awareness amongst the waste generators since minimisation of waste, at source is the most efficient way to safe guard the environment. Commissioning and rich operating experience of waste management plant gather novel ideas which result in beneficial improvements in the system and operating procedure. Some of the steps initiated by designers and site agencies towards this are worth mentioning. (author)

  17. Effects of Cassava Mill Effluent on Some Chemical and Micro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    KEY WORDS: Cassava Mill Effluent, Soil Pollution, Soil Properties, Bacteria, Fungi. INTRODUCTION .... The hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria (HUB) were Bacillus substilis and ..... fermentative hydrogen production: A Review Int. J. Hydrogen ...

  18. A Study Of The Dilution Of Radio-Active Waste In The Rhone (1961); Etude de la dilution dans le rhone des effluents radioactifs du Centre de Marcoule (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodier, J; Scheidhauer, J; Marichal, M; Court, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de Production de Plutonium, Marcoule (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    The discharge into the Rhone of liquid radio-active waste from the Marcoule Centre necessitates a large number of measurements, in particular chemical and radio-chemical analysis of the waste, itself and of the waters of the Rhone both above arid below the point of discharge. The results thus obtained during 1960 made it possible to evaluate the total amount of active waste discharged and its dilution in the receiving medium. A statistical study of the results of the analysis of the Rhone waters shows that a satisfactory dilution of the waste occurs rapidly; the experimental results obtained with an experimental discharge of rhodamine are thus confirmed. (authors) [French] Le rejet au Rhone des effluents radioactifs liquides produits sur le Centre de Marcoule donne lieu a un grand nombre de mesures et en particulier d'analyses chimiques et radio-chimiques des effluents eux-memes ainsi que des eaux du Rhone avant et apres rejet. Au cours de l'annee 1960, l'ensemble des resultats ainsi obtenus a permis de dresser un bilan des activites rejetees et de leur dispersion dans le milieu recepteur. Une etude statistique des resultats d'analyses des eaux du Rhone montre qu'une dilution satisfaisante des effluents s'effectue rapidement confirmant ainsi les resultats obtenus lors d'un rejet experimental de rhodamine. (auteurs)

  19. Study of optimal transformation of liquid effluents resulting from the destruction of radioactive sodium by water into ultimate solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Camaro, S.; Fiquet, O.; Bernard, A.; Le Bescop, P.

    1997-01-01

    In the framework of sodium waste processing, it has been proposed to retain only processes that treat the sodium using water, thus generating the same by-products: hydrogen and sodium hydroxide. As the objective is to minimise radioactive liquid releases and as, moreover, the authorizations with respect to sodium salt releases are highly restrictive, several solutions have been envisaged for transforming the active sodium hydroxide coming from sodium destruction processes into ultimate solid wastes that can be stored on the surface in a storage site approved by the ANDRA (National Radioactive Waste Management Agency): the Aube Storage Site (CSA). Two processes have been considered and compared: immobilisation in concrete (cementation) and immobilisation in ceramic (ceramisation). These two processes are evaluated according to several criteria: the state of advancement of the process, the quantity of sodium hydroxide (and therefore of sodium) that can be treated per package. (author)

  20. Effect of total solid content and pretreatment on the production of lactic acid from mixed culture dark fermentation of food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousuf, Ahasa; Bastidas-Oyanedel, Juan-Rodrigo; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2018-04-28

    Food waste landfilling causes environmental degradation, and this work assesses a sustainable food valorization technique. In this study, food waste is converted into lactic acid in a batch assembly by dark fermentation without pH control and without the addition of external inoculum at 37 °C. The effect of total solid (TS), enzymatic and aeration pretreatment was investigated on liquid products concentration and product yield. The maximum possible TS content was 34% of enzymatic pretreated waste, and showed the highest lactic acid concentration of 52 g/L, with a lactic acid selectivity of 0.6 g lactic /g totalacids . The results indicated that aeration pretreatment does not significantly improve product concentration or yield. Non-pretreated waste in a 29% TS system showed a lactic acid concentration of 31 g/L. The results showed that enzymatic pretreated waste at TS of 34% results in the highest production of lactic acid. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Valorisation of mixed bakery waste in non-sterilized fermentation for L-lactic acid production by an evolved Thermoanaerobacterium sp. strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Muzi; Huang, Xiongliang; Lin, Carol Sze Ki; Wang, Jufang; Li, Shuang

    2015-12-01

    In this study, an advanced biorefinery technology that uses mixed bakery waste has been developed to produce l-lactic acid using an adaptively evolved Thermoanaerobacterium aotearoense LA1002-G40 in a non-sterilized system. Under these conditions, mixed bakery waste was directly hydrolysed by Aspergillus awamori and Aspergillus oryzae, resulting in a nutrient-rich hydrolysate containing 83.6g/L glucose, 9.5 g/L fructose and 612 mg/L free amino nitrogen. T. aotearoense LA1002-G40 was evaluated and then adaptively evolved to grow in this nutrient-rich hydrolysate. Using a 5-L fermenter, the overall lactic acid production from mixed bakery waste was 0.18 g/g with a titer, productivity and yield of 78.5 g/L, 1.63 g/L/h and 0.85 g/g, respectively. This is an innovative procedure involving a complete bioconversion process for l-lactic acid produced from mixed bakery waste under non-sterilized conditions. The proposed process could be potentially applied to turn food waste into l-lactic acid in an economically feasible way. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Continuous Ethanol Fermentation of Pretreated Lignocellulosic Biomasses, Waste Biomasses, Molasses and Syrup Using the Anaerobic, Thermophilic Bacterium Thermoanaerobacter italicus Pentocrobe 411

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Rasmus Lund; Jensen, Karen Møller; Mikkelsen, Marie Just

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellosic ethanol production is now at a stage where commercial or semi-commercial plants are coming online and, provided cost effective production can be achieved, lignocellulosic ethanol will become an important part of the world bio economy. However, challenges are still to be overcome throughout the process and particularly for the fermentation of the complex sugar mixtures resulting from the hydrolysis of hemicellulose. Here we describe the continuous fermentation of glucose, xylose and arabinose from non-detoxified pretreated wheat straw, birch, corn cob, sugar cane bagasse, cardboard, mixed bio waste, oil palm empty fruit bunch and frond, sugar cane syrup and sugar cane molasses using the anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter Pentocrobe 411. All fermentations resulted in close to maximum theoretical ethanol yields of 0.47–0.49 g/g (based on glucose, xylose, and arabinose), volumetric ethanol productivities of 1.2–2.7 g/L/h and a total sugar conversion of 90–99% including glucose, xylose and arabinose. The results solidify the potential of Thermoanaerobacter strains as candidates for lignocellulose bioconversion. PMID:26295944

  3. Supercritical water oxidation test bed effluent treatment study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.M.

    1994-04-01

    This report presents effluent treatment options for a 50 h Supercritical Water Test Unit. Effluent compositions are calculated for eight simulated waste streams, using different assumed cases. Variations in effluent composition with different reactor designs and operating schemes are discussed. Requirements for final effluent compositions are briefly reviewed. A comparison is made of two general schemes. The first is one in which the effluent is cooled and effluent treatment is primarily done in the liquid phase. In the second scheme, most treatment is performed with the effluent in the gas phase. Several unit operations are also discussed, including neutralization, mercury removal, and evaporation

  4. Effects of adding food by-products mainly including noodle waste to total mixed ration silage on fermentation quality, feed intake, digestibility, nitrogen utilization and ruminal fermentation in wethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Kyohei; Yani, Srita; Kitagawa, Masayuki; Oishi, Kazato; Hirooka, Hiroyuki; Kumagai, Hajime

    2012-11-01

    Four wethers were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square design experiment to evaluate the applicability of two types of total mixed ration (TMR) silage with food by-products. Four food by-products (i.e., potato waste, soy sauce cake, soybean curd residue and noodle waste) were obtained and mixed with commercial concentrate (CC) as TMR silage. The two types of TMR silage, T1 and T2, each contained CC, in addition to all by-products for T1 (TRE1), and soy sauce cake and noodle waste for T2 (TRE2) on a dry matter (DM) basis. The silage was well-fermented with low pH values and high lactic acid concentration. As the experimental treatments, T1, T2 and CC (CTL) were fed with a basal diet. The result showed that the digestibility of DM and organic matter (OM) were higher for T1 than for CC (P < 0.05), while crude protein digestibility was not significantly different among T1, T2 and CC. The retained nitrogen was not affected by inclusion of food by-products. Ruminal pH in TRE1 and TRE2 immediately decreased compared to that in CTL. The study suggested that the two types of TMR silage, including food by-products, might be used as a substitute for commercial concentrate. © 2012 The Authors. Animal Science Journal © 2012 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  5. Effluent Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effluent guidelines are national standards for wastewater discharges to surface waters and municipal sewage treatment plants. We issue the regulations for industrial categories based on the performance of treatment and control technologies.

  6. Correlation of radioactive-waste-treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: conversion of yellow cake to uranium hexafluoride. Part II. The solvent extraction-fluorination process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, M.B.; Etnier, E.L.; Hill, G.S.; Patton, B.D.; Witherspoon, J.P.; Yen, S.N.

    1983-03-01

    A cost/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials and chemicals from a model uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) production plant using the solvent extraction-fluorination process, and to evaluate the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the release materials on the environment. The model plant processes 10,000 metric tons of uranium per year. Base-case waste treatment is the minimum necessary to operate the process. Effluents meet the radiological requirements listed in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 20 (10 CFR 20), Appendix B, Table II, but may not be acceptable chemically at all sites. Additional radwaste treatment techniques are applied to the base-case plant in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The costs for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose committment are correlated with the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Much of the technology used in the advanced cases will require development and demonstration, or else is proprietary and unavailable for immediate use. The methodology and assumptions for the radiological doses are found in ORNL-4992.

  7. Correlation of radioactive-waste-treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: conversion of yellow cake to uranium hexafluoride. Part II. The solvent extraction-fluorination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, M.B.; Etnier, E.L.; Hill, G.S.; Patton, B.D.; Witherspoon, J.P.; Yen, S.N.

    1983-03-01

    A cost/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials and chemicals from a model uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) production plant using the solvent extraction-fluorination process, and to evaluate the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the release materials on the environment. The model plant processes 10,000 metric tons of uranium per year. Base-case waste treatment is the minimum necessary to operate the process. Effluents meet the radiological requirements listed in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 20 (10 CFR 20), Appendix B, Table II, but may not be acceptable chemically at all sites. Additional radwaste treatment techniques are applied to the base-case plant in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The costs for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose committment are correlated with the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Much of the technology used in the advanced cases will require development and demonstration, or else is proprietary and unavailable for immediate use. The methodology and assumptions for the radiological doses are found in ORNL-4992

  8. Processing of palm oil mill wastes based on zero waste technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvan

    2018-02-01

    Indonesia is currently the main producer of palm oil in the world with a total production reached 33.5 million tons per year. In the processing of fresh fruit bunches (FFB) besides producing palm oil and kernel oil, palm oil mills also produce liquid and solid wastes. The increase of palm oil production will be followed by an increase in the production of waste generated. It will give rise to major environmental issues especially the discharge of liquid waste to the rivers, the emission of methane from digestion pond and the incineration of empty fruit bunches (EFB). This paper describes a zero waste technology in processing palm oil mill waste after the milling process. The technology involves fermentation of palm oil mill effluent (POME) to biogas by using continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) in the presence of thermophilic microbes, producing activated liquid organic fertilizer (ALOF) from discharge of treated waste effluent from biogas digester, composting EFB by spraying ALOF on the EFB in the composter, and producing pellet or biochar from EFB by pyrolysis process. This concept can be considered as a promising technology for palm oil mills with the main objective of eliminating the effluent from their mills.

  9. Decree no 96-761 from August 27, 1996 authorizing the company for industrial wastes and effluents conditioning to create a basic nuclear installation, named Centraco, in the town of Codolet (Gard department)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juppe, A.; Borotra, F.; Lepage, C.

    1996-01-01

    This decree from the French prime minister, the minister of environment and the minister of industry and postal services gives permission to the Socodei company to create a basic nuclear installation, named Centraco, in the town of Codolet (Gard department, France) for the selection, decontamination, valorization, treatment and conditioning of low radioactive effluents and wastes from French and foreign industries. The decree describes the Centraco installation (buildings, incineration and storage unit, maintenance unit). It summarizes the technical rules which must be applied concerning the quality assurance, the protection against risks of radioactive or chemical materials dissemination, the personnel and public protection against ionizing radiations, the control of environmental pollution with liquid and gaseous effluents, the reduction of volume and radioactivity of solid wastes, the transport and handling of radioactive materials, the protection against earthquakes and fire, the safety systems for plant operation, and the personnel training. (J.S.)

  10. Antiproliferation and induction of cell death of Phaffia rhodozyma (Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous) extract fermented by brewer malt waste on breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Ivy Tuang Ngo; Chui, Chung Hin; Tang, Johnny Cheuk On; Lau, Fung Yi; Cheng, Gregory Yin Ming; Wong, Raymond Siu Ming; Kok, Stanton Hon Lung; Cheng, Chor Hing; Chan, Albert Sun Chi; Ho, Kwok Ping

    2005-11-01

    Astaxanthin has been shown to have antiproliferative activity on breast cancer and skin cancer cells. However, the high cost of production, isolation and purification of purified astaxanthin from natural sources or chemically synthetic methods limit its usage on cancer therapy. We show that astaxanthin could be produced by fermentating the Phaffia rhodozyma (Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous) yeast cells with brewer malt waste using a 20 L B. Braun fermentor. The percentage composition of astaxanthin from the P. rhodozyma was >70% of total pigment as estimated by the high performance liquid chromatographic analysis. Furthermore, the antiproliferative activity of this P. rhodozyma cell extract (PRE) was demonstrated on breast cancer cell lines including the MCF-7 (estrogen receptor positive) and MDA-MB231 (estrogen receptor negative) by using the [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-arboxymethoxyphenyl)-2- (4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium] (MTS) assay. No apoptotic cell death, but growth inhibitory effect was induced after 48 h of PRE incubation as suggested by morphological investigation. Anchorage-dependent clonogenicity assay showed that PRE could reduce the colony formation potential of both breast cancer cell lines. Cell death was observed from both breast cancer cell lines after incubation with PRE for 6 days. Taken together, our results showed that by using an economic method of brewer malt waste fermentation, we obtained P. rhodozyma with a high yield of astaxanthin and the corresponding PRE could have short-term growth inhibition and long-term cell death activity on breast cancer cells.

  11. USE OF BUTTER MILK AND POULTRY-TRANSFORMING WASTES FOR ENHANCED PRODUCTION OF Bacillus subtilis SPB1 BIOSURFACTANT IN SUBMERGED FERMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raida Zouari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Biosurfactants are valuable microbial amphiphilic molecules with effective surface-active and biological properties applicable to several industries and processes. Microorganisms synthesize them, especially during growth on water-immiscible substrates, providing an alternative to chemically prepared conventional surfactants. Microbial surfactants are not yet a sustainable alternative to chemically synthesized surfactants seeing their potentially high production charges. This study highlights the use of low-cost agro-industrial raw material for fermentative production of biosurfactants. The Box–Behnken Design and response surface methodology were employed to optimize the concentrations of the ratio butter milk /distilled water, poultry-transforming wastes and inoculum size for lipopeptide biosurfactant production by B.subtilis SPB1 in submerged fermentation.The best production yield was about 12.61 ± 0.7 g/L of crude lipopeptide biosurfactant. It can be obtained when using a ratio butter milk /distilled water of 1.5, poultry-transforming wastes of 23g/L and an inoculum size of 0.12. In comparison to the highest biosurfactant production yield reported for Bacillus subtilis SPB1, three fold increases were obtained.

  12. Fed batch enzymatic saccharification of food waste improves the sugar concentration in the hydrolysates and eventually the ethanol fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae H058

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoubao Yan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic hydrolysis of food waste by commercially available enzymes and the subsequent ethanol fermentation of the hydrolysates by Saccharomyces cerecisiae H058 were studied in this work. The optimum batch enzymatic conditions were found to be saccharification pH of 4.5, temperature of 55!, glucoamylase concentration of 120 u/g, α-amylase concentration of 10 u/g, solid-liquid ratio of 1: 0.75 (w/w. Fed batch hydrolysis process was started with a solid-liquid ratio of 1: 1 (w/w, with solid food waste added at time lapse of 2 h to get a final solid-liquid ratio of 1: 0.5 (w/w. After 4 h of reaction, the reducing sugar concentration reached 194.43 g/L with a enzymatic digestibility of 93.12%. Further fermentation of the batch and fed batch enzymatic hydrolysates, which contained reducing sugar concentration of 131.41 and 194.43 g/L respectively, was performed using Saccharomyces cerevisiae H058, 62.93 and 90.72 g/L ethanol was obtained within 48 h.

  13. Biohydrogen from thermophilic co-fermentation of swine manure with fruit and vegetable waste: maximizing stable production without pH control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenca, A; Schievano, A; Perazzolo, F; Adani, F; Oberti, R

    2011-09-01

    Hydrogen production by dark fermentation may suffer of inhibition or instability due to pH deviations from optimality. The co-fermentation of promptly degradable feedstock with alkali-rich materials, such as livestock wastes, may represent a feasible and easy to implement approach to avoid external adjustments of pH. Experiments were designed to investigate the effect of the mixing ratio of fruit-vegetable waste with swine manure with the aim of maximizing biohydrogen production while obtaining process stability through the endogenous alkalinity of manure. Fruit-vegetable/swine manure ratio of 35/65 and HRT of 2d resulted to give the highest production rate of 3.27 ± 0.51 L(H2)L(-1)d(-1), with a corresponding hydrogen yield of 126 ± 22 mL(H2)g(-1)(VS-added) and H2 content in the biogas of 42 ± 5%. At these operating conditions the process exhibited also one of the highest measured stability, with daily productions deviating for less than 14% from the average. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Residues of pharmaceutical products in recycled organic manure produced from sewage sludge and solid waste from livestock and relationship to their fermentation level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyama, Miki; Nakagawa, Shuhei; Tanoue, Rumi; Sato, Yuri; Nomiyama, Kei; Shinohara, Ryota

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, sludge generated in sewage treatment plants (STPs) and solid waste from livestock being utilized is useful for circulation of nourishment in farmlands as recycled organic manure (ROM). In this study, we determined the residue levels and patterns of 12 pharmaceutical products generated by human activity in the ROMs produced from human waste sludge (HWS), sewage sludge (SS), cattle manure (CM), poultry manure (PM), swine manure (SM) and horse manure (HM). The kind and number of pharmaceutical products detected in ROMs were different. Fluoroquinolones (FQs) were detected at high levels in HWS and SS samples. In addition, the detection frequency and concentration levels of sulfonamides (SAs) in PM and SM were high. Moreover, high concentrations of chlortetracycline (CTC) were found in only SM. These differences reflect specific adherence adsorption of the pharmaceutical products to different livestock and humans. Moreover, it was found that the concentrations of pharmaceutical products and fermentation levels of ROMs had significant positive correlation (r=0.41, p=0.024). When the fermentation test of ROM was conducted in a rotary fermentor in a lab scale test, the residue levels of pharmaceutical products decreased effectively except carbamazepine (CBZ). The rates of decrease were in the case of tetracyclines (TCs): 85-92%, FQs: 81-100%, erythromycine: 67%, SAs: 79-95%, trimethoprim: 86% and CBZ: 37% by 30 d. Pharmaceutical products that can be decomposed by fermentation process at the lowest impact of residual antibiotic activities may therefore be considered as environmentally friendly medicines. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Tritium effluent removal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamberger, P.H.; Gibbs, G.E.

    1978-01-01

    An air detritiation system has been developed and is in routine use for removing tritium and tritiated compounds from glovebox effluent streams before they are released to the atmosphere. The system is also used, in combination with temporary enclosures, to contain and decontaminate airborne releases resulting from the opening of tritium containment systems during maintenance and repair operations. This detritiation system, which services all the tritium handling areas at Mound Facility, has played an important role in reducing effluents and maintaining them at 2 percent of the level of 8 y ago. The system has a capacity of 1.7 m 3 /min and has operated around the clock for several years. A refrigerated in-line filtration system removes water, mercury, or pump oil and other organics from gaseous waste streams. The filtered waste stream is then heated and passed through two different types of oxidizing beds; the resulting tritiated water is collected on molecular sieve dryer beds. Liquids obtained from regenerating the dryers and from the refrigerated filtration system are collected and transferred to a waste solidification and packaging station. Component redundancy and by-pass capabilities ensure uninterrupted system operation during maintenance. When processing capacity is exceeded, an evacuated storage tank of 45 m 3 is automatically opened to the inlet side of the system. The gaseous effluent from the system is monitored for tritium content and recycled or released directly to the stack. The average release is less than 1 Ci/day. The tritium effluent can be reduced by isotopically swamping the tritium; this is accomplished by adding hydrogen prior to the oxidizer beds, or by adding water to the stream between the two final dryer beds

  16. Introducing capnophilic lactic fermentation in a combined dark-photo fermentation process: a route to unparalleled H2 yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipasquale, L; Adessi, A; d'Ippolito, G; Rossi, F; Fontana, A; De Philippis, R

    2015-01-01

    Two-stage process based on photofermentation of dark fermentation effluents is widely recognized as the most effective method for biological production of hydrogen from organic substrates. Recently, it was described an alternative mechanism, named capnophilic lactic fermentation, for sugar fermentation by the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana in CO2-rich atmosphere. Here, we report the first application of this novel process to two-stage biological production of hydrogen. The microbial system based on T. neapolitana DSM 4359(T) and Rhodopseudomonas palustris 42OL gave 9.4 mol of hydrogen per mole of glucose consumed during the anaerobic process, which is the best production yield so far reported for conventional two-stage batch cultivations. The improvement of hydrogen yield correlates with the increase in lactic production during capnophilic lactic fermentation and takes also advantage of the introduction of original conditions for culturing both microorganisms in minimal media based on diluted sea water. The use of CO2 during the first step of the combined process establishes a novel strategy for biohydrogen technology. Moreover, this study opens the way to cost reduction and use of salt-rich waste as feedstock.

  17. Legal provisions governing liquid effluents radiological monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gans, I.; Ruehle, H.

    1985-01-01

    The KTA rule 1504 for radiological monitoring of liquid effluents from nuclear installations is explained. As there are no such rules published to date for establishments handling isotopes, some criteria are discussed which in the future ought to form part of a practical guide for liquid effluents monitoring in isotope handling installations. Monitoring measures described refer to liquid effluents from transfer containers, auxiliary cooling equipment, turbine buildings, main cooling installations, and waste air discharges from closed-circuit cooling systems. (DG) [de

  18. Candidate Low-Temperature Glass Waste Forms for Technetium-99 Recovered from Hanford Effluent Management Facility Evaporator Concentrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Mei [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tang, Ming [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rim, Jung Ho [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chamberlin, Rebecca M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-24

    Alternative treatment and disposition options may exist for technetium-99 (99Tc) in secondary liquid waste from the Hanford Direct-Feed Low-Activity Waste (DFLAW) process. One approach includes development of an alternate glass waste form that is suitable for on-site disposition of technetium, including salts and other species recovered by ion exchange or precipitation from the EMF evaporator concentrate. By recovering the Tc content from the stream, and not recycling the treated concentrate, the DFLAW process can potentially be operated in a more efficient manner that lowers the cost to the Department of Energy. This report provides a survey of candidate glass formulations and glass-making processes that can potentially incorporate technetium at temperatures <700 °C to avoid volatilization. Three candidate technetium feed streams are considered: (1) dilute sodium pertechnetate loaded on a non-elutable ion exchange resin; (2) dilute sodium-bearing aqueous eluent from ion exchange recovery of pertechnetate, or (3) technetium(IV) oxide precipitate containing Sn and Cr solids in an aqueous slurry. From the technical literature, promising candidate glasses are identified based on their processing temperatures and chemical durability data. The suitability and technical risk of three low-temperature glass processing routes (vitrification, encapsulation by sintering into a glass composite material, and sol-gel chemical condensation) for the three waste streams was assessed, based on available low-temperature glass data. For a subset of candidate glasses, their long-term thermodynamic behavior with exposure to water and oxygen was modeled using Geochemist’s Workbench, with and without addition of reducing stannous ion. For further evaluation and development, encapsulation of precipitated TcO2/Sn/Cr in a glass composite material based on lead-free sealing glasses is recommended as a high priority. Vitrification of pertechnetate in aqueous anion exchange eluent solution

  19. Biomass and lipid production of Chlorella protothecoides under heterotrophic cultivation on a mixed waste substrate of brewer fermentation and crude glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaoyu; Walker, Terry H; Bridges, William C; Thornton, Charles; Gopalakrishnan, Karthik

    2014-08-01

    Biomass and lipid accumulation of heterotrophic microalgae Chlorella protothecoides by supplying mixed waste substrate of brewer fermentation and crude glycerol were investigated. The biomass concentrations of the old and the new C. protothecoides strains on day 6 reached 14.07 and 12.73 g/L, respectively, which were comparable to those in basal medium with supplement of glucose and yeast extract (BM-GY) (14.47 g/L for old strains and 11.43 g/L for new strains) (P>0.05). Approximately 81.5% of total organic carbon and 65.1% of total nitrogen in the mixed waste were effectively removed. The accumulated lipid productivities of the old and the new C. protothecoides strains in BM-GY were 2.07 and 1.61 g/L/day, respectively, whereas in the mixed waste, lipid productivities could reach 2.12 and 1.81 g/L/day, respectively. Our result highlights a new approach of mixing carbon-rich and nitrogen-rich wastes as economical and practical alternative substrates for biofuel production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Quality Assurance Program Plan for FFTF effluent controls. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seamans, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan is specific to environmental related activities within the FFTF Property Protected Area. The activities include effluent monitoring and Low Level Waste Certification

  1. Effluent standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisler, G C [Pennsylvania State University (United States)

    1974-07-01

    At the conference there was a considerable interest in research reactor standards and effluent standards in particular. On the program, this is demonstrated by the panel discussion on effluents, the paper on argon 41 measured by Sims, and the summary paper by Ringle, et al. on the activities of ANS research reactor standards committee (ANS-15). As a result, a meeting was organized to discuss the proposed ANS standard on research reactor effluents (15.9). This was held on Tuesday evening, was attended by members of the ANS-15 committee who were present at the conference, participants in the panel discussion on the subject, and others interested. Out of this meeting came a number of excellent suggestions for changes which will increase the utility of the standard, and a strong recommendation that the effluent standard (15.9) be combined with the effluent monitoring standard. It is expected that these suggestions and recommendations will be incorporated and a revised draft issued for comment early this summer. (author)

  2. Microbial network for waste activated sludge cascade utilization in an integrated system of microbial electrolysis and anaerobic fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wenzong; He, Zhangwei; Yang, Chunxue

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bioelectrochemical systems have been considered a promising novel technology that shows an enhanced energy recovery, as well as generation of value-added products. A number of recent studies suggested that an enhancement of carbon conversion and biogas production can be achieved....... The characterization of integrated community structure and community shifts is not well understood, however, it starts to attract interest of scientists and engineers. Results: In the present work, energy recovery and WAS conversion are comprehensively affected by typical pretreated biosolid characteristics. We...... investigated the interaction of fermentation communities and electrode respiring communities in an integrated system of WAS fermentation and MEC for hydrogen recovery. A high energy recovery was achieved in the MECs feeding WAS fermentation liquid through alkaline pretreatment. Some anaerobes belonging...

  3. Decontamination of irradiated fuel processing waste using lead paraperiodate; Decontamination des effluents de traitement des combustibles irradies par le paraperiodate de plomb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auchapt, J M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Chusclan (France). Centre de Production de Plutonium de Marcoule

    1967-07-01

    The process is designed to eliminate ruthenium. It consists in an oxidation using para-periodic acid whose excess, acting then as a carrying-over agent, is precipitated in the form of a lead salt at a pH of 5 or 6. This process makes it possible to precipitate 80 to 98 per cent of the ruthenium which is not removed by the conventional precipitation techniques which follow it. If the waste is a reducing agent, it is pre-oxidized using ozone or potassium permanganate. The process was developed at Marcoule in 1963 and has since 1965 been applied industrially; its cost price is of the same order of magnitude as conventional processes and its results are satisfactory. (author) [French] Le procede est destine a l'elimination du ruthenium. Il consiste en une oxydation par l'acide par paraperiodique dont l'exces, jouant alors le role d'entraineur, est precipite sous forme de sel de plomb a pH 5 ou 6. Ce traitement permet de precipiter 80 a 98 pour cent du ruthenium rebelle aux traitements de precipitation classique, qui doivent le suivre. Si l'effluent est reducteur il est preoxyde a l'ozone ou au permanganate de potassium. Mis au point a Marcoule en 1963, il est depuis 1965 exploite industriellement, son prix de revient est du meme ordre de grandeur que celui des traitements habituels et les resultats ont donne satisfaction. (auteur)

  4. Fission product determination in irradiated fuel processing waste (electrophoresis); Dosage des produits de fission dans les effluents de traitement des combustibles irradies (electrophorese)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auchapt, J M; Tret, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de Marcoule, 30 - Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France). Centre de Production de Plutonium de Marcoule. Services d' Extraction du Plutonium

    1966-07-01

    This dosage method concerns fission products present in the waste produced from the processing of cooled irradiated fuels. - Sr, Cs, Ce, Y, Ru by quantitative analysis; - Zr, Nb by qualitative analysis. It includes electrophoresis on paper strips one meter long which is then analysed between two window-less Geiger counters. For an activity of 10{sup -2} {mu}Ci of any cation in a 10 {mu}l spot, the standard error {sigma} if 3 to 4 per cent. complete analysis lasts about 5 hours. (authors) [French] Cette methode de dosage concerne les produits de fission presents dans les effluents de traitement des combustibles irradies refroidis: - Sr, Cs, Ce, Y, Ru en analyse quantitative; - Zr, Nb en analyse qualitative. Elle comporte une electrophorese sur bande de papier de un metre de longueur suivie d'un depouillement entre deux compteurs Geiger sans fenetre. Pour une activite de 10{sup -2} {mu}Ci d'un cation quelconque dans une tache de 10 {mu}l l'erreur standard {sigma} est de 3 a 4 pour cent. L'analyse complete demande environ 5 heures. (auteurs)

  5. USERDA effluent data collection and reporting program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elle, D.R.; Schoen, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    Effluent and environmental monitoring has been conducted at United States Energy Research and Development Administration (formerly United States Atomic Energy Commission) facilities and sites virtually since the inception of atomic energy research and development. In 1971, computer systems were developed that permitted storage of information and data characterizing each effluent and onsite discharge point and relevant information on sources, effluent treatment and control systems, and discharge data, and serve as ERDA's computer-based management information systems for compiling waste discharge control and monitoring data on radioactivity released as airborne or liquid effluents or liquid discharges to onsite retention basins at ERDA facilities. The information systems and associated data outputs have proved to be an effective internal management tool for identifying effluent control problem areas and for surveying an agencywide Radioactive Effluent Reduction Program. The trend data facilitate the detection of gradual changes in the effectiveness of waste treatment systems, and errors or oversights in monitoring and data handling. Other computer outputs are useful for identifying effluent release points that have significantly higher or lower concentrations or quantities in the discharge stream than were measured the previous year. The year-to-year trend reports and the extensive computer edit and error checks have improved the reliability of the reported effluent data. Adoption of a uniform, centralized reporting system has improved the understanding and credibility of effluent data, and has allowed management to evaluate the effectiveness of effluent control practices at ERDA facilities. (author)

  6. Role of alkaline-tolerant fungal cellulases in release of total antioxidants from agro-wastes under solid state fermentation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ravindran, C.; Varatharajan, G. R.; Karthikeyan, A.

    -wastes and total antioxidant property. The increased antioxidant activity on free radical scavenging was also observed with the increase in pH. Thus, the present study makes it possible to produce nutraceutical ingredients cost-effectively from agricultural wastes....

  7. Performance of cellulose acetate membrane with different additives for palm oil mill effluent (POME) liquid waste treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprilia, N. A. S.; Fauzi; Azmi, N.; Najwan, N.; Amin, A.

    2018-03-01

    Performance of cellulose acetate membrane for treatment of POME liquid has studied with different additives. Cellulose acetate membranes were prepared with different additive ie formamide and polyethylene glycol and used acetone as solvent. The function of formamide and polyethylene glycol (PEG) is to increase the porosity of the membrane surface. Performance of the membrane were included SEM, FT-IR and coefficient permeability. Membrane performance has been performed for percent rejection of total suspended solid (TSS) and turbidity of POME liquid waste. Cellulose acetate with formamide shows an increased percentage of rejection in removing TSS and turbidity than cellulose acetate with PEG.

  8. 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility: Delisting petition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    Waste water has been generated for over 40 years as a result of operations conducted on the Hanford Site. This waste water previously was discharged to cribs, ponds, or ditches. An example of such waste water includes process condensate that might have been in contact with dangerous waste or mixed waste (containing both radioactive and dangerous components). This petition presents the treatment technologies that are designed into the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility to eliminate the dangerous characteristics of the waste and to delist the effluent in accordance with the requirements found in 40 Code of Federal Regulations 260.20 and 260.22. The purpose of this petition is to demonstrate that the 242-A Evaporator process condensate will be treated adequately so that the effluent from the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility will no longer require management as a regulated dangerous waste. This demonstration was performed by use of a surrogate (synthetic) waste, designed by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office to include species that represent all organic and inorganic constituents (but not radionuclide species) expected to be found on the Hanford Site. Thus, the surrogate will encompass not only the expected 242-A Evaporator process condensate characteristics, but those of other potential 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility waste streams and additional 40 CFR Appendix VIII constituents

  9. Bioremediation of textile effluent using Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioremediation of textile effluent using Phanerochaete chrysosporium. ... African Journal of Biotechnology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS ... The discharge of these waste residues into the environment eventually poison, damage or affect one or ...

  10. Proposal of law about the recovery and valorization of the gas coming from the anaerobic fermentation of organic wastes, renewable energy with a high potentiality; Proposition de Loi portant sur la recuperation et la valorisation du gaz issu de la fermentation anaerobie des dechets organiques, energie renouvelable a forte potentialite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-12-15

    The goal of this proposal of law is the systematic and mandatory capture and valorization of the methane coming from the anaerobic fermentation of municipal and agricultural wastes, and more generally coming from any activity generating gases with at least 25% of methane. (J.S.)

  11. Biogas Production Using Anaerobic Biodigester from Cassava Starch Effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sunarso

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available IKMs’ factory activity in Margoyoso produces liquid and solid wastes. The possible alternative was to use the liquid effluent as biogas raw material. This study focuses on the used of urea, ruminant, yeast, microalgae, the treatment of gelled and ungelled feed for biogas production, pH control during biogas production using buffer Na2CO3, and feeding management in the semi-continuous process of biogas production that perform at ambient temperature for 30 days. Ruminant bacteria, yeast, urea, and microalgae was added 10% (v/v, 0.08% (w/v, 0.04% (w/v, 50% (v/v of mixing solution volume, respectively. The pH of slurry was adjusted with range 6.8-7.2 and was measured daily and corrected when necessary with Na2CO3. The total biogas production was measured daily by the water displacement technique. Biogas production from the ungelling and gelling mixture of cassava starch effluent, yeast, ruminant bacteria, and urea were 726.43 ml/g total solid and 198 ml/g total solid. Biogas production from ungelling mixture without yeast was 58.6 ml/g total solid. Biogas production from ungelling mixture added by microalgae without yeast was 58.72 ml/g total solid and that with yeast was 189 ml/g total solid. Biogas production from ungelling mixture of cassava starch effluent, yeast, ruminant bacteria, and urea in semi-continuous process was 581.15 ml/g total solid. Adding of microalgae as nitrogen source did not give significant effect to biogas production. But adding of yeast as substrate activator was very helpful to accelerate biogas production. The biogas production increased after cassava starch effluent and yeast was added. Requirement of sodium carbonate (Na2CO3 to increase alkalinity or buffering capacity of fermenting solution depends on pH-value

  12. Identification of microplastic in effluents of waste water treatment plants using focal plane array-based micro-Fourier-transform infrared imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintenig, S M; Int-Veen, I; Löder, M G J; Primpke, S; Gerdts, G

    2017-01-01

    The global presence of microplastic (MP) in aquatic ecosystems has been shown by various studies. However, neither MP concentrations nor their sources or sinks are completely known. Waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) are considered as significant point sources discharging MP to the environment. This study investigated MP in the effluents of 12 WWTPs in Lower Saxony, Germany. Samples were purified by a plastic-preserving enzymatic-oxidative procedure and subsequent density separation using a zinc chloride solution. For analysis, attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FT-IR) and focal plane array (FPA)-based transmission micro-FT-IR imaging were applied. This allowed the identification of polymers of all MP down to a size of 20 μm. In all effluents MP was found with quantities ranging from 0 to 5 × 10 1  m -3  MP > 500 μm and 1 × 10 1 to 9 × 10 3  m -3  MP < 500 μm. By far, polyethylene was the most frequent polymer type in both size classes. Quantities of synthetic fibres ranged from 9 × 10 1 to 1 × 10 3  m -3 and were predominantly made of polyester. Considering the annual effluxes of tested WWTPs, total discharges of 9 × 10 7 to 4 × 10 9  MP particles and fibres per WWTP could be expected. Interestingly, one tertiary WWTP had an additionally installed post-filtration that reduced the total MP discharge by 97%. Furthermore, the sewage sludge of six WWTPs was examined and the existence of MP, predominantly polyethylene, revealed. Our findings suggest that WWTPs could be a sink but also a source of MP and thus can be considered to play an important role for environmental MP pollution. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiation treatment of sewage effluent, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawai, Teruko; Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Sawai, Takeshi; Shimokawa, Toshinari; Tanabe, Hiroko

    1991-01-01

    The water demand of the past several years has increased rapidly. Recycling of municipal waste water is an effective mean of coping with the water shortage in Tokyo. We studied the radiation treatment method of further purification of the effluent from sewage treatment plants. By gamma irradiation the refractory organic substances in the effluent were decomposed and the COD values decreased with increasing dose. The high molecular weight components in the effluent were degraded to lower molecular weight substances and were decomposed finally to carbon dioxide. In this paper we studied on the fading color and the reducing of order of sewage effluent. (author)

  14. Correlation of radioactive waste treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: conversion of yellow cake to uranium hexafluoride. Part I. The fluorination-fractionation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, M.B.; Blanco, R.E.; Finney, B.C.; Hill, G.S.; Moore, R.E.; Witherspoon, J.P.

    1977-07-01

    A cost/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials and chemicals from a model uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) production plant using the fluorination-fractionation (dry hydrofluor) process, and to evaluate the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the released materials on the environment. This study is designed to assist in defining the term as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) in relation to limiting the release of radioactive materials from nuclear facilities. The model plant processes 10,000 metric tons of uranium per year. Base-case waste treatment is the minimum necessary to operate the process. Effluents meet the radiological requirements listed in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 20 (10 CFR 20), Appendix B, Table II, but may not be acceptable chemically at all sites. Additional radwaste treatment techniques are applied to the base-case plant in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The costs for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose commitment are calculated for each case. In the final analysis, radiological dose is plotted vs the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Much of the technology used in the advanced cases will require development and demonstration or else is proprietary and unavailable for immediate use. The methodology and assumptions for the radiological doses are found in ORNL-4992.

  15. Correlation of radioactive waste treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: conversion of yellow cake to uranium hexafluoride. Part I. The fluorination-fractionation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, M.B.; Blanco, R.E.; Finney, B.C.; Hill, G.S.; Moore, R.E.; Witherspoon, J.P.

    1977-07-01

    A cost/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials and chemicals from a model uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) production plant using the fluorination-fractionation (dry hydrofluor) process, and to evaluate the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the released materials on the environment. This study is designed to assist in defining the term as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) in relation to limiting the release of radioactive materials from nuclear facilities. The model plant processes 10,000 metric tons of uranium per year. Base-case waste treatment is the minimum necessary to operate the process. Effluents meet the radiological requirements listed in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 20 (10 CFR 20), Appendix B, Table II, but may not be acceptable chemically at all sites. Additional radwaste treatment techniques are applied to the base-case plant in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The costs for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose commitment are calculated for each case. In the final analysis, radiological dose is plotted vs the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Much of the technology used in the advanced cases will require development and demonstration or else is proprietary and unavailable for immediate use. The methodology and assumptions for the radiological doses are found in ORNL-4992

  16. The treatment of effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wormser, G.; Rodier, J.; Robien, E. de; Fernandez, N.

    1964-01-01

    For several years the French Atomic Energy Commission has been studying with interest problems presented by radio-active effluents. Since high activities have not yet received a definite solution we will deal only, in this paper, with the achievements and research concerning low and medium activity effluents. In the field of the achievements, we may mention the various effluent treatment stations which have been built in France; a brief list will be given together with an outline of their main new features. Thus in particular the latest treatment stations put into operation (Grenoble, Fontenay-aux-Roses, Cadarache) will be presented. From all these recent achievements three subjects will be dealt with in more detail. 1 - The workshop for treating with bitumen the sludge obtained after concentration of radionuclides. 2 - The workshop for treating radioactive solid waste by incineration. 3 - A unit for concentrating radio-active liquid effluents by evaporation. In the field of research, several topics have been undertaken, a list will be given. In most cases the research concerns the concentration of radionuclides with a view to a practical and low cost storage, a concentration involving an efficient decontamination of the aqueous liquids in the best possible economic conditions. For improving the treatments leading to the concentration of nuclides, our research has naturally been concerned with perfecting the treatments used in France: coprecipitation and evaporation. In our work we have taken into account in particular two conditions laid down in the French Centres. 1 - A very strict sorting out of the effluents at their source in order to limit in each category the volume of liquid to be dealt with. 2 - The necessity for a very complete decontamination due to the high population density in our country. In the last past we present two original methods for treating liquid effluents. 1 - The use of ion-exchange resins for liquids containing relatively many salts. The

  17. Biotransformation of 1,8-cineole by solid-state fermentation of Eucalyptus waste from the essential oil industry using Pleurotus ostreatus and Favolus tenuiculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omarini, Alejandra; Dambolena, José Sebastián; Lucini, Enrique; Jaramillo Mejía, Santiago; Albertó, Edgardo; Zygadlo, Julio A

    2016-03-01

    Biotechnological conversion of low-cost agro-industrial by-products, such as industrial waste or terpenes from the distillation of essential oils from plants into more valuable oxygenated derivatives, can be achieved by using microbial cells or enzymes. In Argentina, the essential oil industry produces several tons of waste each year that could be used as raw materials in the production of industrially relevant and value-added compounds. In this study, 1,8-cineole, one of the components remaining in the spent leaves of the Eucalyptus cinerea waste, was transformed by solid-state fermentation (SSF) using the two edible mushrooms Pleurotus ostreatus and Favolus tenuiculus. As a result, two new oxygenated derivatives of 1,8-cineole were identified: 1,3,3-trimethyl-2-oxabicyclo [2.2.2]octan-6-ol and 1,3,3-trimethyl-2-oxabicyclo [2.2.2]octan-6-one. Additionally, changes in the relative percentages of other aroma compounds present in the substrate were observed during SSF. Both fungal strains have the ability to produce aroma compounds with potential applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

  18. A contribution to the study of radioactive waste dilution in the Rhone involving tests with a rhodamine B tracer; Contribution a l'etude de la dilution des effluents radioactifs dans le Rhone par le rejet experimental de rhodamine B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodier, J.; Marichal, M. [Commissariat a l' energie atomique et aux energies alternatives - CEA, Centre de production de plutonium de Marcoule, Service de protection contre les radiations (France)

    1961-07-01

    The process whereby waste from the Marcoule plant mixes with the water in the Rhone was followed in tests with rhodamine as a chemical tracer. Satisfactory dispersion was noted less than 4 km downstream from the waste discharge duct outlet, and the degree of homogeneity was considered to be satisfactory at the bridge of Roquemaure, und perfect at Avignon. This investigation not only revealed a complete absence of any preferential flow paths containing high radioactive waste concentrations, but it also enabled the most representative points to be selected at which to take Rhone water samples during future radioactive waste discharges. Reprint of a paper published in 'La Houille Blanche' N. 5 - Aug 196, p. 636-641 [French] L'emploi de la rhodamine comme traceur chimique a permis de suivre l'evolution du melange des effluents du Centre de Marcoule aux eaux du Rhone. La dispersion est deja satisfaisante a moins de 4 km en aval de la conduite des rejets, et l'homogeneite peut etre consideree comme atteinte au pont de Roquemaure et parfaite a Avignon. Cette etude a montre que les veines preferentielles ou se concentrait l'ecoulement des effluents radioactifs n'existent pas. Elle a permis de preciser en outre les emplacements les plus representatifs des points d'echantillonnage des eaux du Rhone au cours des rejets. Reproduction d'un article publie dans 'La houille blanche' N. 5 - Aug 196, p. 636-641.

  19. 200 Area Liquid Effluent Facilities -- Quality assurance program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, L.

    1995-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) describes the quality assurance and management controls used by the 200 Area Liquid Effluent Facilities (LEF) to perform its activities in accordance with DOE Order 5700.6C. The 200 Area LEF consists of the following facilities: Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF); Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF); Liquid Effluent Retention facility (LERF); and Truck Loading Facility -- (Project W291). The intent is to ensure that all activities such as collection of effluents, treatment, concentration of secondary wastes, verification, sampling and disposal of treated effluents and solids related with the LEF operations, conform to established requirements

  20. Fermentation of lactose to ethanol in cheese whey permeate and concentrated permeate by engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasotti, Lorenzo; Zucca, Susanna; Casanova, Michela; Micoli, Giuseppina; Cusella De Angelis, Maria Gabriella; Magni, Paolo

    2017-06-02

    Whey permeate is a lactose-rich effluent remaining after protein extraction from milk-resulting cheese whey, an abundant dairy waste. The lactose to ethanol fermentation can complete whey valorization chain by decreasing dairy waste polluting potential, due to its nutritional load, and producing a biofuel from renewable source at the same time. Wild type and engineered microorganisms have been proposed as fermentation biocatalysts. However, they present different drawbacks (e.g., nutritional supplements requirement, high transcriptional demand of recombinant genes, precise oxygen level, and substrate inhibition) which limit the industrial attractiveness of such conversion process. In this work, we aim to engineer a new bacterial biocatalyst, specific for dairy waste fermentation. We metabolically engineered eight Escherichia coli strains via a new expression plasmid with the pyruvate-to-ethanol conversion genes, and we carried out the selection of the best strain among the candidates, in terms of growth in permeate, lactose consumption and ethanol formation. We finally showed that the selected engineered microbe (W strain) is able to efficiently ferment permeate and concentrated permeate, without nutritional supplements, in pH-controlled bioreactor. In the conditions tested in this work, the selected biocatalyst could complete the fermentation of permeate and concentrated permeate in about 50 and 85 h on average, producing up to 17 and 40 g/l of ethanol, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing efficient ethanol production from the lactose contained in whey permeate with engineered E. coli. The selected strain is amenable to further metabolic optimization and represents an advance towards efficient biofuel production from industrial waste stream.

  1. Combined biological treatment of sinter plant waste water, blast furnace gas scrubber water polluted groundwater and coke plant effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoine van Hoorn [Corus Staal, IJmuiden (Netherlands)

    2006-07-01

    Waste water from the Corus coke plant in IJmuiden had been handled by the activated sludge process since start-up in 1972 but in the eighties it was clear that although this removed most phenols, the rest of the COD and thiocyanate must also be removed before discharge. The paper describes the original water treatment process and the higher pressure gas scrubber system for removal of SO{sub 2}, heavy metals and other harmful components. It goes on to describe development of a combined biological treatment system, the heart of which is the so-called Bio 2000. The performance of this new plant is discussed. COD concentrations are very constant but Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen (TKN) concentrations fluctuate. COD, TKN and heavy metals are in compliance but cyanide and suspended solids are not always so. A method of overcoming this is being sought. This paper was presented at a COMA meeting in March 2005 held in Scunthorpe, UK. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Avoidance of thermal effluent by juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshowytscha) and its implications in waste heat management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, R.H.

    1977-03-01

    Knowledge of behavioral responses of aquatic organisms to thermal discharges at power plants is essential to evaluate thermal exposure and subsequent effects on survival and ecological success. Instantaneous responses of juvenile salmon that encountered a simulated river-thermal plume interface were assessed in a model raceway with a thermal discharge. Fish movement and response to the discharge were recorded on videotape. Juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) tested under three discharge conditions (no plume, ambient plume and heated plume) avoided plume temperatures greater than 9 to 11 0 C above ambient. Fish occasionally oriented to the discharge current, but were not attracted to the thermal component of the plume when plume ΔT's were below the avoidance level of 11 0 C. Fish did not pass to the lower end of the raceway when plume ΔT exceeded 9 to 11 0 C. The responses noted in our experiments suggest organismic behavior may prevent juvenile salmon in nature from experiencing lethal conditions from thermal discharges and have application in waste heat management and utilization

  3. Phosphorus and short-chain fatty acids recovery from waste activated sludge by anaerobic fermentation: Effect of acid or alkali pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liang; Zhang, Cheng; Hu, Hui; Liu, Jianyong; Duan, Tengfei; Luo, Jinghuan; Qian, Guangren

    2017-09-01

    Waste activated sludge (WAS) was pretreated by acid or alkali to enhance the anaerobic fermentation (AF) for phosphorus (P) and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) release into the liquid simultaneously. With acid pretreatment, the released total P concentration achieved 120mg/L, which was 71.4% higher than that with alkali pretreatment. In addition, alkali pretreatment enhanced organic P release with about 35.3% of organic P in the solid being converted to inorganic P, while little had changed with acid pretreatment. The results also showed that acid and alkali pretreatment enhanced SCFAs production by 15.3 and 12.5times, respectively. Acid pretreatment could be preferred for simultaneous recovery of P and SCFAs by AF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Correlation of radioactive waste treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: reprocessing light-water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finney, B.C.; Blanco, R.E.; Dahlman, R.C.; Hill, G.S.; Kitts, F.G.; Moore, R.E.; Witherspoon, J.P.

    1976-10-01

    A cost/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials from a model nuclear fuel reprocessing plant which processes light-water reactor (LWR) fuels, and to determine the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the released materials on the environment. The study is designed to assist in defining the term as low as reasonably achievable in relation to limiting the release of radioactive materials from nuclear facilities. The base case model plant is representative of current plant technology and has an annual capacity of 1500 metric tons of LWR fuel. Additional radwaste treatment systems are added to the base case plant in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The cost for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose commitments are calculated for each case. In the final analysis, radiological dose is plotted vs the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Much of the technology used in the advanced cases is in an early stage of development and is not suitable for immediate use. The methodology used in estimating the costs, and the radiological doses, detailed calculations, and tabulations are presented in Appendix A and ORNL-4992. This report is a revision of the original study

  5. Correlation of radioactive waste treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: conversion of recycle uranium to UF6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roddy, J.W.; Blanco, R.E.; Finney, B.C.; Hill, G.S.; Moore, R.E.; Witherspoon, J.P.

    1977-04-01

    A cost/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of various radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the amount of radioactive materials released from a model recycle uranium conversion and uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) production plant and to determine the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the released radioactive materials on the environment. This study is designed to assist the US NRC in defining the term ''as low as reasonably achievable'' as it applies to these nuclear facilities. The base case model plant is representative of a licensable UF 6 production plant and has an annual capacity of 1500 metric tons of uranium. Additional radwaste treatment systems are added to the base case plant in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The cost for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose commitments is calculated for each case. In the final analysis, radiological dose is plotted vs the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. The methodology used in estimating the costs is presented

  6. Electro-Fermentation - Merging Electrochemistry with Fermentation in Industrial Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schievano, Andrea; Pepé Sciarria, Tommy; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien; De Wever, Heleen; Puig, Sebastià; Andersen, Stephen J; Rabaey, Korneel; Pant, Deepak

    2016-11-01

    Electro-fermentation (EF) merges traditional industrial fermentation with electrochemistry. An imposed electrical field influences the fermentation environment and microbial metabolism in either a reductive or oxidative manner. The benefit of this approach is to produce target biochemicals with improved selectivity, increase carbon efficiency, limit the use of additives for redox balance or pH control, enhance microbial growth, or in some cases enhance product recovery. We discuss the principles of electrically driven fermentations and how EF can be used to steer both pure culture and microbiota-based fermentations. An overview is given on which advantages EF may bring to both existing and innovative industrial fermentation processes, and which doors might be opened in waste biomass utilization towards added-value biorefineries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Treating radioactive effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkham, I.A.

    1981-01-01

    In the treatment of radioactive effluent it is known to produce a floc being a suspension of precipitates carrying radioactive species in a mother liquor containing dissolved non-radioactive salts. It is also known and accepted practice to encapsulate the floc in a solid matrix by treatment with bitumen, cement and the like. In the present invention the floc is washed with water prior to encapsulation in the solid matrix whereby to displace the mother liquor containing the dissolved non-radioactive salts. This serves to reduce the final amount of solidified radioactive waste with consequent advantages in the storage and disposal thereof. (author)

  8. Anaerobic treatment of palm oil mill effluent in batch reactor with digested biodiesel waste as starter and natural zeolite for microbial immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyowati, Paulina Adina Hari; Halim, Lenny; Mellyanawaty, Melly; Sudibyo, Hanifrahmawan; Budhijanto, Wiratni

    2017-05-01

    Palm oil mill effluent (POME) is the wastewater discharged from sludge separation, sterilization, and clarification process of palm oil industries. Each ton of palm oil produces about half ton of high organic load wastewater. Up to now, POME treatment is done in lagoon, leaving major problems in land requirement and greenhouse gasses release. The increasing of palm oil production provokes the urgency of appropriate technology application in treating POME to prevent the greenhouse gasses emission while exploit POME as renewable energy source. The purposes of this study were firstly to test the effectiveness of using the digested biodiesel waste as the inoculum and secondly to evaluate the effectiveness of natural zeolite addition in minimizing the inhibitory effect in digesting POME. It was expected that the oil-degrading bacteria in the inoculum would shorten the adaptation period in digesting POME. Furthermore, the consortium formation of anaerobic bacteria accelerated by natural zeolite powder addition would increase the microbial resistance to the inhibitors contained in the POME. The batch digesters, containing 0 (control); 17; 38; and 63 g natural zeolite/g sCOD substrate were observed for 43 days. The result showed that zeolite addition did not give significant effect on sCOD reduction (97.3-98.6% of initial sCOD). Moreover, addition of immobilization media up to 17 g natural zeolite/g stimulated the acidification and biogas production up to 10% higher than control. The purity of methane produced with various amount of immobilization media did not differ for each variation, i.e. 50-54% v/v methane. The increasing amount of natural zeolite up to 63 g/g sCOD did not significantly enhance biogas product rate nor methane content.

  9. PEMANFAATAN LIMBAH BULU AYAM MENJADI BAHAN PAKAN IKAN DENGAN FERMENTASI Bacillus subtilis (Utilization of Waste Chicken Feather to Fish Feed Ingredients Material with Fermentation of Bacillus subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dini Siswani Mulia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk memanfaatkan limbah bulu ayam menjadi bahan pakan ikan dengan fermentasi Bacillus subtilis. Penelitian menggunakan metode eksperimen dengan Rancangan Acak Lengkap (RAL 4 perlakuan, 3 kali ulangan, yaitu P0 : tepung bulu ayam non fermentasi; P1 : fermentasi dengan inokulum B. subtilis 5 mL/2 g tepung bulu ayam; P2 : fermentasi dengan inokulum B. subtilis 10 mL/2 g tepung bulu ayam; P3 : fermentasi dengan inokulum B. subtilis 15 mL/2 g tepung bulu ayam. Parameter yang diamati adalah hasil uji proksimat meliputi kadar protein kasar, kadar air, kadar abu, kadar lemak kasar, kadar serat kasar, dan parameter pendukung yaitu uji organoleptik, berupa sifat fisik tepung bulu ayam, meliputi warna, tekstur, dan bau. Data berupa hasil uji proksimat dianalisis menggunakan ANAVA dan Duncan Multiple Range Test (DMRT dengan taraf uji 5%, sedangkan untuk data hasil organoleptik dianalisis secara deskriptif kualitatif. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa pemanfaatan limbah bulu ayam menjadi bahan pakan ikan dapat dilakukan dengan fermentasi B. subtilis. Fermentasi tepung bulu ayam menggunakan B. subtillis dapat meningkatkan kualitas bahan baku pakan ikan. Perlakuan P2 (inokulum 10 mL/2 g tepung bulu ayamadalah perlakuan yang paling efektif karena menghasilkan protein tertinggi yaitu 80,59%, dengan perubahan sifat fisik menjadi putih sampai putih kekuningan (warna, lembut (tekstur, dan khas kurang menyengat (bau.   ABSTRACT This study aims to utilize waste chicken feathers into fish feed ingredients by fermentation of Bacillus subtilis. The research has done by experimental methods with completely randomized design (CRD 4 treatments, 3 repetitions, ie P0: non-fermented chicken feather meal; P1: fermentation with B. subtilis 5 mL inoculum/2 g chicken feather meal; P2: 10 mL/2 g chicken feather meal; P3: 15 mL/2 g chicken feather meal. Parameters measured were the proximate test results include the levels of crude protein

  10. Advantages and limits to the fermentation of easily-degradable industrial and food wastes in sewage treatment works; Vorteile und Grenzen der Vergaerung von leicht abbaubaren Industrie- und Lebensmittelabfaellen in Abwasserreinigungsanlagen. Vergleich zu landwirtschaftlichen Anlagen - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, N.; Wellinger, A. [Nova Energie GmbH, Aadorf (Switzerland); Bachmann, N. [EREP SA, Aclens (Switzerland)

    2009-12-15

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at the advantages and limits that apply to the fermentation of industrial and food wastes in sewage treatment facilities in comparison to agricultural installations. For this ecological review, a material-flow analysis was made which permitted the nutrient loss to be quantified. The report presents data on the energy and carbon dioxide balances for the method and also looks at the method from an economical point of view. Co-fermentation in the wastewater treatment plant in Berne, Switzerland, and in agricultural plant are examined.

  11. Modeling and verification of process parameters for the production of tannase by Aspergillus oryzae under submerged fermentation using agro-wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadharajan, Venkatramanan; Vadivel, Sudhan Shanmuga; Ramaswamy, Arulvel; Sundharamurthy, Venkatesaprabhu; Chandrasekar, Priyadharshini

    2017-01-01

    Tannase production by Aspergillus oryzae using various agro-wastes as substrates by submerged fermentation was studied in this research. The microbe was isolated from degrading corn kernel obtained from the corn fields at Tiruchengode, India. The microbial identification was done using 18S rRNA gene analysis. The agro-wastes chosen for the study were pomegranate rind, Cassia auriculata flower, black gram husk, and tea dust. The process parameters chosen for optimization study were substrate concentration, pH, temperature, and incubation period. During one variable at a time optimization, the pomegranate rind extract produced maximum tannase activity of 138.12 IU/mL and it was chosen as the best substrate for further experiments. The quadratic model was found to be the effective model for prediction of tannase production by A. oryzae. The optimized conditions predicted by response surface methodology (RSM) with genetic algorithm (GA) were 1.996% substrate concentration, pH of 4.89, temperature of 34.91 °C, and an incubation time of 70.65 H with maximum tannase activity of 138.363 IU/mL. The confirmatory experiment under optimized conditions showed tannase activity of 139.22 IU/mL. Hence, RSM-GA pair was successfully used in this study to optimize the process parameters required for the production of tannase using pomegranate rind. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Solid substrate fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tengerdy, R P

    1985-04-01

    Solid Substrate Fermentation (SSF) describes the microbiological tranformation of biological materials in their natural state, in contrast with liquid or submerged fermentations which are carried out in dilute solutions or slurries. The most important industrial microorganisms used in SSF are filamentous fungi and the critical factors in their growth are the control of the moisture level and the temperature. Traditionally, most SSFs are conducted in shallow trays (so that heat build up is avoided) and stacked in a moist chamber, however, the modern SSF should be able to mix large amounts of substrate for a uniform fermentation, maximum automization scale-up of the process, continuous operation and fermentation control and a promising new design is the Helical screw fermenter. At the present time SSF is used in the production of foods (e.g. mushrooms and oriental foods) in municipal, agricultural and industrial solid waste disposal and in the production of enzymes and speciality chemicals but it does not seem likely that it will replace prevalent liquid fermentation technologies. 29 references.

  13. KINETIKA FERMENTASI ASAM ASETAT (VINEGAR OLEH BAKTERI Acetobacter aceti B 127 DARI ETANOL HASIL FERMENTASI LIMBAH CAIR PULP KAKAO [Kinetics of Acetic Acid (Vinegar Fermentation By Acetobacter aceti B127 from Ethanol Produced by Fermentation of Liquid Waste of Cacao Pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Supli Effendi

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Acetic acid concentration is one of vinegar’s quality parameter. Acetic acid concentration in vinegar is influenced by the activity of acetic acid bacteria. This research studied the kinetics of anaerobic fermentation of liquid waste of cacao pulp by Saccharomyces cerevisiae R60 to produce ethanol and the kinetics of acetic acid fermentation from ethanol by Acetobacter aceti B127. The kinetics of acetic acid fermentation from ethanol by Acetobacter aceti B127 can be used as a basic of bioprocess design for aerobic fermentation in general and acetic acid fermentation from ethanol by Acetobacter aceti B127 in particular. Fermentation medium used was liquid waste of cocoa pulp with sugar content of 12.85%, and the addition of sucrosa and urea. The parameter observed was growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae R60 and Acetobacter aceti B127, and chemical analysis including concentration of ethanol, total sugar and acetic acid, content. The research result showed that the  value was 0.048 hour-1, Y P was 0.676, Qp value was 0.033 hour-, and KLa value was 0.344, QO2.Cx value was 0.125 (mgO2L-1jam-1, Y X was s O2 0.378 (x 108selmL-1g-1¬¬O2, and dCT was 0.150 mgL-1hour-1. Concentration of acetic acid in the product was 4.24% or 42.4 gL-1

  14. Culture-Independent Analyses Reveal Novel Anaerolineaceae as Abundant Primary Fermenters in Anaerobic Digesters Treating Waste Activated Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J. McIlroy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion for biogas production is reliant on the tightly coupled synergistic activities of complex microbial consortia. Members of the uncultured A6 phylotype, within the phylum Chloroflexi, are among the most abundant genus-level-taxa of mesophilic anaerobic digester systems treating primary and surplus sludge from wastewater treatment plants, yet are known only by their 16S rRNA gene sequence. This study applied metagenomics to obtain a complete circular genome (2.57 Mbp from a representative of the A6 taxon. Preliminary annotation of the genome indicates these organisms to be anaerobic chemoorganoheterotrophs with a fermentative metabolism. Given their observed abundance, they are likely important primary fermenters in digester systems. Application of fluorescence in situ hybridisation probes designed in this study revealed their morphology to be short filaments present within the flocs. The A6 were sometimes co-located with the filamentous Archaea Methanosaeta spp. suggesting potential undetermined synergistic relationships. Based on its genome sequence and morphology we propose the species name Brevefilum fermentans gen. nov. sp. nov.

  15. Microbial degradation of textile industrial effluents | Palamthodi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Textile waste water is a highly variable mixture of many polluting substance ranging from inorganic compounds and elements to polymers and organic products. To ensure the safety of effluents, proper technologies need to be used for the complete degradation of dyes. Traditionally, treatments of textile waste water involve ...

  16. Effluent and water treatment at AERE Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    The treatment of liquid wastes at Harwell is based on two main principles: separation of surface water, domestic sewage, trade wastes and radioactive effluents at source, and a system of holding tanks which are sampled so that the appropriate treatment can be given to any batch. All discharges are subject to independent monitoring by the authorising departments and the Thames Water Inspectors. (author)

  17. Growth Conditions and Gamma-Irradiation as Enhancers of Cellulase Production by Bacillus subtilis Using Solid State Fermentation of Banana Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EI Shafey, H.M.

    2008-01-01

    In the present investigation trials have been carried out to study the effect of growth conditions and y-irradiation on the enhancement of cellulases using banana wastes. Bacterial strains were isolated from degraded banana wastes. Using the plate screening medium, a hypercelIulolytic isolate was selected on the basis of the diameter of the hydrolysis zone surrounding the colonies, and identified as Bacillus subtilis. Three method of pretreatment or the substrate were applied and compared in order to increase the susceptibility of the substrate to biodegradation. The methods used were autoclaving at 121 degree C for 60 min, acid hydrolysis using 2 N HCI, and alkali hydrolysis using 2 M NaOH. Pretreatment of the substrate (banana wastes) by autoclaving at 121 degree C for 60 minutes yielded the highest carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase) and filter paper cellulase (FPase) enzyme activities in comparing with other methods. Production of CMCase and FPase was followed during changes of the growth conditions using solid state fermentation. Results showed that the two enzymes share the same growth factors for the maximum enzymatic production including 36 degree C incubation temperature, 72 hours incubation period, 60% moisture content, 20% v/w inoculum size, and initial ph 7.0. A gamma irradiation dose of 1.5 kGy was found to have an enhancing effect on the two enzymes production. Production of FPase enzyme was enhanced by 3.43 and 2.28% in pseudo stems and leaves, respectively. On the other hand, production of CMCase enzyme was slightly enhanced by 0.91 and 0.72% using pseudo stems and leaves respectively. Results also showed that banana leaves yielded higher CMCase and FPase enzymes than pseudo stems

  18. Effect of dilution and L-malic acid addition on bio-hydrogen production with Rhodopseudomonas palustris from effluent of an acidogenic anaerobic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azbar, N.; Tuba, F.; Dokgoz, C.

    2009-01-01

    production reactor was not suitable for photo-fermentative hydrogen production. It was concluded that dilution of the feeding helps to reduce the nitrogen content and the volatile fatty acid content that might be otherwise harmful to the photo-heterotrophic organisms. The second conclusion that can be drawn is that cheese whey effluent should be mixed with L-malic acid rich co-substrates such as fruit juice processing effluents before fed into the photo-fermentation reactor. Finally, the two-stage H 2 -producing process could be applied in remediation of lactose-containing industrial wastes, H 2 being used on-site, to reduce process costs via generation of electricity by the help of hydrogen fuel cells. (author)

  19. Effect of dilution and L-malic acid addition on bio-hydrogen production with Rhodopseudomonas palustris from effluent of an acidogenic anaerobic reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azbar, N.; Tuba, F.; Dokgoz, C. [Bioengineering Dept., Faculty of Engineering, Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: nuri.azbar@ege.edu.tr

    2009-07-01

    effluent from dark hydrogen production reactor was not suitable for photo-fermentative hydrogen production. It was concluded that dilution of the feeding helps to reduce the nitrogen content and the volatile fatty acid content that might be otherwise harmful to the photo-heterotrophic organisms. The second conclusion that can be drawn is that cheese whey effluent should be mixed with L-malic acid rich co-substrates such as fruit juice processing effluents before fed into the photo-fermentation reactor. Finally, the two-stage H{sub 2}-producing process could be applied in remediation of lactose-containing industrial wastes, H{sub 2} being used on-site, to reduce process costs via generation of electricity by the help of hydrogen fuel cells. (author)

  20. Techno-economic analysis of lipase enzyme production from agro-industry waste with solid state fermentation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayatullah, I. M.; Arbianti, R.; Utami, T. S.; Suci, M.; Sahlan, M.; Wijanarko, A.; Gozan, M.; Hermansyah, H.

    2018-03-01

    Needs for this kind of catalyst derived from biological raw materials (biocatalysts) has increased along with development of products based on eco-friendly. To achieve the needs of biocatalyst (enzyme), large production is necessary. This study aimed to get the best conditions and design equipment to produce lipase enzyme based on solid state fermentation using SuperPro Designer v9.0. Several equipment such as Tray Bioreactor, Mixing Tank 1, Filter Press, centrifuge, Mixing Tank 2, and a dryer have been improved during the simulation. Economic analysis in the form of NPV, IRR, Payback Period, and the Benefit Cost Ratio was evaluated respectively. The result showed that production of 10 kg enzyme with NPV Rp112.796.147.423,00; IRR 54.20%; Payback Period 1.95 years; and Benefit Cost Ratio of 3.36 was more advantageous.

  1. Net mineralization nitrogen and soil chemical changes with application of organic wastes with ‘Fermented Bokashi Compost’ - doi: 10.4025/actasciagron.v35i2.15133

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cácio Luiz Boechat

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of organic wastes in agricultural soils is one of the possible ways to employ these materials. The aims of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of organic wastes and Fermented Bokashi Compost (FBC, to establish the most efficient use of organic wastes for a soil, changing the net nitrogen mineralization and soil chemical properties. The experimental design was completely randomized in a 6 x 2 x 5 factorial, being five organic wastes plus an control (soil without waste, with or without FBC, evaluated at 0, 7, 42, 70 and 91 days of incubation, with three replicates, under laboratory conditions. The organic wastes enhanced the soil chemical properties and increased nitrogen concentration in soil. However, the net nitrogen mineralization was affected by C/N ratio of wastes and incubation time. The FBC mixed with the wastes accelerated and enhanced organic matter degradation, resulting in quickly available quantity of net nitrogen. The wastes can be considered potentially useful as organic fertilizer but their usefulness appears to depend on knowing the C/N ratio of each one. The FBC can be used when one wants a more accelerated degradation, resulting in a quicker quantity of available nutrients to the plants.

  2. Organic acid production from potato starch waste fermentation by rumen microbial communities from Dutch and Thai dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palakawong Na Ayudthaya, Susakul; De Weijer, Van Antonius H.P.; Gelder, Van Antonie H.; Stams, Alfons J.M.; Vos, De Willem M.; Plugge, Caroline M.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Exploring different microbial sources for biotechnological production of organic acids is important. Dutch and Thai cow rumen samples were used as inocula to produce organic acid from starch waste in anaerobic reactors. Organic acid production profiles were determined and microbial

  3. French studies on the thermal effluents of electric power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezes-Cadiere, H.

    1976-01-01

    This report presents a synthesis of studies made in France in the thermal effluent field: thermal power plant cooling systems, transfer and dispersion of thermal effluents in the receptive media, effects of thermal effluents on water physicochemistry and biochemistry, effects of thermal effluents on aquatic ecosystems, and, possibilities of waste heat recovery with the view of utilization in agriculture, aquaculture and district heating. A catalogue of French organizations working or having data on thermal effluents is presented, as also an alphabetical list of the contacted persons. A bibliography of French documents concerning the previously mentioned studies is finally given (193 refs.) [fr

  4. Cleaning of process and excess water from organic waste fermentation with a combination of biological treatment stage and microfiltration; Reinigung von Prozess- und Ueberschusswaessern aus der Bioabfallvergaerung durch Kombination aus biologischer Stufe und Mikrofiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buer, T.; Schumacher, J. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Lehrstuhl und Inst. fuer Siedlungswasserwirtschaft

    1999-07-01

    Within the framework of an R and D project sponsored by the Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt, cleaning of process and excess water from organic waste fermentation plants was studied at the Institute for Siedlungswasserwirtschaft of Aachen Technical University RWTH. The focus in studying these waste waters was on the adaptation and optimization of the ZenoGem {sup trademark} process - a biological cleaning technique with an integrated microfiltration membrane. The use of this technology had the following objectives: to safeguard compliance with the limiting values for direct or indirect discharge of excess water and to reduce the heavy metal freight of circulating process water reentering the fermentation process for mashing raw organic waste. Thus the pollutant content of the fermentation residue was to be cut down. (orig.) [German] Im Rahmen eines von der Deutschen Bundesstiftung Umwelt gefoerderten Forschungs- und Entwicklungsvorhabens wurde am Institut fuer Siedlungswasserwirtschaft der RWTH Aachen die Prozess- und Ueberschusswasserreinigung von Bioabfallvergaerungsanlagen untersucht. Dabei stellte die Adaption und Optimierung des ZenoGem {sup trademark} -Verfahrens - ein biologisches Reinigungsverfahren mit integrierter Mikrofiltrationsmembran - fuer diese Abwaesser den Untersuchungsschwerpunkt dar. Ziel war es, mit dieser Technologie zum einen die Grenzwerte fuer eine direkte oder indirekte Einleitung des Ueberschusswassers zu gewaehrleisten und zum anderen die zirkulierenden Prozesswaesser, die in den Vergaerungsprozess zum Anmaischen der Roh-Bioabfaelle zurueckgefuehrt werden, an Schwermetallen zu entfrachten. Hierdurch sollte eine Schadstoffreduktion im Gaerreststoff erzielt werden. (orig.)

  5. Utilization of ultraviolet radiation in effluent disinfestation of domestic waste treatment systems; Utilizacao da radiacao ultravioleta na desinfeccao de efluentes de sistemas de tratamento de esgotos domesticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho, P.R.R. [Companhia de Tecnologia de Saneamento Ambiental, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Andrade e Silva, L.G. de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1995-12-31

    Ultraviolet radiation disinfection of Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Biodigestor (UASB) and UASB with aerated lagoon pos-treatment effluents is possible to be reached utilizing a single low pressure mercury lamp arc (15 W nominal power) in a shell tube flow through reactor (1.2 L useful volume). Fecal coliforms, total coliforms and colifages were used as microbiological parameters. For fecal coliforms, about 3 logarithmic units (log. un.) was removed from UASB with aerated lagoon pos-treatment effluent and 4 log. un. from UASB effluent with 7 and 30 seconds of hydraulic retention time, respectively. Good empirical correlations were obtained between microbiological parameters and hydraulic retention times. (author). 4 refs, 1 fig, 3 tabs.

  6. Comparison of complex effluent treatability in different bench scale microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ullery, Mark L.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    between the two reactor designs for individual samples, with 66-92% of COD removed for all samples. Current generation was consistent between the reactor types for acetate (AC) and fermentation effluent (FE) samples, but less consistent with industrial (IW

  7. High-loading-substrate enzymatic hydrolysis of palm plantation waste followed by unsterilized-mixed-culture fermentation for bio-ethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardant, Teuku Beuna; Winarni, Ina; Sukmana, Hadid

    2017-01-01

    It was desired to obtain a general formula for producing bio-ethanol from any part of lignocelluloses wastes that came from palm oil industries due to its abundance. Optimum condition that obtained by using RSM for conducting high-loading-substrate enzymatic hydrolysis of palm oil empty fruit bunch was applied to palm oil trunks and then followed by unsterilized fermentation for producing bio-ethanol. From several optimized conditions investigated, the resulted ethanol concentration could reach 7.92 %v by using 36.5 %w of palm oil trunks but the results were averagely 2.46 %v lower than palm oil empty fruit bunch. The results was statistically compared and showed best correlative coefficient at 0.808 (in scale 0-1) which support the conclusion that the optimum condition for empty fruit bunch and trunks are similar. Utilization of mixed-culture yeast was investigated to produce ethanol from unsterilized hydrolysis product but the improvement wasn't significant compares to single culture yeast.

  8. thermo-stable alpha-amylase(S) from irradiated microbial origin utilizing agricultural and environmental wastes under solid state fermentation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moustafa, O.E.A.

    2002-01-01

    an investigation concerning the production of thermo-stable α-amylases by thermophilic bacterial and fungal isolates has been undertaken. nine thermophilic bacteria and five teen fungi were isolated from different localities viz. phyllosphere of water hyacinth, different desert plants leaves, fermented dough, oven dust, garbage , and soil. their amylolytic activities were tested by dinitrosalicylic acid color reagent (Dns) method when grown on some environmental pollutants (garbage and water hyacinth) as well as industrial wastes (Bagasse, biscuit, corn flex and dough residues ) as the sole carbon source at 65 o C for bacterial and at 50 o C for fungal isolates . isolates No. B 1 ,B 2 ,B 5 ,B 6 ,B 7 ,B 8 ,B 9 , and F 4 ,F 6 ,F 8 ,F 1 2,F 1 3 and F 1 5, exhibited the highest α -amylase production when grown on water hyacinth, while B 4 ,F 3 ,F 1 1 and F 1 3, on dough ; (B 3 ,F 9 and F 1 0 ) on bagasse and ( F 1 ,F 2 ,F 5 ,F 7 ,F 1 1 and F 1 4) on garbage. Out of the nine identified bacterial isolated, only two isolates viz; actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, B1 and strepto bacillus moniliformis, B 7 , exhibited the ability to produce high percentages of α amylases at 55 o C (while still able to produce the enzyme within 45-70 o C)

  9. CY-1981 effluent monitoring report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honkus, R.J.

    1982-05-01

    The effluent monitoring programs at ICPP for calendar year 1981 are summarized. During the year, five significant occurrences or unplanned releases occurred. These are briefly described and tabulated. In none of the instances were the applicable Radiation Concentration Guides (RCG's) exceeded. A graphic summary of the total airborne, liquid and solid releases during CY-1981 is presented. Liquid waste activity was higher than anticipated due to various processing factors throughout the year. Solid waste jumped dramatically in December due to shipment of end-prices from the EBR-II fuel which was processed during the Electrolytic campaign

  10. Disposal of tritiated effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, K.; Bruecher, H.

    1981-06-01

    After some introductory remarks on the origin of tritium, its properties and its behaviour in a reprocessing plant three alternative methods for the disposal of tritiated effluents produced during reprocessing are described (deep well injection, in-situ solidification, deep-sea dumping) and compared with each other under various aspects. The study is based on the concept of a 1400 t/a reprocessing plant for LWR fuel, which annually produces 3000 m 3 of tritiated waste water with a tritium content of 6.5 x 10 12 Bq/m 3 as well as a residual fission product and actinide content. An assessment of the three methods under the aspects of simplicity, reliability, safety, costs, state of development and materials handling revealed advantages in favour of 'injection', followed by 'dumping' and 'in-situ solidification'. (orig./HP) [de

  11. High-yield pulping effluent treatment technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, W.X.; Hsieh, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    The objective of this report is to examine the high-yield (mechanical) pulp processes with respect to environmental issues affected by the discharge of their waste streams. Various statistics are given that support the view that high-yield pulping processes will have major growth in the US regions where pulp mills are located, and sites for projects in the development phase are indicated. Conventional and innovative effluent-treatment technologies applicable to these processes are reviewed. The different types of mechanical pulping or high-yield processes are explained, and the chemical additives are discussed. The important relationship between pulp yield and measure of BOD in the effluent is graphically presented. Effluent contaminants are identified, along with other important characteristics of the streams. Current and proposed environmental limitations specifically related to mechanical pulp production are reviewed. Conventional and innovative effluent-treatment technologies are discussed, along with their principle applications, uses, advantages, and disadvantages. Sludge management and disposal techniques become an intimate part of the treatment of waste streams. The conclusion is made that conventional technologies can successfully treat effluent streams under current waste-water discharge limitations, but these systems may not be adequate when stricter standards are imposed. At present, the most important issue in the treatment of pulp-mill waste is the management and disposal of the resultant sludge

  12. Degradation of waste waters from olive oil mills by Yarrowia lipolytica ATCC 20255 and Pseudomonas putida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Felice, B.; Pontecorvo, G.; Carfagna, M. [Univ. of Naples, Caserta (Italy). Inst. of Biology

    1997-12-31

    Waste water from olive oil processing may cause severe pollution in the Mediterranean area, since they have a high level of chemical oxygen demand (COD) (100-200 g/l) and contain other organic and inorganic compounds. In all olive oil producing countries, the reduction of pollution in olive oil mill waste waters at reasonable costs and using techniques suitable for most industrial applications is an unsolved problem. For this paper, the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica ATCC 20255 was grown on waste waters from an olive oil mill in a 3.5 l fermenter under batch culture conditions. The results showed that the yeast was capable of reducing the COD value by 80% in 24 h. In this way, a useful biomass of 22.45 g/l as single cell protein (SCP) and enzyme lipase were produced. During this process, most of the organic and inorganic substances were consumed, only aromatic pollutants were still present in the fermentation effluents. Therefore, we used a phenol degrader, namely Pseudomonas putida, to reduce phenolic compounds in the fermentation effluents after removing Yarrowia lipolytica cells. P. putida was effective in reducing phenols in only 12 h. (orig.)

  13. Physio-Chemical Analysis of Industrial Effluents in parts of Edo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physio-Chemical Analysis of Industrial Effluents in parts of Edo States Nigeria. ... Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management ... particularly, surface water results from all activities of man involving indiscriminate waste disposal from industry such as effluents into waterways, waste, agricultural waste, and all ...

  14. Facility effluent monitoring plan determinations for the 200 Area facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    The following facility effluent monitoring plan determinations document the evaluations conducted for the Westinghouse Hanford Company 200 Area facilities (chemical processing, waste management, 222-S Laboratory, and laundry) on the Hanford Site in south central Washington State. These evaluations determined the need for facility effluent monitoring plans for the 200 Area facilities. The facility effluent monitoring plan determinations have been prepared in accordance with A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438 (WHC 1991). The Plutonium/Uranium Extraction Plant and UO 3 facility effluent monitoring plan determinations were prepared by Los Alamos Technical Associates, Richland, Washington. The Plutonium Finishing Plant, Transuranic Waste Storage and Assay Facility, T Plant, Tank Farms, Low Level Burial Grounds, and 222-S Laboratory determinations were prepared by Science Applications International Corporation of Richland, Washington. The B Plant Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan Determination was prepared by ERCE Environmental Services of Richland, Washington

  15. Recent development of anaerobic digestion processes for energy recovery from wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Naomichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2007-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion leads to the overall gasification of organic wastewaters and wastes, and produces methane and carbon dioxide; this gasification contributes to reducing organic matter and recovering energy from organic carbons. Here, we propose three new processes and demonstrate the effectiveness of each process. By using complete anaerobic organic matter removal process (CARP), in which diluted wastewaters such as sewage and effluent from a methane fermentation digester were treated under anaerobic condition for post-treatment, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) in wastewater was decreased to less than 20 ppm. The dry ammonia-methane two-stage fermentation process (Am-Met process) is useful for the anaerobic treatment of nitrogen-rich wastes such as waste excess sludge, cow feces, chicken feces, and food waste without the dilution of the ammonia produced by water or carbon-rich wastes. The hydrogen-methane two-stage fermentation (Hy-Met process), in which the hydrogen produced in the first stage is used for a fuel cell system to generate electricity and the methane produced in the second stage is used to generate heat energy to heat the two reactors and satisfy heat requirements, is useful for the treatment of sugar-rich wastewaters, bread wastes, and biodiesel wastewaters.

  16. Investigations on pretreatment of waste prior to fermentation by percolation using the ISKA {sup registered} process; Untersuchungen zur Vorbehandlung von Abfaellen vor der Vergaerung mittels Perkolation nach dem ISKA {sup registered} -Verfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santen, H. [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). FG Abfallwirtschaft; Fricke, K. [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Lehrstuhl Abfallwirtschaft; Engelhard, T.; Widmer, C. [ISKA GmbH, Ettlingen (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Waste treatment prior to fermentation is a key aspect in achieving economic efficiency. One process is presented here in particular: percolation, in which waste is hydrolyzed aerobically, treated mechanically, and washed out with the aid of process water. The process involves a percolation stage followed by a fermentation stage. The process water burdened with organic matter is passed into a fermentation reactor in which the organic components are reacted anaerobically into biogas and bacterial mass, and the process water is recirculated into the percolation reactor. (orig.) [German] Vergaerungstechnologien zaehlen zu den etablierten Verfahren zur Gewinnung regenerativer Energien aus Biomasse. Fuer die Energieeffizienz dieser Verfahren sind die Leistung der Vergaerungsstufe, die Hoehe der Verfuegbarkeit der anaerob abzubauenden organischen Substanzen und der spezifische Energiebedarf des Behandlungsverfahrens massgeblich. Eine Schluesselstellung fuer die Optimierung beider Faktoren nimmt die Abfallaufbereitung vor der Vergaerung ein. Eine Technoloie zur Aufbereitung vor der Vergaerung basiert auf dem Verfahren der Perkolation, in der der Abfall aerob hydrolysiert,mechanisch aufgeschlossen und durch Zugabe von Prozesswasser ausgewaschen wird. Das Verfahren besteht aus einer Aufbereitung - der Perkolation - sowie einer nachgeschalteten Vergaerung. Das mit vergaerbarer Organik beladene Prozesswasser wird einem Vergaerungsreaktor zugefuehrt, in dem die organischen Komponenten anaerob zu Biogas und Bakterienmasse umgesetzt werden. Das aufbereitete Prozesswasser wird anschliessend wieder dem Perkolationsreaktor zugefuehrt. (orig.)

  17. Occurrence and geodatabase mapping of three contaminants of emerging concern in receiving water and at effluent from waste water treatment plants - A first overview of the situation in the Republic of Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahar, Alexandre; Tiedeken, Erin Jo; Rowan, Neil J

    2018-03-01

    This constitutes the first study to address occurrence and geodatabase mapping of the anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac (DCL) and the natural (17-beta-estradiol or E2) and synthetic (17-alpha-ethynylestradiol or EE2) estrogenic hormones in Republic of Ireland receiving waters over the period 1999 to 2015. Among these data, 317 samples came from concentration studies, while 205 were from effect-based studies. Monitoring data came from 16 waste water treatment plants (WWTPs), 23 water bodies (including rivers, lakes, marine and transitional waters) and 7 from domestic locations. Out of approximately 1000 WWPTs in the Republic of Ireland, only 16 have been monitored for at least one of these compounds of emerging concern (CECs). Diclofenac is found in treated effluents from 5 WWTPs at levels at least as high as other European WWPTs, and sometime higher. Measurements of E2 and EE2 in WWPT effluents were rare and effluents were more often evaluated for total estrogens; these CECs were generally not detected using conventional analytical methods because of limits of detection being too high compared to environmental concentrations and WFD environmental quality standards. There was good agreement between occurrence of these CEC and regional drug dispensing data in Ireland. Mapping the aforementioned data onto appropriate river basin catchment management tools will inform predictive and simulated risk determinations to inform investment in infrastructure that is necessary to protect rivers and beaches and economic activities that rely on clean water. There is a pressing commensurate need to refine/develop new analytical methods with low levels of detection for future CEC intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mining wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradel, J.

    1981-01-01

    In this article mining wastes means wastes obtained during extraction and processing of uranium ores including production of uraniferous concentrates. The hazards for the population are irradiation, ingestion, dust or radon inhalation. The different wastes produced are reviewed. Management of liquid effluents, water treatment, contamined materials, gaseous wastes and tailings are examined. Environmental impact of wastes during and after exploitation is discussed. Monitoring and measurements are made to verify that ICRP recommendations are met. Studies in progress to improve mining waste management are given [fr

  19. Remaining Sites Verification Package for 132-DR-1, 1608-DR Effluent Pumping Station. Attachment to Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-035

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    Radiological characterization, decommissioning and demolition of the 132-DR-1 site, 1608-DR Effluent Pumping Station was performed in 1987. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. Residual concentrations support future land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario and pose no threat to groundwater or the Columbia River based on RESRAD modeling

  20. Environmental hazard assessment of cheese manufacturing effluent treated for hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadima, Constantina; Theodoropoulos, Chris; Iliopoulou-Georgudaki, Joan

    2009-09-01

    Toxicity of effluents after treatment in an anaerobic fermentation system for hydrogen production is evaluated with three biotests: The zebrafish Danio rerio embryo test, the Thamnotoxkit F and the Daphtoxkit F(TM) magna. Samples were classified from "very" to "extremely toxic". Average toxicity values for zebrafish were 1.55% (24 h) and 0.75% (48 h), for Thamnocephalus 0.69% (24 h) and for Daphnia 2.51% (24 h) and 1.82% (48 h). Statistical analysis between physicochemical parameters and LC(50) values revealed that PO(4)(-3), SO(4)(-2), NH(3)N and NO(3)(-) have the major contribution to toxicity. Based on results, this treatment is considered an environmentally ineffective way of managing the specific wastes.

  1. Decolorization of complex dyes and textile effluent by extracellular enzymes of Cyathus bulleri cultivated on agro-residues/domestic wastes and proposed pathway of degradation of Kiton blue A and reactive orange 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vats, Arpita; Mishra, Saroj

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the white-rot fungus Cyathus bulleri was cultivated on low-cost agro-residues, namely wheat bran (WB), wheat straw (WS), and domestic waste orange peel (OP) for production of ligninolytic enzymes. Of the three substrates, WB and OP served as good materials for the production of laccase with no requirement of additional carbon or nitrogen source. Specific laccase activity of 94.4 U mg -1 extracellular protein and 21.01 U mg -1 protein was obtained on WB and OP, respectively. Maximum decolorization rate of 13.6 μmol h -1  U -1 laccase for reactive black 5 and 22.68 μmol h -1  U -1 laccase for reactive orange 16 (RO) was obtained with the WB culture filtrate, and 11.7 μmol h -1  U -1 laccase for reactive violet 5 was observed with OP culture filtrate. Importantly, Kiton blue A (KB), reported not to be amenable to enzymatic degradation, was degraded by culture filtrate borne activities. Products of degradation of KB and RO were identified by mass spectrometry, and a pathway of degradation proposed. WB-grown culture filtrate decolorized and detoxified real and simulated textile effluents by about 40%. The study highlights the use of inexpensive materials for the production of enzymes effective on dyes and effluents.

  2. Biogas production from solid pineapple waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanticharoen, M.; Bhumiratana, S.; Tientanacom, S.; Pengsobha, L.

    1984-01-01

    Solid pineapple waste composed of shell and core was used as substrate in anaerobic fermentation producing CH4. The experiments were carried out using four 30-L vessels and no mixing, a 200-L plug-flow reactor, and a 5-cubic m stirred tank. Because of high acidity of the substrate, the loading rate is as low as 2.5 g dry solid added/L-day. The average gas yield is 0.3-0.5 L/g dry substrate. A pretreatment of wet solid with sludge effluent prior loading to the digester resulted in better stability of the biodigester than without pretreatment. These studies showed that loading rate can be much higher than those previously used. The 2-stage process was tested to determine a conversion efficiency of high loading and at much shorter reactor retention times. The results of the entire program indicated that biogas production from cannery pineapple waste is technically feasible.

  3. Conversion and degradation of shellfish wastes by Serratia sp. TKU016 fermentation for the production of enzymes and bioactive materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, San-Lang; Chang, Tao-Jen; Liang, Tzu-Wen

    2010-06-01

    A chitosanase and a protease were purified from the culture supernatant of Serratia sp. TKU016 with shrimp shell as the sole carbon/nitrogen source. The molecular masses of the chitosanase and protease determined by SDS-PAGE were approximately 65 and 53 kDa, respectively. The chitosanase was inhibited completely by Mn2+, but the protease was enhanced by all of tested divalent metals. The optimum pH, optimum temperature, pH stability, and thermal stability of the chitosanase and protease were (pH 7, 50 degrees C, pH 6-7, <50 degrees C) and (pH 8-10, 40 degrees C, pH 5-10, <50 degrees C), respectively. SDS (2 mM) had stimulatory effect on TKU016 protease activity. The result demonstrates that TKU016 protease is SDS-resistant protease and probably has a rigid structure. Besides, TKU016 culture supernatant (2% SPP) incubated for 2 days has the highest antioxidant activity, the DPPH scavenging ability was about 76%. With this method, we have shown that shrimp shell wastes can be utilized and it's effective in the production of enzymes, antioxidants, peptide and reducing sugar, facilitating its potential use in biological applications and functional foods.

  4. Hydrogen fermentation of food waste by alkali-shock pretreatment: microbial community analysis and limitation of continuous operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sujin; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Yun, Yeo-Myeong; Lee, Mo-Kwon; Moon, Chungman; Kang, Won-Seok; Kwak, Seung-Shin; Kim, Mi-Sun

    2015-06-01

    In the study, at first, batch tests were performed to investigate the effect of alkali-shock on H2 production from food waste (FW). After alkali-pretreatment of FW at pH 9.0-13.0, the FW was cultivated under mesophilic condition at pH 6.0 for 30 h without external inoculum addition. The amount of H2 production from FW pretreated at pH 11.0 and 12.0 was higher than that achieved in other pretreatment pH. The main metabolite was butyrate, and Clostridium were dominant at pH 11.0 and 12.0. Meanwhile, lactate was the main metabolite with Enterococcus and Streptococcus being the dominant genus at other pretreatment pH. When the batch process was switched to a continuous mode, H2 production was significantly dropped due to the increased activity of H2-consumers. The reliability of alkali-pretreatment at pH 11.0 was proven by repeating the scale-up batch process, recording 1.57±0.11 mol H2/mol hexose(added) (17±2LH2/kg FW) and 4.39±0.32LH2/L/d. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 40 CFR 458.43 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... this paragraph, which may be discharged from the carbon black lamp process by a point source subject to... Lamp Process Subcategory § 458.43 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent... achievable: There shall be no discharge of process waste water pollutants to navigable waters. ...

  6. Effluent monitoring: Its purpose and value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoen, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of effluent monitoring is described in terms of the primary objectives, the most important of which is to verify that the facility is functioning as it was designed and that the waste treatment and effluent control systems are performing as planned and expected. The object of a monitoring programme should be periodically re-examined to ensure that the programme serves a contemporary purpose. The value of the effluent monitoring programme is determined by the extent to which users of the monitoring data, i.e. the operator, the regulating authorities and the public, accept the result as indicating that the plant is operating safely, and in an environmentally acceptable manner. The credibility of the monitoring results is therefore the most important factor determining the value of an effluent monitoring programme. (author)

  7. Mathematical analysis of brewery effluent distribution in Ikpoba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Samples of waste water and river water which were taken at predetermined points, ... thereby making the research result relevant for surface water pollution control. Keywords: Brewery effluent, pollutants, lotic ecosystem, water pollution, river, ...

  8. Correlating Biochemical and Chemical Oxygen Demand of Effluents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    F. K. Attiogbe1, Mary Glover-Amengor2 and K. T. Nyadziehe3

    There is also a slaughterhouse for animals (Sarfo-Afriyie, 1999). ... day period of the BOD test, the bacteria oxidized mainly the soluble organic ..... characteristics of the waste (effluent) not being constant (http://www.hach.com), and this is.

  9. Analysis of tannery effluents from the Challawa industrial estate in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences ... and some physicochemical parameters such as conductivity, solids, chloride, chromium, alkalinity, sulphide, chemical oxygen demand, COD, and biochemical oxygen demand, BOD, of the waste water were determined. ... Keywords: tannery, effluent, pollution, environment

  10. Concentrations of heavy metals in effluent discharges downstream ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-01-18

    Jan 18, 2010 ... nickel, lead and zinc) in the effluents and receiving water were analyzed by atomic absorption ... forms in which metal pollutants exist in waste water dis- charges ..... Enforcement held in Oazaca, Mexico, April 25-28, 1995.

  11. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1993, Part II, Decontamination and actions, collection of liquid effluents and solid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandic, M.; Vukovic, Z.; Lazic, S.; Plecas, I.; Voko, A.

    1993-01-01

    Certain amount of solid waste results from RA reactor operation, the mean quantity of which depends on the duration of reactor operation and related activities. During repair, when reactor is not operated as well under accidental conditions, the quantity of waste is higher, dependent on the type of repair and comprehensiveness of decontamination of the working surface, contaminated tools and components. The waste is sorted and packed on the spot where they appeared according to the existing regulations and principles of radiation protection with aim to minimize unnecessary exposure of the radiation protection personnel who deals with control, transport, radioactive waste treatment and decontamination. During exceptional operations (decontamination, repair, bigger volume of contaminated material, etc.) professional staff of the Radiation protection department gives recommendations and helps in planning the actions related to repair, sorting and packaging of radioactive waste in special containers, identification of the contaminants, etc. [sr

  12. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1998, Part 2, Annex 2, Decontamination and actions, collection of liquid effluents and solid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandic, M.; Vukovic, Z.; Bacic, S.; Plecas, I.

    1998-01-01

    Certain amount of solid waste results from RA reactor operation, the mean quantity of which depends on the duration of reactor operation and related activities. During repair, when reactor is not operated as well under accidental conditions, the quantity of waste is higher, dependent on the type of repair and comprehensiveness of decontamination of the working surface, contaminated tools and components. The waste is sorted and packed on the spot where they appeared according to the existing regulations and principles of radiation protection with aim to minimize unnecessary exposure of the radiation protection personnel who deals with control, transport, radioactive waste treatment and decontamination. During exceptional operations (decontamination, repair, bigger volume of contaminated material, etc.) professional staff of the Radiation protection department gives recommendations and helps in planning the actions related to repair, sorting and packaging of radioactive waste in special containers, identification of the contaminants, etc. [sr

  13. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1995, Part -2, Annex 2, Decontamination and actions, collection of liquid effluents and solid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandic, M.; Vukovic, Z.; Lazic, S.; Plecas, I.; Voko, A.

    1995-01-01

    Certain amount of solid waste results from RA reactor operation, the mean quantity of which depends on the duration of reactor operation and related activities. During repair, when reactor is not operated as well under accidental conditions, the quantity of waste is higher, dependent on the type of repair and comprehensiveness of decontamination of the working surface, contaminated tools and components. The waste is sorted and packed on the spot where they appeared according to the existing regulations and principles of radiation protection with aim to minimize unnecessary exposure of the radiation protection personnel who deals with control, transport, radioactive waste treatment and decontamination. During exceptional operations (decontamination, repair, bigger volume of contaminated material, etc.) professional staff of the Radiation protection department gives recommendations and helps in planning the actions related to repair, sorting and packaging of radioactive waste in special containers, identification of the contaminants, etc. [sr

  14. Statistical evaluation of effluent monitoring data for the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, C.J.; Johnson, V.G.

    2000-01-01

    The 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) consists of a pair of infiltration basins that receive wastewater originating from the 200 West and 200 East Areas of the Hanford Site. TEDF has been in operation since 1995 and is regulated by State Waste Discharge Permit ST 4502 (Ecology 1995) under the authority of Chapter 90.48 Revised Code of Washington (RCW) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 173-216. The permit stipulates monitoring requirements for effluent (or end-of-pipe) discharges and groundwater monitoring for TEDF. Groundwater monitoring began in 1992 prior to TEDF construction. Routine effluent monitoring in accordance with the permit requirements began in late April 1995 when the facility began operations. The State Waste Discharge Permit ST 4502 included a special permit condition (S.6). This condition specified a statistical study of the variability of permitted constituents in the effluent from TEDF during its first year of operation. The study was designed to (1) demonstrate compliance with the waste discharge permit; (2) determine the variability of all constituents in the effluent that have enforcement limits, early warning values, and monitoring requirements (WHC 1995); and (3) determine if concentrations of permitted constituents vary with season. Additional and more frequent sampling was conducted for the effluent variability study. Statistical evaluation results were provided in Chou and Johnson (1996). Parts of the original first year sampling and analysis plan (WHC 1995) were continued with routine monitoring required up to the present time

  15. Waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, D.; Hooper, E.W.

    1981-01-01

    In the treatment of wastes, such as liquid radioactive effluents, it is known to remove radionuclides by successive in situ precipitation of cobalt sulphide, an hydroxide, barium sulphate and a transition element ferrocyanide, followed by separation of the thereby decontaminated effluent. In this invention, use is made of precipitates such as obtained above in the treatment of further fresh liquid radioactive effluent, when it is found that the precipitates have additional capacity for extracting radionuclides. The resulting supernatant liquor may then be subjected to a further precipitation treatment such as above. Decontamination factors for radionuclides of Ce, Ru, Sr and Cs have been considerably enhanced. (author)

  16. Alternatives to disposal of Hanford Site liquid effluents to the soil column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinhardt, C.C.; Flyckt, D.L.; Wirsing, R.M.; Winterhalder, J.A.

    1987-04-01

    Alternative systems were selected for 28 effluent streams, based on the use of available technology and ability to eliminate the contaminated effluent or reduce contaminant levels to meet specified effluent disposal criteria and standards derived from DOE Orders and environmental statutes. This study determined that technically feasible alternative waste disposal systems are available. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Facility effluent monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the facility effluent monitoring programs and provides an evaluation of effluent monitoring data. These evaluations are useful in assessing the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control systems, as well as management practices.

  18. 40 CFR 458.42 - Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Carbon Black Lamp Process Subcategory § 458.42 Effluent limitations guidelines representing the degree of... shall be no discharge of process waste water pollutants into navigable waters. [60 FR 33972, June 29...

  19. British Nuclear Fuels plc's effluent plant services building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, L.

    1990-01-01

    The new Effluent Plant Services building (EPSB) on the Sellafield Nine Acre Site was built by Costain Engineering Limited for British Nuclear Fuels Limited. The EPSB is dedicated to a new generation of nuclear waste treatment plants, aimed at reducing discharges into the Irish Sea and other environmental impacts by removing actinides from liquid effluents and decontaminating waste solvents. This article describes the design, construction and operation of the plant. (UK)

  20. Simultaneous hydrogen and ethanol production from cascade utilization of mono-substrate in integrated dark and photo-fermentative reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing-Feng; Xie, Guo-Jun; Wang, Rui-Qing; Xing, De-Feng; Ding, Jie; Zhou, Xu; Ren, Hong-Yu; Ma, Chao; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2015-01-01

    Integrating hydrogen-producing bacteria with complementary capabilities, dark-fermentative bacteria (DFB) and photo-fermentative bacteria (PFB), is a promising way to completely recover bioenergy from waste biomass. However, the current coupled models always suffer from complicated pretreatment of the effluent from dark-fermentation or imbalance between dark and photo-fermentation, respectively. In this work, an integrated dark and photo-fermentative reactor (IDPFR) was developed to completely convert an organic substrate into bioenergy. In the IDPFR, Ethanoligenens harbinese B49 and Rhodopseudomonas faecalis RLD-53 were separated by a membrane into dark and photo chambers, while the acetate produced by E. harbinese B49 in the dark chamber could freely pass through the membrane into the photo chamber and serve as a carbon source for R. faecalis RLD-53. The hydrogen yield increased with increasing working volume of the photo chamber, and reached 3.38 mol H2/mol glucose at the dark-to-photo chamber ratio of 1:4. Hydrogen production by the IDPFR was also significantly affected by phosphate buffer concentration, glucose concentration, and ratio of dark-photo bacteria. The maximum hydrogen yield (4.96 mol H2/mol glucose) was obtained at a phosphate buffer concentration of 20 mmol/L, a glucose concentration of 8 g/L, and a ratio of dark to photo bacteria of 1:20. As the glucose and acetate were used up by E. harbinese B49 and R. faecalis RLD-53, ethanol produced by E. harbinese B49 was the sole end-product in the effluent from the IDPFR, and the ethanol concentration was 36.53 mmol/L with an ethanol yield of 0.82 mol ethanol/mol glucose. The results indicated that the IDPFR not only circumvented complex pretreatments on the effluent in the two-stage process, but also overcame the imbalance of growth and metabolic rate between DFB and PFB in the co-culture process, and effectively enhanced cooperation between E. harbinense B49 and R. faecalis RLD-53. Moreover

  1. Handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipers, L.R.; Allen, G.C.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of approaches for handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests in an environmentally acceptable manner are discussed. The functional requirements of effluent treatment are defined and concept options are presented within the framework of these requirements. System concepts differ primarily in the choice of fission-product retention and waste handling concepts. The concept options considered range from closed cycle (venting the exhaust to a closed volume or recirculating the hydrogen in a closed loop) to open cycle (real time processing and venting of the effluent). This paper reviews the different methods to handle effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests

  2. Effluent treatment options for nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipers, L.R.; Brockmann, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of approaches for handling effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests in an environmentally acceptable manner are discussed. The functional requirements of effluent treatment are defined and concept options are presented within the framework of these requirements. System concepts differ primarily in the choice of fission-product retention and waste handling concepts. The concept options considered range from closed cycle (venting the exhaust to a closed volume or recirculating the hydrogen in a closed loop) to open cycle (real time processing and venting of the effluent). This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of different methods to handle effluent from nuclear thermal propulsion system ground tests

  3. THE EFFECT OF REFINERY AND PETROCHEMICAL EFFLUENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Osondu

    Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies and Management Vol. ... This study investigated the effects of treated effluent discharge on the water quality of Ubeji Creek ... the ineffectiveness of purification systems, waste ..... a receiving watershed in a typical rural community. ... eastern economy, practice of hall of India private.

  4. Introduction to Effluent Treatment and Industrial Methods

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 11. Techniques of WasteWater Treatment - Introduction to Effluent Treatment and Industrial Methods. Amol A Kulkarni Mugdha Deshpande A B Pandit. General Article Volume 5 Issue 11 November 2000 pp 56-68 ...

  5. Petroleum Refinery Effluents Treatment by Advanced Oxidation Process with Methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoucheng, Wen [Yangtze Univ., HuBei Jingzhou (China)

    2014-02-15

    Petroleum refinery effluents are waste originating from industries primarily engaged in refining crude oil. It is a very complex compound of various oily wastes, water, heavy metals and so on. Conventional processes are unable to effectively remove the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of petroleum refinery effluents. Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) was proposed to treat petroleum refinery effluents. In this paper, methanol was used to investigate co-oxidative effect of methanol on petroleum refinery effluents treatment. The results indicated that supercritical water oxidation is an effective process for petroleum refinery effluents treatment. Adding methanol caused an increase in COD removal. When reaction temperature is 440 .deg. C, residence time is 20 min, OE is 0.5 and initial COD is 40000 mg/L, and COD removal increases 8.5%.

  6. Petroleum Refinery Effluents Treatment by Advanced Oxidation Process with Methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoucheng, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum refinery effluents are waste originating from industries primarily engaged in refining crude oil. It is a very complex compound of various oily wastes, water, heavy metals and so on. Conventional processes are unable to effectively remove the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of petroleum refinery effluents. Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) was proposed to treat petroleum refinery effluents. In this paper, methanol was used to investigate co-oxidative effect of methanol on petroleum refinery effluents treatment. The results indicated that supercritical water oxidation is an effective process for petroleum refinery effluents treatment. Adding methanol caused an increase in COD removal. When reaction temperature is 440 .deg. C, residence time is 20 min, OE is 0.5 and initial COD is 40000 mg/L, and COD removal increases 8.5%

  7. Computer software configuration management plan for 200 East/West Liquid Effluent Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, F.A. Jr.

    1995-02-27

    This computer software management configuration plan covers the control of the software for the monitor and control system that operates the Effluent Treatment Facility and its associated truck load in station and some key aspects of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility that stores condensate to be processed. Also controlled is the Treated Effluent Disposal System`s pumping stations and monitors waste generator flows in this system as well as the Phase Two Effluent Collection System.

  8. Computer software configuration management plan for 200 East/West Liquid Effluent Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, F.A. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This computer software management configuration plan covers the control of the software for the monitor and control system that operates the Effluent Treatment Facility and its associated truck load in station and some key aspects of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility that stores condensate to be processed. Also controlled is the Treated Effluent Disposal System's pumping stations and monitors waste generator flows in this system as well as the Phase Two Effluent Collection System

  9. Fermentation as a first step in carbon and nutrient recovery in regenerative life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Amanda; Lasseur, Christophe; Rebeyre, Pierre; Clauwaert, Peter; Rabaey, Korneel; Ronsse, Frederik; Zhang, Dong Dong; López Barreiro, Diego; Prins, Wolter

    2016-07-01

    Long term manned space missions, such as the establishment of a base on Mars, will require a regenerative means of supplying the basic resources (i.e., food, water, oxygen) necessary to support human life. The MELiSSA-loop is a closed loop compartmentalized artificial aquatic ecosystem designed to recover water, carbon, and nutrients from solid organic wastes (e.g., inedible food waste and feces) for the regeneration of food and oxygen for humans. The first step in this loop is a strictly anaerobic fermentation unit operated as a membrane bioreactor. In this step the aim is to maximize the hydrolysis of complex organic compounds into simple molecules (CO2, ammonia, volatile fatty acids, …) which can be consumed by plants and bacteria downstream to produce food again. Optimal steady state fermentation of a standardized homogeneous mixture of beets, lettuce, wheat straw, toilet paper, feces, and water was demonstrated to recover approximately 50% of the influent carbon as soluble organics in the effluent through anaerobic fermentation. Approximately 10% of the influent COD was converted to CO2, with the remaining ~40% retained as a mixture of undigested solids and biomass. Approximately 50% of the influent nitrogen was recovered in the effluent, 97% of which was in the form of ammonia. Similar results have been obtained at both lab and pilot scale. With only 10% of the carbon driven to CO2 through this fermentation, a major challenge at this moment for the MELiSSA-loop is closing the carbon cycle, by completely oxidizing the carbon in the organic waste and non-edible parts of the plant into CO2 for higher plants and algae to fix again for food production. To further improve the overall degradation we are investigating the integration of a high temperature and pressure, sub- or near critical water conditions to improve the degradation of fibrous material with the addition of an oxidant (hydrogen peroxide, H2O2) under sub- or near critical conditions to further

  10. Life cycle analysis as a tool for assessing new waste water treatment systems. A case study of textile industry effluent; Analisis del ciclo de vida como herramienta de evaluacion de nuevos sistemas de depuracion de aguas residulaes. Caso practico: efluentes de la industria textil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hospido, A.; Novo, E.; Moreira, M. T.; Feijoo, G.

    2001-07-01

    Life cycle analysis (LCA) is a technique that analyses the life cycle of a product process or activity in an attempt to identify its overall environmental impact. This approach can be of great help in strategic or operational decision-making in industry or business. This article takes as an example a comparative study of systems for treating strongly coloured industrial effluent. To this end, two well established technologies for dealing with industrial waste were examined: a) the physico-chemical treatment of effluents by coagulation-flocculation: b) a process combining physico-chemical treatment and biological aerobic activated sludge treatment. In addition, the viability of an emerging technology based on the decolouring of effluents with ligninolytic fungi was considered, although this process is still at the study stage. (Author) 13 refs.

  11. enhancing pineaple waste utilization as animalfeed through nutrient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rose

    2013-10-23

    Oct 23, 2013 ... that fermentation of pineapple waste by solid state fermentation using the fungi A. niger and T. viride significantly (P < 0.05) ... The conventional commercial feeds ... waste management, biomass energy conservation and.

  12. Valorization of onion waste and by-products: MCR-ALS applied to reveal the compositional profiles of alcoholic fermentations of onion juice monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sáiz, José-María; Esteban-Díez, Isabel; Rodríguez-Tecedor, Sofía; Pizarro, Consuelo

    2008-11-01

    The overall purpose of the project, of which this study is a part, was to examine the feasibility of onion waste as a support-substrate for the profitable production of food-grade products. This study focused on the efficient production of ethanol from worthless onions by transforming the onion juice into onion liquor via alcoholic fermentation with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The onion bioethanol produced could be later used as a favorable substrate for acetic fermentation to finally obtain onion vinegar. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), coupled with the multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) method, has been used to reveal the compositional and spectral profiles for both substrates and products of alcoholic fermentation runs, that is, total sugars, ethanol, and biomass concentration. The ambiguity associated with the ALS calculation was resolved by applying suitable inequality and equality constraints. The quality of the results provided by the NIR-based MCR-ALS methodology adopted was evaluated by several performance indicators, including the variance explained by the model, the lack of fit and the agreement between the MCR-ALS achieved solution and the results computed by applying previously validated PLS reference models. An additional fermentation run was employed to test the actual predictive ability of the ALS model developed. For all the components resolved in the fermentation system studied (i.e., total sugars, ethanol, and biomass), the final model obtained showed a high predictive ability and suitable accuracy and precision, both in calibration and external validation, confirmed by the very good agreement between the ALS responses and the reference values (the coefficient of determination was, in all cases, very close to 1, and the statistics confirmed that no significant difference was found between PLS reference models and the MCR-ALS methodology applied). Thus, the proven reliability of the MCR-ALS model presented

  13. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 324 Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    The 324 Facility [Waste Technology Engineering Laboratory] in the 300 Area primarily supports the research and development of radioactive and nonradioactive waste vitrification technologies, biological waste remediation technologies, spent nuclear fuel studies, waste mixing and transport studies, and tritium development programs. All of the above-mentioned programs deal with, and have the potential to, release hazardous and/or radioactive material. The potential for discharge would primarily result from (1) conducting research activities using the hazardous materials, (2) storing radionuclides and hazardous chemicals, and (3) waste accumulation and storage. This report summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents, and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterizing effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements

  14. Are perfluoroalkyl acids in waste water treatment plant effluents the result of primary emissions from the technosphere or of environmental recirculation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipovic, Marko; Berger, Urs

    2015-06-01

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) have been suggested to be one of the major pathways of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) from the technosphere to the aquatic environment. The origin of PFAAs in WWTP influents is either from current primary emissions or a result of recirculation of PFAAs that have been residing and transported in the environment for several years or decades. Environmental recirculation can then occur when PFAAs from the environment enter the wastewater stream in, e.g., tap water. In this study 13 PFAAs and perfluorooctane sulfonamide were analyzed in tap water as well as WWTP influent, effluent and sludge from three Swedish cities: Bromma (in the metropolitan area of Stockholm), Bollebygd and Umeå. A mass balance of the WWTPs was assembled for each PFAA. Positive mass balances were observed for PFHxA and PFOA in all WWTPs, indicating the presence of precursor compounds in the technosphere. With regard to environmental recirculation, tap water was an important source of PFAAs to the Bromma WWTP influent, contributing >40% for each quantified sulfonic acid and up to 30% for the carboxylic acids. The PFAAs in tap water from Bollebygd and Umeå did not contribute significantly to the PFAA load in the WWTP influents. Our results show that in order to estimate current primary emissions from the technosphere, it may be necessary to correct the PFAA emission rates in WWTP effluents for PFAAs present in tap water, especially in the case of elevated levels in tap water. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Avaliação da produção de lipases por diferentes cepas de microrganismos isolados em efluentes de laticínios por fermentação submersa Evaluation of lipase production using different strains of microorganisms isolated from dairy effluent through submerged fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Roveda

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A produção enzimática é um dos campos mais promissores dentro das tecnologias para a síntese de compostos de alto valor agregado, estando em constante crescimento pela grande capacidade dos microrganismos de realizarem transformações químicas. As enzimas produzidas por processos fermentativos têm sido utilizadas para o controle ambiental. Muitas destas enzimas podem ser produzidas a partir de resíduos industriais, diminuindo os custos de produção. As lipases são enzimas que catalisam a hidrólise de triglicerídeos em glicerídeos e ácidos graxos. As lipases vêm sendo utilizadas na redução da concentração dos lipídios contidos nos efluentes, promovendo a hidrólise dos óleos e gorduras presentes. Objetivou-se avaliar a produção de lipases por fungos isolados a partir de efluentes de laticínios. Foram isolados 21 fungos, pertencentes aos gêneros Penicillium, Aspergillus, Trichoderma e Fusarium. Na etapa de seleção, 9 fungos foram selecionados devido à capacidade de crescimento em meio contendo azeite de oliva como substrato. Na fermentação submersa, os fungos E9 (Aspergillus, E21 (Aspergillus e E20 (Penicillium foram os que apresentaram as maiores atividades enzimáticas, de 1,250 a 2,250 U, utilizando-se como meio de cultivo o efluente coletado na saída do equalizador do sistema de tratamento de efluente.Enzymatic production is one of the most promising fields within technologies for the synthesis of high added value compounds, given their constant growth due to the great capacity of microorganisms to carry out chemical transformations. The enzymes produced from fermentation processes have been used for environmental control. Many of these enzymes can be produced from industrial residues, reducing the production cost. Lipases are a group of enzymes that catalyze hydrolysis of triglycerides to glycerides and fatty acids. Lipases have been used to reduce the concentration of lipids contained in effluent, promoting

  16. A holistic approach to managing palm oil mill effluent (POME): biotechnological advances in the sustainable reuse of POME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ta Yeong; Mohammad, Abdul Wahab; Jahim, Jamaliah Md; Anuar, Nurina

    2009-01-01

    During the last century, a great deal of research and development as well as applications has been devoted to waste. These include waste minimization and treatment, the environmental assessment of waste, minimization of environmental impact, life cycle assessment and others. The major reason for such huge efforts is that waste generation constitutes one of the major environmental problems where production industries are concerned. Until now, an increasing pressure has been put on finding methods of reusing waste, for instance through cleaner production, thus mirroring rapid changes in environmental policies. The palm oil industry is one of the leading industries in Malaysia with a yearly production of more than 13 million tons of crude palm oil and plantations covering 11% of the Malaysian land area. However, the production of such amounts of crude palm oil result in even larger amounts of palm oil mill effluent (POME), estimated at nearly three times the quantity of crude palm oil. Normally, POME is treated using end-of-pipe processes, but it is worth considering the potential value of POME prior to its treatment through introduction of a cleaner production. It is envisaged that POME can be sustainably reused as a fermentation substrate in the production of various metabolites, fertilizers and animal feeds through biotechnological advances. The present paper thus discusses various technically feasible and economically beneficial means of transforming the POME into low or preferably high value added products.

  17. Study of stationary phase stability from a column with chromatographic material for steady state treatment of an effluent and/or waste containing Th-232

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felinto, Maria Claudia Franca da Cunha; Martinz, Daniel Ortiz

    1999-01-01

    This work relates the behavior of a new chromatographic material, AMBERCMPO I, that has been studied to remove actinide elements from the High Level Liquid Waste. It gives emphasis to the behavior of chromatographic materials to the extraction of Th 4+ and its performance after some operation cycle. (author)

  18. Identification of microplastic in effluents of waste water treatment plants using focal plane array-based micro-Fourier-transform infrared imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mintenig, S.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413292568; Int-Veen, I.; Löder, M.G.J.; Primpke, S.; Gerdts, G.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The global presence of microplastic (MP) in aquatic ecosystems has been shown by various studies. However, neither MP concentrations nor their sources or sinks are completely known. Waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) are considered as significant point sources discharging MP to the

  19. Suspended solids in liquid effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, J.J.

    1988-06-01

    An international literature review and telephone mail survey was conducted with respect to technical and regulatory aspects of suspended solids in radioactive liquid wastes from nuclear power stations. Results of the survey are summarized and show that suspended solids are an important component of some waste streams. The data available, while limited, show these solids to be associated largely with corrosion products. The solids are highly variable in quantity, size and composition. Filtration is commonly applied for their removal from liquid effluents and is effective. Complex interactions with receiving waters can result in physical/chemical changes of released radionuclides and these phenomena have been seen as reason for not applying regulatory controls based on suspended solids content. 340 refs

  20. Performance Evaluation on Otto Engine Generator Using Gasoline and Biogas from Palm Oil Mill Effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvan; Trisakti, B.; Husaini, T.; Sitio, A.; Sitorus, TB

    2017-06-01

    Biogas is a flammable gas produced from the fermentation of organic materials by anaerobic bacteria originating from household waste manure and organic waste including palm oil mill effluent (POME). POME is mainly discharged from the sterilization unit of palm oil processing into crude palm oil. This study utilized biogas produced from liquid waste palm oil for use as fuel in the Otto engine generator 4 - stroke, type STARKE GFH1900LX with a peak power of 1.3 kW, 1.0 kW average power, bore 55 mm, stroke 40 mm, Vd 95 × 10-6 m3, Vc 10 × 10-6 m3, compression ratio of 10.5 : 1, and the number of cylinders = 1. The objective of this study is to evaluate the performance of Otto engine generator fueled with biogas that generated from POME, then comparing its performance fueled by gasoline. The performance included power, torque, specific fuel consumption, thermal efficiency, and the air-fuel ratio. Experiment was conducted by using a variation of the lamp load of 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 W. The results revealed that the use of biogas as fuel decreased in power, torque, brake thermal efficiency, and air fuel ratio (AFR), while there is an increasing of value specific fuel consumption (SFC).