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Sample records for waste element solubility

  1. Impact of earthworms on trace element solubility in contaminated mine soils amended with green waste compost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sizmur, Tom, E-mail: t.p.sizmur@reading.ac.uk [Soil Research Centre, Dept. Geography and Environmental Science, School of Human and Environmental Sciences, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading, RG6 6DW (United Kingdom); Palumbo-Roe, Barbara [British Geological Survey, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Hodson, Mark E. [Soil Research Centre, Dept. Geography and Environmental Science, School of Human and Environmental Sciences, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading, RG6 6DW (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    The common practice of remediating metal contaminated mine soils with compost can reduce metal mobility and promote revegetation, but the effect of introduced or colonising earthworms on metal solubility is largely unknown. We amended soils from an As/Cu (1150 mgAs kg{sup -1} and 362 mgCu kg{sup -1}) and Pb/Zn mine (4550 mgPb kg{sup -1} and 908 mgZn kg{sup -1}) with 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% compost and then introduced Lumbricus terrestris. Porewater was sampled and soil extracted with water to determine trace element solubility, pH and soluble organic carbon. Compost reduced Cu, Pb and Zn, but increased As solubility. Earthworms decreased water soluble Cu and As but increased Pb and Zn in porewater. The effect of the earthworms decreased with increasing compost amendment. The impact of the compost and the earthworms on metal solubility is explained by their effect on pH and soluble organic carbon and the environmental chemistry of each element. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > Compost reduced the mobility of Cu, Pb and Zn. > Compost increased the mobility of As. > Earthworms decreased water soluble As and Cu but increased Pb and Zn in porewater. > These effects are explained by the impact of the earthworms and compost on pH and DOC. - The effect of earthworms on metal solubility was due to changes in dissolved organic carbon and pH but was reduced with increasing compost amendments.

  2. Impact of earthworms on trace element solubility in contaminated mine soils amended with green waste compost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sizmur, Tom; Palumbo-Roe, Barbara; Hodson, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    The common practice of remediating metal contaminated mine soils with compost can reduce metal mobility and promote revegetation, but the effect of introduced or colonising earthworms on metal solubility is largely unknown. We amended soils from an As/Cu (1150 mgAs kg -1 and 362 mgCu kg -1 ) and Pb/Zn mine (4550 mgPb kg -1 and 908 mgZn kg -1 ) with 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% compost and then introduced Lumbricus terrestris. Porewater was sampled and soil extracted with water to determine trace element solubility, pH and soluble organic carbon. Compost reduced Cu, Pb and Zn, but increased As solubility. Earthworms decreased water soluble Cu and As but increased Pb and Zn in porewater. The effect of the earthworms decreased with increasing compost amendment. The impact of the compost and the earthworms on metal solubility is explained by their effect on pH and soluble organic carbon and the environmental chemistry of each element. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: → Compost reduced the mobility of Cu, Pb and Zn. → Compost increased the mobility of As. → Earthworms decreased water soluble As and Cu but increased Pb and Zn in porewater. → These effects are explained by the impact of the earthworms and compost on pH and DOC. - The effect of earthworms on metal solubility was due to changes in dissolved organic carbon and pH but was reduced with increasing compost amendments.

  3. Estimates of the solubilities of waste element radionuclides in waste isolation pilot plant brines: A report by the expert panel on the source term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobart, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)]|[Glenn T. Seaborg Inst. for Transactinium Science, Livermore, CA (United States); Bruton, C.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Dept.; Millero, F.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)]|[Univ. of Miami, FL (United States). Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Chou, I.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)]|[Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States); Trauth, K.M.; Anderson, D.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Evaluation of the long-term performance of the WIPP includes estimation of the cumulative releases of radionuclide elements to the accessible environment. Nonradioactive lead is added because of the large quantity expected in WIPP wastes. To estimate the solubilities of these elements in WIPP brines, the Panel used the following approach. Existing thermodynamic data were used to identify the most likely aqueous species in solution through the construction of aqueous speciation diagrams. Existing thermodynamic data and expert judgment were used to identify potential solubility-limiting solid phases. Thermodynamic data were used to calculate the activities of the radionuclide aqueous species in equilibrium with each solid. Activity coefficients of the radionuclide-bearing aqueous species were estimated using Pitzer`s equations. These activity coefficients were then used to calculate the concentration of each radionuclide at the 0.1 and 0.9 fractiles. The 0.5 fractile was chosen to represent experimental data with activity coefficient corrections as described above. Expert judgment was used to develop the 0.0, 0.25, 0.75, and 1.0 fractiles by considering the sensitivity of solubility to the potential variability in the composition of brine and gas, and the extent of waste contaminants, and extending the probability distributions accordingly. The results were used in the 1991 and 1992 performance assessment calculations. 68 refs.

  4. Estimates of the solubilities of waste element radionuclides in waste isolation pilot plant brines: A report by the expert panel on the source term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobart, D.E.; Bruton, C.J.; Trauth, K.M.; Anderson, D.R.

    1996-05-01

    Evaluation of the long-term performance of the WIPP includes estimation of the cumulative releases of radionuclide elements to the accessible environment. Nonradioactive lead is added because of the large quantity expected in WIPP wastes. To estimate the solubilities of these elements in WIPP brines, the Panel used the following approach. Existing thermodynamic data were used to identify the most likely aqueous species in solution through the construction of aqueous speciation diagrams. Existing thermodynamic data and expert judgment were used to identify potential solubility-limiting solid phases. Thermodynamic data were used to calculate the activities of the radionuclide aqueous species in equilibrium with each solid. Activity coefficients of the radionuclide-bearing aqueous species were estimated using Pitzer's equations. These activity coefficients were then used to calculate the concentration of each radionuclide at the 0.1 and 0.9 fractiles. The 0.5 fractile was chosen to represent experimental data with activity coefficient corrections as described above. Expert judgment was used to develop the 0.0, 0.25, 0.75, and 1.0 fractiles by considering the sensitivity of solubility to the potential variability in the composition of brine and gas, and the extent of waste contaminants, and extending the probability distributions accordingly. The results were used in the 1991 and 1992 performance assessment calculations. 68 refs

  5. Evaluated and estimated solubility of some elements for performance assessment of geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste using updated version of thermodynamic database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Akira; Doi, Reisuke; Yoshida, Yasushi

    2011-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) established the thermodynamic database (JAEA-TDB) for performance assessment of geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and TRU waste. Twenty-five elements which were important for the performance assessment of geological disposal were selected for the database. JAEA-TDB enhanced reliability of evaluation and estimation of their solubility through selecting the latest and the most reliable thermodynamic data at present. We evaluated and estimated solubility of the 25 elements in the simulated porewaters established in the 'Second Progress Report for Safety Assessment of Geological Disposal of HLW in Japan' using the JAEA-TDB and compared with those using the previous thermodynamic database (JNC-TDB). It was found that most of the evaluated and estimated solubility values were not changed drastically, but the solubility and speciation of dominant aqueous species for some elements using the JAEA-TDB were different from those using the JNC-TDB. We discussed about how to provide reliable solubility values for the performance assessment. (author)

  6. Solubility of plutonium and waste evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karraker, D.G.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical processing of irradiated reactor elements at the Savannah River Site separates uranium, plutonium and fission products; fission products and process-added chemicals are mixed with an excess of NaOH and discharged as a basic slurry into large underground tanks for temporary storage. The slurry is composed of base-insoluble solids that settle to the bottom of the tank; the liquid supemate contains a mixture of base-soluble chemicals--nitrates, nitrites aluminate, sulfate, etc. To conserve space in the waste tanks, the supemate is concentrated by evaporation. As the evaporation proceeds, the solubilities of some components are exceeded, and these species crystallize from solution. Normally, these components are soluble in the hot solution discharged from the waste tank evaporator and do not crystallize until the solution cools. However, concern was aroused at West Valley over the possibility that plutonium would precipitate and accumulate in the evaporator, conceivably to the point that a nuclear accident was possible. There is also a concern at SRS from evaporation of sludge washes, which arise from washing the base-insoluble solids (open-quote sludge close-quote) with ca. 1M NaOH to reduce the Al and S0 4 -2 content. The sludge washes of necessity extract a low level of Pu from the sludge and are evaporated to reduce their volume, presenting the possibility of precipitating Pu. Measurements of the solubility of Pu in synthetic solutions of similar composition to waste supernate and sludge washes are described in this report

  7. Soluble pig for radioactive waste transfer lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohl, P.C.; Pezeshki, C.

    1997-01-01

    Flushing transfer pipe after radioactive waste transfers generates thousands of gallons of additional radioactive waste each year at the Hanford site. The use of pneumatic pigging with waste soluble pigs as a means to clear transfer piping may be an effective alternative to raw water flushes. A feasibility study was performed by a group of senior mechanical engineering students for their senior design project as part of their curriculum at Washington State University. The students divided the feasibility study into three sub-projects involving: (1) material research, (2) delivery system design, and (3) mockup fabrication and testing. The students screened through twenty-three candidate materials and selected a thermoplastic polymer combined 50:50 wt% with sucrose to meet the established material performance criteria. The students also prepared a conceptual design of a remote pneumatic delivery system and constructed a mockup section of transfer pipe for testing the prototype pigs

  8. Solubility effects in waste-glass/demineralized-water systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullam, H.T.

    1981-06-01

    Aqueous systems involving demineralized water and four glass compositions (including standins for actinides and fission products) at temperatures of up to 150 0 C were studied. Two methods were used to measure the solubility of glass components in demineralized water. One method involved approaching equilibrium from subsaturation, while the second method involved approaching equilibrium from supersaturation. The aqueous solutions were analyzed by induction-coupled plasma spectrometry (ICP). Uranium was determined using a Scintrex U-A3 uranium analyzer and zinc and cesium were determined by atomic absorption. The system that results when a waste glass is contacted with demineralized water is a complex one. The two methods used to determine the solubility limits gave very different results, with the supersaturation method yielding much higher solution concentrations than the subsaturation method for most of the elements present in the waste glasses. The results show that it is impossible to assign solubility limits to the various glass components without thoroughly describing the glass-water systems. This includes not only defining the glass type and solution temperature, but also the glass surface area-to-water volume ratio (S/V) of the system and the complete thermal history of the system. 21 figures, 22 tables

  9. Transuranic elements and nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, V.T.

    1974-01-01

    The contamination of oceans and marine life by transuranic elements (elements of atomic number greater than 92) is the main concern of this paper. Wastes of three different types, low-level, intermediate-level, and high-level, are considered. Fallout of Pu and other transuranics is discussed as it affects marine biogeochemistry and geochemistry. Different paths of absorption or uptake under various conditions of release are pointed out in some detail. The transfer of radioactivity to mammals from marine sources is considered in some detail. Waste disposal practices at Windscale are reviewed. It is concluded that the problems associated with transuranic wastes in oceans and marine life are very complex. Monitoring of waste release and uptake is concluded to not be enough. Each situation of release of transuranics to the environment should be treated as an experiment and milked for all the information that it can reveal. The tremendous expenditure of money and manpower necessary for such an undertaking is stressed

  10. Solubilities of gases in simulated Tank 241-SY-101 wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norton, J.D.; Pederson, L.R.

    1995-09-01

    Oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, methane, and nitrous oxide solubilities were evaluated as a function of temperature in SYl-SIM-93B, a homogeneous simulated waste mixture containing sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate, sodium aluminate, and sodium carbonate, the principal inorganic constituents of the wastes in Tank 241-SY-101. Ammonia solubility data for this simulated waste was obtained as a function of temperature in an earlier study. The choice of a homogeneous waste mixture in this study has the advantage of eliminating complications associated with a changing electrolyte concentration as a function of temperature that would be encountered with a slurry simulant. Dissolution is one of the means by which gases may be retained in Hanford Site wastes. While models are available to estimate gas solubilities in electrolyte solutions, few data are in existence that pertain to highly concentrated, multicomponent electrolytes such as those stored in Hanford Site waste tanks

  11. Soluble protein isolated from low cost fish and fish wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Lekshmy Nair, A.; Gopakumar, K.

    1982-01-01

    The method of preparation, composition, amino acid content, protein efficiency ratio and areas of possible application of water soluble protein isolates from low cost fish and fish wastes are discussed in detail in this communication.

  12. Quantitative analysis of soluble elements in environmental waters by PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niizeki, T.; Kawasaki, K.; Adachi, M.; Tsuji, M.; Hattori, T.

    1999-01-01

    We have started PIXE research for environmental science at Van de Graaff accelerator facility in Tokyo Institute of Technology. Quantitative measurements of soluble fractions in river waters have been carried out using the preconcentrate method developed in Tohoku University. We reveal that this PIXE target preparation can be also applied to waste water samples. (author)

  13. 3 and 4 oxidation state element solubilities in borosilicate glasses. Implement to actinides in nuclear glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cachia, J.N.

    2005-12-01

    In order to ensure optimal radionuclides containment, the knowledge of the actinide loading limits in nuclear waste glasses and also the comprehension of the solubilization mechanisms of these elements are essential. A first part of this manuscript deals with the study of the differences in solubility of the tri and tetravalent elements (actinides and surrogates) particularly in function of the melting temperature. The results obtained indicate that trivalent elements (La, Gd, Nd, Am, Cm) exhibit a higher solubility than tetravalent elements (Hf, Th, Pu). Consequently, it was planned to reduce plutonium at the oxidation state (III), the later being essentially tetravalent in borosilicate glasses. An innovating reduction process of multi-valent elements (cerium, plutonium) using silicon nitride has been developed in a second part of this work. Reduced plutonium-bearing glasses synthesized by Si 3 N 4 addition made it possible to double the plutonium solubility from 2 to 4 wt% at 1200 deg C. A structural approach to investigate the differences between tri and tetravalent elements was finally undertaken. These investigations were carried out by X-rays Absorption Spectroscopy (EXAFS) and NMR. Trivalent rare earth and actinide elements seem to behave as network modifiers while tetravalent elements rather present true intermediaries' behaviour. (author)

  14. Elemental content in ground and soluble/instant coffee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega-Carrillo, H.R.; Manzanares-Acuna, E.; Iskander, F.Y.

    2002-01-01

    The concentration of thirty-four elements in twelve coffee brands has been measured using instrumental neutron activation analysis. The samples investigated included four brands of commercially available ground coffee and eight brands of soluble/instant coffee. The elements measured were Al, As, Ba, Ca, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Dy, Eu, Fe, Gd, Hf, K, La, Lu, Mg, Mn, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, Ti, Tm, U, V, Yb and Zn. Twenty four elements were found to be below the detection limit in one or more samples. These elements were Ce, Cr, Fe, V, As, Eu, Ba, Dy, Gd, Hf, La, Lu, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, Ti, Yb, Tm, and U. (author)

  15. Elements of a radioactive waste management course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fentiman, A.W.

    1994-01-01

    The demand for scientists, engineers, and technicians with expertise in radioactive waste management is growing rapidly. Many universities, government agencies, and private contractors are developing courses in radioactive waste management. Two such courses have been developed at The Ohio State University. In support of that course development, two surveys were conducted. One survey went to all nuclear engineering programs in the US to determine what radioactive waste management courses are currently being taught. The other went to 600 waste management professionals, asking them to list the topics they think should be included in a radioactive waste management course. Four key elements of a course in radioactive waste management were identified. They are (a) technical information, (b) legal and regulatory framework, (c) communicating with the public, and (d) sources of information on waste management. Contents of each of the four elements are discussed, and results of the surveys are presented

  16. PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN HIGH-LEVEL WASTE ALKALI BOROSILICATE GLASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

    2011-01-04

    The solubility of plutonium in a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) reference glass and the effect of incorporation of Pu in the glass on specific glass properties were evaluated. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass was studied. Prior to actual plutonium glass testing, surrogate testing (using Hf as a surrogate for Pu) was conducted to evaluate the homogeneity of significant quantities of Hf (Pu) in the glass, determine the most appropriate methods to evaluate homogeneity for Pu glass testing, and to evaluate the impact of Hf loading in the glass on select glass properties. Surrogate testing was conducted using Hf to represent between 0 and 1 wt % Pu in glass on an equivalent molar basis. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass translated to {approx}18 kg Pu per Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister, or about 10X the current allowed limit per the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (2500 g/m{sup 3} of glass or about 1700 g/canister) and about 30X the current allowable concentration based on the fissile material concentration limit referenced in the Yucca Mountain Project License Application (897 g/m{sup 3}3 of glass or about 600 g Pu/canister). Based on historical process throughput data, this level was considered to represent a reasonable upper bound for Pu loading based on the ability to provide Pu containing feed to the DWPF. The task elements included evaluating the distribution of Pu in the glass (e.g. homogeneity), evaluating crystallization within the glass, evaluating select glass properties (with surrogates), and evaluating durability using the Product Consistency Test -- Method A (PCT-A). The behavior of Pu in the melter was evaluated using paper studies and corresponding analyses of DWPF melter pour samples.The results of the testing indicated that at 1 wt % Pu in the glass, the Pu was homogeneously distributed and did not result in any formation of plutonium-containing crystalline phases as long as the glass was prepared under 'well-mixed' conditions

  17. Plutonium Solubility In High-Level Waste Alkali Borosilicate Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marra, J.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Bibler, N.

    2011-01-01

    The solubility of plutonium in a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) reference glass and the effect of incorporation of Pu in the glass on specific glass properties were evaluated. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass was studied. Prior to actual plutonium glass testing, surrogate testing (using Hf as a surrogate for Pu) was conducted to evaluate the homogeneity of significant quantities of Hf (Pu) in the glass, determine the most appropriate methods to evaluate homogeneity for Pu glass testing, and to evaluate the impact of Hf loading in the glass on select glass properties. Surrogate testing was conducted using Hf to represent between 0 and 1 wt % Pu in glass on an equivalent molar basis. A Pu loading of 1 wt % in glass translated to ∼18 kg Pu per Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister, or about 10X the current allowed limit per the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (2500 g/m 3 of glass or about 1700 g/canister) and about 30X the current allowable concentration based on the fissile material concentration limit referenced in the Yucca Mountain Project License Application (897 g/m 3 3 of glass or about 600 g Pu/canister). Based on historical process throughput data, this level was considered to represent a reasonable upper bound for Pu loading based on the ability to provide Pu containing feed to the DWPF. The task elements included evaluating the distribution of Pu in the glass (e.g. homogeneity), evaluating crystallization within the glass, evaluating select glass properties (with surrogates), and evaluating durability using the Product Consistency Test -- Method A (PCT-A). The behavior of Pu in the melter was evaluated using paper studies and corresponding analyses of DWPF melter pour samples.The results of the testing indicated that at 1 wt % Pu in the glass, the Pu was homogeneously distributed and did not result in any formation of plutonium-containing crystalline phases as long as the glass was prepared under 'well-mixed' conditions. The incorporation of 1 wt

  18. Chelating water-soluble polymers for waste minimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.; Cournoyer, M.; Duran, B.; Ford, D.; Gibson, R.; Lin, M.; Meck, A.; Robinson, P.; Robison, T.

    1996-01-01

    Within the DOE complex and in industry there is a tremendous need for advanced metal ion recovery and waste minimization techniques. This project sought to employ capabilities for ligand-design and separations chemistry in which one can develop and evaluate water- soluble chelating polymers for recovering actinides and toxic metals from various process streams. Focus of this work was (1) to develop and select a set of water-soluble polymers suitable for a selected waste stream and (2) demonstrate this technology in 2 areas: removal of (a) actinides and toxic RCRA metals from waste water and (b) recovery of Cu and other precious metals from industrial process streams including from solid catalysts and aqueous waste streams. The R ampersand D was done in 4 phases for each of the 2 target areas: polymer synthesis for scaleup, equipment assembly, process demonstration at a DOE or industrial site, and advanced ligand/polymer synthesis. The TA- 50 site at Los Alamos was thought to be appropriate due to logistics and to its being representative of similar problems throughout the DOE complex

  19. Chemical analysis of simulated high level waste glasses to support stage III sulfate solubility modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms within the DOE complex. These wastes can contain relatively high concentrations of sulfate, which has low solubility in borosilicate glass. This is a significant issue for low-activity waste (LAW) glass and is projected to have a major impact on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Sulfate solubility has also been a limiting factor for recent high level waste (HLW) sludge processed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The low solubility of sulfate in glass, along with melter and off-gas corrosion constraints, dictate that the waste be blended with lower sulfate concentration waste sources or washed to remove sulfate prior to vitrification. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerate mission completion.The objective of the current scope being pursued by SHU is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DWPF and WTP, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput at these facilities. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the model and is identified as Stage III. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to SRNL for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for the Stage III, simulated HLW glasses fabricated by SHU in support of the sulfate solubility model development.

  20. Consideration on thermodynamic data for predicting solubility and chemical species of elements in groundwater. Part 1: Tc, U, Am

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Tetsuji; Takeda, Seiji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-01-01

    The solubility determines the release of radionuclides from waste form and is used as a source term in radionuclide migration analysis in performance assessment of radioactive waste repository. Complexations of radionuclides by ligands in groundwater affect the interaction between radionuclides and geologic media, thus affect their migration behavior. Thermodynamic data for Tc, Am and U were reviewed and compiled to be used for predicting the solubility and chemical species in groundwater. Thermodynamic data were reviewed with emphasis on the hydrolysis and carbonate complexation that can dominate the speciation in typical groundwater. Thermodynamic data for other species were selected based on existing database. Thermodynamic data for other important elements are under investigation, thus shown in an appendix for temporary use. (author)

  1. Consideration on thermodynamic data for predicting solubility and chemical species of elements in groundwater. Part 2: Np, Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Tetsuji

    2000-11-01

    The solubility determines the release of a radionuclide from waste form and is used as a source term in radionuclide migration analysis in performance assessment of radioactive waste repository. Complexations of the radionuclide by ligands in groundwater affect the interaction between radionuclides and geologic media, thus affect their migration behavior. It is essential to estimate the solubility and to predict the chemical species for the radionuclide based on thermodynamic data. The thermodynamic data of aqueous species and compounds were reviewed and compiled for Np and Pu. Thermodynamic data were reviewed with emphasis on the hydrolysis and carbonate complexation that can dominate the speciation in groundwater. Thermodynamic data for other species were selected based on existing databases. Thermodynamic data for other important elements are under investigation, thus shown in an appendix for temporary use. (author)

  2. Solubilities of sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate in simulated nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, D.A.; Herting, D.L.

    1984-09-01

    Solubilities were determined for sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate in synthetic nuclear waste liquor. Solubilities were determined as a function of temperature and solution composition (concentrations of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate). Temperature had the greatest effect on the solubilities of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite and a somewhat lesser effect on sodium aluminate solubility. Hydroxide had a great effect on the solubilities of all three salts. Other solution components had minor effects. 2 references, 8 figures, 11 tables

  3. A study of transformation water - soluble forms of hevy metals at waste incenerator for detoxicationof ash.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilets'ka V. А.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The complex research processes of transformation of soluble forms of heavy metals in sediment interaction with ash. Proved that the adsorption processes of immobilization lead to a significant decrease of soluble forms of heavy metals in the waste.

  4. Status of solubility data for selected elements (U, Mp, Pu, Am, Te, Ni, and Zr)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moll, H.; Brachmann, A.; Wruck, D.; Palmer, C.

    1997-01-01

    This report is an evaluation of solubility data for U, Np, Pu, Am, Tc, Ni and Zr compounds at ambient and elevated temperatures. We review the status of such data in light of the most recently reported experimental results. The focus is on the solid phases that may control solubilities under expected conditions in and near a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Solubility data or reliable predictions over the temperature range 20 to 150 degrees C will be used in geochemical modeling studies of the Yucca Mountain Project [96PAL

  5. The Apparent Solubility Of Aluminum(III) In Hanford High-Level Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, J.G.

    2012-01-01

    The solubility of aluminum in Hanford nuclear waste impacts on the process ability of the waste by a number of proposed treatment options. For many years, Hanford staff has anecdotally noted that aluminum appears to be considerably more soluble in Hanford waste than the simpler electrolyte solutions used as analogues. There has been minimal scientific study to confirm these anecdotal observations, however. The present study determines the apparent solubility product for gibbsite in 50 tank samples. The ratio of hydroxide to aluminum in the liquid phase for the samples is calculated and plotted as a function of total sodium molarity. Total sodium molarity is used as a surrogate for ionic strength, because the relative ratios of mono, di and trivalent anions are not available for all of the samples. These results were compared to the simple NaOH-NaAl(OH 4 )H 2 O system, and the NaOH-NaAl(OH 4 )NaCl-H 2 O system data retrieved from the literature. The results show that gibbsite is apparently more soluble in the samples than in the simple systems whenever the sodium molarity is greater than two. This apparent enhanced solubility cannot be explained solely by differences in ionic strength. The change in solubility with ionic strength in simple systems is small compared to the difference between aluminum solubility in Hanford waste and the simple systems. The reason for the apparent enhanced solubility is unknown, but could include. kinetic or thermodynamic factors that are not present in the simple electrolyte systems. Any kinetic explanation would have to explain why the samples are always supersaturated whenever the sodium molarity is above two. Real waste characterization data should not be used to validate thermodynamic solubility models until it can be confirmed that the apparent enhanced gibbsite solubility is a thermodynamic effect and not a kinetic effect.

  6. Evolution of chemical conditions and estimated solubility controls on radionuclides in the residual waste layer during post-closure aging of high-level waste tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denham, M. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Millings, M. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2012-08-28

    in a flow and transport model were estimated for 27 elements in each of the chemical stages generated in the grout simulations plus local groundwater. The grout simulations were run with the initial infiltrating fluid in equilibrium with atmospheric oxygen to account for degradation of the reduction capacity of the grout. However, a lower Eh was used in pore fluids in the oxidizing conditions used to estimate solubilities to be more consistent with measured Eh values and natural systems. Solubilities of plutonium are affected by this decision, but those of other elements are not. In addition, the baseline for H-Area tanks is that they will be washed with oxalic acid prior to being filled with grout. Hence, oxalate was included in the pore fluids by assuming equilibrium with calcium oxalate. Solubility estimates were done by equilibrating a solubility controlling phase for each element with the pore fluid compositions using The Geochemist’s Workbench®. Condition B pore fluids are similar to Condition D. Therefore, solubilities for Condition B were not estimated, but assumed to be the same as in Condition D. In general solubility controlling phases were selected to bias solubilities to higher values. Several elements had no solubility controls and solubility estimates for other elements were omitted because the elements had short half-lives or were present in residual waste in very low amounts. For these it is recommended that release from the tank be instantaneous when the tank liner is breached. There is considerable uncertainty in this approach to enabling a flow and transport model to account for variable waste release. Yet, it is also flexible and requires much less computing time than a fully coupled reactive transport model. This allows some of the uncertainty to be addressed by multiple flow and transport sensitivity cases. Some of the uncertainties are addressed within this document. These include uncertainty in infiltrate composition, grout mineralogy, and

  7. The water-soluble fraction of potentially toxic elements in contaminated soils: relationships between ecotoxicity, solubility and geochemical reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, L; Rodrigues, S M; Lopes, I; Soares, A M V M; Duarte, A C; Pereira, E

    2011-09-01

    To better understand the impacts posed by soil contamination to aquatic ecosystems it is crucial to characterise the links between ecotoxicity, chemical availability and geochemical reactivity of potentially toxic elements (PTE's) in soils. We evaluated the adverse effects of water extracts obtained from soils contaminated by chemical industry and mining, using a test battery including organisms from different trophic levels (bacteria, algae and daphnids). These tests provided a quick assessment of the ecotoxicity of soils with respect to possible adverse effects on aquatic organisms although the ecotoxicological responses could be related to the solubility of PTE's only to a limited extent. The analysis of results of bioassays together with the chemical characterisation of water extracts provided additional relevant insight into the role of conductivity, pH, Al, Fe, and Mn of soil extracts on toxicity to organisms. Furthermore, an important conclusion of this study was that the toxicity of extracts to the aquatic organisms could also be related to the soil properties (pH, Org C and Fe(ox)) and to the reactivity of PTE's in soils which in fact control the soluble fraction of the contaminants. The combined assessment of ecotoxicity in water fractions, solubility and geochemical reactivity of PTE's in soils provided a more comprehensive understanding of the bioavailability of inorganic contaminants than ecotoxicological or chemical studies alone and can therefore be most useful for environmental risks assessment of contaminated soils. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Process to separate transuranic elements from nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, T.R.; Ackerman, J.P.; Tomczuk, Z.; Fischer, D.F.

    1989-01-01

    A process is described for removing transuranic elements from a waste chloride electrolytic salt containing transuranic elements in addition to rare earth and other fission product elements so the salt waste may be disposed of more easily and the valuable transuranic elements may be recovered for reuse. The salt is contacted with a cadmium-uranium alloy which selectively extracts the transuranic elements from the salt. The waste salt is generated during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel associated with the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). 2 figs

  9. Process to separate transuranic elements from nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T.R.; Ackerman, J.P.; Tomczuk, Z.; Fischer, D.F.

    1989-03-21

    A process is described for removing transuranic elements from a waste chloride electrolytic salt containing transuranic elements in addition to rare earth and other fission product elements so the salt waste may be disposed of more easily and the valuable transuranic elements may be recovered for reuse. The salt is contacted with a cadmium-uranium alloy which selectively extracts the transuranic elements from the salt. The waste salt is generated during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel associated with the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). 2 figs.

  10. Demonstration of sulfur solubility determinations in high waste loading, low-activity waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-04-25

    A method recommended by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for sulfate solubility determinations in simulated low-activity waste glasses was demonstrated using three compositions from a recent Hanford high waste loading glass study. Sodium and sulfate concentrations in the glasses increased after each re-melting step. Visual observations of the glasses during the re-melting process reflected the changes in composition. The measured compositions showed that the glasses met the targeted values. The amount of SO3 retained in the glasses after washing was relatively high, ranging from 1.6 to 2.6 weight percent (wt %). Measured SnO2 concentrations were notably low in all of the study glasses. The composition of the wash solutions should be measured in future work to determine whether SnO2 is present with the excess sulfate washed from the glass. Increases in batch size and the amount of sodium sulfate added did not have a measureable impact on the amount of sulfate retained in the glass, although this was tested for only a single glass composition. A batch size of 250 g and a sodium sulfate addition targeting 7 wt %, as recommended by PNNL, will be used in future experiments.

  11. Solubility of metallic elements in LBE under extra low oxygen potential. JFY2003 joint research report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Toshiharu; Furukawa, Tomohiro; Aoto, Kazumi

    2004-03-01

    Lead-Bismuth eutectic alloy (LBE) has been considered as a prospective coolant for a fast-breeder reactor. However a corrosion of cooling pipe is anticipated when it is used at the similar temperature as sodium coolant. In this study, solubility of major metallic elements in LBE was measured under extra low oxygen potential. The interactive effect of those elements on the solubility was also to be examined. (1) The solubility of oxygen in LBE was measured by the gas equilibrium method (1223 k-1323 K). The standard Gibbs free energy change of oxygen solution reaction and the self-interaction parameter of oxygen in LBE were calculated, respectively. (2) The solubility of iron in LBE was measured by both the gas equilibrium method and the oxide equilibrium method (873 K-1323 K). The standard Gibbs free energy change of iron solution reaction, interaction parameter of oxygen on iron and self-interaction parameter of iron in LBE were calculated, respectively. (3) The interactive effect of iron and oxygen on the solubility in LBE was considered thermodynamically. (4) The solubility of chromium and nickel in LBE were measured under Ar-H 2 atmosphere. (author)

  12. NEARSOL, Aqueous Speciation and Solubility of Actinides for Waste Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leach, S.J.; Pryke, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    A - Description of program or function: NEARSOL models the aqueous speciation and solubility of actinides under near-field conditions for disposal using a simple thermodynamic approach. B - Method of solution: The program draws information from a thermodynamic data base consisting of solubility products and complex formation constants for all known species, and standard electrode potentials, at 25 C, corrected for ionic strength effects. By minimising the free energy of the system through a series of iterations, a precipitating solid phase is predicted which limits the solubility, and the concentration of the main aqueous species are calculated as a function of pH. Initially the program evaluates only hydroxide and carbonate species, but the effect of sulphate, phosphate and fluoride anions can also be included. The program is simple to use, requiring inputs of: 1. Actinide(s); 2. pH range; 3. Ionic strength; 4. Redox conditions; 5. Ligand concentrations. Functions are included to calculate the distribution of the protonated and un-protonated forms of carbonate and phosphate and the value of Eh as a function of pH under disposal conditions as required. The program can further evaluate the role of free calcium ions. C - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: None

  13. Probabilistic finite element modeling of waste rollover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaleel, M.A.; Cofer, W.F.; Al-fouqaha, A.A.

    1995-09-01

    Stratification of the wastes in many Hanford storage tanks has resulted in sludge layers which are capable of retaining gases formed by chemical and/or radiolytic reactions. As the gas is produced, the mechanisms of gas storage evolve until the resulting buoyancy in the sludge leads to instability, at which point the sludge ''rolls over'' and a significant volume of gas is suddenly released. Because the releases may contain flammable gases, these episodes of release are potentially hazardous. Mitigation techniques are desirable for more controlled releases at more frequent intervals. To aid the mitigation efforts, a methodology for predicting of sludge rollover at specific times is desired. This methodology would then provide a rational basis for the development of a schedule for the mitigation procedures. In addition, a knowledge of the sensitivity of the sludge rollovers to various physical and chemical properties within the tanks would provide direction for efforts to reduce the frequency and severity of these events. In this report, the use of probabilistic finite element analyses for computing the probability of rollover and the sensitivity of rollover probability to various parameters is described

  14. A MODERN INTERPRETATION OF THE BARNEY DIAGRAM FOR ALUMINUM SOLUBILITY IN TANK WASTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, J.G.; Reynolds, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental and modeling studies of aluminum solubility in Hanford tank waste have been developed and refined for many years in efforts to resolve new issues or develop waste treatment flowsheets. The earliest of these studies was conducted by G. Scott Barney, who performed solubility studies in highly concentrated electrolyte solutions to support evaporator campaign flowsheets in the 1970's. The 'Barney Diagram', a term still widely used at Hanford today, suggested gibbsite (γ-Al(OH) 3 ) was much more soluble in tank waste than in simple sodium hydroxide solutions. These results, which were highly surprising at the time, continue to be applied to new situations where aluminum solubility in tank waste is of interest. Here, we review the history and provide a modern explanation for the large gibbsite solubility observed by Barney, an explanation based on basic research that has been performed and published in the last 30 years. This explanation has both thermodynamic and kinetic aspects. Thermodynamically, saturated salt solutions stabilize soluble aluminate species that are minor components in simple sodium hydroxide solutions. These species are the aluminate dimer and the sodium-aluminate ion-pair. Ion-pairs must be present in the Barney simulants because calculations showed that there was insufficient space between the highly concentrated ions for a water molecule. Thus, most of the ions in the simulants have to be ion-paired. Kinetics likely played a role as well. The simulants were incubated for four to seven days, and more recent data indicate that this was unlikely sufficient time to achieve equilibrium from supersaturation. These results allow us to evaluate applications of the Barney results to current and future tank waste issues or flowsheets.

  15. Regulatable elements in the high-level waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oakley, D.

    1979-01-01

    Regulatable elements of a deep geological nuclear waste isolation system are those characteristics of a candidate system which need to be specified to achieve control of its performance. This report identifies the regulatable elements with respect to waste form, repository design, site suitability, and the modeling and decision analysis processes. Regulatable elements in each section are listed and described briefly as they affect the short-term and long-term performance of a deep geological repository

  16. Incorporation of transuranic elements in titanate nuclear waste ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzke, H.J.; Ray, I.L.F.; Theile, H.; Trisoglio, C.; Walker, C.T.; White, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    The incorporation of actinide elements and their rare-earth element analogues in titanate nuclear waste forms in reviewed. New partitioning data are presented for three waste forms containing Purex waste simulant in combination with either NpO 2 , PuO 2 , or Am 2 O 3 . The greater proportion of transuranics partition between perovskite and zirconolite, while some americium may enter loveringite. Autoradiography revealed clusters of plutonium atoms which have been interpreted as unreacted dioxide or sesquioxide. It is concluded that the solid-state behavior of transuranic elements in titanate waste forms is poorly understood, certainly not well enough to tailor a ceramic for the incorporation of waste from reprocessing of fast breeder reactor fuel in which transuranic species are more abundant than in Purex waste

  17. Production of water-soluble sago waste - HAMPAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norhazlin Zainuddin; Kamaruddin Hashim; Kamaruddin Bahari; Mansor Ahmad; Wan Md Zin Wan Yunus

    2002-01-01

    Carboxylmethyl sago waste (CMSW) was prepared in completely heterogeneous conditions as a product of the reaction of sago waste and sodium monochloroacetate (MCA) in mixed solution of isopropanol and sodium hydroxide (NaOH). The results showed that the DS values depend on the concentration of NaOH, ratio of MCA to anhydroglucose unit (AGU), (MCA:AGU), and also time and temperature of the reaction. DS value increased with increasing the concentration of NaOH and reaction temperature, but further increase will reduce the value of DS. Increasing the reaction time will increase the DS value and achieve a constant value after 2 hours. The study showed that the highest value of DS i.e. 1.04, could be achieved at 2:1 of MCA:AGU ratio, NaOh concentration of 25% and 2 hours reaction time at 55 degree C. (Author)

  18. WATER ACTIVITY DATA ASSESSMENT TO BE USED IN HANFORD WASTE SOLUBILITY CALCULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DISSELKAMP RS

    2011-01-06

    The purpose of this report is to present and assess water activity versus ionic strength for six solutes:sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, sodium chloride, sodium carbonate, sodium sulfate, and potassium nitrate. Water activity is given versus molality (e.g., ionic strength) and temperature. Water activity is used to estimate Hanford crystal hydrate solubility present in the waste.

  19. WATER ACTIVITY DATA ASSESSMENT TO BE USED IN HANFORD WASTE SOLUBILITY CALCULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disselkamp, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present and assess water activity versus ionic strength for six solutes:sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, sodium chloride, sodium carbonate, sodium sulfate, and potassium nitrate. Water activity is given versus molality (e.g., ionic strength) and temperature. Water activity is used to estimate Hanford crystal hydrate solubility present in the waste.

  20. Use Of Stream Analyzer For Solubility Predictions Of Selected Hanford Tank Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierson, Kayla; Belsher, Jeremy; Ho, Quynh-dao

    2012-01-01

    The Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) models the mission to manage, retrieve, treat and vitrify Hanford waste for long-term storage and disposal. HTWOS is a dynamic, flowsheet, mass balance model of waste retrieval and treatment activities. It is used to evaluate the impact of changes on long-term mission planning. The project is to create and evaluate the integrated solubility model (ISM). The ISM is a first step in improving the chemistry basis in HTWOS. On principal the ISM is better than the current HTWOS solubility. ISM solids predictions match the experimental data well, with a few exceptions. ISM predictions are consistent with Stream Analyzer predictions except for chromium. HTWOS is producing more realistic results with the ISM

  1. Summary of Uranium Solubility Studies in Concrete Waste Forms and Vadose Zone Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bovaird, Chase C.

    2011-09-30

    One of the methods being considered for safely disposing of Category 3 low-level radioactive wastes is to encase the waste in concrete. Concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and act as an intrusion barrier. The current plan for waste isolation consists of stacking low-level waste packages on a trench floor, surrounding the stacks with reinforced steel, and encasing these packages in concrete. These concrete-encased waste stacks are expected to vary in size with maximum dimensions of 6.4 m long, 2.7 m wide, and 4 m high. The waste stacks are expected to have a surrounding minimum thickness of 15 cm of concrete encasement. These concrete-encased waste packages are expected to withstand environmental exposure (solar radiation, temperature variations, and precipitation) until an interim soil cover or permanent closure cover is installed and to remain largely intact thereafter. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. This report presents the results of investigations elucidating the uranium mineral phases controlling the long-term fate of uranium within concrete waste forms and the solubility of these phases in concrete pore waters and alkaline, circum-neutral vadose zone environments.

  2. 3 and 4 oxidation state element solubilities in borosilicate glasses. Implement to actinides in nuclear glasses; Solubilite des elements aux degres d'oxydation (3) et (4) dans les verres de borosilicate. Application aux actinides dans les verres nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cachia, J.N

    2005-12-15

    In order to ensure optimal radionuclides containment, the knowledge of the actinide loading limits in nuclear waste glasses and also the comprehension of the solubilization mechanisms of these elements are essential. A first part of this manuscript deals with the study of the differences in solubility of the tri and tetravalent elements (actinides and surrogates) particularly in function of the melting temperature. The results obtained indicate that trivalent elements (La, Gd, Nd, Am, Cm) exhibit a higher solubility than tetravalent elements (Hf, Th, Pu). Consequently, it was planned to reduce plutonium at the oxidation state (III), the later being essentially tetravalent in borosilicate glasses. An innovating reduction process of multi-valent elements (cerium, plutonium) using silicon nitride has been developed in a second part of this work. Reduced plutonium-bearing glasses synthesized by Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} addition made it possible to double the plutonium solubility from 2 to 4 wt% at 1200 deg C. A structural approach to investigate the differences between tri and tetravalent elements was finally undertaken. These investigations were carried out by X-rays Absorption Spectroscopy (EXAFS) and NMR. Trivalent rare earth and actinide elements seem to behave as network modifiers while tetravalent elements rather present true intermediaries' behaviour. (author)

  3. Waste to energy – key element for sustainable waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, Paul H.; Rechberger, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • First paper on the importance of incineration from a urban metabolism point of view. • Proves that incineration is necessary for sustainable waste management. • Historical and technical overview of 100 years development of MSW incineration. - Abstract: Human activities inevitably result in wastes. The higher the material turnover, and the more complex and divers the materials produced, the more challenging it is for waste management to reach the goals of “protection of men and environment” and “resource conservation”. Waste incineration, introduced originally for volume reduction and hygienic reasons, went through a long and intense development. Together with prevention and recycling measures, waste to energy (WTE) facilities contribute significantly to reaching the goals of waste management. Sophisticated air pollution control (APC) devices ensure that emissions are environmentally safe. Incinerators are crucial and unique for the complete destruction of hazardous organic materials, to reduce risks due to pathogenic microorganisms and viruses, and for concentrating valuable as well as toxic metals in certain fractions. Bottom ash and APC residues have become new sources of secondary metals, hence incineration has become a materials recycling facility, too. WTE plants are supporting decisions about waste and environmental management: They can routinely and cost effectively supply information about chemical waste composition as well as about the ratio of biogenic to fossil carbon in MSW and off-gas

  4. Waste to energy – key element for sustainable waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Paul H., E-mail: paul.h.brunner@tuwien.ac.at; Rechberger, Helmut

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • First paper on the importance of incineration from a urban metabolism point of view. • Proves that incineration is necessary for sustainable waste management. • Historical and technical overview of 100 years development of MSW incineration. - Abstract: Human activities inevitably result in wastes. The higher the material turnover, and the more complex and divers the materials produced, the more challenging it is for waste management to reach the goals of “protection of men and environment” and “resource conservation”. Waste incineration, introduced originally for volume reduction and hygienic reasons, went through a long and intense development. Together with prevention and recycling measures, waste to energy (WTE) facilities contribute significantly to reaching the goals of waste management. Sophisticated air pollution control (APC) devices ensure that emissions are environmentally safe. Incinerators are crucial and unique for the complete destruction of hazardous organic materials, to reduce risks due to pathogenic microorganisms and viruses, and for concentrating valuable as well as toxic metals in certain fractions. Bottom ash and APC residues have become new sources of secondary metals, hence incineration has become a materials recycling facility, too. WTE plants are supporting decisions about waste and environmental management: They can routinely and cost effectively supply information about chemical waste composition as well as about the ratio of biogenic to fossil carbon in MSW and off-gas.

  5. Using Aspen simulation package to determine solubility of mixed salts in TRU waste evaporator bottoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatchell, J.L.

    1998-03-01

    Nitric acid from plutonium process waste is a candidate for waste minimization by recycling. Process simulation software packages, such as Aspen, are valuable tools to estimate how effective recovery processes can be, however, constants in equations of state for many ionic components are not in their data libraries. One option is to combine single salt solubility`s in the Aspen model for mixed salt system. Single salt solubilities were regressed in Aspen within 0.82 weight percent of literature values. These were combined into a single Aspen model and used in the mixed salt studies. A simulated nitric acid waste containing mixed aluminum, calcium, iron, magnesium and sodium nitrate was tested to determine points of solubility between 25 and 100 C. Only four of the modeled experimental conditions, at 50 C and 75 C, produced a saturated solution. While experimental results indicate that sodium nitrate is the first salt to crystallize out, the Aspen computer model shows that the most insoluble salt, magnesium nitrate, the first salt to crystallize. Possible double salt formation is actually taking place under experimental conditions, which is not captured by the Aspen model.

  6. Solubility of metallic elements in LBE under extra low oxygen potential. JFY2001 joint research report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Toshiharu

    2002-03-01

    Lead-Bismuth eutectic alloy (LBE) has been considered as a prospective coolant for a fast-breeder reactor. However a corrosion of cooling pipe is anticipated when it is used at the similar temperature as sodium coolant. In this study, solubility of major metallic elements in LBE is to be measured under extra low oxygen potential. The interactive effect of those elements on the solubility is also to be examined. As a first step, measurements of the solubility of iron in LBE at 673 K were conducted where the partial pressure of oxygen was controlled by using equilibrium between iron and its oxide. Several experimental runs were conducted. But relationship between iron content and oxygen content in LBE could not be defined precisely, because chemical reactions proceeded very slowly at such a low temperature and reliable enough data have not been obtained yet until now. Based on the above results, following subjects were extracted for JFY2002 study. (1) To establish the method of quantitative analysis of oxygen content in LBE. (2) To obtain the solubility data at elevated temperature, then approach to lower temperature. (3) To control the oxygen partial pressure in LBE by CO-CO 2 mixed gases supply. (author)

  7. Organic waste process containing at least one radioactive element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roy, F.

    1977-01-01

    The description is given of an organic waste process containing at least one element from the group comprising strontium, cesium, iodine and ruthenium. It comprises the introduction of the organic waste and gaseous oxygen in a bath of melted salt containing an alkaline carbonate, the bath being maintained at a high temperature between 400 and 1000 0 C and at a pressure of 0.5 to 10 bars, so that the organic waste is burnt and oxidised at least partly, the element selected being retained by the bath of melted salt [fr

  8. Tritium solubility and permeation in high retention fusion reactor breeder elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakeman, D.

    1979-11-01

    As an alternative to the current philosophy of reducing the tritium inventory to a minimum by continuously extracting tritium from the breeder of a fusion reactor, an alternative design philosophy is examined in which tritium is contained within high retention breeder elements which can remain in the reactor for a substantial time. To prevent tritium diffusion through the clad of the element it is necessary to maintain a low tritium pressure within the element. Pressures of between 10 4 Pa and 1 Pa appear possible with an element containing a high solubility material provided it is kept below about 400 0 C. This should lead to a leakage into the coolant of between 10 Ci day -1 and 10 4 Ci day -1 which is considerably less than the 10 7 Ci day -1 in present designs. (author)

  9. A solubility-limited-source-term model for the geological disposal of cemented intermediate-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, P.C.; Hodgkinson, D.P.; Tasker, P.W.; Lever, D.A.; Windsor, M.E.; Grime, P.W.; Herbert, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents and illustrates the use of a source-team model for an intermediate-level radioactive-waste repository. The model deals with the behaviour of long-lived nuclides after the initial containment period. The major processes occurring in the near-field are included, namely sorption, elemental solubility limits, chain decay and transport due to groundwater flow. The model is applied to a realistic example of ILW disposal. From this it is clear that some nuclides are present in sufficient quantities to reach their solubility limit even when the assumed sorption coefficients are large. For these nuclides the precise sorption coefficient is unimportant. It is also clear that some daughter products, in particular Pb-210, become significant. The toxicity of the repository porewater is calculated and it is shown that, although this toxicity is high compared to levels acceptable in drinking water, it is much lower than the toxicity of the waste itself. However, the near-field chemical environment is only one of a number of containment barriers. In addition, it has been shown that the rate at which radionuclides enter the rock surrounding the repository is very low. (author)

  10. Major and trace elements regulation in natural granitic waters: Application to deep radioactive waste disposals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michard, G.; Negrel, G.; Toulhoat, P.; Beaucaire, C.; Ouzounian, G.

    1991-01-01

    In order to forecast the evolution of deep groundwaters in the environment of a radioactive waste disposal, one must be able to understand the behaviour of major and trace elements in natural systems. From granitic geothermal and groundwater systems the authors establish that major elements are controlled by mineral precipitation. Regulation levels depend both on equilibration temperature and mobile anion concentration (mainly C1). From empirical laws, the regulation levels with temperature of some trace elements (alkaline and most divalent) elements can be estimated, although a precise explanation for the regulation mechanism is not yet available. They demonstrate that some transition metals are controlled by sulphide precipitation; that uranium is controlled by uraninite solubility; that trivalent and tetravalent metals are present in association with colloidal particles. Maximum regulation levels can be estimated. Such studies can also be useful to forecast the concentration levels of many elements related to nuclear wastes, mainly fission products, uranium, thorium and by analogy artificial actinide elements, as the behaviour of corresponding natural elements can be evaluated

  11. Elements affecting food waste in the food service sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Lotta; Reinikainen, Anu; Katajajuuri, Juha-Matti; Silvennoinen, Kirsi; Hartikainen, Hanna

    2016-10-01

    Avoidable food waste is produced in the food service sector, with significant ecological and economical impacts. In order to understand and explain better the complex issue of food waste a qualitative study was conducted on the reasons for its generation in restaurants and catering businesses. Research data were collected during three participatory workshops for personnel from three different catering sector companies in Finland. Based on synthesized qualitative content analysis, eight elements influencing production and reduction of food waste were identified. Results revealed the diversity of managing food waste in the food service sector and how a holistic approach is required to prevent and reduce it. It is crucial to understand that food waste is manageable and should be an integral component of the management system. The model of eight factors provides a framework for recognition and management of food waste in the food service sector. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Soil amendments reduce trace element solubility in a contaminated soil and allow regrowth of natural vegetation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madejon, Engracia; Perez de Mora, Alfredo; Felipe, Efrain; Burgos, Pilar; Cabrera, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    We tested the effects of three amendments (a biosolid compost, a sugar beet lime, and a combination of leonardite plus sugar beet lime) on trace element stabilisation and spontaneous revegetation of a trace element contaminated soil. Soil properties were analysed before and after amendment application. Spontaneous vegetation growing on the experimental plot was studied by three surveys in terms of number of taxa colonising, percentage vegetation cover and plant biomass. Macronutrients and trace element concentrations of the five most frequent species were analysed. The results showed a positive effect of the amendments both on soil chemical properties and vegetation. All amendments increased soil pH and TOC content and reduced CaCl 2 -soluble-trace element concentrations. Colonisation by wild plants was enhanced in all amended treatments. The nutritional status of the five species studied was improved in some cases, while a general reduction in trace element concentrations of the aboveground parts was observed in all treated plots. The results obtained show that natural assisted remediation has potential for success on a field scale reducing trace element entry in the food chain. - Soil amendments affect soil chemistry and allow revegetation of soils contaminated by trace elements

  13. Report on the disposal of radioactive wastes and spent fuel elements from Baden-Wuerttemberg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-04-01

    The report on the disposal of radioactive wastes and spent fuel elements from Baden- Wuerttemberg covers the following issues: legal framework for the nuclear disposal; producer of spent fuels and radioactive wastes in Baden- Report on the disposal of radioactive wastes and spent fuel elements from Baden- Wuerttemberg; low- and medium-level radioactive wastes (non heat generating radioactive wastes); spent fuels and radioactive wastes from waste processing (heat generating radioactive wastes); final disposal.

  14. Methods for removing transuranic elements from waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, S.A.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Connor, C.; Sedlet, J.; Srinivasan, B.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1994-11-01

    This report outlines a treatment scheme for separating and concentrating the transuranic (TRU) elements present in aqueous waste solutions stored at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The treatment method selected is carrier precipitation. Potential carriers will be evaluated in future laboratory work, beginning with ferric hydroxide and magnetite. The process will result in a supernatant with alpha activity low enough that it can be treated in the existing evaporator/concentrator at ANL. The separated TRU waste will be packaged for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

  15. Solubility of iron and other trace elements in rainwater collected on the Kerguelen Islands (South Indian Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Heimburger

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The soluble fraction of aerosols that is deposited on the open ocean is vital for phytoplankton growth. It is believed that a large proportion of this dissolved fraction is bioavailable for marine biota and thus plays an important role in primary production, especially in HNLC oceanic areas where this production is limited by micronutrient supply. There is still much uncertainty surrounding the solubility of atmospheric particles in global biogeochemical cycles and it is not well understood. In this study, we present the solubilities of seven elements (Al, Ce, Fe, La, Mn, Nd, Ti in rainwater on the Kerguelen Islands, in the middle of the Southern Indian Ocean. The solubilities of elements exhibit high values, generally greater than 70%, and Ti remains the least soluble element. Because the Southern Indian Ocean is remote from its dust sources, only a fraction of smaller aerosols reaches the Kerguelen Islands after undergoing several cloud and chemical processes during their transport, resulting in a drastic increase in solubility. Finally, we deduced an average soluble iron deposition flux of 27 ± 6 μg m−2 d−1 (~0.5 μmol m−2 d−1 for the studied oceanic area, taking into account a median iron solubility of 82% ± 18%.

  16. Water-soluble elements in atmospheric particulate matter over tropical and equatorial Atlantic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buat-Menard, Patrick; Morelli, Jacques; Chesselet, Roger

    1974-01-01

    Samples of water-soluble atmospheric particulate matter collected from R/V ''Jean Charcot'' (May to October 1971) and R/V ''James Gilliss'' (October 1972) over Tropical and Equatorial Atlantic were analyzed for Na, Mg, K and Ca by atomic absorption and for Cl and S as SO 4 by colorimetry. Data shows a strong geographical dependence of K and Ca enrichment relative to their elemental ratio to Na in sea-water. Ca enrichment is related to presence of identified soluble calcium minerals in continental dust originating from African deserts (Sahara-Kalahari). This dust does not influence amounts of K in the water-soluble phase. When observed, strong K enrichment appears tightly associated with high concentrations of surface-active organic material in the microlayer derived from high biological activity (Gulf of Guinea). Observed in same samples, SO 4 enrichment could also be controlled by the same source. This SO 4 enrichment balances the observed Cl loss in aerosols accordingly with gaseous HCl formation processes in marine atmosphere [fr

  17. Extractable trace elements and sodium in Illinois coal-cleaning wastes: correlation with concentrations in tall fescue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, B.G.

    1983-07-01

    Trace element concentrations in shoots of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) were correlated with extractable element concentrations in five southern Illinois coal-cleaning wastes limed to pH 6.5, in a greenhouse study to determine applicability of soil tests to coal-waste evaluation. There was little or no correlation between shoot concentrations of Fe, and Fe extracted from the wastes by dilute acid (r equals 0.60), DTPA at pH 6.4 (r equals 0.47) or DTPA at pH 8.4 (r equals -0.17). The corresponding r values for Mn were 0.94, 0.97, and 0.96; for Zn, 0.96, 0.96, and 0.88; and for Cu, 0.67, 0.90, and 0.88, respectively. Shoot B correlated well with hot water-soluble B(r equals 0.96) and acid-soluble B(r equals 0.91). Correlations for shoot Na were also good with water-soluble Na and acid-soluble Na (r equals 0.96 in both cases). Concentrations of Al, As, Cd, Ni, Pb, and Se in the shoots were well below reported upper critical levels, and similar to concentrations in the grass grown on a silt loam under the same greenhouse conditions. 21 references.

  18. Rhenium solubility in borosilicate nuclear waste glass: implications for the processing and immobilization of technetium-99.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloy, John S; Riley, Brian J; Goel, Ashutosh; Liezers, Martin; Schweiger, Michael J; Rodriguez, Carmen P; Hrma, Pavel; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lukens, Wayne W; Kruger, Albert A

    2012-11-20

    The immobilization of technetium-99 ((99)Tc) in a suitable host matrix has proven to be a challenging task for researchers in the nuclear waste community around the world. In this context, the present work reports on the solubility and retention of rhenium, a nonradioactive surrogate for (99)Tc, in a sodium borosilicate glass. Glasses containing target Re concentrations from 0 to 10,000 ppm [by mass, added as KReO(4) (Re(7+))] were synthesized in vacuum-sealed quartz ampules to minimize the loss of Re from volatilization during melting at 1000 °C. The rhenium was found as Re(7+) in all of the glasses as observed by X-ray absorption near-edge structure. The solubility of Re in borosilicate glasses was determined to be ~3000 ppm (by mass) using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. At higher rhenium concentrations, additional rhenium was retained in the glasses as crystalline inclusions of alkali perrhenates detected with X-ray diffraction. Since (99)Tc concentrations in a glass waste form are predicted to be wastes, assuming Tc as Tc(7+) and similarities between Re(7+) and Tc(7+) behavior in this glass system.

  19. Properties and solubility of chrome in iron alumina phosphate glasses containing high level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, W.; Day, D.E.; Ray, C.S.; Kim, C.W.; Reis, S.T.D.

    2004-01-01

    Chemical durability, glass formation tendency, and other properties of iron alumina phosphate glasses containing 70 wt% of a simulated high level nuclear waste (HLW), doped with different amounts of Cr 2 O 3 , have been investigated. All of the iron alumina phosphate glasses had an outstanding chemical durability as measured by their small dissolution rate (1 . 10 -9 g/(cm 2 . min)) in deionized water at 90 C for 128 d, their low normalized mass release as determined by the product consistency test (PCT) and a barely measurable corrosion rate of 2 . d) after 7 d at 200 C by the vapor hydration test (VHT). The solubility limit for Cr 2 O 3 in the iron phosphate melts was estimated at 4.1 wt%, but all of the as-annealed melts contained a few percent of crystalline Cr 2 O 3 that had no apparent effect on the chemical durability. The chemical durability was unchanged after deliberate crystallization, 48 h at 650 C. These iron phosphate waste forms, with a waste loading of at least 70 wt%, can be readily melted in commercial refractory crucibles at 1250 C for 2 to 4 h, are resistant to crystallization, meet all current US Department of Energy requirements for chemical durability, and have a solubility limit for Cr 2 O 3 which is at least three times larger than that for borosilicate glasses. (orig.)

  20. Study of the solubility and stability of polystyrene wastes in a dissolution recycling process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Maria Teresa; Gracia, Ignacio; Duque, Gema; Lucas, Antonio de; Rodriguez, Juan Francisco

    2009-01-01

    Dissolution with suitable solvents is one of the cheapest and more efficient processes for polystyrene waste management. In this work the solubility of polystyrene foams in several solvents benzene, toluene, xylene, tetrahydrofuran, chloroform, 1,3-butanediol, 2-butanol, linalool, geraniol, d-limonene, p-cymene, terpinene, phellandrene, terpineol, menthol, eucalyptol, cinnamaldheyde, nitrobenzene, N,N-dimethylformamide and water has been determined. Experimental results have shown that to develop a 'green process' the constituents of essential oils, d-limonene, p-cymene, terpinene, phellandrene, are the most appropriate solvents. The action of these solvent does not produce any degradation of polymer chains. The solubility of the polymer in the mentioned solvents at different temperatures has been investigated. The solvent can be easily recycled by distillation.

  1. Mass and element balance in food waste composting facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huijun; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2010-01-01

    The mass and element balance in municipal solid waste composting facilities that handle food waste was studied. Material samples from the facilities were analyzed for moisture, ash, carbon, nitrogen, and the oxygen consumption of compost and bulking material was determined. Three different processes were used in the food waste composting facilities: standard in-vessel composting, drying, and stand-alone composting machine. Satisfactory results were obtained for the input/output ash balance despite several assumptions made concerning the quantities involved. The carbon/nitrogen ratio and oxygen consumption values for compost derived only from food waste were estimated by excluding the contribution of the bulking material remaining in the compost product. These estimates seemed to be suitable indices for the biological stability of compost because there was a good correlation between them, and because the values seemed logical given the operating conditions at the facilities. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The modelling of 2-D migration patterns of soluble waste in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villar, H.P.

    1998-01-01

    A novel approach to the modelling of two-dimensional migration patterns of soluble waste in soils is presented. This approach, albeit very simple and straightforward, was found to be powerful enough to simulate several aspects of the migration of conservative tracers in non-sorptive soils. In brief, the finite-difference technique is adopted for the solution of the two-dimensional advection-dispersion equation. Since the simulated data were to be verified against experimental data obtained through the use of radioactive tracers, the numerical model was modified to take into account the corresponding experimental aspects, with special regard to the attenuation of radiation through the soil mass. The introduction of this correcting factor rendered the simulation quite faithful to the experimental data, thus suggesting the feasibility of the proposed approach for the two-dimensional analysis of waste migration. (author)

  3. Program for responsible and safe disposal of spent fuel elements and radioactive wastes (National disposal program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The contribution covers the following topics: fundamentals of the disposal policy; amount of radioactive wastes and prognosis; disposal of radioactive wastes - spent fuel elements and wastes from waste processing, radioactive wastes with low heat production; legal framework of the nuclear waste disposal in Germany; public participation, cost and financing.

  4. Sulphate solubility and sulphate diffusion in oxide glasses: implications for the containment of sulphate-bearing nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenoir, M.

    2009-09-01

    The thesis deals with sulphate solubility and sulphate diffusion in oxide glasses, in order to control sulphate incorporation and sulphate volatilization in nuclear waste glasses. It was conducted on simplified compositions, in the SiO 2 -B 2 O 3 -R 2 O (R = Li, Na, K, Cs), SiO 2 -B 2 O 3 -BaO and V 2 O 5 -B 2 O 3 -BaO systems. These compositions allowed us to study the influence of the nature of network-modifying ions (Li + , Na + , K + , Cs + or Ba 2+ ) and also of former elements (Si, B, V), on structure and properties of glasses. Sulphate volatility is studied in sodium borosilicate melts using an innovative technique of sulphate quantitation with Raman spectroscopy. This technique is useful to obtain kinetic curves of sulphate volatilization. The establishment of a model to fit these curves leads to the determination of diffusion coefficients of sulphate. These diffusion coefficients can thus be compared to diffusion coefficients of other species, determined by other techniques and presented in the literature. They are also linked to diffusion coefficients in relation with the viscosity of the melts. Concerning sulphate solubility in glasses, it depends on glass composition and on the nature of sulphate incorporated. Sulphate incorporation in alkali borosilicate glasses leads to the formation of a sulphate layer floating on top of the melt. Sulphate incorporation in barium borosilicate and boro-vanadate glasses leads to the crystallization of sulphate species inside the vitreous matrix. Moreover, sulphate solubility is higher in these glasses than in alkali borosilicates. Finally, exchanges between cations present in glasses and cations present in the sulphate phase are also studied. (author)

  5. Compositional Dependence of Solubility/Retention of Molybdenum Oxides in Aluminoborosilicate-Based Model Nuclear Waste Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehault, Antoine; Patil, Deepak; Kamat, Hrishikesh; Youngman, Randall E; Thirion, Lynn M; Mauro, John C; Corkhill, Claire L; McCloy, John S; Goel, Ashutosh

    2018-02-08

    Molybdenum oxides are an integral component of the high-level waste streams being generated from the nuclear reactors in several countries. Although borosilicate glass has been chosen as the baseline waste form by most of the countries to immobilize these waste streams, molybdate oxyanions (MoO 4 2- ) exhibit very low solubility (∼1 mol %) in these glass matrices. In the past three to four decades, several studies describing the compositional and structural dependence of molybdate anions in borosilicate and aluminoborosilicate glasses have been reported in the literature, providing a basis for our understanding of fundamental science that governs the solubility and retention of these species in the nuclear waste glasses. However, there are still several open questions that need to be answered to gain an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms that control the solubility and retention of these oxyanions in glassy waste forms. This article is focused on finding answers to two such questions: (1) What are the solubility and retention limits of MoO 3 in aluminoborosilicate glasses as a function of chemical composition? (2) Why is there a considerable increase in the solubility of MoO 3 with incorporation of rare-earth oxides (for example, Nd 2 O 3 ) in aluminoborosilicate glasses? Accordingly, three different series of aluminoborosilicate glasses (compositional complexity being added in a tiered approach) with varying MoO 3 concentrations have been synthesized and characterized for their ability to accommodate molybdate ions in their structure (solubility) and as a glass-ceramic (retention). The contradictory viewpoints (between different research groups) pertaining to the impact of rare-earth cations on the structure of aluminoborosilicate glasses are discussed, and their implications on the solubility of MoO 3 in these glasses are evaluated. A novel hypothesis explaining the mechanism governing the solubility of MoO 3 in rare-earth containing aluminoborosilicate

  6. Distribution and leaching characteristics of trace elements in ashes as a function of different waste fuels and incineration technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqib, Naeem; Bäckström, Mattias

    2015-10-01

    Impact of waste fuels (virgin/waste wood, mixed biofuel (peat, bark, wood chips) industrial, household, mixed waste fuel) and incineration technologies on partitioning and leaching behavior of trace elements has been investigated. Study included 4 grate fired and 9 fluidized boilers. Results showed that mixed waste incineration mostly caused increased transfer of trace elements to fly ash; particularly Pb/Zn. Waste wood incineration showed higher transfer of Cr, As and Zn to fly ash as compared to virgin wood. The possible reasons could be high input of trace element in waste fuel/change in volatilization behavior due to addition of certain waste fractions. The concentration of Cd and Zn increased in fly ash with incineration temperature. Total concentration in ashes decreased in order of Zn>Cu>Pb>Cr>Sb>As>Mo. The concentration levels of trace elements were mostly higher in fluidized boilers fly ashes as compared to grate boilers (especially for biofuel incineration). It might be attributed to high combustion efficiency due to pre-treatment of waste in fluidized boilers. Leaching results indicated that water soluble forms of elements in ashes were low with few exceptions. Concentration levels in ash and ash matrix properties (association of elements on ash particles) are crucial parameters affecting leaching. Leached amounts of Pb, Zn and Cr in >50% of fly ashes exceeded regulatory limit for disposal. 87% of chlorine in fly ashes washed out with water at the liquid to solid ratio 10 indicating excessive presence of alkali metal chlorides/alkaline earths. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Macroencapsulated and elemental lead mixed waste sites report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalia, A.; Jacobson, R.

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compile a list of the Macroencapsulated (MACRO) and Elemental Lead (EL) Mixed Wastes sites that will be treated and require disposal at the Nevada Test Site within the next five to ten years. The five sites selected were: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho Falls, Idaho; Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Rocky Flats Environmental Technology (RF), Golden, Colorado; and Savannah River (SRS), Charleston, South Carolina. A summary of total lead mixed waste forms at the five selected DOE sites is described in Table E-1. This table provides a summary of total waste and grand total of the current inventory and five-year projected generation of lead mixed waste for each site. This report provides conclusions and recommendations for further investigations. The major conclusions are: (1) the quantity of lead mixed current inventory waste is 500.1 m 3 located at the INEL, and (2) the five sites contain several other waste types contaminated with mercury, organics, heavy metal solids, and mixed sludges

  8. Solubility limits on radionuclide dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-12-31

    This paper examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that would be characteristics of a Yucca Mountain repository. A saturation-limited dissolution model, in which the water flowing through the repository is assumed to be saturated with each waste element, is very conservative in that it overestimates dissolution rates. A diffusion-limited dissolution model, in which element-dissolution rates are limited by diffusion of waste elements into water flowing past the waste, is more realistic, but it is subject to some uncertainty at this time. Dissolution rates of some elements (Pu, Am, Sn, Th, Zr, Sm) are always limited by solubility. Dissolution rates of other elements (Cs, Tc, Np, Sr, C, I) are never solubility limited; their release would be limited by dissolution of the bulk waste form. Still other elements (U, Cm, Ni, Ra) show solubility-limited dissolution under some conditions. 9 references, 3 tables.

  9. Comparison of the thermodynamic databases for radioactive elements in application to the calculation of the solubilities in the porewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Reisuke; Shibata, Masahiro

    2006-07-01

    To calculate the solubility of radioactive elements which is the important parameter for performance assessment of geological disposal system, the thermodynamic database must be reliable and based on the latest information. In this research, it has been compared in the calculation of the solubilities of the representative radioactive elements in the porewater compositions of the compacted bentonite which were set up in the second progress report (H12) that the thermodynamic database of JNC, OECD/NEA, Nagra/PSI. And the causes of the differences among the results from application of different databases were investigated and discussed. (author)

  10. Evaluation Of The Integrated Solubility Model, A Graded Approach For Predicting Phase Distribution In Hanford Tank Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierson, Kayla L.; Belsher, Jeremy D.; Seniow, Kendra R.

    2012-01-01

    The mission of the DOE River Protection Project (RPP) is to store, retrieve, treat and dispose of Hanford's tank waste. Waste is retrieved from the underground tanks and delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Waste is processed through a pretreatment facility where it is separated into low activity waste (LAW), which is primarily liquid, and high level waste (HLW), which is primarily solid. The LAW and HLW are sent to two different vitrification facilities and glass canisters are then disposed of onsite (for LAW) or shipped off-site (for HLW). The RPP mission is modeled by the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS), a dynamic flowsheet simulator and mass balance model that is used for mission analysis and strategic planning. The integrated solubility model (ISM) was developed to improve the chemistry basis in HTWOS and better predict the outcome of the RPP mission. The ISM uses a graded approach to focus on the components that have the greatest impact to the mission while building the infrastructure for continued future improvement and expansion. Components in the ISM are grouped depending upon their relative solubility and impact to the RPP mission. The solubility of each group of components is characterized by sub-models of varying levels of complexity, ranging from simplified correlations to a set of Pitzer equations used for the minimization of Gibbs Energy

  11. Evaluation Of The Integrated Solubility Model, A Graded Approach For Predicting Phase Distribution In Hanford Tank Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierson, Kayla L.; Belsher, Jeremy D.; Seniow, Kendra R.

    2012-10-19

    The mission of the DOE River Protection Project (RPP) is to store, retrieve, treat and dispose of Hanford's tank waste. Waste is retrieved from the underground tanks and delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Waste is processed through a pretreatment facility where it is separated into low activity waste (LAW), which is primarily liquid, and high level waste (HLW), which is primarily solid. The LAW and HLW are sent to two different vitrification facilities and glass canisters are then disposed of onsite (for LAW) or shipped off-site (for HLW). The RPP mission is modeled by the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS), a dynamic flowsheet simulator and mass balance model that is used for mission analysis and strategic planning. The integrated solubility model (ISM) was developed to improve the chemistry basis in HTWOS and better predict the outcome of the RPP mission. The ISM uses a graded approach to focus on the components that have the greatest impact to the mission while building the infrastructure for continued future improvement and expansion. Components in the ISM are grouped depending upon their relative solubility and impact to the RPP mission. The solubility of each group of components is characterized by sub-models of varying levels of complexity, ranging from simplified correlations to a set of Pitzer equations used for the minimization of Gibbs Energy.

  12. Metallic elements fractionation in municipal solid waste incineration residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Piotr R.; Kasina, Monika; Michalik, Marek

    2016-04-01

    Municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) residues are represented by three main materials: bottom ash, fly ash and air pollution control (APC) residues. Among them ˜80 wt% is bottom ash. All of that materials are products of high temperature (>1000° C) treatment of waste. Incineration process allows to obtain significant reduction of waste mass (up to 70%) and volume (up to 90%) what is commonly used in waste management to reduce the amount need to be landfilled or managed in other way. Incineration promote accumulation non-combustible fraction of waste, which part are metallic elements. That type of concentration is object of concerns about the incineration residues impact on the environment and also gives the possibility of attempts to recover them. Metallic elements are not equally distributed among the materials. Several factors influence the process: melting points, volatility and place and forms of metallic occurrence in the incinerated waste. To investigate metallic elements distribution in MSWI residues samples from one of the biggest MSW incineration plant in Poland were collected in 2015. Chemical analysis with emphasis on the metallic elements content were performed using inductively coupled plasma optical emission (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The bottom ash was a SiO2-CaO-Al2O3-Fe2O3-Na2O rich material, whereas fly ash and APC residues were mostly composed of CaO and SiO2. All of the materials were rich in amorphous phase occurring together with various, mostly silicate crystalline phases. In a mass of bottom ash 11 wt% were metallic elements but also in ashes 8.5 wt% (fly ash) and ˜4.5 wt% (APC residues) of them were present. Among the metallic elements equal distribution between bottom and fly ash was observed for Al (˜3.85 wt%), Mn (770 ppm) and Ni (˜65 ppm). In bottom ash Fe (5.5 wt%), Cr (590 ppm) and Cu (1250 ppm) were concentrated. These values in comparison to fly ash were 5-fold higher for Fe, 3-fold for Cu and 1.5-fold for

  13. Leaching due to hygroscopic water uptake in cemented waste containing soluble salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, K.

    1992-01-01

    conditions, condensation of water vapour will result in generation of a certain amount of liquid in the form of a strong salt solution. The volume of liquid may well exceed the storage capacity of the pore system in the cemented material and in the release of a limited amount of free contaminated solution......Considerable amounts of easily soluble salts such as sodium nitrate, sulphate, or carbonate are introduced into certain types of cemented waste. When such materials are stored in atmospheres with high relative humidity or disposed or by shallow land burial under unsaturated, but still humid....... A model of the quantitative aspects for the equilibrium situation is presented. Experiments with hygroscopic water uptake support the model and give indications about the rate of the process. The release mechanism is only thought to be important for radionuclides which are not fixed in a low...

  14. Analysis of TRU waste for RCRA-listed elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahan, C.; Gerth, D.; Yoshida, T.

    1996-01-01

    Analytical methods for RCRA listed elements on Portland cement type waste have been employed using both microwave and open hot plate digestions with subsequent analysis by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-AES), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), graphite furnace atomic absorption (GFAA) and cold vapor atomic absorption and fluorescence (CVAA/CVAFS). Four different digestion procedures were evaluated including an open hot plate nitric acid digestion, EPA SW-846 Method 3051, and 2 methods using modifications to Method 3051. The open hot plate and the modified Method 3051, which used aqua regia for dissolution, were the only methods which resulted in acceptable data quality for all 14 RCRA-listed elements. Results for the nitric acid open hot plate digestion were used to qualify the analytical methods for TRU waste characterization, and resulted in a 99% passing score. Direct chemical analysis of TRU waste is being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in an attempt to circumvent the problems associated with strong acid digestion methods. Technology development includes laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS), dc arc CID atomic emission spectroscopy (DC-AES), and glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS). Analytical methods using the Portland cement matrix are currently being developed for each of the listed techniques. Upon completion of the development stage, blind samples will be distributed to each of the technology developers for RCRA metals characterization

  15. Separation of transuranium elements and fission products from medium activity aqueous liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gompper, K.; Kunze, S.; Eden, G.; Loesch, G.; Zemski, C.

    1986-01-01

    In the course of work performed between January 1981 and June 1985 on the separation of TRU elements and fission products three liquid alpha containing waste streams were treated: - medium level waste solutions, - waste solutions from the acid digestion of burnable alpha containing solid residues, - waste solutions from mixed oxide fuel element fabrication. The method of separation was initially developed and optimized with simulating substances. Subesequently it was tested with real waste solutions

  16. Sulfur polymer cement stabilization of elemental mercury mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melamed, D.; Fuhrmann, M.; Kalb, P.; Patel, B.

    1998-04-01

    Elemental mercury, contaminated with radionuclides, is a problem throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This report describes the development and testing of a process to immobilize elemental mercury, contaminated with radionuclides, in a form that is non-dispersible, will meet EPA leaching criteria, and has low mercury vapor pressure. In this stabilization and solidification process (patent pending) elemental mercury is mixed with an excess of powdered sulfur polymer cement (SPC) and additives in a vessel and heated to ∼35 C, for several hours, until all of the mercury is converted into mercuric sulfide (HgS). Additional SPC is then added and the mixture raised to 135 C, resulting in a homogeneous molten liquid which is poured into a suitable mold where is cools and solidifies. The final stabilized and solidified waste forms were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, as well as tested for leaching behavior and mercury vapor pressure. During this study the authors have processed the entire inventory of mixed mercury waste stored at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

  17. Laboratory and in-situ reductions of soluble phosphorus in swine waste slurries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, R T; Moody, L B; Walker, F R; Raman

    2001-11-01

    Laboratory and field experiments were conducted using magnesium chloride (MgCl2) to force the precipitation of struvite (MgNH4PO4 x 6H2O) and reduce the concentration of soluble phosphorus (SP) in swine waste. In laboratory experiments, reductions of SP of 76% (572 to 135 mg P l(-1)) were observed in raw swine manure after addition of magnesium chloride (MgCl2) at a rate calculated to provide a 1.6:1 molar ratio of magnesium (Mg) to total phosphorus. Adjusting the pH of the treated manure to pH 9.0 with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) increased SP reduction to 91% (572 to 50 mg P l(-1)). X-ray diffraction of the precipitate recovered from swine waste slurry treated only with MgCl2 confirmed the presence ofstruvite. The molar N:P:Mg ratio of the recovered precipitate was 1:1.95:0.24, suggesting that compounds in addition to struvite were formed. In a field experiment conducted in a swine manure holding pond, a 90% reduction in SP concentration was observed in approximately 140,000 l of swine manure slurry treated before land application with 2,000 l MgCl2 (64% solution) at ambient slurry temperatures ranging from 5 to 10 degrees C.

  18. Revised thermodynamic properties of brucite determined by solubility studies and its significance to nuclear waste isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Yongliang

    2007-01-01

    MgO is the only engineered barrier certified by EPA for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in USA. The German Asse repository will also employ an Mg(OH) 2 (brucite)-based engineered barrier. The chemical function of the engineered barrier is to consume CO 2 that may be generated by the microbial degradation of organic materials in waste packages. Experimental results at SNL indicate that MgO is first hydrated as brucite, and then brucite is carbonated as hydromagnesite (5424) (Mg 5 (CO 3 ) 4 (OH) 2 · 4H 2 O). As MgO is in excess relative to CO 2 that may be produced, the brucite-hydromagnesite (5424) assemblage would buffer f CO2 in the repository. Consequently, the thermodynamic properties of this assemblage is of great significance to the performance assessment (PA) as actinide solubility is strongly affected by f CO2 . In turn, PA is important to the demonstration of the long-term safety of nuclear waste repositories, as assessed by the use of probabilistic performance calculations. There is a substantial discrepancy for Δ f G brucite 0 in recent publications, ranging from -830.4 (Harvie et al., 1984; Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 723-751), through -831.9 (Brown et al., 1996; J. Chem. Soc., Dalton Trans., 3071-3075), through -833.5 (Robie and Hemingway, 1995; USGS Bull., 2131), and to -835.9 kJ mol -1 (Konigsberger et al., 1999; Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 3105-3119). Using the Δ f G hydromagnesite (5424) 0 from Konigsberger et al., the predicted log f CO2 for this assemblage would range from -5.96 (Δ f G brucite 0 from Harvie et al.) to -4.84 (Δ f G brucite 0 from Konigsberger et al.). Therefore, it is desirable to better constrain the Δ f G brucite 0 . For this reason, a series of solubility experiments involving brucite in NaCl solutions ranging from 0.01 M to 4.0 M have being conducted at SNL. The derived Δ f G brucite 0 from this study by extrapolation to infinite dilution via Pitzer formalism is -830.8 kJ mol -1 , which is in excellent agreement with

  19. Store for radioactive waste and burnt-up fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spilker, H.; Rox, R.; Peschl, H.W.

    1985-01-01

    The invention concerns a concrete storage block in which there are several vertical storage and cooling ducts for radioactive waste and burnt-up fuel elements. The storage block is assembled from several square concrete blocks. Several vertical ducts are made in these. The square blocks are placed on a concrete baseplate. The aligned ducts of several square blocks placed above each other form storage and cooling ducts for tubular storage containers. An annular gap is left for cooling air between the outside wall of the storage containers and the inside wall of the storage and cooling ducts. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Forensic Discrimination of Concrete Pieces by Elemental Analysis of Acid-soluble Component with Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasamatsu, Masaaki; Igawa, Takao; Suzuki, Shinichi; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2018-01-01

    Since fragments of concrete can be evidence of crime, a determination of whether or not they come from the same origin is required. The authors focused on nitric acid-soluble components in the fragments of concrete. As a result of qualitative analysis with ICP-MS, it was confirmed that elements such as Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, Zr, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, and Pb were contained in the fragments. After the nitric acid-soluble components in the fragments of concrete were separated by dissolving them in nitric acid, the concentrations of these elements in the dissolved solution were quantitatively determined by ICP-MS. The concentration ratios of nine elements compared to La were used as indicators. By comparing these indicators, it was possible to discriminate between the fragments of concrete.

  1. Role of metal ion solubility in leaching of nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grambow, B.

    1982-04-01

    From the results of a variety of experiments it can be concluded that reaction of the matrix is the fundamental process that occurs in the leaching of PNL 76-68 glass. This reaction has two aspects. Without solubility restrictions, congruent leaching behavior occurs at all pH values and leachant compositions. When this reaction raises solution concentrations of certain elements to the level at which new solid phases form, these phases will regulate the solution concentration. These solid phases are dominant constituents of the leached layer. For the leaching of PNL 76-68 glass, the solubilities of these reaction products regulate the solution concentration as if the solution is in equilibrium with pure Fe(OH) 3 (amorphous), Zn(OH) 2 (amorphous), Nd(OH) 3 , SrCO 3 or CaCO 3 . The experimental conditions, in particular the pH value, that govern the formation of solid reaction products and control of the solution concentrations can be identified

  2. Changes in the content of water-soluble sulphur in the soil after an application of straw and elemental sulphur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Ryant

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The changes in the content of water-soluble sulphur in the soil after the application of straw and elemental sulphur (ES were explored in a 2-year vegetation pot experiment. The following variants were included in the experiment: 1 unfertilised control; 2 wheat straw; 3 rape straw; 4 ES; 5 wheat straw + ES; 6 rape straw + ES. The two types of straw were applied in a dose of 32 g of dry matter and elemental sulphur was applied in a dose of 0.42 g per pot, i.e. 6 kg of soil. The unsatisfactory C:N ratio in the straw was optimised to 25:1 by adding nitrogen in urea. Soil samples were taken prior to sowing of the model plant (spring wheat in 2005 and white mustard in 2006 and then in regular monthly intervals until harvesting (5 times a year. The content of water-soluble sulphur in the soil was evaluated by multifactorial analysis of variance monitoring the effect of the crop, date of soil sampling, application of straw and elemental sulphur.The contents of water-soluble sulphur differed statistically significantly (P > 0.999 when growing the individual model plants. When growing white mustard in 2006 the amount of available sulphur was by 1/5 higher and could have been partly affected by the warm year 2006, as compared to 2005 when spring wheat was grown. Significant differences (P > 0.999 were also discovered among the dates of soil sampling; higher values were detected before the sowing of model plants, i.e. after incubation in the winter, during vegetation the content of water-soluble sulphur decreased and sulphur showed the significantly highest values at the harvest of model plants. When wheat straw was applied the sulphur content did not increase and this may be associated with the wide C:S ratio, whereas after the application of rape straw the content of water-soluble sulphur increased by one third more than in the unfertilised control. The application of elemental sulphur also significantly increased the amount of water-soluble sulphur in

  3. Investigation of waste form materials suitable for immobilizing actinide elements in high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Issei; Kamizono, Hiroshi

    1992-07-01

    The microstructure of waste form materials suitable for immobilizing actinide elements can be classified into the following two categories. (1) Actinide elements are immobilized in an crystallized matrix after the formation of solid solution or compounds. (2) Actinide elements are immobilized in a durable material by encapsulation. Based on crystal chemistry, durability data, phase diagrams, compositions of natural minerals, eleven oxide compounds and one non-oxide compound are pointed out to be new candidates included in category (1). The other survey on material compositions, manufacturing conditions and feasibility shows that SiC, glassy carbon, ZrO 2 , Ti-O-Si-C ceramics are preferable matrix materials included in category (2). Polymers and fine powders are suitable as starting materials for the encapsulation of actinide elements because of their excellent sinterability. (author) 50 refs

  4. Acute and Chronic Toxicity of Soluble Fractions of Industrial Solid Wastes on Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Flohr

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrial wastes may produce leachates that can contaminate the aquatic ecosystem. Toxicity testing in acute and chronic levels is essential to assess environmental risks from the soluble fractions of these wastes, since only chemical analysis may not be adequate to classify the hazard of an industrial waste. In this study, ten samples of solid wastes from textile, metal-mechanic, and pulp and paper industries were analyzed by acute and chronic toxicity tests with Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri. A metal-mechanic waste (sample MM3 induced the highest toxicity level to Daphnia magna(CE50,48 h=2.21%. A textile waste induced the highest toxicity level to Vibrio fischeri (sample TX2, CE50,30 min=12.08%. All samples of pulp and paper wastes, and a textile waste (sample TX2 induced chronic effects on reproduction, length, and longevity of Daphnia magna. These results could serve as an alert about the environmental risks of an inadequate waste classification method.

  5. Solid solubility of fission product and other transition elements in carbides and nitrides of uranium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, U.

    1979-01-01

    Solubility studies were made in some MX-Me systems (M:U or Pu; X: C or N; Me: fission product or other transition element) by X-ray diffraction and partly by microprobe determination of solute concentrations. Up to 23 m/o ZrC and 17 m/o TaC dissolved in the PuC phases of sintered PuC-ZrC and PuC-TaC samples; the lattice parameter/concentration relationships were derived. The relative lattice parameter difference (RLPD) between MXy and MeXy (y: ratio X/(M+Me)) was used as a solubility criterion. NaCl type monocarbides with RLPD's from -10.2% to +7.8% are completely miscible with UC and PuC. NaCl type mononitrides with RLPD's from -7.5% to 8.5% are completely miscible with UN and PuN. The solubility in the sesquicarbides increases with decreasing RLPD and becomes complete in Pu 2 C 3 at RLPD =+4%, and in U 2 C 3 at RLPD ca. +1.5%. Solubilities are predicted on the basis of these rules for the cases where no experimental results are available. A general review on the experimental and predicted solubilities is given. (orig.) [de

  6. The solubility of nickel and its migration through the cementitious backfill of a geological disposal facility for nuclear waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felipe-Sotelo, M; Hinchliff, J; Field, L P; Milodowski, A E; Holt, J D; Taylor, S E; Read, D

    2016-08-15

    This work describes the solubility of nickel under the alkaline conditions anticipated in the near field of a cementitious repository for intermediate level nuclear waste. The measured solubility of Ni in 95%-saturated Ca(OH)2 solution is similar to values obtained in water equilibrated with a bespoke cementitious backfill material, on the order of 5×10(-7)M. Solubility in 0.02M NaOH is one order of magnitude lower. For all solutions, the solubility limiting phase is Ni(OH)2; powder X-ray diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscopy indicate that differences in crystallinity are the likely cause of the lower solubility observed in NaOH. The presence of cellulose degradation products causes an increase in the solubility of Ni by approximately one order of magnitude. The organic compounds significantly increase the rate of Ni transport under advective conditions and show measurable diffusive transport through intact monoliths of the cementitious backfill material. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Chemical modeling of acid-base properties of soluble biopolymers derived from municipal waste treatment materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabasso, Silvia; Berto, Silvia; Rosato, Roberta; Marinos, Janeth Alicia Tafur; Ginepro, Marco; Zelano, Vincenzo; Daniele, Pier Giuseppe; Montoneri, Enzo

    2015-02-04

    This work reports a study of the proton-binding capacity of biopolymers obtained from different materials supplied by a municipal biowaste treatment plant located in Northern Italy. One material was the anaerobic fermentation digestate of the urban wastes organic humid fraction. The others were the compost of home and public gardening residues and the compost of the mix of the above residues, digestate and sewage sludge. These materials were hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to yield the biopolymers by saponification. The biopolymers were characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and potentiometric titration. The titration data were elaborated to attain chemical models for interpretation of the proton-binding capacity of the biopolymers obtaining the acidic sites concentrations and their protonation constants. The results obtained with the models and by NMR spectroscopy were elaborated together in order to better characterize the nature of the macromolecules. The chemical nature of the biopolymers was found dependent upon the nature of the sourcing materials.

  8. Distribution and Solubility of Radionuclides and Neutron Absorbers in Waste Forms for Disposition of Plutonium Ash and Scraps, Excess Plutonium, and Miscellaneous Spent Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. Denis M. Strachan; Dr. David K. Shuh; Dr. Rodney C. Ewing; Dr. Eric R. Vance

    2002-01-01

    The initial goal of this project was to investigate the solubility of radionuclides in glass and other potential waste forms for the purpose of increasing the waste loading in glass and ceramic waste forms. About one year into the project, the project decided to focus on two potential waste forms - glass at PNNL and initiate ceramics at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO)

  9. Optimal acid digestion for multi-element analysis of different waste matrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Götze, Ramona; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    of the distinct waste materials and recyclables. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of different standardized microwave assisted acid digestion methods on waste samples and subsequent multi-element analysis. Six acid digestion methods were applied on a Paper & Cardboard and Composite waste...

  10. Determination of elements in industrial waste sample and TENORM using XRF Technique in Nuclear Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulus, W.; Sarimah Mahat; Meor Yusoff Meor Sulaiman

    2011-01-01

    Industrial waste such as aluminium dross and TENORM waste, oil sludge has been used as sample in this research. Determination of main elements by using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) in Material Technology Group, Malaysian Nuclear Agency. Results shows that main elements in these samples, aluminium and silicon, respectively. Thereby, this research shows that XRF can be considered as one of the techniques that can be used in waste characterization and furthermore, it can help researchers and engineer in the research related to waste treatment especially radioactive waste. (author)

  11. Chemical Modeling of Acid-Base Properties of Soluble Biopolymers Derived from Municipal Waste Treatment Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Tabasso

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This work reports a study of the proton-binding capacity of biopolymers obtained from different materials supplied by a municipal biowaste treatment plant located in Northern Italy. One material was the anaerobic fermentation digestate of the urban wastes organic humid fraction. The others were the compost of home and public gardening residues and the compost of the mix of the above residues, digestate and sewage sludge. These materials were hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to yield the biopolymers by saponification. The biopolymers were characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and potentiometric titration. The titration data were elaborated to attain chemical models for interpretation of the proton-binding capacity of the biopolymers obtaining the acidic sites concentrations and their protonation constants. The results obtained with the models and by NMR spectroscopy were elaborated together in order to better characterize the nature of the macromolecules. The chemical nature of the biopolymers was found dependent upon the nature of the sourcing materials.

  12. Development of a new generation of waste form for entrapment and immobilization of highly volatile and soluble radionuclides.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Bencoe, Denise Nora; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Murphy, Andrew Wilson; Holt, Kathleen Caroline; Turnham, Rigney; Kruichak, Jessica Nicole; Tellez, Hernesto; Miller, Andy; Xiong, Yongliang; Pohl, Phillip Isabio; Ockwig, Nathan W.; Wang, Yifeng; Gao, Huizhen

    2010-09-01

    The United States is now re-assessing its nuclear waste disposal policy and re-evaluating the option of moving away from the current once-through open fuel cycle to a closed fuel cycle. In a closed fuel cycle, used fuels will be reprocessed and useful components such as uranium or transuranics will be recovered for reuse. During this process, a variety of waste streams will be generated. Immobilizing these waste streams into appropriate waste forms for either interim storage or long-term disposal is technically challenging. Highly volatile or soluble radionuclides such as iodine ({sup 129}I) and technetium ({sup 99}Tc) are particularly problematic, because both have long half-lives and can exist as gaseous or anionic species that are highly soluble and poorly sorbed by natural materials. Under the support of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Laboratory-Directed Research & Development (LDRD), we have developed a suite of inorganic nanocomposite materials (SNL-NCP) that can effectively entrap various radionuclides, especially for {sup 129}I and {sup 99}Tc. In particular, these materials have high sorption capabilities for iodine gas. After the sorption of radionuclides, these materials can be directly converted into nanostructured waste forms. This new generation of waste forms incorporates radionuclides as nano-scale inclusions in a host matrix and thus effectively relaxes the constraint of crystal structure on waste loadings. Therefore, the new waste forms have an unprecedented flexibility to accommodate a wide range of radionuclides with high waste loadings and low leaching rates. Specifically, we have developed a general route for synthesizing nanoporous metal oxides from inexpensive inorganic precursors. More than 300 materials have been synthesized and characterized with x-ray diffraction (XRD), BET surface area measurements, and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The sorption capabilities of the synthesized materials have been quantified by using stable

  13. Development of a new generation of waste form for entrapment and immobilization of highly volatile and soluble radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Bencoe, Denise Nora; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Murphy, Andrew Wilson; Holt, Kathleen Caroline; Turnham, Rigney; Kruichak, Jessica Nicole; Tellez, Hernesto; Miller, Andy; Xiong, Yongliang; Pohl, Phillip Isabio; Ockwig, Nathan W.; Wang, Yifeng; Gao, Huizhen

    2010-01-01

    The United States is now re-assessing its nuclear waste disposal policy and re-evaluating the option of moving away from the current once-through open fuel cycle to a closed fuel cycle. In a closed fuel cycle, used fuels will be reprocessed and useful components such as uranium or transuranics will be recovered for reuse. During this process, a variety of waste streams will be generated. Immobilizing these waste streams into appropriate waste forms for either interim storage or long-term disposal is technically challenging. Highly volatile or soluble radionuclides such as iodine ( 129 I) and technetium ( 99 Tc) are particularly problematic, because both have long half-lives and can exist as gaseous or anionic species that are highly soluble and poorly sorbed by natural materials. Under the support of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD), we have developed a suite of inorganic nanocomposite materials (SNL-NCP) that can effectively entrap various radionuclides, especially for 129 I and 99 Tc. In particular, these materials have high sorption capabilities for iodine gas. After the sorption of radionuclides, these materials can be directly converted into nanostructured waste forms. This new generation of waste forms incorporates radionuclides as nano-scale inclusions in a host matrix and thus effectively relaxes the constraint of crystal structure on waste loadings. Therefore, the new waste forms have an unprecedented flexibility to accommodate a wide range of radionuclides with high waste loadings and low leaching rates. Specifically, we have developed a general route for synthesizing nanoporous metal oxides from inexpensive inorganic precursors. More than 300 materials have been synthesized and characterized with x-ray diffraction (XRD), BET surface area measurements, and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The sorption capabilities of the synthesized materials have been quantified by using stable isotopes I and

  14. Solid solubility in 1:13 phase of doping element for La(Fe,Si13 alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. T. Zong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The influences of Ni, Cr and Nb as substitution elements for Fe were investigated. The change in microstructure and the magnetic properties have been discussed in detail. Substitution elements Ni, Cr and Nb not only have limited solubility in NaZn13-type (1:13 phase, but also hinder the peritectoid reaction. Ni element mainly enters into La-rich phase while Cr element mainly concentrates in α-Fe phase, which both have detriment effect on the peritectoid reaction, leading to a large residual of impurity phases after annealing and a decrease of magnetic entropy change. Besides, Ni and Cr participated in peritectoid reaction by entering parent phases but slightly entering 1:13 phase, which would cause the disappearance of first order magnetic phase transition. A new phase (Fe,Si2Nb was found when Nb element substitutes Fe in La(Fe,Si13, suggesting that Nb does not participate in peritectoid reaction and only exists in (Fe,Si2Nb phase after annealing. The alloy with Nb substitution maintains the first order magnetic phase transition character.

  15. Near-field solubility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomason, H.P.; Williams, S.J.

    1992-02-01

    Experimental determinations of the solubilities of americium, plutonium, neptunium, protactinium, thorium, radium, lead, tin, palladium and zirconium are reported. These elements have radioactive isotopes of concern in assessments of radioactive waste disposal. All measurements were made under the highly alkaline conditions typical of the near field of a radioactive waste repository which uses cementitious materials for many of the immobilisation matrices, the backfill and the engineered structures. Low redox potentials, typical of those resulting from the corrosion of iron and steel, were simulated for those elements having more than one accessible oxidation state. The dissolved concentrations of the elements were defined using ultrafiltration. In addition, the corrosion of iron and stainless steel was shown to generate low redox potentials in solution and the solubility of iron(II) at high pH was measured and found to be sufficient for it to act as a redox buffer with respect to neptunium and plutonium. (author)

  16. Alleviation of environmental risks associated with severely contaminated mine tailings using amendments: Modeling of trace element speciation, solubility, and plant accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Tania; Bes, Cleménce; Bernal, Maria Pilar; Clemente, Rafael

    2016-11-01

    Tailings are considered one of the most relevant sources of contamination associated with mining activities. Phytostabilization of mine spoils may need the application of the adequate combination of amendments to facilitate plant establishment and reduce their environmental impact. Two pot experiments were set up to assess the capability of 2 inorganic materials (calcium carbonate and a red mud derivate, ViroBind TM ), alone or in combination with organic amendments, for the stabilization of highly acidic trace element-contaminated mine tailings using Atriplex halimus. The effects of the treatments on tailings and porewater physico-chemical properties and trace-element accumulation by the plants, as well as the processes governing trace elements speciation and solubility in soil solution and their bioavailability were modeled. The application of the amendments increased tailings pH and decreased (>99%) trace elements solubility in porewater, but also changed the speciation of soluble Cd, Cu, and Pb. All the treatments made A. halimus growth in the tailings possible; organic amendments increased plant biomass and nutritional status, and reduced trace-element accumulation in the plants. Tailings amendments modified trace-element speciation in porewater (favoring the formation of chlorides and/or organo-metallic forms) and their solubility and plant uptake, which were found to be mainly governed by tailing/porewater pH, electrical conductivity, and organic carbon content, as well as soluble/available trace-element concentrations. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2874-2884. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  17. Long-term anaerobic digestion of food waste stabilized by trace elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lei; Jahng, Deokjin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Korean food waste was found to contain low level of trace elements. ► Stable anaerobic digestion of food waste was achieved by adding trace elements. ► Iron played an important role in anaerobic digestion of food waste. ► Cobalt addition further enhanced the process performance in the presence of iron. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine if long-term anaerobic digestion of food waste in a semi-continuous single-stage reactor could be stabilized by supplementing trace elements. Contrary to the failure of anaerobic digestion of food waste alone, stable anaerobic digestion of food waste was achieved for 368 days by supplementing trace elements. Under the conditions of OLR (organic loading rates) of 2.19–6.64 g VS (volatile solid)/L day and 20–30 days of HRT (hydraulic retention time), a high methane yield (352–450 mL CH 4 /g VS added ) was obtained, and no significant accumulation of volatile fatty acids was observed. The subsequent investigation on effects of individual trace elements (Co, Fe, Mo and Ni) showed that iron was essential for maintaining stable methane production. These results proved that the food waste used in this study was deficient in trace elements.

  18. Solubility and speciation of actinides in salt solutions and migration experiments of intermediate level waste in salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    A comprehensive study into the solubility of the actinides americium and plutonium in concentrated salt solutions, the release of radionuclides from various forms of conditioned ILW and the migration behaviour of these nuclides through geological material specific to the Gorleben site in Lower Saxony is described. A detailed investigation into the characterization of four highly concentrated salt solutions in terms of their pH, Eh, inorganic carbon contents and their densities is given and a series of experiments investigating the solubility of standard americium(III) and plutonium(IV) hydroxides in these solutions is described. Transuranic mobility studies for solutions derived from the standard hydroxides through salt and sand have shown the presence of at least two types of species present of widely differing mobility; one migrating with approximately the same velocity as the solvent front and the other strongly retarded. Actinide mobility data are presented and discussed for leachates derived from the simulated ILW in cement and data are also presented for the migration of the fission products in leachates derived from real waste solidified in cement and bitumen. Relatively high plutonium mobilities were observed in the case of the former and in the case of the real waste leachates, cesium was found to be the least retarded. The sorption of ruthenium was found to be largely associated with the insoluble residues of the natural rock salt rather than the halite itself. (orig./RB)

  19. Isolation of transplutonium elements from high-level radioactive wastes using diphenyl(dibutylcarbamoylmethyl)phosphine oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmutova, M.K.; Litvina, M.N.; Pribylova, G.A.; Ivanova, L.A.; Myasoedov, B.F.; Smirnov, I.V.; Shadrin, A.Yu.

    1999-01-01

    Consequent stages of development of principal technological scheme of extraction separation of transplutonium elements from high-level radioactive wastes of spent fuel reprocessing are presented. Approach to reagent selection from the series of carbamoylmethylphosphine oxides is based. Distribution of transplutonium elements and accompanying elements between model solution of high-level radioactive wastes and solution of reagent in organic solvent is investigated. Methods of separation of transplutonium elements, reextraction of transplutonium elements together with rare earth elements are developed. Principal technological scheme of transplutonium elements separation from nonevaporated raffinates of spent fuel of WWER type reactors and method of separation of transplutonium and rare earth elements in weakly acid reextract with the use of liquid chromatography with free immobile phase are proposed [ru

  20. Recovery of transplutonium elements from nuclear reactor waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, D.O.; Buxton, S.R.

    1977-01-01

    A method of separating actinide values from nitric acid waste solutions resulting from reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels comprises oxalate precipitation of the major portion of actinide and lanthanide values to provide a trivalent fraction suitable for subsequent actinide/lanthanide partition, exchange of actinide and lanthanide values in the supernate onto a suitable cation exchange resin to provide an intermediate-lived raffinate waste stream substantially free of actinides, and elution of the actinide values from the exchange resin. The eluate is then used to dissolve the trivalent oxalate fraction prior to actinide/lanthanide partition or may be combined with the reprocessing waste stream and recycled. 5 claims, 2 figures

  1. NEARSOL - a simple program to model actinide speciation and solubility under waste disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leach, S.J.; Pryke, D.C.

    1986-05-01

    A simple program, NearSol, has been written in Fortran 77 on the Harwell Central Computer to model the aqueous speciation and solubility of actinides under near-field conditions for disposal using a simple thermodynamic approach. The methodology and running of the program are described together with a worked example. (author)

  2. Investigations of trace element profiles in e-waste by EDXRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, Daisy; Polumi; Kale, S.K.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Electronic waste, e-waste, e-scrap, or Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) which means loosely discarded, surplus, obsolete, or broken electrical or electronic devices is good source of toxins in atmosphere. Environmental groups claim that the informal processing of electronic waste in developing countries causes serious health and pollution problems. Some electronic scrap components, contain contaminants such as lead, cadmium, beryllium, mercury, and brominated flame retardants. Activists claim that even in developed countries recycling and disposal of e-waste may involve significant risk to workers and communities and great care must be taken to avoid unsafe exposure in recycling operations and leaching of material such as heavy metals. Scrap industry and USA EPA officials agree that materials should be managed with caution, but that environmental dangers of unused electronics have been exaggerated by groups which benefit from increased regulation. To solve this debatable issue we have carried out EDXFR of e-waste for trace elemental profile investigations. E-waste from IT industry in the form of powder was analyzed by 109 Cd induced Energy Dispersive X-ray fluorescence. Elements such as Ca, Fe, Br, Sr and Zr were seen. The trace element significance of e-waste and its correlation to environmental toxicity is being looked into

  3. Highly water soluble nanoparticles as a draw solute in forward osmosis for the treatment of radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Heeman; Choi, Hye Min; Jang, Sungchan; Seo, Bumkyoung; Lee, Kune Woo; Moon, Jei Kwon

    2014-01-01

    . In this study, we introduced highly water-soluble hyperbranched caroboxylated polyglycerol-coated magnetic nanoparticles (CPG-MNPs). It is known that the highly branched, globular architecture of PG significantly increase solubility compared to linear polymer and they are eco-friendly. The CPG-MNPs showed no aggregate of particles in water even after placing external magnet, and exhibited a high water flux in FO process. The CPG-MNPs are, therefore, potentially useful as a draw solute in FO processes. The operation of nuclear pressurized water reactors (PWRs) results in numerous radioactive waste streams which vary in radioactivity content. Most PWR stations have experienced leakages of boric acid into liquid radioactive waste systems. These wastes contain about 0.3∼0.8 wt% of boric acid. It is known that reverse osmosis (RO) membrane can eliminate boron at high pH and boron of 40∼90% can be removed by RO membrane in pH condition. RO uses hydraulic pressure to oppose, and exceed, the osmotic pressure of an aqueous feed solution containing boric acid. Forward osmosis (FO), a low energy technique based on membrane technologies, has recently garnered attention for its utility in wastewater treatment and desalination applications. In the FO process, water flows across a semi-permeable membrane from a solution with a low osmotic pressure (the feed solution) to a solution with a high osmotic pressure (the draw solution). The driving force in FO processes is provided by the osmotic gradient between the two solutions. Low energy costs and low degrees of membrane fouling are two of the advantages conveyed by FO processes over other processes, such as reverse osmosis processes that rely on a hydraulic pressure driving force. However, the challenges of FO still lie in the fabrication of eligible FO membranes and the readily separable draw solutes of high osmotic pressures. Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles can be separated from water by an external magnet field

  4. Highly water soluble nanoparticles as a draw solute in forward osmosis for the treatment of radioactive liquid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Heeman; Choi, Hye Min; Jang, Sungchan; Seo, Bumkyoung; Lee, Kune Woo; Moon, Jei Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    . In this study, we introduced highly water-soluble hyperbranched caroboxylated polyglycerol-coated magnetic nanoparticles (CPG-MNPs). It is known that the highly branched, globular architecture of PG significantly increase solubility compared to linear polymer and they are eco-friendly. The CPG-MNPs showed no aggregate of particles in water even after placing external magnet, and exhibited a high water flux in FO process. The CPG-MNPs are, therefore, potentially useful as a draw solute in FO processes. The operation of nuclear pressurized water reactors (PWRs) results in numerous radioactive waste streams which vary in radioactivity content. Most PWR stations have experienced leakages of boric acid into liquid radioactive waste systems. These wastes contain about 0.3∼0.8 wt% of boric acid. It is known that reverse osmosis (RO) membrane can eliminate boron at high pH and boron of 40∼90% can be removed by RO membrane in pH condition. RO uses hydraulic pressure to oppose, and exceed, the osmotic pressure of an aqueous feed solution containing boric acid. Forward osmosis (FO), a low energy technique based on membrane technologies, has recently garnered attention for its utility in wastewater treatment and desalination applications. In the FO process, water flows across a semi-permeable membrane from a solution with a low osmotic pressure (the feed solution) to a solution with a high osmotic pressure (the draw solution). The driving force in FO processes is provided by the osmotic gradient between the two solutions. Low energy costs and low degrees of membrane fouling are two of the advantages conveyed by FO processes over other processes, such as reverse osmosis processes that rely on a hydraulic pressure driving force. However, the challenges of FO still lie in the fabrication of eligible FO membranes and the readily separable draw solutes of high osmotic pressures. Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles can be separated from water by an external magnet field

  5. Removal of radionuclides from the water-soluble fraction of Hanford nuclear defense wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, D.M.; Schulz, W.W.

    1980-01-01

    The current Hanford Waste Management Program has operated since 1968 to remove the bulk of the long-lived heat emitters /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs from stored high-level wastes. The liquid waste remaining after removal of /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs is returned to underground tanks for eventual evaporation to damp solid salt cake. Approximately 95,000 m/sup 3/ of salt cake and 49,000 m/sup 3/ of ''sludge'' will eventually accumulate in approximately 50 underground single-shell tanks. One alternative for long-term management of high-level Hanford wastes involves retrieval, after a yet-to-be determined interim storage time, conversion to more immobile forms, and terminal storage in a suitable geologic repository. Another alternative for long-term management of salt cake and residual liquid involves removing most of the long-lived radionuclides and many of the shorter-lived ones from these wastes. This paper describes conditions and results of recent hot cell tests of the complete Hanford Radionuclide Removal Process. These advanced tests, made with actual residual liquid containing large concentrations of ethylenediaminetetracetic acid (EDTA) and other organic compounds, provided a rigorous and convincing proof of the process flowsheet. 16 refs

  6. Principal elements of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project performance assessment studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baca, R.G.; Wilde, R.T.

    1983-12-01

    In this paper, three of the principal elements of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) performance assessment studies are focused on: (1) development of a methodology for probabilistic risk assessment, (2) performance analyses of repository subsystems, and (3) selection and ranking of disruptive event scenarios. Other elements of the BWIP performance assessment studies are briefly outlined. 12 references, 5 figures

  7. Eficiencia agronómica del azufre elemental relativa a una fuente azufrada soluble en trigo en la Región Pampeana Agronomic efficiency of elemental sulphur in wheat relative to a soluble sulphur source in the Pampas Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Torres Duggan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available La eficiencia agronómica del azufre elemental (AE en relación a fuentes azufradas solubles y sulfatadas, depende de su reactividad (e.g. tamaño de partícula y de las condiciones edafo-climáticas. Para las condiciones de la Región Pampeana algunas publicaciones sugieren que el AE puede ser una fuente de S tan efectiva como las fuentes solubles, aunque la información no concluyente. Se hipotetiza que en las condiciones de la Región Pampeana, ambas fuentes poseen similar eficiencia agronómica en la mayoría de los años. Los objetivos del trabajo fueron: i. Evaluar la respuesta al agregado de S con una fuente reactiva de AE en relación a un fertilizante azufrado sulfatado, aplicado en trigo en diferentes dosis y en distintas condiciones edafo-climáticas; ii. Comparar, para el conjunto de experimentos, la eficiencia agronómica del S aplicado con las distintas fuentes. iii. Relacionar las respuestas a la fertilización azufrada con variables de suelo y clima. Se realizaron ocho ensayos de campo durante dos años consecutivos en lotes de producción ubicados en la Región Pampeana. Se aplicó un diseño en bloques completos aleatorizados con cuatro o seis repeticiones en un arreglo factorial de tratamientos (factor 1: fuente azufrada, factor 2: dosis de S. Los tratamientos fueron: un testigo absoluto; fertilización con AE micronizado (95% de S en dos niveles de dosis y fertilización con sulfato de amonio granulado (SA, 24% S, también en dos niveles de dosis. Las dosis evaluadas fueron 10 y 30 kg ha-1 de S (año 1 y 15 y 30 kg ha¹ (año 2. La fertilización azufrada afectó significativamente (p0,05 en la mayoría de los sitios. La dosis más baja (10 o 15 kg ha-1 fue suficiente para cubrir el requerimiento de S del cultivo. Se observó una asociación positiva entre las respuestas y el contenido de MO del suelo y las precipitaciones (macollaje y total del ciclo y una relación inversa con el contenido de S-SO4(2- disponibles a la

  8. The distribution of soluble radionuclide-relevant trace elements between salt minerals and saline solutions; Die Verteilung loeslicher Radionuklid-relevanter Spurenelemente zwischen Salzmineralen und salinaren Loesungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, Ina

    2015-07-16

    The research platform ENTRIA (Disposal options for radioactive residues Interdisciplinary analyses and development of evaluation principles) includes the sub-project ''Final disposal in deep geological formations without any arrangements for retrieval''. This approach considers rock salt (beside clay and granite) as host rock formation for disposal of heat-producing long-live waste. Most rock salt formations contain Mg-rich brines derived from highly evolved sea water evaporation processes now included in the rock salt mass. If such brines get access to metal-canister corrosion will allow release of soluble nuclides to the brine. In this scenario, it cannot be excluded that contaminated brines leave the deep seated disposal area and move along geological or technical migration pathways towards the rock salt/cap rock contact. The temperature of the brine will drop from near 80 C to 25 or 30 C. The deceasing temperature of the brine causes precipitation of magnesian chloride and sulfate phase in equilibrium with the brine. In order to understand the salt precipitation and the retention mechanism of dissolved trace elements experiments have been set up which allow formation of sylvite, carnallite, kainite, and hydrous Mg-sulphates under controlled conditions. The retention capacity of crystallizing salt minerals based occurring in magnesian brine solutions at decreasing temperature within a salt dome is best measured as the distribution coefficient D. This concept assumes incorporation of trace elements into the lattice of salt minerals. The distribution coefficients of the trace elements, Rb, Cs, Co, Ni, Zn, Li and B between sylvite, carnallite, kainite, and MgSO{sub 4} phases have been determined at experimental temperatures of 25, 35, 55 and 83 C. The results clearly indicate the following range of distribution coefficients (D): Sylvite D > 1 Rb and Br, D < 1 Co, Ni, Zn, Li and B, Carnallite D > 1 Rb and Cs, D < 1 Co, Ni, Zn, Li and B, Kainite D

  9. Ammonia in simulated Hanford double-shell tank wastes: Solubility and effects on surface tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norton, J.D.; Pederson, L.R.

    1994-09-01

    Radioactive and wastes left from defense materials production activities are temporarily stored in large underground tanks at the Hanford Site in south central Washington State (Tank Waste Science Panel 1991). Some of these wastes are in the form of a thick slurry (''double-shell slurry'') containing sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, sodium aluminate, sodium hydroxide, sodium carbonate, organic complexants and buffering agents, complexant fragments and other minor components (Herting et al. 1992a; Herting et al. 1992b; Campbell et al. 1994). As a result of thermal and radiolytic processes, a number of gases are known to be produced by some of these stored wastes, including ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, hydrogen, and methane (Babad et al. 1991; Ashby et al. 1992; Meisel et al. 1993; Ashby et al. 1993; Ashby et al. 1994; Bryan et al. 1993; US Department of Energy 1994). Before the emplacement of a mixer pump, these gases were retained in and periodically released from Tank 241-SY-101, a double-shell tank at the Hanford Site (Babad et al. 1992; US Department of Energy 1994). Gases are believed to be retained primarily in the form of bubbles attached to solid particles (Bryan, Pederson, and Scheele 1992), with very little actually dissolved in the liquid. Ammonia is an exception. The relation between the concentration of aqueous ammonia in such concentrated, caustic mixtures and the ammonia partial pressure is not well known, however

  10. Recovery of the transplutonium elements from nuclear reactor waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, D.O.; Buxton, S.R.

    1980-01-01

    A new method for separating actinides from fission product waste does not require quantitative precipitation of radioactive solids. The method involves a refinement of the first partitioning step in a two-step process. The nitric acid content of the reprocessing waste stream, which contains actinides, lanthanides and other metals, is first adjusted to 0.1 - 1.0 M. An excess of oxalate ions is added to cause most of the actinides and lanthanides to precipitate as solid oxalates leaving a supernate solution containing the remaining actinides and lanthanides and other metals. The oxalate precipitate is separated from the precipitation zone to provide a trivalent fraction for the second actinide/lanthanide partitioning step. The supernatant solution is contacted with sufficiently strong acid ion exchange resin so that the actinides and lanthanides are adsorbed. The raffinate is substantially free of actinides. The actinides and lanthanides are eluted from the resin with 3-6 M nitric acid. The eluate may be concentrated and combined with the trivalent fraction obtained prior to the actinide/lathanide partitioning step. Or, the actinides and lanthanides from the eluate can be combined with additional reprocessing waste for recycle. (DN)

  11. Revisiting the elemental composition and the calorific value of the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komilis, Dimitrios; Evangelou, Alexandros; Giannakis, Georgios; Lymperis, Constantinos

    2012-03-01

    In this work, the elemental content (C, N, H, S, O), the organic matter content and the calorific value of various organic components that are commonly found in the municipal solid waste stream were measured. The objective of this work was to develop an empirical equation to describe the calorific value of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste as a function of its elemental composition. The MSW components were grouped into paper wastes, food wastes, yard wastes and plastics. Sample sizes ranged from 0.2 to 0.5 kg. In addition to the above individual components, commingled municipal solid wastes were sampled from a bio-drying facility located in Crete (sample sizes ranged from 8 to 15 kg) and were analyzed for the same parameters. Based on the results of this work, an improved empirical model was developed that revealed that carbon, hydrogen and oxygen were the only statistically significant predictors of calorific value. Total organic carbon was statistically similar to total carbon for most materials in this work. The carbon to organic matter ratio of 26 municipal solid waste substrates and of 18 organic composts varied from 0.40 to 0.99. An approximate chemical empirical formula calculated for the organic fraction of commingled municipal solid wastes was C(32)NH(55)O(16). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Recovery of soluble chloride salts from the wastewater generated during the washing process of municipal solid wastes incineration fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hailong; Erzat, Aris; Liu, Yangsheng

    2014-01-01

    Water washing is widely used as the pretreatment method to treat municipal solid waste incineration fly ash, which facilitates the further solidification/stabilization treatment or resource recovery of the fly ash. The wastewater generated during the washing process is a kind of hydrosaline solution, usually containing high concentrations of alkali chlorides and sulphates, which cause serious pollution to environment. However, these salts can be recycled as resources instead of discharge. This paper explored an effective and practical recovery method to separate sodium chloride, potassium chloride, and calcium chloride salts individually from the hydrosaline water. In laboratory experiments, a simulating hydrosaline solution was prepared according to composition of the waste washing water. First, in the three-step evaporation-crystallization process, pure sodium chloride and solid mixture of sodium and potassium chlorides were obtained separately, and the remaining solution contained potassium and calcium chlorides (solution A). And then, the solid mixture was fully dissolved into water (solution B obtained). Finally, ethanol was added into solutions A and B to change the solubility of sodium, potassium, and calcium chlorides within the mixed solvent of water and ethanol. During the ethanol-adding precipitation process, each salt was separated individually, and the purity of the raw production in laboratory experiments reached about 90%. The ethanol can be recycled by distillation and reused as the solvent. Therefore, this technology may bring both environmental and economic benefits.

  13. The French national inventory of radioactive waste. Elements of openness and responsibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faussat, A.; Fernique, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    Article 13 of the Waste Act of 30 December 1991 calls for the Agence nationale pour la gestion des dechets radioactifs (ANDRA) ''to register the condition and location of all radioactive waste on national territory''. The establishment of a national inventory of radioactive waste and the broad distribution of inventory report to ensure that it becomes a matter of public record constitute a new approach to public information and an effective means of fulfilling the responsibility of the present generation vis-a-vis posterity. The National Waste Register goes beyond the low level radioactive waste disposal facilities to encompass 'all' waste, wherever it may be, including waste in storage at sites where waste is produced. As a result, the Register is multi-faceted, containing information on a variety of elements, from highly radioactive waste to hospital waste collected by ANDRA and to repositories with very low level radioactive material. Information must be provided about all of these widely divergent components. ANDRA has already published two inventories, which demonstrates the durability of its new mission. The Register now contains the inventory of radioactive waste generated by some activities connected with the defence programme. Data collection for the Register involves contacting the generators of waste and working with these entities, whether they are nuclear industry companies, defence organizations, non-nuclear industries, or the 25 Regional Directorates of Industry, Research and Environment, the control institutions or the environmental protection organizations. The yearly exchange of information among all partners involved in radioactive waste management is one of the basic tools of ANDRA, allowing it to be recognized as open and responsible, and to be more credible, fulfilling in this way one of the essential criteria for acceptability. (author). 4 refs

  14. Contamination by trace elements at e-waste recycling sites in Bangalore, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Nguyen Ngoc; Agusa, Tetsuro; Ramu, Karri; Tu, Nguyen Phuc Cam; Murata, Satoko; Bulbule, Keshav A; Parthasaraty, Peethmbaram; Takahashi, Shin; Subramanian, Annamalai; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2009-06-01

    The recycling and disposal of electronic waste (e-waste) in developing countries is causing an increasing concern due to its effects on the environment and associated human health risks. To understand the contamination status, we measured trace elements (TEs) in soil, air dust, and human hair collected from e-waste recycling sites (a recycling facility and backyard recycling units) and the reference sites in Bangalore and Chennai in India. Concentrations of Cu, Zn, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Hg, Pb, and Bi were higher in soil from e-waste recycling sites compared to reference sites. For Cu, Sb, Hg, and Pb in some soils from e-waste sites, the levels exceeded screening values proposed by US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Concentrations of Cr, Mn, Co, Cu, In, Sn, Sb, Tl, Pb and Bi in air from the e-waste recycling facility were relatively higher than the levels in Chennai city. High levels of Cu, Mo, Ag, Cd, In, Sb, Tl, and Pb were observed in hair of male workers from e-waste recycling sites. Our results suggest that e-waste recycling and its disposal may lead to the environmental and human contamination by some TEs. To our knowledge, this is the first study on TE contamination at e-waste recycling sites in Bangalore, India.

  15. Retention of redox sensitive waste elements in compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torstenfelt, B.; Allard, B.

    1984-01-01

    The diffusion of technetium, iodine, uranium and neptunium in compacted bentonite has been studied. The possible reduction of the transport rate of these elements (i.e. redoxsensitive elements) by mixing the clay with metallic iron (for technetium, uranium and neptunium) or by adding a chemisorbent (for iodine) to the clay is reported. Technetium has an apparent diffusivity about 5 times higher in the heptavalent state (TcO 4 - ) than in the tetravalent state (TcO(OH) 2 or TcO 2 ), uranium and neptunium in their higher oxidation state (VI and V) have apparent diffusivities about 6 and 50 times higher, respectively, than in the tetravalent state. Iodine, as I - (or IO 3 - ), has a transport rate more than one order of magnitude lower than TcO 4 - . 10 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  16. Optimized elemental analysis of fluorescence lamp shredder waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobohm, Julia; Kuchta, Kerstin; Krüger, Oliver; van Wasen, Sebastian; Adam, Christian

    2016-01-15

    Fluorescence lamps contain considerable amounts of rare earth elements (REE). Several recycling procedures for REE recovery from spent lamps have been established. However, despite their economic importance, the respective recycling is scarce so far, with an REE recovery rate of less than 1%. A reliable analysis of REE and other relevant metals like Yttrium is crucial for a thorough and complete recovery process. This applies both to the solid matter and aqueous phase, since most of the recycling processes include wet-chemical steps. We tested seven different reagent mixtures for microwave-assisted digestion of fluorescent lamp shredder, including hydrofluoric acid, perchloric acid, and hydrogen peroxide. We determined the concentrations of 25 of the most relevant rare earth and other trace elements (Al, P, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Ga, Ge, As, Y, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, La, Ce, Eu, Gd, Tb, W, Au, Hg, and Pb) in the respective dilutions. Two independent digestions, one a mixture of perchlorid/nitric/hydrofluoric acid and the other aqua regia, showed the highest concentrations of 23 of these elements, excluding only Sn and Tb. The REE concentrations in the tested lamp shredder sample (stated in g/kg) were 10.2 (Y), 12.1 (La), 7.77 (Ce), 6.91 (Eu), 1.90 (Gd), and 4.11 (Tb). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Preliminary studies on trace element contamination in dumping sites of municipal wastes in India and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agusa, T.; Kunito, T.; Nakashima, E.; Minh, T. B.; Tanabe, S.; Subramanian, A.; Viet, P. H.

    2003-05-01

    The disposal of wastes in dumping sites has increasingly caused concem about adverse health effects on the populations living nearby. However, no investigation has been conducted yet on contamination in dumping sites of municipal wastes in Asian developing countries. In this study, concentrations of 11 trace elements (V, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu, Zn, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sb and Pb) were detennined in scalp hair from the population living nearby and in soil from dumping sites and control sites of India and Vietnam. Soil samples in dumping site in India showed significantly higher concentrations of some trace elements than soils in control site, whereas this trend was not notable in Vietnam. This is probably due to the fact that the wastes were covered with the soil in the dumping site of Vietnam. Cadmium concentrations in some hair samples of people living near dumping site in India and Vietnam exceeded the level associated with learning disorder in children. Levels of most of the trace elements in hair were significantly higher in dumping site than those in control site in India and Vietnam, suggesting direct or indirect exposure to those elements from dumping wastes. To our knowledge, this is the first study of trace element contamination in dumping sites in India and Vietnam.

  18. Evolution Of Chemical Conditions And Estimated Plutonium Solubility In The Residual Waste Layer During Post-Closure Aging Of Tank 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denham, M.

    2012-01-01

    This document updates the Eh-pH transitions from grout aging simulations and the plutonium waste release model of Denham (2007, Rev. 1) based on new data. New thermodynamic data for cementitious minerals are used for the grout simulations. Newer thermodynamic data, recommended by plutonium experts (Plutonium Solubility Peer Review Report, LA-UR-12-00079), are used to estimate solubilities of plutonium at various pore water compositions expected during grout aging. In addition, a new grout formula is used in the grout aging simulations and apparent solubilities of coprecipitated plutonium are estimated using data from analysis of Tank 18 residual waste. The conceptual model of waste release and the grout aging simulations are done in a manner similar to that of Denham (2007, Rev. 1). It is assumed that the pore fluid composition passing from the tank grout into the residual waste layer controls the solubility, and hence the waste release concentration of plutonium. Pore volumes of infiltrating fluid of an assumed composition are reacted with a hypothetical grout block using The Geochemist's Workbench(reg s ign) and changes in pore fluid chemistry correspond to the number of pore fluid volumes reacted. As in the earlier document, this results in three states of grout pore fluid composition throughout the simulation period that are termed Reduced Region II, Oxidized Region II, and Oxidized Region III. The one major difference from the earlier document is that pyrite is used to account for reducing capacity of the tank grout rather than pyrrhotite. This poises Eh at -0.47 volts during Reduced Region II. The major transitions in pore fluid composition are shown. Plutonium solubilities are estimated for discrete PuO2(am,hyd) particles and for plutonium coprecipitated with iron phases in the residual waste. Thermodynamic data for plutonium from the Nuclear Energy Agency are used to estimate the solubilities of the discrete particles for the three stages of pore fluid

  19. Speciation and mobility of potentially toxic elements in municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schollbach, K.; Alam, Q.; Florea, M.V.A.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2017-01-01

    Bottom ash (BA) is the main residue from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI), which can have some applications in construction materials, but is mostly landfilled in many countries. The main problem is the high concentration of potentially toxic elements (PTEs), particularly in the fine

  20. Toxicity of water-soluble fractions of biodiesel fuels derived from castor oil, palm oil, and waste cooking oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Maria Bernadete Neiva Lemos; de Araújo, Milena Maria Sampaio; Nascimento, Iracema Andrade; da Cruz, Andrea Cristina Santos; Pereira, Solange Andrade; do Nascimento, Núbia Costa

    2011-04-01

    Concerns over the sustained availability of fossil fuels and their impact on global warming and pollution have led to the search for fuels from renewable sources to address worldwide rising energy demands. Biodiesel is emerging as one of the possible solutions for the transport sector. It shows comparable engine performance to that of conventional diesel fuel, while reducing greenhouse gas emissions. However, the toxicity of products and effluents from the biodiesel industry has not yet been sufficiently investigated. Brazil has a very high potential as a biodiesel producer, in view of its climatic conditions and vast areas for cropland, with consequent environmental risks because of possible accidental biodiesel spillages into water bodies and runoff to coastal areas. This research determined the toxicity to two marine organisms of the water-soluble fractions (WSF) of three different biodiesel fuels obtained by methanol transesterification of castor oil (CO), palm oil (PO), and waste cooking oil (WCO). Microalgae and sea urchins were used as the test organisms, respectively, for culture-growth-inhibition and early-life-stage-toxicity tests. The toxicity levels of the analyzed biodiesel WSF showed the highest toxicity for the CO, followed by WCO and the PO. Methanol was the most prominent contaminant; concentrations increased over time in WSF samples stored up to 120 d. Copyright © 2010 SETAC.

  1. Element partitioning in combustion- and gasification-based waste-to-energy units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arena, Umberto; Di Gregorio, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Element partitioning of waste-to-energy units by means of a substance flow analysis. ► A comparison between moving grate combustors and high temperature gasifiers. ► Classification of key elements according to their behavior during WtE processes. ► Slags and metals from waste gasifiers are completely and immediately recyclable. ► Potential reduction of amounts of solid residue to be sent to landfill disposal. - Abstract: A critical comparison between combustion- and gasification-based waste-to-energy systems needs a deep knowledge of the mass flows of materials and elements inside and throughout the units. The study collected and processed data from several moving grate conventional incinerators and high-temperature shaft gasifiers with direct melting, which are in operation worldwide. A material and substance flow analysis was then developed to systematically assess the flows and stocks of materials and elements within each waste-to-energy unit, by connecting the sources, pathways, and intermediate and final sinks of each species. The patterns of key elements, such as carbon, chloride and heavy metals, in the different solid and gaseous output streams of the two compared processes have been then defined. The combination of partitioning coefficients with the mass balances on atomic species and results of mineralogical characterization from recent literatures was used to estimate a composition of bottom ashes and slags from the two types of waste-to-energy technologies. The results also allow to quantify some of the performance parameters of the units and, in particular, the potential reduction of the amount of solid residues to be sent to final disposal

  2. Production of building elements based on alkali-activated red clay brick waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Andres Robayo-Salazar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the feasibility of reusing a red clay brick waste (RCBW in order to produce building elements such as blocks, pavers and tiles, by using the technique of alkaline activation. The production of these building elements was based on the design of a hybrid mortar with 48.61 MPa of compressive strength, at 28 curing days at room temperature (25 °C. The hybrid mortar was synthesized by adding 10% by weight of Portland cement (OPC to the RCBW, Red Clay Brick Waste. As alkaline activators were used commercial industrial grade sodium hydroxide (NaOH and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3. Building elements were physically and mechanically characterized, according to Colombian Technical Standards (NTC. This technology process is presented as an alternative for the reuse of RCBW and its contribution to the environmental sustainability.

  3. Disposal of flow-level radioactive waste in Belgium: A safety analysis for inorganic chemotoxic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallants, D.; Volckaert, G.; Marivoet, J.; Neerdael, B.

    2000-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste often contains large quantities of inorganic chemical substances. Due attention should therefore be given to the safety implications of both the radiological and chemical substances in the waste. Our study develops the safety assessment methodology for surface disposal with emphasis on the potential effects of inorganic nonradiological elements on human health. Contamination of groundwater was considered as the major exposure pathway. The applied methodology first screens all elements on the basis of five criteria. Conservative screening calculations were used to screen out the elements that do not pose danger to humans, and to select those that could have a negative impact and thus require further analysis. The latter was done by first calculating the elemental mass fluxes out of the repository and into the aquifer followed by the calculation of groundwater concentrations. The results showed that on the basis of the screening calculations, 75% of all elements could be classified as non-hazardous. The detailed calculations showed that the majority of the remaining elements had groundwater concentrations below the drinking water or groundwater standards. The results further showed that for a few elements the maximum groundwater concentration was above the standard, but below the background concentrations. (author)

  4. Recovery of enriched Uranium (20% U-235) from wastes obtained in the preparation of fuel elements for argonaut type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uriarte, A.; Ramos, L.; Estrada, J.; del Val, J. L.

    1962-01-01

    Results obtained with the two following installations for recovering enriched uranium (20% U-235) from wastes obtained in the preparation of fuel elements for Argonaut type reactors are presented. Ion exchange unit to recover uranium form mother liquors resulting from the precipitation ammonium diuranate (ADU) from UO 2 F 2 solutions. Uranium recovery unit from solid wastes from the process of manufacture of fuel elements, consisting of a) waste dissolution, and b) extraction with 10% (v/v) TBP. (Author) 9 refs

  5. Groundwater flow analysis using mixed hybrid finite element method for radioactive waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Hiroomi; Shimomura, Masanori; Kawakami, Hiroto; Suzuki, Shunichi

    2011-01-01

    In safety assessments of radioactive waste disposal facilities, ground water flow analysis are used for calculating the radionuclide transport pathway and the infiltration flow rate of groundwater into the disposal facilities. For this type of calculations, the mixed hybrid finite element method has been used and discussed about the accuracy of ones in Europe. This paper puts great emphasis on the infiltration flow rate of groundwater into the disposal facilities, and describes the accuracy of results obtained from mixed hybrid finite element method by comparing of local water mass conservation and the reliability of the element breakdown numbers among the mixed hybrid finite element method, finite volume method and nondegenerated finite element method. (author)

  6. Element composition and mineralogical characterisation of air pollution control residue from UK energy-from-waste facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogush, Anna [Centre for Resource Efficiency & the Environment (CREE), Department of Civil, Environmental & Geomatic Engineering (CEGE), University College London UCL, Chadwick Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Stegemann, Julia A., E-mail: j.stegemann@ucl.ac.uk [Centre for Resource Efficiency & the Environment (CREE), Department of Civil, Environmental & Geomatic Engineering (CEGE), University College London UCL, Chadwick Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Wood, Ian [Department of Earth Sciences, University College London UCL, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Roy, Amitava [J. Bennett Johnston, Sr., Center for Advanced Microstructures & Devices, Louisiana State University, 6980 Jefferson Hwy, Baton Rouge, LA 70806 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • 66 elements, including “critical strategic elements” were determined in UK EfW APC residues. • Metal pollutants (Zn, Pb, As, Cd, Cu, Mo, Sb, Sn, Se, Ag and In) are enriched in APC residues. • Metal pollutants were widely associated with fine deposits of highly soluble CaCl{sub x}OH{sub 2−x}. • Specific metal (Zn, Pb, Cu)-bearing minerals were also detected in APC residues. - Abstract: Air pollution control (APC) residues from energy-from-waste (EfW) are alkaline (corrosive) and contain high concentrations of metals, such as zinc and lead, and soluble salts, such as chlorides and sulphates. The EPA 3050B-extractable concentrations of 66 elements, including critical elements of strategic importance for advanced electronics and energy technologies, were determined in eight APC residues from six UK EfW facilities. The concentrations of Ag (6–15 mg/kg) and In (1–13 mg/kg), as well as potential pollutants, especially Zn (0.26–0.73 wt.%), Pb (0.05–0.2 wt.%), As, Cd, Cu, Mo, Sb, Sn and Se were found to be enriched in all APC residues compared to average crustal abundances. Results from a combination of scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and also powder X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy give an exceptionally full understanding of the mineralogy of these residues, which is discussed in the context of other results in the literature. The present work has shown that the bulk of the crystalline phases present in the investigated APC residues include Ca-based phases, such as CaCl{sub x}OH{sub 2−x}, CaCO{sub 3}, Ca(OH){sub 2}, CaSO{sub 4}, and CaO, as well as soluble salts, such as NaCl and KCl. Poorly-crystalline aragonite was identified by FTIR. Sulphur appears to have complex redox speciation, presenting as both anhydrite and hannebachite in some UK EfW APC residues. Hazardous elements (Zn and Pb) were widely associated with soluble Ca- and Cl-bearing phases

  7. Elemental balance of SRF production process: solid recovered fuel produced from municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrullah, Muhammad; Vainikka, Pasi; Hannula, Janne; Hurme, Markku; Oinas, Pekka

    2016-01-01

    In the production of solid recovered fuel (SRF), certain waste components have excessive influence on the quality of product. The proportion of rubber, plastic (hard) and certain textiles was found to be critical as to the elemental quality of SRF. The mass flow of rubber, plastic (hard) and textiles (to certain extent, especially synthetic textile) components from input waste stream into the output streams of SRF production was found to play the decisive role in defining the elemental quality of SRF. This paper presents the mass flow of polluting and potentially toxic elements (PTEs) in SRF production. The SRF was produced from municipal solid waste (MSW) through mechanical treatment (MT). The results showed that of the total input chlorine content to process, 55% was found in the SRF and 30% in reject material. Of the total input arsenic content, 30% was found in the SRF and 45% in fine fraction. In case of cadmium, lead and mercury, of their total input content to the process, 62%, 38% and 30%, respectively, was found in the SRF. Among the components of MSW, rubber material was identified as potential source of chlorine, containing 8.0 wt.% of chlorine. Plastic (hard) and textile components contained 1.6 and 1.1. wt.% of chlorine, respectively. Plastic (hard) contained higher lead and cadmium content compared with other waste components, i.e. 500 mg kg(-1) and 9.0 mg kg(-1), respectively. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis of toxic elements in radioactive waste packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J.-L. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Carasco, C., E-mail: cedric.carasco@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Perot, B. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Mauerhofer, E.; Kettler, J.; Havenith, A. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research - Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    The French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA) are conducting an R and D program to improve the characterization of long-lived and medium activity (LL-MA) radioactive waste packages. In particular, the amount of toxic elements present in radioactive waste packages must be assessed before they can be accepted in repository facilities in order to avoid pollution of underground water reserves. To this aim, the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory of CEA-Cadarache has started to study the performances of Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) for elements showing large capture cross sections such as mercury, cadmium, boron, and chromium. This paper reports a comparison between Monte Carlo calculations performed with the MCNPX computer code using the ENDF/B-VII.0 library and experimental gamma rays measured in the REGAIN PGNAA cell with small samples of nickel, lead, cadmium, arsenic, antimony, chromium, magnesium, zinc, boron, and lithium to verify the validity of a numerical model and gamma-ray production data. The measurement of a {approx}20 kg test sample of concrete containing toxic elements has also been performed, in collaboration with Forschungszentrum Juelich, to validate the model in view of future performance studies for dense and large LL-MA waste packages. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison between measurements and MCNP calculation has been performed for a PGNAA system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system aims at controlling the amount of toxic elements in nuclear waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple samples and a concrete cylinder in which impurities have been added are used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calculations agree within a factor 2 with measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system can be improved with a better neutron flux monitoring and the use of boron-free graphite.

  9. Acceptance of spent nuclear fuel in multiple element sealed canisters by the Federal Waste Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This report is one of a series of eight prepared by E.R. Johnson Associates, Inc. (JAI) under ORNL's contract with DOE's OCRWM Systems Integration Program and in support of the Annual Capacity Report (ACR) Issue Resolution Process. The report topics relate specifically to the list of high priority technical waste acceptance issues developed jointly by DOE and a utility-working group. JAI performed various analyses and studies on each topic to serve as starting points for further discussion and analysis leading eventually to finalizing the process by which DOE will accept spent fuel and waste into its waste management system. The eight reports are concerned with the conditions under which spent fuel and high level waste will be accepted in the following categories: (1) failed fuel; (2) consolidated fuel and associated structural parts; (3) non-fuel-assembly hardware; (4) fuel in metal storage casks; (5) fuel in multi-element sealed canisters; (6) inspection and testing requirements for wastes; (7) canister criteria; (8) spent fuel selection for delivery; and (9) defense and commercial high-level waste packages. 14 refs., 27 figs

  10. Study of the physico-chemical behavior of transuranian elements in radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitorge, P.; Billon, A.; Dautel, C.; Michau, O.; Quevrin, M.; Delorme, P.; Berthoud, T.; Mauchien, P.

    1986-01-01

    Transuranian chemistry is being studied in the geochemical context of the geological disposal of radioactive waste. The transuranians considered are plutonium, neptunium and americium. The first part, devoted to the chemistry of these elements in aqueous solutions, consists of a critical compilation of literature data with a view to resulting in producing the E h -pH diagrams of transuranians in a complexing environment. The study of the retention by constituents of artificial clay barriers (bentonite and attapulgite) is the subject of the second part. The third part concerns the development of a measurement technique for transuranian elements at trace levels by the thermal lensing method

  11. Risk assessment of particle dispersion and trace element contamination from mine-waste dumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Antonio; González, Isabel; Martín, José María; Vázquez, María Auxiliadora; Ortiz, Pilar

    2015-04-01

    In this study, a model to delimit risk zones influenced by atmospheric particle dispersion from mine-waste dumps is developed to assess their influence on the soil and the population according to the concentration of trace elements in the waste. The model is applied to the Riotinto Mine (in SW Spain), which has a long history of mining and heavy land contamination. The waste materials are separated into three clusters according to the mapping, mineralogy, and geochemical classification using cluster analysis. Two of the clusters are composed of slag, fresh pyrite, and roasted pyrite ashes, which may contain high concentrations of trace elements (e.g., >1 % As or >4 % Pb). The average pollution load index (PLI) calculated for As, Cd, Co, Cu, Pb, Tl, and Zn versus the baseline of the regional soil is 19. The other cluster is primarily composed of sterile rocks and ochreous tailings, and the average PLI is 3. The combination of particle dispersion calculated by a Gaussian model, the PLI, the surface area of each waste and the wind direction is used to develop a risk-assessment model with Geographic Information System GIS software. The zone of high risk can affect the agricultural soil and the population in the study area, particularly if mining activity is restarted in the near future. This model can be applied to spatial planning and environmental protection if the information is complemented with atmospheric particulate matter studies.

  12. Biorefine: Recovery of nutrients and metallic trace elements from different wastes by chemical and biochemical processes

    OpenAIRE

    Tarayre, Cédric; Fischer, Christophe; De Clercq, Lies; Michels, Evi; Meers, Erik; Buysse, Jeroen; Delvigne, Frank; Thonart, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    At present, most waste processing operations are not oriented towards the valorization of valuable reusable components such as nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and even Metallic Trace Elements (MTEs). Currently, sewage sludge, for example is usually used as a fertilizer in agriculture, in energy production or in the field of construction. Ashes originating from sludge incineration contain heavy metals and minerals in large quantities. Manure is mainly used in agriculture, although considerable...

  13. Separation of transuranium elements from high-level waste by extraction with diisodecyl phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Y.; Kubota, M.; Tani, S.

    1991-01-01

    Separation of transuranic elements (TRU) by extraction with diisodecyl phosphoric acid (DIDPA) has been studied to develop a partitioning process for high-level waste (HLW). In the present study, experiments of counter-current continuous extraction and back-extraction using a miniature mixer-settler were carried out to find the optimum process condition for the separation of Np initially in the pentavalent state and to examine the extraction behaviors of fission and corrosion products. (J.P.N.)

  14. Solubility and transport measurements as tools for the speciation of f-elements at tracer-scale amounts; application to Eu and Th in phosphate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourest, B.; David, F.; Lagarde, G.; Lindecker, C.; Du, J.F. Le; Tarapcik, P.; Trskova, R.

    1998-01-01

    The speciation of f-elements can be examined by methods which are based either on the distribution of the radionuclide of interest between two phases (solubility measurements) or on its moving in solution (capillary diffusion and migration). Predictive curves giving the variation of the mobility and the concentration of Europium as a function of pH and/or phosphate concentration can be proposed from selected literature data. Capillary electrophoresis experiments show that the mobility decrease due to hydrolysis occurs at a pH value lower than expected. The peak intensity is correspondingly smaller, but this observation cannot be simply related to a change in the charge of the migrating species because of sorption and precipitation phenomena on the capillary walls. Diffusion coefficient measurements by the 'open end capillary' method confirm the formation of larger and/or less charged species starting at a similar pH value. In the presence of phosphate anions, both transport methods should indicate the presence in solution of species having a larger size than expected, which could be polynuclear. Solubility measurements give more information but require the synthesis of a well-defined labelled phosphate compound. The total concentration of f-elements detected in the solutions equilibrated with such compounds allow to deduce, by varying only one parameter in the solution (pH or phosphate concentration), the form and the charge of the different species prevailing in the solution. The solubility method appears particularly interesting in the case of concentrated phosphate media

  15. Monitoring of toxic elements present in sludge of industrial waste using CF-LIBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rohit; Rai, Awadhesh K; Alamelu, Devanathan; Aggarwal, Suresh K

    2013-01-01

    Industrial waste is one of the main causes of environmental pollution. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied to detect the toxic metals in the sludge of industrial waste water. Sludge on filter paper was obtained after filtering the collected waste water samples from different sections of a water treatment plant situated in an industrial area of Kanpur City. The LIBS spectra of the sludge samples were recorded in the spectral range of 200 to 500 nm by focusing the laser light on sludge. Calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (CF-LIBS) technique was used for the quantitative measurement of toxic elements such as Cr and Pb present in the sample. We also used the traditional calibration curve approach to quantify these elements. The results obtained from CF-LIBS are in good agreement with the results from the calibration curve approach. Thus, our results demonstrate that CF-LIBS is an appropriate technique for quantitative analysis where reference/standard samples are not available to make the calibration curve. The results of the present experiment are alarming to the people living nearby areas of industrial activities, as the concentrations of toxic elements are quite high compared to the admissible limits of these substances.

  16. Anaerobic digestion of thermal pre-treated emulsified slaughterhouse wastes (TESW): Effect of trace element limitation on process efficiency and sludge metabolic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftaxias, Alexandros; Diamantis, Vasileios; Aivasidis, Alexandros

    2018-06-01

    Slaughterhouse solid wastes, characterized by a high lipid content, are considered a valuable resource for energy production by means of anaerobic digestion technologies. Aim of this study was to examine the effect of trace element limitation on the mesophilic anaerobic digestion of thermally pre-treated emulsified slaughterhouse wastes (TESW). Under two distinct experimental periods (Period I - low and Period II - high trace element dosage respectively) a CSTR with sludge recirculation was operated at increasing organic loading rate (OLR) from 1.5 to 10 g L -1  d -1 . Under optimum conditions, COD removal was higher than 96%, biogas yield equal to 0.53 L g -1  COD feed and the biogas methane content 77%. Trace element limitation however, resulted in a dramatic decline in process efficiency, with VFA accumulation and events of extreme sludge flotation, despite that the soluble concentration of Ni, Co and Mo were between 12 and 28 μg L -1 . This is indicative of mass transfer limitations caused by lipids adsorption onto the anaerobic biomass. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Finite element analysis of ion transport in solid state nuclear waste form materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbi, F.; Brinkman, K.; Amoroso, J.; Reifsnider, K.

    2017-09-01

    Release of nuclear species from spent fuel ceramic waste form storage depends on the individual constituent properties as well as their internal morphology, heterogeneity and boundary conditions. Predicting the release rate is essential for designing a ceramic waste form, which is capable of effectively storing the spent fuel without contaminating the surrounding environment for a longer period of time. To predict the release rate, in the present work a conformal finite element model is developed based on the Nernst Planck Equation. The equation describes charged species transport through different media by convection, diffusion, or migration. And the transport can be driven by chemical/electrical potentials or velocity fields. The model calculates species flux in the waste form with different diffusion coefficient for each species in each constituent phase. In the work reported, a 2D approach is taken to investigate the contributions of different basic parameters in a waste form design, i.e., volume fraction, phase dispersion, phase surface area variation, phase diffusion co-efficient, boundary concentration etc. The analytical approach with preliminary results is discussed. The method is postulated to be a foundation for conformal analysis based design of heterogeneous waste form materials.

  18. Removal of actinide elements from high level radioactive waste by trialkylphosphine oxide (TRPO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Chongli; Yang Dazhu; He Longhai; Xu Jingming; Zhu Yongjun

    1992-03-01

    The modified TRPO process for removing actinide elements from synthetic solution, which was taken from reprocessing of power reactor nuclear fuel, was verified by cascade experiment. Neptunium valence was adjusted in the process for improving neptunium removing efficiency. At 1 mol/L concentration of HNO 3 of feed solution and after a few stages of extraction with 30% t=TRPO kerosene, over 99.9% of Am, Pu, Np and U could be removed from HAW (high level radioactive waste) solution. The stripping of actinides loaded in TRPO are accomplished by high concentration nitric acid, oxalic acid and sodium carbonate instead of amino carboxylic complexing agents used in previous process. The actinides stripped were divided into three groups, which are Am + RE, Np + Pu, and U, and the cross contamination between them is small. Behaviours of F.P. elements are divided into three types which are not extracted, little extracted and extracted elements. The extracted elements are rare earth and Pd, Zr and Mo which are co-extracted with actinides. The separation factor between actinides and other two types of F.P.elements will increase if more scrubbing sections are added in the process. The relative concentration profile of actinide elements and Tc in various stages as well as the distribution of actinides and F.P. elements in the process stream solutions are also presented

  19. Standard test method for determining elements in waste streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    This test method covers the determination of trace, minor, and major elements in waste streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) following an acid digestion of the specimen. Waste streams from manufacturing processes of nuclear and nonnuclear materials can be analyzed. This test method is applicable to the determination of total metals. Results from this test method can be used to characterize waste received by treatment facilities and to formulate appropriate treatment recipes. The results are also usable to process control within waste treatment facilities. This test method is applicable only to waste streams that contain radioactivity levels which do not require special personnel or environmental protection. A list of the elements determined in waste streams and the corresponding lower reporting limit is included

  20. Study on solubility and leaching property of Iodine-129 waste-forms for geological disposal. Document prepared by other institute, based on the trust contract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakashita, A.; Izumi, J. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kitao, H. [Nuclear Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Ueta, S.; Okada, K.; Nakazawa, T.; Muroi, M. [Mitsubishi Materials Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-02-01

    As concern the study on the property of Iodine-129 waste-forms, the solubilities and leachabilities of iodine-sodalite and leachabilities of apatite containing Iodine were measured last year. The results in this year are summarized as follows. 1. Solubility and Leachability of Iodine-sodalite. Leachabilities and solubilities of the synthesized iodine-sodalite by HIP method were measured by means of a long-term leach test in the solution with chloride ions and high pH (12.5). The measured solubilities were within a range of 10{sup -3} - 10{sup -2} mol/L, which were larger compare with the previous values. The leachabilities were 10{sup -6} g/cm{sup 2}/day (powder) and 10{sup -3} g/cm{sup 2}/day (block). After the leach test, the solid phases were analyzed and the alternation was not observed. 2. Leaching Property of Apatite Sample which contains Iodine adsorption medicine. Apatite sample was manufactured from apatite and zeorait which adsorbs iodine matrix by plasma-hotpress. The porosity of the samples was under 5% and release rate of iodine was about 10% at plasma-hotpress manufacturing. The leachabilities of iodine were 10{sup -4} - 10{sup -3} g/cm{sup 2}/d at 56 day soaking period. These values were 1 - 2 digits higher compare with the leachabilities of calcium. It is thought that the iodine selectively is leached from apatite sample. (author)

  1. Fundamental study on the extraction of transuranium elements from high-level liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Masumitsu; Morita, Yasuji; Tochiyama, Osamu; Inoue, Yasushi.

    1988-01-01

    A great many extractants have been studied for the separation of transuranium elements. The present study deals with the survey and classification of the extractants appearing in literature, bearing in mind the relationship between the molecular structure of extractants and their extractability for the transuranium elements from the standpoint of their selective separation from high-level liquid waste (HLW) generated from fuel reprocessing. The extractants surveyed were classified into six groups; unidentate neutral organophosphorus compounds, bidentate neutral organophosphorus compounds, acidic organophosphorus compounds, amines and ammonium salts, N,N-disubstituted amides and the other compounds. These extractants are not always applicable to the separation of transuranium elements from HLW because of their limitations in extractability and radiation durability. Only a limited number of extractants belonging to the bidentate neutral organophosphorus compounds and the acidic organophosphorus compounds are considered to be suitable for the present purpose. (author)

  2. Bioavailability of elemental iron powders to rats is less than bakery-grade ferrous sulfate and predicted by iron solubility and particle surface area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, James H; Newman, Samuel M; Hunt, Janet R

    2003-11-01

    Foods are fortified with elemental forms of iron to reduce iron deficiency. However, the nutritional efficacy of current, commercially produced elemental iron powders has not been verified. We determined the bioavailability of six commercial elemental iron powders and examined how physicochemistry influences bioavailability. Relative biological value (RBV) of the iron powders was determined using a hemoglobin repletion/slope ratio method, treating iron-deficient rats with repletion diets fortified with graded quantities of iron powders, bakery-grade ferrous sulfate or no added iron. Iron powders were assessed physicochemically by measuring iron solubility in hydrochloric acid at pH 1.0 and 1.7, surface area by nitrogen gas adsorption and surface microstructure by electron microscopy. Bioavailability from the iron powders, based on absolute iron intake, was significantly less than from FeSO4 (100%; P Electrolytic (54%; A-131, U.S.) > Electrolytic (46%; Electrolytic Iron, India) > H-Reduced (42%; AC-325, U.S.) > Reduced (24%; ATOMET 95SP, Canada) > CO-Reduced (21%; RSI-325, Sweden). Solubility testing of the iron powders resulted in different relative rankings and better RBV predictability with increasing time at pH 1.7 (R2 = 0.65 at 150 min). The prediction was improved with less time and lower pH (R2 = 0.82, pH 1.0 at 30 min). Surface area, ranging from 90 to 370 m2/kg, was also highly predictive of RBV (R2 = 0.80). Bioavailability of iron powders is less than bakery-grade ferrous sulfate and varies up to three times among different commercial forms. Solubility at pH 1.0 and surface area were predictive of iron bioavailability in rats.

  3. Thermodynamic properties of chemical species in nuclear waste: Topical report: The solubilities of crystalline neodymium and americium trihydroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, R.J.

    1982-12-01

    The solubilities of crystalline Nd(OH) 3 and Am(OH) 3 were measured at 25 +- 1 0 C in aqueous solutions of 0.1 M NaClO 4 under argon as a function of pH by determination of the solution concentrations of Nd and Am. Prior to use in the solubility measurements, the solid materials were characterized through their x-ray powder patterns. Analyses of the solubility data with the computer code MINEQL allowed estimates of the solubility product constants, K/sub s10/, and the second and third hydrolysis constants, K 12 and K 13 , for Nd 3+ and Am 3+ . Upper limits for the fourth hydrolysis constants were also estimated. For Nd, they are: log K/sub s10/ = 16.0 +- .2, log K 12 = -15.8 +- .5, log K 13 = -23.9 +- .2 and log K 14 12 = -16.0 +- .7, log K 13 = -24.3 +- .3 and log K 14 3 was found to be a factor of 100 to 300 less soluble than predicted from previously reported thermodynamic data over much of the pH range of environmental interest. The measured solubility of crystalline Am(OH) 3 was also considerably less than predicted from the previously estimated solubility product constant, i.e., a factor of about 600. For Am, the solubility of the crystalline material was a factor of about 30 less than the amorphous material. The solubilities of crystalline Nd(OH) 3 and Am(OH) 3 as a function of pH were found to be very similar and Nd(OH) 3 should be a good analog compound for Am(OH) 3

  4. Content of selected elements in Boletus badius fruiting bodies growing in extremely polluted wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mleczek, Mirosław; Siwulski, Marek; Mikołajczak, Patrycja; Gąsecka, Monika; Sobieralski, Krzysztof; Szymańczyk, Mateusz; Goliński, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse levels of 17 trace elements and 5 major minerals in 11 Boletus badius fruiting bodies able to grow in extremely polluted waste (flotation tailings) and polluted soil in southern Poland. The presented data widen the limited literature data about the abilities of wild-growing mushroom species to grow on heavily contaminated substrates. Content of elements in waste, soil and mushrooms was analysed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) and cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS - Hg). The industrial areas differed greatly as regards the content of elements in flotation tailings and soil; therefore differences in Ag, Ba, Cd, Co, Fe, Mo, Ni, Pb, Ca, K, Mg, Na and P accumulation in mushrooms were observed. The highest contents of elements in mushrooms were observed for: As, Al, Cu and Zn (86 ± 28, 549 ± 116, 341 ± 59 and 506 ± 40 mg kg(-1) dry matter, respectively). Calculated bioconcentration factor (BCF) values were higher than 1 for Al (15.1-16.9), Fe (10.6-24.4) and Hg (10.2-16.4) only. The main value of the presented results is the fact that one of the common wild-growing mushroom species was able to grow on flotation tailings containing over 22 g kg(-1) of As and, additionally, effective accumulation of other elements was observed. In view of the high content of the majority of analysed elements in fruiting bodies, edible mushrooms from such polluted areas are nonconsumable.

  5. Waste fatty acid addition to black liquor to decrease tall oil soap solubility and increase skimming efficiency in kraft mills pulping mountain pine beetle-infested wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uloth, V.; Guy, E. [FPInnovations, Prince George, BC (Canada). PAPRICAN Div.; Shewchuk, D. [Cariboo Pulp and Paper, Quesnel, BC (Canada); Van Heek, R. [Aker Kvaerner, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This paper presented the results of tests conducted to determine if the addition of waste fatty acids from vegetable oil processing might decrease tall oil soap solubility in pine-beetle impacted wood from British Columbia (BC). The soap recovery and tall oil production at BC mills has fallen by 30 to 40 percent in recent years due to the pulping of high proportions of grey-stage beetle-impacted wood. Full-scale mill tests were conducted over a 4-day period. The study showed that the addition of tall oil fatty acids or waste fatty acids from vegetable oil processing could decrease tall oil soap solubility and increase the soup skimming efficiency in mills pulping a large percentage of grey stage beetle-infested wood. The addition of fatty acids increased tall oil soap skimming efficiency from 50.2 percent in the baseline tests to 71.8 percent based on the total soap available, and from 76.7 percent in the baseline tests to 87.5 percent based on insoluble soap only. The economic analyses indicated that waste fatty acid addition could be economical when natural gas and oil prices are high. 4 tabs., 9 figs.

  6. Efficiency Evaluation of Food Waste Materials for the Removal of Metals and Metalloids from Complex Multi-Element Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimi, Lorenzo; Giuliano, Antonella; Astolfi, Maria Luisa; Congedo, Rossana; Masotti, Andrea; Canepari, Silvia

    2018-02-26

    Recent studies have shown the potential of food waste materials as low cost adsorbents for the removal of heavy metals and toxic elements from wastewater. However, the adsorption experiments have been performed in heterogeneous conditions, consequently it is difficult to compare the efficiency of the individual adsorbents. In this study, the adsorption capacities of 12 food waste materials were evaluated by comparing the adsorbents' efficiency for the removal of 23 elements from complex multi-element solutions, maintaining homogeneous experimental conditions. The examined materials resulted to be extremely efficient for the adsorption of many elements from synthetic multi-element solutions as well as from a heavy metal wastewater. The 12 adsorbent surfaces were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and showed different types and amounts of functional groups, which demonstrated to act as adsorption active sites for various elements. By multivariate statistical computations of the obtained data, the 12 food waste materials were grouped in five clusters characterized by different elements' removal efficiency which resulted to be in correlation with the specific adsorbents' chemical structures. Banana peel, watermelon peel and grape waste resulted the least selective and the most efficient food waste materials for the removal of most of the elements.

  7. Seasonal variations in the concentration and solubility of elements in atmospheric particulate matter: a case study in Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canepari S.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric particulate matter is characterized by a variety of chemical components, generally produced by different sources. Chemical fractionation of elements, namely the determination of their extractable and residual fractions, may reliably increase the selectivity of some elements as tracers of specific PM sources. Seasonal variations of atmospheric particulate matter concentration in PM10 and PM2.5, of elemental concentration in PM10 and PM2.5, of the extractable and residual fraction of elements in different size fractions in the range 0.18 – 18 μm are reported in this paper. The effect of the ageing of the air masses is discussed.

  8. Composition and leaching of construction and demolition waste: inorganic elements and organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, Stefania; Christensen, Thomas H; Astrup, Thomas F

    2014-07-15

    Thirty-three samples of construction and demolition waste collected at 11 recycling facilities in Denmark were characterised in terms of total content and leaching of inorganic elements and presence of the persistent organic pollutants PCBs and PAHs. Samples included (i) "clean" (i.e. unmixed) concrete waste, (ii) mixed masonry and concrete, (iii) asphalt and (iv) freshly cast concrete cores; both old and newly generated construction and demolition waste was included. PCBs and PAHs were detected in all samples, generally in non-critical concentrations. Overall, PAHs were comparable to background levels in urban environments. "Old" and "new" concrete samples indicated different PCB congener profiles and the presence of PCB even in new concrete suggested that background levels in raw materials may be an issue. Significant variability in total content of trace elements, even more pronounced for leaching, was observed indicating that the number of analysed samples may be critical in relation to decisions regarding management and utilisation of the materials. Higher leaching of chromium, sulphate and chloride were observed for masonry-containing and partly carbonated samples, indicating that source segregation and management practices may be important. Generally, leaching was in compliance with available leaching limits, except for selenium, and in some cases chromium, sulphate and antimony. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Distributions of 12 elements on 64 absorbers from simulated Hanford Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.; Marsh, S.F.

    1994-12-01

    As part of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System program at Los Alamos, we evaluated 64 commercially available or experimental absorber materials for their ability to remove hazardous components from high-level waste. These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. We tested these absorbers with a solution that simulates Hanford neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) (pH 14.2). To this simulant solution we added the appropriate radionuclides and used gamma spectrometry to measure fission products (Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y) and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Ni, V, Zn, and Zr). For each of 768 element/absorber combinations, we measured distribution coefficients for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to obtain information about sorption kinetics. On the basis of these 2304 measured distribution coefficients, we determined that many of the tested absorbers may be suitable for processing NCAW solutions

  10. Analysis of americium, plutonium and technetium solubility in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Seiji

    1999-08-01

    Safety assessments for geologic disposal of radioactive waste generally use solubilities of radioactive elements as the parameter restricting the dissolution of the elements from a waste matrix. This study evaluated americium, plutonium and technetium solubilities under a variety of geochemical conditions using the geochemical model EQ3/6. Thermodynamic data of elements used in the analysis were provided in the JAERI-data base. Chemical properties of both natural groundwater and interstitial water in buffer materials (bentonite and concrete) were investigated to determine the variations in Eh, pH and ligand concentrations (CO 3 2- , F - , PO 4 3- , SO 4 2- , NO 3 - and NH 4 + ). These properties can play an important role in the complexation of radioactive elements. Effect of the groundwater chemical properties on the solubility and formation of chemical species for americium, plutonium and technetium was predicted based on the solubility analyses under a variety of geochemical conditions. The solubility and speciation of the radioactive elements were estimated, taking into account the possible range of chemical compositions determined from the groundwater investigation. (author)

  11. The dissolution kinetics of major elements in municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendz, David; Tüchsen, Peter L.; Christensen, Thomas H.

    2007-12-01

    Leaching and tracer experiments in batches at L/S 20 were performed with 3-month-old MSWI bottom ash separated into eight different particle sizes. The time-dependent leaching of major elements (Ca 2+, K +, Na +, Cl - and SO 4- 2 ) was monitored for up to 747 h. Physical properties of the particles, the specific surface (BET), pore volume and pore volume distribution over pore sizes (BJH) were determined for all particle classes by N 2 adsorption/desorption experiments. Some common features of physical pore structure for all particles were revealed. The specific surface and the particle pore volume were found to be negatively correlated with particle size, ranging from 3.2 m 2/g to 25.7 m 2/g for the surface area and from 0.0086 cm 3/g to 0.091 cm 3/g for the pore volume. Not surprisingly, the specific surface area was found to be the major material parameter that governed the leaching behavior for all elements (Ca 2+, K +, Na +, Cl - and SO 4- 2 ) and particle sizes. The diffusion resistance was determined independently by separate tracer (tritium) experiments. Diffusion gave a significant contribution to the apparent leaching kinetics for all elements during the first 10-40 h (depending on the particle size) of leaching and surface reaction was the overall rate controlling mechanism at late times for all particle sizes. For Ca 2+ and SO 4- 2 , the coupled effect of diffusion resistance and the degree of undersaturation in the intra particle pore volume was found to be a major rate limiting dissolution mechanism for both early and late times. The solubility control in the intra particulate porosity may undermine any attempt to treat bottom ash by washing out the sulfate. Even for high liquid/solid ratios, the solubility in the intra-particular porosity will limit the release rate.

  12. Exchangeable fraction of elements in alluvial sediments under waste disposal site (Zagreb, Croatia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertacnik, A.; Barisic, D.; Musani, Lj.; Prohic, E.; Juracic, M.

    1997-01-01

    Concentrations of Ag, Ba, Cd, Ce, Cs, Co, Cr, Eu, Fe, Rb, Sc, Sr, Th, and Zn exchangeable fractions were determined in alluvial sediments at waste disposal site area in the vicinity of water-well field. Samples have been'leached with 0.5M NH 4 Cl at a sample/solution ratio of 1:20 during 24 hours without shaking. INAA of dry NH 4 Cl residues show that the concentrations of exchangeable elements determined in the most of the sediments below the wastes have natural levels. Ag, Ba and Sr are readily exchangeable; Rb, Cs and Zn have lower exchangeability, while Cd, Ce, Th, Sc, Eu, Cr, Fe and Co are rather immobile. Extremely high total and exchangeable silver concentration was found at 6.5-6.8 meters below waste in the aerated layer occasionally under the water table. Exchangeable concentrations in deeper water-bearing sediment layers are not elevated. Due to this, one can presume that the upper sediment layers act as chemical filter generally preventing the infiltration from overlying wastes into water-bearing layers. (author)

  13. RHENIUM SOLUBILITY IN BOROSILICATE NUCLEAR WASTE GLASS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE PROCESSING AND IMMOBILIZATION OF TECHNETIUM-99 (AND SUPPORTING INFORMATION WITH GRAPHICAL ABSTRACT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AA KRUGER; A GOEL; CP RODRIGUEZ; JS MCCLOY; MJ SCHWEIGER; WW LUKENS; JR, BJ RILEY; D KIM; M LIEZERS; P HRMA

    2012-08-13

    The immobilization of 99Tc in a suitable host matrix has proved a challenging task for researchers in the nuclear waste community around the world. At the Hanford site in Washington State in the U.S., the total amount of 99Tc in low-activity waste (LAW) is {approx} 1,300 kg and the current strategy is to immobilize the 99Tc in borosilicate glass with vitrification. In this context, the present article reports on the solubility and retention of rhenium, a nonradioactive surrogate for 99Tc, in a LAW sodium borosilicate glass. Due to the radioactive nature of technetium, rhenium was chosen as a simulant because of previously established similarities in ionic radii and other chemical aspects. The glasses containing target Re concentrations varying from 0 to10,000 ppm by mass were synthesized in vacuum-sealed quartz ampoules to minimize the loss of Re by volatilization during melting at 1000 DC. The rhenium was found to be present predominantly as Re7 + in all the glasses as observed by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). The solubility of Re in borosilicate glasses was determined to be {approx}3,000 ppm (by mass) using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). At higher rhenium concentrations, some additional material was retained in the glasses in the form of alkali perrhenate crystalline inclusions detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and laser ablation-ICP mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Assuming justifiably substantial similarities between Re7 + and Tc 7+ behavior in this glass system, these results implied that the processing and immobilization of 99Tc from radioactive wastes should not be limited by the solubility of 99Tc in borosilicate LAW glasses.

  14. KEY ELEMENTS OF CHARACTERIZING SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE INSOLUBLES THROUGH SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reboul, S; Barbara Hamm, B

    2007-01-01

    Characterization of HLW is a prerequisite for effective planning of HLW disposition and site closure performance assessment activities. Adequate characterization typically requires application of a combination of data sources, including process knowledge, theoretical relationships, and real-waste analytical data. Consistently obtaining high quality real-waste analytical data is a challenge, particularly for HLW sludge insolubles, due to the inherent complexities associated with matrix heterogeneities, sampling access limitations, radiological constraints, analyte loss mechanisms, and analyte measurement interferences. Understanding how each of these complexities affects the analytical results is the first step to developing a sampling and analysis program that provides characterization data that are both meaningful and adequate. A summary of the key elements impacting SRS HLW sludge analytical data uncertainties is presented in this paper, along with guidelines for managing each of the impacts. The particular elements addressed include: (a) sample representativeness; (b) solid/liquid phase quantification effectiveness; (c) solids dissolution effectiveness; (d) analyte cross contamination, loss, and tracking; (e) dilution requirements; (f) interference removal; (g) analyte measurement technique; and (h) analytical detection limit constraints. A primary goal of understanding these elements is to provide a basis for quantifying total propagated data uncertainty

  15. Efficiency Evaluation of Food Waste Materials for the Removal of Metals and Metalloids from Complex Multi-Element Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Antonella; Astolfi, Maria Luisa; Congedo, Rossana; Masotti, Andrea; Canepari, Silvia

    2018-01-01

    Recent studies have shown the potential of food waste materials as low cost adsorbents for the removal of heavy metals and toxic elements from wastewater. However, the adsorption experiments have been performed in heterogeneous conditions, consequently it is difficult to compare the efficiency of the individual adsorbents. In this study, the adsorption capacities of 12 food waste materials were evaluated by comparing the adsorbents’ efficiency for the removal of 23 elements from complex multi-element solutions, maintaining homogeneous experimental conditions. The examined materials resulted to be extremely efficient for the adsorption of many elements from synthetic multi-element solutions as well as from a heavy metal wastewater. The 12 adsorbent surfaces were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and showed different types and amounts of functional groups, which demonstrated to act as adsorption active sites for various elements. By multivariate statistical computations of the obtained data, the 12 food waste materials were grouped in five clusters characterized by different elements’ removal efficiency which resulted to be in correlation with the specific adsorbents’ chemical structures. Banana peel, watermelon peel and grape waste resulted the least selective and the most efficient food waste materials for the removal of most of the elements. PMID:29495363

  16. Efficiency Evaluation of Food Waste Materials for the Removal of Metals and Metalloids from Complex Multi-Element Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Massimi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown the potential of food waste materials as low cost adsorbents for the removal of heavy metals and toxic elements from wastewater. However, the adsorption experiments have been performed in heterogeneous conditions, consequently it is difficult to compare the efficiency of the individual adsorbents. In this study, the adsorption capacities of 12 food waste materials were evaluated by comparing the adsorbents’ efficiency for the removal of 23 elements from complex multi-element solutions, maintaining homogeneous experimental conditions. The examined materials resulted to be extremely efficient for the adsorption of many elements from synthetic multi-element solutions as well as from a heavy metal wastewater. The 12 adsorbent surfaces were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and showed different types and amounts of functional groups, which demonstrated to act as adsorption active sites for various elements. By multivariate statistical computations of the obtained data, the 12 food waste materials were grouped in five clusters characterized by different elements’ removal efficiency which resulted to be in correlation with the specific adsorbents’ chemical structures. Banana peel, watermelon peel and grape waste resulted the least selective and the most efficient food waste materials for the removal of most of the elements.

  17. Recovery of enriched Uranium (20% U-235) from wastes obtained in the preparation of fuel elements for argonaut type reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uriarte, A; Ramos, L; Estrada, J; Val, J L. del

    1962-07-01

    Results obtained with the two following installations for recovering enriched uranium (20% U-235) from wastes obtained in the preparation of fuel elements for Argonaut type reactors are presented. Ion exchange unit to recover uranium form mother liquors resulting from the precipitation ammonium diuranate (ADU) from UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} solutions. Uranium recovery unit from solid wastes from the process of manufacture of fuel elements, consisting of a) waste dissolution, and b) extraction with 10% (v/v) TBP. (Author) 9 refs.

  18. Rare earth element recycling from waste nickel-metal hydride batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiuli; Zhang, Junwei; Fang, Xihui

    2014-08-30

    With an increase in number of waste nickel-metal hydride batteries, and because of the importance of rare earth elements, the recycling of rare earth elements is becoming increasingly important. In this paper, we investigate the effects of temperature, hydrochloric acid concentration, and leaching time to optimize leaching conditions and determine leach kinetics. The results indicate that an increase in temperature, hydrochloric acid concentration, and leaching time enhance the leaching rate of rare earth elements. A maximum rare earth elements recovery of 95.16% was achieved at optimal leaching conditions of 70°C, solid/liquid ratio of 1:10, 20% hydrochloric acid concentration, -74μm particle size, and 100min leaching time. The experimental data were best fitted by a chemical reaction-controlled model. The activation energy was 43.98kJ/mol and the reaction order for hydrochloric acid concentration was 0.64. The kinetic equation for the leaching process was found to be: 1-(1-x)(1/3)=A/ρr0[HCl](0.64)exp-439,8008.314Tt. After leaching and filtration, by adding saturated oxalic solution to the filtrate, rare earth element oxalates were obtained. After removing impurities by adding ammonia, filtering, washing with dilute hydrochloric acid, and calcining at 810°C, a final product of 99% pure rare earth oxides was obtained. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Metallic elements occurrences within metallic fragments in the municipal waste incineration bottom ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Piotr; Kasina, Monika; Michalik, Marek

    2017-04-01

    Bottom ash (BA) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is composed of grainy ash material, residual components and metallic fragments (from few µm up to 3-5 cm). Its mineral and chemical composition is related to the composition of the waste stream in the incinerator operational area. Wide use of thermal techniques in management of solid waste makes important the studies on valuable components and their distribution within the material in terms of their further processing. By using various valorization or extraction techniques it is possible to extend the range of its possible further application. To investigate metallic elements distribution within metallic fragments of the MSWI BA material produced in municipal waste incineration plant in Poland were collected in 2015 and 2016. BA and its components were investigated using spectroscopic methods of chemical analysis: ICP-OES, ICP-MS, LECO and EDS (used for microanalysis during SEM observations). BA is a material rich in Si (22.5 wt%), Ca (13.4 wt%), Fe (4 wt%), Al (5.2 wt%) and Na (3.5 wt%), composed of equal part of amorphous (silicate glass dominated) and crystalline phase (rich in silicates, aluminosilicates, oxides of non- and metallic elements and sulphates). The content of metallic elements (Al, Fe, Mg, Ti, Mn, Cr, Ni, Sc, Mo, Cu, Pb, Zn, Sn) is 11.5 wt% with domination of Al (5.2 wt%) and Fe (4 wt%) and elevated values of Mg (1 wt%), Ti (0.54 wt%), Cu (0.26 wt%) and Zn (0.27 wt%) (Kowalski et al., 2016). They were mostly concentrated in the form of metallic fragments, mainly as metallic inclusions in the size of 1-20 µm and separated metallic grains in the size of 50-300 µm. Metallic fragments present in the BA are characterized by their composition heterogeneity and various oxygen content. Fragments are rarely composed of single metallic element and usually in their composition up to few main elements dominated over others. The most common were Fe-, Al- and Zn-rich fragments forming respectively

  20. Segregation of the elements of the platinum group in a simulated high-level waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitamura, H.; Banba, T.; Kamizono, H.; Kiriyama, Y.; Kumata, M.; Murakami, T.; Tashiro, S.

    1983-01-01

    Segregation of the elements of the platinum group occurred during vitrification of the borosilicate glass containing 20 wt% simulated high-level waste oxides. The segregated materials were composed of two crystalline phases: one was the solid solution of ruthenium and rhodium dioxides and the other was that of palladium and rhodium metals also with tellurium. The segregated materials were not distributed homogeneously throughout the glass: (i) on the surface of the glass, there occurred palladium, rhodium and tellurium alloy alone; and (ii) at the inner part of the glass, the agglomerates of the two phases were concentrated in one part and dispersed in the other

  1. Sulphate solubility and sulphate diffusion in oxide glasses: implications for the containment of sulphate-bearing nuclear wastes; Solubilite et cinetiques de diffusion des sulfates dans differents verres d'oxydes: application au conditionnement des dechets nucleaires sulfates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenoir, M.

    2009-09-15

    The thesis deals with sulphate solubility and sulphate diffusion in oxide glasses, in order to control sulphate incorporation and sulphate volatilization in nuclear waste glasses. It was conducted on simplified compositions, in the SiO{sub 2}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-R{sub 2}O (R = Li, Na, K, Cs), SiO{sub 2}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-BaO and V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-BaO systems. These compositions allowed us to study the influence of the nature of network-modifying ions (Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Cs{sup +} or Ba{sup 2+}) and also of former elements (Si, B, V), on structure and properties of glasses. Sulphate volatility is studied in sodium borosilicate melts using an innovative technique of sulphate quantitation with Raman spectroscopy. This technique is useful to obtain kinetic curves of sulphate volatilization. The establishment of a model to fit these curves leads to the determination of diffusion coefficients of sulphate. These diffusion coefficients can thus be compared to diffusion coefficients of other species, determined by other techniques and presented in the literature. They are also linked to diffusion coefficients in relation with the viscosity of the melts. Concerning sulphate solubility in glasses, it depends on glass composition and on the nature of sulphate incorporated. Sulphate incorporation in alkali borosilicate glasses leads to the formation of a sulphate layer floating on top of the melt. Sulphate incorporation in barium borosilicate and boro-vanadate glasses leads to the crystallization of sulphate species inside the vitreous matrix. Moreover, sulphate solubility is higher in these glasses than in alkali borosilicates. Finally, exchanges between cations present in glasses and cations present in the sulphate phase are also studied. (author)

  2. Effective utilization of distiller's grain soluble-an agro-industrial waste in the feed of cage-reared minor carp Labeo bata in a tropical reservoir, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, M A; Aftabuddin, Md; Meena, D K; Mishal, P; Gupta, S Das

    2016-08-01

    A 60-day feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of distiller's grain soluble (brewery waste) as a prospective ingredient to substitute expensive and high demand feed component, soybean meal for farming Labeo bata in cages installed in tropical reservoir. Two isonitrogenous and isocaloric diets comprising brewery waste (49.2 % CP) as test diet and soybean meal (44.4 % CP) as reference diet were formulated and extruded to obtain 2-mm floating pellets. The efficacy of the diets was tested in terms of survival (%), live weight gain (%), SGR (%/day), FCR, PER and ANPU and recorded 65 ± 0.2, 96 ± 8.1, 1.9 ± 0.1, 2.5 ± 0.02, 1.4 ± 0.1, 20.3 ± 2.0 and 66 ± 0.6, 112 ± 9.8, 2.2 ± 0.1, 2.2 ± 0.2, 1.6 ± 0.1 and 20 ± 2.1, respectively, for soybean and brewer's waste-based formulated feed. The analyses of results revealed that survival, growth parameters and biochemical composition of whole body tissue did not differ significantly (p > 0.05) despite complete replacement of soybean meal by brewery waste. However, the cost estimate of diet revealed marked reduction of feed cost of Rs. 9.2/kg (33.8 %) in the test diet as compared to the reference diet. The study suggests that brewery waste could effectively replace soybean meal without effecting survival and growth of the fish. The finding thus may pave a productive way for reducing environmental pressure of disposal of an agro-industrial waste.

  3. Uranium, thorium and trace elements in geologic occurrences as analogues of nuclear waste repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollenberg, H.A.; Brookins, D.G.; Cohen, L.H.; Flexser, S.; Abashian, M.; Murphy, M.; Williams, A.E.

    1984-01-01

    Contact zones between intrusive rocks and tuff, basalt, salt and granitic rock were investigated as possible analogues of nuclear waste repository conditions. Results of detailed studies of contacts between quartz monzonite of Laramide age, intrusive into Precambrian gneiss, and a Tertiary monzonite-tuff contact zone indicate that uranium, thorium and other trace elements have not migrated significantly from the more radioactive instrusives into the country rock. Similar observations resulted from preliminary investigations of a rhyodacite dike cutting basalt of the Columbia River plateau and a kimberlitic dike cutting bedded salt of the Salina basin. This lack of radionuclide migration occurred in hydrologic and thermal conditions comparable to, or more severe than those expected in nuclear waste repository environments and over time periods of the order of concern for waste repositories. Attention is now directed to investigation of active hydrothermal systems in candidate repository rock types, and in this regard a preliminary set of samples has been obtained from a core hole intersecting basalt underlying the Newberry caldera, Oregon, where temperatures presently range from 100 to 265 0 C. Results of mineralogical and geochemical investigations of this core should indicate the alteration mineralogy and behavior of radioelements in conditions analogous to those in the near field of a repository in basalt

  4. Rare earth elements recycling from waste phosphor by dual hydrochloric acid dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hu; Zhang, Shengen; Pan, Dean; Tian, Jianjun; Yang, Min; Wu, Maolin; Volinsky, Alex A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The article provides a new method for recycling rare earth (RE) from waste phosphor. • When compared with the traditional methods, leach rate was much higher. • Y–Eu concentrate and Tb–Ce concentrate were obtained successively. • It would reduce the burden of later extraction, separation and purification. - Abstract: This paper is a comparative study of recycling rare earth elements from waste phosphor, which focuses on the leaching rate and the technical principle. The traditional and dual dissolution by hydrochloric acid (DHA) methods were compared. The method of dual dissolution by hydrochloric acid has been developed. The Red rare earth phosphor (Y 0.95 Eu 0.05 ) 2 O 3 in waste phosphor is dissolved during the first step of acid leaching, while the Green phosphor (Ce 0.67 Tb 0.33 MgAl 11 O 19 ) and the Blue phosphor (Ba 0.9 Eu 0.1 MgAl 10 O 17 ) mixed with caustic soda are obtained by alkali sintering. The excess caustic soda and NaAlO 2 are removed by washing. The insoluble matter is leached by the hydrochloric acid, followed by solvent extraction and precipitation (the DHA method). In comparison, the total leaching rate of the rare earth elements was 94.6% by DHA, which is much higher than 42.08% achieved by the traditional method. The leaching rate of Y, Eu, Ce and Tb reached 94.6%, 99.05%, 71.45%, and 76.22%, respectively. DHA can decrease the consumption of chemicals and energy. The suggested DHA method is feasible for industrial applications

  5. Rare earth elements recycling from waste phosphor by dual hydrochloric acid dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, Shengen, E-mail: zhangshengen@mater.ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Pan, Dean; Tian, Jianjun; Yang, Min; Wu, Maolin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Volinsky, Alex A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • The article provides a new method for recycling rare earth (RE) from waste phosphor. • When compared with the traditional methods, leach rate was much higher. • Y–Eu concentrate and Tb–Ce concentrate were obtained successively. • It would reduce the burden of later extraction, separation and purification. - Abstract: This paper is a comparative study of recycling rare earth elements from waste phosphor, which focuses on the leaching rate and the technical principle. The traditional and dual dissolution by hydrochloric acid (DHA) methods were compared. The method of dual dissolution by hydrochloric acid has been developed. The Red rare earth phosphor (Y{sub 0.95}Eu{sub 0.05}){sub 2}O{sub 3} in waste phosphor is dissolved during the first step of acid leaching, while the Green phosphor (Ce{sub 0.67}Tb{sub 0.33}MgAl{sub 11}O{sub 19}) and the Blue phosphor (Ba{sub 0.9}Eu{sub 0.1}MgAl{sub 10}O{sub 17}) mixed with caustic soda are obtained by alkali sintering. The excess caustic soda and NaAlO{sub 2} are removed by washing. The insoluble matter is leached by the hydrochloric acid, followed by solvent extraction and precipitation (the DHA method). In comparison, the total leaching rate of the rare earth elements was 94.6% by DHA, which is much higher than 42.08% achieved by the traditional method. The leaching rate of Y, Eu, Ce and Tb reached 94.6%, 99.05%, 71.45%, and 76.22%, respectively. DHA can decrease the consumption of chemicals and energy. The suggested DHA method is feasible for industrial applications.

  6. Characteristics of soil-to-plant transfer of elements relevant to radioactive waste in boreal forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roivainen, P.

    2011-01-01

    The use of nuclear energy generates large amounts of different types of radioactive wastes that can be accidentally released into the environment. Soil-to-plant transfer is a key process for the dispersion of radionuclides in the biosphere and is usually described by a concentration ratio (CR) between plant and soil concentrations in radioecological models. Our knowledge of the soil-to-plant transfer of many radionuclides is currently limited and concerns mainly agricultural species and temperate environments. The validity of radioecological modelling is affected by the accuracy of the assumptions and parameters used to describe soil-to-plant transfer. This study investigated the soil-to-plant transfer of six elements (cobalt (Co), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), uranium (U) and zinc (Zn)) relevant to radioactive waste at two boreal forest sites and assessed the factors affecting the CR values. May lily (Maianthemum bifolium), narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana) and blueberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) were selected as representatives of understory species, while rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) represented trees in this study. All the elements studied were found to accumulate in plant roots, indicating that separate CR values for root and aboveground plant parts are needed. The between-species variation in CR values was not clearly higher than the within-species variation, suggesting that the use of generic CR values for understory species and trees is justified. No linear relationship was found between soil and plant concentrations for the elements studied and a non-linear equation was found to be the best for describing the dependence of CR values on soil concentration. Thus, the commonly used assumption of a linear relationship between plant and soil concentrations may lead to underestimation of plant root uptake at low soil concentrations. Plant nutrients potassium, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus and sulphur were found to

  7. Characteristics of soil-to-plant transfer of elements relevant to radioactive waste in boreal forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roivainen, P.

    2011-07-01

    The use of nuclear energy generates large amounts of different types of radioactive wastes that can be accidentally released into the environment. Soil-to-plant transfer is a key process for the dispersion of radionuclides in the biosphere and is usually described by a concentration ratio (CR) between plant and soil concentrations in radioecological models. Our knowledge of the soil-to-plant transfer of many radionuclides is currently limited and concerns mainly agricultural species and temperate environments. The validity of radioecological modelling is affected by the accuracy of the assumptions and parameters used to describe soil-to-plant transfer. This study investigated the soil-to-plant transfer of six elements (cobalt (Co), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), uranium (U) and zinc (Zn)) relevant to radioactive waste at two boreal forest sites and assessed the factors affecting the CR values. May lily (Maianthemum bifolium), narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana) and blueberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) were selected as representatives of understory species, while rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) represented trees in this study. All the elements studied were found to accumulate in plant roots, indicating that separate CR values for root and aboveground plant parts are needed. The between-species variation in CR values was not clearly higher than the within-species variation, suggesting that the use of generic CR values for understory species and trees is justified. No linear relationship was found between soil and plant concentrations for the elements studied and a non-linear equation was found to be the best for describing the dependence of CR values on soil concentration. Thus, the commonly used assumption of a linear relationship between plant and soil concentrations may lead to underestimation of plant root uptake at low soil concentrations. Plant nutrients potassium, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus and sulphur were found to

  8. Rare earth element recycling from waste nickel-metal hydride batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiuli; Zhang, Junwei; Fang, Xihui

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Leaching kinetics of REEs has rarely been reported. • A new method, including hydrochloric acid leaching and oxalic acid precipitation, was proposed. • REEs recovery rate of 95.16% and pure rare earth oxides of 99% were obtained. • Leaching process was controlled by chemical reaction. • The kinetic equation was determined. - Abstract: With an increase in number of waste nickel-metal hydride batteries, and because of the importance of rare earth elements, the recycling of rare earth elements is becoming increasingly important. In this paper, we investigate the effects of temperature, hydrochloric acid concentration, and leaching time to optimize leaching conditions and determine leach kinetics. The results indicate that an increase in temperature, hydrochloric acid concentration, and leaching time enhance the leaching rate of rare earth elements. A maximum rare earth elements recovery of 95.16% was achieved at optimal leaching conditions of 70 °C, solid/liquid ratio of 1:10, 20% hydrochloric acid concentration, −74 μm particle size, and 100 min leaching time. The experimental data were best fitted by a chemical reaction-controlled model. The activation energy was 43.98 kJ/mol and the reaction order for hydrochloric acid concentration was 0.64. The kinetic equation for the leaching process was found to be: 1−(1−x) 1/3 =A/ρr 0 [HCl] 0.64 exp((−439,800)/(8.314T) )t. After leaching and filtration, by adding saturated oxalic solution to the filtrate, rare earth element oxalates were obtained. After removing impurities by adding ammonia, filtering, washing with dilute hydrochloric acid, and calcining at 810 °C, a final product of 99% pure rare earth oxides was obtained

  9. Three-dimensional finite element impact analysis of a nuclear waste truck cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional finite element impact analysis of a hypothetical accident event for the preliminary design of a shipping cask which is used to transport radioactive waste by standard tractor-semitrailer truck. The nonlinear dynamic structural analysis code DYNA3D run on Sandia's Cray-1 computer was used to calculate the effects of the cask's closure-end impacting a rigid frictionless surface on an edge of its external impact limiter after a 30-foot fall. The center of gravity of the cask (made of 304 stainless steel and depleted uranium) was assumed to be directly above the impact point. An elastic-plastic material constitutive model was used to calculate the nonlinear response of the cask components to the transient loading. Interactive color graphics (PATRAN and MOVIE BYU) were used throughout the analysis, proving to be extremely helpful for generation and verification of the geometry and boundary conditions of the finite element model and for interpretation of the analysis results. Results from the calculations show the cask sustained large localized deformations. However, these were almost entirely confined to the impact limiters built into the cask. The closure sections were determined to remain intact, and leakage would not be expected after the event. As an example of a large three-dimensional finite element dynamic impact calculation, this analysis can serve as an excellent benchmark for computer aided design procedures

  10. Supercritical Fluid Chromatography with Photodiode Array Detection in the Determination of Fat-Soluble Vitamins in Hemp Seed Oil and Waste Fish Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Tyśkiewicz

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In the presented study for the first time a new, optimized, fast SFC (supercritical fluid chromatography method was applied to separate in one run fat-soluble vitamins from waste fish oil, including cis-and trans-retinyl palmitate, cis- and trans-retinyl acetate, retinol, α-tocopherol, β-tocopherol, γ‑tocopherol, δ-tocopherol, ergocalciferol (D2, cholecalciferol (D3, cis- and trans-phylloquinone (K1 and menaquinone-4 (K2-MK4. Vitamins were baseline separated on an Acquity UPC2 (ultra performance convergence chromatography HSS C18 SB (highly strength chemically modified silica column within 13 min. The influence of the stationary phase, such as Torus 1-AA (1-aminoanthracene, Torus Diol (high density diol, Torus DEA (diethylamine, BEH (silica with no bonding, BEH-2EP (2-ethylpirydine, CSH Fluoro-Phenyl (silica with fluoro-phenyl groups, column temperature, flow rate and back pressure on the separation of the compounds was described. The application of the modified saponification procedure allowed us to increase concentration in the sample prepared for the analysis of γ‑tocopherol from less than 1% (wt % to 14% for the first time. In addition, α‑tocopherol, γ‑tocopherol, δ‑tocopherol and retinol were identified in waste fish oil. Vitamin purification and analysis in waste fish oil are reported for the first time here. Due to the short time and effectiveness of the proposed method, it can be easily applied in industrial processes.

  11. Water soluble nano-scale transient material germanium oxide for zero toxic waste based environmentally benign nano-manufacturing

    KAUST Repository

    Almuslem, A. S.

    2017-02-14

    In the recent past, with the advent of transient electronics for mostly implantable and secured electronic applications, the whole field effect transistor structure has been dissolved in a variety of chemicals. Here, we show simple water soluble nano-scale (sub-10 nm) germanium oxide (GeO) as the dissolvable component to remove the functional structures of metal oxide semiconductor devices and then reuse the expensive germanium substrate again for functional device fabrication. This way, in addition to transiency, we also show an environmentally friendly manufacturing process for a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. Every year, trillions of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics are manufactured and billions are disposed, which extend the harmful impact to our environment. Therefore, this is a key study to show a pragmatic approach for water soluble high performance electronics for environmentally friendly manufacturing and bioresorbable electronic applications.

  12. Report on the disposal of radioactive wastes and spent fuel elements from Baden-Wuerttemberg; Bericht ueber die Entsorgung von radioaktiven Abfaellen und abgebrannten Brennelementen aus Baden-Wuerttemberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-04-15

    The report on the disposal of radioactive wastes and spent fuel elements from Baden- Wuerttemberg covers the following issues: legal framework for the nuclear disposal; producer of spent fuels and radioactive wastes in Baden- Report on the disposal of radioactive wastes and spent fuel elements from Baden- Wuerttemberg; low- and medium-level radioactive wastes (non heat generating radioactive wastes); spent fuels and radioactive wastes from waste processing (heat generating radioactive wastes); final disposal.

  13. In situ detection of a heat-shock regulatory element binding protein using a soluble short synthetic enhancer sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harel-Bellan, A; Brini, A T; Farrar, W L [National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD (USA); Ferris, D K [Program Resources, Inc., Frederick, MD (USA); Robin, P [Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France)

    1989-06-12

    In various studies, enhancer binding proteins have been successfully absorbed out by competing sequences inserted into plasmids, resulting in the inhibition of the plasmid expression. Theoretically, such a result could be achieved using synthetic enhancer sequences not inserted into plasmids. In this study, a double stranded DNA sequence corresponding to the human heat shock regulatory element was chemically synthesized. By in vitro retardation assays, the synthetic sequence was shown to bind specifically a protein in extracts from the human T cell line Jurkat. When the synthetic enhancer was electroporated into Jurkat cells, not only the enhancer was shown to remain undegraded into the cells for up to 2 days, but also its was shown to bind intracellularly a protein. The binding was specific and was modulated upon heat shock. Furthermore, the binding protein was shown to be of the expected molecular weight by UV crosslinking. However, when the synthetic enhancer element was co-electroporated with an HSP 70-CAT reporter construct, the expression of the reporter plasmid was consistently enhanced in the presence of the exogenous synthetic enhancer.

  14. Application of insoluble tannin to recovery of uranium, TRU and heavy metals elements form radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Kazuhiko; Shirato, Wataru; Nakamura, Yasuo; Matsumura, Tatsuro; Takeshita, Kenji; Nakano, Yoshio

    1999-01-01

    Mitsubishi Nuclear Fuel Co., Ltd. (MNF) has developed a new adsorbent, TANNIX (tread mark), for the recovery of uranium, TRU and heavy metal elements in the liquid waste, in which TANNIX derived from a natural tannin polymer. TANNIX has same advantages that handling is easier than that of standard IX-resin, and that the volume of secondary waste is reduced by burning the used TANNIX. We have replaced its radioactive liquid waste treatment system from the conventional co-precipitation process to adsorption process by using TANNIX. TANNIX was founded to be more effective for the recovery of Pu, TRU, and hexavalent chromium Cr-(VI) as well as Uranium. (author)

  15. Accomplishing simple, solubility-based separations of rare earth elements with complexes bearing size-sensitive molecular apertures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogart, Justin A; Cole, Bren E; Boreen, Michael A; Lippincott, Connor A; Manor, Brian C; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2016-12-27

    Rare earth (RE) metals are critical components of electronic materials and permanent magnets. Recycling of consumer materials is a promising new source of rare REs. To incentivize recycling, there is a clear need for the development of simple methods for targeted separations of mixtures of RE metal salts. Metal complexes of a tripodal hydroxylaminato ligand, TriNOx 3- , featured a size-sensitive aperture formed of its three η 2 -(N,O) ligand arms. Exposure of cations in the aperture induced a self-associative equilibrium comprising RE(TriNOx)THF and [RE(TriNOx)] 2 species. Differences in the equilibrium constants K dimer for early and late metals enabled simple separations through leaching. Separations were performed on RE1/RE2 mixtures, where RE1 = La-Sm and RE2 = Gd-Lu, with emphasis on Eu/Y separations for potential applications in the recycling of phosphor waste from compact fluorescent light bulbs. Using the leaching method, separations factors approaching 2,000 were obtained for early-late RE combinations. Following solvent optimization, >95% pure samples of Eu were obtained with a 67% recovery for the technologically relevant Eu/Y separation.

  16. Standard test method for determining elements in waste Streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of trace, minor, and major elements in waste streams by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) following an acid digestion of the sample. Waste streams from manufacturing processes of nuclear and non-nuclear materials can be analyzed. This test method is applicable to the determination of total metals. Results from this test method can be used to characterize waste received by treatment facilities and to formulate appropriate treatment recipes. The results are also usable in process control within waste treatment facilities. 1.2 This test method is applicable only to waste streams that contain radioactivity levels that do not require special personnel or environmental protection. 1.3 A list of the elements determined in waste streams and the corresponding lower reporting limit is found in Table 1. 1.4 This test method has been used successfully for treatment of a large variety of waste solutions and industrial process liquids. The com...

  17. Composition and leaching of construction and demolition waste: Inorganic elements and organic compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butera, Stefania; Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2014-01-01

    Thirty-three samples of construction and demolition waste collected at 11 recycling facilities in Denmark were characterised in terms of total content and leaching of inorganic elements and presence of the persistent organic pollutants PCBs and PAHs. Samples included (i) "clean" (i.e. unmixed...... for leaching, was observed indicating that the number of analysed samples may be critical in relation to decisions regarding management and utilisation of the materials. Higher leaching of chromium, sulphate and chloride were observed for masonry-containing and partly carbonated samples, indicating that source...... segregation and management practices may be important. Generally, leaching was in compliance with available leaching limits, except for selenium, and in some cases chromium, sulphate and antimony. © 2014 Elsevier B.V....

  18. FEMWASTE: a Finite-Element Model of Waste transport through porous saturated-unsaturated media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, G.T.; Ward, D.S.

    1981-04-01

    A two-dimensional transient model for the transport of dissolved constituents through porous media originally developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been expanded and modified. Transport mechanisms include: convection, hydrodynamic dispersion, chemical sorption, and first-order decay. Implementation of quadrilateral iso-parametric finite elements, bilinear spatial interpolation, asymmetric weighting functions, several time-marching techniques, and Gaussian elimination are employed in the numerical formulation. A comparative example is included to demonstrate the difference between the new and original models. Results from 12 alternative numerical schemes of the new model are compared. The waste transport model is compatible with the water flow model developed at ORNL for predicting convective Darcy velocities in porous media which may be partially saturated

  19. Magnesium Potassium Phosphate Compound for Immobilization of Radioactive Waste Containing Actinide and Rare Earth Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey E. Vinokurov

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of effective immobilization of liquid radioactive waste (LRW is key to the successful development of nuclear energy. The possibility of using the magnesium potassium phosphate (MKP compound for LRW immobilization on the example of nitric acid solutions containing actinides and rare earth elements (REE, including high level waste (HLW surrogate solution, is considered in the research work. Under the study of phase composition and structure of the MKP compounds that is obtained by the XRD and SEM methods, it was established that the compounds are composed of crystalline phases—analogues of natural phosphate minerals (struvite, metaankoleite. The hydrolytic stability of the compounds was determined according to the semi-dynamic test GOST R 52126-2003. Low leaching rates of radionuclides from the compound are established, including a differential leaching rate of 239Pu and 241Am—3.5 × 10−7 and 5.3 × 10−7 g/(cm2∙day. As a result of the research work, it was concluded that the MKP compound is promising for LRW immobilization and can become an alternative material combining the advantages of easy implementation of the technology, like cementation and the high physical and chemical stability corresponding to a glass-like compound.

  20. The rare earth elements in municipal solid waste incinerators ash and promising tools for their prospecting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funari, Valerio, E-mail: valerio.funari@unibo.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Biologiche, Geologiche e Ambientali (BiGeA)—University of Bologna, Piazza di Porta San Donato 1, Bologna (Italy); Bokhari, Syed Nadeem Hussain [General and Analytical Chemistry—Montanuniversität Leoben, Franz-Josef-Str. 18, Leoben (Austria); Vigliotti, Luigi [Istituto di Scienze Marine (ISMAR-CNR)—National Research Council, Via Piero Gobetti 101, Bologna (Italy); Meisel, Thomas [General and Analytical Chemistry—Montanuniversität Leoben, Franz-Josef-Str. 18, Leoben (Austria); Braga, Roberto [Dipartimento di Scienze Biologiche, Geologiche e Ambientali (BiGeA)—University of Bologna, Piazza di Porta San Donato 1, Bologna (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • The REE concentrations of bottom and fly ashes from municipal incinerators are investigated. • First attempt toward discriminating the magnetic signature (susceptibility) of ashes from incinerators. • New methods and parameters for REE prospecting, which can be determined quickly and with limited costs, are provided. - Abstract: Bottom and fly ashes from Municipal Solid Waste Incinerators (MSWI) are hazardous products that present concern for their safe management. An attractive option to reduce their impact both on the environment and the financial commitment is turning MSWI ashes into secondary raw materials. In this study we present the REE content and distribution of bottom and fly ashes from MSWI after a highly effective digestion method and samples analysis by ICP–MS. The chondrite-normalised REE patterns of MSWI bottom and fly ash are comparable with that of crustal averages, suggesting a main geogenic source. Deviations from typical crustal pattern (e.g., Eu, Tb) disclose a contribution of likely anthropogenic provenance. The correlation with major elements indicates possible sources for REE and facilitates a preliminary resource assessment. Moreover, magnetic susceptibility measurements can be a useful prospecting method in urban ores made of MSWI ashes. The relationship between REE and some influencing parameters (e.g., Pricing Influence Factor) emphasises the importance of MSWI ash as alternative source of REE and the need of further efforts for REE recovery and purification from low concentrations but high flows waste.

  1. Fungus-Mediated Preferential Bioleaching of Waste Material Such as Fly - Ash as a Means of Producing Extracellular, Protein Capped, Fluorescent and Water Soluble Silica Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shadab Ali; Uddin, Imran; Moeez, Sana; Ahmad, Absar

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we for the first time show the ability of the mesophilic fungus Fusarium oxysporum in the bioleaching of waste material such as Fly-ash for the extracellular production of highly crystalline and highly stable, protein capped, fluorescent and water soluble silica nanoparticles at ambient conditions. When the fungus Fusarium oxysporum is exposed to Fly-ash, it is capable of selectively leaching out silica nanoparticles of quasi-spherical morphology within 24 h of reaction. These silica nanoparticles have been completely characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, Photoluminescence (PL), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX). PMID:25244567

  2. Fungus-mediated preferential bioleaching of waste material such as fly - ash as a means of producing extracellular, protein capped, fluorescent and water soluble silica nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadab Ali Khan

    Full Text Available In this paper, we for the first time show the ability of the mesophilic fungus Fusarium oxysporum in the bioleaching of waste material such as Fly-ash for the extracellular production of highly crystalline and highly stable, protein capped, fluorescent and water soluble silica nanoparticles at ambient conditions. When the fungus Fusarium oxysporum is exposed to Fly-ash, it is capable of selectively leaching out silica nanoparticles of quasi-spherical morphology within 24 h of reaction. These silica nanoparticles have been completely characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, Photoluminescence (PL, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and Energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX.

  3. Addition of granular activated carbon and trace elements to favor volatile fatty acid consumption during anaerobic digestion of food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capson-Tojo, Gabriel; Moscoviz, Roman; Ruiz, Diane; Santa-Catalina, Gaëlle; Trably, Eric; Rouez, Maxime; Crest, Marion; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Bernet, Nicolas; Delgenès, Jean-Philippe; Escudié, Renaud

    2018-07-01

    The effect of supplementing granular activated carbon and trace elements on the anaerobic digestion performance of consecutive batch reactors treating food waste was investigated. The results from the first batch suggest that addition of activated carbon favored biomass acclimation, improving acetic acid consumption and enhancing methane production. Adding trace elements allowed a faster consumption of propionic acid. A second batch proved that a synergy existed when activated carbon and trace elements were supplemented simultaneously. The degradation kinetics of propionate oxidation were particularly improved, reducing significantly the batch duration and improving the average methane productivities. Addition of activated carbon favored the growth of archaea and syntrophic bacteria, suggesting that interactions between these microorganisms were enhanced. Interestingly, microbial analyses showed that hydrogenotrophic methanogens were predominant. This study shows for the first time that addition of granular activated carbon and trace elements may be a feasible solution to stabilize food waste anaerobic digestion. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of the performance and limitations of empirical partition-relations and process based multisurface models to predict trace element solubility in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenenberg, J.E.; Bonten, L.T.C. [Alterra, Wageningen UR, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Dijkstra, J.J. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); De Vries, W. [Department of Environmental Systems Analysis, Wageningen University, Wageningen UR, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Comans, R.N.J. [Department of Soil Quality, Wageningen University, Wageningen UR, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2012-07-15

    Here we evaluate the performance and limitations of two frequently used model-types to predict trace element solubility in soils: regression based 'partition-relations' and thermodynamically based 'multisurface models', for a large set of elements. For this purpose partition-relations were derived for As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, V, Zn. The multi-surface model included aqueous speciation, mineral equilibria, sorption to organic matter, Fe/Al-(hydr)oxides and clay. Both approaches were evaluated by their application to independent data for a wide variety of conditions. We conclude that Freundlich-based partition-relations are robust predictors for most cations and can be used for independent soils, but within the environmental conditions of the data used for their derivation. The multisurface model is shown to be able to successfully predict solution concentrations over a wide range of conditions. Predicted trends for oxy-anions agree well for both approaches but with larger (random) deviations than for cations.

  5. Investigation of recovery and recycling of rare earth elements from waste fluorescent lamp phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eduafo, Patrick Max

    Characterization techniques and experimental measurements were used to evaluate a process for recycling rare earth elements (REEs) from spent fluorescent lamp phosphors. QEMSCAN analysis revealed that over 60% of the rare earth bearing minerals was less than 10 microm. A representative sample of the as-received feed contained 14.59 wt% total rare earth elements (TREE) and upon sieving to below 75 microm, the grade increased to 19.60 wt% REE with 98.75% recovery. Based on experimental work, a new process for extracting the chief REEs from end of life fluorescent lamps has been developed. The proposed flowsheet employs a three-stage leaching and precipitation process for selective extraction and recovery of the REEs. Hydrochloric acid was used as lixiviant in batch leach experiments on the phosphor powder. The maximum extraction obtained was 100% for both yttrium and europium under the following leaching conditions: 2.5 M HCl, 70°C, 1 hour, 180 g/L and 600 rpm. However, the solubility of cerium, lanthanum and terbium remained low at these conditions. Kinetic data of the leaching of yttrium and europium showed best fit to the logarithmic rate expression of the empirical model of leaching. Activation energy was calculated to be 77.49 kJ/mol for Y and 72.75 kJ/mol for Eu in the temperature range of 298 to 343 K. Precipitation tests demonstrate that at least 50% excess the stoichiometric amount of oxalic acid is needed to recover yttrium and europium efficiently to produce a pure (Y, Eu) mixed oxide. Total recovery of the REEs was achieved even at very low pH or without any base added. Over 99% pure mixed rare earth oxide at 99% recovery has been attained. An economic assessment of the developed process using operating and capital cost have be undertaken and based on the analysis of the three economic scenarios, two are economic and one is non-economic.

  6. Molecular composition of recycled organic wastes, as determined by solid-state {sup 13}C NMR and elemental analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldridge, S.M., E-mail: simon.eldridge@dpi.nsw.gov.au [Environmental Futures Centre, School of Environment, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111 (Australia); NSW Department of Primary Industries, Bruxner Highway, Wollongbar, NSW 2477 (Australia); Chen, C.R. [Environmental Futures Centre, School of Environment, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111 (Australia); Xu, Z.H. [Environmental Futures Centre, School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111 (Australia); Nelson, P.N. [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University, Cairns, QLD 4870 (Australia); Boyd, S.E. [Environmental Futures Centre, School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111 (Australia); Meszaros, I. [Formerly NSW Department of Primary Industries, Richmond, NSW 2753 (Australia); Chan, K.Y. [Graduate School of Environment, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW 2109 (Australia); Formerly NSW Department of Primary Industries, Richmond, NSW 2753 (Australia)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Model estimated the molecular C components well for most RO wastes. • Molecular nature of organic matter in RO wastes varied widely. • Molecular composition by NMR modelling preferable to extraction techniques. • Some model shortcomings in estimating molecular composition of biochars. • Waste molecular composition important for carbon/nutrient outcomes in soil. - Abstract: Using solid state {sup 13}C NMR data and elemental composition in a molecular mixing model, we estimated the molecular components of the organic matter in 16 recycled organic (RO) wastes representative of the major materials generated in the Sydney basin area. Close correspondence was found between the measured NMR signal intensities and those predicted by the model for all RO wastes except for poultry manure char. Molecular nature of the organic matter differed widely between the RO wastes. As a proportion of organic C, carbohydrate C ranged from 0.07 to 0.63, protein C from <0.01 to 0.66, lignin C from <0.01 to 0.31, aliphatic C from 0.09 to 0.73, carbonyl C from 0.02 to 0.23, and char C from 0 to 0.45. This method is considered preferable to techniques involving imprecise extraction methods for RO wastes. Molecular composition data has great potential as a predictor of RO waste soil carbon and nutrient outcomes.

  7. Molecular composition of recycled organic wastes, as determined by solid-state 13C NMR and elemental analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldridge, S.M.; Chen, C.R.; Xu, Z.H.; Nelson, P.N.; Boyd, S.E.; Meszaros, I.; Chan, K.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Model estimated the molecular C components well for most RO wastes. • Molecular nature of organic matter in RO wastes varied widely. • Molecular composition by NMR modelling preferable to extraction techniques. • Some model shortcomings in estimating molecular composition of biochars. • Waste molecular composition important for carbon/nutrient outcomes in soil. - Abstract: Using solid state 13 C NMR data and elemental composition in a molecular mixing model, we estimated the molecular components of the organic matter in 16 recycled organic (RO) wastes representative of the major materials generated in the Sydney basin area. Close correspondence was found between the measured NMR signal intensities and those predicted by the model for all RO wastes except for poultry manure char. Molecular nature of the organic matter differed widely between the RO wastes. As a proportion of organic C, carbohydrate C ranged from 0.07 to 0.63, protein C from <0.01 to 0.66, lignin C from <0.01 to 0.31, aliphatic C from 0.09 to 0.73, carbonyl C from 0.02 to 0.23, and char C from 0 to 0.45. This method is considered preferable to techniques involving imprecise extraction methods for RO wastes. Molecular composition data has great potential as a predictor of RO waste soil carbon and nutrient outcomes

  8. The application of the German reg. guides ('elements of calculation') for radioactive discharges via exhaust air and waste water on fuel element fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hille, R.; Rudolph, W.

    1978-01-01

    The fuel element fabricating plants at Hanau are handlung uranium, plutonium and thorium. The process essentially of converting these heavy metals into oxide, carbide or metal compounds. Thereby occur radioactive discharges into the exhaust air and the waste water. The most important pathway for exposure from these substances is inhalation, the released radionuclides mostly being α-emitters. Compared to this the external irradiation from immersion in γ, β, and neutron radiation is of less importance. (orig./HP) [de

  9. Trace-element concentrations and water-soluble ions in size-segregated dust-borne and soil samples in Sistan, southeast Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrooz, Reza Dahmardeh; Esmaili-Sari, Abbas; Bahramifar, Nader; Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Saeb, Keivan; Rajaei, Fatemeh

    2017-04-01

    This study analyzes the chemical composition (water-soluble ions and trace elements) of the total suspended particles (TSP) and particulate matter less than 10 and 2.5 μm (PM10 and PM2.5) in the Sistan basin, southeast Iran during the dusty and windy period June - October 2014. Extreme TSP, PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations, means of 1624.8, 433.4 and 320.8 μgm-3, respectively, were recorded in the Zabol sampling site, while the examined water-soluble ions and trace metals constitute small fractions (∼4.1%-17.7%) of the particulate masses. Intense winds on the dust-storm days result in weathering of soil crust and deflation of evaporate minerals from the dried Hamoun lake beds in the Sistan basin. The soil samples are rich in Ca2+, SO42-, Na+ and Cl- revealing the existence of non-sea salts, as well as in Al, Fe and Mg, while the similarity in the chemical composition between soil and airborne samples indicates that the dust events over Sistan are local in origin. In contrast, low concentrations of secondary ions (i.e., nitrate) and heavy metals (i.e., Pb, Cr, Ni, Cu) indicate less anthropogenic and industrial emissions. Enrichment Factor analysis for TSP, PM10 and PM2.5 reveals that the anthropogenic sources contribute a substantial amount in the heavy metals rather than soil crust, while Al, Fe, Sn, Mg are mostly of crustal origin. The results provide essential knowledge in atmospheric chemistry over Sistan and in establishing mitigation strategies for air pollution control.

  10. Removal of actinide elements from liquid scintillation cocktail wastes using liquid-liquid extraction and demulsification techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foltz, K.; Landsberger, S.; Srinivasan, B.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1994-01-01

    For many years liquid scintillation cocktail (LSC) wastes have been generated and stored at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). These wastes are stored in thousands of 10--20 m scintillation vials, many of which contain elements with Z > 88. Because storage space is limited, disposal of this waste is pressing. These wastes could be commercially incinerated if the radionuclides with Z>88 are reduced to sufficiently low levels. However, there is currently no deminimus level for these radionuclides, and separation techniques are still being tested. The University of Illinois is conducting experiments to separate radionuclides with Z > 88 from simulated LSC wastes by using liquid-liquid extraction (LLX) and demulsification techniques. The actinide elements are removed from the LSC by extraction into an aqueous phase after the cocktail has been demulsified. The aqueous and organic phases are separated and the organic phase, now free from radionuclides with Z > 88, can be sent to a commercial incineration facility. The aqueous phase may be treated and disposed of using existing techniques. The LLX separation techniques used solutions of sodium oxalate, aluminum nitrate, and tetrasodium EDTA at varying concentrations. These extractants were mixed with the simulated waste in a 1:1 volume ratio. Using 1.0M Na 4 EDTA salt solutions, decontamination ratios as high as 230 were achieved

  11. The leaching of trace elements from municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash at different stages of weathering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meima, J.A.; Comans, R.N.J.

    1999-01-01

    For a proper assessment of the environmental impact of the utilisation and disposal of Municipal Solid Waste Incinerator (MSWI) bottom ash it is necessary to understand weathering processes and their effects on (trace) element leaching. The authors have investigated the processes that control the

  12. Strategies for redundancy resolution of dual-arm systems with passive elements for tank waste removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubey, R.

    1997-01-01

    The work described in this paper focuses on the coordination and control of two manipulators coupled by passive elements operating in a confined space. An example of one such system is the hardware used for the environmental response treatability study funded by the Department of Energy at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The motivation for this project is to establish the methodology necessary to extract large volumes of hazardous waste from underground storage facilities. The hardware used at ORNL consists of two long-reach manipulators. The first robot, the Modified Light Duty Utility Arm (MLDUA), is an 8-degree-of-freedom long-reach manipulator. The second arm, the Hose Management Arm (HMA), has two active degrees-of-freedom and provides hardware to break up and extract materials from the tank. Current strategies call for the MLDUA to grasp a combined sluicing end-effector attached, by a long flexible hose, to the HMA. The MLDUA will then move the combined system through the waste, extracting material. This paper describes many of the issues related to redundancy resolution and the coordinated control of these two robots. First, the authors provide a brief outline of the project and the existing hardware. This is followed by a description of existing redundancy resolution techniques and the impact redundancy has on the success of the project. Finally, preliminary simulation results show the effect cooperative control has on the level of forces generated between the dual-arm systems when coupled by an elastic exhaust hose. These results show a significant reduction in forces when both arms are active and have a combined manipulation strategy

  13. Strategies for redundancy resolution of dual-arm systems with passive elements for tank waste removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubey, R. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Love, L.J. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1997-03-01

    The work described in this paper focuses on the coordination and control of two manipulators coupled by passive elements operating in a confined space. An example of one such system is the hardware used for the environmental response treatability study funded by the Department of Energy at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The motivation for this project is to establish the methodology necessary to extract large volumes of hazardous waste from underground storage facilities. The hardware used at ORNL consists of two long-reach manipulators. The first robot, the Modified Light Duty Utility Arm (MLDUA), is an 8-degree-of-freedom long-reach manipulator. The second arm, the Hose Management Arm (HMA), has two active degrees-of-freedom and provides hardware to break up and extract materials from the tank. Current strategies call for the MLDUA to grasp a combined sluicing end-effector attached, by a long flexible hose, to the HMA. The MLDUA will then move the combined system through the waste, extracting material. This paper describes many of the issues related to redundancy resolution and the coordinated control of these two robots. First, the authors provide a brief outline of the project and the existing hardware. This is followed by a description of existing redundancy resolution techniques and the impact redundancy has on the success of the project. Finally, preliminary simulation results show the effect cooperative control has on the level of forces generated between the dual-arm systems when coupled by an elastic exhaust hose. These results show a significant reduction in forces when both arms are active and have a combined manipulation strategy.

  14. nfluences of ammonium-nitrate, food waste compost and bacterial fertilizer on soluble soil nitrogen forms and on the growth of carrot (Daucus Carota L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Balla Kovács

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a greenhouse study to compare the effects of food waste compost, bacterial fertilizer and their combination with the effect of mineral fertilizer on yield of carrot and the available nutrient content of soils. The study was conducted on calcareous chernozem and acidic sandy soils and consisted of 8 treatments in a randomized complete block design with four replications. The NH4NO3 resulted in reduced growing of carrot plant in sandy soil, and the treatment effect of mineral fertilizer was not observed significantly in chernozem soil. Sandy soil showed higher response of growth of carrot to food waste compost fertilization than chernozem soil. Sole application of EM-1 bacterial fertilizer did not have marked effect on yield parameters and sizes of roots. When EM-1 bacterial fertilizer was applied together with ammonium-nitrate or with compost in chernozem soil, the weights of roots and the sizes of roots in some cases became higher compared to the values of appropriate treatments without inoculation. In sandy soil the diameter of roots slightly increased when EM-1 bacterial fertilizer was applied with ammonium-nitrate and with ammonium-nitrate+compost combination compared to appropriate treatment without inoculation. In chernozem soil the maximum weights and sizes of roots were achieved with the combined treatment of ammonium-nitrate+compost+EM-1 bacterial fertilizer and in sandy soil with compost treatment. Our results of soluble nitrogen content of soils are in good agreement with yield parameters of carrot. Results suggest that food waste compost could be a good substitute for mineral fertilizer application in carrot production mainly in sandy soil. EM-1 bacterial fertilizer did not cause marked effect on yield and yield parameters of carrot plant, but its combination with other fertilizers promises a little bit higher yield or plant available nutrient in the soil. These effects do not clear exactly, so further studies are

  15. Heavy element accumulation in Evernia prunastri lichen transplants around a municipal solid waste landfill in central Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nannoni, Francesco; Santolini, Riccardo; Protano, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a biomonitoring study to evaluate the environmental impact of airborne emissions from a municipal solid waste landfill in central Italy. Concentrations of 11 heavy elements, as well as photosynthetic efficiency and cell membrane integrity were measured in Evernia prunastri lichens transplanted for 4months in 17 monitoring sites around the waste landfill. Heavy element contents were also determined in surface soils. Analytical data indicated that emissions from the landfill affected Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sb and Zn concentrations in lichens transplanted within the landfill and along the fallout direction. In these sites moderate to severe accumulation of these heavy elements in lichens was coupled with an increase in cell membrane damage and decrease in photosynthetic efficiency. Nevertheless, results indicated that landfill emissions had no relevant impact on lichens, as heavy element accumulation and weak stress symptoms were detected only in lichen transplants from sites close to solid waste. The appropriate management of this landfill poses a low risk of environmental contamination by heavy elements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Selenium and Other Trace Element Mobility in Waste Products and Weathered Sediments at Parys Mountain Copper Mine, Anglesey, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam A. Bullock

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Parys Mountain copper mining district (Anglesey, North Wales hosts exposed pyritic bedrock, solid mine waste spoil heaps, and acid drainage (ochre sediment deposits. Both natural and waste deposits show elevated trace element concentrations, including selenium (Se, at abundances of both economic and environmental consideration. Elevated concentrations of semi-metals such as Se in waste smelts highlight the potential for economic reserves in this and similar base metal mining sites. Selenium is sourced from the pyritic bedrock and concentrations are retained in red weathering smelt soils, but lost in bedrock-weathered soils and clays. Selenium correlates with Te, Au, Bi, Cd, Hg, Pb, S, and Sb across bedrock and weathered deposits. Man-made mine waste deposits show enrichment of As, Bi, Cu, Sb, and Te, with Fe oxide-rich smelt materials containing high Pb, up to 1.5 wt %, and Au contents, up to 1.2 ppm. The trace elements As, Co, Cu, and Pb are retained from bedrock to all sediments, including high Cu content in Fe oxide-rich ochre sediments. The high abundance and mobility of trace elements in sediments and waters should be considered as potential pollutants to the area, and also as a source for economic reserves of previously extracted and new strategic commodities.

  17. Online elemental analysis of process gases with ICP-OES: A case study on waste wood combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellinger, Marco; Wochele, Joerg; Biollaz, Serge M.A.; Ludwig, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Simultaneous measurements of 23 elements in process gases of a waste wood combustor. ► Mobile ICP spectrometer allows measurements of high quality at industrial plants. ► Continuous online measurements with high temporal resolution. ► Linear correlations among element concentrations in the raw flue gas were detected. ► Novel sampling and calibration methods for ICP-OES analysis of process gases. - Abstract: A mobile sampling and measurement system for the analysis of gaseous and liquid samples in the field was developed. An inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES), which is built into a van, was used as detector. The analytical system was calibrated with liquid and/or gaseous standards. It was shown that identical mass flows of either gaseous or liquid standards resulted in identical ICP-OES signal intensities. In a field measurement campaign trace and minor elements in the raw flue gas of a waste wood combustor were monitored. Sampling was performed with a highly transport efficient liquid quench system, which allowed to observe temporal variations in the elemental process gas composition. After a change in feedstock an immediate change of the element concentrations in the flue gas was detected. A comparison of the average element concentrations during the combustion of the two feedstocks showed a high reproducibility for matrix elements that are expected to be present in similar concentrations. On the other hand elements that showed strong differences in their concentration in the feedstock were also represented by a higher concentration in the flue gas. Following the temporal variations of different elements revealed strong correlations between a number of elements, such as chlorine with sodium, potassium and zinc, as well as arsenic with lead, and calcium with strontium.

  18. Trace element partitioning in ashes from boilers firing pure wood or mixtures of solid waste with respect to fuel composition, chlorine content and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqib, Naeem; Bäckström, Mattias

    2014-12-01

    Trace element partitioning in solid waste (household waste, industrial waste, waste wood chips and waste mixtures) incineration residues was investigated. Samples of fly ash and bottom ash were collected from six incineration facilities across Sweden including two grate fired and four fluidized bed incinerators, to have a variation in the input fuel composition (from pure biofuel to mixture of waste) and different temperature boiler conditions. As trace element concentrations in the input waste at the same facilities have already been analyzed, the present study focuses on the concentration of trace elements in the waste fuel, their distribution in the incineration residues with respect to chlorine content of waste and combustion temperature. Results indicate that Zn, Cu and Pb are dominating trace elements in the waste fuel. Highly volatile elements mercury and cadmium are mainly found in fly ash in all cases; 2/3 of lead also end up in fly ash while Zn, As and Sb show a large variation in distribution with most of them residing in the fly ash. Lithophilic elements such as copper and chromium are mainly found in bottom ash from grate fired facilities while partition mostly into fly ash from fluidized bed incinerators, especially for plants fuelled by waste wood or ordinary wood chips. There is no specific correlation between input concentration of an element in the waste fuel and fraction partitioned to fly ash. Temperature and chlorine content have significant effects on partitioning characteristics by increasing the formation and vaporization of highly volatile metal chlorides. Zinc and cadmium concentrations in fly ash increase with the incineration temperature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. On The Cusp of the New Spatial Challenges - The Thermal Waste Processing Plant as an Element of Urban Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójtowicz-Wróbel, Agnieszka

    2017-10-01

    The goal of this paper is to answer the question about the current importance of structures associated with the thermal processing of waste within the space of Polish cities and what status can they have in the functional and spatial structure of Polish cities in the future. The construction of thermal waste processing plants in Poland is currently a new and important problem, with numerous structures of this type being built due to increasing care for the natural environment, with the introduction of legal regulations, as well as due to the possibility of obtaining large external funding for the purposes of undertaking pro-environmental spatial initiatives, etc. For this reason, the paper contains research on the increase in the number of thermal waste processing plants in Poland in recent years. The abovementioned data was compared with similar information from other European Union member states. In the group containing Polish thermal waste processing plants, research was performed regarding the stage of the construction of a plant (operating plant, plant under construction, design in a construction phase, etc.). The paper also contains a listing of the functions other than the basic form of use, which is the incineration of waste - similarly to numerous foreign examples - that the environmentally friendly waste incineration plants fulfil in Poland, dividing the additional forms of use into "hard" elements (at the design level, requiring the expansion of a building featuring new elements that are not directly associated with the basic purpose of waste processing) and soft (social, educational, promotional actions, as well as other endeavours that require human involvement, but that do not entail significant design work on the buildings itself, expanding its form of use, etc.) as well as mixed activity, which required design work, but on a relatively small scale. Research was also conducted regarding the placement of thermal waste processing plants within the

  20. Dissolved Concentration Limits of Radioactive Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Chen; E.R. Thomas; F.J. Pearson; P.L. Cloke; T.L. Steinborn; P.V. Brady

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of radioactive elements under possible repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, and measurements made in laboratory experiments and field work. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 radioactive elements (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium), which are important to calculated dose. Model outputs are mainly in the form of look-up tables plus one or more uncertainty terms. The rest are either in the form of distributions or single values. The results of this analysis are fundamental inputs for total system performance assessment to constrain the release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Solubilities of plutonium, neptunium, uranium, americium, actinium, thorium, protactinium, lead, and radium have been re-evaluated using the newly updated thermodynamic database (Data0.ymp.R2). For all of the actinides, identical modeling approaches and consistent environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models in this revision. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, activity coefficients, and selection of solubility controlling phase have been quantified or otherwise addressed. Moreover, a new blended plutonium solubility model has been developed in this revision, which gives a mean solubility that is three orders of magnitude lower than the plutonium solubility model used for the Total System Performance Assessment for the Site Recommendation. Two alternative neptunium solubility models have also been

  1. Dissolved Concentration Limits of Radioactive Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Chen; E.R. Thomas; F.J. Pearson; P.L. Cloke; T.L. Steinborn; P.V. Brady

    2003-06-20

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of radioactive elements under possible repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, and measurements made in laboratory experiments and field work. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 radioactive elements (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium), which are important to calculated dose. Model outputs are mainly in the form of look-up tables plus one or more uncertainty terms. The rest are either in the form of distributions or single values. The results of this analysis are fundamental inputs for total system performance assessment to constrain the release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Solubilities of plutonium, neptunium, uranium, americium, actinium, thorium, protactinium, lead, and radium have been re-evaluated using the newly updated thermodynamic database (Data0.ymp.R2). For all of the actinides, identical modeling approaches and consistent environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models in this revision. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, activity coefficients, and selection of solubility controlling phase have been quantified or otherwise addressed. Moreover, a new blended plutonium solubility model has been developed in this revision, which gives a mean solubility that is three orders of magnitude lower than the plutonium solubility model used for the Total System Performance Assessment for the Site Recommendation. Two alternative neptunium solubility models have also been

  2. Effects of a low severity prescribed fire on water-soluble elements in ash from a cork oak (Quercus suber) forest located in the northeast of the Iberian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, P.; beda, X.; Martin, D.; Mataix-Solera, J.; Guerrero, C.

    2011-01-01

    Wildfire is the major disturbance in Mediterranean forests. Prescribed fire can be an alternative to reduce the amount of fuel and hence decrease the wildfire risk. However the effects of prescribed fire must be studied, especially on ash properties, because ash is an important nutrient source for ecosystem recovery. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of a low severity prescribed fire on water-soluble elements in ash including pH, electrical conductivity (EC), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), potassium (K), aluminum (Al), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), silica (SiO2) and total sulphur (TS). A prescribed fire was conducted in a cork oak (Quercus suber) (Q.S) forest located in the northeast part of the Iberian Peninsula. Samples were collected from a flat plot of 40??70m mainly composed of Q.S and Quercus robur (Q.R) trees. In order to understand the effects of the prescribed fire on the soluble elements in ash, we conducted our data analysis on three data groups: all samples, only Q.S samples and only Q.R samples. All three sample groups exhibited a significant increase in pH, EC (p<0.001), water-soluble Ca, Mg, Na, SiO2 and TS and a decrease in water-soluble Mn, Fe and Zn. Differences were identified between oak species for water-soluble K, Al and Fe. In Q.S samples we registered a significant increase in the first two elements p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively, and a non-significant impact in the third, at p<0.05. In Q.R data we identified a non-significant impact on water-soluble K and Al and a significant decrease in water-soluble Fe (p<0.05). These differences are probably due to vegetation characteristics and burn severity. The fire induced a higher variability in the ash soluble elements, especially in Q.S samples, that at some points burned with higher severity. The increase of pH, EC, Ca, Mg, Na and K will improve soil fertility, mainly in the study area where soils are acidic. The application of this low severity prescribed

  3. Precious metals and rare earth elements in municipal solid waste – Sources and fate in a Swiss incineration plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morf, Leo S., E-mail: leo.morf@bd.zh.ch [Baudirektion Kanton Zürich, Amt für Abfall, Wasser, Energie und Luft, Zurich (Switzerland); Gloor, Rolf; Haag, Olaf [Bachema AG, Schlieren (Switzerland); Haupt, Melanie [Zentrum für nachhaltige Abfall-und Ressourcennutzung ZAR, Hinwil (Switzerland); Skutan, Stefan [Bachema AG, Schlieren (Switzerland); Lorenzo, Fabian Di; Böni, Daniel [Zentrum für nachhaltige Abfall-und Ressourcennutzung ZAR, Hinwil (Switzerland)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► We carefully addressed all the very valuable comments and suggestions of the reviewers. ► We also have shortened the size of the paper and tried simplify it substantially, as requested by the reviewers (introduction 25% reduced!). ► We have decided to take the chance and have replaced the data for the “additional” elements (Cu, Cd, Zn, Pb, Sn, Cr, Ni, Fe, Al) of the earlier MFA (Morf, 2011) with data that belong to the samples of this study. ► We are convinced that with the revision the paper has significantly improved in quality and attractiveness. - Abstract: In Switzerland many kinds of waste, e.g. paper, metals, electrical and electronic equipment are separately collected and recycled to a large extent. The residual amount of municipal solid waste (MSW) has to be thermally treated before final disposal. Efforts to recover valuable metals from incineration residues have recently increased. However, the resource potential of critical elements in the waste input (sources) and their partitioning into recyclable fractions and residues (fate) is unknown. Therefore, a substance flow analysis (SFA) for 31 elements including precious metals (Au, Ag), platinum metal group elements (Pt, Rh) and rare earth elements (La, Ce, etc.) has been conducted in a solid waste incinerator (SWI) with a state-of-the-art bottom ash treatment according to the Thermo-Re® concept. The SFA allowed the determination of the element partitioning in the SWI, as well as the elemental composition of the MSW by indirect analysis. The results show that the waste-input contains substantial quantities of precious metals, such as 0.4 ± 0.2 mg/kg Au and 5.3 ± 0.7 mg/kg Ag. Many of the valuable substances, such as Au and Ag are enriched in specific outputs (e.g. non-ferrous metal fractions) and are therefore recoverable. As the precious metal content in MSW is expected to rise due to its increasing application in complex consumer products, the results of this study are

  4. Precious metals and rare earth elements in municipal solid waste – Sources and fate in a Swiss incineration plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morf, Leo S.; Gloor, Rolf; Haag, Olaf; Haupt, Melanie; Skutan, Stefan; Lorenzo, Fabian Di; Böni, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We carefully addressed all the very valuable comments and suggestions of the reviewers. ► We also have shortened the size of the paper and tried simplify it substantially, as requested by the reviewers (introduction 25% reduced!). ► We have decided to take the chance and have replaced the data for the “additional” elements (Cu, Cd, Zn, Pb, Sn, Cr, Ni, Fe, Al) of the earlier MFA (Morf, 2011) with data that belong to the samples of this study. ► We are convinced that with the revision the paper has significantly improved in quality and attractiveness. - Abstract: In Switzerland many kinds of waste, e.g. paper, metals, electrical and electronic equipment are separately collected and recycled to a large extent. The residual amount of municipal solid waste (MSW) has to be thermally treated before final disposal. Efforts to recover valuable metals from incineration residues have recently increased. However, the resource potential of critical elements in the waste input (sources) and their partitioning into recyclable fractions and residues (fate) is unknown. Therefore, a substance flow analysis (SFA) for 31 elements including precious metals (Au, Ag), platinum metal group elements (Pt, Rh) and rare earth elements (La, Ce, etc.) has been conducted in a solid waste incinerator (SWI) with a state-of-the-art bottom ash treatment according to the Thermo-Re® concept. The SFA allowed the determination of the element partitioning in the SWI, as well as the elemental composition of the MSW by indirect analysis. The results show that the waste-input contains substantial quantities of precious metals, such as 0.4 ± 0.2 mg/kg Au and 5.3 ± 0.7 mg/kg Ag. Many of the valuable substances, such as Au and Ag are enriched in specific outputs (e.g. non-ferrous metal fractions) and are therefore recoverable. As the precious metal content in MSW is expected to rise due to its increasing application in complex consumer products, the results of this study are

  5. Assessment of the important radionuclides in nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1985-10-01

    The relative importance of the various radionuclides contained in nuclear waste has been assessed by consideration of (1) the quantity of each radionuclide present, (2) the Environmental Protection Agency's release limits for radionuclides, (3) how retardation processes such as solubility and sorption affect radionuclie transport, and (4) the physical and chemical forms of radionuclides in the waste. Three types of waste were reviewed: spent fuel, high-level waste, and defense high-level waste. Conditions specific to the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations project potential site at Yucca Mountain were used to describe radionuclide transport. The actinides Am, Pu, Np, and U were identified as the waste elements for which solubility and sorption data were most urgently needed. Other important waste elements were identified as Sr, Cs, C, Ni, Zr, Tc, Th, Ra, and Sn. Under some conditions, radionuclides of three elements (C, Tc, and I) may have high solubility and negligible sorption. The potential for transport of some waste elements (C and I) in the gas phase must also be evaluated for the Yucca Mountain Site. 12 refs., 17 tabs

  6. Soil-to-plant transfer of elements is not linear: Results for five elements relevant to radioactive waste in five boreal forest species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuovinen, Tiina S.; Roivainen, Paeivi, E-mail: paivi.roivainen@uef.fi; Makkonen, Sari; Kolehmainen, Mikko; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2011-12-01

    Element-specific concentration ratios (CRs) assuming that plant uptake of elements is linear are commonly used in radioecological modelling to describe the soil-to-plant transfer of elements. The goal of this study was to investigate the validity of the linearity assumption in boreal forest plants, for which only limited relevant data are available. The soil-to-plant transfer of three essential (Mo, Ni, Zn) and two non-essential (Pb, U) elements relevant to the safety of radioactive waste disposal was studied. Three understory species (blueberry, narrow buckler fern and May lily) and two tree species (Norway spruce and rowan) were included. Examining CRs as a function of soil concentration showed that CR was not constant but decreased with increasing soil concentrations for all elements and plant species. A non-linear equation fitted fairly well with the empirical data; the R{sup 2}-values for this equation were constantly higher than those for the linear fit. The difference between the two fits was most evident at low soil concentrations where the use of constant CRs underestimated transfer from soil to plants. Site-specific factors affected the transfer of Mo and Ni. The results suggested that systematic variation with soil concentrations explains a part of the large variation of empirically determined CRs, and the accuracy of modelling the soil-to-plant transfer might be improved by using non-linear methods. Non-linearity of soil-to-plant transfer has been previously reported for a few different species, elements and environments. The present study systematically tested the linearity assumption for five elements (both essential and non-essential) and in five boreal forest species representing different growth traits and phylogenies. The data supported non-linearity in all cases.

  7. Soil-to-plant transfer of elements is not linear: Results for five elements relevant to radioactive waste in five boreal forest species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuovinen, Tiina S.; Roivainen, Päivi; Makkonen, Sari; Kolehmainen, Mikko; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    Element-specific concentration ratios (CRs) assuming that plant uptake of elements is linear are commonly used in radioecological modelling to describe the soil-to-plant transfer of elements. The goal of this study was to investigate the validity of the linearity assumption in boreal forest plants, for which only limited relevant data are available. The soil-to-plant transfer of three essential (Mo, Ni, Zn) and two non-essential (Pb, U) elements relevant to the safety of radioactive waste disposal was studied. Three understory species (blueberry, narrow buckler fern and May lily) and two tree species (Norway spruce and rowan) were included. Examining CRs as a function of soil concentration showed that CR was not constant but decreased with increasing soil concentrations for all elements and plant species. A non-linear equation fitted fairly well with the empirical data; the R 2 -values for this equation were constantly higher than those for the linear fit. The difference between the two fits was most evident at low soil concentrations where the use of constant CRs underestimated transfer from soil to plants. Site-specific factors affected the transfer of Mo and Ni. The results suggested that systematic variation with soil concentrations explains a part of the large variation of empirically determined CRs, and the accuracy of modelling the soil-to-plant transfer might be improved by using non-linear methods. Non-linearity of soil-to-plant transfer has been previously reported for a few different species, elements and environments. The present study systematically tested the linearity assumption for five elements (both essential and non-essential) and in five boreal forest species representing different growth traits and phylogenies. The data supported non-linearity in all cases.

  8. Behavior of nuclear waste elements during hydrothermal alteration of glassy rhyolite in an active geothermal system: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Seitz, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    The behavior of a group of nuclear waste elements (U, Th, Sr, Zr, Sb, Cs, Ba, and Sm) during hydrothermal alteration of glassy rhyolite is investigated through detailed geochemical analyses of whole rocks, glass and mineral separates, and thermal waters. Significant mobility of U, Sr, Sb, Cs, and Ba is found, and the role of sorption processes in their observed behavior is identified. Th, Zr, and Sm are relatively immobile, except on a microscopic scale. 9 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  9. Finite element code FENIA verification and application for 3D modelling of thermal state of radioactive waste deep geological repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butov, R. A.; Drobyshevsky, N. I.; Moiseenko, E. V.; Tokarev, U. N.

    2017-11-01

    The verification of the FENIA finite element code on some problems and an example of its application are presented in the paper. The code is being developing for 3D modelling of thermal, mechanical and hydrodynamical (THM) problems related to the functioning of deep geological repositories. Verification of the code for two analytical problems has been performed. The first one is point heat source with exponential heat decrease, the second one - linear heat source with similar behavior. Analytical solutions have been obtained by the authors. The problems have been chosen because they reflect the processes influencing the thermal state of deep geological repository of radioactive waste. Verification was performed for several meshes with different resolution. Good convergence between analytical and numerical solutions was achieved. The application of the FENIA code is illustrated by 3D modelling of thermal state of a prototypic deep geological repository of radioactive waste. The repository is designed for disposal of radioactive waste in a rock at depth of several hundred meters with no intention of later retrieval. Vitrified radioactive waste is placed in the containers, which are placed in vertical boreholes. The residual decay heat of radioactive waste leads to containers, engineered safety barriers and host rock heating. Maximum temperatures and corresponding times of their establishment have been determined.

  10. Plutonium solubilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puigdomnech, I.; Bruno, J.

    1991-02-01

    Thermochemical data has been selected for plutonium oxide, hydroxide, carbonate and phosphate equilibria. Equilibrium constants have been evaluated in the temperature range 0 to 300 degrees C at a pressure of 1 bar to T≤100 degrees C and at the steam saturated pressure at higher temperatures. Measured solubilities of plutonium that are reported in the literature for laboratory experiments have been collected. Solubility data on oxides, hydroxides, carbonates and phosphates have been selected. No solubility data were found at temperatures higher than 60 degrees C. The literature solubility data have been compared with plutonium solubilities calculated with the EQ3/6 geochemical modelling programs, using the selected thermodynamic data for plutonium. (authors)

  11. ENHANCED ANAEROBIC DIGESTION OF FOOD WASTE BY SUPPLEMENTING TRACE ELEMENTS: ROLE OF SELENIUM (VI AND IRON (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javkhlan eAriunbaatar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the potential to enhance the anaerobic digestion of food waste FW by supplementing trace elements (Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, Mn, Cu, Se, and Mo individually as well as in cocktails. A series of batch experiments on the biomethane potential of synthetic food waste were performed with low (FW-A and high (FW-B trace element background concentrations prepared in, respectively, Delft (The Netherlands and Tampa (Florida, USA. The most effective trace elements for FW-A were Fe with an increase of 39.2 (± 0.6 % of biomethane production, followed by Se (34.1 ± 5.6 % increase, Ni (26.4 ± 0.2 % increase and Co (23.8 ± 0.2 % increase. For FW-B supplementing these trace elements did not result in enhancement of the biomethane production, except for Se. FW-B had a Se concentration of 1.3 (± 0. 5 µg/gTS, while it was below the detection limit for FW-A. Regardless of the FW source, Se resulted in 30 – 35% increase of biomethane production at a concentration range of 25-50 µg/L (0.32 – 0.63 µM. Volatile fatty acids analysis revealed that TE supplementation enhances their consumption, thus yielding a higher biomethane production. Moreover, additional experiments on sulfide inhibition showed the enhancing effects of trace elements on the anaerobic digestion of food waste were not related with sulfide toxicity, but with the enzymatic reactions and/or microbial biomass aggregation.

  12. Waste Management: A Case Study of Ongoing Traditional Practices at East Calcutta Wetland

    OpenAIRE

    Shaon Raychaudhuri; Madhusmita Mishra; Poulomi Nandy; Ashoke R. Thakur

    2008-01-01

    Calcutta has a unique waste management system which uses the traditional non conventional practice for treating both the solid as well as soluble waste for its 12 million inhabitants . It not only detoxifies the waste but also generates resources for the existing society in form of employment as well as edibles like sufficient vegetable, fish as well as paddy for consumption. The elemental analysis of these products showed no metal toxicity due to their cultivation using waste resource. Thus ...

  13. Trace element partitioning in ashes from boilers firing pure wood or mixtures of solid waste with respect to fuel composition, chlorine content and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saqib, Naeem, E-mail: naeem.saqib@oru.se; Bäckström, Mattias, E-mail: mattias.backstrom@oru.se

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Different solids waste incineration is discussed in grate fired and fluidized bed boilers. • We explained waste composition, temperature and chlorine effects on metal partitioning. • Excessive chlorine content can change oxide to chloride equilibrium partitioning the trace elements in fly ash. • Volatility increases with temperature due to increase in vapor pressure of metals and compounds. • In Fluidized bed boiler, most metals find themselves in fly ash, especially for wood incineration. - Abstract: Trace element partitioning in solid waste (household waste, industrial waste, waste wood chips and waste mixtures) incineration residues was investigated. Samples of fly ash and bottom ash were collected from six incineration facilities across Sweden including two grate fired and four fluidized bed incinerators, to have a variation in the input fuel composition (from pure biofuel to mixture of waste) and different temperature boiler conditions. As trace element concentrations in the input waste at the same facilities have already been analyzed, the present study focuses on the concentration of trace elements in the waste fuel, their distribution in the incineration residues with respect to chlorine content of waste and combustion temperature. Results indicate that Zn, Cu and Pb are dominating trace elements in the waste fuel. Highly volatile elements mercury and cadmium are mainly found in fly ash in all cases; 2/3 of lead also end up in fly ash while Zn, As and Sb show a large variation in distribution with most of them residing in the fly ash. Lithophilic elements such as copper and chromium are mainly found in bottom ash from grate fired facilities while partition mostly into fly ash from fluidized bed incinerators, especially for plants fuelled by waste wood or ordinary wood chips. There is no specific correlation between input concentration of an element in the waste fuel and fraction partitioned to fly ash. Temperature and chlorine

  14. Fiscal 1998 research report on the demand forecast of rare element minerals, recycling technology of rare elements from waste, and substitute rare element minerals; 1998 nendo chosa hokokusho. Kisho genso koseki no juyo yosoku, kisho genso no haikibutsu kara no kaishu gijutsu oyobi daitai kisho genso koseki nado ni kansuru chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Rare element mineral is indispensable material for functionalization of high-tech raw materials. Its deposit is poor, an increase in its future demand is expected, and its information disclosure is insufficient because of strategic important material. To solve these problems, the following were studied systematically, and urgent research themes on rare element minerals were clarified: (1) High-efficiency recycling technology of rare elements, (2) Waste treatment system after recycling of rare elements from the viewpoint of environmental measures, (3) Establishment of the database of rare element minerals, and development of new substitute rare element minerals, and (4) Design method of substitute materials possible to generate various existing functions without any rare elements. Among them, in particular, precise separation of 46 kinds of rare elements from waste of high-tech raw materials, and recycling of rare elements from zinc refining waste and pyrite ore deposit containing copper were pointed out as important themes. (NEDO)

  15. Extraction processes and solvents for recovery of cesium, strontium, rare earth elements, technetium and actinides from liquid radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Boris N.; Esimantovskiy, Vyacheslav M.; Lazarev, Leonard N.; Dzekun, Evgeniy G.; Romanovskiy, Valeriy N.; Todd, Terry A.; Brewer, Ken N.; Herbst, Ronald S.; Law, Jack D.

    2001-01-01

    Cesium and strontium are extracted from aqueous acidic radioactive waste containing rare earth elements, technetium and actinides, by contacting the waste with a composition of a complex organoboron compound and polyethylene glycol in an organofluorine diluent mixture. In a preferred embodiment the complex organoboron compound is chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, the polyethylene glycol has the formula RC.sub.6 H.sub.4 (OCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.n OH, and the organofluorine diluent is a mixture of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of diethylene glycol with at least one of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of ethylene glycol and bis-tetrafluoropropyl formal. The rare earths, technetium and the actinides (especially uranium, plutonium and americium), are extracted from the aqueous phase using a phosphine oxide in a hydrocarbon diluent, and reextracted from the resulting organic phase into an aqueous phase by using a suitable strip reagent.

  16. Decontamination by ultrafiltration of low radioactivity waste water from fuel element fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, H.M.

    1984-01-01

    It could be demonstrated that waste waters which contain uranium in a filterable form, such as laundry and floor-cleaning waste, can be sufficiently decontaminated by means of ultra-filtration. In the case of process waste solutions, which contain uranium in a dissolved form, high decontamination factors could be achieved by means of flocculation or coprecipitation. The following methods were tested: - flocculation with Fe (OH) 3 , - coprecipitation with CaHPO 4 , - precipitation with K 4 (Fe(CN) 6 ). The phosphate precipitation, whereby the uranium is probably coprecipitated as Ca(UO 2 ) 2 (PO 4 ) 2 , was found to be the most reliable method. Difficulties were encountered when complex-forming anions, notably carbonate, oxalate and fluoride were present. These necessitate specific pretreatment steps. Whether ultrafiltration then still remains an economical option must be judged in each individual case. The application of the methods so far developed on combined waste streams remains an object for further research. In combination with a phosphate precipitation, ultrafiltration is a suitable method for the decontamination of low-activity, uranium-contaminated waste waters

  17. Volume reduction of waste contaminated by fission product elements and plutonium using molten salt combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, D.E.; Grantham, L.F.; Paulson, R.B.

    1979-01-01

    In the Molten Salt Combustion Process, transuranic or β-γ organic waste and air are continuously introduced beneath the surface of a sodium carbonate-containing melt at a temperature of about 800 0 C. Complete combustion of the organic material to carbon dioxide and steam occurs without the conversion of nitrogen to nitrogen oxides. The noxious gases formed by combustion of the chloride, sulfur or phosphorus content of the waste instantly react with the melt to form the corresponding sodium compounds. These compounds as well as the ash and radionuclides are retained in the molten salt. The spent salt is either fused cast into an engineered disposal container or processed to recover salt and plutonium. Molten salt combustion reduces the waste to about 2% of its original volume. Many reactor or reprocessing wastes which cannot be incinerated without difficulty are readily combusted in the molten salt. A 50 kg/hr molten salt combustion system is being designed for the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Construction of the combustor started during 1977, and combustor startup was scheduled for the spring of 1978

  18. Behaviour, capture and inertization of some trace elements during combustion of refuse-derived char from municipal solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vassilev, S.V.; Braekman-Danheux, C.; Laurent, P.; Thiemann, T.; Fontana, A. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Central Lab. of Mineralogy and Crystallography

    1999-08-01

    An investigation of refuse-derived char (RDC) generated by thermolysis of municipal solid waste (MSW) was undertaken to elucidate the behaviour of some toxic and potentially toxic trace elements (Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb and Zn) plus Fe during combustion of RDC. About 87% of Sb, 66% of Pb, 60% of Cu and significant parts of Fe{gt}Zn{gt}Ni{gt}Mn{gt}Cr from the RDC are volatile at 1200{degree}C, and their behaviour in the temperature interval 500-1200{degree}C is characterized. The use of sorbents (zeolite, kaolinite, montmorillonite, coals enriched in kaolinite and calcite, and lime plus portlandite) for capture, solidification and inertization of the most volatile elements during combustion of RDC is also described. Perspective sorbents and inertants for a retention of the most volatile Pb, Sb and Cu in RDC ash are kaolinite and montmorillonite or coals enriched in these minerals. In addition, when there is an effective RDC washing (dechlorination and desulphurization), the use of sorbents for capture of some metals could be reduced or even avoided. Recommendations are given for RDC utilization and improvisation of the collection, separation procedures and removal efficiency of some heavy-metal, chloride and sulphate compounds from MSW and RDC prior to their use. The results show that a long-term strategy based on detailed understanding of the source, formation, behaviour and fate of the elements and their modes of occurrence in MSW, RDC and combustion waste residues is required in order to validate a perspective waste pyrolytic processes development. 55 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Leachability of rare earth elements (REEs) from solid wastes generated during chemical processing of monazite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radhakrishnan, Sujata; Pillai, P.M.B.

    2001-01-01

    Studies have been carried out to assess the leachability of REEs from solid wastes generated in monazite processing. Leachability of REEs (La, Ce, Nd, Pr, Sm, Gd) and Y from PbS-Ba(Ra)SO 4 (Mixed cake) and Effluent Treatment Plant cake (calcium hydroxy apatite) has been studied using rain water as the leachant. Studies indicate that 23 -60 % of the REEs gets leached out from the mixed cake in the first 24 hours. From the ETP cake, the percentage of REEs leached out were negligible. The results provide inputs for hazards evaluation in accidental situations resulting in breach of integrity of the waste storages. (author)

  20. Alkaline chemistry of transuranium elements and technetium and the treatment of alkaline radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delegard, C.H.; Peretrukhin, V.F.; Shilov, V.P.; Pikaev, A.K.

    1995-05-01

    Goal of this survey is to generalize the known data on fundamental physical-chemical properties of TRUs and Tc, methods for their isolation, and to provide recommendations that will be useful for partitioning them from alkaline high-level wastes

  1. Alkaline chemistry of transuranium elements and technetium and the treatment of alkaline radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, C.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Peretrukhin, V.F.; Shilov, V.P.; Pikaev, A.K. [Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation). Inst. of Physical Chemistry

    1995-05-01

    Goal of this survey is to generalize the known data on fundamental physical-chemical properties of TRUs and Tc, methods for their isolation, and to provide recommendations that will be useful for partitioning them from alkaline high-level wastes.

  2. Element interactions and soil properties affecting the soil-to-plant transfer of six elements relevant to radioactive waste in boreal forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roivainen, Paeivi; Makkonen, Sari; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2012-01-01

    Cobalt (Co), lead (Pb), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), uranium (U), and zinc (Zn) are among the elements that have radioactive isotopes in radioactive waste. Soil-to-plant transfer is a key process for possible adverse effects if these radionuclides are accidentally released into the environment. The present study aimed at investigating factors affecting such transfer in boreal forest. The plant species studied were blueberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), May lily (Maianthemum bifolium), narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana), rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) and Norway spruce (Picea abies). Regression analyses were carried out to investigate the effects of the chemical composition and physical properties of soil on the soil-to-leaf/needle concentration ratios of Co, Mo, Ni, Pb, U and Zn. Soil potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), phosphorus (P) and sulphur (S) concentrations were the most important factors affecting the soil-to-plant transfer of the elements studied. Soil clay and organic matter contents were found to significantly affect plant uptake of Mo, Pb and U. Knowledge of the effects of these factors is helpful for interpretation of the predictions of radioecological models describing soil-to-plant transfer and for improving such models. (orig.)

  3. Element interactions and soil properties affecting the soil-to-plant transfer of six elements relevant to radioactive waste in boreal forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roivainen, Paeivi; Makkonen, Sari; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, Kuopio (Finland)

    2012-03-15

    Cobalt (Co), lead (Pb), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), uranium (U), and zinc (Zn) are among the elements that have radioactive isotopes in radioactive waste. Soil-to-plant transfer is a key process for possible adverse effects if these radionuclides are accidentally released into the environment. The present study aimed at investigating factors affecting such transfer in boreal forest. The plant species studied were blueberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), May lily (Maianthemum bifolium), narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana), rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) and Norway spruce (Picea abies). Regression analyses were carried out to investigate the effects of the chemical composition and physical properties of soil on the soil-to-leaf/needle concentration ratios of Co, Mo, Ni, Pb, U and Zn. Soil potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), phosphorus (P) and sulphur (S) concentrations were the most important factors affecting the soil-to-plant transfer of the elements studied. Soil clay and organic matter contents were found to significantly affect plant uptake of Mo, Pb and U. Knowledge of the effects of these factors is helpful for interpretation of the predictions of radioecological models describing soil-to-plant transfer and for improving such models. (orig.)

  4. Solubility limits of importance to leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogard, A.; Bentley, G.; Bryant, E.; Duffy, C.; Grisham, J.; Norris, E.; Orth, C.; Thomas, K.

    1981-01-01

    The solubilities of some radionuclides, especially rare earths and actinides, may be an important and controlling factor in leaching of waste forms. These solubilities should be measured accurately as a function of pH and not as a part of a multicomponent system. Individual solubilities should be measured as a function of temperature to determine if a kinetic effect is being observed in the data. A negative temperature coefficient of solubility for actinides and rare earths in water would have important consequences for nuclear reactor safety and for the management of nuclear wastes

  5. Testing contamination risk assessment methods for toxic elements from mine waste sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdaal, A.; Jordan, G.; Szilassi, P.; Kiss, J.; Detzky, G.

    2012-04-01

    Major incidents involving mine waste facilities and poor environmental management practices have left a legacy of thousands of contaminated sites like in the historic mining areas in the Carpathian Basin. Associated environmental risks have triggered the development of new EU environmental legislation to prevent and minimize the effects of such incidents. The Mine Waste Directive requires the risk-based inventory of all mine waste sites in Europe by May 2012. In order to address the mining problems a standard risk-based Pre-selection protocol has been developed by the EU Commission. This paper discusses the heavy metal contamination in acid mine drainage (AMD) for risk assessment (RA) along the Source-Pathway-Receptor chain using decision support methods which are intended to aid national and regional organizations in the inventory and assessment of potentially contaminated mine waste sites. Several recognized methods such as the European Environmental Agency (EEA) standard PRAMS model for soil contamination, US EPA-based AIMSS and Irish HMS-IRC models for RA of abandoned sites are reviewed, compared and tested for the mining waste environment. In total 145 ore mine waste sites have been selected for scientific testing using the EU Pre-selection protocol as a case study from Hungary. The proportion of uncertain to certain responses for a site and for the total number of sites may give an insight of specific and overall uncertainty in the data we use. The Pre-selection questions are efficiently linked to a GIS system as database inquiries using digital spatial data to directly generate answers. Key parameters such as distance to the nearest surface and ground water bodies, to settlements and protected areas are calculated and statistically evaluated using STATGRAPHICS® in order to calibrate the RA models. According to our scientific research results, of the 145 sites 11 sites are the most risky having foundation slope >20o, 57 sites are within distance 66 (class VI

  6. Organic aerosols and inorganic species from post-harvest agricultural-waste burning emissions over northern India: impact on mass absorption efficiency of elemental carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Prashant; Sarin, M M; Sharma, Deepti; Singh, Darshan

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter of ≤ 2.5 μm), collected from a source region [Patiala: 30.2 °N; 76.3 °E; 250 m above mean sea level] of emissions from post-harvest agricultural-waste (paddy-residue) burning in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP), North India, has been studied for its chemical composition and impact on regional atmospheric radiative forcing. On average, organic aerosol mass accounts for 63% of PM2.5, whereas the contribution of elemental carbon (EC) is ∼3.5%. Sulphate, nitrate and ammonium contribute up to ∼85% of the total water-soluble inorganic species (WSIS), which constitutes ∼23% of PM2.5. The potassium-to-organic carbon ratio from paddy-residue burning emissions (KBB(+)/OC: 0.05 ± 0.01) is quite similar to that reported from Amazonian and Savanna forest-fires; whereas non-sea-salt-sulphate-to-OC ratio (nss-SO4(2-)/OC: 0.21) and nss-SO4(2-)/EC ratio of 2.6 are significantly higher (by factor of 5 to 8). The mass absorption efficiency of EC (3.8 ± 1.3 m(2) g(-1)) shows significant decrease with a parallel increase in the concentrations of organic aerosols and scattering species (sulphate and nitrate). A cross plot of OC/EC and nss-SO4(2-)/EC ratios show distinct differences for post-harvest burning emissions from paddy-residue as compared to those from fossil-fuel combustion sources in south-east Asia.

  7. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA

    2004-11-22

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) important to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log (line integral) CO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for all of the actinides. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

  8. Evaluation of Wet Chemical ICP-AES Elemental Analysis Methods using Simulated Hanford Waste Samples-Phase I Interim Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, Charles J.; Edwards, Thomas B.

    2005-01-01

    The wet chemistry digestion method development for providing process control elemental analyses of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Melter Feed Preparation Vessel (MFPV) samples is divided into two phases: Phase I consists of: (1) optimizing digestion methods as a precursor to elemental analyses by ICP-AES techniques; (2) selecting methods with the desired analytical reliability and speed to support the nine-hour or less turnaround time requirement of the WTP; and (3) providing baseline comparison to the laser ablation (LA) sample introduction technique for ICP-AES elemental analyses that is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Phase II consists of: (1) Time-and-Motion study of the selected methods from Phase I with actual Hanford waste or waste simulants in shielded cell facilities to ensure that the methods can be performed remotely and maintain the desired characteristics; and (2) digestion of glass samples prepared from actual Hanford Waste tank sludge for providing comparative results to the LA Phase II study. Based on the Phase I testing discussed in this report, a tandem digestion approach consisting of sodium peroxide fusion digestions carried out in nickel crucibles and warm mixed-acid digestions carried out in plastic bottles has been selected for Time-and-Motion study in Phase II. SRNL experience with performing this analytical approach in laboratory hoods indicates that well-trained cell operator teams will be able to perform the tandem digestions in five hours or less. The selected approach will produce two sets of solutions for analysis by ICP-AES techniques. Four hours would then be allocated for performing the ICP-AES analyses and reporting results to meet the nine-hour or less turnaround time requirement. The tandem digestion approach will need to be performed in two separate shielded analytical cells by two separate cell operator teams in order to achieve the nine-hour or less turnaround

  9. Effects of a low severity prescribed fire on water-soluble elements in ash from a cork oak (Quercus suber) forest located in the northeast of the Iberian Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Ubeda, Xavier; Martin, Deborah; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Guerrero, César

    2011-02-01

    Wildfire is the major disturbance in Mediterranean forests. Prescribed fire can be an alternative to reduce the amount of fuel and hence decrease the wildfire risk. However the effects of prescribed fire must be studied, especially on ash properties, because ash is an important nutrient source for ecosystem recovery. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of a low severity prescribed fire on water-soluble elements in ash including pH, electrical conductivity (EC), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), potassium (K), aluminum (Al), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), silica (SiO(2)) and total sulphur (TS). A prescribed fire was conducted in a cork oak (Quercus suber) (Q.S) forest located in the northeast part of the Iberian Peninsula. Samples were collected from a flat plot of 40×70m mainly composed of Q.S and Quercus robur (Q.R) trees. In order to understand the effects of the prescribed fire on the soluble elements in ash, we conducted our data analysis on three data groups: all samples, only Q.S samples and only Q.R samples. All three sample groups exhibited a significant increase in pH, EC (pfire induced a higher variability in the ash soluble elements, especially in Q.S samples, that at some points burned with higher severity. The increase of pH, EC, Ca, Mg, Na and K will improve soil fertility, mainly in the study area where soils are acidic. The application of this low severity prescribed fire will improve soil nutrient status without causing soil degradation and thus is considered to be a good management strategy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Technical possibilities to support separation of radioactive elements from metallic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerkvall, Johan; Ye, Guozhu; Lindberg, Maria

    2014-01-01

    In the nuclear industry metallic objects can be either surface or bulk contaminated. Surface contaminated objects are often decontaminated by chemical or mechanical means, but are there other possibilities? During melting slags are formed either spontaneously or by adding slag forming compounds. However, one question that frequently arises is: Can all nuclides be separated by adding slag forming compounds? This question is not entirely correct as it is not only the radioactive nuclides that are separated from the metal but all atoms of that element present in the melt, radioactive and stable isotopes alike. Part of the answer lays in thermodynamics. Thermodynamics cannot positively answer the question with yes, as there are also practical and economical aspects to take into account, but if the answer is no there will never be any practical or economical efforts that will override nature. This paper will describe the theoretical baseline for evaluating the possibilities to separate certain elements during the melting process, mainly from steel but other metals will also touched on. The most common elements that have radioactive isotopes of interest is of course cobalt (Co-60, Co-58), but other elements of interest are manganese (Mn-54), strontium (Sr- 90), antimony (Sb-125) and of course heavy elements such as uranium, plutonium and americium. The paper will also describe methods used in the normal metal melting industry to separate elements from the base metal melted. This section will cover practical methods used as well as developed methods that are very seldom used due to time or financial constraints. (authors)

  11. Levels of toxic elements in soils of abandoned waste dump site ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of all the five toxic elements studied, the highest mean concentration (mg/kg) of 133.74±10.60 was recorded for Pb followed by Cr (22.27±3.03), Ni (8.14±0.33) and As (5.97±0.32) in the soils while the least mean concentration of 1.64±0.11 was recorded for Cd. The toxic elements were examined for dependency upon some ...

  12. Demonstration of pyropartitioning process by using genuine high-level liquid waste. Reductive-extraction of actinide elements from chlorination product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uozumi, Koichi; Iizuka, Masatoshi; Kurata, Masaki; Ougier, Michel; Malmbeck, Rikard; Winckel, Stefaan van

    2009-01-01

    The pyropartitioning process separates the minor actinide elements (MAs) together with uranium and plutonium from the high-level liquid waste generated at the Purex reprocessing of spent LWR fuel and introduces them to metallic fuel cycle. For the demonstration of this technology, a series experiment using 520g of genuine high-level liquid waste was started and the conversion of actinide elements to their chlorides was already demonstrated by denitration and chlorination. In the present study, a reductive extraction experiment in molten salt/liquid cadmium system to recover actinide elements from the chlorination product of the genuine high-level liquid waste was performed. The results of the experiment are as following; 1) By the addition of the cadmium-lithium alloy reductant, almost all of plutonium and MAs in the initial high-level liquid waste were recovered in the cadmium phase. It means no mass loss during denitration, chlorination, and reductive-extraction. 2) The separation factor values of plutonium, MAs, and rare-earth fission product elements versus uranium agreed with the literature values. Therefore, actinide elements will be separated from fission product elements in the actual system. Hence, the pyropartitioning process was successfully demonstrated. (author)

  13. The properties of the nano-minerals and hazardous elements: Potential environmental impacts of Brazilian coal waste fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civeira, Matheus S; Pinheiro, Rafael N; Gredilla, Ainara; de Vallejuelo, Silvia Fdez Ortiz; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Ramos, Claudete G; Taffarel, Silvio R; Kautzmann, Rubens M; Madariaga, Juan Manuel; Silva, Luis F O

    2016-02-15

    Brazilian coal area (South Brazil) impacted the environment by means of a large number of coal waste piles emplaced over the old mine sites and the adjacent areas of the Criciúma, Urussanga, and Siderópolis cities. The area studied here was abandoned and after almost 30 years (smokeless visual) some companies use the actual minerals derived from burning coal cleaning rejects (BCCRs) complied in the mentioned area for industry tiles or refractory bricks. Mineralogical and geochemical similarities between the BCCRs and non-anthropogenic geological environments are outlined here. Although no visible flames were observed, this study revealed that auto-combustion existed in the studied area for many years. The presence of amorphous phases, mullite, hematite and other Fe-minerals formed by high temperature was found. There is also pyrite, Fe-sulphates (eg. jarosite) and unburnt coal present, which are useful for comparison purposes. Bad disposal of coal-dump wastes represents significant environmental concerns due to their potential influence on atmosphere, river sediments, soils and as well as on the surface and groundwater in the surroundings of these areas. The present study using advanced analytical techniques were performed to provide an improved understanding of the complex processes related with sulphide-rich coal waste oxidation, spontaneous combustion and mineral formation. It is reporting huge numbers of rare minerals with alunite, montmorillonite, szomolnokite, halotrichite, coquimbite and copiapite at the BCCRs. The data showed the presence of abundant amorphous Si-Al-Fe-Ti as (oxy-)hydroxides and Fe-hydro/oxides with goethite and hematite with various degrees of crystallinity, containing hazardous elements, such as Cu, Cr, Hf, Hg, Mo, Ni, Se, Pb, Th, U, Zr, and others. By Principal Component Analysis (PCA), the mineralogical composition was related with the range of elemental concentration of each sample. Most of the nano-minerals and ultra-fine particles

  14. Volatilization behavior of semivolatile elements in vitrification of high-level liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Hiroshi; Kato, Koh; Takahashi, Takeshi

    1991-11-01

    The effect of temperature on the volatilization of ruthenium, technetium, and selenium was observed in calcination experiments with simulated high-level liquid waste. Technetium and selenium were more volatile as calcining temperature increased. Ruthenium was less volatile when temperature exceeded 300degC. More than 80% of ruthenium that volatilized from room temperature to 500degC occurred between 200 and 300degC. A small amount of ruthenium volatilized above 300degC as well as below 135degC. (author)

  15. Geochemistry of radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    Safe, permanent disposal of radioactive wastes requires isolation of a number of elements including Se, Tc, I, Sr, Cs, Pd, u, Np, Pu and Cm from the environment for a long period of time. The aquatic chemistry of these elements ranges from simple anionic (I - ,IO 3 - ) and cationic (Cs + ,Sr ++ ) forms to multivalent hydrolyzed complexes which can be anionic or cationic (Pu(OH) 2 + ,Pu(OH) 3 + , PuO 2 (CO 3 )(OH) - ,PuO 2 Cl - ,etc.) depending on the chemical environment. The parameters which can affect repository safety are rate of access and composition of grounwater, stability of the waste container, stability of the waste form, rock-water-waste interactons, and dilution and dispersion as the waste moves away from the repository site. Our overall research program on radioactive waste disposal includes corrosion studies of containment systems hydrothermal stability of various waste forms, and geochemical behaviour of various nuclides including solubilities, redox equilibria, hydrolysis, colloid fomation and transport ion exchange equilibria and adsorption on mineral surfaces and irreversible precipitation reactions. This paper discusses the geochemistry of I, Se, Tc, Cs, Sr and the actinide elements and potential mechanisms by which the mobility could be retarded if necessary

  16. Method of removing arsenic and/or other amphoteric elements from sludge and solid waste materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Breemen, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    Abstract of WO 9006820 (A1) The noxious element arsenic may be removed with high efficiency from iron hydroxide sludge by first subjecting that sludge first to a thermal treatment in the presence of air or oxygen and of an alkaline reagent and next extracting the treated material with water. The

  17. Temporal variation of trace elements in waters polluted by municipal solid waste landfill leachate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ettler, V.; Mihaljevič, M.; Matura, M.; Skalková, M.; Šebek, O.; Bezdička, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 3 (2008), s. 274-279 ISSN 0007-4861 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB3111402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : trace elements * landfill leachate * temporal variation Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 0.609, year: 2008

  18. Yttrium separation of Xenotime waste in Pitinga (Brazil), in order to obtain rare earth elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo.

    1996-01-01

    The xenotime (YPO 4 and rare earth elements) found in the mine of Pitinga, Amazonas State, Brazil, has its origin in a primal depository ('eluvio' kind) of cassiterite, having considerable quantities of zirconite, ilmenite, topaz and niobates-tantalates. This xenotime has different characteristics in relation of the depositories that exist in other countries for presenting more concentration of rare earth heavy oxides. The mineralization of this cassiterite is problematic, because of the high level of radioactive elements. In the present work, we will process only the xenotime. The separation of rare earth elements is very difficult due to their great chemical similarity. For a more exactly determination, it is necessary to separate them at least of the macron constituents of the sample. As the Yttrium is considerate one of the rare earth elements, due to its chemical similarity, we can understand the difficulty of a chemical separation, mainly when this one is also a macro constituent of the sample, as in the case of xenotime. The process of separation will be based on the little difference that exists between the constants of complexation and the fluoride. (authors). 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  19. Multi-trace element levels and arsenic speciation in urine of e-waste recycling workers from Agbogbloshie, Accra in Ghana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asante, Kwadwo Ansong [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); CSIR Water Research Institute, P. O. Box AH 38, Achimota, Accra (Ghana); Agusa, Tetsuro [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Biney, Charles Augustus [Volta Basin Authority (VBA), 10 P. O. Box 13621, Ouagadougou 10 (Burkina Faso); Agyekum, William Atuobi; Bello, Mohammed [CSIR Water Research Institute, P. O. Box AH 38, Achimota, Accra (Ghana); Otsuka, Masanari [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Ehime Prefectural Institute of Public Health and Environmental Science, 8-234 Sanban-cho, Matsuyama 790-0003 (Japan); Itai, Takaaki; Takahashi, Shin [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Tanabe, Shinsuke, E-mail: shinsuke@agr.ehime-u.ac.jp [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan)

    2012-05-01

    To understand human contamination by multi-trace elements (TEs) in electrical and electronic waste (e-waste) recycling site at Agbogbloshie, Accra in Ghana, this study analyzed TEs and As speciation in urine of e-waste recycling workers. Concentrations of Fe, Sb, and Pb in urine of e-waste recycling workers were significantly higher than those of reference sites after consideration of interaction by age, indicating that the recycling workers are exposed to these TEs through the recycling activity. Urinary As concentration was relatively high, although the level in drinking water was quite low. Speciation analysis of As in human urine revealed that arsenobetaine and dimethylarsinic acid were the predominant As species and concentrations of both species were positively correlated with total As concentration as well as between each other. These results suggest that such compounds may be derived from the same source, probably fish and shellfish and greatly influence As exposure levels. To our knowledge, this is the first study on human contamination resulting from the primitive recycling of e-waste in Ghana. This study will contribute to the knowledge about human exposure to trace elements from an e-waste site in a less industrialized region so far scantly covered in the literature. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Exposure status of trace elements in e-waste recycling workers was assessed in Ghana. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concentrations of Fe, Sb, and Pb in urine of e-waste workers were significantly higher than those of the reference subjects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study is the first to investigate human contamination arising from primitive recycling of e-waste arguably from Africa.

  20. Multi-trace element levels and arsenic speciation in urine of e-waste recycling workers from Agbogbloshie, Accra in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asante, Kwadwo Ansong; Agusa, Tetsuro; Biney, Charles Augustus; Agyekum, William Atuobi; Bello, Mohammed; Otsuka, Masanari; Itai, Takaaki; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2012-01-01

    To understand human contamination by multi-trace elements (TEs) in electrical and electronic waste (e-waste) recycling site at Agbogbloshie, Accra in Ghana, this study analyzed TEs and As speciation in urine of e-waste recycling workers. Concentrations of Fe, Sb, and Pb in urine of e-waste recycling workers were significantly higher than those of reference sites after consideration of interaction by age, indicating that the recycling workers are exposed to these TEs through the recycling activity. Urinary As concentration was relatively high, although the level in drinking water was quite low. Speciation analysis of As in human urine revealed that arsenobetaine and dimethylarsinic acid were the predominant As species and concentrations of both species were positively correlated with total As concentration as well as between each other. These results suggest that such compounds may be derived from the same source, probably fish and shellfish and greatly influence As exposure levels. To our knowledge, this is the first study on human contamination resulting from the primitive recycling of e-waste in Ghana. This study will contribute to the knowledge about human exposure to trace elements from an e-waste site in a less industrialized region so far scantly covered in the literature. - Highlights: ► Exposure status of trace elements in e-waste recycling workers was assessed in Ghana. ► Concentrations of Fe, Sb, and Pb in urine of e-waste workers were significantly higher than those of the reference subjects. ► This study is the first to investigate human contamination arising from primitive recycling of e-waste arguably from Africa.

  1. Method for the recovery of actinide elements from nuclear reactor waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Delphin, Walter H.; Mason, George W.

    1979-01-01

    A process for partitioning and recovering actinide values from acidic waste solutions resulting from reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels by adding hydroxylammonium nitrate and hydrazine to the waste solution to adjust the valence of the neptunium and plutonium values in the solution to the +4 oxidation state, thus forming a feed solution and contacting the feed solution with an extractant of dihexoxyethyl phosphoric acid in an organic diluent whereby the actinide values, most of the rare earth values and some fission product values are taken up by the extractant. Separation is achieved by contacting the loaded extractant with two aqueous strip solutions, a nitric acid solution to selectively strip the americium, curium and rare earth values and an oxalate solution of tetramethylammonium hydrogen oxalate and oxalic acid or trimethylammonium hydrogen oxalate to selectively strip the neptunium, plutonium and fission product values. Uranium values remain in the extractant and may be recovered with a phosphoric acid strip. The neptunium and plutonium values are recovered from the oxalate by adding sufficient nitric acid to destroy the complexing ability of the oxalate, forming a second feed, and contacting the second feed with a second extractant of tricaprylmethylammonium nitrate in an inert diluent whereby the neptunium and plutonium values are selectively extracted. The values are recovered from the extractant with formic acid.

  2. Method for the recovery of actinide elements from nuclear reactor waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Delphin, W.H.; Mason, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    A process is described for partitioning and recovering actinide values from acidic waste solutions resulting from reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels by adding hydroxylammonium nitrate and hydrazine to the waste solution to adjust the valence of the neptunium and plutonium values in the solution to the +4 oxidation state, thus forming a feed solution and contacting the feed solution with an extractant of dihexoxyethyl phosphoric acid in an organic diluent whereby the actinide values, most of the rare earth values and some fission product values are taken up by the extractant. Separation is achieved by contacting the loaded extractant with two aqueous strip solutions, a nitric acid solution to selectively strip the americium, curium and rare earth values and an oxalate and oxalic acid or trimethylammonium hydrogen oxalate to selectively strip the neptunium, plutonium and fission product values. Uranium values remain in the extractant and may be recovered with a phosphoric acid strip. The neptunium and plutonium values are recovered from the oxalate by adding sufficient nitric acid to destroy the complexing ability of the oxalate, forming a second feed, and contacting the second feed with a second extractant of tricaprylmethylammonium nitrate in an inert diluent whereby the neptunium and plutonium values are selectively extracted. The values are recovered from the extractant with formic acid

  3. Finite-element model evaluation of barrier configurations to reduce infiltration into waste-disposal structures: preliminary results and design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, A.H.; Phillips, S.J.; Adams, M.R.

    1982-09-01

    Barriers to reduce infiltration into waste burial disposal structures (trenches, pits, etc.) may be required to provide adequate waste confinement. The preliminary engineering design of these barriers should consider interrelated barrier performance factors. This paper summarizes preliminary computer simulation activities to further engineering barrier design efforts. Several barrier configurations were conceived and evaluated. Models were simulated for each barrier configuration using a finite element computer code. Results of this preliminary evaluation indicate that barrier configurations, depending on their morphology and materials, may significantly influence infiltration, flux, drainage, and storage of water through and within waste disposal structures. 9 figures

  4. Development of treatment method for stillage residues of liquid radioactive wastes to remove organic substances and transuranium elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudenko, L.I.; Dzhuzha, O.V.; Khan, V.E.

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the study into the laws that govern the process of treating by oxidation the stillage residues of liquid radioactive wastes to remove organic compounds and transuranium elements with the use of hydrogen peroxide, potassium permanganate and subsequent ultra-filtration. The optimum oxidisation regime has been defined on the basis of this study to ensure that the initial dichromate oxidability of LRW's stillage residues decreases from 6,000-9,500 to 500-1,000 mg O/I, whereas the TUE activity associated with the key isotopes is reduced by 74-87 % for 238,239,240 Pu, by 94-95 % for 241 Am, and by 90-95 % for 244 Cm. The concentration of uranium decreases by 94-99 %. It is proposed to implement this method at the Chernobyl NPP site.

  5. The simultaneous neutron and photon interrogation method for fissile and non-fissile element separation in radioactive waste drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jallu, F.; Lyoussi, A.; Passard, C.; Payan, E.; Recroix, H.; Nurdin, G.; Buisson, A.; Allano, J.

    2000-01-01

    Measuring α-emitters such as ( 234,235,236,238 U, 238,239,240,242,244 Pu, 237 Np, 241,243 Am, ...), in solid radioactive waste allows us to quantify the α-activity in a drum and then to classify it. The simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation experiment (SIMPHONIE) method dealt with in this paper, combines both active neutron interrogation and induced photofission interrogation techniques simultaneously. Its purpose is to quantify fissile ( 235 U, 239,241 Pu, ...) and non-fissile ( 236,238 U, 238,240 Pu, ...) elements separately in only one measurement. This paper presents the principle of the method, the experimental setup, and the first experimental results obtained using the DGA/ETCA Linac and MiniLinatron pulsed linear electron accelerators located at Arcueil, France. First studies were carried out with U and Pu bare samples

  6. Elemental analysis of ash residue from combustion of CCA treated wood waste before and after electrodialytic extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2006-01-01

    Element distribution in a combined fly ash and bottom ash from combustion of copper chromate arsenate (CCA) treated wood waste was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDX) before and after electrodialytic extraction. The untreated ash contained various particles, including pieces...... of incompletely combusted wood rich in Cr and Ca, and irregular particles rich in Si, Al and K. Cr was also found incorporated in silica-based matrix particles. As was associated with Ca in porous (char) particles, indicating that Ca-arsenates had been formed during combustion. Cu was associated with Cr...... in the incompletely combusted wood pieces and was also found in almost pure form in a surface layer of some matrix particles – indicating surface condensation of volatile Cu species. In treated ash, Ca and As were no longer found together, indicating that Ca-arsenates had been dissolved due to the electrodialytic...

  7. Electrochemical quantification of some water soluble vitamins in commercial multi-vitamin using poly-amino acid caped by graphene quantum dots nanocomposite as dual signal amplification elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadjou, Nasrin; Hasanzadeh, Mohammad; Omari, Ali

    2017-12-15

    Rapid analyses of some water soluble vitamins (Vitamin B2, B9, and C) in commercial multi vitamins could be routinely performed in analytical laboratories. This study reports on the electropolymerization of a low toxic and biocompatible polymer "poly aspartic acid-graphene quantum dots" as a novel strategy for surface modification of glassy carbon electrode and preparation a new interface for measurement of selected vitamins in commercial multi vitamins. Electrochemical deposition, as a well-controlled synthesis procedure, has been used for subsequently layer-by-layer preparation of graphene quantum dots nanostructures on a poly aspartic acid using cyclic voltammetry techniques in the regime of -1.5 to 2 V. The field emission scanning electron microscopy indicated immobilization of graphene quantum dots onto poly aspartic acid film. The modified electrode possessed as an effective electroactivity for detection of water soluble vitamins by using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and differential pulse voltammetry. Enhancement of peak currents is ascribed to the fast heterogeneous electron transfer kinetics that arise from the synergistic coupling between the excellent properties of poly aspartic acid as semiconducting polymer, graphene quantum dots as high density of edge plane sites and chemical modification. Under the optimized analysis conditions, the prepared sensor for detection of VB2, VB9, and VC showed a low limit of quantification 0.22, 0.1, 0.1 μM, respectively. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. New technique for quantification of elemental hg in mine wastes and its implications for mercury evasion into the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jew, A.D.; Kim, C.S.; Rytuba, J.J.; Gustin, M.S.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2011-01-01

    Mercury in the environment is of prime concern to both ecosystem and human health. Determination of the molecular-level speciation of Hg in soils and mine wastes is important for understanding its sequestration, mobility, and availability for methylation. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy carried out under ambient P-T conditions has been used in a number of past studies to determine Hg speciation in complex mine wastes and associated soils. However, this approach cannot detect elemental (liquid) mercury in Hg-polluted soils and sediments due to the significant structural disorder of liquid Hg at ambient-temperature. A new sample preparation protocol involving slow cooling through the crystallization temperature of Hg(0) (234 K) results in its transformation to crystalline ??-Hg(0). The presence and proportion of Hg(0), relative to other crystalline Hg-bearing phases, in samples prepared in this way can be quantified by low-temperature (77 K) EXAFS spectroscopy. Using this approach, we have determined the relative concentrations of liquid Hg(0) in Hg mine wastes from several sites in the California Coast Range and have found that they correlate well with measured fluxes of gaseous Hg released during light and dark exposure of the same samples, with higher evasion ratios from samples containing higher concentrations of liquid Hg(0). Two different linear relationships are observed in plots of the ratio of Hg emission under light and dark conditions vs % Hg(0), corresponding to silica-carbonate- and hot springs-type Hg deposits, with the hot springs-type samples exhibiting higher evasion fluxes than silica-carbonate type samples at similar Hg(0) concentrations. Our findings help explain significant differences in Hg evasion data for different mine sites in the California Coast Range. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  9. The immobilisation of nuclear waste materials containing different alkali elements into single-phase NZP based ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pet'kov, V.I.; Orlova, A.I.; Trubach, I.G.; Demarin, T.; Kurazhkovskaya, V.S.

    2002-01-01

    The NZP matrix, which is based on NaZr 2 (PO 4 ) 3 , is a viable candidate for nuclear waste immobilisation. We examined the possibilities of incorporating of alkali elements into the NZP host structure, investigated the conditions of the crystalline solution formation, and determined the regions of the NZP structure compositional stability for a series of complex orthophosphates of titanium or zirconium and alkali elements A m-x A' x M 2-(m-1)/4 (PO 4 ) 3 with m = 1, 3, or 5 and 0 ≤ x ≤ m, where A and A' are mutually different alkali elements and M is Ti or Zr. The phosphates containing Li-Na, Li-K, Li-Rb, Li-Cs, Na-K, Na-Rb, Na-Cs, K-Rb, K-Cs and Rb-Cs pairs were prepared and studied by X-ray powder analysis, IR spectroscopy, simultaneous DTA-TG measurements and electron microprobe analyses. In the systems studied, wide ranges of crystalline phosphate solutions with tailored alkali metal substitutions were formed owing to the large number of sites available for substitution and high degree of flexibility in the NZP structure. It was found that introduction of the less expensive and lighter Ti in the host phase in place of the commonly used Zr permits cheaper ceramics, having in some cases larger alkali element contents, to be obtained. The phases containing alkali metals can be formed, for instance, during phosphate solidification of molten alkali chlorides with radioactive nuclides from the pyroelectrochemical technologies of nuclear fuel recycling

  10. Effects of trace element addition on process stability during anaerobic co-digestion of OFMSW and slaughterhouse waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moestedt, J; Nordell, E; Shakeri Yekta, S; Lundgren, J; Martí, M; Sundberg, C; Ejlertsson, J; Svensson, B H; Björn, A

    2016-01-01

    This study used semi-continuous laboratory scale biogas reactors to simulate the effects of trace-element addition in different combinations, while degrading the organic fraction of municipal solid waste and slaughterhouse waste. The results show that the combined addition of Fe, Co and Ni was superior to the addition of only Fe, Fe and Co or Fe and Ni. However, the addition of only Fe resulted in a more stable process than the combined addition of Fe and Co, perhaps indicating a too efficient acidogenesis and/or homoacetogenesis in relation to a Ni-deprived methanogenic population. The results were observed in terms of higher biogas production (+9%), biogas production rates (+35%) and reduced VFA concentration for combined addition compared to only Fe and Ni. The higher stability was supported by observations of differences in viscosity, intraday VFA- and biogas kinetics as well as by the 16S rRNA gene and 16S rRNA of the methanogens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Transport of elemental mercury in the unsaturated zone from a waste disposal site in an arid region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walvoord, Michelle Ann; Andraski, Brian J.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    Mercury contained in buried landfill waste may be released via upward emission to the atmosphere or downward leaching to groundwater. Data from the US Geological Survey’s Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS) in arid southwestern Nevada reveal another potential pathway of Hg release: long-distance (102 m) lateral migration of elemental Hg (Hg0) through the unsaturated zone. Gas collected from multiple depths from two instrumented boreholes that sample the entire 110-m unsaturated zone thickness and are located 100 and 160 m away from the closest waste burial trench exhibit gaseous Hg concentrations of up to 33 and 11 ng m−3, respectively. The vertical distribution of gaseous Hg in the borehole closest to the disposal site shows distinct subsurface peaks in concentration at depths of 1.5 and 24 m that cannot be explained by radial diffusive transport through a heterogeneous layered unsaturated zone. The inability of current models to explain gaseous Hg distribution at the ADRS highlights the need to advance the understanding of gas-phase contaminant transport in unsaturated zones to attain a comprehensive model of landfill Hg release.

  12. Behavior of rare earth elements in fractured aquifers: an application to geological disposal criteria for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Gu; Kim, Yong Je; Lee, Kil Yong; Kim, Kun Han

    2003-01-01

    An understanding of the geochemistry of potential host rocks is very important in the site evaluation for construction of an underground geologic repository for radioactive waste. Because of similar valence and ionic radii and high similarity in electronic structure with trivalent actinides (such as Am 3+ and Cm 3+ ), the rare earth elements (REEs) have been used to predict the behavior of actinide-series elements in solution (Runde et al., 1992). For Am and Cm, which occur only in the trivalent states in most waste-disposal repository environments, the analogy with the REEs is particularly relevant. In order to discuss the behavior of REEs in geological media and to deduce the behavior of actinides in geological environments based on the REE abundance, and to provide an useful tool in deciding an optimum geological condition for radioactive disposal, we estimated the REE abundance from various kinds of fractured rock type. In fractured granitic aquifer, chondrite-normalized REE pattern show Eu positive anomaly due to fracture-filling calcite precipitation. However, in fractured meta-basaltic and volcanic tuffaceous aquifer, REE pattern do not show the change of Eu anomaly due to fracture-filling calcite precipitation. Eu shows very similar properties such as cohesive energy, ionic radii with coordination number compared to Am. Therefore, if we consider the Eu behavior in fractured rocks and the similar physical/chemical properties of Eu and Am, together, our results strongly suggest that Eu is a very useful analogue for predicting the behavior of Am in geological environment

  13. Data base for a site-specific migration analysis radioactive elements out of a waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadermann, J

    1981-11-01

    Migration analysis is of considerable importance in long-term safety analysis of radioactive waste repositories. In a first step our plans are to calculate transport of radionuclides using data - as far as possible - for an undisturbed hydrogeology. Thereby a reference case is defined. In a later step, possible events and processes can be considered leading to a deviation from the reference case. The present work gives the data base for a selected part of a comprehensive geosphere transport calculation. We restrict ourselves to a critical evaluation of parameters pertinent to the migration analysis of the /sup 245/Cm chain. This includes the important nuclide /sup 237/Np. For the first time we are able to perform a site specific calculation for repositories planned in deep geologic formations in Switzerland. The well-known fact that the data basis is extremely sparse is pointed out once more and concretized in detail.

  14. Applications and mechanisms of laser ablation for elemental analysis of nuclear wastes and contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langford, S.C.; Dickinson, J.T.

    1996-01-01

    Survey methods for compositional analysis of nuclear wastes and contaminated soils are under development to support characterization prior to treatment and continued monitoring during remediation. Laser ablation in conjunction with optical spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy are attractive because of the safety and convenience of minimal sample handling and very small sampling volume. However, the signal intensities in analytic applications depend sensitively on the physical state of the sample (e.g., particle morphology, defect concentration, impurities, and presence of liquids). In this work, the authors examine how solid and condensed state properties of the sample affect the laser-substrate interaction, and the dynamic electronic, physical, and chemical processes which ultimately generate the signals that are detected for analytic purposes

  15. Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovard, Pierre

    The origin of the wastes (power stations, reprocessing, fission products) is determined and the control ensuring the innocuity with respect to man, public acceptance, availability, economics and cost are examined [fr

  16. Mineral contents and their solubility on calcium carbonat calcite nanocrystals from cockle shell powder (Anadara granosa Linn)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widyastuti, S.; Pramushinta, I. A.

    2018-03-01

    Prepared and characterized calcium carbonat calcite nanocrystals improves solubility. Calcium carbonat calcite nanocrystals were synthesized using precipitation method from the waste of blood clam cockle shells (Anadara granosa Linn). This study was conducted to analyze mineral composition of nanocrystals calcium carbonat calcite cockle (Anadara granosa) shell for calcium fortification of food applications and to evaluate the solubilities of Calsium and Phospor. The sample of nanocrystals from cockle shells was evaluated to determine the content of 11 macro-and micro-elements. These elements are Calcium (Ca), Magnesium (Mg), Sodium (Na), Phosphorus (P), Potassium (K), Ferrum (Fe), Copper (Cu), Nickel (Ni), Zink (Zn), Boron (B) and Silica (Si)). Cockleshell powders were found to contain toxic elements below detectable levels. The solubilities of Calcium and Phospor were p<0.05.

  17. REDOX state analysis of platinoid elements in simulated high-level radioactive waste glass by synchrotron radiation based EXAFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Yoshihiro, E-mail: okamoto.yoshihiro@jaea.go.jp [Condensed Matter Chemistry Group, Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Shiwaku, Hideaki [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo-cho, Hyogo 679-5143 (Japan); Nakada, Masami [Nuclear Engineering Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Komamine, Satoshi; Ochi, Eiji [Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited, 4-108 Aza Okitsuke, Oaza Obuchi, Rokkasho-mura, Aomori 030-3212 (Japan); Akabori, Mitsuo [Nuclear Engineering Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2016-04-01

    Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) analyses were performed to evaluate REDOX (REDuction and OXidation) state of platinoid elements in simulated high-level nuclear waste glass samples prepared under different conditions of temperature and atmosphere. At first, EXAFS functions were compared with those of standard materials such as RuO{sub 2}. Then structural parameters were obtained from a curve fitting analysis. In addition, a fitting analysis used a linear combination of the two standard EXAFS functions of a given elements metal and oxide was applied to determine ratio of metal/oxide in the simulated glass. The redox state of Ru was successfully evaluated from the linear combination fitting results of EXAFS functions. The ratio of metal increased at more reducing atmosphere and at higher temperatures. Chemical form of rhodium oxide in the simulated glass samples was RhO{sub 2} unlike expected Rh{sub 2}O{sub 3}. It can be estimated rhodium behaves according with ruthenium when the chemical form is oxide.

  18. Doping influence by some transition elements on the irradiation effects in nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florent, Olivier

    2006-06-01

    High-level waste glasses are submitted to auto-irradiation. Modelling it using external irradiations on simple glasses revealed defects production and non negligible structural changes. This thesis aims at determining the impact of a more complex composition on these effects, especially the influence of adding polyvalent transition metals. Silicate, soda-lime and alumino-borosilicate glasses are doped with different iron, chromium and manganese concentrations then β irradiated at different doses up to 10 9 Gy. Non doped glasses show an increase of their density and polymerisation coupled with a molecular oxygen and point defects production. Adding 0.16 mol% Fe decreases the amount of defects by 85 % and all irradiation effects. A Fe 3+ reduction is also observed by EPR, optical absorption and indirectly by Raman spectroscopy. A higher than 0.32 mol% Fe concentration causes complete blockage of the evolution of polymerisation, density and defect production. The same results are obtained on chromium or manganese doped glasses. An original in situ optical absorption device shows the quick decrease of Fe 3+ amount to a 25 % lower level during irradiation. Stopping irradiation causes a lower decrease of 65 %, suggesting a dynamic (h 0 /e-) consuming equilibrium. He + and Kr 3+ ions and γ irradiated glasses tend to confirm these phenomena for all kind of irradiation with electronic excitations. (author)

  19. Theoretical study of trivalent element complexes for the nuclear waste reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, L.

    2007-10-01

    Current energetic and environmental concerns have made the nuclear waste reprocessing to be a major issue in numerous countries. One avenue to treat nuclear spent fuel requires separating selectively trivalent minor actinides An (Am 3+ , Cm 3+ ) from lanthanides Ln. In this regard, nitrogen extractants are under study. Their selectivity toward actinides is still unclear, but could be the result of enhanced covalency effects with trivalent minor actinides with respect to lanthanides (III). In this thesis, we have performed DFT calculations (Density Functional Theory) to study covalency effects within the actinide-ligand bond, following three main axes of research: advanced study of the nature of the chemical bonding, spectroscopic characterization of covalency, and preliminary tests of ab initio molecular dynamics for future calculations in solvent. Methods that are not regularly applied to trivalent actinides complexes have been used: topological methods, TDDFT, LDDFT, ab initio molecular dynamics. We have managed to show that the selectivity of the BTP ligand - the most effective An/Ln extractant to date - comes at least for a part from stronger covalency effects within the An-BTP bond with respect to the Ln-BTP bond, which has never been proved before. (author)

  20. Effects of aqueous-soluble organic compounds on the removal of selected radionuclides from high-level waste part I: Distribution of Sr, Cs, and Tc onto 18 absorbers from an irradiated, organic-containing leachate simulant for Hanford Tank 101-SY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    Many of the radioactive waste storage tanks at U.S. Department of Energy facilities contain organic compounds that have been degraded by radiolysis and chemical reactions. In this investigation, we measured the effect of some aqueous-soluble organic compounds on the sorption of strontium, cesium, and technetium onto 18 absorbers that offer high sorption of strontium from organic-free solutions. For our test solution we used a leachate from a simulated slurry for Hanford Tank 101-SY that initially contained ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and then was gamma-irradiated to 34 Mrads. We measured distribution coefficients (Kds) for each element/absorber combination for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to obtain information about sorption kinetics. To facilitate comparisons, we include Kd values for these same element/absorber combinations from three organic-free simulant solutions. The Kd values for strontium sorption from the simulant that contained the degraded organics usually decreased by large factors, whereas the Kd values for cesium and technetium sorption were relatively unaffected

  1. Effects of soluble organic complexants and their degradation products on the removal of selected radionuclides from high-level waste. Part II: Distributions of Sr, Cs, Tc, and Am onto 32 absorbers from four variations of Hanford tank 101-SY simulant solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

    1995-04-01

    Many of the radioactive waste storage tanks at U.S. Department of Energy facilities contain organic compounds that have been degraded by radiolysis and chemical reactions during decades of storage. In this second part of our three-part investigation of the effects of soluble organic complexants and their degradation products, we measured the sorption of strontium, cesium, technetium, and americium onto 32 absorbers that offer high sorption of these elements in the absence of organic complexants. The four solutions tested were (1) a simulant for a 3:1 dilution of Hanford Tank 101-SY contents that initially contained ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), (2) this simulant after gamma-irradiation to 34 Mrads, (3) the unirradiated simulant after treatment with a hydrothermal organic-destruction process, and (4) the irradiated simulant after hydrothermal processing. For each of 512 element/absorber/solution combinations, we measured distribution coefficients (Kds) twice for each period for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to obtain information about sorption kinetics. On the basis of our 3,072 measured Kd values, the sorption of strontium and americium is significantly decreased by the organic components of the simulant solutions, whereas the sorption of cesium and technetium appears unaffected by the organic components of the simulant solutions

  2. Final report on fabrication and study of SYNROC containing radioactive waste elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeve, K.D.; Levins, D.M.; Seatonberry, B.W.; Ryan, R.K.; Hart, K.P.; Stevens, G.T.

    1987-01-01

    Two facilities for the fabrication and testing of Synroc samples containing separate additions of the transuranic actinides americium, plutonium, curium and neptunium, a fission product solution, and two radioisotopes of caesium and strontium were designed, built and operated by the AAEC at the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories. Twenty-one 75 g batches of radioactive Synroc were made and representative samples were characterised by alpha track etching, scanning electron microscopy and aqueous leach testing, mostly at 70 deg C. Where comparisons were possible, radioactive fission products behaved as expected from non-radioactive tests. The leaching behaviour of the actinides was complex but as a group they were the least leachable of all the elements studied

  3. Elevated standard metabolic rate in a freshwater shrimp (Palaeomonetes paludosus) exposed to trace element-rich coal combustion waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, C.L. [University of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab.

    1998-12-01

    A transplant experiment was conducted to determine whether standard metabolic rate (SMR) of a freshwater shrimp (Palaeomonetes paludosus) would be affected by exposure to trace element-enriched coal combustion waste (coal ash). Shrimp were transplanted into replicate cages in a coal ash-polluted site and a reference site for 8 months. The coal ash-polluted site was characterized by elevated sediment concentrations of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Se compared to sediments in the reference site. After 8 months in the study sites, shrimp in the polluted site appeared to have accumulated As, Cd and Se from the habitat, but there were on differences in survival between the study sites. However, mean SMR of shrimp (measured as O{sub 2} consumption at rest) held in the polluted site was 51% higher than mean SMR of shrimp held in the reference site. The elevation in SMR indicates that the energetic costs of maintenance are greater for shrimp chronically exposed to the coal-ash polluted enviorment than shrimp in the reference site. It is likely, therefore, that other physiological or behavioral processes may be modified in the pollution-exposed individuals to compensate for the increased energy demands for maintenance. Recent studies have reported similar elevations in SMR in an amphibian and a reptile chronically exposed to coal ash. Analogous physiological responses in such taxonomically diverse animals (a crustacean, an amphibian, and a reptile) indicate that elevated SMR may be a general response by many types of organisms exposed to the mixture of trace elements characteristic of coal ash. The relationships among pollution-induced elevations in maintenance expenditures, long-term health of individuals, and population-level parameters require further attention. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Radionuclide solubility control by solid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, F.; Klinkenberg, M.; Rozov, K.; Bosbach, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. of Energy and Climate Research - Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety (IEK-6); Vinograd, V. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Geosciences

    2015-07-01

    The migration of radionuclides in the geosphere is to a large extend controlled by sorption processes onto minerals and colloids. On a molecular level, sorption phenomena involve surface complexation, ion exchange as well as solid solution formation. The formation of solid solutions leads to the structural incorporation of radionuclides in a host structure. Such solid solutions are ubiquitous in natural systems - most minerals in nature are atomistic mixtures of elements rather than pure compounds because their formation leads to a thermodynamically more stable situation compared to the formation of pure compounds. However, due to a lack of reliable data for the expected scenario at close-to equilibrium conditions, solid solution systems have so far not been considered in long-term safety assessments for nuclear waste repositories. In recent years, various solid-solution aqueous solution systems have been studied. Here we present state-of-the art results regarding the formation of (Ra,Ba)SO{sub 4} solid solutions. In some scenarios describing a waste repository system for spent nuclear fuel in crystalline rocks {sup 226}Ra dominates the radiological impact to the environment associated with the potential release of radionuclides from the repository in the future. The solubility of Ra in equilibrium with (Ra,Ba)SO{sub 4} is much lower than the one calculated with RaSO{sub 4} as solubility limiting phase. Especially, the available literature data for the interaction parameter W{sub BaRa}, which describes the non-ideality of the solid solution, vary by about one order of magnitude (Zhu, 2004; Curti et al., 2010). The final {sup 226}Ra concentration in this system is extremely sensitive to the amount of barite, the difference in the solubility products of the end-member phases, and the degree of non-ideality of the solid solution phase. Here, we have enhanced the fundamental understanding regarding (1) the thermodynamics of (Ra,Ba)SO{sub 4} solid solutions and (2) the

  5. Efficient anaerobic mono-digestion of N-rich slaughterhouse waste: influence of ammonia, temperature and trace elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortner, Markus; Leitzinger, Kerstin; Skupien, Sören; Bochmann, Günther; Fuchs, Werner

    2014-12-01

    Three mono-digestion experiments treating slaughterhouse waste with high TKN concentration (∼11g/kg) were applied in lab-scale at mesophilic and psychrophilic conditions to study the impact of high ammonia concentrations and additives. Precipitation of sulphur by addition of ferrous chloride did not influence process behaviour, whereas supplementation of trace elements significantly improved process stability by reducing volatile fatty acid concentration towards zero. The limit of NH4-N concentration causing a rise of VFAs to 19,000mg/l and reduction of methane by 25% was found between 7.7 and 9.1g/kg which correspond to NH3 concentrations of 830-1060mg/l. Psychrophilic operation (25°C) lowered inhibitory NH3 concentration to 140mg/l, but process performance was stable only at low OLR of 0.4kgVS/m(3)d. Robust performance at highest possible NH4-N concentration (7.7g/kg), low VFA accumulation and satisfying methane yield of about 280Nm(3)/t COD was observed at OLR of 2.5kgVS/m(3)d at 37°C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Studies on the separation and purification of strontium from the highly radioactive waste flow of fuel element reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuerker, A.

    1989-10-01

    The quantity of spent fuel elements is increasing due to the extended peaceful uses of nuclear energy. Of the numerous fission products, strontium has an interesting application potential as a radiation or energy source for utilization in various industrial fields. A necessary condition for its use is its isolation in high radiochemical purity from the highly radioactive waste flow of the Purex process. In the present study, precipitation and coprecipitation reactions, and in particular ion exchange reactions, were chosen from among the various possible chemical and physical separation methods and examined with respect to their suitability for a selective separation of strontium from the other fission products. In selecting separation materials, particularly with respect to radiation resistance, thermal stability and selectivity, polyantimonic acid proved to be the best absorbent (even in a very acid medium) for strontium. Furthermore, the behaviour of the most important radionuclides was studied with respect to the denitration reaction from a 5 molar nitric acid solution. On the basis of the high demands made on the purity of the product, a method was developed by combining lead sulphate carrier precipitation with an ion exchange reaction on polyantimonic acid and is shown in a flow chart. (orig.) [de

  7. Materials characterization of radioactive waste forms using a multi-element detection method based on the instrumental neutron activation analysis. MEDINA; Stoffliche Charakterisierung radioaktiver Abfallprodukte durch ein Multi-Element-Analyseverfahren basierend auf der instrumentellen Neutronen-Aktivierungs-Analyse. MEDINA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havenith, Andreas Wilhelm

    2015-07-01

    Radioactive waste has to meet the specifications and acceptance criteria defined by national regulatory and management authorities for its intermediate and final storage. In Germany the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz - BfS) has established waste acceptance requirements for the Konrad repository. Konrad is the disposal for radioactive waste with negligible heat generation and is located near the city of Salzgitter and is currently under construction. It will start operation not before the year 2021. The waste-acceptance-requirements are derived from a site-specific safety assessment. They include specific requirements on waste forms, packaging as well as limitations to activities of individual radionuclides and limitations to masses of non-radioactive harmful substances. The amount of chemically toxic elements in the waste is limited in order to avoid pollution of underground water reserves. To comply with these requirements every waste package has to be characterised in its radiological and chemical composition. This characterisation can be performed on the basis of existing documentation or, if the documentation is insufficient, on further analytical analysis. Segmented or integral gamma-scanning as well as active or passive neutron counting are used worldwide as the standard measurement methods for the radiological characterisation and quality checking of radioactive waste. These techniques determine the isotope specific activity of waste packages, but they do not allow the detection of non-radioactive hazardous substances inside the waste packages. Against this background the Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Technology Transfer (NET) at RWTH Aachen University and the Institute of Safety Research and Reactor Technology at Forschungszentrum Juelich jointly develop an innovative non-destructive analytical technique called MEDINA - ''Multi-Element Detection based on Instrumental Neutron Activation'' for

  8. Type of dietary fibre (soluble versus insoluble) influences digestion, faeces characteristics and faecal waste production in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amirkolaie, A.K.; Leenhouwers, J.I.; Verreth, J.A.J.; Schrama, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    The physico-chemical properties of nutrients influence the physical characteristics of faeces and thus may affect waste removal efficiency. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of type of non-starch polysaccharide (NSP) on digesta viscosity, faeces recovery and nutrient digestibility in

  9. Hydrogen solubility in austenite of Fe-Ni-Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhirnova, V.V.; Mogutnov, B.M.; Tomilin, I.A.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen solubility in Fe-Ni-Cr alloys at 600-1000 deg C is determined. Hydrogen solubility in ternary alloys can not be predicted on the basis of the data on its solubility in binary Fe-Ni, Fe-Cr alloys. Chromium and nickel effect on hydrogen solubility in iron is insignificant in comparison with the effect of these elements on carbon or nitrogen solubility [ru

  10. Scientific investigation plan for NNWSI WBS element 1.2.2.5.L: NNWSI waste package performance assessment: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggert, K.G.; O'Connell, W.J.; Lappa, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Waste package performance assessment contains three broad categories of activities. These activities are: (1) development of a hydrothermal flow and transport model to test concepts to be used in establishing boundary conditions for performance calculations, and to interface EBS release calculations with total system performance calculations; (2) development of a waste package systems model to provide integrated deterministic assessments of performance and analyses of waste package designs; and (3) development of an uncertainty methodology for combination with the system model to perform probabilistic reliability and performance analysis waste package designs. The first category contains activities that aid in determining the scope of a separate, simplified set of hydrologic calculations needed to characterize the waste package environment for performance assessment calculations. The last two activity categories are directly concerned with waste package performance calculations. A rationale for each activity under these groups is presented. All of the activities of performance assessment are either code development or analyses of waste package problems

  11. Combined Waste Form Cost Trade Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gombert, Dirk; Piet, Steve; Trickel, Timothy; Carter, Joe; Vienna, John; Ebert, Bill; Matthern, Gretchen

    2008-01-01

    A new generation of aqueous nuclear fuel reprocessing, now in development under the auspices of the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), separates fuel into several fractions, thereby partitioning the wastes into groups of common chemistry. This technology advance enables development of waste management strategies that were not conceivable with simple PUREX reprocessing. Conventional wisdom suggests minimizing high level waste (HLW) volume is desirable, but logical extrapolation of this concept suggests that at some point the cost of reducing volume further will reach a point of diminishing return and may cease to be cost-effective. This report summarizes an evaluation considering three groupings of wastes in terms of cost-benefit for the reprocessing system. Internationally, the typical waste form for HLW from the PUREX process is borosilicate glass containing waste elements as oxides. Unfortunately several fission products (primarily Mo and the noble metals Ru, Rh, Pd) have limited solubility in glass, yielding relatively low waste loading, producing more glass, and greater disposal costs. Advanced separations allow matching the waste form to waste stream chemistry, allowing the disposal system to achieve more optimum waste loading with improved performance. Metals can be segregated from oxides and each can be stabilized in forms to minimize the HLW volume for repository disposal. Thus, a more efficient waste management system making the most effective use of advanced waste forms and disposal design for each waste is enabled by advanced separations and how the waste streams are combined. This trade-study was designed to juxtapose a combined waste form baseline waste treatment scheme with two options and to evaluate the cost-benefit using available data from the conceptual design studies supported by DOE-NE

  12. Materials characterization of radioactive waste forms using a multi-element detection method based on the instrumental neutron activation analysis. MEDINA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havenith, Andreas Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive waste has to meet the specifications and acceptance criteria defined by national regulatory and management authorities for its intermediate and final storage. In Germany the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz - BfS) has established waste acceptance requirements for the Konrad repository. Konrad is the disposal for radioactive waste with negligible heat generation and is located near the city of Salzgitter and is currently under construction. It will start operation not before the year 2021. The waste-acceptance-requirements are derived from a site-specific safety assessment. They include specific requirements on waste forms, packaging as well as limitations to activities of individual radionuclides and limitations to masses of non-radioactive harmful substances. The amount of chemically toxic elements in the waste is limited in order to avoid pollution of underground water reserves. To comply with these requirements every waste package has to be characterised in its radiological and chemical composition. This characterisation can be performed on the basis of existing documentation or, if the documentation is insufficient, on further analytical analysis. Segmented or integral gamma-scanning as well as active or passive neutron counting are used worldwide as the standard measurement methods for the radiological characterisation and quality checking of radioactive waste. These techniques determine the isotope specific activity of waste packages, but they do not allow the detection of non-radioactive hazardous substances inside the waste packages. Against this background the Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Technology Transfer (NET) at RWTH Aachen University and the Institute of Safety Research and Reactor Technology at Forschungszentrum Juelich jointly develop an innovative non-destructive analytical technique called MEDINA - ''Multi-Element Detection based on Instrumental Neutron Activation'' for

  13. Redistribution of elements between wastes and organic-bearing material in the dispersion train of gold-bearing sulfide tailings: Part I. Geochemistry and mineralogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saryg-Ool, B Yu; Myagkaya, I N; Kirichenko, I S; Gustaytis, M A; Shuvaeva, O V; Zhmodik, S M; Lazareva, E V

    2017-03-01

    Migration and redistribution of elements during prolonged interaction of cyanide wastes with the underlying natural organic-bearing material have been studied in two ~40cm deep cores that sample primary ores and their weathering profile (wastes I and II, respectively) in the dispersion train of gold-bearing sulfide tailings in Siberia. Analytical results of SR-XRF, whole-rock XRF, AAS, CHNS, and SEM measurements of core samples show high K, Sr, Ti, and Fe enrichments and correlation of P 2 O 5 and Mn with LOI and C org . Organic material interlayered or mixed with the wastes accumulates Cu, Zn, Se, Cd, Ag, Au, and Hg. The peat that contacts wastes II bears up to 3wt.% Zn, 1000g/t Se, 100g/t Cd, and 8000g/t Hg. New phases of Zn and Hg sulfides and Hg selenides occur as abundant sheaths over bacterial cells suggesting microbial mediation in sorption of elements. Organic-bearing material in the cores contains 10-30g/t Au in 2-5cm thick intervals, both within and outside the intervals rich in sulfides and selenides. Most of gold is invisible but reaches 345g/t and forms 50nm to 1.5μm Au 0 particles in a thin 2-3cm interval of organic remnants mixed with wastes I. Vertical and lateral infiltration of AMD waters in peat and oxidative dissolution of wastes within the dispersion train of the Ursk tailings lead to redistribution of elements and their accumulation by combined physical (material's permeability, direction AMD), chemical (complexing, sorption by organic matter and Fe(III) hydroxides) and biochemical (metabolism of sulfate-reducing bacteria) processes. The accumulated elements form secondary sulfates, and Hg and Zn selenides. The results provide insights into accumulation of elements in the early history of coal and black shale deposits and have implications for remediation of polluted areas and for secondary enrichment technologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. BLT-EC (Breach, Leach Transport, and Equilibrium Chemistry), a finite-element model for assessing the release of radionuclides from low-level waste disposal units: Background, theory, and model description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKinnon, R.J.; Sullivan, T.M.; Simonson, S.A.; Suen, C.J.

    1995-08-01

    Performance assessment models typically account for the processes of sorption and dissolution-precipitation by using an empirical distribution coefficient, commonly referred to as K d that combines the effects of all chemical reactions between solid and aqueous phases. In recent years, however, there has been an increasing awareness that performance assessments based solely on empirically based K d models may be incomplete, particularly for applications involving radionuclides having sorption and solubility properties that are sensitive to variations in the in-situ chemical environment. To accommodate variations in the in-situ chemical environment, and to assess its impact on radionuclide mobility, it is necessary to model radionuclide release, transport, and chemical processes in a coupled fashion. This modeling has been done and incorporated into the two-dimensional, finite-element, computer code BLT-EC (Breach, Leach, Transport, Equilibrium Chemistry). BLT-EC is capable of predicting container degradation, waste-form leaching, and advective-dispersive, multispecies, solute transport. BLT-EC accounts for retardation directly by modeling the chemical processes of complexation, sorption, dissolution-precipitation, ion-exchange, and oxidation-reduction reactions. In this report we: (1) present a detailed description of the various physical and chemical processes that control the release and migration of radionuclides from shallow land LLW disposal facilities; (2) formulate the mathematical models that represent these processes; (3) outline how these models are incorporated and implemented in BLT-EC; and (4) demonstrate the application of BLT-EC on a set of example problems

  15. Evidence for a sulfur-undersaturated lunar interior from the solubility of sulfur in lunar melts and sulfide-silicate partitioning of siderophile elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenstra, E. S.; Seegers, A. X.; Eising, J.; Tomassen, B. G. J.; Webers, F. P. F.; Berndt, J.; Klemme, S.; Matveev, S.; van Westrenen, W.

    2018-06-01

    Sulfur concentrations at sulfide saturation (SCSS) were determined for a range of low- to high-Ti lunar melt compositions (synthetic equivalents of Apollo 14 black and yellow glass, Apollo 15 green glass, Apollo 17 orange glass and a late-stage lunar magma ocean melt, containing between 0.2 and 25 wt.% TiO2) as a function of pressure (1-2.5 GPa) and temperature (1683-1883 K). For the same experiments, sulfide-silicate partition coefficients were derived for elements V, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Mo, Sn, Sb, Te, W and Pb. The SCSS is a strong function of silicate melt composition, most notably FeO content. An increase in temperature increases the SCSS and an increase in pressure decreases the SCSS, both in agreement with previous work on terrestrial, lunar and martian compositions. Previously reported SCSS values for high-FeO melts were combined with the experimental data reported here to obtain a new predictive equation to calculate the SCSS for high-FeO lunar melt compositions. Calculated SCSS values, combined with previously estimated S contents of lunar low-Ti basalts and primitive pyroclastic glasses, suggest their source regions were not sulfide saturated. Even when correcting for the currently inferred maximum extent of S degassing during or after eruption, sample S abundances are still > 700 ppm lower than the calculated SCSS values for these compositions. To achieve sulfide saturation in the source regions of low-Ti basalts and lunar pyroclastic glasses, the extent of degassing of S in lunar magma would have to be orders of magnitude higher than currently thought, inconsistent with S isotopic and core-to-rim S diffusion profile data. The only lunar samples that could have experienced sulfide saturation are some of the more evolved A17 high-Ti basalts, if sulfides are Ni- and/or Cu rich. Sulfide saturation in the source regions of lunar melts is also inconsistent with the sulfide-silicate partitioning systematics of Ni, Co and Cu. Segregation of

  16. Solubility database for TILA-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuorinen, U.; Carlsson, T. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Kulmala, S.; Hakanen, M. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Lab. of Radiochemistry; Ahonen, L. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-11-01

    The safety assessment of spent fuel disposal requires solubility values for several elements estimated in Finnish disposal conditions. In Finland four sites (Haestholmen, Kivetty, Olkiluoto and Romuvaara) are investigated for the disposal of spent fuel. Haestholmen and OLkiluoto are onshore sites, while Kivetty and Romuvaara are inland sites. Based on groundwater analysis and classification according to salinity at the planned disposal depth mainly fresh groundwater is encountered at Kivetty and Romuvaara, while brackish and saline water-types are met at Haestholmen and Olkiluoto. Very saline, almost brine-type water ({approx}70 g/l) has been found in the deepest parts of the investigated bedrock at one of the sites (Olkiluoto). The reference waters and conditions were chosen according to the water-types. The considered reference conditions incorporated both the near- and far-field, and both oxidizing and reducing conditions were considered. In the reference conditions, the changes in solubilities were also estimated as caused by possible variations in the pH, carbonate content and redox conditions. Uranium, which is the main component of spent fuel is dealt with in a separate report presenting the solubility of uranium and spent fuel dissolution. In this work the solubilities of all the other elements of concern (Am, Cu, Nb, Np, Pa, Pd, Pu, Ra, Se, Sn, Tc, Zr, Cm, Ni, Sr, Th, C, Cl, Cs, Fe, Ho, I, and Sm) in the safety assessment are considered. Some discussion on the corrosion of the spent fuel canister is also presented. For the estimation of solubilities of the elements in question, literature data was collected that mainly comprised experimentally measured concentrations. The sources used were spent fuel experiments, concentrations measured in solubility measurements, natural concentrations and concentrations from natural analogue sites (especially Palmottu and Hyrkkoelae in Finland) as well as the concentrations measured at the Finnish investigation sites

  17. Solubility database for TILA-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuorinen, U.; Carlsson, T.; Kulmala, S.; Hakanen, M.

    1998-11-01

    The safety assessment of spent fuel disposal requires solubility values for several elements estimated in Finnish disposal conditions. In Finland four sites (Haestholmen, Kivetty, Olkiluoto and Romuvaara) are investigated for the disposal of spent fuel. Haestholmen and OLkiluoto are onshore sites, while Kivetty and Romuvaara are inland sites. Based on groundwater analysis and classification according to salinity at the planned disposal depth mainly fresh groundwater is encountered at Kivetty and Romuvaara, while brackish and saline water-types are met at Haestholmen and Olkiluoto. Very saline, almost brine-type water (∼70 g/l) has been found in the deepest parts of the investigated bedrock at one of the sites (Olkiluoto). The reference waters and conditions were chosen according to the water-types. The considered reference conditions incorporated both the near- and far-field, and both oxidizing and reducing conditions were considered. In the reference conditions, the changes in solubilities were also estimated as caused by possible variations in the pH, carbonate content and redox conditions. Uranium, which is the main component of spent fuel is dealt with in a separate report presenting the solubility of uranium and spent fuel dissolution. In this work the solubilities of all the other elements of concern (Am, Cu, Nb, Np, Pa, Pd, Pu, Ra, Se, Sn, Tc, Zr, Cm, Ni, Sr, Th, C, Cl, Cs, Fe, Ho, I, and Sm) in the safety assessment are considered. Some discussion on the corrosion of the spent fuel canister is also presented. For the estimation of solubilities of the elements in question, literature data was collected that mainly comprised experimentally measured concentrations. The sources used were spent fuel experiments, concentrations measured in solubility measurements, natural concentrations and concentrations from natural analogue sites (especially Palmottu and Hyrkkoelae in Finland) as well as the concentrations measured at the Finnish investigation sites. The

  18. Progress in the research of neptunium solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Tao; Liu Yongye; Yao Jun

    2012-01-01

    237 Np is considered a possible long-term potential threat for environment, because of its long half-life, high toxicity and its mobile nature under aerobic conditions due to the high chemical stability of its pentavalent state. Therefore 237 Np is considered as one of high-level radioactive waste and need to be disposed in deep geologic disposal repository. The dissolution behavior is an important aspect of migration research. The solubility is considered very important for high level waste geological disposal safety and environmental evaluation. The solubility determines the maximum concentration of the discharge, and then it is initial concentration of the radionuclides migration to the environment. The solubility impact directly on radionuclides migration in host rock, and can be used to predict the concentration and speciation of radionuclides in groundwater around disposal sites many years later. This paper focused on research results of the solubility, some proposals for Np dissolution chemistry research were also been suggested. (authors)

  19. Solubility and stability of inorganic carbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.

    1987-01-01

    The chemistry of inorganic carbonates is reviewed, with emphasis on solubility and hydrolytic stability, in order to identify candidate waste forms for immobilization and disposal of 14 C. At present, CaCO 3 and BaCO 3 are the two most widely favoured wasted forms, primarily because they are the products of proven CO 2 -scrubbing technology. However, they have relatively high solubilities in non-alkaline solutions, necessitating care in selecting and assessing an appropriate disposal environment. Three compounds with better solubility characteristics in near-neutral waters are identified: bismutite, (BiO) 2 CO 3 ; hydrocerussite, Pb 3 (OH) 2 (CO 3 ) 2 ; and rhodochrosite, MnCO 3 . Some of the limitations of each of these alternative waste forms are discussed

  20. Solubility of Plutonium (IV) Oxalate During Americium/Curium Pretreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudisill, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    Approximately 15,000 L of solution containing isotopes of americium and curium (Am/Cm) will undergo stabilization by vitrification at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Prior to vitrification, an in-tank pretreatment will be used to remove metal impurities from the solution using an oxalate precipitation process. Material balance calculations for this process, based on solubility data in pure nitric acid, predict approximately 80 percent of the plutonium in the solution will be lost to waste. Due to the uncertainty associated with the plutonium losses during processing, solubility experiments were performed to measure the recovery of plutonium during pretreatment and a subsequent precipitation process to prepare a slurry feed for a batch melter. A good estimate of the plutonium content of the glass is required for planning the shipment of the vitrified Am/Cm product to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).The plutonium solubility in the oxalate precipitation supernate during pretreatment was 10 mg/mL at 35 degrees C. In two subsequent washes with a 0.25M oxalic acid/0.5M nitric acid solution, the solubility dropped to less than 5 mg/mL. During the precipitation and washing steps, lanthanide fission products in the solution were mostly insoluble. Uranium, and alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metal impurities were soluble as expected. An elemental material balance for plutonium showed that greater than 94 percent of the plutonium was recovered in the dissolved precipitate. The recovery of the lanthanide elements was generally 94 percent or higher except for the more soluble lanthanum. The recovery of soluble metal impurities from the precipitate slurry ranged from 15 to 22 percent. Theoretically, 16 percent of the soluble oxalates should have been present in the dissolved slurry based on the dilution effects and volumes of supernate and wash solutions removed. A trace level material balance showed greater than 97 percent recovery of americium-241 (from the beta dec

  1. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Bernot

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) relevant to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are provided in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log fCO 2 as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. Even though selection of an appropriate set of radionuclides documented in Radionuclide Screening (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160059]) includes actinium, transport of Ac is not modeled in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model because of its extremely short half-life. Actinium dose is calculated in the TSPA-LA by assuming secular equilibrium with 231 Pa (Section 6.10); therefore, Ac is not analyzed in this report. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for TSPA-LA used to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for the actinides discussed in this report. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise

  2. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Bernot

    2005-07-13

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) relevant to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are provided in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log fCO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. Even though selection of an appropriate set of radionuclides documented in Radionuclide Screening (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160059]) includes actinium, transport of Ac is not modeled in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model because of its extremely short half-life. Actinium dose is calculated in the TSPA-LA by assuming secular equilibrium with {sup 231}Pa (Section 6.10); therefore, Ac is not analyzed in this report. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for TSPA-LA used to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for the actinides discussed in this report. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or

  3. An environmentally friendly electro-oxidative approach to recover valuable elements from NdFeB magnet waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venkatesan, P.; Sun, Z.; Sietsma, J.; Yang, Y.

    2018-01-01

    In this manuscript, we demonstrate a room temperature electrochemical process for efficiently recycling NdFeB magnet waste. First, the magnet waste was completely leached with HCl and then, in-situ electrochemical oxidation was performed to selectively oxidize Fe(II) in the leachate to Fe(III).

  4. Radionuclide solubilities in boom clay. Final report, part 2 : a report produced for ONDRAF/NIRAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, S.; Baston, G.M.N.; Boult, K.A. [and others

    2000-07-01

    The release of radionuclides from a High Level Radioactive Waste repository situated in the Boom Clay at Mol would depend, in part, on their retardation within the Boom Clay. A number of parameters are required to assess such retardation; these include the solubilities of key radionuclides and their sorption behaviour. ONDRAF/NIRAS has identified neptunium, technetium, selenium, uranium and plutonium as elements for study. AEA Technology plc was requested to undertake a joint experimental and modelling study to determine the solubilities of these five elements under conditions representative of those in the Boom Clay (the in situ chemical conditions are pH{approx}8, Eh {approx} -230 mV). The work programme was carried out over three years, and for completeness this final report includes all the results.

  5. Radionuclide solubilities in boom clay. Final report, part 2 : a report produced for ONDRAF/NIRAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, S.; Baston, G.M.N.; Boult, K.A.

    2000-01-01

    The release of radionuclides from a High Level Radioactive Waste repository situated in the Boom Clay at Mol would depend, in part, on their retardation within the Boom Clay. A number of parameters are required to assess such retardation; these include the solubilities of key radionuclides and their sorption behaviour. ONDRAF/NIRAS has identified neptunium, technetium, selenium, uranium and plutonium as elements for study. AEA Technology plc was requested to undertake a joint experimental and modelling study to determine the solubilities of these five elements under conditions representative of those in the Boom Clay (the in situ chemical conditions are pH∼8, Eh ∼ -230 mV). The work programme was carried out over three years, and for completeness this final report includes all the results

  6. Chemistry of the redox sensitive elements. Literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suter, D.

    1991-10-01

    As a part of the safety assessment for a nuclear waste repository, the migration of the radioactive elements from the waste matrix to the biosphere has to be modelled. The geosphere is an important barrier and a consideration of the retention of the radioactive isotopes needs knowledge of sorption coefficients and solubilities. Important long-lived isotopes in the high level radioactive waste are the fission products selenium, technetium, palladium and tin, and the actinide neptunium, which are all redox sensitive elements. A transport model using conservative sorption values predicts mainly doses from these five elements. Since the individual oxidation states of the redox sensitive elements have different and largely unknown sorption properties and solubilities, the realistic doses might be far less. The relevant literature about the chemistry of the five elements is summarized and is planned to serve as the basis for an experimental programme. For every element, the literature about the general chemistry, selected sorption studies, geochemistry, and analytical methods is reviewed. It was found that the knowledge about some of these points is very limited. Even the general chemistry of some of the elements is not well known, because they have only limited applications and research concentrates only on certain aspects. Most of the sorption studies in the context of nuclear waste concentrate on a few of the relevant elements and others have been neglected up to now. The simulation of a realistic system in the laboratory poses some problems, which have to be solved as well. The literature about this subject is also critically reviewed. The elements which are most mobile under realistic far-field conditions are identified and it is recommended to concentrate research on these at the beginning. (author)

  7. Chemistry of the redox sensitive elements. Literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suter, D.

    1991-10-01

    As a part of the safety assessment for a nuclear waste repository, the migration of the radioactive elements from the waste matrix to the biosphere has to be modelled. The geosphere is an important barrier and a consideration of the retention of the radioactive isotopes needs knowledge of sorption coefficients and solubilities. Important long-lived isotopes in the high level radioactive waste are the fission products selenium, technetium, palladium and tin, and the actinide neptunium, which are all redox sensitive elements. A transport model using conservative sorption values predicts mainly doses from these five elements. Since the individual oxidation states of the redox sensitive elements have different and largely unknown sorption properties and solubilities, the realistic doses might be far less. The relevant literature about the chemistry of the five elements is summarized and is planned to serve as the basis for an experimental programme. For every element, the literature about the general chemistry, selected sorption studies, geochemistry, and analytical methods is reviewed. It was found that the knowledge about some of these points is very limited. Even the general chemistry of some of the elements in not well known, because they have only limited applications and research concentrates only on certain aspects. Most of the sorption studies in the context of nuclear waste concentrate on a few of the relevant elements and others have been neglected up to now. The simulation of a realistic system in the laboratory poses some problems, which have to be solved as well. The literature about this subject is also critically reviewed. The elements which are most mobile under realistic far-field conditions are identified and it is recommended to concentrate research on these at the beginning. (author) 9 figs., 192 refs

  8. In Vitro Studies Evaluating Leaching of Mercury from Mine Waste Calcine Using Simulated Human Body Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, John E.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Morman, Suzette A.; Higueras, Pablo L.; Crock, James G.; Lowers, Heather A.; Witten, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    In vitro bioaccessibility (IVBA) studies were carried out on samples of mercury (Hg) mine-waste calcine (roasted Hg ore) by leaching with simulated human body fluids. The objective was to estimate potential human exposure to Hg due to inhalation of airborne calcine particulates and hand-to-mouth ingestion of Hg-bearing calcines. Mine waste calcines collected from Hg mines at Almad?n, Spain, and Terlingua, Texas, contain Hg sulfide, elemental Hg, and soluble Hg compounds, which constitute prim...

  9. Hydrogen solubility in pore water of partially saturated argillites: Application to Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rock in the context of a nuclear waste geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassin, A.; Dymitrowska, M.; Azaroual, M.

    2011-01-01

    In nuclear waste geological disposals, large amounts of hydrogen (H 2 ) are expected to be produced by different (bio-)geochemical processes. Depending on the pressure generated by such a process, H 2 could be produced as a gas phase and displace the neighbouring pore water. As a consequence, a water-unsaturated zone could be created around the waste and possibly affect the physical and physic-chemical properties of the disposal and the excavation disturbed zone around it. The present study is the first part of an ongoing research program aimed at evaluating the possible chemical evolution of the pore water-minerals-gas system in such a context. The goal of this study was to evaluate, in terms of thermodynamic equilibrium conditions, the geochemical disturbance of the pore water due to variations in hydrogen pressure, temperature and relative humidity. No heterogeneous reactions involving mineral phases of the clay-rock or reactive surface sites were taken into account in the thermodynamic analysis. In the case sulphate reduction reaction is allowed, geochemical modelling results indicate that the main disturbance is the increase in pH (from around 7 up to more than 10) and an important decrease in the redox potential (Eh) related to hydrogen dissolution. This occurs from relatively low H 2 partial pressures (∼1 bar and above). Then, temperature and relative humidity (expressed in terms of capillary pressure) further displace the thermodynamic equilibrium conditions, namely the pH and the aqueous speciation as well as saturation indices of mineral phases. Finally, the results suggest that the generation of hydrogen, combined with an increase in temperature (between 30 deg. C and 80 deg. C) and a decrease in relative humidity (from 100% to 30%), should increase the chemical reactivity of the pore water-rock-gas system. (authors)

  10. Synthesis of high-purity precipitated calcium carbonate during the process of recovery of elemental sulphur from gypsum waste

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Beer, Morris

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available (PCC). The process used an acid gas (H2S) to improve the aqueous dissolution of CaS, which is otherwise poorly soluble. The carbonate product was primarily calcite (99.5%) with traces of quartz (0.5%). Calcite was the only CaCO3 polymorph obtained...

  11. Species-and stage-specific differences in trace element tissue concentrations in amphibians: implications for the disposal of coal-combustion wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roe, John H.; Hopkins, William A.; Jackson, Brian P.

    2005-01-01

    Information on species-and stage-specific patterns of contaminant accumulation is generally lacking for amphibians, yet such information could provide valuable knowledge on how amphibians interact with contaminants. We assessed concentrations of As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, and Zn in whole bodies of larval, recently metamorphosed, and adult life stages in Bufo terrestris and Rana sphenocephala from a site that currently receives coal combustion waste (CCW) discharge, a site where CCW was formerly discharged that has undergone natural attenuation for 30 years, and a nearby reference site. For the majority of elements (As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn), concentrations were highest in larvae, but Se and Sr concentrations remained elevated in later life stages, likely because these elements are S and Ca analogs, respectively, and are thus retained throughout structural changes during metamorphosis. Element concentrations were generally higher in B. terrestris than in R. sphenocephala. Concentrations of As, Se, and Sr were up to 11-35 times higher in metamorphs emigrating from CCW-polluted wetlands compared to unpolluted wetlands, suggesting metamorphosed amphibians can transport trace elements from aquatic disposal basins to nearby uncontaminated terrestrial habitats. In addition, anurans utilizing naturally revegetated sites up to 30 years after CCW disposal ceases are exposed to trace elements, although to a lesser degree than sites where CCW is currently discharged. - Results suggest that metamorphosed amphibians can transport trace elements from aquatic disposal basins to non-contaminated habitats

  12. Species-and stage-specific differences in trace element tissue concentrations in amphibians: implications for the disposal of coal-combustion wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roe, John H. [University of Georgia, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, P.O. Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (United States); Hopkins, William A. [University of Georgia, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, P.O. Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (United States)]. E-mail: hopkins@srel.edu; Jackson, Brian P. [University of Georgia, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, P.O. Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (United States)

    2005-07-15

    Information on species-and stage-specific patterns of contaminant accumulation is generally lacking for amphibians, yet such information could provide valuable knowledge on how amphibians interact with contaminants. We assessed concentrations of As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, and Zn in whole bodies of larval, recently metamorphosed, and adult life stages in Bufo terrestris and Rana sphenocephala from a site that currently receives coal combustion waste (CCW) discharge, a site where CCW was formerly discharged that has undergone natural attenuation for 30 years, and a nearby reference site. For the majority of elements (As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn), concentrations were highest in larvae, but Se and Sr concentrations remained elevated in later life stages, likely because these elements are S and Ca analogs, respectively, and are thus retained throughout structural changes during metamorphosis. Element concentrations were generally higher in B. terrestris than in R. sphenocephala. Concentrations of As, Se, and Sr were up to 11-35 times higher in metamorphs emigrating from CCW-polluted wetlands compared to unpolluted wetlands, suggesting metamorphosed amphibians can transport trace elements from aquatic disposal basins to nearby uncontaminated terrestrial habitats. In addition, anurans utilizing naturally revegetated sites up to 30 years after CCW disposal ceases are exposed to trace elements, although to a lesser degree than sites where CCW is currently discharged. - Results suggest that metamorphosed amphibians can transport trace elements from aquatic disposal basins to non-contaminated habitats.

  13. Refuse derived soluble bio-organics enhancing tomato plant growth and productivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sortino, Orazio [Dipartimento di Scienze Agronomiche Agrochimiche e delle Produzioni Animali, Universita degli Studi di Catania, Via Valdisavoia 5, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipasquale, Mauro [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Montoneri, Enzo, E-mail: enzo.montoneri@unito.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Tomasso, Lorenzo; Perrone, Daniele G. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Vindrola, Daniela; Negre, Michele; Piccone, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Valorizzazione e Protezione delle Risorse Agroforestali, Universita di Torino, Via L. da Vinci 44, 10095 Grugliasco (Italy)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Municipal bio-wastes are a sustainable source of bio-based products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Refuse derived soluble bio-organics promote chlorophyll synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Refuse derived soluble bio-organics enhance plant growth and fruit ripening rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustainable chemistry exploiting urban refuse allows sustainable development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemistry, agriculture and the environment benefit from biowaste technology. - Abstract: Municipal bio-refuse (CVD), containing kitchen wastes, home gardening residues and public park trimmings, was treated with alkali to yield a soluble bio-organic fraction (SBO) and an insoluble residue. These materials were characterized using elemental analysis, potentiometric titration, and 13C NMR spectroscopy, and then applied as organic fertilizers to soil for tomato greenhouse cultivation. Their performance was compared with a commercial product obtained from animal residues. Plant growth, fruit yield and quality, and soil and leaf chemical composition were the selected performance indicators. The SBO exhibited the best performance by enhancing leaf chlorophyll content, improving plant growth and fruit ripening rate and yield. No product performance-chemical composition relationship could be assessed. Solubility could be one reason for the superior performance of SBO as a tomato growth promoter. The enhancement of leaf chlorophyll content is discussed to identify a possible link with the SBO photosensitizing properties that have been demonstrated in other work, and thus with photosynthetic performance.

  14. Refuse derived soluble bio-organics enhancing tomato plant growth and productivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sortino, Orazio; Dipasquale, Mauro; Montoneri, Enzo; Tomasso, Lorenzo; Perrone, Daniele G.; Vindrola, Daniela; Negre, Michele; Piccone, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Municipal bio-wastes are a sustainable source of bio-based products. ► Refuse derived soluble bio-organics promote chlorophyll synthesis. ► Refuse derived soluble bio-organics enhance plant growth and fruit ripening rate. ► Sustainable chemistry exploiting urban refuse allows sustainable development. ► Chemistry, agriculture and the environment benefit from biowaste technology. - Abstract: Municipal bio-refuse (CVD), containing kitchen wastes, home gardening residues and public park trimmings, was treated with alkali to yield a soluble bio-organic fraction (SBO) and an insoluble residue. These materials were characterized using elemental analysis, potentiometric titration, and 13C NMR spectroscopy, and then applied as organic fertilizers to soil for tomato greenhouse cultivation. Their performance was compared with a commercial product obtained from animal residues. Plant growth, fruit yield and quality, and soil and leaf chemical composition were the selected performance indicators. The SBO exhibited the best performance by enhancing leaf chlorophyll content, improving plant growth and fruit ripening rate and yield. No product performance-chemical composition relationship could be assessed. Solubility could be one reason for the superior performance of SBO as a tomato growth promoter. The enhancement of leaf chlorophyll content is discussed to identify a possible link with the SBO photosensitizing properties that have been demonstrated in other work, and thus with photosynthetic performance.

  15. Leaching behavior of a simulated bituminized radioactive waste form under deep geological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Shinichi; Iida, Yoshihisa; Nagano, Tetsushi; Akimoto, Toshiyuki

    2003-01-01

    The leaching behavior of a simulated bituminized waste form was studied to acquire data for the performance assessment of the geologic disposal of bituminized radioactive waste. Laboratory-scale leaching tests were performed for radioactive and non-radioactive waste specimens simulating bituminized waste of a French reprocessing company, COGEMA. The simulated waste was contacted with deionized water, an alkaline solution (0.03-mol/l KOH), and a saline solution (0.5-mol/l KCl) under atmospheric and anoxic conditions. The concentrations of Na, Ba, Cs, Sr, Np, Pu, NO 3 , SO 4 and I in the leachates were determined. Swelling of the bituminized waste progressed in deionized water and KOH. The release of the soluble components, Na and Cs, was enhanced by the swelling, and considered to be diffusion-controlled in the swelled layers of the specimens. The release of sparingly soluble components such as Ba and Np was solubility-limited in addition to the progression of leaching. Neptunium, a redox-sensitive element, showed a distinct difference in release between anoxic and atmospheric conditions. The elemental release from the bituminized waste specimens leached in the KCl was very low, which is likely due to the suppression of swelling of the specimens at high ionic strength. (author)

  16. Gas solubilities widespread applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gerrard, William

    1980-01-01

    Gas Solubilities: Widespread Applications discusses several topics concerning the various applications of gas solubilities. The first chapter of the book reviews Henr's law, while the second chapter covers the effect of temperature on gas solubility. The third chapter discusses the various gases used by Horiuti, and the following chapters evaluate the data on sulfur dioxide, chlorine data, and solubility data for hydrogen sulfide. Chapter 7 concerns itself with solubility of radon, thoron, and actinon. Chapter 8 tackles the solubilities of diborane and the gaseous hydrides of groups IV, V, and

  17. Glassy slag: A complementary waste form to homogeneous glass for the implementation of MAWS in treating DOE low level/mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, X.; Ordaz, G.; Krumrine, P.

    1994-01-01

    Glassy slag waste forms are being developed to complement glass waste forms in implementing the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS) Program for supporting DOE's environmental restoration efforts. These glassy slags are composed of various metal oxide crystalline phases embedded in an alumino-silicate glass phase. The slags are appropriate final waste forms for waste streams that contain large amounts of scrap metals and elements with low solubilities in glass, and that have low-flux contents. Homogeneous glass waste forms are appropriate for wastes with sufficient fluxes and low metal contents. Therefore, utilization of both glass and glassy slag waste forms will make vitrification technology applicable to the treatment of a much larger range of radioactive and mixed wastes. The MAWS approach was a plied to glassy slags by blending multiple waste streams to produce the final waste form, minimizing overall waste form volume and reducing costs. The crystalline oxide phases formed in the glassy slags can be specially formulated so that they are very durable and contain hazardous and radioactive elements in their lattice structures. The Structural Bond Strength (SBS) Model was used to predict the chemical durability of the product from the slag composition so that optimized slag compositions could be obtain with a limited number of crucible melts and testing

  18. Applicability of thermodynamic database of radioactive elements developed for the Japanese performance assessment of HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yui, Mikazu; Shibata, Masahiro; Rai, Dhanpat; Ochs, Michael

    2003-01-01

    In 1999 Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) published a second progress report (also known as H12 report) on high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal in Japan (JNC 1999). This report helped to develop confidence in the selected HLW disposal system and to establish the implementation body in 2000 for the disposal of HLW. JNC developed an in-house thermodynamic database for radioactive elements for performance analysis of the engineered barrier system (EBS) and the geosphere for H12 report. This paper briefly presents the status of the JNC's thermodynamic database and its applicability to perform realistic analyses of the solubilities of radioactive elements, evolution of solubility-limiting solid phases, predictions of the redox state of Pu in the neutral pH range under reducing conditions, and to estimate solubilities of radioactive elements in cementitious conditions. (author)

  19. Species- and stage-specific differences in trace element tissue concentrations in amphibians: implications for the disposal of coal-combustion wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roe, J.H.; Hopkins, W.A.; Jackson, B.P. [University of Georgia, Aiken, SC (US)

    2005-07-01

    Information on species- and stage-specific patterns of contaminant accumulation is generally lacking for amphibians, yet such information could provide valuable knowledge on how amphibians interact with contaminants. We assessed concentrations of As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, and Zn in whole bodies of larval, recently metamorphosed, and adult life stages in Bufo terrestris and Rana sphenocephala from a site that currently receives coal combustion waste (CCW) discharge, a site where CCW was formerly discharged that has undergone natural attenuation for 30 years, and a nearby reference site. For the majority of elements (As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn), concentrations were highest in larvae, but Se and Sr concentrations remained elevated in later life stages, likely because these elements are S and Ca analogs, respectively, and are thus retained throughout structural changes during metamorphosis. Element concentrations were generally higher in B. terrestris than in R. sphenocephala. Concentrations of As, Se, and Sr were up to 11-35 times higher in metamorphs emigrating from CCW-polluted wetlands compared to unpolluted wetlands, suggesting metamorphosed amphibians can transport trace elements from aquatic disposal basins to nearby uncontaminated terrestrial habitats. In addition, anurans utilizing naturally revegetated sites up to 30 years after CCW disposal ceases are exposed to trace elements, although to a lesser degree than sites where CCW is currently discharged.

  20. From waste water treatment to land management: Conversion of aquatic biomass to biochar for soil amelioration and the fortification of crops with essential trace elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David A; Paul, Nicholas A; Cole, Andrew J; de Nys, Rocky

    2015-07-01

    Macroalgae can be grown in industrial waste water to sequester metals and the resulting biomass used for biotechnological applications. We have previously cultivated the freshwater macroalga Oedogonium at a coal-fired power station to treat a metal-contaminated effluent from that facility. We then produced biochar from this biomass and determined the suitability of both the biomass and the biochar for soil amelioration. The dried biomass of Oedogonium cultivated in the waste water contained several elements for which there are terrestrial biosolids criteria (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni, Se and Zn) and leached significant amounts of these elements into solution. Here, we demonstrate that these biomass leachates impair the germination and growth of radishes as a model crop. However, the biochar produced from this same biomass leaches negligible amounts of metal into solution and the leachates support high germination and growth of radishes. Biochar produced at 750 °C leaches the least metal and has the highest recalcitrant C content. When this biochar is added to a low-quality soil it improves the retention of nutrients (N, P, Ca, Mg, K and Mo) from fertilizer in the soil and the growth of radishes by 35-40%. Radishes grown in the soils amended with the biochar have equal or lower metal contents than radishes grown in soil without biochar, but much higher concentrations of essential trace elements (Mo) and macro nutrients (P, K, Ca and Mg). The cultivation of macroalgae is an effective waste water bioremediation technology that also produces biomass that can be used as a feedstock for conversion to biochar for soil amelioration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Leaching study of heavy and radioactive elements present in wastes discarded by a uranium extraction and processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pihlak, A.; Lippmaa, E.; Maremaee, E.; Sirk, A; Uustalu, E.

    1995-08-01

    The present report provides a systematic leaching study of the waste depository at the Sillamaee metallurgical plant 'Silmet' (former uranium extraction and processing facility), its construction and environmental impact. The following data are presented: γ-activity data of the depository and two drill cores, chemical composition and physical properties of depository material and leaching waters, results of γ- and α-spectrometric studies, leaching (with demineralized and sea water) intensities of loparite and uranium ore processing waste components. Environmental danger presented by the Sillamaee waste dump to the Gulf of Finland and the surrounding environment in Estonia is mainly due to uranium leaching and the presence of a large array of chemically poisonous substances

  2. Solubility study of Tc(IV) oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, D.J.; Fan, X.H.

    2005-01-01

    The deep geological disposal of the high level radioactive wastes is expected to be a safer disposal method in most countries. The long-lived fission product 99 Tc is present in large quantities in nuclear wastes and its chemical behavior in aqueous solution is of considerable interest. Under oxidizing conditions technetium exists as the anionic species TcO 4 - whereas under the reducing conditions, expected to exist in a deep geological repository, it is generally predicted that technetium will be present as TcO 2 ·nH 2 O. Hence, the mobility of Tc(IV) in reducing groundwater may be limited by the solubility of TcO 2 ·nH 2 O under these conditions. Due to this fact it is important to investigate the solubility of TcO 2 ·nH 2 O. The solubility determines the release of radionuclides from waste form and is used as a source term in radionuclide migration analysis in performance assessment of radioactive waste repository. Technetium oxide was prepared by reduction of a technetate solution with Sn 2 + . The solubility of Tc(IV) oxide has been determined in simulated groundwater and redistilled water under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The effects of pH and CO 3 2- concentration of solution on solubility of Tc(IV) oxide were studied. The concentration of total technetium and Tc(IV) species in the solutions were periodically determined by separating the oxidized and reduced technetium species using a solvent extraction procedure and counting the beta activity of the 99 Tc with a liquid scintillation counter. The experimental results show that the rate of oxidation of Tc(IV) in simulated groundwater and redistilled water is about (1.49-1.86) x 10 -9 mol/(L·d) under aerobic conditions, but Tc(IV) in simulated groundwater and redistilled water is not oxidized under anaerobic conditions. Under aerobic or anaerobic conditions the solubility of Tc(IV) oxide in simulated groundwater and redistilled water is equal on the whole after centrifugation or ultrafiltration. The

  3. Literature survey on solid and aqueous species of importance for nuclear waste repositories: The elements uranium, neptunium and cesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucher, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    This document contains extensive tables listing all possible chemical compounds of species that might occur in a proposed nuclear waste repository. Most are listed as unlikely to occur under conditions predicted for the repository. Extensive data tables and reference sources are provided for those compounds that might occur on form

  4. Neptunium (IV) oxalate solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luerkens, D.W.

    1983-07-01

    The equilibrium solubility of neptunium (IV) oxalate in nitric/oxalic acid solutions was determined at 22 0 C, 45 0 C, and 60 0 C. The concentrations of nitric/oxalic acid solutions represented a wide range of free oxalate ion concentration. A mathematical solubility model was developed which is based on the formation of the known complexes of neptunium (IV) oxalate. the solubility model uses a simplified concentration parameter which is proportional to the free oxalate ion concentration. The solubility model can be used to estimate the equilibrium solubility of neptunium (IV) oxalate over a wide range of oxalic and nitric acid concentrations at each temperature

  5. Theoretical study of trivalent element complexes for the nuclear waste reprocessing; Etude theorique de complexes d'elements f trivalents pour le retraitement des dechets nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, L

    2007-10-15

    Current energetic and environmental concerns have made the nuclear waste reprocessing to be a major issue in numerous countries. One avenue to treat nuclear spent fuel requires separating selectively trivalent minor actinides An (Am{sup 3+}, Cm{sup 3+}) from lanthanides Ln. In this regard, nitrogen extractants are under study. Their selectivity toward actinides is still unclear, but could be the result of enhanced covalency effects with trivalent minor actinides with respect to lanthanides (III). In this thesis, we have performed DFT calculations (Density Functional Theory) to study covalency effects within the actinide-ligand bond, following three main axes of research: advanced study of the nature of the chemical bonding, spectroscopic characterization of covalency, and preliminary tests of ab initio molecular dynamics for future calculations in solvent. Methods that are not regularly applied to trivalent actinides complexes have been used: topological methods, TDDFT, LDDFT, ab initio molecular dynamics. We have managed to show that the selectivity of the BTP ligand - the most effective An/Ln extractant to date - comes at least for a part from stronger covalency effects within the An-BTP bond with respect to the Ln-BTP bond, which has never been proved before. (author)

  6. Solubility of radionuclides in a concrete environment for provisional safety analyses for SGT-E2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berner, U.

    2014-08-15

    Within stage 2 of the sectoral plan for deep geological repositories for radioactive waste in Switzerland, safety analyses are carried out. In the case of the repository for long lived intermediate level waste (ILW) retention mechanisms include the concentration limits of safety relevant elements in the pore water of the engineered concrete system. The present work describes the evaluation of solubility limits for the safety relevant elements Be, C, Cl, K, Ca, Co, Ni, Se, Sr, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Pd, Ag, Sn, I, Cs, Sm, Eu, Ho, Pb, Po, Ra, Ac, Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm in the pore water of a concrete system corresponding to a degradation stage characterised by portlandite saturation and by the absence of (Na,K)OH solutes. The term solubility limit denotes the maximum amount of an element dissolving in the pore solution of the considered chemical reference system. For a given solid phase equilibrium, thermodynamics predicts the amount of substance dissolving in the solution and describes the speciation of the considered element in solution. The principles of chemical equilibrium will be the primary work hypothesis in the present work. Solubility calculations were performed with the most recent version of GEMS/PSI using the PSI/Nagra Chemical Thermodynamic Data Base 12/07. The database was complemented with other datasets for elements that were not considered in the mentioned update. Reference values solubilities as well as lower and upper guideline values are evaluated. For many formation constants of solids and solutes, uncertainties are known and allow conveying lower and upper guideline values. In many cases it is not clear whether the most stable solid is formed. In such cases the (kinetically driven) formation of alternative solid phases is included in the derivation of reference and guideline values. Corresponding justifications are given for the individual elements and are an important part of this work. A similar report for an almost identical chemical

  7. Solubility of radionuclides in a concrete environment for provisional safety analyses for SGT-E2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berner, U.

    2014-08-01

    Within stage 2 of the sectoral plan for deep geological repositories for radioactive waste in Switzerland, safety analyses are carried out. In the case of the repository for long lived intermediate level waste (ILW) retention mechanisms include the concentration limits of safety relevant elements in the pore water of the engineered concrete system. The present work describes the evaluation of solubility limits for the safety relevant elements Be, C, Cl, K, Ca, Co, Ni, Se, Sr, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Pd, Ag, Sn, I, Cs, Sm, Eu, Ho, Pb, Po, Ra, Ac, Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm in the pore water of a concrete system corresponding to a degradation stage characterised by portlandite saturation and by the absence of (Na,K)OH solutes. The term solubility limit denotes the maximum amount of an element dissolving in the pore solution of the considered chemical reference system. For a given solid phase equilibrium, thermodynamics predicts the amount of substance dissolving in the solution and describes the speciation of the considered element in solution. The principles of chemical equilibrium will be the primary work hypothesis in the present work. Solubility calculations were performed with the most recent version of GEMS/PSI using the PSI/Nagra Chemical Thermodynamic Data Base 12/07. The database was complemented with other datasets for elements that were not considered in the mentioned update. Reference values solubilities as well as lower and upper guideline values are evaluated. For many formation constants of solids and solutes, uncertainties are known and allow conveying lower and upper guideline values. In many cases it is not clear whether the most stable solid is formed. In such cases the (kinetically driven) formation of alternative solid phases is included in the derivation of reference and guideline values. Corresponding justifications are given for the individual elements and are an important part of this work. A similar report for an almost identical chemical

  8. Experimental results on salt concrete for barrier elements made of salt concrete in a repository for radioactive waste in a salt mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutsch, Alex-W.; Preuss, Juergen; Mauke, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The Bartensleben rock salt mine in Germany was used as a repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste from 1971 to 1991 and from 1994 to 1998. The repository with an overall volume of about 6 million m 3 has to be closed. Salt concrete is used for the refill of the voids of the repository. The concrete mixtures contain crushed salt instead of natural aggregates as the void filling material should be as similar to the salt rock as possible. Very high requirements regarding low heat development and little or even no cracking during concrete hardening had to be fulfilled even for the barrier elements made from salt concrete which separate the radioactive waste from the environment. Requirements for the salt concrete were set up with regard to the fluidity of the fresh concrete during the hardening process and its durability. In the view of a comprehensive numerical calculations of the temperature development and thermal stresses in the massive salt concrete elements of the backfill of the voids, experimental results for material properties of the salt concrete are presented: mixture of the salt concrete, thermodynamic properties (adiabatic heat release, thermal dilatation, thermal conductivity and heat capacity), mechanical short term properties, creep (under tension, under compression), autogenous shrinkage

  9. Geomicrobiological redox cycling of the transuranic element neptunium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Gareth T W; Geissler, Andrea; Lloyd, Jonathan R; Livens, Francis R; Boothman, Christopher; Begg, James D C; Denecke, Melissa A; Rothe, Jörg; Dardenne, Kathy; Burke, Ian T; Charnock, John M; Morris, Katherine

    2010-12-01

    Microbial processes can affect the environmental behavior of redox sensitive radionuclides, and understanding these reactions is essential for the safe management of radioactive wastes. Neptunium, an alpha-emitting transuranic element, is of particular importance because of its long half-life, high radiotoxicity, and relatively high solubility as Np(V)O(2)(+) under oxic conditions. Here, we describe experiments to explore the biogeochemistry of Np where Np(V) was added to oxic sediment microcosms with indigenous microorganisms and anaerobically incubated. Enhanced Np removal to sediments occurred during microbially mediated metal reduction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed this was due to reduction to poorly soluble Np(IV) on solids. In subsequent reoxidation experiments, sediment-associated Np(IV) was somewhat resistant to oxidative remobilization. These results demonstrate the influence of microbial processes on Np solubility and highlight the critical importance of radionuclide biogeochemistry in nuclear legacy management.

  10. Concentrations of trace elements and PCDD/Fs around a municipal solid waste incinerator in Girona (Catalonia, Spain). Human health risks for the population living in the neighborhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, Joaquim; Nadal, Martí; Schuhmacher, Marta; Domingo, José L

    2018-07-15

    Previously to the modernization of the municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) of Campdorà (Girona, Catalonia, Spain) two sampling campaigns (2015 and 2016) were conducted. In each campaign, 8 soil and 4 air samples (PM 10 and total particle phase and gas phase) were collected. The levels of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sn, Tl and V, and PCDD/Fs were analysed at different distances and wind directions around the MSWI. Environmental levels of trace elements and PCDD/Fs were used to assess exposure and health risks (carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic) for the population living around the facility. In soils, no significant differences were observed for trace elements and PCDD/Fs between both campaigns. In air, significant higher levels of As, Cd, Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, Tl and V were detected in 2016. Regarding soil levels, only Cd (distances) and As, Cu, Mn, and Ni (wind directions) showed significant differences. No differences were noted in the concentrations of trace elements and PCDD/Fs in air levels with respect to distances and directions to the MSWI. No differences were registered in air levels (elements and PCDD/Fs) between points influenced by MSWI emissions and background point. However some differences in congener profile were noted regarding from where back-trajectories come from (HYSPLIT model results), pointing some influence of Barcelona metropolitan area. The concentrations of trace elements and PCDD/Fs were similar -or even lower- than those reported around other MSWIs in Catalonia and various countries. Non-carcinogenic risks were below the safety limit (HQ<1). In turn, carcinogenic risks due to exposure to trace elements and PCDD/Fs were in acceptable ranges, according to national and international standard regulations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Waste and effluent management: Experience of the plutonium fuel element fabrication complex at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnal, T.; Bailly, H.

    1981-01-01

    Since the start of its activities in 1963, the Cadarache Fuel Fabrication Complex has paid particular attention, in its production balances, to identifiable plutonium losses. These losses are divided into three main components, namely: solid waste, liquid effluents and losses due to the conversion of 241 Pu into 241 Am. The paper briefly deals with the origin of the identifiable losses and the procedures which are being gradually implemented to optimize identification of these losses; first, physical identification (sorting of waste at the source and appropriate training of personnel) and second, analytical identification (non-destructive tests). The identifiable losses are then evaluated quantitatively on the basis of technological improvements of the production lines and measurement equipment. (author)

  12. Conservation and retrieval of information - Elements of a strategy to inform future societies about nuclear waste repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M [ed.; National Inst. of Radiation Protection, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-12-01

    Two main strategies exist for long-term information transfer, one which links information through successive transfers of archived material and other forms of knowledge in society, and one - such as marking the site with a monument - relying upon a direct link from the present to the distant future. Digital methods are not recommended for long-term storage, but digital processing may be a valuable tool to structure information summaries, and in the creation of better long-lasting records. Advances in archive management should also be pursued to widen the choice of information carriers of high durability. In the Nordic countries, during the first few thousand years, and perhaps up to the next period of glaciation, monuments at a repository site may be used to warn the public of the presence of dangerous waste. But messages from such markers may pose interpretation problems as we have today for messages left by earlier societies such as rune inscriptions. Since the national borders may change in the time scale relevant for nuclear waste, the creation of an international archive for all radioactive wastes would represent an improvement as regards conservation and retrieval of information. (EG).

  13. Conservation and retrieval of information - Elements of a strategy to inform future societies about nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, M.

    1996-01-01

    Two main strategies exist for long-term information transfer, one which links information through successive transfers of archived material and other forms of knowledge in society, and one - such as marking the site with a monument - relying upon a direct link from the present to the distant future. Digital methods are not recommended for long-term storage, but digital processing may be a valuable tool to structure information summaries, and in the creation of better long-lasting records. Advances in archive management should also be pursued to widen the choice of information carriers of high durability. In the Nordic countries, during the first few thousand years, and perhaps up to the next period of glaciation, monuments at a repository site may be used to warn the public of the presence of dangerous waste. But messages from such markers may pose interpretation problems as we have today for messages left by earlier societies such as rune inscriptions. Since the national borders may change in the time scale relevant for nuclear waste, the creation of an international archive for all radioactive wastes would represent an improvement as regards conservation and retrieval of information. (EG)

  14. Wasting away

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzman, L.

    1978-01-01

    The problems of radioactive waste disposal are discussed, with particular reference to the following: radiation hazards from uranium mill tailings; disposal and storage of high-level wastes from spent fuel elements and reprocessing; low-level wastes; decommissioning of aged reactors; underground disposal, such as in salt formations; migration of radioactive isotopes, for example into ground water supplies or into the human food chain. (U.K.)

  15. Solubility of radionuclides in a bentonite environment for provisional safety analyses for SGT-E2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berner, U.

    2014-08-01

    Within stage 2 of the sectoral plan for deep geological repositories for radioactive waste in Switzerland provisional safety analyses are carried out. In the case of the repository for spent fuel and vitrified high level waste considered, retention mechanisms include the concentration limits of safety relevant elements in the pore water of the buffer material (bentonite). The present work describes the solubility limits of the safety relevant elements Be, C_i_n_o_r_g, Cl, K, Ca, Co, Ni, Se, Sr, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Pd, Ag, Sn, I, Cs, Sm, Eu, Ho, Pb, Po, Ra, Ac, Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm in the pore water of bentonite after diffusive solution exchange with the host rock Opalinus Clay. The term solubility limit denotes the maximum amount of an element dissolving in the pore solution of the considered chemical reference system. Chemical equilibrium thermodynamics is the classical tool used for quantifying such considerations. For a given solid phase equilibrium thermodynamics predict the amount of substance dissolving in the solution and describe the speciation of the considered element in solution. The principles of chemical equilibrium will also be the primary work hypothesis in the present work. Solubility calculations were performed with the most recent version of GEMS/PSI (GEMS3.2 v.890) using the PSI/Nagra Chemical Thermodynamic Data Base 12/07, which is an update of the former Nagra/PSI Chemical Thermodynamic Data Base 01/01. The database was complemented with datasets from the ThermoChimie v. 7b for elements that were not considered in the mentioned update (Ag, Co, Sm, Ho, Pa, Be), with data from Iupac (Pb) and with data from the literature (Mo). Differing sources for thermodynamic data are noted. Reference values as well as lower and upper guideline values are evaluated. For many formation constants of solids and solutes uncertainties are known and allow conveying lower and upper guideline values. In many cases it is not clear whether the most stable solid is

  16. Solubility of pllutonium in alkaline salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, D.T.; Edwards, T.B.

    1993-01-01

    Plutonium solubility data from several studies have been evaluated. For each data set, a predictive model has been developed where appropriate. In addition, a statistical model and corresponding prediction intervals for plutonium solubility as a quadratic function of the hydroxide concentration have been developed. Because of the wide range of solution compositions, the solubility of plutonium can vary by as much as three orders of magnitude for any given hydroxide concentration and still remain within the prediction interval. Any nuclear safety assessments that depend on the maximum amount of plutonium dissolved in alkaline salt solutions should use concentrations at least as great as the upper prediction limits developed in this study. To increase the confidence in the prediction model, it is recommended that additional solubility tests be conducted at low hydroxide concentrations and with all of the other solution components involved. To validate the model for application to actual waste solutions, it is recommended that the plutonium solubilities in actual waste solutions be determined and compared to the values predicted by the quadratic model

  17. Cluster analysis to evaluate stable chemical elements and physical-chemical parameters behavior on uranium mining waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Wagner de Souza; Py Junior, Delcy de Azevedo; Goncalves, Simone, E-mail: wspereira@inb.gov.br [Unidade de Tratamento de Minerio (UTM/INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Coordenacao de Protecao Radiologica. Grupo Multidisciplinar de Radioprotecao; Kelecom, Alphonse [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia e Radiometria Pedro Lopes dos Santos; Morais, Gustavo Ferrari de; Campelo, Emanuele Lazzaretti Cordova [Unidade de Tratamento de Minerio (UTM/INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Coordenacao de Desenvolvimento de Processos; Dores, Luis Augusto de Carvalho Bresser [Unidade de Tratamento de Minerio (UTM/INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Gerencia de Descomissionamento

    2011-07-01

    The Ore Treating Unit (UTM, in portuguese) is a deactivated uranium mine. A cluster analysis was used to evaluate the behavior of stable chemical elements and physical-chemical parameters in their effluents. The utilization of the cluster analysis proved itself effective in the assessment, allowing the identification of groups of chemical elements, physical-chemical parameters and their joint analysis (elements and parameters). As a result we may assert, based on data analysis, that there is a strong link between calcium and magnesium and between aluminum and rare-earth oxides on UTM's effluents. Sulphate was also identified as strongly linked to total and dissolved solids, and those to electrical conductivity. There were other associations, but not so strongly linked. Further gathering, to seasonal evaluation, are required in order to confirm those analysis. Additional statistical analysis (factor analysis) must be used to try to identify the origin of the identified groups on this analysis. (author)

  18. Cluster analysis to evaluate stable chemical elements and physical-chemical parameters behavior on uranium mining waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Wagner de Souza; Py Junior, Delcy de Azevedo; Goncalves, Simone; Kelecom, Alphonse; Morais, Gustavo Ferrari de; Campelo, Emanuele Lazzaretti Cordova; Dores, Luis Augusto de Carvalho Bresser

    2011-01-01

    The Ore Treating Unit (UTM, in portuguese) is a deactivated uranium mine. A cluster analysis was used to evaluate the behavior of stable chemical elements and physical-chemical parameters in their effluents. The utilization of the cluster analysis proved itself effective in the assessment, allowing the identification of groups of chemical elements, physical-chemical parameters and their joint analysis (elements and parameters). As a result we may assert, based on data analysis, that there is a strong link between calcium and magnesium and between aluminum and rare-earth oxides on UTM's effluents. Sulphate was also identified as strongly linked to total and dissolved solids, and those to electrical conductivity. There were other associations, but not so strongly linked. Further gathering, to seasonal evaluation, are required in order to confirm those analysis. Additional statistical analysis (factor analysis) must be used to try to identify the origin of the identified groups on this analysis. (author)

  19. Pretreatment of Hanford purex plant first-cycle waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, M.W.; Gerboth, D.M.; Peters, B.B.

    1987-01-01

    A process has been developed to pretreat neutralized, first-cycle high-level waste from the fuels reprocessing facility (PUREX Plant) at the Hanford Site. The process separates solids from the supernate liquid, which contains soluble salts. The solids, including most of the fission products and transuranic elements, may then be vitrified for disposal, while the low-level supernate stream may be processed into a less expensive grout waste form. The process also includes ion exchange treatment of the separated supernate stream to remove radiocesium. A flow sheet based on these operations was completed to support a planned demonstration of the process in the Hanford site B Plant canyon facility

  20. Investigations concerning the source term for the emission of fission products and transuranic elements from the highly radioactive waste in the temperature region between 200 and 11000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, F.; Krebs, K.; Merte, B.

    1984-04-01

    Starting point of these investigations was the research report 290 of the former Institute for Reactor Safety, Cologne. The largely incorrect assumptions made in the chemical statement led to high radioactive doses not only for the closer, but also for the further surroundings of a reprocessing plant in case that the cooling system of the fuel element storage or the storage tank for the highly radioactive waste (HAW) should become inoperative for an extended period of time. However, as a result of this temperature region which we used in our experiments, the investigations concerning the source term of the HAW between 1100 and 1200 0 C became interesting again, because a glass melt of about 1100 0 C is used during the PAMELA-process for the vitrification of the HAW. The aqueous HAW-solution is thereby poured onto a hot glass melt. The solution thereby dries up, the HAW-salt is calcined and finally sinks into the glass melt. From today's point of view an investigation concerning the source term of the fission products and transuranic elements from the HAW at 1100 0 C therefore provides information regarding the fission product- and transuranic element volatilization within the melting furnace during the vitrification process. The results may now therefore also be considered a contribution for the layout of the off-gas purification system during the PAMELA-process

  1. Association of trace elements with colloidal fractions in leachates from closed and active municipal solid waste landfills

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matura, M.; Ettler, V.; Ježek, J.; Mihaljevič, M.; Šebek, O.; Sýkora, V.; Klementová, Mariana

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 183, 1-3 (2010), s. 541-548 ISSN 0304-3894 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : Landfill * leachate * trace elements * colloids * cascade filtration Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 3.723, year: 2010

  2. Tetraphenylborate Solubility in High Ionic Strength Salt Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serkiz, S.M.; Ginn, J.D.; Jurgensen, A.R.

    1998-04-01

    Solubility of sodium and potassium salts of the tetraphenylborate ion (TPB) in simulated Savannah River Site High Level Waste was investigated. Data generated from this study allow more accurate predictions of TPB solubility at the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) facility. Because previous research showed large deviations in the observed solubility of TPB salts when compared with model predictions, additional data were generated to better understand the solubility of TPB in more complex systems of high ionic strength and those containing both potassium and sodium. These data allow evaluation of the ability of current models to accurately predict equilibrium TPB concentrations over the range of experimental conditions investigated in this study

  3. Solubility measurement of iron-selenium compounds under reducing conditions. Research document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Akira; Shibata, Masahiro

    2003-03-01

    Chemical behavior of selenium (Se), which was one of the important elements for performance assessment of geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, was investigated under reducing and iron-containing conditions. A washing method for an iron diselenide (FeSe 2 (cr)) reagent with acidic and basic solutions (0.1 and 1 M HCl and 1 M NaOH) was carried out for the purification of FeSe 2 reagent, which was considered to be a solubility limiting solid for Se under the geological disposal conditions. Furthermore, solubility of FeSe 2 (cr) was measured in alkaline solution (pH: 11 - 13) under reducing conditions (E h vs SHE: -0.4 - 0 V), and thermodynamic data on equilibrium reactions between Se in solution and Se precipitate were obtained. The dependencies of solubility values on pH and redox potential (E h : vs. standard hydrogen electrode) were best interpreted that the solubility limiting solid was not FeSe 2 (cr) but Se(cr) and the aqueous species was SeO 3 2- in the present experimental conditions. The equilibrium constant between Se(cr) and SeO 3 2- at zero ionic strength was determined and compared with literature values. The chemical behavior of Se under geological disposal conditions was discussed. (author)

  4. Fate of soluble uranium in the I{sub 2}/KI leaching process for mercury removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostick, W.D.; Davis, W.H.; Jarabek, R.J. [East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials and Chemistry Lab.

    1997-09-01

    General Electric Corporation has developed an extraction and recovery system for mercury, based upon the use of iodine (oxidant) and iodide ion (complexing agent). This system has been proposed for application to select mercury-contaminated mixed waste (i.e., waste containing radionuclides as well as other hazardous constituents), which have been generated by historic activities in support of US Department of Energy (DOE) missions. This system is compared to a system utilizing hypochlorite and chloride ions for removal of mercury and uranium from a sample of authentic mixed waste sludge. Relative to the hypochlorite (bleach) system, the iodine system mobilized more mercury and less uranium from the sludge. An engineering flowsheet has been developed to treat spent iodine-containing extraction medium, allowing the system to be recycled. The fate of soluble uranium in this series of treatment unit operations was monitored by tracing isotopically-enriched uranyl ion into simulated spent extraction medium. Treatment with use of elemental iron is shown to remove > 85% of the traced uranium while concurrently reducing excess iodine to the iodide ion. The next unit operation, adjustment of the solution pH to a value near 12 by the addition of lime slurry to form a metal-laden sludge phase (an operation referred to as lime-softening), removed an additional 57% of soluble uranium activity, for an over-all removal efficiency of {approximately} 96%. However, the precipitated solids did not settle well, and some iodide reagent is held up in the wet filtercake.

  5. Fate of soluble uranium in the I2/KI leaching process for mercury removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, W.D.; Davis, W.H.; Jarabek, R.J.

    1997-09-01

    General Electric Corporation has developed an extraction and recovery system for mercury, based upon the use of iodine (oxidant) and iodide ion (complexing agent). This system has been proposed for application to select mercury-contaminated mixed waste (i.e., waste containing radionuclides as well as other hazardous constituents), which have been generated by historic activities in support of US Department of Energy (DOE) missions. This system is compared to a system utilizing hypochlorite and chloride ions for removal of mercury and uranium from a sample of authentic mixed waste sludge. Relative to the hypochlorite (bleach) system, the iodine system mobilized more mercury and less uranium from the sludge. An engineering flowsheet has been developed to treat spent iodine-containing extraction medium, allowing the system to be recycled. The fate of soluble uranium in this series of treatment unit operations was monitored by tracing isotopically-enriched uranyl ion into simulated spent extraction medium. Treatment with use of elemental iron is shown to remove > 85% of the traced uranium while concurrently reducing excess iodine to the iodide ion. The next unit operation, adjustment of the solution pH to a value near 12 by the addition of lime slurry to form a metal-laden sludge phase (an operation referred to as lime-softening), removed an additional 57% of soluble uranium activity, for an over-all removal efficiency of ∼ 96%. However, the precipitated solids did not settle well, and some iodide reagent is held up in the wet filtercake

  6. Alternate source term models for Yucca Mountain performance assessment based on natural analog data and secondary mineral solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, W.M.; Codell, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    Performance assessment calculations for the proposed high level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, were conducted using the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Total-System Performance Assessment (TPA 3.2) code to test conceptual models and parameter values for the source term based on data from the Pena Blanca, Mexico, natural analog site and based on a model for coprecipitation and solubility of secondary schoepite. In previous studies the value for the maximum constant oxidative alteration rate of uraninite at the Nopal I uranium body at Pena Blanca was estimated. Scaling this rate to the mass of uranium for the proposed Yucca Mountain repository yields an oxidative alteration rate of 22 kg/y, which was assumed to be an upper limit on the release rate from the proposed repository. A second model was developed assuming releases of radionuclides are based on the solubility of secondary schoepite as a function of temperature and solution chemistry. Releases of uranium are given by the product of uranium concentrations at equilibrium with schoepite and the flow of water through the waste packages. For both models, radionuclides other than uranium and those in the cladding and gap fraction were modeled to be released at a rate proportional to the uranium release rate, with additional elemental solubility limits applied. Performance assessment results using the Pena Blanca oxidation rate and schoepite solubility models for Yucca Mountain were compared to the TPA 3.2 base case model, in which release was based on laboratory studies of spent fuel dissolution, cladding and gap release, and solubility limits. Doses calculated using the release rate based on natural analog data and the schoepite solubility models were smaller than doses generated using the base case model. These results provide a degree of confidence in safety predictions using the base case model and an indication of how conservatism in the base case model may be reduced in future analyses

  7. Alternate source term models for Yucca Mountain performance assessment based on natural analog data and secondary mineral solubility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, W.M.; Codell, R.B.

    1999-07-01

    Performance assessment calculations for the proposed high level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, were conducted using the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Total-System Performance Assessment (TPA 3.2) code to test conceptual models and parameter values for the source term based on data from the Pena Blanca, Mexico, natural analog site and based on a model for coprecipitation and solubility of secondary schoepite. In previous studies the value for the maximum constant oxidative alteration rate of uraninite at the Nopal I uranium body at Pena Blanca was estimated. Scaling this rate to the mass of uranium for the proposed Yucca Mountain repository yields an oxidative alteration rate of 22 kg/y, which was assumed to be an upper limit on the release rate from the proposed repository. A second model was developed assuming releases of radionuclides are based on the solubility of secondary schoepite as a function of temperature and solution chemistry. Releases of uranium are given by the product of uranium concentrations at equilibrium with schoepite and the flow of water through the waste packages. For both models, radionuclides other than uranium and those in the cladding and gap fraction were modeled to be released at a rate proportional to the uranium release rate, with additional elemental solubility limits applied. Performance assessment results using the Pena Blanca oxidation rate and schoepite solubility models for Yucca Mountain were compared to the TPA 3.2 base case model, in which release was based on laboratory studies of spent fuel dissolution, cladding and gap release, and solubility limits. Doses calculated using the release rate based on natural analog data and the schoepite solubility models were smaller than doses generated using the base case model. These results provide a degree of confidence in safety predictions using the base case model and an indication of how conservatism in the base case model may be reduced in future analyses.

  8. Mercury removal from SRP radioactive waste streams using ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibler, J.P.; Wallace, R.M.; Ebra, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Mercury is present in varying concentrations in some Savannah River Plant (SRP) waste streams as a result of its use as a catalyst in the dissolution of fuel elements composed of uranium-aluminum alloys. It may be desirable to remove mercury from these streams before treatment of the waste for incorporation in glass for long-term storage. The glass forming process will also create waste from which mercury will have to be removed. The goal of mercury would be to eliminate ultimate emission of the toxic substance into the environment. This paper describes tests that demonstrate the feasibility of using a specific cation exchange resin, Duolite GT-73 for the removal of mercury from five waste streams generated at the SRP. Two of these streams are dilute; one is the condensate from a waste evaporator while the other is the effluent from an effluent treatment plant now under development. The three other streams are related to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) that is being built at SRP. One of these streams is a concentrated salt solution (principally sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide) that constitutes the soluble fraction of SRP waste and contains 20% mercury in the waste. The second stream is a slurry of the insoluble components in SRP waste and contains 80% of the mercury. The third stream is the offgas condensate from the glass melter system in the DWPF

  9. Solubility of Tc(IV) oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, D.J.; Fan, X.H.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The deep geological disposal of the high level radioactive wastes is expected to be a safer disposal method in most countries. The long-lived fission product 99 Tc is present in large quantities in nuclear wastes and its chemical behavior in aqueous solution is of considerable interest. Under the reducing conditions, expected to exist in a deep geological repository, it is generally predicted that technetium will be present as TcO 2 .nH 2 O. The solubility of Tc(IV) is used as a source term in performance assessment of radioactive waste repository. Technetium oxide was prepared by reduction of a technetate solution with Sn 2+ . The solubility of Tc(IV) oxide has been determined in simulated groundwater and re-distilled water under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The effects of pH and CO 3 2- concentration of solution on solubility of Tc(IV) oxide were studied. The concentration of total technetium and Tc(IV) species in the solutions were periodically determined by separating the oxidized and reduced technetium species using a solvent extraction procedure and counting the beta activity of the 99 Tc with a liquid scintillation counter. The experimental results show that the rate of oxidation of Tc(IV) in simulated groundwater and re-distilled water is about (1.49∼1.86) x 10 -9 mol/(L.d) under aerobic conditions, but Tc(IV) in simulated groundwater and re-distilled water is not oxidized under anaerobic conditions. Under aerobic or anaerobic conditions the solubility of Tc(IV) oxide in simulated groundwater and re-distilled water is equal on the whole after centrifugation or ultrafiltration. The solubility of Tc(IV) oxide decreases with the increase of pH at pH 10 and is pH independent in the range 2 -8 to 10 -9 mol/L at 2 3 2- concentration. These data could be used to estimate the Tc(IV) solubility for cases where solubility limits transport of technetium in reducing environments of high-level waste repositories. (authors)

  10. AW-101 entrained solids - Solubility versus temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GJ Lumetta; RC Lettau; GF Piepel

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the solubility of the solids entrained in the diluted AW-101 low-activity waste (LAW) sample. BNFL requested Battelle to dilute the AW-1-1 sample using de-ionized water to mimic expected plant operating conditions. BNFL further requested Battelle to assess the solubility of the solids present in the diluted AW-101 sample versus temperature conditions of 30, 40, and 50 C. BNFL requested these tests to assess the composition of the LAW supernatant and solids versus expected plant-operating conditions. The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-7, Rev. 0, Determination of the Solubility of LAW Entrained Solids. The test went according to plan, with no deviations from the test plan

  11. Portland clinker production with carbonatite waste and tire-derived fuel: crystallochemistry of minor and trace elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. R. D. Andrade

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results on the composition of Portland clinkers produced with non-conventional raw-materials and fuels, focusing on the distribution of selected trace elements. Clinkers produced with three different fuel compositions were sampled in an industrial plant, where all other parameters were kept unchanged. The fuels have chemical fingerprints, which are sulfur for petroleum coke and zinc for TDF (tire-derived fuel. Presence of carbonatite in the raw materials is indicated by high amounts of strontium and phosphorous. Electron microprobe data was used to determine occupation of structural site of both C3S and C2S, and the distribution of trace elements among clinker phases. Phosphorous occurs in similar proportions in C3S and C2S; while considering its modal abundance, C3S is its main reservoir in the clinker. Sulfur is preferentially partitioned toward C2S compared to C3S. Strontium substitutes for Ca2+ mainly in C2S and in non-silicatic phases, compared to C3S.

  12. Use of leaching tests to quantify trace element release from waste to energy bottom ash amended pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessler, Justin G; Townsend, Timothy G; Ferraro, Christopher C

    2015-12-30

    A series of roadway tests strips were paved on-site at a landfill in Florida, U.S. Waste to energy (WTE) bottom ash was used as a partial course aggregate replacement in a hot mix asphalt (HMA) and a Portland cement concrete (PCC) pavement, along with control HMA and PCC sections. This allowed for a comparison of the relative degree of leaching between both materials (HMA and PCC) as well as between the ash-amended and control pavements. Batch and monolithic tank leaching tests were conducted on the pavements. Testing of the PCC samples demonstrated that Mo and Al were elevated above regulatory thresholds for both the control and ash amended samples. Further leach testing demonstrated that the release of Mo was likely from the PCC and not a result of the inclusion of the BA into pavement. Batch leach testing of ash-amended HMA samples revealed Sb as a constituent of potential concern. The results of the monolith leaching test displayed leaching of Sb within the same order of magnitude as the regulatory threshold. Calculation of the leachability index (LI) for Sb found that it would have limited mobility when incorporated in the HMA matrix. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Waste disposal: preliminary studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, J.F. de.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of high level radioactive waste disposal is analyzed, suggesting an alternative for the final waste disposal from irradiated fuel elements. A methodology for determining the temperature field around an underground disposal facility is presented. (E.G.) [pt

  14. Radioactive elements and ionizing radiation in the environment of the alternative sites for the final disposal of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voutilainen, A.

    1998-09-01

    This report summarises a short review of the origin of earth's natural radioactivity and concentrations of radioactive elements in ground and water. The radiation doses of natural and artificial sources are examined and presented for population of both Finland and the whole world. The report includes data on the radioactivity of indoor and outdoor air, rainwater, surface and groundwater, soil and bedrock in Eurajoki, Kuhmo, Loviisa and Aeaenekoski. The radiation doses from natural sources are also estimated in each municipality separately. Natural radiation is the most significant source of radiation exposure in the world. We eat, drink and breathe radioactive elements. The most radiation dose to man comes from indoor radon. We get cosmic radiation from space and terrestrial gamma radiation from ground. Indoor radon and radon in drilled wells causes the largest variation in radiation doses between municipalities or individuals. The radiation doses in Loviisa and Aeaenekoski are bigger and in Eurajoki and Kuhmo smaller than the average in Finland. The average radiation dose from natural radiation and Chernobyl fallout is 3,5 milli-sievert per year (mSv/a) for a Finn who lives in a detached house and uses household water from waterworks. The corresponding radiation dose in Eurajoki is 3,3, in Kuhmo 2,6, in Loviisa 8,3 and in Aeaenekoski 4,2 mSv/a The average doses for persons who use household water from drilled wells are respectively 5,4 (all Finns), 4,1 (Eurajoki), 3,5 (Kuhmo), 12 (Loviisa) and 5,4 mSv/a (Aeaenekoski). The other sources of radiation, excluding indoor radon and household water, cause together less than 1 mSv per year, although these doses vary in different municipalities, too. (orig.)

  15. Aluminum Solubility in Complex Electrolytes - 13011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnew, S.F. [Columbia Energy and Environmental Services, Inc., 1806 Terminal Dr., Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Johnston, C.T. [Dept. of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Predicting aluminum solubility for Hanford and Savannah River waste liquids is very important for their disposition. It is a key mission goal at each Site to leach as much aluminum as practical from sludges in order to minimize the amount of vitrified high level waste. And it is correspondingly important to assure that any soluble aluminum does not precipitate during subsequent decontamination of the liquid leachates with ion exchange. This report shows a very simple and yet thermodynamic model for aluminum solubility that is consistent with a wide range of Al liquors, from simple mixtures of hydroxide and aluminate to over 300 Hanford concentrates and to a set of 19 Bayer liquors for temperatures from 20-100 deg. C. This dimer-dS{sub mix} (DDS) model incorporates an ideal entropy of mixing along with previous reports for the Al dimer, water activities, gibbsite, and bayerite thermodynamics. We expect this model will have broad application for nuclear wastes as well as the Bayer gibbsite process industry. (authors)

  16. Nuclear waste glasses of SON68 type and their weathering products, optical spectroscopy of uranium and rare earth elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ollier, N.

    2002-09-01

    This study concerns the long-term behaviour of high-level waste glasses and more precisely lanthanides and uranium behaviour with weathering. The leaching was performed on glass powder at 90 deg. C in a pseudo-dynamic mode. Two weathering gels were obtained, with different renewal rate and leaching duration. In glass, we demonstrate that U(IV) and U(VI) species coexist. Time-resolved spectroscopy and XPS measurements show that hexavalent uranium is present under uranyl entities and UO 3 type environment. In weathering gels, U(VI) is still present under uranyl form as well as uranyl hydroxide. It means that U behaviour depends on renewal rate, moreover precipitation of crystallized phases like bauranolte BaU 2 O 7 .xH 2 O and uranyl silicate of uranophane type occur. Concerning lanthanides, Eu 3+ was used as a luminescent local probe. Two sites were found in glass and gels. In glass, the sites were attributed to a silicate and a borate one. In gels, the silicate site is conserved whereas the second one is supposed to correspond to an aluminate one. Photoluminescence and Moessbauer measurements show that the rare earth site symmetry increases in gel. This result confirms that order is higher in gels than in glass. The third part of the thesis concerns irradiation effect in glasses. The main result shows some behaviour differences between a 5 oxides borosilicate glass and a more complex one close to the SON68 glass. Presence of mixed alkali (Na, Li and Cs) seems to notably reduce the Na migration. (author)

  17. KRISTALLIN-I: estimates of solubility limits for safety relevant radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berner, U.

    1995-04-01

    The safety concept for the Swiss high level radioactive waste repository is based on a multiple barrier system. Within the concept of the safety analysis KRISTALLIN-I, the waste glass starts corroding after failure of the massive steel canister and nuclides are released to the bentonite backfill. This release is limited by restricted solubility of solid phases. The present work quantifies the maximum expected concentrations of the elements Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, Tc, Ni, Pd, Se, Ra, Zr, Nb, Sn, Pb, Sb, Bi and Sm within the reference bentonite porewater with pH = 9, Eh = -400 mV and I = 0.08 M at 50 o C. In a first step, maximum expected concentrations were calculated with a geochemical speciation code (MINEQL) based on a documented thermodynamic database. In a second step, the values obtained in this way were carefully reviewed and modified, based on extended geochemical considerations and system-dependent parameters. Thereby, the relevance of potentially limiting solids, chemical analogies, absolute and relative inventories and recent experimental findings from laboratory and natural systems were particularly considered. The expected groundwater composition in the crystalline host rock (modified by the barrier material bentonite) covers a rather narrow pH range from 8.5 to 9. Within this narrow pH range, solubility limits may be termed as pH independent since computable pH effects are never significant compared to the general uncertainty of the solubility limits. The chemical model defining the reference groundwater predicts a system-wide Eh ranging from -400 mV up to +100 mV. A slightly oxidising near-field will stabilize the generally more soluble higher oxidation states of redox sensitive radionuclides. Based on the available thermodynamic data the elements U, Tc, Se and Pa are predicted not to be solubility limited at +75 mV. Therefore, a more detailed investigation of the redox behaviour of critical elements and, much more importantly, a very careful

  18. Scientific basis for nuclear waste management XX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, W.J.; Triay, I.R.

    1997-01-01

    The proceedings are divided into the following topical sections: Glass formulations and properties; Glass/water interactions; Cements in radioactive waste management; Ceramic and crystalline waste forms; Spent nuclear fuel; Waste processing and treatment; Radiation effects in ceramics, glasses, and nuclear waste materials; Waste package materials; Radionuclide solubility and speciation; Radionuclide sorption; Radionuclide transport; Repository backfill; Performance assessment; Natural analogues; Excess plutonium dispositioning; and Chernobyl-related waste disposal issues. Papers within scope have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  19. IGNEOUS INTRUSION IMPACTS ON WASTE PACKAGES AND WASTE FORMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernot, P.

    2004-01-01

    -chemical environment and seepage water alteration by reaction with intruded basalt. The scope of this model only includes impacts to the components stated above, and does not include impacts to other engineered barrier system (EBS) components such as the waste package pallet. The results of this model report will be used in TSPA for several parameters including (1) temperature of magma (used for the temperature of the waste form after an intrusion) (2) temperature increase in Zone 2 due to intrusion to evaluate impact to Zone 2 waste packages; (3) effects of exsolved gases reaching Zone 2 to evaluate impact to Zone 2 waste packages; and (4) pH and ionic strength of water reacted with basalt to be used in conjunction with ''Dissolved Concentration Limits of Radioactive Elements'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS: 163152]) to determine solubility of spent fuel within the basalt. Ionic strength will also be used in conjunction with ''Waste Form and In-Drift Colloids-Associated Radionuclide Concentrations: Abstraction and Summary'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS: 166845]) for stability of colloids

  20. Comparison of the bioavailability of elemental waste laden soils using ''in vivo'' and ''in vitro'' analytical methodology and refinement of exposure/dose models. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, B.; Gallo, M.; Georgopoulos, P.; Lioy, P.J.; Tate, R.

    1998-01-01

    'The authors hypotheses are: (1) the more closely the synthetic, in vitro, extractant mimics the extraction properties of the human digestive bio-fluids, the more accurate will be the estimate of an internal dose; (2) performance can be evaluated by in vivo studies with a rat model and quantitative examination of a mass balance, calculation and dose estimates from model simulations for the in vitro and in vivo system; and (3) the concentration of the elements Pb, Cd, Cr and selected Radionuclides present in the bioavailable fraction obtained with a synthetic extraction system will be a better indicator of contaminant ingestion from a contaminated soil because it represents the portion of the mass which can yield exposure, uptake and then the internal dose to an individual. As of April 15, 1998, they have made significant progress in the development of a unified approach to the examination of bioavailability and bioaccessibility of elemental contamination of soils for the ingestion route of exposure. This includes the initial characterization of the soil, in vitro measurements of bioaccessibility, and in vivo measurements of bioavailability. They have identified the basic chemical and microbiological characteristics of waste laden soils. These have been used to prioritize the soils for potential mobility of the trace elements present in the soil. Subsequently they have employed a mass balance technique, which for the first time tracked the movement and distribution of elements through an in vitro or in vivo experimental protocol to define the bioaccessible and the bioavailable fractions of digested soil. The basic mass balance equation for the in vitro system is: MT = MSGJ + MIJ + MR. where MT is the total mass extractable by a specific method, MSGJ, is the mass extracted by the saliva and the gastric juices, MIJ is the mass extracted by the intestinal fluid, and MR is the unextractable portion of the initial mass. The above is based upon the use of a synthetic

  1. Occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes and mobile genetic elements in enterococci and genomic DNA during anaerobic digestion of pharmaceutical waste sludge with different pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Juan; Lu, XueTing; Zhang, JunYa; Sui, Qianwen; Wang, Rui; Chen, Meixue; Wei, Yuansong

    2017-07-01

    Pharmaceutical waste sludge harbors large amounts of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and mobile genetic elements (MGEs), and it is necessary to study the reduction of ARGs and MGEs during sludge treatment. Therefore, the antibiotic resistance phenotypes and genotypes of enterococci, and the ARGs and MGEs in genomic DNA were investigated during anaerobic digestion (AD) with microwave (MW), thermal hydrolysis (TH) and ozone pretreatment. Results showed that sludge pretreatment increased the occurrence of the resistance phenotypes and genotypes of enterococci. During AD, the resistance of enterococci to macrolides decreased, except for in the MW-pretreated sludge. Horizontal gene transfer and co-occurrence of ermB and tetM in enterococci resulted in increased tetracycline resistance of enterococci throughout the sludge treatment. MGEs such as intI1, ISCR1 and Tn916/1545 had a significant effect on the distribution of ARGs. AD with pretreatment, especially TH pretreatment, resulted in greater ARGs and MGEs reduction and improved methane production. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. The solubility of metals in Pb-17Li liquid alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgstedt, H.U.; Feuerstein, H.

    1992-01-01

    The solubility data of iron in the eutectic alloy Pb-17Li which were evaluated from corrosion tests in a turbulent flow of the molten alloy are discussed in the frame of solubilities of the transition metals in liquid lead. It is shown that the solubility of iron in the alloy is close to that in lead. This is also the fact for several other alloying elements of steels. A comparison of all known data shows that they are in agreement with generally shown trends for the solubility of the transition metals in low melting metals. These trends indicate comparably high solubilities of nickel and manganese in the liquid metals, lower saturation concentration of vanadium, chromium, iron, and cobalt, and extremely low solubility of molybdenum. (orig.)

  3. Alcohol production from pineapple waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban-Koffi, L. (Ministry of Scientific Research, Abidjan (CI). Ivorian Center of Technological Research); Han, Y.W. (USDA, Southern Regional Research Center, New Orleans, LA (US))

    1990-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zymomonas mobilis were grown on pineapple waste and their alcohol production characteristics compared. The pineapple waste consisted of 19% cellulose, 22% hemi-cellulose, 5% lignin and 53% cell soluble matters but concentration of soluble sugars, which included 5.2% sucrose, 3.1% glucose and 3.4% fructose, was relatively low and pretreatment of the substrate was needed. Pretreatment of pineapple waste with cellulase and hemi-cellulase and then fermentation with S. cerevisiae or Z. mobilis produced about 8% ethanol from pineapple waste in 48 h. (author).

  4. Revisiting Pocos de Caldas. Application of the co-precipitation approach to establish realistic solubility limits for performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, J.; Duro, L.; Jordana, S.; Cera, E.

    1996-02-01

    Solubility limits constitute a critical parameter for the determination of the mobility of radionuclides in the near field and the geosphere, and consequently for the performance assessment of nuclear waste repositories. Mounting evidence from natural system studies indicate that trace elements, and consequently radionuclides, are associated to the dynamic cycling of major geochemical components. We have recently developed a thermodynamic approach to take into consideration the co-precipitation and co-dissolution processes that mainly control this linkage. The approach has been tested in various natural system studies with encouraging results. The Pocos de Caldas natural analogue was one of the sites where a full testing of our predictive geochemical modelling capabilities were done during the analogue project. We have revisited the Pocos de Caldas data and expanded the trace element solubility calculations by considering the documented trace metal/major ion interactions. This has been done by using the co-precipitation/co-dissolution approach. The outcome is as follows: A satisfactory modelling of the behaviour of U, Zn and REEs is achieved by assuming co-precipitation with ferrihydrite. Strontium concentrations are apparently controlled by its co-dissolution from Sr-rich fluorites. From the performance assessment point of view, the present work indicates that calculated solubility limits using the co-precipitation approach are in close agreement with the actual trace element concentrations. Furthermore, the calculated radionuclide concentrations are 2-4 orders of magnitude lower than conservative solubility limits calculated by assuming equilibrium with individual trace element phases. 34 refs, 18 figs, 13 tabs

  5. Revisiting Pocos de Caldas. Application of the co-precipitation approach to establish realistic solubility limits for performance assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, J.; Duro, L.; Jordana, S.; Cera, E. [QuantiSci, Barcelona (Spain)

    1996-02-01

    Solubility limits constitute a critical parameter for the determination of the mobility of radionuclides in the near field and the geosphere, and consequently for the performance assessment of nuclear waste repositories. Mounting evidence from natural system studies indicate that trace elements, and consequently radionuclides, are associated to the dynamic cycling of major geochemical components. We have recently developed a thermodynamic approach to take into consideration the co-precipitation and co-dissolution processes that mainly control this linkage. The approach has been tested in various natural system studies with encouraging results. The Pocos de Caldas natural analogue was one of the sites where a full testing of our predictive geochemical modelling capabilities were done during the analogue project. We have revisited the Pocos de Caldas data and expanded the trace element solubility calculations by considering the documented trace metal/major ion interactions. This has been done by using the co-precipitation/co-dissolution approach. The outcome is as follows: A satisfactory modelling of the behaviour of U, Zn and REEs is achieved by assuming co-precipitation with ferrihydrite. Strontium concentrations are apparently controlled by its co-dissolution from Sr-rich fluorites. From the performance assessment point of view, the present work indicates that calculated solubility limits using the co-precipitation approach are in close agreement with the actual trace element concentrations. Furthermore, the calculated radionuclide concentrations are 2-4 orders of magnitude lower than conservative solubility limits calculated by assuming equilibrium with individual trace element phases. 34 refs, 18 figs, 13 tabs.

  6. Solubility of iron in liquid lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali-Khan, I.

    1981-01-01

    The use of liquid lead in high temperature chemical and metallurgical processes is well known. The structural materials applied for the containment of these processes are either iron base alloys or possess iron as an alloying element. Besides that, lead itself is alloyed in some steels to achieve some very useful properties. For understanding the effect of liquid lead in such structural materials, it is important to determine the solubility of iron in liquid lead which would also be indicative of the stability of these alloys. At the institute of reactor materials of KFA Juelich, investigations have been conducted to determine the solubility of iron in liquid lead up to a temperature of about 1000 0 C. In this presentation the data concerning the solubility of iron in liquid lead are brought up to date and discussed including the results of our previous investigations. (orig.)

  7. Thermodynamic data development using the solubility method (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Dhanpat; Yui, Mikazu

    2013-05-01

    The solubility method is one of the most powerful tools to obtain reliable thermodynamic data for 1) solubility products of discrete solids and double salts, 2) complexation constants for various ligands, 3) development of data in a wide range of pH values, 4) evaluation of data for metals that form very insoluble solids (e.g. tetravalent actinides), 5) determining solubility-controlling solids in different types of wastes and 6) elevated temperatures for redox sensitive systems. This document is focused on describing various aspects of obtaining thermodynamic data using the solubility method. This manuscript deals with various aspects of conducting solubility studies, including selecting the study topic, modeling to define important variables, selecting the range of variables and experimental parameters, anticipating results, general equipment requirements, conducting experiments, and interpreting experimental data. (author)

  8. DEPENDENCY OF SULFATE SOLUBILITY ON MELT COMPOSITION AND MELT POLYMERIZATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JANTZEN, CAROL M.

    2004-01-01

    Sulfate and sulfate salts are not very soluble in borosilicate waste glass. When sulfate is present in excess it can form water soluble secondary phases and/or a molten salt layer (gall) on the melt pool surface which is purported to cause steam explosions in slurry fed melters. Therefore, sulfate can impact glass durability while formation of a molten salt layer on the melt pool can impact processing. Sulfate solubility has been shown to be compositionally dependent in various studies, (e.g. , B2O3, Li2O, CaO, MgO, Na2O, and Fe2O3 were shown to increase sulfate solubility while Al2O3 and SiO2 decreased sulfate solubility). This compositional dependency is shown to be related to the calculated melt viscosity at various temperatures and hence the melt polymerization

  9. Effect of anthropogenic organic complexants on the solubility of Ni, Th, U(IV) and U(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felipe-Sotelo, M., E-mail: m.felipe-sotelo@lboro.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, Loughborough University, LE11 3TU Loughborough, Leicestershire (United Kingdom); Edgar, M. [Department of Chemistry, Loughborough University, LE11 3TU Loughborough, Leicestershire (United Kingdom); Beattie, T. [MCM Consulting. Täfernstrasse 11, CH 5405 Baden-Dättwil (Switzerland); Warwick, P. [Enviras Ltd., LE11 3TU Loughborough, Leicestershire (United Kingdom); Evans, N.D.M.; Read, D. [Department of Chemistry, Loughborough University, LE11 3TU Loughborough, Leicestershire (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Citrate increases the solubility of Ni, Th and U between 3 and 4 orders of magnitude. • Theophrastite is the solubility controlling phase of Ni in 95%-saturated Ca(OH){sub 2}. • U(VI) and Ni may form Metal-citrate-OH complexes stabilised by the presence of Ca{sup 2+}. - Abstract: The influence of anthropogenic organic complexants (citrate, EDTA and DTPA from 0.005 to 0.1 M) on the solubility of nickel(II), thorium(IV) and uranium (U(IV) and U(VI)) has been studied. Experiments were carried out in 95%-saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} solutions, representing the high pH conditions anticipated in the near field of a cementitious intermediate level radioactive waste repository. Results showed that Ni(II) solubility increased by 2–4 orders of magnitude in the presence of EDTA and DTPA and from 3 to 4 orders of magnitude in the case of citrate. Citrate had the greatest effect on the solubility of Th(IV) and U(IV)/(VI). XRD and SEM analyses indicate that the precipitates are largely amorphous; only in the case of Ni(II), is there some evidence of incipient crystallinity, in the form of Ni(OH){sub 2} (theophrastite). A study of the effect of calcium suggests that U(VI) and Ni(II) may form metal-citrate-OH complexes stabilised by Ca{sup 2+}. Thermodynamic modelling underestimates the concentrations in solution in the presence of the ligands for all the elements considered here. Further investigation of the behaviour of organic ligands under hyperalkaline conditions is important because of the use of the thermodynamic constants in preparing the safety case for the geological disposal of radioactive wastes.

  10. Sorption, Diffusion and Solubility Databases for Performance Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Gutierrez, M.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents a deterministic and probabilistic databases for application in Performance Assessment of a high-level radioactive waste disposal. This work includes a theoretical description of sorption, diffusion and solubility phenomena of radionuclides in geological media. The report presents and compares the databases of different nuclear wastes management agencies, describes the materials in the Spanish reference system, and the results of sorption diffusion and solubility in this system, with both the deterministic and probabilistic approximation. The probabilistic approximation is presented in the form of probability density functions (pdf). (Author) 52 refs

  11. Soluble theory with massive ghosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarski, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    To investigate the unitarity of asymptotically free, higher-derivative theories, like certain models of quantum gravity, I study a prototype in two space-time dimensions. The prototype is a kind of higher-derivative nonlinear sigma model; it is asymptotically free, exhibits dimensional transmutation, and is soluble in a large-N expansion. The S-matrix elements, constructed from the analytic continuation of the Euclidean Green's functions, conserve probability to approx.O(N -1 ), but violate unitarity at approx.O(N -2 ). The model demonstrates that in higher-derivative theories unitarity, or the lack thereof, cannot be decided without explicit control over the infrared limit. Even so, the results suggest that there may exist some (rather special) asymptotically free, higher-derivative theories which are unitary

  12. The management of high-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennemann, Wm.L.

    1979-01-01

    The definition of high-level radioactive wastes is given. The following aspects of high-level radioactive wastes' management are discussed: fuel reprocessing and high-level waste; storage of high-level liquid waste; solidification of high-level waste; interim storage of solidified high-level waste; disposal of high-level waste; disposal of irradiated fuel elements as a waste

  13. Soluble CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger J

    2012-01-01

    CD163 is an endocytic receptor for haptoglobin-hemoglobin complexes and is expressed solely on macrophages and monocytes. As a result of ectodomain shedding, the extracellular portion of CD163 circulates in blood as a soluble protein (sCD163) at 0.7-3.9 mg/l in healthy individuals. The function o...

  14. Solubility Part 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tantra, Ratna; Bolea, Eduardo; Bouwmeester, H.; Rey-Castro, Carlos; David, C.A.A.; Dogné, Jean Michel; Laborda, Francisco; Laloy, Julie; Robinson, Kenneth N.; Undas, A.K.; Zande, van der M.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of different methods that can potentially be used to determine the solubility of nanomaterials. In general, the methods presented can be broadly divided into four categories: separation methods, methods to quantify free ions, methods to quantify total dissolved

  15. Devitrification of defense nuclear waste glasses: role of melt insolubles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, D.F.; Jantzen, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    Time-temperature-transformation (TTT) curves have been determined for simulated nuclear waste glasses bounding the compositional range in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Formulations include all of the minor chemical elements such as ruthenium and chromium which have limited solubility in borosilicate glasses. Heterogeneous nucleation of spinel on ruthenium dioxide, and subsequent nucleation of acmite on spinel is the major devitrification path. Heterogeneous nucleation on melt insolubles causes more rapid growth of crystalline devitrification phases, than in glass free of melt insolubles. These studies point out the importance of simulating waste glass composition and processing as accurately as possible to obtain reliable estimates of glass performance. 11 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  16. Solubility of heavy metals added to MSW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, H.M.; Lin, K.C.; Liu, M.H.; Pai, T.Z.; Lin, C.Y.; Liu, W.F.; Fang, G.C.; Lu, C.; Chiang, C.F.; Wang, S.C.; Chen, P.H.; Chen, J.K.; Chiu, H.Y.; Wu, K.C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the six heavy metal levels (Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni and Zn) in municipal solid waste (MSW) at different pHs. It intends to provide the baseline information of metals solubility in MSW co-disposed or co-digested with MSW incinerator ashes in landfill or anaerobic bioreactors or heavy metals contaminated in anaerobic digesters. One milliliter (equal to 1 mg) of each metal was added to the 100 ml MSW and the batch reactor test was carried out. The results showed that higher HNO 3 and NaOH were consumed at extreme pH of 1 and 13 compared to those from pH 2 to 11 due to the comparably higher buffer capacity. Pb was found to have the least soluble level, highest metal adsorption (%) and highest partitioning K d (l g -1 ) between pH 3 and 12. In contrast, Ni showed the highest soluble level, lowest metal adsorption (%) and lowest K d (l g -1 ) between pH 4 and 12. Except Ni and Cr, other four metals seemed to show the amphibious properties as comparative higher solubility was found in the acidic and basic conditions

  17. Solubility of heavy metals added to MSW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, H.M. [Department of Environmental Engineering and Management, Chaoyang University of Technology, 168 Gifong E. Road, Wufong, Taichung County 41349, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: hmlo@cyut.edu.tw; Lin, K.C. [Department of Occupational Safety and Health, Chung Shan Medical University, 110, Sec. 1, Jiangguo N. Rd., Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Liu, M.H.; Pai, T.Z. [Department of Environmental Engineering and Management, Chaoyang University of Technology, 168 Gifong E. Road, Wufong, Taichung County 41349, Taiwan (China); Lin, C.Y. [Department of Soil and Water Conservation, Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuokuang Road, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Liu, W.F. [Department of Electronical Engineering, Feng Chia University, 100 Wenhwa Road, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Fang, G.C. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Hungkuang University, 34 Chung-Chie Road, Sha Lu, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China); Lu, C. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuokuang Road, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Chiang, C.F. [Department of Health Risk Management, China Medical University, No. 91 Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Wang, S.C.; Chen, P.H.; Chen, J.K.; Chiu, H.Y.; Wu, K.C. [Department of Environmental Engineering and Management, Chaoyang University of Technology, 168 Gifong E. Road, Wufong, Taichung County 41349, Taiwan (China)

    2009-01-15

    This paper aims to investigate the six heavy metal levels (Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni and Zn) in municipal solid waste (MSW) at different pHs. It intends to provide the baseline information of metals solubility in MSW co-disposed or co-digested with MSW incinerator ashes in landfill or anaerobic bioreactors or heavy metals contaminated in anaerobic digesters. One milliliter (equal to 1 mg) of each metal was added to the 100 ml MSW and the batch reactor test was carried out. The results showed that higher HNO{sub 3} and NaOH were consumed at extreme pH of 1 and 13 compared to those from pH 2 to 11 due to the comparably higher buffer capacity. Pb was found to have the least soluble level, highest metal adsorption (%) and highest partitioning K{sub d} (l g{sup -1}) between pH 3 and 12. In contrast, Ni showed the highest soluble level, lowest metal adsorption (%) and lowest K{sub d} (l g{sup -1}) between pH 4 and 12. Except Ni and Cr, other four metals seemed to show the amphibious properties as comparative higher solubility was found in the acidic and basic conditions.

  18. Mediated electrochemical hazardous waste destruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, R.G.; Farmer, J.C.; Wang, F.T.

    1992-03-01

    There are few permitted processes for mixed waste (radioactive plus chemically hazardous) treatment. We are developing an electrochemical process, based upon mediated electrochemical oxidation (MEO), that converts toxic organic components of mixed waste to water, carbon dioxide, and chloride or chloride precipitates. Aggressive oxidizer ions such as Ag 2+ , Co 3+ , or Fe 3+ are produced at an anode. These can attack organic molecules directly, and may also produce hydroxyl free radicals that promote destruction. Solid and liquid radioactive waste streams containing only inorganic radionuclide forms may be treated with existing technology and prepared for final disposal. The coulombic efficiency of the process has been determined, as well as the destruction efficiency for ethylene glycol, a surrogate waste. In addition, hazardous organic materials are becoming very expensive to dispose of and when they are combined with transuranic radioactive elements no processes are presently permitted. Mediated electrochemical oxidation is an ambient- temperature aqueous-phase process that can be used to oxidize organic components of mixed wastes. Problems associated with incineration, such as high-temperature volatilization of radionuclides, are avoided. Historically, Ag(II) has been used as a mediator in this process. Fe(III) and Co(III) are attractive alternatives to Ag(II) since they form soluble chlorides during the destruction of chlorinated solvents. Furthermore, silver itself is toxic heavy metal. Quantitative data have been obtained for the complete oxidation of ethylene glycol by Fe(III) and Co(III). Though ethylene glycol is a nonhalogenated organic, these data have enabled us to make direct comparisons of activities of Fe(III) and Co(III) with Ag(II). Very good quantitative data for the oxidation of ethylene glycol by Ag(II) had already been collected

  19. Environmental mineralogy - Understanding element behavior in ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown Jr, G.E.; Calas, G.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental Mineralogy has developed over the past decade in response to the recognition that minerals are linked in many important ways with the global ecosystem. Minerals are the main repositories of the chemical elements in Earth's crust and thus are the main sources of elements needed for the development of civilization, contaminant and pollutant elements that impact global and local ecosystems, and elements that are essential plant nutrients. These elements are released from minerals through natural processes, such as chemical weathering, and anthropogenic activities, such as mining and energy production, agriculture and industrial activities, and careless waste disposal. Minerals also play key roles in the biogeochemical cycling of the elements, sequestering elements and releasing them as the primary minerals in crustal rocks undergo various structural and compositional transformations in response to physical, chemical, and biological processes that produce secondary minerals and soils. These processes have resulted in the release of toxic elements such as arsenic in groundwater aquifers, which is having a major impact on the health of millions of people in South and Southeast Asia. The interfaces between mineral surfaces and aqueous solutions are the locations of most chemical reactions that control the composition of the natural environment, including the composition of natural waters. The nuclear fuel cycle, from uranium mining to the disposition of high-level nuclear waste, is also intimately related to minerals. A fundamental understanding of these processes requires molecular-scale information about minerals, their bulk structures and properties such as solubility, their surfaces, and their interactions with aqueous solutions, atmospheric and soil gases, natural organic matter, and biological organisms. Gaining this understanding is further complicated by the presence of natural, incidental, and manufactured nano-particles in the environment, which

  20. Evaluation of the distribution of rare earths elements in fluvial sediments, rocks and wastes correlated to the Caldas Ore Treatment Unit (UTM-Caldas), Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possas, Clara R.; Moura, Rodrigo R. de; Carvalho Filho, Carlos A. de; Menezes, Maria Ângela de B.C.

    2017-01-01

    The Caldas Ore Treatment Unit (UTM-Caldas), located at the municipality of Caldas (Minas Gerais-Brazil), was a site for the exploration and treatment of uranium between 1982 and 1995. The area is located in the Alcalino Complex of Poços de Caldas, a geologically peculiar region, composed of alkaline igneous rocks with exotic minerals, some rich in rare earth elements (REE). The UTM-Caldas uranium deposit was defined as a U, Th, Zr, Mo and REE mineralization. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the distribution of REEs in river sediments adjacent to UTM-Caldas and to verify if effluents from the mine are interfering in the concentration of REEs in these sediments. To develop the research, five samples were collected in 2011, including sediments from the Soberbo river, the waste dam and the tank of radio precipitation. The samples were prepared in the Sedimentology Laboratory of the Center for the Development of Nuclear Technology (CDTN), where the rocks and tailings were crushed, ground and pulverized while the sediments were sieved and an aliquot of the silt-clay fraction was separated for analysis at the CDTN. The analytical method employed was Neutron Activation Analysis (ANA), method k 0 . The samples were irradiated in the TRIGA MARK I IPR-R1 research reactor, and the REEs identified by gamma-spectrometry in the Neutron Activation Laboratory (LAN-CDTN). The results showed a distribution model of the REEs in the study area, which may be useful in evaluating of the environmental impacts of effluents from UTM-Caldas, now in the process of decommissioning

  1. Handbook of hazardous waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metry, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    The contents of this work are arranged so as to give the reader a detailed understanding of the elements of hazardous waste management. Generalized management concepts are covered in Chapters 1 through 5 which are entitled: Introduction, Regulations Affecting Hazardous Waste Management, Comprehensive Hazardous Waste Management, Control of Hazardous Waste Transportation, and Emergency Hazardous Waste Management. Chapters 6 through 11 deal with treatment concepts and are entitled: General Considerations for Hazardous Waste Management Facilities, Physical Treatment of Hazardous Wastes, Chemical Treatment of Hazardous Wastes, Biological Treatment of Hazardous Wastes, Incineration of Hazardous Wastes, and Hazardous Waste Management of Selected Industries. Chapters 12 through 15 are devoted to ultimate disposal concepts and are entitled: Land Disposal Facilities, Ocean Dumping of Hazardous Wastes, Disposal of Extremely Hazardous Wastes, and Generalized Criteria for Hazardous Waste Management Facilities

  2. An assessment of the long-term impact of chemically toxic contaminants from the disposal of nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, B.W.; Garisto, N.C.; Barnard, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the potential for impact on man of chemically toxic contaminants associated with the Canadian concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste. The elements of concern are determined through a series of screening criteria such as elemental abundances and solubilities. A systems variability analysis approach is then used to predict the possible concentrations of these elements that may arise in the biosphere. These concentrations are compared with environmental guidelines such as permissible levels in drinking water. Conclusions are made regarding the potential for the chemically toxic contaminants to have an impact on man. 54 refs

  3. Solubility product of tetravalent neptunium hydrous oxide and its ionic strength dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, K.; Mori, T. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), 4-33, Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1194 (Japan); Kohara, Y. [Inspection and Development Company, 4-33, Muramatsu, Tokaimura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1112 (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Solubility products (K{sub sp}) are key parameters in the context of reliable assessment of actinides migration in the repository conditions of high level radioactive waste. Neptunium (Np(IV)) is one of the most important actinide elements in the assessment, because of its inventory and the long half-life. A few previous data for Np(IV) solubility are varied widely due to experimental difficulties related to the extremely low solubility. We carried out batch-type experiments under nitrogen atmosphere using a glovebox. Np(V) was reduced to Np(III) by bubbling 0.5 ppm H{sub 2} / N{sub 2} gas through the solution for 30 days in the presence of platinum black as catalyst. After reducing treatment, the Np(III) converted to Np(IV) by auto-oxidation within approximately three days. The solubilities of the Np(IV) were measured in the pHc ranging from 2 to 4, at room temperature (23 {+-} 2 deg. C), in ionic strength(I) = 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 M NaClO{sub 4}. The equilibrium condition was confirmed by over-saturation and under-saturation method. After the equilibrium, the pH{sub c} and the E{sub h} value of the suspension were measured. The suspension was then filtered using a filter with a NMWL of 3000 (less than 2 nm{phi}). The Np radio activity in the filtrate was determined by alpha spectrometry and absorption spectra of Np(IV). The solubility decreased with increasing pHc and the hydrolysis species are predominantly formed. From the obtained results, the solubility products (K{sub sp}) of Np hydroxide, for the reaction, NpO{sub 2} . xH{sub 2}O {r_reversible} Np{sup 4+} + 4OH{sup -} + (x-2)H{sub 2}O, at I = 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 were determined by using formation constants ({beta}{sub n}(I)), which were determined for the reaction, Np{sup 4+} + nOH{sup -} {r_reversible} Np(OH){sub n}{sup (4-n)+}. By using the specific interaction theory (SIT), the solubility product of tetravalent Np hydrous oxide is calculated to be log K{sub sp}{sup 0

  4. Status report: Pretreatment chemistry evaluation FY1997 -- Wash and leach factors for the single-shell tank waste inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colton, N.G.

    1997-08-01

    The wash factors will be used to partition the single-shell tank (SST) inventory into soluble and insoluble portions. The leach factors will be used to estimate the further removal of bulk analytes, such as chromium, aluminum, and phosphate, as well as minor components. Wash and leach factors are given here for 18 analytes, elements expected to drive the volume of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW). These factors are determined by a weighting methodology developed earlier by this task. Tank-specific analyte inventory values depicted in Tank Waste Data Summary Worksheets, are calculated from concentrations obtained from characterization reports; the waste density; and the tank waste volume. The experimentally determined percentage of analytes removed by washing and leaching in a particular tank waste are translated into a mass (metric tons) in Experimental Washing and Leaching Data Summary Worksheets.

  5. Status report: Pretreatment chemistry evaluation FY1997 - Wash and leach factors for the single-shell tank waste inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colton, N.G.

    1997-08-01

    The wash factors will be used to partition the single-shell tank (SST) inventory into soluble and insoluble portions. The leach factors will be used to estimate the further removal of bulk analytes, such as chromium, aluminum, and phosphate, as well as minor components. Wash and leach factors are given here for 18 analytes, elements expected to drive the volume of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW). These factors are determined by a weighting methodology developed earlier by this task. Tank-specific analyte inventory values depicted in Tank Waste Data Summary Worksheets, are calculated from concentrations obtained from characterization reports; the waste density; and the tank waste volume. The experimentally determined percentage of analytes removed by washing and leaching in a particular tank waste are translated into a mass (metric tons) in Experimental Washing and Leaching Data Summary Worksheets

  6. Best-basis estimates of solubility of selected radionuclides in sludges in Hanford single-shell tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HARMSEN, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    The Hanford Defined Waste (HDW) model (Rev. 4) (Agnew et al. 1997) projects inventories (as of January 1, 1994) of 46 radionuclides in the Hanford Site underground waste storage tanks. To model the distribution of the 46 radionuclides among the 177 tanks, it was necessary for Agnew et al. to estimate the solubility of each radionuclide in the various waste types originally added to the single-shell tanks. Previous editions of the HDW model used single-point solubility estimates. The work described in this report was undertaken to provide more accurate estimates of the solubility of all 46 radionuclides in the various wastes

  7. Best-basis estimates of solubility of selected radionuclides in sludges in Hanford single-shell tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HARMSEN, R.W.

    1999-02-24

    The Hanford Defined Waste (HDW) model (Rev. 4) (Agnew et al. 1997) projects inventories (as of January 1, 1994) of 46 radionuclides in the Hanford Site underground waste storage tanks. To model the distribution of the 46 radionuclides among the 177 tanks, it was necessary for Agnew et al. to estimate the solubility of each radionuclide in the various waste types originally added to the single-shell tanks. Previous editions of the HDW model used single-point solubility estimates. The work described in this report was undertaken to provide more accurate estimates of the solubility of all 46 radionuclides in the various wastes.

  8. Uranyl Oxalate Solubility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leturcq, G.; Costenoble, S.; Grandjean, S. [CEA Marcoule DEN/DRCP/SCPS/LCA - BP17171 - 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    The solubility of uranyl oxalate was determined at ambient temperature by precipitation in oxalic-nitric solutions, using an initial uranyl concentration of 0.1 mol/L. Oxalic concentration varied from 0.075 to 0.3 mol/L while nitric concentration ranged between 0.75 and 3 mol/L. Dissolution tests, using complementary oxalic-nitric media, were carried out for 550 hours in order to study the kinetic to reach thermodynamic equilibrium. Similar solubility values were reached by dissolution and precipitation. Using the results, it was possible to draw the solubility surface versus oxalic and nitric concentrations and to determine both the apparent solubility constant of UO{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, 3H{sub 2}O (Ks) and the apparent formation constant of the first uranyl-oxalate complex UO{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4} (log {beta}1), for ionic strengths varying between 1 and 3 mol/L. Ks and log {beta}1 values were found to vary from 1.9 10{sup -8} to 9.2 10{sup -9} and from 5.95 to 6.06, respectively, when ionic strength varied from 1 to 3 mol/L. A second model may fit our data obtained at an ionic strength of 3 mol/L suggesting as reported by Moskvin et al. (1959) that no complexes are formed for [H{sup +}] at 3 M. The Ks value would then be 1.3 10{sup -8}. (authors)

  9. Solubility study of Tc(IV) in a granitic water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, D.J.; Yao, J.; Wang, B.; Bruggeman, C.; Maes, N.

    2007-01-01

    The deep geological disposal of the high level radioactive wastes is expected to be a safe disposal method in most countries. The long-lived fission product 99 Tc is present in large quantities in nuclear wastes and its chemical behavior in aqueous solution is of considerable interest. Under oxidizing conditions technetium exists as the anionic species TcO 4 - whereas under the reducing conditions, expected to exist in a deep geological repository, it is generally predicted that technetium will be present as TcO 2 .nH 2 O. Hence, the mobility of Tc(IV) in reducing groundwater may be limited by the solubility of TcO 2 .nH 2 O under these conditions. Due to this fact it is important to investigate the solubility of TcO 2 .nH 2 O. The solubility determines the release of radionuclides from waste form and is used as a source term in radionuclide migration analysis in performance assessment of radioactive waste repository. Technetium(IV) was prepared by reduction of a technetate solution with Sn 2+ . The solubility of Tc(IV) has been determined in simulated groundwater and redistilled water under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The effects of pH and CO 3 2- concentration of solution on solubility of Tc(IV) were studied. The concentration of total technetium and Tc(IV) species in the solutions were periodically determined by separating the oxidized and reduced technetium species using a solvent extraction procedure and counting the beta activity of the 99 Tc with a liquid scintillation counter. The experimental results show that the rate of oxidation of Tc(IV) in simulated groundwater and redistilled water is about (1.49 ∝ 1.86) x 10 -9 mol L -1 d -1 under aerobic conditions, while no Tc(IV) oxidation was detected in simulated groundwater and redistilled water under anaerobic conditions. Under aerobic or anaerobic conditions the solubility of Tc(IV) in simulated groundwater and redistilled water is equal on the whole after centrifugation or ultrafiltration. The

  10. Argon solubility in liquid steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, R; Dankert, O; Van Veen, A; Kamperman, AA

    2000-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to establish the solubility of argon in liquid interstitial-free steel. The solubility appears to be lower than 0.1 at ppb, The results are in line with argon solubilities reported in the literature on liquid iron. Semiempirical theories and calculations based on the

  11. Sampling and analyses of SRP high-level waste sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, J.A.; Kelley, J.A.; McMillan, T.S.

    1976-08-01

    Twelve 3-liter samples of high-heat waste sludges were collected from four Savannah River Plant waste tanks with a hydraulically operated sample collector of unique design. Ten of these samples were processed in Savannah River Laboratory shielded cell facilities, yielding 5.3 kg of washed, dried sludge products for waste solidification studies. After initial drying, each batch was washed by settling and decantation to remove the bulk of soluble salts and then was redried. Additional washes were by filtration, followed by final drying. Conclusions from analyses of samples taken during the processing steps were: (a) the raw sludges contained approximately 80 wt percent soluble salts, most of which were removed by the washes; (b) 90 Sr and 238 , 239 Pu remained in the sludges, but most of the 137 Cs was removed by washing; (c) small amounts of sodium, sulfate, and 137 Cs remained in the sludges after thorough washing; (d) no significant differences were found in sludge samples taken from different risers of one waste tank. Chemical and radiometric compositions of the sludge product from each tank were determined. The sludges had diverse compositions, but iron, manganese, aluminum, and uranium were principal elements in each sludge. 90 Sr was the predominant radionuclide in each sludge product

  12. The solubility and sorption of nickel and niobium under high pH conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilkington, N.J.; Stone, N.S.

    1990-01-01

    The solubilities of nickel and niobium were measured in a range of cement-equilibrated waters. For nickel the effects of cellulose degradation products and of chloride were examined and the dependence of nickel solubility on pH was measured. The sorption of nickel and niobium on to cement representative of the ''near field'' of a radioactive waste repository was also measured. (author)

  13. Mass transport of soluble species through backfill into surrounding rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Chul Hyung; Park, Hun Hwee

    1992-01-01

    Some soluble species may not be solubility-limited or congruent-released with the matrix species. For example, during the operation of the nuclear reactor, the fission products can be accumulated in the fuel-cladding gap, void, and grain boundaries of the fuel rods. In the waste package for spent-fuel placed in a geologic repository, the high solubility species of these fission products accumulated in the 'gap', e.g. cesium or iodine are expected to dissolve rapidly when ground water penetrates fuel rods. The time and space dependent mass transport for high solubility nuclides in the gap is analyzed, and its numerical illustrations are demonstrated. The approximate solution that is valid for all times is developed, and validated by comparison with an asymptotic solution and the solution obtained by the numerical inversion of Laplace transform covering the entire time span. (Author)

  14. Soluble porphyrin polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Jr., John Devens; Liddell, Paul Anthony

    2015-07-07

    Porphyrin polymers of Structure 1, where n is an integer (e.g., 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or greater) ##STR00001## are synthesized by the method shown in FIGS. 2A and 2B. The porphyrin polymers of Structure 1 are soluble in organic solvents such as 2-MeTHF and the like, and can be synthesized in bulk (i.e., in processes other than electropolymerization). These porphyrin polymers have long excited state lifetimes, making the material suitable as an organic semiconductor for organic electronic devices including transistors and memories, as well as solar cells, sensors, light-emitting devices, and other opto-electronic devices.

  15. Solubility of actinides and surrogates in nuclear glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Ch.

    2003-01-01

    The nuclear wastes are currently incorporated in borosilicate glass matrices. The resulting glass must be perfectly homogeneous. The work discussed here is a study of actinide (thorium and plutonium) solubility in borosilicate glass, undertaken to assess the extent of actinide solubility in the glass and to understand the mechanisms controlling actinide solubilization. Glass specimens containing; actinide surrogates were used to prepare and optimize the fabrication of radioactive glass samples. These preliminary studies revealed that actinide Surrogates solubility in the glass was enhanced by controlling the processing temperature, the dissolution kinetic of the surrogate precursors, the glass composition and the oxidizing versus reducing conditions. The actinide solubility was investigated in the borosilicate glass. The evolution of thorium solubility in borosilicate glass was determined for temperatures ranging from 1200 deg C to 1400 deg C.Borosilicate glass specimens containing plutonium were fabricated. The experimental result showed that the plutonium solubility limit ranged from 1 to 2.5 wt% PuO 2 at 1200 deg C. A structural approach based on the determination of the local structure around actinides and their surrogates by EXAFS spectroscopy was used to determine their structural role in the glass and the nature of their bonding with the vitreous network. This approach revealed a correlation between the length of these bonds and the solubility of the actinides and their surrogates. (author)

  16. Fiscal 1997 report of the development of high efficiency waste power generation technology. No.1 volume. Element technology development; Kokoritsu haikibutsu hatsuden gijutsu kaihatsu (yoso gijutsu kaihatsu). 1997 nendo hokokusho (daiichi bunsatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Following the previous fiscal year, the technology development was conducted of a high efficiency waste power generation system using general waste as fuel. In the development of high temperature high efficiency combustion furnace, a combustion test on the external circulating fluidized bed incinerator was made to obtain data on formation/decomposition of dioxins. Moreover, a combustion test was conducted using mock refuse, petroleum-derived waste and waste plastics, to confirm stabilized combustion characteristics and low pollution. In the development of a corrosion resistant superheater, made were the stress load high temperature corrosion test, study of intergranular corrosion by elements of impurities, etc. In the development of the environmental load reduction technology, conducted was the conceptional design of pulse plasma exhaust gas disposal equipment corresponding to the actual one. In the verification test in a pilot plant, the pilot plant passed the pre-use inspection and was completed in February 1998. In the study of an optimal total system, discussed were the data on the pilot plant verification test, measuring points, how to arrange them, etc. 2 refs., 88 figs., 50 tabs.

  17. Retardation of uranium and thorium by a cementitious backfill developed for radioactive waste disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felipe-Sotelo, M; Hinchliff, J; Field, L P; Milodowski, A E; Preedy, O; Read, D

    2017-07-01

    The solubility of uranium and thorium has been measured under the conditions anticipated in a cementitious, geological disposal facility for low and intermediate level radioactive waste. Similar solubilities were obtained for thorium in all media, comprising NaOH, Ca(OH) 2 and water equilibrated with a cement designed as repository backfill (NRVB, Nirex Reference Vault Backfill). In contrast, the solubility of U(VI) was one order of magnitude higher in NaOH than in the remaining solutions. The presence of cellulose degradation products (CDP) results in a comparable solubility increase for both elements. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data suggest that the solubility-limiting phase for uranium corresponds to a becquerelite-type solid whereas thermodynamic modelling predicts a poorly crystalline, hydrated calcium uranate phase. The solubility-limiting phase for thorium was ThO 2 of intermediate crystallinity. No breakthrough of either uranium or thorium was observed in diffusion experiments involving NRVB after three years. Nevertheless, backscattering electron microscopy and microfocus X-ray fluorescence confirmed that uranium had penetrated about 40 μm into the cement, implying active diffusion governed by slow dissolution-precipitation kinetics. Precise identification of the uranium solid proved difficult, displaying characteristics of both calcium uranate and becquerelite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Molybdenum solubility in aluminium nitrate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heres, X.; Sans, D.; Bertrand, M.; Eysseric, C. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Division, DRCP, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Brackx, E.; Domenger, R.; Excoffier, E. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Division, DTEC, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Valery, J.F. [AREVA-NC, DOR/RDP, Paris - La Defense (France)

    2016-07-01

    For over 60 years, research reactors (RR or RTR for research testing reactors) have been used as neutron sources for research, radioisotope production ({sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc), nuclear medicine, materials characterization, etc... Currently, over 240 of these reactors are in operation in 56 countries. They are simpler than power reactors and operate at lower temperature (cooled to below 100 C. degrees). The fuel assemblies are typically plates or cylinders of uranium alloy and aluminium (U-Al) coated with pure aluminium. These fuels can be processed in AREVA La Hague plant after batch dissolution in concentrated nitric acid and mixing with UOX fuel streams. The aim of this study is to accurately measure the solubility of molybdenum in nitric acid solution containing high concentrations of aluminium. The higher the molybdenum solubility is, the more flexible reprocessing operations are, especially when the spent fuels contain high amounts of molybdenum. To be most representative of the dissolution process, uranium-molybdenum alloy and molybdenum metal powder were dissolved in solutions of aluminium nitrate at the nominal dissolution temperature. The experiments showed complete dissolution of metallic elements after 30 minutes long stirring, even if molybdenum metal was added in excess. After an induction period, a slow precipitation of molybdic acid occurs for about 15 hours. The data obtained show the molybdenum solubility decreases with increasing aluminium concentration. The solubility law follows an exponential relation around 40 g/L of aluminium with a high determination coefficient. Molybdenum solubility is not impacted by the presence of gadolinium, or by an increasing concentration of uranium. (authors)

  19. An evaluation of trace element release associated with acid mine drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, P.J.; Yelton, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    The determination of trace element release from geologic materials, such as oil shale and coal overburden, is important for proper solid waste management planning. The objective of this study was to determine a correlation between release using the following methods: (1) sequential selective dissolution for determining trace element residencies, (2) toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), and (3) humidity cell weathering study simulating maximum trace element release. Two eastern oil shales were used, a New Albany shale that contains 4.6 percent pyrite, and a Chattanooga shale that contains 1.5 percent pyrite. Each shale was analyzed for elemental concentrations by soluble, adsorbed, organic, carbonate, and sulfide phases. The results of the results of the selective dissolution studies show that each trace element has a unique distribution between the various phases. Thus, it is possible to predict trace element release based on trace element residency. The TCLP results show that this method is suitable for assessing soluble trace element release but does not realistically assess potential hazards. The results of the humidity cell studies do demonstrate a more reasonable method for predicting trace element release and potential water quality hazards. The humidity cell methods, however, require months to obtain the required data with a large number of analytical measurements. When the selective dissolution data are compared to the trace element concentrations in the TCLP and humidity cell leachates, it is shown that leachate concentrations are predicted by the selective dissolution data. Therefore, selective dissolution may represent a rapid method to assess trace element release associated with acid mine drainage

  20. Evaluation on the structural soundness of the transport package for low-level radioactive waste for subsurface disposal against aircraft impact by finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Chihiro

    2009-01-01

    The structural analysis of aircraft crush on the transport package for low-level radioactive waste was performed using the impact force which was already used for the evaluation of the high-level waste transport package by LSDYNA code. The transport package was deformed, and stresses due to the crush exceeded elastic range. However, plastic strains yieled in the package were far than the elongation of the materials and the body of the package did not contact the disposal packages due to the deformation of the package. Therefore, it was confirmed that the package keeps its integrity against aircraft crush. (author)

  1. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In 1972, two chemical elements which generate a lot of heat were removed from the high level waste tanks at Hanford. Called cesium and strontium, these elements had...

  2. Study of the behavior of high activity waste produced during the regeneration of fast reactor fuel elements by the gaseous fluoride method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiriolovich, A.P.; Dem'yanovich, M.A.; Lavrinovich, Yu.G.; Skiba, O.V.; Gazizov, R.K.; Vorobey, M.P.

    The composition and certain physicochemical and radiation properties of waste obtained from reprocessing BOR-60 fuel by the gaseous fluoride method were studied on an experimental stand. It was found that from 80 to 85 percent of the total activity is concentrated in the fluorination cakes. From thermographic analysis, measurement of radiation-induced gas evolution and composition of the gaseous phase, it is concluded that the waste must be canned. Compatibility of carbon steel, austenitic steel, and nickel with low-activity fluoride cakes was studied. It is shown that the corrosion of these materials increases with temperature and moisture content of the medium. In the first stage of waste disposal, hermetic storage in special containers of stainless steel or nickel is recommended. From their corrosion resistance in low-activity fluoride cakes, the wall temperatures of containers made of St. 3 should not exceed 100 0 C, Kh18N10T 230 0 C, and nickel 300 0 C. Later, after cooling and a decrease in the γ activity of the waste (10 to 15 years), they can be reprocessed to recover valuable components (Am, Cm, etc.) and then buried. 5 tables

  3. Trace element geochemistry of self-burning and weathering of a mineralized coal waste dump: The Novátor mine, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kříbek, B.; Sýkorová, Ivana; Veselovský, F.; Laufek, F.; Malec, J.; Knésl, I.; Majer, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 173, MAR 15 (2017), s. 158-175 ISSN 0166-5162 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-11674S Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : coal wastes * organic matter * uranium * mineralization * self-heating * biomarkers Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry OBOR OECD: Geology Impact factor: 4.783, year: 2016

  4. Water-soluble vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konings, Erik J M

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous Determination of Vitamins.--Klejdus et al. described a simultaneous determination of 10 water- and 10 fat-soluble vitamins in pharmaceutical preparations by liquid chromatography-diode-array detection (LC-DAD). A combined isocratic and linear gradient allowed separation of vitamins in 3 distinct groups: polar, low-polar, and nonpolar. The method was applied to pharmaceutical preparations, fortified powdered drinks, and food samples, for which results were in good agreement with values claimed. Heudi et al. described a separation of 9 water-soluble vitamins by LC-UV. The method was applied for the quantification of vitamins in polyvitaminated premixes used for the fortification of infant nutrition products. The repeatability of the method was evaluated at different concentration levels and coefficients of variation were based on, for example, LC. Koontz et al. showed results of total folate concentrations measured by microbiological assay in a variety of foods. Samples were submitted in a routine manner to experienced laboratories that regularly perform folate analysis fee-for-service basis in the United States. Each laboratory reported the use of a microbiological method similar to the AOAC Official Method for the determination of folic acid. Striking was, the use of 3 different pH extraction conditions by 4 laboratories. Only one laboratory reported using a tri-enzyme extraction. Results were evaluated. Results for folic acid fortified foods had considerably lower between-laboratory variation, 9-11%, versus >45% for other foods. Mean total folate ranged from 14 to 279 microg/100 g for a mixed vegetable reference material, from 5 to 70 microg/100 g for strawberries, and from 28 to 81 microg/100 g for wholemeal flour. One should realize a large variation in results, which might be caused by slight modifications in the microbiological analysis of total folate in foods or the analysis in various (unfortified) food matrixes. Furthermore, optimal

  5. Waste acceptance and logistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, James H.

    1992-01-01

    There are three major components which are normally highlighted when the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is discussed - the repository, the monitored retrievable storage facility, and the transportation system. These are clearly the major physical system elements and they receive the greatest external attention. However, there will not be a successful, operative waste management system without fully operational waste acceptance plans and logistics arrangements. This paper will discuss the importance of developing, on a parallel basis to the normally considered waste management system elements, the waste acceptance and logistics arrangements to enable the timely transfer of spent nuclear fuel from more than one hundred and twenty waste generators to the Federal government. The paper will also describe the specific activities the Program has underway to make the necessary arrangements. (author)

  6. Pretreatment of Hanford PUREX Plant first-cycle waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, M.W.; Gerboth, D.M.; Peters, B.B.

    1987-04-01

    A process has been developed to pretreat neutralized, first-cycle high-level waste from the fuels reprocessing facility at the Hanford Site. The process separates solids from the supernate liquid, which contains soluble salts. The solids, including most of the fission products and transuranic elements, may then be vitrified for disposal, while the low-level supernate stream may be processed into a less expensive grout waste form. The process also includes ion exchange treatment of the separated supernate stream to remove radiocesium. A flow sheet based on these operations was completed to support a planned demonstration of the process in the Hanford Site B Plant canyon facility. 5 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  7. Solubility of gases in water at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crovetto, Rosa; Fernandez Prini, R.J.; Japas, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    In the primary circuits of the PWR, it is usual to find apolar gases such as the noble gases like, nitrogen, hydrogen (deuterium) and oxygen. These gases enter into the circuit partly due to failures in the fuel elements, accidental entries of air into the system and corrosion processes and radiolisis in the coolant media. For the operation of several auxiliary systems in the primary circuit, it is important to know the solubility of these gases in the flux of the circuit and the evaluation of physicochemical processes that take place. A cell has been built that allows to carry out determinations of solubility in the range of 350 deg C and 100 Mega Pascal. Three alternative experimental techniques have been developed to determine the solubility of the gases which are compared to each other. Measures of solubility of argon in H2O and D2O have been made in a wide range of temperatures. (V.B.) [es

  8. Wastes from fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschrich, H.

    1976-01-01

    Handling, treatment, and interim storage of radioactive waste, problems confronted with during the reprocessing of spent fuel elements from LWR's according to the Purex-type process, are dealt with in detail. (HR/LN) [de

  9. Students’ misconceptions on solubility equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiowati, H.; Utomo, S. B.; Ashadi

    2018-05-01

    This study investigated the students’ misconceptions of the solubility equilibrium. The participants of the study consisted of 164 students who were in the science class of second year high school. Instrument used is two-tier diagnostic test consisting of 15 items. Responses were marked and coded into four categories: understanding, misconception, understand little without misconception, and not understanding. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 45 students according to their written responses which reflected different perspectives, to obtain a more elaborated source of data. Data collected from multiple methods were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. Based on the data analysis showed that the students misconceptions in all areas in solubility equilibrium. They had more misconceptions such as in the relation of solubility and solubility product, common-ion effect and pH in solubility, and precipitation concept.

  10. On the americium oxalate solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakolupin, S.A.; Korablin, Eh.V.

    1977-01-01

    The americium oxalate solubility at different nitric (0.0-1 M) and oxalic (0.0-0.4 M) acid concentrations was investigated in the temperature range from 14 to 60 deg C. The dependence of americium oxalate solubility on the oxalic acid concentration was determined. Increasing oxalic acid concentration was found to reduce the americium oxalate solubility. The dependence of americium oxalate solubility on the oxalic acid concentration was noted to be a minimum at low acidity (0.1-0.3 M nitric acid). This is most likely due to Am(C 2 O 4 ) + , Am(C 2 O 4 ) 2 - and Am(C 2 O 4 ) 3 3- complex ion formation which have different unstability constants. On the basis of the data obtained, a preliminary estimate was carried out for the product of americium oxalate solubility in nitric acid medium (10 -29 -10 -31 ) and of the one in water (6.4x10 -20 )

  11. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide-Soluble Ligands for Extracting Actinide Metal Ions from Porous Solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, Mark L.

    2001-01-01

    Numerous types of actinide-bearing waste materials are found throughout the DOE complex. Most of these wastes consist of large volumes of non-hazardous materials contaminated with relatively small quantities of actinide elements. Separation of these wastes into their inert and radioactive components would dramatically reduce the costs of stabilization and disposal. For example, the DOE is responsible for decontaminating concrete within 7000 surplus contaminated buildings. The best technology now available for removing surface contamination from concrete involves removing the surface layer by grit blasting, which produces a large volume of blasting residue containing a small amount of radioactive material. Disposal of this residue is expensive because of its large volume and fine particulate nature. Considerable cost savings would result from separation of the radioactive constituents and stabilization of the concrete dust. Similarly, gas diffusion plants for uranium enrichment contain valuable high-purity nickel in the form of diffusion barriers. Decontamination is complicated by the extremely fine pores in these barriers, which are not readily accessible by most cleaning techniques. A cost-effective method for the removal of radioactive contaminants would release this valuable material for salvage. The objective of this project is to develop novel, substituted diphosphonic acid ligands that can be used for supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of actinide ions from solid wastes. Specifically, selected diphosphonic acids, which are known to form extremely stable complexes with actinides in aqueous and organic solution, are to be rendered carbon dioxide-soluble by the introduction of appropriate alkyl- or silicon-containing substituents. The metal complexation chemistry of these new ligands in SC-CO2 will then be investigated and techniques for their use in actinide extraction from porous solids developed

  12. Aqueous solubility, dispersibility and toxicity of biodiesels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollebone, B.P.; Fieldhouse, B.; Lumley, T.C.; Landriault, M.; Doe, K.; Jackman, P.

    2007-01-01

    The renewed interest in the use of biological fuels can be attributed to that fact that feedstocks for fatty-acid ester biodiesels are renewable and can be reclaimed from waste. Although there are significant benefits to using biodiesels, their increased use leaves potential for accidental release to the environment. Therefore, their environmental behaviours and impacts must be evaluated along with the risk associated with their use. Biodiesel fuels may be made from soy oil, canola oil, reclaimed restaurant grease, fish oil and animal fat. The toxicological fate of biofuel depends on the variability of its chemical composition. This study provided an initial assessment of the aqueous fate and effects of biodiesel from a broad range of commonly available feedstocks and their blends with petroleum diesels. The study focused primarily on the fate and impact of these fuels in fresh-water. The use of chemical dispersion as a countermeasure for saltwater was also investigated. The exposure of aquatic ecosystems to biodiesels and petroleum diesel occurs via the transfer of material from the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) into the aqueous phase, as both soluble and dispersed components. The aqueous solubilities of the fuels were determined from the equilibrium water-accommodated fraction concentrations. The acute toxicities of many biodiesels were reported for 3 test species used by Environment Canada for toxicological evaluation, namely rainbow trout, the water flea and a luminescent bacterium. This study also evaluated the natural potential for dispersion of the fuels in the water column in both low and high-energy wave conditions. Chemical dispersion as a potential countermeasure for biodiesel spills was also evaluated using solubility testing, acute toxicity testing, and dispersibility testing. It was shown that biodiesels have much different fates and impacts from petroleum diesels. The compounds partitioning into the water column are also very different for each

  13. Waste container and method for containing waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Akira; Matsushita, Mitsuhiro; Doi, Makoto; Nakatani, Seiichi.

    1990-01-01

    In a waste container, water-proof membranes and rare earth element layers are formed on the inner surface of a steel plate concrete container in which steel plates are embedded. Further, rear earth element detectors are disposed each from the inner side of the steel plate concrete container by way of a pressure pipe to the outer side of the container. As a method for actually containing wastes, when a plurality of vessels in which wastes are fixed are collectively enhoused to the waste container, cussioning materials are attached to the inner surface of the container and wastes fixing containers are stacked successively in a plurality of rows in a bag made of elastic materials. Subsequently, fixing materials are filled and tightly sealed in the waste container. When the waste container thus constituted is buried underground, even if it should be deformed to cause intrusion of rain water to the inside of the container, the rare earth elements in the container dissolved in the rain water can be detected by the detectors, the containers are exchanged before the rain water intruding to the inner side is leached to the surrounding ground, to previously prevent the leakage of radioactive nuclides. (K.M.)

  14. Mediated electrochemical hazardous waste destruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, R.G.; Farmer, J.C.; Wang, F.T.

    1991-08-01

    There are few permitted processes for mixed waste (radioactive plus chemically hazardous) treatment. We are developing electrochemical processes that convert the toxic organic components of mixed waste to water, carbon dioxide, an innocuous anions such as chloride. Aggressive oxidizer ions such as Ag 2+ or Ce +4 are produced at an anode. These can attack the organic molecules directly. They can also attack water which yields hydroxyl free radicals that in turn attack the organic molecules. The condensed (i.e., solid and/or liquid) effluent streams contain the inorganic radionuclide forms. These may be treated with existing technology and prepared for final disposal. Kinetics and the extent of destruction of some toxic organics have been measured. Depending on how the process is operated, coulombic efficiency can be nearly 100%. In addition, hazardous organic materials are becoming very expensive to dispose of and when they are combined with transuranic radioactive elements no processes are presently permitted. Mediated electrochemical oxidation is an ambient-temperature aqueous-phase process that can be used to oxidize organic components of mixed wastes. Problems associated with incineration, such as high-temperature volatilization of radionuclides, are avoided. Historically, Ag (2) has been used as a mediator in this process. Fe(6) and Co(3) are attractive alternatives to Ag(2) since they form soluble chlorides during the destruction of chlorinated solvents. Furthermore, silver itself is a toxic heavy metal. Quantitative data has been obtained for the complete oxidation of ethylene glycol by Fe(6) and Co(3). Though ethylene glycol is a nonhalogenated organic, this data has enabled us to make direct comparisons of activities of Fe(6) and Co(3) with Ag(2). Very good quantitative data for the oxidation of ethylene glycol by Ag(2) had already been collected. 4 refs., 6 figs

  15. [The Waste Package Project. Final report, July 1, 1995--February 27, 1996]: Volume 3, Stress study in faulted tunnel models by combined photoelastic measurements and finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladkany, S.G.; Huang, Yuping.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this part of the Nuclear Waste Package Project research at UNLV is to investigate the stresses in a model of a faulted mountain and the effect of the fault on the stability of drifts in a proposed High Level Nuclear Waste Repository. An investigation was performed to develop a proper technique for analyzing the stresses in and around three adjacent scaled tunnel models, along with the stress concentration factors resulting from the existence of a fault that penetrates two of the three tunnels, at an inclined angel of 44 degrees to the horizontal plane. The results and experience gained from this investigation will be used in a future project in which a full-size repository drift and a penetrating fault will be modeled and analyzed

  16. Synthesis of water soluble photo-initiators of thioxanthone derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Guozhen; Wang Jindi; Lin Yiqing

    1999-01-01

    Eight new photo-initiators of water-soluble thioxanthone derivatives were prepared. These compounds were identified by IR, NMR, MS and elemental analysis etc. The UV absorption wavelength, molar absorption coefficient and fluorescent quantum yield were determined. Furthermore, the relationship between structure and properties was discussed

  17. Synthesis of water soluble photo-initiators of thioxanthone derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guozhen, Qi; Jindi, Wang; Yiqing, Lin [Inst. of Fine Chemicals ECUST, Shanghai (China)

    1999-07-01

    Eight new photo-initiators of water-soluble thioxanthone derivatives were prepared. These compounds were identified by IR, NMR, MS and elemental analysis etc. The UV absorption wavelength, molar absorption coefficient and fluorescent quantum yield were determined. Furthermore, the relationship between structure and properties was discussed.

  18. Electrochemical Methods for Reprocessing Defective Fuel Elements and for Decontaminating Equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikheykin, S. V.; Rybakov, K. A.; Simonov, V. P.

    2002-01-01

    Reprocessing of fuel elements receives much consideration in nuclear engineering. Chemical and electrochemical methods are used for the purpose. For difficultly soluble materials based on zirconium alloys chemical methods are not suitable. Chemical reprocessing of defective or irradiated fuel elements requires special methods for their decladding because the dissolution of the clad material in nitric acid is either impossible (stainless steel, Zr alloys) or quite slow (aluminium). Fuel elements are cut in air-tight glove-boxes equipped with a dust collector and a feeder for crushed material. Chemical treatment is not free from limitations. For this reason we started a study of the feasibility of electrochemical methods for reprocessing defective and irradiated fuel elements. A simplified electrochemical technology developed makes it possible to recover expensive materials which were earlier wasted or required multi-step treatment. The method and an electrochemical cell are suitable for essentially complete dissolution of any fuel elements, specifically those made of materials which are difficultly soluble by chemical methods

  19. The nuclear waste containment and some aspects of the deep disposal concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felix, B.; Thorner, P.; Raimbault, P.; Beaulieu, F.

    1995-01-01

    The French agency for the management of nuclear waste, ANDRA, is in charge of investigating the feasibility of deep disposal of high level waste in at least two types of geologic formation, leading to the validation of disposal concepts with and without retrievability. Plans to build two underground laboratories are afoot. Meanwhile, parametric modelling studies have been performed, with interesting results, some of which are shown here in graphic form. It is proved that if the overpack surrounding waste containers can be made to last for a thousand years, the dose resulting from Sr-90 and Cs-137 is nil. Conversely, the dose from actinides such as americium and Th-229 is largely unaffected by the package, being determined by their own low solubilities and underground water flow. Temperature rise in a granite host formation was modelled as a function of the distance between disposal boreholes. Finite element two dimensional calculations of water flow through backfill were also performed. 1 ref., 8 figs

  20. Wastes in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    As human space activities have created more wastes on low and high Earth orbits over the past 50 years than the solar system injected meteorites over billions of years, this report gives an overview of this problem. It identifies the origins of these space debris and wastes (launchers, combustion residues, exploitation wastes, out-of-use satellites, accidental explosions, accidental collisions, voluntary destructions, space erosion), and proposes a stock list of space wastes. Then, it distinguishes the situation for the different orbits: low Earth orbit or LEO (traffic, presence of the International Space Station), medium Earth orbits or MEO (traffic, operating satellites, wastes), geostationary Earth orbit or GEO (traffic, operating satellites, wastes). It also discusses wastes and bacteria present on the moon (due to Apollo missions or to crash tests). It evokes how space and nuclear industry is concerned, and discusses the re-entry issue (radioactive boomerang, metallic boomerang). It also indicates elements of international law

  1. Uranium solubility and solubility controls in selected Needle's Eye groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falck, W.E.; Hooker, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The solubility control of uranium in selected groundwater samples from the cliff and sediments at the Needle's Eye natural analogue site is investigated using the speciation code PHREEQE and the CHEMVAL thermodynamic database (release 3). Alkali-earth bearing uranyl carbonate secondary minerals are likely to exert influence on the solubility . Other candidates are UO 2 and arsenates, depending on the prevailing redox conditions. In the absence of literature data, solubility products for important arsenates have been estimated from analogy with other arsenates and phosphates. Phosphates themselves are unlikely to exert control owing to their comparatively high solubilities. The influence of seawater flooding into the sediments is also discussed. The importance of uranyl arsenates in the retardation of uranium in shallow sediments has been demonstrated in theory, but there are some significant gaps in the thermodynamic databases used. (author)

  2. Noble gases solubility in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crovetto, Rosa; Fernandez Prini, Roberto.

    1980-07-01

    The available experimental data of solubility of noble gases in water for temperatures smaller than 330 0 C have been critically surveyed. Due to the unique structure of the solvent, the solubility of noble gases in water decreases with temperature passing through a temperature of minimum solubility which is different for each gas, and then increases at higher temperatures. As aresult of the analysis of the experimental data and of the features of the solute-solvent interaction, a generalized equation is proposed which enables thecalculation of Henry's coefficient at different temperatures for all noble gases. (author) [es

  3. Study of solubility of akaline earth metals in liquid iron and in alloys on its base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ageev, Yu.A.; Archugov, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Solubility of magnesium, calcium, strontium and barium in liquid iron and its alloys with aluminium, silicon, nickel, chromium and carbon at 1600 deg C has been measured. Interaction parameters taking account of the effect of added elements on alkaline earth metal solubility in liquid iron have been estimated

  4. Solubility study of Tc(Ⅳ) in a granitic water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dejun; Yao Jun; Wang Bo

    2008-01-01

    The deep geological disposal of the high level radioactive wastes is expected to be a safe disposal method in most countries. The long-lived fission product 99 Tc is present in large quantities in nuclear wastes and its chemical behavior in aqueous solution is of considerable interest. Under oxidizing conditions technetium exists as the anionic species TcO 4 - whereas under the reducing conditions, expected to exist in a deep geological repository, it is generally predicted that technetium will be present as TcO 2 -nH 2 O. Hence, the mobility of Tc(Ⅳ) in reducing groundwater may be limited by the solubility of TcO 2 ·nH 2 O under these conditions. Due to this fact it is important to investigate the solubility of TcO 2 ·nH 2 O. The solubility determines the release of radionuclides from waste form and is used as a source term in radionuclide migration analysis in performance assessment of radioactive waste repository. Technetium (Ⅳ) was prepared by reduction of a technetate solution with Sn 2+ . The solubility of Tc(Ⅳ) has been determined in simulated groundwater and redistilled water under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The effects of pH and CO 3 2- concentration of solution on solubility of Tc(Ⅳ) were studied. The concentration of total technetium and Tc(Ⅳ) species in the solutions were periodically determined by separating the oxidized and reduced technetium species using a solvent extraction procedure and counting the beta activity of the 99 Tc with a liquid scintillation counter. The experimental results show that the rate of oxidation of Tc(Ⅳ) in simulated groundwater and redistilled water is about (1.49-1.86)x10 -9 mol·L -1 d -1 under aerobic conditions, while no Tc(Ⅳ) oxidation was detected in simulated groundwater and redistilled water under anaerobic conditions. Under aerobic or anaerobic conditions the solubility of Tc(Ⅳ) in simulated groundwater and redistilled water is equal on the whole after centrifugation or ultrafiltration. The

  5. Method of solidifying radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukazawa, Tetsuo; Ootsuka, Masaharu; Uetake, Naoto; Ozawa, Yoshihiro.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To prepare radioactive solidified wastes excellent in strength, heat resistance, weather-proof, water resistance, dampproof and low-leaching property. Method: A hardening material reactive with alkali silicates to form less soluble salts is used as a hardener for alkali silicates which are solidification filler for the radioactive wastes, and mixed with cement as a water absorbent and water to solidify the radioactive wastes. The hardening agent includes, for example, CaCO 3 , Ca(ClO 4 ) 2 , CaSiF 6 and CaSiO 3 . Further, in order to reduce the water content in the wastes and reduce the gap ratio in the solidification products, the hardener adding rate, cement adding rate and water content are selected adequately. As the result, solidification products can be prepared with no deposition of easily soluble salts to the surface thereof, with extremely low leaching of radioactive nucleides. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Transuranium elements leaching from simulated HLW glasses in synthetic interstitial claywater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.

    1992-08-01

    The main objective of this Master Thesis is to measure the steady-state concentrations of Pu, Np, and Am upon the leaching of High-Level Waste Glass in two types of synthetic claywater: humic acid free and humic acid containing synthetic claywater. The synthetic claywater has a composition that is representative for the in-situ interstitial groundwater of the Boom clay formation, a potential geological repository of radioactive waste in Belgium. The steady-state concentrations of transuranium elements were measured by leaching experiments with a typical duration of 400 days. Five main conclusions are drawn from the experimental data. (1) The transuranium elements that are released from simulated High Level Waste Glass are dominantly present in the synthetic claywater solutions as colloids. These colloids are smaller than 2 nm in absence of humic acids. In the presence of humic acids however, the colloids interact with actinides (adsorb or coagulate) and form particles larger than 2 nm. Np and Am are associated with inorganic and organic colloids in the synthetic interstitial claywater solution whereas Pu forms only inorganic colloids. (2) The steady-state concentration of Pu is in good agreement with the solubility of the Pu compound PuO 2 .xH 2 O. It is therefore concluded that PuO 2 .xH 2 O is the solubility controlling phase. (3) The Pu(IV)-species are dominant in the leaching solutions. Carbonate and humic acid complexes are negligible. (4) The steady-state concentrations of Np and Am in leaching solutions were much lower than the values calculated on the basis of known thermodynamic data. This indicates that the solubility controlling phases for Np and Am were not correctly identified or that the measured Np and Am concentrations were not steady-state values. (5) Non-active glass leaching tests have indicated that no organic colloids were formed as a result of glass dissolution. (A.S.)

  7. Study of deuterons induced nuclear reactions on light elements (N, Al and Si): Application to containment materials of radioactive wastes; Etude des reactions nucleaires induites par des deuterons sur des elements legers (N, Al, Si): application aux materiaux de confinement des dechets radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrino, St

    2004-03-01

    Nuclear reaction analysis is well adapted to the quantification of light element. Profiles of concentration in order to follow elements migration into materials can be undertaken. This technique is used to study the behavior of the future matrices for nuclear waste containment. This technique is isotopic, characterized by a good signal-to-background ratio and a very low detection limit. The probability of a nuclear reaction is linked to a parameter called 'cross section' we have to know in order to carry out quantitative analysis. We have determined excitation curves for nitrogen, aluminium and silicon. These experiments were done with deuterons from 0.5 to 2 MeV. Two methods for the cross section characterization are presented and are in agreement with each other. The second one reduces uncertainty. Data are incorporated in the simulation software SIMNRA. We have compared the results obtained on different samples when we use data in literature or data of the study. We have noticed a great fit improvement with the data of this study. The new cross sections of this work will be integrated in the general data base SIGMABASE. Applications on materials such as Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, nano-metric powders, WCN and nuclear glass YLaMgSiAlON studied for radioactive waste containment are also presented. (author)

  8. Other-than-high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, G.R.

    1976-01-01

    The main emphasis of the work in the area of partitioning transuranic elements from waste has been in the area of high-level liquid waste. But there are ''other-than-high-level wastes'' generated by the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle that are both large in volume and contaminated with significant quantities of transuranic elements. The combined volume of these other wastes is approximately 50 times that of the solidified high-level waste. These other wastes also contain up to 75% of the transuranic elements associated with waste generated by the back end of the fuel cycle. Therefore, any detailed evaluation of partitioning as a viable waste management option must address both high-level wastes and ''other-than-high-level wastes.''

  9. Certification plan transuranic waste: Hazardous Waste Handling Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of transuranic (TRU) waste handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The plan incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWBF; and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification

  10. Radionuclide solubilities at elevated temperatures. A literature study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, T.; Vuorinen, U.

    1997-07-01

    This literature study contains experimental data and modelling data collected in order to illustrate how temperature affects radionuclide solubilities under conditions similar to those expected in the vicinity of a planned repository for spent nuclear fuel. The elements considered were Ni, Se, Zr, Tc, Pd, Sn, Ra, Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu and Am. The temperatures of main interest are restricted to the interval between room temperature and 100 deg C. The study showed that the literature on radionuclide solubility at temperatures above room temperature is scarce. Therefore, also work that refers to conditions slightly varying from the expected repository conditions has been considered. A minor modelling exercise was done in this study in order to show the effect of temperature on the solubilities of Ni, Np and U under various conditions. The results from the literature survey and our modelling demonstrate the complexity of groundwater systems and the difficulty in finding simple and general relationships between temperature and radionuclide solubilities. Often an increase in temperature (below 100 deg C) leads to a reduction of the radionuclide solubility or leaves it roughly unchanged. However, examples are also found where the rise in temperature increases the radionuclide solubility by several orders of magnitude. (orig.)

  11. Radionuclide solubilities at elevated temperatures. A literature study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, T.; Vuorinen, U. [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-07-01

    This literature study contains experimental data and modelling data collected in order to illustrate how temperature affects radionuclide solubilities under conditions similar to those expected in the vicinity of a planned repository for spent nuclear fuel. The elements considered were Ni, Se, Zr, Tc, Pd, Sn, Ra, Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu and Am. The temperatures of main interest are restricted to the interval between room temperature and 100 deg C. The study showed that the literature on radionuclide solubility at temperatures above room temperature is scarce. Therefore, also work that refers to conditions slightly varying from the expected repository conditions has been considered. A minor modelling exercise was done in this study in order to show the effect of temperature on the solubilities of Ni, Np and U under various conditions. The results from the literature survey and our modelling demonstrate the complexity of groundwater systems and the difficulty in finding simple and general relationships between temperature and radionuclide solubilities. Often an increase in temperature (below 100 deg C) leads to a reduction of the radionuclide solubility or leaves it roughly unchanged. However, examples are also found where the rise in temperature increases the radionuclide solubility by several orders of magnitude. (orig.). 54 refs.

  12. Some thermodynamic aspects of the solubility of iron in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awasthi, S.P.; Sundaresan, M.

    1984-01-01

    Because of the use of liquid sodium as a heat transfer fluid in fast breeder reactors, its interaction with Fe and some alloying elements, has assumed great importance. Solubility is an important manifestation of this interaction, but there exists in literature a wide divergence in the data on the solubility of iron, which is known to have an intimate relationship with temperature and the concentration of available oxygen in sodium. An attempt has been made, here, to arrive at the mechanism of the observed enhanced solubility of iron in presence of oxygen by analysing the available experimental isothermal and athermal data on solubilities in literature by computing the relevant thermodynamic parameters for various probable interactions in the Na-O-Fe system. From comparison of these with the sign and magnitude of the theoretically calculated thermodynamic values, it has been shown that the predominant iron species existing in liquid sodium in presence of higher concentrations of oxygen is the soluble compound Na 4 FeO 3 . The most probable mechanism of the enhanced solubility of iron can be explained in terms of a sequence involving the initial formation of iron oxide (FeO) in liquid sodium, followed by its conversion to the compound Na 4 FeO 3 . (author)

  13. Thermodynamic properties of soddyite from solubility and calorimetry measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman-Lewis, Drew; Mazeina, Lena; Fein, Jeremy B.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E.S.; Burns, Peter C.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    The release of uranium from geologic nuclear waste repositories under oxidizing conditions can only be modeled if the thermodynamic properties of the secondary uranyl minerals that form in the repository setting are known. Toward this end, we synthesized soddyite ((UO 2 ) 2 (SiO 4 )(H 2 O) 2 ), and performed solubility measurements from both undersaturation and supersaturation. The solubility measurements rigorously constrain the value of the solubility product of synthetic soddyite, and consequently its standard-state Gibbs free energy of formation. The log solubility product (lg K sp ) with its error (1σ) is (6.43 + 0.20/-0.37), and the standard-state Gibbs free energy of formation is (-3652.2 ± 4.2 (2σ)) kJ mol -1 . High-temperature drop solution calorimetry was conducted, yielding a calculated standard-state enthalpy of formation of soddyite of (-4045.4 ± 4.9 (2σ)) kJ . mol -1 . The standard-state Gibbs free energy and enthalpy of formation yield a calculated standard-state entropy of formation of soddyite of (-1318.7 ± 21.7 (2σ)) J . mol -1 . K -1 . The measurements and associated thermodynamic calculations not only describe the T = 298 K stability and solubility of soddyite, but they also can be used in predictions of repository performance through extrapolation of these properties to repository temperatures

  14. Y-12 Plant waste minimization strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The 1984 Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) mandate that waste minimization be a major element of hazardous waste management. In response to this mandate and the increasing costs for waste treatment, storage, and disposal, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant developed a waste minimization program to encompass all types of wastes. Thus, waste minimization has become an integral part of the overall waste management program. Unlike traditional approaches, waste minimization focuses on controlling waste at the beginning of production instead of the end. This approach includes: (1) substituting nonhazardous process materials for hazardous ones, (2) recycling or reusing waste effluents, (3) segregating nonhazardous waste from hazardous and radioactive waste, and (4) modifying processes to generate less waste or less toxic waste. An effective waste minimization program must provide the appropriate incentives for generators to reduce their waste and provide the necessary support mechanisms to identify opportunities for waste minimization. This presentation focuses on the Y-12 Plant's strategy to implement a comprehensive waste minimization program. This approach consists of four major program elements: (1) promotional campaign, (2) process evaluation for waste minimization opportunities, (3) waste generation tracking system, and (4) information exchange network. The presentation also examines some of the accomplishments of the program and issues which need to be resolved

  15. Experimental studies on the migration of radionuclides of the elements I, Sr, Cs, Co and Pd in the roof rock of the projected waste repository at Gorleben

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, D.; Lang, H.; Moser, H.

    1985-07-01

    The studies were intended to provide information on the sorptive properties of 15 samples of fine-grain and medium-grain sands with regard to the radionuclides of I, Sr, Cs, Co, and Pd, and on their hydraulic properties. The samples were taken from the geologic formations in the area surrounding the projected waste repository in the Gorleben salt mine, at depth of up to 250 m down from terrain surface, and were analysed by means of column and batch experiments. Further goals were to determine the radionuclide migration as a function of flow velocity of the groundwater, and of sand compactness, as well as the effects of carrier ions and main groundwater contituents. The margins of retardation factors for the various radionuclides are given. One important result of the studies is that it could be expeimentally verified that there is the process of quasi irreversible sorption, i.e. it could be shown that desorption of radionuclides from natural, unconsolidated rock proceeds very much slowlier than sorption, so that this finding is of great significance to the safety assessment of a radioactive waste repository in geologic formations. (orig./HP) [de

  16. Pure Phase Solubility Limits: LANL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. Stockman

    2001-01-01

    The natural and engineered system at Yucca Mountain (YM) defines the site-specific conditions under which one must determine to what extent the engineered and the natural geochemical barriers will prevent the release of radioactive material from the repository. Most important mechanisms for retention or enhancement of radionuclide transport include precipitation or co-precipitation of radionuclide-bearing solid phases (solubility limits), complexation in solution, sorption onto surfaces, colloid formation, and diffusion. There may be many scenarios that could affect the near-field environment, creating chemical conditions more aggressive than the conditions presented by the unperturbed system (such as pH changes beyond the range of 6 to 9 or significant changes in the ionic strength of infiltrated waters). For an extended period of time, the near-field water composition may be quite different and more extreme in pH, ionic strength, and CO 2 partial pressure (or carbonate concentration) than waters at some distance from the repository. Reducing conditions, high pH (up to 11), and low carbonate concentration may be present in the near-field after reaction of infiltrating groundwater with engineered barrier systems, such as cementitious materials. In the far-field, conditions are controlled by the rock-mass buffer providing a near-neutral, oxidizing, low-ionic-strength environment that controls radionuclide solubility limits and sorption capacities. There is the need for characterization of variable chemical conditions that affect solubility, speciation, and sorption reactions. Modeling of the groundwater chemistry is required and leads to an understanding of solubility and speciation of the important radionuclides. Because experimental studies cannot be performed under the numerous potential chemical conditions, solubility limitations must rely on geochemical modeling of the radionuclide's chemistry. Fundamental thermodynamic properties, such as solubility products

  17. Pure Phase Solubility Limits: LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Stockman

    2001-01-26

    The natural and engineered system at Yucca Mountain (YM) defines the site-specific conditions under which one must determine to what extent the engineered and the natural geochemical barriers will prevent the release of radioactive material from the repository. Most important mechanisms for retention or enhancement of radionuclide transport include precipitation or co-precipitation of radionuclide-bearing solid phases (solubility limits), complexation in solution, sorption onto surfaces, colloid formation, and diffusion. There may be many scenarios that could affect the near-field environment, creating chemical conditions more aggressive than the conditions presented by the unperturbed system (such as pH changes beyond the range of 6 to 9 or significant changes in the ionic strength of infiltrated waters). For an extended period of time, the near-field water composition may be quite different and more extreme in pH, ionic strength, and CO{sub 2} partial pressure (or carbonate concentration) than waters at some distance from the repository. Reducing conditions, high pH (up to 11), and low carbonate concentration may be present in the near-field after reaction of infiltrating groundwater with engineered barrier systems, such as cementitious materials. In the far-field, conditions are controlled by the rock-mass buffer providing a near-neutral, oxidizing, low-ionic-strength environment that controls radionuclide solubility limits and sorption capacities. There is the need for characterization of variable chemical conditions that affect solubility, speciation, and sorption reactions. Modeling of the groundwater chemistry is required and leads to an understanding of solubility and speciation of the important radionuclides. Because experimental studies cannot be performed under the numerous potential chemical conditions, solubility limitations must rely on geochemical modeling of the radionuclide's chemistry. Fundamental thermodynamic properties, such as solubility

  18. PROCESSING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B.M. Jr.; Barton, G.B.

    1961-11-14

    A process for treating radioactive waste solutions prior to disposal is described. A water-soluble phosphate, borate, and/or silicate is added. The solution is sprayed with steam into a space heated from 325 to 400 deg C whereby a powder is formed. The powder is melted and calcined at from 800 to 1000 deg C. Water vapor and gaseous products are separated from the glass formed. (AEC)

  19. Environmental mineralogy - Understanding element behavior in ecosystems; Mineralogie environnementale: comprendre le comportement des elements dans les ecosystemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown Jr, G.E. [Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-2115 (United States); Department of Photon Science and Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Calas, G. [Institut de mineralogie et de physique des milieux condenses (IMPMC), universite Paris-6 - universite Paris-7, IPGP, CNRS, case 115, 75252 Paris (France)

    2011-02-15

    Environmental Mineralogy has developed over the past decade in response to the recognition that minerals are linked in many important ways with the global ecosystem. Minerals are the main repositories of the chemical elements in Earth's crust and thus are the main sources of elements needed for the development of civilization, contaminant and pollutant elements that impact global and local ecosystems, and elements that are essential plant nutrients. These elements are released from minerals through natural processes, such as chemical weathering, and anthropogenic activities, such as mining and energy production, agriculture and industrial activities, and careless waste disposal. Minerals also play key roles in the biogeochemical cycling of the elements, sequestering elements and releasing them as the primary minerals in crustal rocks undergo various structural and compositional transformations in response to physical, chemical, and biological processes that produce secondary minerals and soils. These processes have resulted in the release of toxic elements such as arsenic in groundwater aquifers, which is having a major impact on the health of millions of people in South and Southeast Asia. The interfaces between mineral surfaces and aqueous solutions are the locations of most chemical reactions that control the composition of the natural environment, including the composition of natural waters. The nuclear fuel cycle, from uranium mining to the disposition of high-level nuclear waste, is also intimately related to minerals. A fundamental understanding of these processes requires molecular-scale information about minerals, their bulk structures and properties such as solubility, their surfaces, and their interactions with aqueous solutions, atmospheric and soil gases, natural organic matter, and biological organisms. Gaining this understanding is further complicated by the presence of natural, incidental, and manufactured nano-particles in the environment

  20. Canister arrangement for storing radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, D.K.; Van Cleve, J.E. Jr.

    1980-04-23

    The subject invention relates to a canister arrangement for jointly storing high level radioactive chemical waste and metallic waste resulting from the reprocessing of nuclear reactor fuel elements. A cylindrical steel canister is provided with an elongated centrally disposed billet of the metallic waste and the chemical waste in vitreous form is disposed in the annulus surrounding the billet.

  1. PAIRWISE BLENDING OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CERTA, P.J.

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate a mission scenario that uses pairwise and incidental blending of high level waste (HLW) to reduce the total mass of HLW glass. Secondary objectives include understanding how recent refinements to the tank waste inventory and solubility assumptions affect the mass of HLW glass and how logistical constraints may affect the efficacy of HLW blending

  2. Binary systems solubilities of inorganic and organic compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Stephen, H

    1963-01-01

    Solubilities of Inorganic and Organic Compounds, Volume 1: Binary Systems, Part 1 is part of an approximately 5,500-page manual containing a selection from the International Chemical Literature on the Solubilities of Elements, Inorganic Compounds, Metallo-organic and Organic Compounds in Binary, Ternary and Multi-component Systems. A careful survey of the literature in all languages by a panel of scientists specially appointed for the task by the U.S.S.R. Academy of Sciences, Moscow, has made the compilation of this work possible. The complete English edition in five separately bound volumes w

  3. Waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, D.; Hooper, E.W.

    1981-01-01

    In the treatment of wastes, such as liquid radioactive effluents, it is known to remove radionuclides by successive in situ precipitation of cobalt sulphide, an hydroxide, barium sulphate and a transition element ferrocyanide, followed by separation of the thereby decontaminated effluent. In this invention, use is made of precipitates such as obtained above in the treatment of further fresh liquid radioactive effluent, when it is found that the precipitates have additional capacity for extracting radionuclides. The resulting supernatant liquor may then be subjected to a further precipitation treatment such as above. Decontamination factors for radionuclides of Ce, Ru, Sr and Cs have been considerably enhanced. (author)

  4. Characterization of domestic and market solid wastes at source in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    Waste management is an important element of environmental protection. Proper ... market waste generated from source and also the seasonal composition of household waste. The ..... the recent explosion in packaged water business and the.

  5. Doping influence by some transition elements on the irradiation effects in nuclear waste glasses; Influence du dopage par certains elements de transition sur les effets d'irradiation dans des verres d'interet nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florent, Olivier

    2006-06-15

    High-level waste glasses are submitted to auto-irradiation. Modelling it using external irradiations on simple glasses revealed defects production and non negligible structural changes. This thesis aims at determining the impact of a more complex composition on these effects, especially the influence of adding polyvalent transition metals. Silicate, soda-lime and alumino-borosilicate glasses are doped with different iron, chromium and manganese concentrations then {beta} irradiated at different doses up to 10{sup 9} Gy. Non doped glasses show an increase of their density and polymerisation coupled with a molecular oxygen and point defects production. Adding 0.16 mol% Fe decreases the amount of defects by 85 % and all irradiation effects. A Fe{sup 3+} reduction is also observed by EPR, optical absorption and indirectly by Raman spectroscopy. A higher than 0.32 mol% Fe concentration causes complete blockage of the evolution of polymerisation, density and defect production. The same results are obtained on chromium or manganese doped glasses. An original in situ optical absorption device shows the quick decrease of Fe{sup 3+} amount to a 25 % lower level during irradiation. Stopping irradiation causes a lower decrease of 65 %, suggesting a dynamic (h{sup 0}/e-) consuming equilibrium. He{sup +} and Kr{sup 3+} ions and {gamma} irradiated glasses tend to confirm these phenomena for all kind of irradiation with electronic excitations. (author)

  6. Distribution of rare earth elements in marine sediments from the Strait of Sicily (western Mediterranean Sea): Evidence of phosphogypsum waste contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranchida, G.; Oliveri, E.; Angelone, M.; Bellanca, A.; Censi, P.; D'Elia, M.; Neri, R.; Placenti, F.; Sprovieri, M.; Mazzola, S.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Coastal recent sediments from the Strait of Sicily showed elevated concentrations of REE associated to high Th concentrations. The shale-normalized REE + Y patterns are characterized by MREE enrichments relative to HREE and LREE, manifested with a convexity along the patterns. Sm n /La n ratio, indicative of MREE enrichments, showed a significant correlation with the Th concentration. This positive correlation supports the origin of these elements by phosphogypsum-contaminated effluents from an industrial plant, located in the southern Sicilian coast. Research highlights: → REE + Y contents are higher in onshore than offshore sediments. → Anomaly in sediments near southwestern Sicilian coast (site 134): high REE + Y. → REE + Y patterns show Middle REE enrichments (convexity around Sm-Gd-Eu elements). → Sm n /La n, measure of MREE enrichments, is correlated with high Th concentrations. → Anomalies are associated with the input of phosphogypsum-contaminated effluents. - Abstract: Concentrations of rare earth elements (REE), Y, Th and Sc were recently determined in marine sediments collected using a box corer along two onshore-offshore transects located in the Strait of Sicily (Mediterranean Sea). The REE + Y were enriched in offshore fine-grained sediments where clay minerals are abundant, whereas the REE + Y contents were lower in onshore coarse-grained sediments with high carbonate fractions. Considering this distribution trend, the onshore sediments in front of the southwestern Sicilian coast represent an anomaly with high REE + Y concentrations (mean value 163.4 μg g -1 ) associated to high Th concentrations (mean value 7.9 μg g -1 ). Plot of shale-normalized REE + Y data of these coastal sediments showed Middle REE enrichments relative to Light REE and Heavy REE, manifested by a convexity around Sm-Gd-Eu elements. These anomalies in the fractionation patterns of the coastal sediments were attributed to phosphogypsum

  7. Oklo reactors: natural analogs to nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, D.B.; Benjamin, T.M.; Gancarz, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    The 2-billion-year-old fossil reactors at Oklo are ancient natural nuclear waste sites. Isotope dilution mass spectrometric analyses of the fission products in the reactor core uraninite and the peripheral pelitic sandstone provide data for calculating the reactor operating parameters, the quantities of fissiogenic isotopes produced, the fraction of these isotopes retained in the cores, and the location in the peripheral rocks of the fissiogenic fraction lost from the cores. For a duration of criticality of 3 x 10 5 yrs, the thermal plus resonance neutron fluence ranged between 10 20 and 10 21 neutrons/cm 2 . The fraction of technetium (60 to 85%), ruthenium (75 to 90%), and neodymium (85 to 100%) retained is negatively correlated with fluence. The lost fission products are contained within a few tens of meters of their source, the reactor cores. The systematics of the decay of 99 Tc (t/sub 1/2/ = 2.13 x 10 5 yr) to 99 Ru limits the period of fissiogenic element migration to approximately 1 million yr at a time 2 billion yr ago. Thermodynamic calculations of the temperature-dependent solubilities indicate that the loss of fissiogenic elements is diffusion controlled, whereas retention in the surrounding rocks is a result of temperature-dependent deposition from an aqueous solution. These results concerning the geochemistry of technetium, ruthenium, and neodymium at a natural waste site support the concept of geologic burial of man-made radioactive wastes

  8. Standard elements; Elements standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanc, B [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    Following his own experience the author recalls the various advantages, especially in the laboratory, of having pre-fabricated vacuum-line components at his disposal. (author) [French] A la suite de sa propre experience, l'auteur veut rappeler les divers avantages que presente, tout particulierement en laboratoire, le fait d'avoir a sa disposition des elements pre-fabriques de canalisations a vide. (auteur)

  9. Role of groundwater oxidation potential and radiolysis on waste glass performance in crystalline repository environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Bibler, N.E.

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have shown that groundwater conditions in a granite repository will be as reducing as those in a basalt repository. Chemical analysis of the reduced groundwaters confirmed that the Fe 2+ /Fe 3+ couple controls the oxidation potential (Eh). The reducing groundwater conditions were found to decrease the time-dependent release of soluble elements (Li and B) from the waste glass. However, due to the lower solubility of multivalent elements released from the glass when the groundwaters are reducing, these elements have significantly lower concentrations in the leachates. Gamma radiolysis reduced the oxidation potential of both granitic and basaltic groundwater in the absence of both waste glass and oxygen. This occurred in tests at atmospheric pressure where H 2 could have escaped from the solution. The mechanism for this decrease in Eh is under investigation but appears related to the reactive amorphous precipitate in both groundwaters. The results of these tests suggest that radiolysis may not cause the groundwaters to become oxidizing in a crystalline repository when abundant Fe 2+ species are present

  10. Contaminant Release from Residual Waste in Single Shell Tanks at the Hanford Site, Washington, USA - 9276

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Deutsch, William J.; Lindberg, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Determinations of elemental and solid-phase compositions, and contaminant release studies have been applied in an ongoing study of residual tank wastes (i.e., waste remaining after final retrieval operations) from five of 149 underground single-shell storage tanks (241-C-103, 241-C-106, 241-C-202, 241-C-203, and 241-S-112) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State. This work is being conducted to support performance assessments that will be required to evaluate long-term health and safety risks associated with tank site closure. The results of studies completed to date show significant variability in the compositions, solid phase properties, and contaminant release characteristics from these residual tank wastes. This variability is the result of differences in waste chemistry/composition of wastes produced from several different spent fuel reprocessing schemes, subsequent waste reprocessing to remove certain target constituents, tank farm operations that concentrated wastes and mixed wastes between tanks, and differences in retrieval processes used to remove the wastes from the tanks. Release models were developed based upon results of chemical characterization of the bulk residual waste, solid-phase characterization (see companion paper 9277 by Krupka et al.), leaching and extraction experiments, and geochemical modeling. In most cases empirical release models were required to describe contaminant release from these wastes. Release of contaminants from residual waste was frequently found to be controlled by the solubility of phases that could not be identified and/or for which thermodynamic data and/or dissolution rates have not been measured. For example, significant fractions of Tc-99, I-129, and Cr appear to be coprecipitated at trace concentrations in metal oxide phases that could not be identified unambiguously. In the case of U release from tank 241-C-103 residual waste, geochemical calculations indicated that leachate

  11. Certification Plan, low-level waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, R.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. This plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Waste Certification Specialist to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Waste generators have the primary responsibility for the proper characterization of LLW. The Waste Certification Specialist verifies and certifies that LBL LLW is characterized, handled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Certification is the governing process in which LBL personnel conduct their waste generating and waste handling activities in such a manner that the Waste Certification Specialist can verify that the requirements of WHC-WAC are met

  12. Highly Efficient Fecal Waste Incinerator, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Volume reduction is a critical element of Solid Waste Management for manned spacecraft and planetary habitations. To this end, the proposed fecal waste incinerator...

  13. Product consistency leach tests of Savannah River Site radioactive waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibler, N.E.; Bates, J.K.

    1990-01-01

    The product consistency test (PCT) is a glass leach test developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to confirm the durability of radioactive nuclear waste glasses that will be produced in the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The PCT is a seven day, crushed glass leach test in deionized water at 90C. Final leachates are filtered and acidified prior to analysis. To demonstrate the reproducibility of the PCT when performed remotely, SRS and Argonne National Laboratory have performed the PCT on samples of two radioactive glasses. The tests were also performed to compare the releases of the radionuclides with the major nonradioactive glass components and to determine if radiation from the glass was affecting the results of the PCT. The test was performed in triplicate at each laboratory. For the major soluble elements, B, Li, Na, and Si, in the glass, each investigator obtained relative precisions in the range 2-5% in the triplicate tests. This range indicates good precision for the PCT when performed remotely with master slave manipulators in a shielded cell environment. When the results of the two laboratories were compared to each other, the agreement was within 20%. Normalized concentrations for the nonradioactive and radioactive elements in the PCT leachates measured at both facilities indicated that the radionuclides were released from the glass slower than the major soluble elements in the glass. For both laboratories, the normalized releases for both glasses were in the general order Li ∼ B ∼ Na > Si > Cs - 137 > Sb - 125 < Sr - 90. The normalized releases for the major soluble elements and the final pH values in the tests with radioactive glass are consistent with those for nonradioactive glasses with similar compositions. This indicates that there was no significant effect of radiation on the results of the PCT

  14. Microbiological treatment of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.

    1992-01-01

    The ability of microorganisms which are ubiquitous throughout nature to bring about information of organic and inorganic compounds in radioactive wastes has been recognized. Unlike organic contaminants, metals cannot be destroyed, but must be either removed or converted to a stable form. Radionuclides and toxic metals in wastes may be present initially in soluble form or, after disposal may be converted to a soluble form by chemical or microbiological processes. The key microbiological reactions include (i) oxidation/reduction; (ii) change in pH and Eh which affects the valence state and solubility of the metal; (iii) production of sequestering agents; and (iv) bioaccumulation. All of these processes can mobilize or stabilize metals in the environment

  15. Waterproofing improvement of radioactive waste asphalt solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Katsuhiko; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Ikeoka, Akira.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the waterproofing of asphalt solid by adding an alkaline earth metal salt and, further, paraffin, into radioactive liquid waste when processing asphalt solidification of the radioactive liquid waste. Method: Before processing molten asphalt solidification of radioactive liquid waste, soluble salts of alkaline earth metal such as calcium chloride, magnesium chloride, or the like is added to the radioactive liquid waste. Paraffin having a melting point of higher than 60 0 C, for example, is added to the asphalt, and waterproofing can be remarkably improved. The waste asphalt solid thus fabricated can prevent the swelling thereof, and can improve its waterproofing. (Yoshihara, H.)

  16. Evaluation of selected static methods used to estimate element mobility, acid-generating and acid-neutralizing potentials associated with geologically diverse mining wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, Philip L.; Seal, Robert R.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Lowers, Heather

    2015-01-01

    A comparison study of selected static leaching and acid–base accounting (ABA) methods using a mineralogically diverse set of 12 modern-style, metal mine waste samples was undertaken to understand the relative performance of the various tests. To complement this study, in-depth mineralogical studies were conducted in order to elucidate the relationships between sample mineralogy, weathering features, and leachate and ABA characteristics. In part one of the study, splits of the samples were leached using six commonly used leaching tests including paste pH, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Field Leach Test (FLT) (both 5-min and 18-h agitation), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Method 1312 SPLP (both leachate pH 4.2 and leachate pH 5.0), and the USEPA Method 1311 TCLP (leachate pH 4.9). Leachate geochemical trends were compared in order to assess differences, if any, produced by the various leaching procedures. Results showed that the FLT (5-min agitation) was just as effective as the 18-h leaching tests in revealing the leachate geochemical characteristics of the samples. Leaching results also showed that the TCLP leaching test produces inconsistent results when compared to results produced from the other leaching tests. In part two of the study, the ABA was determined on splits of the samples using both well-established traditional static testing methods and a relatively quick, simplified net acid–base accounting (NABA) procedure. Results showed that the traditional methods, while time consuming, provide the most in-depth data on both the acid generating, and acid neutralizing tendencies of the samples. However, the simplified NABA method provided a relatively fast, effective estimation of the net acid–base account of the samples. Overall, this study showed that while most of the well-established methods are useful and effective, the use of a simplified leaching test and the NABA acid–base accounting method provide investigators fast

  17. Geochemical analysis of leachates from cement/low-level radioactive waste/soil systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criscenti, L.J.; Serne, R.J.

    1988-09-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted as part of the Special Waste Form Lysimeters/endash/Arid Program. These experiments were conducted to investigate the performance of solidified low-level nuclear waste in a typical arid, near-surface disposal site, and to evaluate the ability of laboratory tests to predict leaching in actual field conditions. Batch leaching, soil adsorption column, and soil/waste form column experiments were conducted using Portland III cement waste forms containing boiling-water reactor evaporator concentrate and ion-exchange resin waste. In order to understand the reaction chemistry of the cement waste form/soil/ground-water system, the compositions of the leachates from the laboratory experiments were studied with the aid of the MINTEQ ion speciation/solubility and mass transfer computer code. The purpose of this report is to describe the changes in leachate composition that occur during the course of the experiments, to discuss the geochemical modeling results, and to explore the factors controlling the major element chemistry of these leachates. 18 refs., 84 figs., 14 tabs

  18. Waste management in NUCEF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Maeda, A.; Sugikawa, S.; Takeshita, I.

    2000-01-01

    In the NUCEF, the researches on criticality safety have been performed at two critical experiment facilities, STACY and TRACY in addition to the researches on fuel cycle such as advanced reprocessing and partitioning in alpha-gamma concrete cells and glove boxes. Many kinds of radioactive wastes have been generated through the research activities. Furthermore, the waste treatment itself may produce some secondary wastes. In addition, the separation and purification of plutonium of several tens-kg from MOX powder are scheduled in order to supply plutonium nitrate solution fuel for critical experiments at STACY. A large amount of wastes containing plutonium and americium will be generated from the plutonium fuel treatment. From the viewpoint of safety, the proper waste management is one of important works in NUCEF. Many efforts, therefore, have been made for the development of advanced waste treatment techniques to improve the waste management in NUCEF. Especially the reduction of alpha-contaminated wastes is a major interest. For example, the separation of americium is planned from the liquid waste evolved alter plutonium purification by application of tannin gel as an adsorbent of actinide elements. The waste management and the relating technological development in NUCEF are briefly described in this paper. (authors)

  19. Waste management in NUCEF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Y.; Maeda, A.; Sugikawa, S.; Takeshita, I. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Dept. of Safety Research Technical Support, Tokai-Mura, Naka-Gun, Ibaraki-Ken (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    In the NUCEF, the researches on criticality safety have been performed at two critical experiment facilities, STACY and TRACY in addition to the researches on fuel cycle such as advanced reprocessing and partitioning in alpha-gamma concrete cells and glove boxes. Many kinds of radioactive wastes have been generated through the research activities. Furthermore, the waste treatment itself may produce some secondary wastes. In addition, the separation and purification of plutonium of several tens-kg from MOX powder are scheduled in order to supply plutonium nitrate solution fuel for critical experiments at STACY. A large amount of wastes containing plutonium and americium will be generated from the plutonium fuel treatment. From the viewpoint of safety, the proper waste management is one of important works in NUCEF. Many efforts, therefore, have been made for the development of advanced waste treatment techniques to improve the waste management in NUCEF. Especially the reduction of alpha-contaminated wastes is a major interest. For example, the separation of americium is planned from the liquid waste evolved alter plutonium purification by application of tannin gel as an adsorbent of actinide elements. The waste management and the relating technological development in NUCEF are briefly described in this paper. (authors)

  20. Product control of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnecke, E.; Giller, H.

    1989-09-01

    The aim of the seminar was to give a survey of product quality control and to find out whether the producers/conditioners of waste set and fulfil requirements for the quality of the waste. The program included the following main areas: Random sample tests; Container tests; Process qualification and inspection, and Inspections of waste from fuel element reprocessing abroad. In other lectures, there are reports on measures for producers of waste for guaranteeing the final storage requirements, on quality assurance measurements in the conditioning of waste from large research establishments and from fuel element manufacture. The calling up of waste containers and the documentation of waste data is also introduced. (orig./HP) [de

  1. On nitrogen solubility in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalajda, Yu.A.; Katkov, Yu.D.; Kuznetsov, V.A.; Lastovtsev, A.Yu.; Lastochkin, A.P.; Susoev, V.S.

    1980-01-01

    Presented are the results of experimental investigations on nitrogen solubility in water under 0-15 MPa pressure, at the temperature of 100-340 deg C and nitrogen concentration of 0-5000 n.ml. N 2 /kg H 2 O. Empiric equations are derived and a diagram of nitrogen solubility in water is developed on the basis of the experimental data, as well as critically evaluated published data. The investigation results can be used in analyzing water-gas regime of a primary heat carrier in stream-generating plants with water-water reactors

  2. Preliminary considerations concerning actinide solubilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, T.W.; Bayhurst, B.P.; Daniels, W.R.; Erdal, B.R.; Ogard, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    Work at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory on the fundamental solution chemistry of the actinides has thus far been confined to preliminary considerations of the problems involved in developing an understanding of the precipitation and dissolution behavior of actinide compounds under environmental conditions. Attempts have been made to calculate solubility as a function of Eh and pH using the appropriate thermodynamic data; results have been presented in terms of contour maps showing lines of constant solubility as a function of Eh and pH. Possible methods of control of the redox potential of rock-groundwater systems by the use of Eh buffers (redox couples) is presented

  3. Thorium oxalate solubility and morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monson, P.R. Jr.; Hall, R.

    1981-10-01

    Thorium was used as a stand-in for studying the solubility and precipitation of neptunium and plutonium oxalates. Thorium oxalate solubility was determined over a range of 0.001 to 10.0 in the concentration parameter [H 2 C 2 O 4 ]/[HNO 3 ] 2 . Morphology of thorium oxide made from the oxalate precipitates was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The different morphologies found for oxalate-lean and oxalate-rich precipitations were in agreement with predictions based on precipitation theory

  4. Wastes options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maes, M.

    1992-01-01

    After a description of the EEC environmental policy, some wastes families are described: bio-contaminant wastes (municipal and industrial), hospitals wastes, toxic wastes in dispersed quantities, nuclear wastes (radioactive and thermal), plastics compounds wastes, volatiles organic compounds, hydrocarbons and used solvents. Sources, quantities and treatments are given. (A.B.). refs., figs., tabs

  5. Experimental evidence of colloids and nanoparticles presence from 25 waste leachates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennebert, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.hennebert@ineris.fr [INERIS – Institut National de l’Environnement Industriel et des Risques, Domaine du Petit Arbois BP33, F-13545 Aix-en-Provence (France); Avellan, Astrid; Yan, Junfang [INERIS – Institut National de l’Environnement Industriel et des Risques, Domaine du Petit Arbois BP33, F-13545 Aix-en-Provence (France); Aguerre-Chariol, Olivier [INERIS, Parc Technologique ALATA, BP No. 2, 60550 Verneuil en Halatte (France)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • This work is the first assessment of colloids in waste leachates. • Analytical methods are proposed and discussed. • All the waste have at least one element in colloidal form, and some elements are always colloidal. • Man-made nanoparticles are observed. • It can change the interpretation of leachate elemental concentration. - Abstract: The potential colloids release from a large panel of 25 solid industrial and municipal waste leachates, contaminated soil, contaminated sediments and landfill leachates was studied. Standardized leaching, cascade filtrations and measurement of element concentrations in the microfiltrate (MF) and ultrafiltrate (UF) fraction were used to easily detect colloids potentially released by waste. Precautions against CO{sub 2} capture by alkaline leachates, or bacterial re-growth in leachates from wastes containing organic matter should be taken. Most of the colloidal particles were visible by transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersion spectrometry (TEM–EDS) if their elemental MF concentration is greater than 200 μg l{sup −1}. If the samples are dried during the preparation for microscopy, neoformation of particles can occur from the soluble part of the element. Size distribution analysis measured by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) were frequently unvalid, particularly due to polydispersity and/or too low concentrations in the leachates. A low sensitivity device is required, and further improvement is desirable in that field. For some waste leachates, particles had a zeta potential strong enough to remain in suspension. Mn, As, Co, Pb, Sn, Zn had always a colloidal form (MF concentration/UF concentration > 1.5) and total organic carbon (TOC), Fe, P, Ba, Cr, Cu, Ni are partly colloidal for more than half of the samples). Nearly all the micro-pollutants (As, Ba, Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sn, V and Zn) were found at least once in colloidal form greater than 100 μg l{sup −1}. In particular

  6. A benchmark report on MVA Berlin, the key element of waste management in Berlin; MVA Berlin als Herzstueck der Berliner Entsorgung im Vergleich mit der Wettbewerbs-Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempin, T. [Berliner Stadtreinigungsbetrieb, Berlin (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The MVA Ruhleben incinerator has state-of-the-art technology, volume-dependent prime costs of 100-130 EUR/t, an acceptance payment of 63.70 EUR/t, employees covered by collective agreement system, disposal capacities of 500,000 tpa of residues, ecological sustainability, and customer-friendliness. Its importance will increase in the future as more than half of the expected waste volume of 983,000 tpa will be processed from 2005. (orig.) [German] Die MVA Ruhleben gewaehrleistet derzeit den Stand der Technik, mengenabhaengige Selbstkosten zwischen 100 EUR/t und 130 EUR/t, ein Annahmeentgelt von 63,70 EUR/t, soziale tarifgebundene Arbeitsplaetze, Entsorgungssicherheit, derzeit fuer 500.000 Tonnen Abfall pro Jahr, oekologische Nachhaltigkeit, Kundenfreundlichkeit. Die MVA Ruhleben wird zukuenftig fuer die Abfallentsorgung in Berlin eine noch groessere Bedeutung haben. Mit etwa 520.000 t/a Abfallentsorgungskapazitaet wird sie mehr als die Haelfte des erwarteten ueberlassungspflichtigen Restabfallaufkommens von 983.000 t/a ab 2005 verarbeiten. (orig.)

  7. Waste Sites - Municipal Waste Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — A Municipal Waste Operation is a DEP primary facility type related to the Waste Management Municipal Waste Program. The sub-facility types related to Municipal Waste...

  8. Measurement of soluble nuclide dissolution rates from spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.; Gray, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    Gaining a better understanding of the potential release behavior of water-soluble radionuclides is the focus of new laboratory spent fuel dissolution studies being planned in support of the Yucca Mountain Project. Previous studies have suggested that maximum release rates for actinide nuclides, which account for most of the long-term radioactivity in spent fuel, should be solubility-limited and should not depend on the characteristics or durability of the spent fuel waste form. Maximum actinide concentrations should be sufficiently low to meet the NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) annual release limits. Potential release rates for soluble nuclides such as 99 Tc, 135 Cs, 14 C and 129 I, which account for about 1-2% of the activity in spent fuel at 1,000 years, are less certain and may depend on processes such as oxidation of the fuel in the repository air environment. Dissolution rates for several soluble nuclides have been measured from spent fuel specimens using static and semi-static methods. However, such tests do not provide a direct measurement of fuel matrix dissolution rates that may ultimately control soluble-nuclide release rates. Flow-through tests are being developed as a potential supplemental method for determining the matrix component of soluble-nuclide dissolution. Advantages and disadvantages of both semi-static and flow-through methods are discussed. Tests with fuel specimens representing a range of potential fuel states that may occur in the repository, including oxidized fuel, are proposed. Preliminary results from flow-through tests with unirradiated UO 2 suggesting that matrix dissolution rates are very sensitive to water composition are also presented

  9. Computer Programs for Uncertainty Analysis of Solubility Calculations: Windows Version and Other Updates of the SENVAR and UNCCON. Program Description and Handling Instructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekberg, Christian; Oedegaard Jensen, Arvid

    2004-04-01

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis is becoming more and more important for testing the reliability of computer predictions. Solubility estimations play important roles for, e.g. underground repositories for nuclear waste, other hazardous materials as well as simple dissolution problems in general or industrial chemistry applications. The calculated solubility of a solid phase is dependent on several input data, e.g. the stability constants for the complexes formed in the solution, the enthalpies of reaction for the formation of these complexes and also the content of other elements in the water used for the dissolution. These input data are determined with more or less accuracy and thus the results of the calculations are uncertain. For the purpose of investigating the effects of these uncertainties several computer programs were developed in the 1990s, e.g. SENVAR, MINVAR and UNCCON. Of these SENVAR and UNCCON now exist as windows programs based on a newer speciation code. In this report we have given an explanation of how the codes work and also given some test cases as handling instructions. The results are naturally similar to the previous ones but the advantages are easier handling and more stable solubility calculations. With these improvements the programs presented here will be more publically accessible

  10. Solubility of chromate in a hydrated OPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leisinger, Sabine M.; Bhatnagar, Amit; Lothenbach, Barbara; Johnson, C. Annette

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Solid solutions exist between gypsum and calcium chromate. • The cementitious matrix can bind chromate concentrations up to 0.1 mol/kg. • The chromate binding phase in the cementitious matrix is CrO 4 -ettringite. - Abstract: The knowledge of the chromate binding mechanisms is essential for the prediction of the long-term leachability of cement-based solidified waste containing increased chromate concentrations because of its toxicity and high mobility. In this paper pore water concentrations from OPC doped with varying CaCrO 4 concentrations (0.01–0.8 mol/kg), equilibrated for 28 days were reported. It could be shown that the cementitious matrix can bind chromate concentrations up to 0.1 mol/kg and that the chromate solubility limiting phase was CrO 4 -ettringite, while chromate containing AFm (monochromate) was unstable. Comparison with thermodynamic modelling indicated that at lower chromate dosages chromate was mainly bound by CrO 4 -ettringite while at very high dosages also a mixed CaCrO 4 –CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O phase precipitated. Additional experiments indicated a solubility product of 10 −3.66 for CaCrO 4 and verified the solid solution formation with CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O. Leaching tests indicated a strong chromate binding mainly in the pH range 10.5–13.5, while at pH < 10 very little chromate was bound as ettringite, monocarbonate and C–S–H phases were destabilized. Generally the thermodynamic modeling underestimated chromate uptake indicating that an additional chromate binding possibly on C–S–H or on mixed chromate–carbonate–hydroxide AFm phases

  11. Certification Plan, Radioactive Mixed Waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, R.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of radioactive mixed waste (RMW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). RMW is low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or transuranic (TRU) waste that is co-contaminated with dangerous waste as defined in the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and the Washington State Dangerous Waste Regulations, 173-303-040 (18). This waste is to be transferred to the Hanford Site Central Waste Complex and Burial Grounds in Hanford, Washington. This plan incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF (Section 4); and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification

  12. Solubility of Nd in brine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalili, F.I.; Symeopoulos, V.; Chen, J.F.; Choppin, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    The solubility of Nd(III) has been measured at 23±3 C in a synthetic brine at pcH 6.4, 8.4, 10.4 and 12.4. The brine consisted predominantly of (Na+K)Cl and MgCl 2 with an ionic strength of 7.8 M (9.4 m) a solid compound of Nd(III) at each pcH was assigned from X-ray diffraction patterns. The log values of the experimental solubilities decrease fomr -3 at pcH 6.4 to -5.8 at pcH 8.4; at pcH 10.4 and 12.4 the solubility was below the detection limit of -7.5. The experimental solubility does not follow closely the variation with pcH estimated from modeling of the species in solution in equilibrium with the Nd solid using S.I.T. (orig.)

  13. European Program 'EVEREST'. Evaluation of the elements producing the effective doses associated to a radioactive waste disposal in deep underground geological formations. Comparative study of the results obtained by IPSN concerning the sedimentary and granite formations; Programme europeen 'EVEREST'. Evaluation des elements responsables des doses efficaces associees a un stockage de dechets radioactifs en formations geologiques profondes. Etude comparative des resultats obtenus par l'IPSN concernant les formations sedimentaire et granitique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudoin, Patrick; Serres, Christophe; Certes Catherine [Departement d' evaluation de surete, Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, CEA Centre d' Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France)

    1996-09-01

    The European exercise EVEREST that was run from 1991 to 1995 was a means of training for IPSN, having in view the expertise studies of ANDRA on the safety of radioactive waste geological disposal. The exercise implied two fictitious waste disposal sites, one inside a granite massif and the other in a clay formation, and had as principal objective identification and establishing a hierarchy of the radiological risk parameters important after the disposal closing. The study has considered the most likely scenario for evolution of the geological environment. As computing tools three codes were utilized: MELODIE, assuming a continuous 2D water flow and transfer of radionuclides from waste disposal to biosphere; TRISEC, assuming a continuous 3D water flow and NEWSAM, assuming a transient water flow in a multi-shell geometry. Results for the water circulation in different geological environment as well as the flux curves of soluble radionuclides are presented. Twenty seven radionuclides were retained as important by their radiological impact in assessing the influential EVEREST parameters. The EVEREST exercise does not prove the feasibility of a given geological disposal. It only contributes to the comprehension of the mechanisms controlling the radionuclide migration and gives a hierarchy of the questions which IPSN must answer in approaching the safety demonstrations required by ANDRA.

  14. Galvanic element. Galvanisches Element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprengel, D.; Haelbig, H.

    1980-01-03

    The invention concerns a gas-tight sealed accumulator with positive and negative electrode plates and an auxillary electrode electroconductively bound to the latter for suppressing oxygen pressure. The auxillary electrode is an intermediate film electrode. The film catalysing oxygen reduction is hydrophilic in character and the other film is hydrophobic. A double coated foil has proved to be advantageous, the hydrophilic film being formed from polymer-bound activated carbon and the hydrophrobic film from porous polytetrafluoroethylene. A metallic network of silver or nickel is rolled into the outer side of the activated carbon film. This auxillary electrode can be used to advantage in all galvanic elements. Even primary cells fall within the scope of application for auxillary electrodes because many of these contain a highly oxidized electrodic material which tends to give off oxygen.

  15. Solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The article drawn up within the framework of 'the assessment of the state of the environment in Lebanon' provides an overview of solid waste management, and assesses future wastes volume and waste disposal issues.In particular it addresses the following concerns: - Long term projections of solid waste arisings (i.e. domestic, industrial, such commercial wastes, vehicle types, construction waste, waste oils, hazardous toxic wastes and finally hospital and clinical wastes) are described. - Appropriate disposal routes, and strategies for reducing volumes for final disposal - Balance between municipal and industrial solid waste generation and disposal/treatment and - environmental impacts (aesthetics, human health, natural environment )of existing dumps, and the potential impact of government plans for construction of solid waste facilities). Possible policies for institutional reform within the waste management sector are proposed. Tables provides estimations of generation rates and distribution of wastes in different regions of Lebanon. Laws related to solid waste management are summarized

  16. Transmutation of radioactive waste: Effect on the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, N.C.; Pigford, T.H.

    1997-01-01

    A committee of the National Research Council reviewed three concepts for transmuting radionuclides recovered from the chemical reprocessing of commercial light-water-reactor (LWR) fuel: LWR transmutation reactors fueled with recycled actinides, advanced liquid-metal reactors (ALMRs), and accelerator-driven subcritical reactors for transmutation of waste (ATW). The concepts were evaluated in terms of: (1) the extent to which waste disposal would benefit from transmutation, (2) time required to reduce the total inventory of radionuclides in the waste and fuel cycle, (3) the complexity of the overall transmutation system, (4) the extent of new development required, and (5) institutional and economic problems of operating such systems. Transmutation could affect geologic disposal of waste by reducing the inventory of transuranics (TRUs), fission products, and other radionuclides in the waste. Reducing the inventory of transuranics does not necessarily affect radiation doses to people who use contaminated ground water if the dissolution rate of transuranics in waste is controlled by elemental solubilities. However, reducing inventories of Am and Pu would decrease potential hazards from human intrusion. The likelihood for underground nuclear criticality would also be reduced. The long-lived fission products Tc-99, I-129, Cs-135 and others typically contribute most to the long-term radiation doses to future populations who use contaminated water from the repository. Their transmutation requires thermal or epithermal neutrons, readily available in LWR and ATW transmutors. ALMR and LWR transmutors would require several hundred years to reduce the total transuranic inventory by even a factor of 10 at constant electric power, and thousands of years for a hundred-fold reduction. For the same electrical power, the ATW could reduce total transuranic inventory about tenfold more rapidly, because of its very high thermal-neutron flux. However, extremely low process losses would be

  17. Waste characterization: What's on second?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, F.J.; Smith, M.A.

    1989-07-01

    Waste characterization is the process whereby the physical properties and chemical composition of waste are determined. Waste characterization is an important element which is necessary to certify that waste meets the acceptance criteria for storage, treatment, or disposal. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders list and describe the germane waste form, package, and container criteria for the storage of both solid low-level waste package, and container criteria for the storage of both solid low-level waste (SLLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste, including chemical composition and compatibility, hazardous material content (e.g., lead), fissile material content, radioisotopic inventory, particulate content, equivalent alpha activity, thermal heat output, and absence of free liquids, explosives, and compressed gases. At the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the responsibility for waste characterization begins with the individual or individuals who generate the waste. The generator must be able to document the type and estimate the quantity of various materials (e.g., waste forms -- physical characteristics, chemical composition, hazardous materials, major radioisotopes) which have been placed into the waste container. Analyses of process flow sheets and a statistically valid sampling program can provide much of the required information as well as a documented level of confidence in the acquired data. A program is being instituted in which major generator facilities perform radionuclide assay of small packets of waste prior to being placed into a waste drum. 17 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  18. Preliminary assessment of blending Hanford tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geeting, J.G.H.; Kurath, D.E.

    1993-03-01

    A parametric study of blending Hanford tank wastes identified possible benefits from blending wastes prior to immobilization as a high level or low level waste form. Track Radioactive Components data were used as the basis for the single-shell tank (SST) waste composition, while analytical data were used for the double-shell tank (DST) composition. Limiting components were determined using the existing feed criteria for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) and the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF). Results have shown that blending can significantly increase waste loading and that the baseline quantities of immobilized waste projected for the sludge-wash pretreatment case may have been drastically underestimated, because critical components were not considered. Alternatively, the results suggest further review of the grout feed specifications and the solubility of minor components in HWVP borosilicate glass. Future immobilized waste estimates might be decreased substantially upon a thorough review of the appropriate feed specifications

  19. Preliminary assessment of blending Hanford tank wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geeting, J.G.H.; Kurath, D.E.

    1993-03-01

    A parametric study of blending Hanford tank wastes identified possible benefits from blending wastes prior to immobilization as a high level or low level waste form. Track Radioactive Components data were used as the basis for the single-shell tank (SST) waste composition, while analytical data were used for the double-shell tank (DST) composition. Limiting components were determined using the existing feed criteria for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) and the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF). Results have shown that blending can significantly increase waste loading and that the baseline quantities of immobilized waste projected for the sludge-wash pretreatment case may have been drastically underestimated, because critical components were not considered. Alternatively, the results suggest further review of the grout feed specifications and the solubility of minor components in HWVP borosilicate glass. Future immobilized waste estimates might be decreased substantially upon a thorough review of the appropriate feed specifications.

  20. Waste management - sewage - special wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The 27 papers represent a cross-section of the subject waste management. Particular attention is paid to the following themes: waste avoidance, waste product utilization, household wastes, dumping technology, sewage sludge treatments, special wastes, seepage from hazardous waste dumps, radioactive wastes, hospital wastes, purification of flue gas from waste combustion plants, flue gas purification and heavy metals, as well as combined sewage sludge and waste product utilization. The examples given relate to plants in Germany and other European countries. 12 papers have been separately recorded in the data base. (DG) [de

  1. Impact of Alkali Source on Vitrification of SRS High Level Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LAMBERT, D. P.; MILLER, D. H.; PEELER, D. K.; SMITH, M. E.; STONE, M. E.

    2005-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Savannah River Site is currently immobilizing high level nuclear waste sludge by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The processing strategy involves blending a large batch of sludge into a feed tank, washing the sludge to reduce the amount of soluble species, then processing the large ''sludge batch'' through the DWPF. Each sludge batch is tested by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using simulants and tests with samples of the radioactive waste to ''qualify'' the batch prior to processing in the DWPF. The DWPF pretreats the sludge by first acidifying the sludge with nitric and formic acid. The ratio of nitric to formic acid is adjusted as required to target a final glass composition that is slightly reducing (the target is for ∼20% of the iron to have a valence of two in the glass). The formic acid reduces the mercury in the feed to elemental mercury which is steam stripped from the feed. After a concentration step, the glass former (glass frit) is added as a 50 wt% slurry and the batch is concentrated to approximately 50 wt% solids. The feed slurry is then fed to a joule heated melter maintained at 1150 C. The glass must meet both processing (e.g., viscosity and liquidus temperature) and product performance (e.g., durability) constraints The alkali content of the final waste glass is a critical parameter that affects key glass properties (such as durability) as well as the processing characteristics of the waste sludge during the pretreatment and vitrification processes. Increasing the alkali content of the glass has been shown to improve the production rate of the DWPF, but the total alkali in the final glass is limited by constraints on glass durability and viscosity. Two sources of alkali contribute to the final alkali content of the glass: sodium salts in the waste supernate and sodium and lithium oxides in the glass frit added during pretreatment processes. Sodium salts in the waste supernate can

  2. Conditioning of alpha waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halaszovich, S.; Gerontopoulos, P.; Hennart, D.; Ledebrink, F.W.; Loida, A.; Phillips, D.C.; Vandevoorde, N.

    1985-01-01

    The long life and high radiotoxicity of the alph-emitting transuranics in radioactive waste provide an incentive for the constant improvement of existing processes and waste forms or the development of new alternatives, to isolate them safely from the biosphere. In the following, five processes at differing stages of development are outlined, the products ranging between cement, glass and ceramics: a process developed by ALKEM for the cementation of waste from fuel element manufacture; a process to improve the quality of cement products containing Magnox hulls, under development at AERE Harwell; high-temperature slagging incineration, developed at SCK/CEN; embedding of waste in an alumosilicate-based ceramic, being developed at KfK; embedding of waste in a titanium dioxide-based ceramic, proposed by Agip

  3. Copper solubility in DWPF, Batch 1 waste glass: Update report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacker, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    The ''Late Washing'' Step in the processing of precipitate will require the use of additional copper formate in the Precipitate Reactor to catalyze the hydrolysis reaction. The increased copper concentration in the melter feed increases the potential for metal precipitation during the vitrification of the melter feed. This report describes recent results with a conservative glass selected from the DWPF acceptable region in the Batch 1 Variability Study

  4. Concentration of High Level Radioactive Liquid Waste. Basic data acquisition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juvenelle, A.; Masson, M.; Garrido, M.H. [DEN/VRH/DRCP/SCPS/LPCP, BP 17171 - 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze Cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: In order to enhance its knowledge about the concentration of high level liquid waste (HLLW) from the nuclear fuel reprocessing process, a program of studies was defined by Cea. In a large field of acidity, it proposes to characterize the concentrated solution and the obtained precipitates versus the concentration factor. Four steps are considered: quantification of the salting-out effect on the concentrate acidity, acquisition of solubility data, precipitates characterisation versus the concentration factor through aging tests and concentration experimentation starting from simulated fission products solutions. The first results, reported here, connect the acidity of the concentrated solution to the concentration factor and allow us to precise the field of acidity (4 to 12 N) for the next experiments. In this field, solubility data of various elements (Ba, Sr, Zr...) are separately measured at room temperature, in nitric acid in a first time, then in the presence of various species present in medium (TBP, PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}). The reactions between these various elements are then investigated (formation of insoluble mixed compounds) by following the concentration cations in solution and characterising the precipitates. (authors)

  5. Solubility of sparingly soluble drug derivatives of anthranilic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domańska, Urszula; Pobudkowska, Aneta; Pelczarska, Aleksandra

    2011-03-24

    This work is a continuation of our systematic study of the solubility of pharmaceuticals (Pharms). All substances here are derivatives of anthranilic acid, and have an anti-inflammatory direction of action (niflumic acid, flufenamic acid, and diclofenac sodium). The basic thermal properties of pure Pharms, i.e., melting and glass-transition temperatures as well as the enthalpy of melting, have been measured with the differential scanning microcalorimetry technique (DSC). Molar volumes have been calculated with the Barton group contribution method. The equilibrium mole fraction solubilities of three pharmaceuticals were measured in a range of temperatures from 285 to 355 K in three important solvents for Pharm investigations: water, ethanol, and 1-octanol using a dynamic method and spectroscopic UV-vis method. The experimental solubility data have been correlated by means of the commonly known G(E) equation: the NRTL, with the assumption that the systems studied here have revealed simple eutectic mixtures. pK(a) precise measurement values have been investigated with the Bates-Schwarzenbach spectrophotometric method. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  6. Speciation and Oxidative Stability of Alkaline Soluble, Non-Pertechnetate Technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rapko, Brian M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, Amity [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Peterson, James M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chatterjee, Sayandev [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Walter, Eric D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cho, Herman M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Washton, Nancy M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The long half-life, complex chemical behavior in tank waste, limited incorporation in mid- to high-temperature immobilization processes, and high mobility in subsurface environments make technetium (Tc) one of the most difficult contaminants to dispose of and/or remediate. Technetium exists predominantly in the liquid tank waste phase as the relatively mobile form of pertechnetate, TcO4-. However, based on experimentation to date a significant fraction of the soluble Tc cannot be effectively separated from the wastes and may be present as a non- pertechnetate species. The presence of a non-pertechnetate species significantly complicates disposition of low-activity waste (LAW), and the development of methods to either convert them to pertechnetate or to separate directly is needed. The challenge is the uncertainty regarding the chemical form of the alkaline-soluble low-valent non-pertechnetate species in the liquid tank waste. This report summarizes work done in fiscal year (FY) 2014 exploring the chemistry of a low-valence technetium(I) species, [(CO)3Tc(H2O)3]+, a compound of interest due to its implication in the speciation of alkaline-soluble technetium in several Hanford tank waste supernatants.

  7. Radioactive waste material disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Charles W.; Beahm, Edward C.; Parker, George W.

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

  8. Experimental measurements of the solubilities of selected long-lived fission products, activation products and actinide daughters under high pH conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilkington, N.J.; Shadbolt, P.J.; Wilkins, J.D.

    1988-05-01

    Solubility measurements of several elements have been attempted under high pH and oxic conditions in a range of concrete leachates. The elements investigated were niobium, tin, selenium, lead and thorium. (author)

  9. Waste management safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, H.

    1983-01-01

    All studies carried out by competent authors of the safety of a waste management concept on the basis of reprocessing of the spent fuel elements and storage in the deep underground of the radioactive waste show that only a minor technical risk is involved in this step. This also holds true when evaluating the accidents which have occurred in waste management facilities. To explain the risk, first the completely different safety aspects of nuclear power plants, reprocessing plants and repositories are outlined together with the safety related characteristics of these plants. Also this comparison indicates that the risk of waste management facilities is considerably lower than the, already very small, risk of nuclear power plants. For the final storage of waste from reprocessing and for the direct storage of fuel elements, the results of safety analyses show that the radiological exposure following an accident with radioactivity releases, even under conservative assumptions, is considerably below the natural radiation exposure. The very small danger to the environment arising from waste management by reprocessing clearly indicates that aspects of technical safety alone will hardly be a major criterion for the decision in favor of one or the other waste management approach. (orig.) [de

  10. Utilization of water soluble plastics for radiological control within nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.J.; Deltete, C.P.; Homyk, W.A.; Kasprzak, L.; Robinson, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    The utilization of plastic products for radioactive contamination control within nuclear power facilities currently results in relatively large volumes of waste requiring disposal as low-level radioactive waste. The utilization of a polymer resin product that possesses comparable physical attributes to currently utilized plastic materials, but which is water soluble, has significant potential to reduce the volume of plastic waste requiring disposal as radwaste. Such a volume reduction will reduce overall plant )ampersand M costs, reduce the overall waste volume allocation utilization, and improve the regulatory perception of any plant realizing a volume reduction through plastic source minimization. This potential reduction in waste volume (and associated availability of the Low-level Waste Policy Amendments Act disposal allocation for other purposes), combined with potential economic benefits summarized above, has led to the undertaking of a detailed evaluation, presented in this paper

  11. Geochemistry and mineralogy of arsenic in mine wastes and stream sediments in a historic metal mining area in the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieuwerts, J.S., E-mail: jrieuwerts@plymouth.ac.uk [School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Plymouth University, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Mighanetara, K.; Braungardt, C.B. [School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Plymouth University, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Rollinson, G.K. [Camborne School of Mines, CEMPS, University of Exeter, Tremough Campus, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9EZ (United Kingdom); Pirrie, D. [Helford Geoscience LLP, Menallack Farm, Treverva, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9BP (United Kingdom); Azizi, F. [School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Plymouth University, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-01

    Mining generates large amounts of waste which may contain potentially toxic elements (PTE), which, if released into the wider environment, can cause air, water and soil pollution long after mining operations have ceased. The fate and toxicological impact of PTEs are determined by their partitioning and speciation and in this study, the concentrations and mineralogy of arsenic in mine wastes and stream sediments in a former metal mining area of the UK are investigated. Pseudo-total (aqua-regia extractable) arsenic concentrations in all samples from the mining area exceeded background and guideline values by 1–5 orders of magnitude, with a maximum concentration in mine wastes of 1.8 × 10{sup 5} mg kg{sup −1} As and concentrations in stream sediments of up to 2.5 × 10{sup 4} mg kg{sup −1} As, raising concerns over potential environmental impacts. Mineralogical analysis of the wastes and sediments was undertaken by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and automated SEM-EDS based quantitative evaluation (QEMSCAN®). The main arsenic mineral in the mine waste was scorodite and this was significantly correlated with pseudo-total As concentrations and significantly inversely correlated with potentially mobile arsenic, as estimated from the sum of exchangeable, reducible and oxidisable arsenic fractions obtained from a sequential extraction procedure; these findings correspond with the low solubility of scorodite in acidic mine wastes. The work presented shows that the study area remains grossly polluted by historical mining and processing and illustrates the value of combining mineralogical data with acid and sequential extractions to increase our understanding of potential environmental threats. - Highlights: • Stream sediments in a former mining area remain polluted with up to 25 g As per kg. • The main arsenic mineral in adjacent mine wastes appears to be scorodite. • Low solubility scorodite was inversely correlated with potentially mobile As. • Combining

  12. Geochemistry and mineralogy of arsenic in mine wastes and stream sediments in a historic metal mining area in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieuwerts, J.S.; Mighanetara, K.; Braungardt, C.B.; Rollinson, G.K.; Pirrie, D.; Azizi, F.

    2014-01-01

    Mining generates large amounts of waste which may contain potentially toxic elements (PTE), which, if released into the wider environment, can cause air, water and soil pollution long after mining operations have ceased. The fate and toxicological impact of PTEs are determined by their partitioning and speciation and in this study, the concentrations and mineralogy of arsenic in mine wastes and stream sediments in a former metal mining area of the UK are investigated. Pseudo-total (aqua-regia extractable) arsenic concentrations in all samples from the mining area exceeded background and guideline values by 1–5 orders of magnitude, with a maximum concentration in mine wastes of 1.8 × 10 5 mg kg −1 As and concentrations in stream sediments of up to 2.5 × 10 4 mg kg −1 As, raising concerns over potential environmental impacts. Mineralogical analysis of the wastes and sediments was undertaken by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and automated SEM-EDS based quantitative evaluation (QEMSCAN®). The main arsenic mineral in the mine waste was scorodite and this was significantly correlated with pseudo-total As concentrations and significantly inversely correlated with potentially mobile arsenic, as estimated from the sum of exchangeable, reducible and oxidisable arsenic fractions obtained from a sequential extraction procedure; these findings correspond with the low solubility of scorodite in acidic mine wastes. The work presented shows that the study area remains grossly polluted by historical mining and processing and illustrates the value of combining mineralogical data with acid and sequential extractions to increase our understanding of potential environmental threats. - Highlights: • Stream sediments in a former mining area remain polluted with up to 25 g As per kg. • The main arsenic mineral in adjacent mine wastes appears to be scorodite. • Low solubility scorodite was inversely correlated with potentially mobile As. • Combining mineralogical and

  13. Hydroxylamine hydrochloride-acetic acid-soluble and -insoluble fractions of pelagic sediment: Readsorption revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, D.Z.; Wandless, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    The extraction of the rare earth elements (REE) from deep-ocean pelagic sediment, using hydroxylamine hydrochloride-acetic acid, leads to the separation of approximately 70% of the bulk REE content into the soluble fraction and 30% into the insoluble fraction. The REE pattern of the soluble fraction, i.e., the content of REE normalized to average shale on an element-by-element basis and plotted against atomic number, resembles the pattern for seawater, whereas the pattern, as well as the absolute concentrations, in the insoluble fraction resembles the North American shale composite. These results preclude significant readsorption of the REE by the insoluble phases during the leaching procedure.