WorldWideScience

Sample records for waste drying experiments

  1. Drying kinetics of potato pulp waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webber Tavares de Carvalho

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Potato pulp waste (PPW drying was investigated under different experimental conditions (temperatures from 50 to 70 °C and air flow from 0.06 to 0.092 m³ m- 2 s- 1 as a possible way to recover the waste generated by potato chip industries and to select the best-fit model to the experimental results of PPW drying. As a criterion to evaluate the fitting of mathematical models, a method based on the sum of the scores assigned to the four evaluated statistical parameters was used: regression coefficient (R², relative mean error P (%, root mean square error (RMSE, and reduced chi-square (χ². The results revealed that temperature and air velocity are important parameters to reduce PPW drying time. The models Midilli and Diffusion had the lowest sum values, i.e., with the best fit to the drying data, satisfactorily representing the drying kinetics of PPW.

  2. Dried poultry waste versus groundnut cake as protein supplement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In two separate experiments dried poultry waste (DPW) from caged-layer units was evaluated as a protein supplement for small ruminants. In experiment 1, nine goats divided into three groups of three animals each were randomly assigned to three diets containing 0,25, and 30% DPW in three periods of 17 days per period.

  3. Solid and Liquid Waste Drying Bag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwiller, Eric (Inventor); Hogan, John A. (Inventor); Fisher, John W. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for processing waste from human activities, including solids, liquids and vapors. A fluid-impermeable bag, lined with a liquid-impermeable but vapor-permeable membrane, defining an inner bag, is provided. A vacuum force is provided to extract vapors so that the waste is moved toward a selected region in the inner bag, extracted vapors, including the waste vapors and vaporized portions of the waste liquids are transported across the membrane, and most or all of the solids remain within the liner. Extracted vapors are filtered, and sanitized components thereof are isolated and optionally stored. The solids remaining within the liner are optionally dried and isolated for ultimate disposal.

  4. Microwave Enhanced Freeze Drying of Solid Waste Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of technology for Microwave Enhanced Freeze Drying of Solid Waste (MEFDSW) is proposed. The present state of the art for solid waste stabilization using...

  5. Research on the drying kinetics of household food waste for the development and optimization of domestic waste drying technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulos, A; Malamis, D; Michailidis, P; Krokida, M; Loizidou, M

    2016-01-01

    Domestic food waste drying foresees the significant reduction of household food waste mass through the hygienic removal of its moisture content at source. In this manuscript, a new approach for the development and optimization of an innovative household waste dryer for the effective dehydration of food waste at source is presented. Food waste samples were dehydrated with the use of the heated air-drying technique under different air-drying conditions, namely air temperature and air velocity, in order to investigate their drying kinetics. Different thin-layer drying models have been applied, in which the drying constant is a function of the process variables. The Midilli model demonstrated the best performance in fitting the experimental data in all tested samples, whereas it was found that food waste drying is greatly affected by temperature and to a smaller scale by air velocity. Due to the increased moisture content of food waste, an appropriate configuration of the drying process variables can lead to a total reduction of its mass by 87% w/w, thus achieving a sustainable residence time and energy consumption level. Thus, the development of a domestic waste dryer can be proved to be economically and environmentally viable in the future.

  6. Microwave Enhanced Freeze Drying of Solid Waste Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of advanced methods for Microwave Enhanced Freeze Drying of Solid Waste (MEFDSW) is proposed. Methods for the recovery of relatively pure water as a...

  7. Evaluating the biogas potential of the dry fraction from pretreatment of food waste from households

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murto, Marika, E-mail: marika.murto@biotek.lu.se [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Björnsson, Lovisa, E-mail: lovisa.bjornsson@miljo.lth.se [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Environmental and Energy Systems Studies, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Rosqvist, Håkan, E-mail: hakan@rosqvist-resurs.se [Rosqvist Resurs, Gamla Malmövägen 25, SE-230 41 Klågerup (Sweden); Bohn, Irene, E-mail: irene.bohn@nsr.se [NSR AB, Hjortshögsvägen 1, SE-251 89 Helsingborg (Sweden)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► A novel approach for biogas production from a waste fraction that today is incinerated. ► Biogas production is possible in spite of the impurities of the waste. ► Tracer studies are applied in a novel way. ► Structural material is needed to improve the flow pattern of the waste. ► We provide a solution to biological treatment for the complex waste fraction. - Abstract: At the waste handling company NSR, Helsingborg, Sweden, the food waste fraction of source separated municipal solid waste is pretreated to obtain a liquid fraction, which is used for biogas production, and a dry fraction, which is at present incinerated. This pretreatment and separation is performed to remove impurities, however also some of the organic material is removed. The possibility of realising the methane potential of the dry fraction through batch-wise dry anaerobic digestion was investigated. The anaerobic digestion technique used was a two-stage process consisting of a static leach bed reactor and a methane reactor. Treatment of the dry fraction alone and in a mixture with structural material was tested to investigate the effect on the porosity of the leach bed. A tracer experiment was carried out to investigate the liquid flow through the leach beds, and this method proved useful in demonstrating a more homogenous flow through the leach bed when structural material was added. Addition of structural material to the dry fraction was needed to achieve a functional digestion process. A methane yield of 98 m{sup 3}/ton was obtained from the dry fraction mixed with structural material after 76 days of digestion. This was in the same range as obtained in the laboratory scale biochemical methane potential test, showing that it was possible to extract the organic content in the dry fraction in this type of dry digestion system for the production of methane.

  8. WASTE-FREE PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY OF DRY MASHED POTATOES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Kalashnikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. According to data on norms of consumption of vegetable production of scientific research institute of Food of the Russian Academy of Medical Science, potatoes win first place with norm of 120 kg a year on the person. In this regard much attention is paid to processing of potatoes that allows to prolong the term of its validity, and also to reduce the capacity of storages and to reduce transport transportations as 1 kg of a dry potatoes produсt is equivalent 7-8 kg of fresh potatoes. Thus industrial processing of potatoes on dry mashed potatoes allows to reduce losses of potatoes at storage and transportation, there is a possibility of enrichment of products vitamins and other useful components, its nutrition value remains better, conditions for complex processing of raw materials with full recycling and creations of stocks of products from potatoes on a crop failure case are created. Dry mashed potatoes are a product of long storage. On the basis of studying of the production technology of mashed potatoes the analysis of technological processes as sources of creation of waste, and the directions of recovery of secondary raw materials for complex waste-free technology of processing of potatoes are defined is provided. The waste-free technological scheme of processing of potatoes and production of dry instant mashed potatoes on the basis of dehydration and moisture thermal treatment a component providing recovery of secondary carbohydrate content raw materials in the form of waste of the main production is developed. The main stages of production of dry instant mashed potatoes are described. It is offered the technological scheme of a production line of mashed potatoes on the basis of waste-free technology. Advantages of the offered waste-free production technology of dry instant mashed potatoes with processing of secondary starch-containing raw materials are given.

  9. Evaluation of dry solid waste recycling from municipal solid waste: case of Mashhad city, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzadkia, Mahdi; Jorfi, Sahand; Akbari, Hamideh; Ghasemi, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    The recycling for recovery and reuse of material and energy resources undoubtedly provides a substantial alternative supply of raw materials and reduces the dependence on virgin feedstock. The main objective of this study was to assess the potential of dry municipal solid waste recycling in Mashhad city, Iran. Several questionnaires were prepared and distributed among various branches of the municipality, related organizations and people. The total amount of solid waste generated in Mashhad in 2008 was 594, 800  tons with per capita solid waste generation rate of 0.609  kg  person(-1) day(-1). Environmental educational programmes via mass media and direct education of civilians were implemented to publicize the advantages and necessity of recycling. The amount of recycled dry solid waste was increased from 2.42% of total dry solid waste (2588.36  ton  year(-1)) in 1999 to 7.22% (10, 165  ton  year(-1)) in 2008. The most important fractions of recycled dry solid waste in Mashhad included paper and board (51.33%), stale bread (14.59%), glass (9.73%), ferrous metals (9.73%), plastic (9.73%), polyethylene terephthalate (2.62%) and non-ferrous metals (0.97%). It can be concluded that unfortunately the potential of dry solid waste recycling in Mashhad has not been considered properly and there is a great effort to be made in order to achieve the desired conditions of recycling.

  10. Catalytic dry reforming of waste plastics from different waste treatment plants for production of synthesis gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Juniza Md; Williams, Paul T

    2016-12-01

    Catalytic dry reforming of mixed waste plastics, from a range of different municipal, commercial and industrial sources, were processed in a two-stage fixed bed reactor. Pyrolysis of the plastics took place in the first stage and dry (CO2) reforming of the evolved pyrolysis gases took place in the second stage in the presence of Ni/Al2O3 and Ni-Co/Al2O3 catalysts in order to improve the production of syngas from the dry reforming process. The results showed that the highest amount of syngas yield was obtained from the dry reforming of plastic waste from the agricultural industry with the Ni/Al2O3 catalyst, producing 153.67mmolsyngasg-1waste. The addition of cobalt metal as a promoter to the Ni/Al2O3 catalyst did not have a major influence on syngas yield. Overall, the catalytic-dry reforming of waste plastics from various waste treatment plants showed great potential towards the production of synthesis gases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. European dry cooling tower operating experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSteese, J.G.; Simhan, K.

    1976-03-01

    Interviews were held with representatives of major plants and equipment manufacturers to obtain current information on operating experience with dry cooling towers in Europe. The report documents the objectives, background, and organizational details of the study, and presents an itemized account of contacts made to obtain information. Plant selection was based on a merit index involving thermal capacity and length of service. A questionnaire was used to organize operational data, when available, into nine major categories of experience. Information was also solicited concerning the use of codes and standards to ensure the achievement of cooling tower performance. Several plant operators provided finned-tube samples for metallographic analysis. Additionally, information on both operating experience and developing technology was supplied by European technical societies and research establishments. Information obtained from these contacts provides an updated and representative sample of European experience with dry cooling towers, which supplements some of the detailed reviews already available in the literature. In addition, the study presents categorized operating experience with installations which have not been reviewed so extensively, but nevertheless, have significant operational histories when ranked by the merit index. The contacts and interviews reported in the survey occurred between late March and October 1975. The study was motivated by the expressed interest of U.S. utility industry representatives who expect European experience to provide a basis of confidence that dry cooling is a reliable technology, applicable when necessary, to U.S. operating requirements.

  12. Vacuum drying plant for liquid waste; Planta de secado a vacio para concentrados de evaporador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benavides, E.

    2001-07-01

    Drying of liquid waste to a dry product, is a technique that, allows the maximum volume reduction of liquid waste in the operation of a nuclear power plant. Equipos Nucleares, S. A. has developed a modular and automatic plant for under vacuum in drum driving liquid waste. (Author)

  13. RELEASE OF DRIED RADIOACTIVE WASTE MATERIALS TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KOZLOWSKI, S.D.

    2007-05-30

    This technical basis document was developed to support RPP-23429, Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis for the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (PDSA) and RPP-23479, Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis for the Contact-Handled Transuranic Mixed (CH-TRUM) Waste Facility. The main document describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins to the representative accidents involving the release of dried radioactive waste materials from the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) and to the associated represented hazardous conditions. Appendices D through F provide the technical basis for assigning risk bins to the representative dried waste release accident and associated represented hazardous conditions for the Contact-Handled Transuranic Mixed (CH-TRUM) Waste Packaging Unit (WPU). The risk binning process uses an evaluation of the frequency and consequence of a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition to determine the need for safety structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls. A representative accident or a represented hazardous condition is assigned to a risk bin based on the potential radiological and toxicological consequences to the public and the collocated worker. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers because credible hazardous conditions with the potential for significant facility worker consequences are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls regardless of their estimated frequency. The controls for protection of the facility workers are described in RPP-23429 and RPP-23479. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, as described below.

  14. Gasification experience with biomass and wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffer, H.P.; Adlhoch, W. [Rheinbraun AG, Cologne (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    The HTW process is particularly favourable for the gasification of low-rank feedstocks. During various tests - performed in b-bench- scale, pilot-scale and industrial scale units - consequences with regard to feedstock preparation. Gasification behaviour, corrosion, emission and residual matter were carefully studied for a large number of different feedstocks. Information is now available for optimal utilisation of several types of biomass and waste materials in relation to plant operation, emission and residue utilization. Different types of biomass were tested in bench-scale conditions in an atmospheric HTW process development unit. Industrial-scale experience concerning biomass is available from the Gasification plant at Oulu, Finland, which operated from 1988 to 1991, producing ammonia synthesis gas from dried Finnish peat. During several test campaigns performed at the HTW demonstration plant sewage sludge, loaded coke and used plastics were co-gasified at feeding rates of up to 5 t/h. Operability, conversion efficiency, syngas contaminants, solid residue characteristics and emissions were monitored very carefully. Co-gasification in a dried lignite mixture allows synthesis gas for methanol production to be obtained also from waste materials. Thus, waste is converted into a useful chemical feedstock. For both sewage sludge and loaded coke, conversion efficiency and syngas yield were sufficient. Within the scope of a solid residue characterization various contaminants, including chlorine, sulphur, heavy metals and other trace elements or organic compounds, their formation and/or release were detected. Emissions were well below the limits. However, an increase in the benzene and naphthalene concentrations in the crude gas occurred. Thus, a commercial application requires additional gas treatment. In the next few years, feedstock recycling of mixed plastics household waste from Duales System Deutschland GmbH will call for a plant capacity of 350 000 to 400 000

  15. Sustainable biobutanol production from pineapple waste by using Clostridium acetobutylicum B 527: Drying kinetics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khedkar, Manisha A; Nimbalkar, Pranhita R; Gaikwad, Shashank G; Chavan, Prakash V; Bankar, Sandip B

    2017-02-01

    Present investigation explores the use of pineapple peel, a food industry waste, for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production using Clostridium acetobutylicum B 527. Proximate analysis of pineapple peel shows that it contains 35% cellulose, 19% hemicellulose, and 16% lignin on dry basis. Drying experiments on pineapple peel waste were carried out in the temperature range of 60-120°C and experimental drying data was modeled using moisture diffusion control model to study its effect on ABE production. The production of ABE was further accomplished via acid hydrolysis, detoxification, and fermentation process. Maximum total sugar release obtained by using acid hydrolysis was 97g/L with 95-97% and 10-50% removal of phenolics and acetic acid, respectively during detoxification process. The maximum ABE titer obtained was 5.23g/L with 55.6% substrate consumption when samples dried at 120°C were used as a substrate (after detoxification). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dry friction avalanches: Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Ferrante, John; Zypman, Fredy R.

    2006-12-01

    Experimental evidence and theoretical models are presented supporting the conjecture that dry friction stick-slip is described by self-organized criticality. We use the data, obtained with a pin-on-disk tribometer set to measure lateral force, to examine the variation of the friction force as a function of time. We study nominally flat surfaces of matching aluminum and steel. The probability distribution of force drops follows a negative power law with exponents μ in the range 3.2-3.5. The frequency power spectrum follows a 1/fα pattern with α in the range 1-1.8. We first compare these experimental results with the well-known Robin Hood model of self-organized criticality. We find good agreement between theory and experiment for the force-drop distribution but not for the power spectrum. We explain this on a physical basis and propose a model which takes explicitly into account the stiffness and inertia of the tribometer. Specifically, we numerically solve the equation of motion of a block on a friction surface pulled by a spring and show that for certain spring constants the motion is characterized by the same power law spectrum as in experiments. We propose a physical picture relating the fluctuations of the force drops to the microscopic geometry of the surface.

  17. [An experience of dried cornea transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundorova, R A; Chentsova, E V; Makarov, P V; Kugusheva, A É; Rakova, A V

    2011-01-01

    Sometimes an urgent lamellar keratoplasty remains the only treatment option for corneal defect closure. When fresh donor tissue is absent as it is regular in recent years dried cornea transplantation becomes reasonable. In recent years in ocular trauma department 320 transplantations of dried on silicagel cornea were performed. Analysis of results allows to conclude that use of dried cornea is a promising surgical procedure to preserve the globe and in some cases to prepare the eye with severe trauma for subsequent optic surgery.

  18. Current disposal planning for dry active wastes at Rokkasho Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Mitsuo [Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., Aomori (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    In nuclear power stations, two kinds of low level radioactive wastes are generated: `uniform solidified waste` in which waste liquid, spent resin and so on are uniformly solidified and `solid waste` in which metals, lagging materials, plastics and others are solidified. In Rokkasho Low Level Radioactive Waste Burying Center, the burying facility for the first period for the uniform solidified waste started the operation in December, 1992, and this time as the second period plan, it has been planned to increase No. 2 waste burying facility for the solid waste. The kinds of the radioactive waste solidified in containers to be buried are the solid state radioactive waste generated by the operation of nuclear power stations and that generated accompanying the operation of this facility. The wastes are classified, cut, pressed and melted as occasion demands so that cement filling material is easily filled in containers, and solidified in the containers. As for the waste to be buried, at the time of its acceptance, 6 months or longer have elapsed since its generation in nuclear power stations, and the surface dose equivalent rate does not exceed 10 mSv/h. The acceptance plan and the expected number of burying, the total radioactivity of buried waste, and the location, geological and hydraulic features, the structure and facilities of waste burying facilities, the method of burying, the management of waste burying site and the evaluation of dose equivalent are reported. (K.I.)

  19. Freeze Drying of Fruits and Vegetables: A Laboratory Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Richard D.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment for freeze-drying fruits and vegetables which aims to expose college students to the principles of drying and simultaneous heat and mass transfer. The experimental apparatus, procedure of the experiment, and data analysis are also included. (HM)

  20. Characteristics of Vacuum Freeze Drying with Utilization of Internal Cooling and Condenser Waste Heat for Sublimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Alhamid

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Vacuum freeze drying is an excellent drying method, but it is very energy-intensive because a relatively long drying time is required. This research investigates the utilization of condenser waste heat for sublimation as a way of accelerating the drying rate. In addition, it also investigates the effect of internal cooling combined with vacuum cooling in the pressure reduction process. Jelly fish tentacles were used as the specimen, with different configurations for condenser heat waste and internal cooling valve opening. The results show that heating with condenser heat waste can accelerate the drying rate up to 0.0035 kg/m2.s. In addition, pre-freezing by internal cooling prevents evaporation until the mass of the specimen is 0.47 g and promotes transition of the specimen into the solid phase.

  1. Dry anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brummeler, ten E.

    1993-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is an attractive technology for solid waste management. This thesis describes the technological potentials of dry anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) using batch systems. In 1985 a research programme was started to develop the so-

  2. PULSE DRYING EXPERIMENT AND BURNER CONSTRUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert States

    2006-07-15

    Non steady impingement heat transfer is measured. Impingement heating consumes 130 T-BTU/Yr in paper drying, but is only 25% thermally efficient. Pulse impingement is experimentally shown to enhance heat transfer by 2.8, and may deliver thermal efficiencies near 85%. Experimental results uncovered heat transfer deviations from steady theory and from previous investigators, indicating the need for further study and a better theoretical framework. The pulse burner is described, and its roll in pulse impingement is analyzed.

  3. Dry anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    OpenAIRE

    Brummeler, ten, E.

    1993-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is an attractive technology for solid waste management. This thesis describes the technological potentials of dry anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) using batch systems. In 1985 a research programme was started to develop the so- called BIOCEL system based on batchwise anaerobic digestion yielding biogas and compost. The research programme was financially supported by the Dutch National Programme for reuse of Waste (NOH), wh...

  4. Dry-thermophilic anaerobic digestion of simulated organic fraction of municipal solid waste: process modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fdez-Güelfo, L A; Álvarez-Gallego, C; Sales Márquez, D; Romero García, L I

    2011-01-01

    Solid retention time (SRT) is a very important operational variable in continuous and semicontinuous waste treatment processes since the organic matter removal efficiency--expressed in terms of percentage of Dissolved Organic Carbon (% DOC) or Volatile Solids (% VS) removed--and the biogas or methane production are closely related with the SRT imposed. Optimum SRT is depending on the waste characteristics and the microorganisms involved in the process and, hence, it should be determined specifically in each case. In this work a series of experiments were carried out to determine the effect of SRT, from 40 to 8 days, on the performance of the dry (30% Total Solids) thermophilic (55°C) anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of Municipal Solid Wastes (OFMSW) operating at semicontinuous regime of feeding. The experimental results show than 15days is the optimum SRT (the best between all proved) for this process. Besides, data of organic matter concentration and methane production versus SRT have been used to obtain the kinetic parameters of the kinetic model of Romero García (1991): the maximum specific growth rate of the microorganisms (μmax=0.580 days(-1)) and the fraction of substrate non-biodegradable (α=0.268). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Possible Removal of Mercury in Dry Flue Gas Cleaning Lines of Solid Waste Incineration Units

    OpenAIRE

    Svoboda, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Here we will focus on dry flue gas cleaning methods applied for MSW incineration. Majority of dust from the incineration is usually removed in electrostatic filters or fabric (bag) filters. Dry method of flue gas cleaning are advantageous particularly in smaller solid waste incineration units, they have usually lower capital costs and simpler operation. The dry gas cleaning methods are based on an alkali sorbent injection and fabric filters for removal of dust and solid products from cleaning...

  6. Chemical composition and binding power of dried pulp wastes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pulp waste was used wholly and partially to replace corn starch (yellow maize) as a binder in the preparation of the diet of cultured fish (Clarias gariepinus). Six diets were formulated using the pulp waste in various proportions. The binding power and the crumbling rate were assessed. The crumbling rate declined with ...

  7. DRYING KINETICS OF OIL PALM FROND WASTE USING SIMPLE BATCH OVEN DRYER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Halim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Drying phenomena of oil palm frond waste as agriculture waste was observed using simple batch oven dryer. The operation temperatures were 50, 80 and 120 °C. The sample of oil palm frond was weighed periodically every 30 minutes. Moisture content, shrinkage phenomena and drying kinetic model were investigated to the difference operation temperature. Experimental result exhibited that temperature influent significantly to the drying rate. The water transport controlled by diffuse mechanism. Shrinkage occurred in radial direction and decreased the size to almost 65% from initial size. In longitudinal direction almost is not change of size.

  8. DRYING OF EMPTY FRUIT BUNCHES AS WASTED BIOMASS BY HYBRID SOLAR–THERMAL DRYING TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. H. Al-Kayiem

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Solar drying of EFB is highly feasible and economic, but the solar drying process is interrupted during cloudy or rainy days and also at night. In the present paper, a combined solar, as the main heat input, and biomass burner, as an auxiliary source of thermal energy, has been investigated experimentally to dry EFB. An experimental model consisting of a solar dryer integrated with a thermal backup unit was designed and fabricated. A series of experimental measurements were carried out in four different drying modes, namely, open sun, mixed direct and indirect solar, thermal backup, and hybrid. The results from the four modes used to dry 2.5 kg of EFB were summarized and compared. The results indicated that the solar drying mode required around 52 to 80 hours to dry the EFB, while the open sun drying mode required 100 hours. Usage of the thermal backup as heat source reduced the drying time to 48–56 hours. With the hybrid mode, the drying time was considerably reduced to 24–32 hours. The results demonstrate that the combined solar and thermal backup effectively enhanced the drying performance. The application of a solar dryer with a biomass burner is practical for massive production of solid fuels from EFB.

  9. Waste heat potentials in the drying section of the paper machine in Umka Cardboard Mill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankes Goran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper production is one of the most energy intensive industrial processes. The use of waste heat is very important for energy efficiency improvement in paper industry. This paper deals with methods for calculation of potentials of waste heat generated in paper/board production process. For that purpose, the material and heat balance of the cardboard machine at Umka Cardboard Mill has been determined. Field measurements were conducted in order to define the unknown values of process parameters used for calculation in the balance equations and modelling. The focus was given to the cardboard drying section, which consumes most of the energy supplied to the machine. Additional aim of the work presented in the paper was to evaluate the specific energy consumption and the thermal efficiency of all individual energy units within the machine’s drying section. The results indicate two main sources of waste heat: waste heat released to the atmosphere with the discharge air from the present waste heat recovery system (14,380 kW; and waste heat released into the hall from the machine and extracted by the hall ventilation system (4,430 kW. Waste heat from both sources is characterized by fairly low temperatures 58-75ºС and fairly high moisture content (30-40 g/kg. The waste heat can be partly utilized for preheating the fresh air in cardboard drying process, saving up to 13% of steam consumption. The specific heat consumption and specific steam consumption (consumption per tonne of produced cardboard of the machine was 1,490 kWh/t and 1.4 t/t, respectively. The thermal efficiency of drying section and coating drying section was 55.6% and 33.6%, respectively. All these figures imply necessity for further waste heat utilization with the aim of improving the efficiency of energy use.

  10. Effect of drying on leaching testing of treated municipal solid waste incineration APC-residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuyan; Hyks, Jiri; Astrup, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas H

    2008-08-01

    Air-pollution-control (APC) residues from waste incinerators are hazardous waste according to European legislation and must be treated prior to landfilling. Batch and column leaching data determine which type of landfill can receive the treated APC-residues. CEN standards are prescribed for the batch and column leaching test; however, these standards do not specify whether or not the residue samples should be dried prior to the leaching testing. Laboratory tests were performed in parallel (dried/non-dried) on treated APC-residue samples and evaluated with respect to Cr, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn leaching. The effect of drying of the wet APC-residue samples was particularly dramatic regarding the leaching of Cr. Drying resulted in 10-100 times more Cr leaching in both batch and columns test. Drying also affected the leaching of Cd, Cu and Pb. Initial Cd leaching was up to 100 times higher in column tests with dried APC-residue than in tests with wet residues. The effect of drying appeared to be a combination of decreasing the reduction capacity of the sample (Cr), decreasing pH (Cd, Cu) and in column tests also a wash-out of salts (probably affecting Cd and Pb). If the leaching tests are intended to mimic landfill conditions, the results of this paper suggest that the tests should be done on wet, non-dried residue samples, although this may be less practical than testing dried samples.

  11. Element test experiments and simulations: From dry towards cohesive powders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imole, Olukayode Isaiah; Kumar, Nishant; Luding, Stefan; Onate, E; Owen, D.R.J

    2011-01-01

    Findings from experiments and particle simulations for dry and cohesive granular materials are presented with the goal to reach quantitative agreement between simulations and experiments. Results for the compressibility, tested with the FT4 Powder Rheometer are presented. The first simulation

  12. Selected Models for Key Processes in a Nuclear Waste Repository Temperature field - Bentonite drying/resaturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claesson, Johan (Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2007-12-15

    The bentonite, which surrounds and protects the canisters in a nuclear waste repository deep down in rock, experiences a complex, coupled heat and moisture flow process. The emitted heat from the canisters will cause an initial drying from the warmer canister side. The water in cracks and fractures in the rock will on the other hand cause successive saturation of the bentonite from the outer rock side, These processes will interact and one key question is the degree of initial drying and the time it takes to saturate the bentonite. This paper studies this problem and presents new handy tools of analysis. A compact formula for the temperature level and gradient in the bentonite is presented. The key radial moisture flow process around a canister is shown to be governed by two flow coefficient functions. These depend on water and bentonite properties in a rather complicated way, but they are determined quite handily by one of the models. The moisture flow may have a time scale of a few years, while the canister heat emission and temperature process involve a time scale of decades. Steady-state solutions are therefore of interest. One model solves the general case of coupled nonlinear differential equations for water saturation S(r) and temperature T(r) . An analysis of the equations shows that there is a direct relation between S and T, with the initial degree of saturation as a parameter. We get a set of curves that gives the (steady-state) drying for any temperature level, canister heat emission, and water saturation level. These very instructive diagrams are generated for any set of data in a few seconds. The second part of the analysis concerns the transient moisture flow process. There are two limits. In the wet-rock case, full saturation (S = 1) is maintained at the rock boundary. The moisture flux is zero at the rock boundary in the dry-rock case. The equation for the water saturation S(r,f) involves two free flow coefficient functions which are functions of S

  13. Effect of the addition of fibreglass waste on the properties of dried and fired clay bricks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzlena, S.; Sakale, G.; Certoks, S.; Grase, L.

    2017-10-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the addition of fibreglass waste on the properties of the dried and fired clay bricks. Different amounts of waste glass (0 – 10 wt %) were added to the original brick clay and fired at 1000 °C. The effects on the technological properties of the bricks such as compressive strength, water absorption and density after firing were investigated. Also cracks and fibreglass influence in dried and fired samples were analysed by digital camera and SEM-EDX analysis.

  14. Bread enriched in lycopene and other bioactive compounds by addition of dry tomato waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour, Violeta; Ionica, Mira Elena; Trandafir, Ion

    2015-12-01

    The tomato processing industry generates high amounts of waste, mainly tomato skins and seeds, which create environmental problems. These residues are attractive sources of valuable bioactive components and pigments. A relatively simple recovery technology could consist of production of powders to be directly incorporated into foods. Tomato waste coming from a Romanian tomato processing unit were analyzed for the content of several bioactive compounds like ascorbic acid, β-carotene, lycopene, total phenolics, mineral and trace elements. In addition, its antioxidant capacity was assayed. Results revealed that tomato waste (skins and seeds) could be successfully utilized as functional ingredient for the formulation of antioxidant rich functional foods. Dry tomato processing waste were used to supplement wheat flour at 6 and 10 % levels (w/w flour basis) and the effects on the bread's physicochemical, baking and sensorial characteristics were studied. The following changes were observed: increase in moisture content, titratable acidity and bread crumb elasticity, reduction in specific volume and bread crumb porosity. The addition of dry tomato waste at 6 % resulted in bread with good sensory characteristics and overall acceptability but as the amount of dry tomato waste increased to 10 %, bread was less acceptable.

  15. Extractable and Non-Extractable Phenolics and Antioxidant Capacity of Mandarin Waste Dried at Different Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza-Martínez, Francisco J; Miranda-López, Rita; Mata-Sánchez, Sara M; Guzmán-Maldonado, Salvador H

    2016-09-01

    The mandarin industry is generating more waste due to the increasing demand for juice. In this study, extractable and non-extractable phenolics as well as 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) antioxidant activities in Satsuma mandarin waste dried at different temperatures were determined. The amounts of non-extractable total phenols, total flavonoids, and condensed tannins measured in mandarin waste dried at 120 °C were 39.4, 44.3, and 45.6 %, respectively, which were higher than those of fresh-mandarin waste. Dried mandarin waste is rich in extractable and non-extractable hesperidin (259.86 and 182.52 mg/g, respectively) and eriocitrin (85.12 and 197.24 mg/g, respectively), as well as non-extractable gallic acid (36.08 μg/g). The antioxidant capacities of extractable and non-extractable phenolics, from the highest to the lowest, were ABTS > ORAC > DPPH > FRAP and ORAC > ABTS > DPPH > FRAP, respectively. The information reported here may encourage mandarin industry operators to re-evaluate their by-products, extending the application of mandarin fruits and reducing waste.

  16. Utilizing waste heat from metal industry for drying of organic waste

    OpenAIRE

    Dobric, Sasa

    2014-01-01

    Growing generation of organic waste is a real problem all over the world. This is specifically expressed in the developed countries because the amounts of the waste are larger. Therefore, it implies problem connected with organic waste disposal. In the modern society it is prohibited to dump the waste on landfills. It was necessary to find the solution how to deal with this situation.One of the options is delivering of the organic waste to the burning facilities. In this way it is possible to...

  17. Sewage sludge drying process integration with a waste-to-energy power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, A; Bonfiglioli, L; Pellegrini, M; Saccani, C

    2015-08-01

    Dewatered sewage sludge from Waste Water Treatment Plants (WWTPs) is encountering increasing problems associated with its disposal. Several solutions have been proposed in the last years regarding energy and materials recovery from sewage sludge. Current technological solutions have relevant limits as dewatered sewage sludge is characterized by a high water content (70-75% by weight), even if mechanically treated. A Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) with good thermal characteristics in terms of Lower Heating Value (LHV) can be obtained if dewatered sludge is further processed, for example by a thermal drying stage. Sewage sludge thermal drying is not sustainable if the power is fed by primary energy sources, but can be appealing if waste heat, recovered from other processes, is used. A suitable integration can be realized between a WWTP and a waste-to-energy (WTE) power plant through the recovery of WTE waste heat as energy source for sewage sludge drying. In this paper, the properties of sewage sludge from three different WWTPs are studied. On the basis of the results obtained, a facility for the integration of sewage sludge drying within a WTE power plant is developed. Furthermore, energy and mass balances are set up in order to evaluate the benefits brought by the described integration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Issues related to waste sewage sludge drying under superheated steam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamawand Ihsan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sewage sludge was dried in a rotary drum dryer under superheated steam. Particle size and moisture content were shown to have significant influences on sticking and agglomeration of the materials. Pouring partially dried sludge (70–80% moisture content, wet basis directly into the screw feeder of the drum dryer resulted in a significant sticking to the surface of the drum and the final particle size of the product was greater than 100 mm in diameter. The moisture content of this product was slightly less than its initial value. To overcome this issue, the sludge was mixed with lignite at variety ratios and then chopped before being introduced to the feeding screw. It was found that mixing the sludge with lignite and then sieving the chopped materials through a four millimetre mesh sieve was the key to solve this issue. This technique significantly reduced both stickiness and agglomeration of the material. Also, this enabled for a significant reduction in moisture content of the final product.

  19. Assessment of two techniques for drying of easily degradable organic bio-waste; Bedoemning av tvaa tekniker foer torkning av laett nedbrytbart organiskt matavfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raaholt, Birgitta; Bergstroem, Birgitta; Broberg, Agneta; Holtz, Emma; Nordberg, Ulf; Del Pilar Castillo, Maria; Baky, Andras

    2011-10-15

    incoming material to treatment plants, energy consumption, cost, and climate impact. The quality of the dried material was evaluated with respect to purity degree, shelf-life stability, nutritional content, bio fuel potential and rehydration properties. In the system analysis, each drying technology, combined with a supposed subsequent digestion process, was compared to today's system for collection and digestion of food waste. An initial assessment of the potential of the microwave-vacuum drying process was made, as an alternative technique for hygienisation of food waste which contains animal by-products (ABP). The results indicate that the microwave process would be possible to adjust, in order to meet the time-temperature requirements for hygienisation. However, complementing studies are required to optimise and control the process towards the required microbiological reduction. Dried material has, as expected, advantages from both an odour and storage point of view; the lower water content corresponds to lower water activity and accordingly longer shelf-life and reduced risk for e.g. mould growth and odour. Even if energy is needed for drying the material, there are environmental advantages at collection of food waste (at transport distances less than about 50 km). Digestion experiments showed that dried food waste from households in Goeteborg did not result in any significant differences in methane exchange, with regard to organic matter (VS), expressed as m{sup 3}CH{sub 4}/tonne VS, compared with fresh food waste. Dried waste from food establishments in Boraas showed significantly lower methane exchange, with respect to organic matter (VS), than fresh food waste. The reasons for this need to be further investigated. A project delimitation was that the techniques were evaluated based upon food waste which was collected during a relatively short period of time. The target group of the project is the Swedish food industry, personnel responsible for waste

  20. Cauliflower waste utilization for sustainable biobutanol production: revelation of drying kinetics and bioprocess development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khedkar, Manisha A; Nimbalkar, Pranhita R; Chavan, Prakash V; Chendake, Yogesh J; Bankar, Sandip B

    2017-07-03

    Efficient yet economic production of biofuel(s) using varied second-generation feedstock needs to be explored in the current scenario to cope up with global fuel demand. Hence, the present study was performed to reveal the use of cauliflower waste for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production using Clostridium acetobutylicum NRRL B 527. The proximate analysis of cauliflower waste demonstrated to comprise 17.32% cellulose, 9.12% hemicellulose, and 5.94% lignin. Drying of cauliflower waste was carried out in the temperature range of 60-120 °C to investigate its effect on ABE production. The experimental drying data were simulated using moisture diffusion control model. The cauliflower waste dried at 80 °C showed maximum total sugar yield of 26.05 g L-1. Furthermore, the removal of phenolics, acetic acid, and total furans was found to be 90-97, 10-40, and 95-97%, respectively. Incidentally, maximum ABE titer obtained was 5.35 g L-1 with 50% sugar utilization.

  1. Evaluation of dry-solids-blend material source for grouts containing 106-AN waste: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, R.D.; Gilliam, T.M.; Osborne, S.C.; Francis, C.L.; Trotter, D.R.

    1993-09-01

    Stabilization/solidification technology is one of the most widely used techniques for the treatment and ultimate disposal of both radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes. Cement-based products, commonly referred to as grouts, are the predominant materials of choice because of their low associated processing costs, compatibility with a wide variety of disposal scenarios, and ability to meet stringent processing and performance requirements. Such technology is being utilized in a Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for the disposal of various wastes, including 106-AN wastes, located on the Hanford Reservation. The WHC personnel have developed a grout formula for 106-AN disposal that is designed to meet stringent performance requirements. This formula consists of a dry-solids blend containing 40 wt % limestone, 28 wt % granulated blast furnace slag (BFS), 28 wt % American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Class F fly ash, and 4 wt % Type I-II-LA Portland cement. This blend is mixed with 106-AN at a mix ratio of 9 lb of dry-solids blend per gallon of waste. This report documents the final results of efforts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in support of WHC`s Grout Technology Program to assess the effects of the source of the dry-solids-blend materials on the resulting grout formula.

  2. A study of the impact of moist-heat and dry-heat treatment processes on hazardous trace elements migration in food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Jin, Yiying; Qiu, Xiaopeng; Chen, Xin

    2015-03-01

    Using laboratory experiments, the authors investigated the impact of dry-heat and moist-heat treatment processes on hazardous trace elements (As, Hg, Cd, Cr, and Pb) in food waste and explored their distribution patterns for three waste components: oil, aqueous, and solid components. The results indicated that an insignificant reduction of hazardous trace elements in heat-treated waste-0.61-14.29% after moist-heat treatment and 4.53-12.25% after dry-heat treatment-and a significant reduction in hazardous trace elements (except for Hg without external addition) after centrifugal dehydration (P heat treatment, over 90% of the hazardous trace elements in the waste were detected in the aqueous and solid components, whereas only a trace amount of hazardous trace elements was detected in the oil component (heat treatment process did not significantly reduce the concentration of hazardous trace elements in food waste, but the separation process for solid and aqueous components, such as centrifugal dehydration, could reduce the risk considerably. Finally, combined with the separation technology for solid and liquid components, dry-heat treatment is superior to moist-heat treatment on the removal of external water-soluble ionic hazardous trace elements. An insignificant reduction of hazardous trace elements in heat-treated waste showed that heat treatment does not reduce trace elements contamination in food waste considerably, whereas the separation process for solid and aqueous components, such as centrifugal dehydration, could reduce the risk significantly. Moreover, combined with the separation technology for solid and liquid components, dry-heat treatment is superior to moist-heat treatment for the removal of external water-soluble ionic hazardous trace elements, by exploring distribution patterns of trace elements in three waste components: oil, aqueous, and solid components.

  3. Recovery of valuable components from waste LCD panel through a dry physical method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; He, Yaqun; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Guangwen

    2017-06-01

    A waste liquid crystal display (LCD) panel was recycled synthetically and cleanly by using dry physical methods, namely, mechanical exfoliation, dry crushing and vibrated gas-solid fluidized bed separation. Results of elemental and phase analyses show that indium and tin contents were enriched greatly in indium tin oxide concentrate obtained from colour filter and thin-film transistor glass. The results of crushing, ash content and scanning electron microscopic analyses show that when the LCD panel was crushed into particles smaller than 0.25mm, the polarizer film is nearly completely liberated from the glass. Moreover, the results of vibrated gas-solid fluidized bed separation show that gas velocity and separation time are the main factors influencing the separation. The vibration intensity of 6.8, gas velocity of 13.6cm/s and fluidizing time of 30s are the optimum operating parameters, and the degree of separation and recovery of polarizing film reached up to 37.69 and 72.3%, respectively. Based on these results, the combination of dry enrichment, dry crushing and dry separation in a flowsheet is proposed for recycling of waste LCD panel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Experiment of Drying Process of the Fibrous Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří RASZKA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the experiment of water evaporation from fibrous material (cotton. The material is placed in the tube and hot air flows through (process of drying. Temperature of air is measured by thermocouple. The textile represents porous medium with certain amount of water (wet textile. Porous layer makes pressure drop when airflow starts. Properties of air (temperature, relative humidity change during evaporation process. Values of pressure drop, temperature and humidity measured during experiment are used for set up of boundary condition, porous layer and evaporation model in Ansys Fluent 13.

  5. Kinetic study of dry anaerobic co-digestion of food waste and cardboard for methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capson-Tojo, Gabriel; Rouez, Maxime; Crest, Marion; Trably, Eric; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Bernet, Nicolas; Delgenès, Jean-Philippe; Escudié, Renaud

    2017-11-01

    Dry anaerobic digestion is a promising option for food waste treatment and valorization. However, accumulation of ammonia and volatile fatty acids often occurs, leading to inefficient processes and digestion failure. Co-digestion with cardboard may be a solution to overcome this problem. The effect of the initial substrate to inoculum ratio (0.25 to 1gVS·gVS-1) and the initial total solids contents (20-30%) on the kinetics and performance of dry food waste mono-digestion and co-digestion with cardboard was investigated in batch tests. All the conditions produced methane efficiently (71-93% of the biochemical methane potential). However, due to lack of methanogenic activity, volatile fatty acids accumulated at the beginning of the digestion and lag phases in the methane production were observed. At increasing substrate to inoculum ratios, the initial acid accumulation was more pronounced and lower cumulative methane yields were obtained. Higher amounts of soluble organic matter remained undegraded at higher substrate loads. Although causing slightly longer lag phases, high initial total solids contents did not jeopardize the methane yields. Cardboard addition reduced acid accumulation and the decline in the yields at increasing substrate loads. However, cardboard addition also caused higher concentrations of propionic acid, which appeared as the most last acid to be degraded. Nevertheless, dry co-digestion of food waste and cardboard in urban areas is demonstrated asan interesting feasible valorization option. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of Drying Technologies for Resource Recovery from Solid Wastes and Brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wignarajah, Kanapathipillai; Alba, Ric; Fisher, John W.; Hogan, John A.; Polonsky, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Long term storage of unprocessed biological wastes and human wastes can present major health issues and a loss of potential resources. Space vehicles and planetary habitats are typically resource-scarce or resource-limited environments for long-term human habitation. To-date, most of the resources will need to be supplied from Earth, but this may not be possible for long duration human exploration. Based on present knowledge, there is only very limited in-situ resources on planetary habitats. Hence, the opportunity to "live off the land" in a planetary habitat is limited. However, if we assume that wastes generated by human explorers are viewed as resources, there is great potential to utilize and recycle them, thereby reducing the requirements for supply Earth and enabling the "live off the land" exploration scenario. Technologies used for the recovery of resources from wastes should be reliable, safe, easy to operate, fail-proof, modular, automated and preferably multifunctional in being capable of handling mixed solid and liquid wastes. For a lunar habitat, energy does not appear to be the major driving factor amongst the technologies studied. Instead, reliability appears to be more important[1] . This paper reports studies to date on drying technologies to remove water from solid wastes and brines. Experimental performance data obtained for recovery water from wastes and brine are presented. Simplicity of operation of hardware and energy efficiency are discussed. Some improvements and modifications to hardware were performed. Hopefully, this information will assist in future efforts in the "downselection" of technologies for recovery of water and resources from solid wastes and brines.

  7. Behavioral approach to food waste: an experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagau, H.; Vyrastekova, J.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of behavioral interventions and nudging in dealing with the food waste problem. In particular, the authors implement an information campaign aiming to increase consumers’ awareness of the food waste problem. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH:

  8. Use of dried waste of cassava starch extraction for feeding lactating cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TATIANE FERNANDES

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the best level of utilization of dried waste of cassava starch extraction (WCSEd as a substitute for corn for lactating cows. Four lactating cows were fed diets with increasing levels (0%, 33%, 66% and 100% of WCSEd as a substitute for corn. The intake and digestibility of dry matter and nutrients, milk production and composition, blood parameters of glucose and urea and microbial synthesis of the diets were evaluated. There was a reduction in dry matter intake, organic matter, ether extract and total carbohydrate, and increased intake of acid detergent fiber. Nutrient digestibility was not affected while the synthesis of microbial protein increased. These changes resulted in reduced milk production, without altering the efficiency of production or the constituents of milk, with a decreasing effect on daily production of lactose, solids and minerals. Metabolic parameters, glucose and urea nitrogen in plasma, remained within appropriate levels. The dried residue from the extraction of cassava starch can be used as feed for dairy cows to replace up to 100% of the corn ration. However, its use promotes a reduction in intake of dry matter and nutrients as well as a reduction in the production of milk, with impacts on the profitability of the product.

  9. Sorting efficiency and combustion properties of municipal solid waste during bio-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong-Qing; He, Pin-Jing; Shao, Li-Ming

    2009-11-01

    One aerobic and two combined bio-drying processes were set up to investigate the quantitative relationships of sorting efficiency and combustion properties with organics degradation and water removal during bio-drying. Results showed that the bio-drying could enhance the sorting efficiency of municipal solid waste (MSW) up to 71% from the initial of 34%. The sorting efficiency was correlated with water content negatively (correlation coefficient, r=-0.89) and organics degradation rate positively (r=0.92). The higher heating values (HHVs) were correlated with organics degradation negatively for FP (i.e. the sum of only food and paper) (r=-0.93) but positively for the mixing waste (MW) (r=0.90), whereas the lower heating values (LHVs) were negatively correlated with water content for both FP (r=-0.71) and MW (r=-0.96). Other combustion properties depended on organics degradation performance, except for ignition performance and combustion rate. The LHVs could be greatly enhanced by the combined process with insufficient aeration during the hydrolytic stage. Compared with FP, MW had higher LHVs and ratios of volatile matter to fixed carbon. Nevertheless, FP had higher final burnout values than MW.

  10. Performance and kinetic study of semi-dry thermophilic anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajeena Beevi, B; Madhu, G; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is promoted as an energy source and waste disposal. In this study semi dry anaerobic digestion of organic solid wastes was conducted for 45 days in a lab-scale batch experiment for total solid concentration of 100g/L for investigating the start-up performances under thermophilic condition (50 °C). The performance of the reactor was evaluated by measuring the daily biogas production and calculating the degradation of total solids and the total volatile solids. The biogas yield at the end of the digestion was 52.9L/kg VS (volatile solid) for the total solid (TS) concentration of 100g/L. About 66.7% of the volatile solid degradation was obtained during the digestion. A first order model based on the availability of substrate as the limiting factor was used to perform the kinetic studies of batch anaerobic digestion system. The value of reaction rate constant, k, obtained was 0.0249 day(-1). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Performance and kinetic study of semi-dry thermophilic anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajeena Beevi, B., E-mail: sajeenanazer@gmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Govt. Engineering College, Thrissur, Kerala 680 009 (India); Madhu, G., E-mail: profmadhugopal@gmail.com [Division of Safety & Fire Engineering, School of Engineering, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin, Kerala 682 022 (India); Sahoo, Deepak Kumar, E-mail: dksahoo@gmail.com [Division of Safety & Fire Engineering, School of Engineering, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin, Kerala 682 022 (India)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Performance of the reactor was evaluated by the degradation of volatile solids. • Biogas yield at the end of the digestion was 52.9 L/kg VS. • Value of reaction rate constant, k, obtained was 0.0249 day{sup −1}. • During the digestion 66.7% of the volatile solid degradation was obtained. - Abstract: Anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is promoted as an energy source and waste disposal. In this study semi dry anaerobic digestion of organic solid wastes was conducted for 45 days in a lab-scale batch experiment for total solid concentration of 100 g/L for investigating the start-up performances under thermophilic condition (50 °C). The performance of the reactor was evaluated by measuring the daily biogas production and calculating the degradation of total solids and the total volatile solids. The biogas yield at the end of the digestion was 52.9 L/kg VS (volatile solid) for the total solid (TS) concentration of 100 g/L. About 66.7% of the volatile solid degradation was obtained during the digestion. A first order model based on the availability of substrate as the limiting factor was used to perform the kinetic studies of batch anaerobic digestion system. The value of reaction rate constant, k, obtained was 0.0249 day{sup −1}.

  12. Performance of A Horizontal Cylinder Type Rotary Dryer for Drying Process ofOrganic Compost from Solid Waste Cocoa Pod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukrisno Widyotomo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Cocoa pod husk is the bigest component of cocoa pod, about 70% of total ht of mature pod, and to potentially used as organic compost source. Poten tial solid waste of cocoa pod husk from a cocoa processing centre is about 15— 22 m3/ha/year. A cocoa plantation needs about 20—30 ton/ha/year of organic matters. One of important steps in compos processing technology of cocoa pod solid waste is drying process. Organic compost with 20% moisture content is more easy in handling, application, storage and distribution. Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute has designed and tested a horizontal cylinder type rotary dryer for drying process of organic compos from solid waste cocoa pod with kerosene burner as energy sources. The objective of this research is to study performance of a horizontal cylinder type rotary dryer using kerosene burner as energy source for drying process of organic compost from solid waste cocoa pod. The material used was solid waste cocoa pod with 70—75% moisture content (wet basis, 70% size particle larger than 4.76 mm, and 30% size particle less than 4.76 mm, 690—695 kg/m3 bulk density. Drying process temperatures treatment were 60OC, 80OC, and 100OC, and cylinder rotary speed treatments were 7 rpm, 10 rpm, dan 16 rpm. The results showed that dryer had capacity about 102—150 kg/h depend on drying temperature and cylinder rotary speed. Optimum operation condition at 100OC drying temperature, and 10 rpm cylinder rotary speed with drying time to reach final moisture content of 20% was 1,6 h, capacity 136,14 kg/ h, bulk density 410 kg/m3, porocity 45,15%, kerosene consumption as energy source was 2,57 l/h, and drying efficiency 68,34%. Key words : cocoa, drying, rotary dryer, compost, waste

  13. Hazardous Waste Water Remediation by Ecoresin-Dry Cow Dung Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagla, Hemlata; Barot, Nisha

    2013-04-01

    Water, the matter, matrix, medium and the mother of our life, is indeed one of the drivers of Nature. Through water cycle only the intra and inter equilibrium is maintained constantly between entire 'green' and 'blue'. Unfortunately, with each successive epoch of industrialization and urbanization, human societies have produced non-biodegradable waste hulk with far beyond handling capacities of mankind. At this juncture the very need is to appreciate and move towards the cost as well as time effective scientific alternatives for the removal of aqueous heavy metal pollutants. Green chemistry advocates the utilization of naturally available bio-resins which are environmentally benign alternative to current synthetic materials and technologies employed for waste water treatment. This explicit investigation aims to explore Dry Cow dung powder, DCP, a natural biosorbent as a green and clean alternative for the aqueous waste water treatment. It is naturally available bio-organic, complex, polymorphic humified fecal matter of cow and is enriched with minerals, carbohydrates, fats, proteins, bile pigments, aliphatic - aromatic species such as 'Humic acid'(HA). The HA has been successfully extracted by authors from DCP and this piece of work has been published in the International Journal [1]. We have developed simple, efficient and eco-friendly method for the removal of aqueous heavy metal pollutant such as Cr(VI) [2], Cd(II), Cr(III) [3] and Hg(II) as well radiotoxic 90Sr(II) [4], employing DCP. DCP is employed without any pre or post treatment. Being freely and easily available DCP has an edge over processed natural adsorbent considering their cost, time and energy efficiency. In nutshell we have to remember that prevention is better than the cure. If we fail to meet this, the situation will surely augment which will drain our water, our life, to slaughters knife..! Reference: 1. H.K.Bagla, N.S.Barot, Soil Amendement by Green Supplement: Dry Cowdung powder, EGUGA - 11

  14. Bio-drying and size sorting of municipal solid waste with high water content for improving energy recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Li-Ming; Ma, Zhong-He; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Dong-Qing; He, Pin-Jing

    2010-07-01

    Bio-drying can enhance the sortability and heating value of municipal solid waste (MSW), consequently improving energy recovery. Bio-drying followed by size sorting was adopted for MSW with high water content to improve its combustibility and reduce potential environmental pollution during the follow-up incineration. The effects of bio-drying and waste particle size on heating values, acid gas and heavy metal emission potential were investigated. The results show that, the water content of MSW decreased from 73.0% to 48.3% after bio-drying, whereas its lower heating value (LHV) increased by 157%. The heavy metal concentrations increased by around 60% due to the loss of dry materials mainly resulting from biodegradation of food residues. The bio-dried waste fractions with particle size higher than 45 mm were mainly composed of plastics and papers, and were preferable for the production of refuse derived fuel (RDF) in view of higher LHV as well as lower heavy metal concentration and emission. However, due to the higher chlorine content and HCl emission potential, attention should be paid to acid gas and dioxin pollution control. Although LHVs of the waste fractions with size bio-drying, they were still below the quality standards for RDF and much higher heavy metal pollution potential was observed. Different incineration strategies could be adopted for different particle size fractions of MSW, regarding to their combustibility and pollution property. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dry-thermophilic anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste: methane production modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fdez-Güelfo, L A; Alvarez-Gallego, C; Sales, D; García, L I Romero

    2012-03-01

    The influence of particle size and organic matter content of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) in the overall kinetics of dry (30% total solids) thermophilic (55°C) anaerobic digestion have been studied in a semi-continuous stirred tank reactor (SSTR). Two types of wastes were used: synthetic OFMSW (average particle size of 1mm; 0.71 g Volatile Solids/g waste), and OFMSW coming from a composting full scale plant (average particle size of 30 mm; 0.16 g Volatile Solids/g waste). A modification of a widely-validated product-generation kinetic model has been proposed. Results obtained from the modified-model parameterization at steady-state (that include new kinetic parameters as K, Y(pMAX) and θ(MIN)) indicate that the features of the feedstock strongly influence the kinetics of the process. The overall specific growth rate of microorganisms (μ(max)) with synthetic OFMSW is 43% higher compared to OFMSW coming from a composting full scale plant: 0.238 d(-1) (K=1.391 d(-1); Y(pMAX)=1.167 L CH(4)/gDOC(c); θ(MIN)=7.924 days) vs. 0.135 d(-1) (K=1.282 d(-1); Y(pMAX)=1.150 L CH(4)/gDOC(c); θ(MIN)=9.997 days) respectively. Finally, it could be emphasized that the validation of proposed modified-model has been performed successfully by means of the simulation of non-steady state data for the different SRTs tested with each waste. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Design of SMART waste heat removal dry cooling tower using solar energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong Jae; Jeong, Yong Hoon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The 85% of cooling system are once-through cooling system and closed cycle wet cooling system. However, many countries are trying to reduce the power plant water requirement due to the water shortage and water pollution. Dry cooling system is investigated for water saving advantage. There are two dry cooling system which are direct and indirect cooling system. In direct type, turbine exhaust is directly cooled by air-cooled condenser. In indirect system, turbine steam is cooled by recirculating intermediate cooling water loop, then the loop is cooled by air-cooled heat exchanger in cooling tower. In this paper, the purpose is to remove SMART waste heat, 200MW by using newly designed tower. The possibility of enhancing cooling performance by solar energy is analyzed. The simple cooling tower and solar energy cooling tower are presented and two design should meet the purpose of removing SMART waste heat, 200MW. In first design, when tower diameter is 70m, the height of tower should be 360m high. In second design, the chimney height decrease from 360m to 180m as collector radius increase from 100m to 500m due to collector temperature enhancement by solar energy, To analyze solar cooling tower further, consideration of solar energy performance at night should be analyzed.

  17. Dry anaerobic digestion of rejects from pre-treated food waste; Torroetning av rejekt fraan foerbehandling av matavfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohn, Irene [NSR, Helsingborg (Sweden); Murto, Marika; Bjoernsson, Lovisa [Bioteknik, LTH, Lund (Sweden); Rosqvist, Haakan [Rosqvist Resurs, Klaagerup (Sweden)

    2011-11-15

    When the organic fraction of source separated municipal solid waste is digested anaerobically in a continuously stirred tank reactor there is a need for a pretreatment to make the waste pumpable and remove contaminants. In one type of pretreatment the material passes through a screw press which separates waste in a liquid fraction and a dry fraction (the reject). At NSR this technique is used and at present the reject is incinerated. A previous study has shown that about 30 % of the methane potential of the incoming organic waste can be found in the reject. The aim of the present project was to investigate the possibilities of realizing the methane potential through batch wise dry anaerobic digestion followed by composting as an alternative to incineration. In the technique used in the present project the material was digested in an anaerobic leach-bed with recirculation of leachate over the bed. It is important that the material is sufficiently porous to let the leachate spread evenly through the leach-bed. Treatment of reject and a mixture of reject and structural material were tested to investigate if the addition of structural material had an effect on the porosity. The flow of liquid through a leach-bed of reject and one of reject mixed with structural material was studied using LiBr as tracer. The digestate from the dry digestion process was composted, and the resulting compost was evaluated. The odor from the digestate, the active compost and the compost product was measured by analyzing the odor in the air of the porous space in heaps of the different materials. This was used to evaluate the risk of odor problems. The dry digestion and the tracer experiment both showed that mixing the reject with structural material had a positive effect on the flow of liquid through the material and the digestion process. Addition of structural material to the reject was needed in order to achieve an efficient digestion process. Using tracers proved to be a useful way of

  18. Thermo gravimetric and kinetic studies on dried solid waste of post-methanated distillery effluent under oxygen and nitrogen atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveen, C; Premalatha, M

    2014-12-01

    This work seeks for the possibility of using solid waste generated by drying the post-methanated distillery effluent, as fuel. TGA has been employed to analyse the kinetics of thermal degradation of the solid waste at different heating rates of 10, 20, 30, and 40°Cmin(-1) in pyrolysis and combustion modes. In combustion mode, the activation energy changes from 253.58 to 87.91kJmol(-1), corresponding to the changes in heating rates of 10°Cmin(-1) to 40°Cmin(-1), whereas, there is no significant change of activation energy in pyrolysis mode. The Arrhenius equation based kinetic model with regression analysis using LINEST function is able to predict the kinetic variables of dried solid waste in both the modes. Solid waste almost completely degrades at the end of isothermal condition in pyrolysis mode. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Experiences with waste incineration for energy production in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Janus; Grohnheit, Poul Erik; Møller Andersen, Frits

    The Bioenergy Department in SENER have requested assistance with planning for the deployment of bioenergy (Biomass, biogas and waste incineration) in Mexico and information on Danish experiences with developing policy initiatives promoting bioenergy. This introduction to the Danish experiences wi...... with waste incineration for energy production use is compiled as preparation for SENER’s potential visit to Denmark in 2014. This report was prepared 19 June, 2014 by COWI DTU System Analysis to Danish Energy Agency (DEA) as part of a frame contract agreement.......The Bioenergy Department in SENER have requested assistance with planning for the deployment of bioenergy (Biomass, biogas and waste incineration) in Mexico and information on Danish experiences with developing policy initiatives promoting bioenergy. This introduction to the Danish experiences...

  20. Experiences Spreading Organic Solid Wastes on Forest Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.H. Wilhoit; L.J. Samuelson

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews experiences spreading organic solid wastes on forest land over the past six years. Presented are some of the first-ever reported results on tree growth responses from fertilizing pine trees with poultry litter, spreader distribution pattern results for spreading in a pine plantation stand, and a discussion of equipment-related experiences spreading...

  1. Management of solid wastes from the Limestone Injection Dry Scrubbing (LIDS) clean coal technology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musiol, W.F. Jr.; Czuczwa, J.M.

    1993-03-01

    The objectives of this project were to characterize by-products from a pilot Limestone Injection Dry Scrubbing (LIDS) process and to develop processes directed toward the safe and economic use or disposal of these wastes. Because LIDS is a developing Clean Coal technology, a database of chemical and physical characteristics of the by-product was first developed. During the course of this project, it was found that the waste alone did not form high-strength products sufficient for use in construction and engineering applications. Therefore, the project was redirected to evaluate the by-product as a soil-cement and Portland cement raw material, agricultural liming agent, backfill/landfill material component, and mine reclamation/neutralizing agent. Based on these evaluations, the most viable uses for the LIDS byproduct include use in mine reclamation or as a neutralization agent. If soluble sulfites can be minimized by avoiding a dolomitic LIDS reagent, use as an agricultural liming agent has promise. Interest from an Ohio utility in the LIDS process suggests possible application of results at the demonstration or commercial stages.

  2. Feasibility of drying system using waste heat as the heating source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, M. N.; Shi, Y. L.; Chen, L. X.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, a wastewater heat pump system was proposed and its thermal performance was analyzed. The proposed system includes two evaporators: an air-source evaporator and a water-source evaporator. The air-source evaporator absorbs heat from the moist hot air which exhaust from the drying oven. The water-source evaporator absorbs heat from the waste water, while the waste water recovers heat from the mechanical energy, which was produced by cutting and polishing in stone production. The thermodynamic model was developed to evaluate the performance of the proposed system. The energetic analysis was carried out to investigate the influences of the temperature of fresh air. The results show significantly higher energy efficiency, compact-sized and energy-saving compared with the system which uses air as the heat source. Among the seven of alternative refrigerants (R152a, R123, R1234yf, R1234ze, R600a, R22 and R600) investigated, R123 was suggested to be used in this heat pump for its high heating efficiency, inflammable, very low ODP(Ozone Depletion Potential) and GWP(Global warming potential).

  3. 40 year experience of radioactive waste disposal in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solente, N.; Ouzounian, G.; Dutzer, M.; Miguez, R. [ANDRA Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs, Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2011-07-01

    France's experience in the management of radioactive waste is supported by forty years of operational activities in the field of surface disposal. This feedback is related to three disposal facilities: Centre de la Manche disposal, not far away Cherbourg, from design to post-closure facility; Centre at Soulaines-Dhuys from site selection to design to operation during nearly 20 years; and, Centre at Morvilliers from site selection to operation for seven years now. During the operational period of Centre de la Manche disposal facility (1969-1994), the safety concept for low-and intermediate level short lived waste (LIL-SLW) was developed and progressively incorporated in the procedures of the facility. The facility entered its institutional control period and the experience of this facility has been useful for the operating facilities. Centre de l'Aube that took over Centre de la Manche, and Morvilliers for very low level wastes. Both facilities currently accommodate the major part of the volume of radioactive wastes that are generated in France. However disposal facilities have to be considered as rare resources. Then new waste management options are being investigated as the disposal of large components or recycling metallic wastes within the nuclear industry. (author)

  4. Briquettes of rice husk, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and dried leaves as implementation of wastes recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariyanto, Sucipto; Usman, Mohammad Nurdianfajar; Citrasari, Nita

    2017-06-01

    This research aim is to determine the best briquettes as implementation of wastes recycle based on scoring method, main component composition, compressive strength, caloric value, water content, vollatile content, and ash content, also the suitability with SNI 01-6235-2000. Main component that used are rice husk, 2mm and 6 mm PET, and dried leaves. Composition variation in this research are marked as K1, K2, K3, K4, and K5 with 2 mm PET plastic and K1, K2, K3, K4, and K5 with 6 mm PET plastic. The total weight of the briquettes is 100 g and divided into 90% main components and 10% tapioca as binder. The compressive strength, caloric value, water content, vollatile content, and ash content were tested according to ASTM D 5865-04, ASTM D 3173-03, ASTM D 3175-02, ASTM D 3174-02. The tested results were used to determine the best briquette by scoring method, and the chosen briquettes is K2 with 6 mm PET plastic. The composition is 70% rice husk, 20% 6 mm PET plastic, and 10% dried leaves with the compressive strength, caloric value, water content, vollatile content, and ash content value is 51,55 kg/cm2; 5123 kal/g; 3,049%; 31,823%, dan 12,869%. The suitable value that meet the criteria according to SNI 01-6235-2000 is compressive strength, caloric value, water content, and ash content.

  5. Possibilities of mercury removal in the dry flue gas cleaning lines of solid waste incineration units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, Karel; Hartman, Miloslav; Šyc, Michal; Pohořelý, Michael; Kameníková, Petra; Jeremiáš, Michal; Durda, Tomáš

    2016-01-15

    Dry methods of the flue gas cleaning (for HCl and SO2 removal) are useful particularly in smaller solid waste incineration units. The amount and forms of mercury emissions depend on waste (fuel) composition, content of mercury and chlorine and on the entire process of the flue gas cleaning. In the case of high HCl/total Hg molar ratio in the flue gas, the majority (usually 70-90%) of mercury is present in the form of HgCl2 and a smaller amount in the form of mercury vapors at higher temperatures. Removal of both main forms of mercury from the flue gas is dependent on chemical reactions and sorption processes at the temperatures below approx. 340 °C. Significant part of HgCl2 and a small part of elemental Hg vapors can be adsorbed on fly ash and solid particle in the air pollution control (APC) processes, which are removed in dust filters. Injection of non-impregnated active carbon (AC) or activated lignite coke particles is able to remove mainly the oxidized Hg(2+) compounds. Vapors of metallic Hg(o) are adsorbed relatively weakly. Much better chemisorption of Hg(o) together with higher sorbent capacity is achieved by AC-based sorbents impregnated with sulfur, alkali poly-sulfides, ferric chloride, etc. Inorganic sorbents with the same or similar chemical impregnation are also applicable for deeper Hg(o) removal (over 85%). SCR catalysts convert part of Hg(o) into oxidized compounds (HgO, HgCl2, etc.) contributing to more efficient Hg removal, but excess of NH3 has a negative effect. Both forms, elemental Hg(o) and HgCl2, can be converted into HgS particles by reacting with droplets/aerosol of poly-sulfides solutions/solids in flue gas. Mercury captured in the form of water insoluble HgS is more advantageous in the disposal of solid waste from APC processes. Four selected options of the dry flue gas cleaning with mercury removal are analyzed, assessed and compared (in terms of efficiency of Hg-emission reduction and costs) with wet methods and retrofits for more

  6. First Experience with Dry-Ice Cleaning on SRF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Reschke, D

    2004-01-01

    The surface of superconducting (s.c.) accelerator cavities must be cleaned from any kind of contaminations, like particles or chemical residues. Contaminations might act as centers for field emission, thus limiting the maximum gradient. Today's final cleaning is based on high pressure rinsing with ultra pure water. Application of dry-ice cleaning might result in additional cleaning potential. Dry-ice cleaning using the sublimation-impulse method removes particulate and film contaminations without residues. As a first qualifying step intentionally contaminated niobium samples were treated by dry ice cleaning. It resulted in a drastic reduction of DC field emission up to fields of 100 MV/m as well as in the reduction of particle numbers. The dry ice jet caused no observable surface damage. First cleaning tests on single-cell cavities showed Q-values at low fields up to 4x1010

  7. Reduction experiment of iron scale by adding waste plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chongmin; Chen, Shuwen; Miao, Xincheng; Yuan, Hao

    2009-01-01

    The special features of waste plastics in China are huge in total amount, various in type and dispersive in deposition. Therefore, it is necessary to try some new ways that are fit to Chinese situation for disposing waste plastics as metallurgical raw materials more effectively and flexibly. Owing to its high ferrous content and less impurity, the iron scale became ideal raw material to produce pure iron powder. One of the methods to produce pure iron powder is Hoganas Method, by which, after one or multistage of reduction steps, the iron scale can be reduced pure iron powder. However, combining utilization of waste plastics and iron powder production, a series of reduction experiments were arranged and investigated, which is hoped to take use of both thermal and chemical energy contained in waste plastics as well as to improve the reducing condition of iron scale, and hence to develop a new metallurgical way of disposing waste plastics. The results show that under these experimental conditions, the thermal-decomposition of water plastics can conduce to an increase of porosity in the reduction systems. Moreover, better thermodynamics and kinetics conditions for the reduction of scale can be reached. As a result, the reduction rate is increased.

  8. Experiences in the emptying of waste silos containing solid nuclear waste from graphite- moderated reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, S.; Schwarz, T. [RWE NUKEM Limited, B7 Windscale, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PF (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    difference in the two streams lays in the chosen retrieval technology, reflecting the different problems involved. The most significant differences in the retrieval solutions are; - MAC recovery is achieved with a hydraulic Artisan manipulator arm deployed through a series of new access points in the vault roof; - FED recovery utilizes two retrieval units which deploy petal grabs through tubes originally connected to the waste discharge conveyors. The waste is then transported for further treatment including monitoring, packing, lid and grouting fitting, box filling and swabbing of the boxes to eliminate external contamination. This poster session discusses the experiences made with the retrieval and emptying of graphite containing nuclear waste silos.

  9. CROPS AND CHEMISM OF PLANTS OF A MULTIVARIANT MODEL EXPERIMENT ON COAL COMBUSTION WASTE DEPOSITS. PART II (2012 – 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Siuta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Reclamation efficiency of composts produced from the mixture of municipal waste (Radiowo and ZUSOK, urban green waste composts (Complex, housing estate lawn mowing waste (plants and sewage sludge, as well as mineral fertilizer (NPK – without the use of any organic fertilizer, was assessed in a model experiment on an ash soil. The experiment was launched in 2005 and continued until the end of 2013. Crops were collected and subjected to the analysis in 2005, 2006 and between 2011 and 2012. In the period between 2007 and 2010 no agrotechnical treatments were carried out, with the experiment being limited to mere observation of the natural (spontaneous succession of plants. Reclamation doses of composts and sewage sludge were measured quantitatively, therefore they differed in the content of dry matter as well as in the contents of organic substances and minerals in the dry matter. The largest aggregated dry matter yield of plants (2005–2013 was reported in the Complex variant, and similarly, in the Radiowo and plant variants, whereas the ZUSOK variant reported the lowest aggregated dry matter field of plants. The yield-forming efficiency of NPK fertilizer was lower than in the case of compost and sludge variants. However, the field-forming efficiency of sewage sludge was lower than its fertilization potential as it was unstable and difficult to mix with the experimental soil. The results showed the yield-forming potential of plants on the experimental coal combustion waste deposits fertilized with composts and sewage sludge as well as the examples of the sites where sewage sludge could be used for the biological reclamation of landfills and spoil tips.

  10. Characterizing differences in precipitation regimes of extreme wet and dry years: implications for climate change experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Alan K; Hoover, David L; Wilcox, Kevin R; Avolio, Meghan L; Koerner, Sally E; La Pierre, Kimberly J; Loik, Michael E; Luo, Yiqi; Sala, Osvaldo E; Smith, Melinda D

    2015-02-03

    Climate change is intensifying the hydrologic cycle and is expected to increase the frequency of extreme wet and dry years. Beyond precipitation amount, extreme wet and dry years may differ in other ways, such as the number of precipitation events, event size, and the time between events. We assessed 1614 long-term (100 year) precipitation records from around the world to identify key attributes of precipitation regimes, besides amount, that distinguish statistically extreme wet from extreme dry years. In general, in regions where mean annual precipitation (MAP) exceeded 1000 mm, precipitation amounts in extreme wet and dry years differed from average years by ~40% and 30%, respectively. The magnitude of these deviations increased to >60% for dry years and to >150% for wet years in arid regions (MAPExtreme wet years were primarily distinguished from average and extreme dry years by the presence of multiple extreme (large) daily precipitation events (events >99th percentile of all events); these occurred twice as often in extreme wet years compared to average years. In contrast, these large precipitation events were rare in extreme dry years. Less important for distinguishing extreme wet from dry years were mean event size and frequency, or the number of dry days between events. However, extreme dry years were distinguished from average years by an increase in the number of dry days between events. These precipitation regime attributes consistently differed between extreme wet and dry years across 12 major terrestrial ecoregions from around the world, from deserts to the tropics. Thus, we recommend that climate change experiments and model simulations incorporate these differences in key precipitation regime attributes, as well as amount into treatments. This will allow experiments to more realistically simulate extreme precipitation years and more accurately assess the ecological consequences. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Removal of Co(II) from waste water using dry cow dung powder : a green ambrosia to soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagla, Hemlata; Khilnani, Roshan

    2015-04-01

    Co(II) is one of the hazardous products found in the waste streams. The anthropogenic activities are major sources of Co(II) in our environment. Some of the well-established processes such as chemical precipitation, membrane process, liquid extraction and ion exchange have been applied as a tool for the removal of this metal ion [1]. All the above methods are not considered to be greener due to some of their shortcomings such as incomplete metal ion removal, high requirement of energy and reagents, generation of toxic sludge or other waste materials which in turn require further treatments for their cautious disposal. The present investigation entails the application of dry cow dung powder (DCP) as an indigenous, inexpensive and eco-friendly material for the removal of Co(II) from aqueous medium. DCP, is naturally available bio-organic, complex, polymorphic humified fecal matter of cow and is enriched with minerals, carbohydrates, fats, proteins, bile pigments, aliphatic-aromatic species such as 'Humic acid' (HA), Fulvic acid, Ulmic acid [2,3]. Batch biosorption experiments were conducted employing 60Co(II) as a tracer and effect of various process parameters such as pH (1-8), temperature (283-363K), amount of biosorbent (5-40 g/L), time of equilibration (0-30 min), agitation speed (0-4000 rpm), concentration of initial metal ions (0.5-20 mg/mL) and interfering effect of different organic as well as inorganic salts were studied. The Kinetic studies were carried out employing various models but the best fitting was given by Lagergren Pseudo-second order model [4] with high correlation coefficient R2 value of 0.999 and adsorption capacity of 2.31 mg/g. The thermodynamic parameters for biosorption were also evaluated which indicated spontaneous and exothermic process with high affinity of DCP for Co(II). Many naturally available materials are used for biosorption of hazardous metal pollutants, where most of them are physically or chemically modified. In this research

  12. Evaluation of dried bread waste as feedstuff for growing crossbred pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to investigate the effect of bread waste feeding on feed intake, utilization and growth performance of crossbred pigs and to evaluate the economics of bread waste feeding. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted for a period of 3 months (December, 2012-March, 2013. Large White Yorkshire crosses (LWY X Desi were included in the study. A total of 24 weaned crossbred growing pigs were randomly assigned to four different groups, with six animals in each group. The experimental animals were fed as per their body weight following Indian Council of Agricultural Research requirements. They were fed twice a day according to schedule at 9:00 am and 3:00 pm. The water was kept available to animals round the clock. The cost of the experimental diets was calculated based on the existing price of the ingredients during the experimental period. Samples of feed were collected for analysis of proximate principles as per Association of Official Analytical Chemist. Body weight of all animals was recorded fortnightly basis in the morning before feeding with the use of platform type electronic weighing balance. Feed conversion ratio (FCR and protein conversion ration was calculated by using a standard formula. Data were analyzed, using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Means showing significant differences in the ANOVA table were compared using the Duncan multiple range test. Results: Crude protein content (% of the diets was 16.01±0.02, 16.13±0.02, 16.14±0.02, 16.04±0.02, 16.08±0.02 and 12.72±0.03, respectively for the G1, G2, G3 and G4, groups. Proximate compositions (% of diets used in the experiment were not significantly different. Digestibility coefficients of all the nutrients were significantly varied among the experimental groups. Daily feed intake was significantly (p<0.05 varied among the groups. Average daily gain (kg/pig/day were significantly (p<0.01 higher in group G2 (0.377. FCR was significantly (p<0.01 higher in the

  13. Engineering spray-dried rosemary extracts with improved physicomechanical properties: a design of experiments issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza T. Chaul

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A 33 Box–Behnken design and Response Surface Methodology were performed to evaluate the influence of extract feed rate, drying air inlet temperature and spray nozzle airflow rate on the process yield, stability parameters (moisture content and water activity and on several physicomechanical properties of spray-dried rosemary extracts. Powder yield ranged from 17.1 to 74.96%. The spray-dried rosemary extracts showed moisture content and water activity below 5% and 0.5%, respectively, which indicate their chemical and microbiological stabilities. Even without using drying aids, some sets of experimental conditions rendered dried products with suitable flowability and compressibility characteristics for direct preparation of solid dosage forms. Analysis of variance and Response Surface Methodology proved that studied factors significantly affected most of the spray-dried rosemary extract quality indicators at different levels. The main processing parameter affecting the spray-dried rosemary extract characteristics was inlet temperature. The best combination of parameters used to obtain a reasonable yield of stable dry rosemary extracts with adequate technological properties for pharmaceutical purpose involves an extract feed rate of 2 ml/min, 80 °C inlet temperature and 40 l/min SA. The design of experiments approach is an interesting strategy for engineering spray-dried rosemary extracts with improved characteristics for pharmaceutical industrial purpose.

  14. Thermophilic Dry Methane Fermentation of Distillation Residue Eluted from Ethanol Fermentation of Kitchen Waste and Dynamics of Microbial Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Lian; Tan, Li; Wang, Ting-Ting; Sun, Zhao-Yong; Tang, Yue-Qin; Kida, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Thermophilic dry methane fermentation is advantageous for feedstock with high solid content. Distillation residue with 65.1 % moisture content was eluted from ethanol fermentation of kitchen waste and subjected to thermophilic dry methane fermentation, after adjusting the moisture content to 75 %. The effect of carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratio on thermophilic dry methane fermentation was investigated. Results showed that thermophilic dry methane fermentation could not be stably performed for >10 weeks at a C/N ratio of 12.6 and a volatile total solid (VTS) loading rate of 1 g/kg sludge/d; however, it was stably performed at a C/N ratio of 19.8 and a VTS loading rate of 3 g/kg sludge/d with 83.4 % energy recovery efficiency. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the number of bacteria and archaea decreased by two orders of magnitude at a C/N ratio of 12.6, whereas they were not influenced at a C/N ratio of 19.8. Microbial community analysis revealed that the relative abundance of protein-degrading bacteria increased and that of organic acid-oxidizing bacteria and acetic acid-oxidizing bacteria decreased at a C/N ratio of 12.6. Therefore, there was accumulation of NH4(+) and acetic acid, which inhibited thermophilic dry methane fermentation.

  15. ISOLATION OF ENT-KAUR-16-EN-19-OIC AND ENT-TRACHILOBAN-19-OIC ACIDS FROM THE SUNFLOWER HELIANTHUS ANNUUS L.DRY WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicon Ungur

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A relatively simple method for isolation of the mixture of ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic (1 and ent-trachiloban-19-oic (2 acids from dry waste of sunflower processing has been elaborated, and it has been shown that the waste can serve as an accessible source of ent-kauranic and ent-trachilobanic diterpenoids.

  16. Atmospheric dry deposition of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in the vicinity of municipal solid waste incinerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yee-Lin; Lin, Long-Full; Hsieh, Lien-Te; Wang, Lin-Chi; Chang-Chien, Guo-Ping

    2009-02-15

    This study focuses on the atmospheric dry deposition flux of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in the vicinity of the two municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs) located in southern Taiwan. PCDD/Fs in ambient air were taken and analyzed for seventeen 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDD/Fs during November 2004 and July 2005. Results show that the mean concentrations of PCDD/Fs in the ambient air near MSWI-GS and MSWI-RW were 0.090 and 0.097pg I-TEQ/Nm(3), respectively. Dry deposition fluxes of total PCDD/Fs were 18.0 and 23.5pg I-TEQ/(m(2)d) in the ambient air near MSWI-GS and MSWI-RW, respectively, which were considerably higher than that measured in Guangzhou, China. Annual dry deposition fluxes of total PCDD/Fs in the ambient air near MSWI-GS and MSWI-RW were 189 and 217ng/(m(2)year), respectively, which were also much higher than dry deposition of total PCDD/Fs to the Atlantic Ocean. The results of the present study strongly suggest that exposure to PCDD/Fs in this area should be reduced. In addition, parametric sensitivity shows that dry deposition flux of PCDD/Fs is most sensitive to dry deposition velocity of the particle-phase, followed by air temperature and concentration of total suspended particulate but least sensitive to dry deposition velocity of the gas-phase.

  17. Dry anaerobic digestion of food waste and cardboard at different substrate loads, solid contents and co-digestion proportions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capson-Tojo, Gabriel; Trably, Eric; Rouez, Maxime; Crest, Marion; Steyer, Jean-Philippe; Delgenès, Jean-Philippe; Escudié, Renaud

    2017-06-01

    The increasing food waste production calls for developing efficient technologies for its treatment. Anaerobic processes provide an effective waste valorization. The influence of the initial substrate load on the performance of batch dry anaerobic co-digestion reactors treating food waste and cardboard was investigated. The load was varied by modifying the substrate to inoculum ratio (S/X), the total solids content and the co-digestion proportions. The results showed that the S/X was a crucial parameter. Within the tested values (0.25, 1 and 4gVS·gVS-1), only the reactors working at 0.25 produced methane. Methanosarcina was the main archaea, indicating its importance for efficient methanogenesis. Acidogenic fermentation was predominant at higher S/X, producing hydrogen and other metabolites. Higher substrate conversions (≤48%) and hydrogen yields (≤62mL·gVS-1) were achieved at low loads. This study suggests that different value-added compounds can be produced in dry conditions, with the initial substrate load as easy-to-control operational parameter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of drying on leaching testing of treated municipal solid waste incineration APC-residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Y.; Hyks, Jiri; Astrup, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    tests with dried APC-residue than in tests with wet residues. The effect of drying appeared to be a combination of decreasing the reduction capacity of the sample (Cr), decreasing pH (Cd, Cu) and in column tests also a wash-out of salts (probably affecting Cd and Pb). If the leaching tests are intended...... leaching. The effect of drying of the wet APC-residue samples was particularly dramatic regarding the leaching of Cr. Drying resulted in 10—100 times more Cr leaching in both batch and columns test. Drying also affected the leaching of Cd, Cu and Pb. Initial Cd leaching was up to 100 times higher in column...

  19. Utilization of household food waste for the production of ethanol at high dry material content

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matsakas, Leonidas; Kekos, Dimitris; Loizidou, Maria; Christakopoulos, Paul

    2014-01-01

    .... In order to minimize the competition between fuels and food production, researchers are focusing their efforts to the utilization of wastes and by-products as raw materials for the production of ethanol...

  20. Bread enriched in lycopene and other bioactive compounds by addition of dry tomato waste

    OpenAIRE

    Violeta NOUR; Mira Elena IONICA; Ion TRANDAFIR

    2015-01-01

    The tomato processing industry generates high amounts of waste, mainly tomato skins and seeds, which create environmental problems. These residues are attractive sources of valuable bioactive components and pigments. A relatively simple recovery technology could consist of production of powders to be directly incorporated into foods. Tomato waste coming from a Romanian tomato processing unit were analyzed for the content of several bioactive compounds like ascorbic acid, β-carotene, lycopene,...

  1. Towards zero waste in emerging countries - a South African experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matete, Ntlibi; Trois, Cristina

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the optimisation of Waste Minimisation/Zero Waste strategies into an already established integrated waste management system and to present a Zero Waste model for post-consumer waste for urban communities in South Africa. The research was undertaken towards the fulfilment of the goals of the Polokwane Declaration on Waste Management [DEAT, 2001. Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism, Government of South Africa. Polokwane Declaration. Drafted by Government, Civil Society and the Business Community. National Waste Summit, Polokwane, 26-28 September 2001], which has set as its target the reduction of waste generation and disposal by 50% and 25%, respectively, by 2012 and the development of a plan for Zero Waste by 2022. Two communities, adjacent to the Mariannhill Landfill site in Durban, were selected as a case study for a comparative analysis of formal and informal settlements. Since the waste generated from these two communities is disposed of at the Mariannhill landfill, the impact of Zero Waste on landfill volumes could be readily assessed. A Zero Waste scheme, based on costs and landfill airspace savings, was proposed for the area. The case study demonstrates that waste minimisation schemes can be introduced into urban areas, in emerging countries, with differing levels of service and that Zero Waste models are appropriate to urban areas in South Africa.

  2. Inactivation of enteric indicator bacteria and system stability during dry co-digestion of food waste and pig manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan; Dennehy, Conor; Lawlor, Peadar G; Hu, Zhenhu; Zhan, Xinmin; Gardiner, Gillian E

    2018-01-15

    Provision of digestate with satisfactory biosafety is critical to land application of digestate and to the anaerobic digestion approach to treating manure and food waste (FW). No studies have been conducted on digestate biosafety in dry co-digestion systems. The aim of this study was to assess the inactivation efficiency and possible inactivation mechanism for three enteric indicator bacteria and the system stability during dry mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of FW and pig manure (PM). The effects of two different inocula were examined at a rate of 50% based on volatile solids (VS): digestate taken from existing dry co-digestion digesters and dewatered anaerobic sludge from a local wastewater treatment plant. The FW/PM ratios of 50:50 and 75:25 on a VS basis were also assessed. The results showed that using digestate as the inoculum and a FW/PM ratio of 50:50 led to stable dry co-digestion, with the specific methane yield (SMY) of 252mL/gVSadded. Total volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration was a significant inhibition factor for methane production during dry co-digestion (Penteric indicator bacteria. E. coli and total coliforms counts decreased below the limit of detection (LOD, 10(2)CFU/g) within 4-7days, with free VFA identified as a significant inactivation factor. Enterococci were more resistant but nonetheless the counts decreased below the LOD within 12days in the digestate inoculum systems and 26-31days in the sludge inoculum systems. The residence time was the most significant inactivation factor for enterococci, with the free VFA concentration playing a secondary role at high FW/PM ratio in the sludge inoculum system. In conclusion, digestate as inoculum and the FW/PM ratio of 50:50 were preferable operation conditions to realize system stability, methane production and enteric indicator bacteria inactivation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A comparison of costs associated with utility management options for dry active waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornibrook, C. [EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The economics of low level waste management is receiving more attention today than ever before. This is due to four factors: (1) the increases in the cost of processing of these wastes; (2) increases in the cost of disposal; (3) the addition of storage costs for those without access to disposal; and (4) the increasing competitive nature of the electric generation industry. These pressures are forcing the industry to update it`s evaluation of the mix of processing that will afford it the best long term economics and minimize it`s risks for unforeseen costs. Whether disposal is available or not, all utilities face the same challenge of minimizing the costs associated with the management of these wastes. There are a number of variables that will impact how a utility manages their wastes but the problem is the uncertainty of what will actually happen, i.e., will disposal be available, when and at what cost. Using the EPRI-developed WASTECOST: DAW code, this paper explores a variety of LLW management options available to utilities. Along with providing the costs and benefits, other technical considerations which play an important part in the management of these wastes are also addressed.

  4. Dry-thermophilic anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of the municipal solid waste: focusing on the inoculum sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster-Carneiro, T; Pérez, M; Romero, L I; Sales, D

    2007-12-01

    The effect of inoculum source on anaerobic thermophilic digestion of separately collected organic fraction of municipal solid wastes (SC_OFMSW) has been studied. Performance of laboratory scale reactors (V: 1.1 L) were evaluated using six different inoculums sources: (1) corn silage (CS); (2) restaurant waste digested mixed with rice hulls (RH_OFMSW); (3) cattle excrement (CATTLE); (4) swine excrement (SWINE); (5) digested sludge (SLUDGE); and (6) SWINE mixed with SLUDGE (1:1) (SWINE/SLUDGE). The SC_OFMSW was separately and collected from university restaurant. The selected conditions were: 25% of inoculum, 30% of total solid and 55 degrees C of temperature, optimum in the thermophilic range. The six inoculum sources showed an initial start-up phase in the range between 2 and 4 days and the initial methane generation began over 10 days operational process. Results indicated that SLUDGE is the best inoculum source for anaerobic thermophilic digestion of the treatment of organic fraction of municipal solid waste at dry conditions (30%TS). Over 60 days operating period, it was confirmed that SLUDGE reactor can achieve 44.0%COD removal efficiency and 43.0%VS removal. In stabilization phase, SLUDGE reactor showed higher volumetric biogas generated of 78.9 mL/day (or 35.6 mLCH(4)/day) reaching a methane yield of 0.53 LCH(4)/gVS. Also, SWINE/SLUDGE and SWINE were good inoculums at these experimental conditions.

  5. Sound propagation in dry granular materials : discrete element simulations, theory, and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouraille, O.J.P.

    2009-01-01

    In this study sound wave propagation through different types of dry confined granular systems is studied. With three-dimensional discrete element simulations, theory and experiments, the influence of several micro-scale properties: friction, dissipation, particle rotation, and contact disorder, on

  6. Effect of drying, composting and subsequent impurity removal by sieving on the properties of digestates from municipal organic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, Christine; Dornack, Christina; Raab, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    The application of organic soil amendments is a common measure to prevent structural degradation of agricultural soils and to maintain and improve long-term soil fertility. Solid residues from anaerobic digestion of municipal organic waste (MOW) are rich in nutrients and organic matter and have a promising potential to be used as soil amendment. However, no study has related amendment properties of MOW digestate of one origin to different treatment procedures. We therefore investigated the impact of drying, composting and sieving on final digestate properties and specifically nutrient availability and heavy metal and carbon elution. Samples were provided by a semi-industrial two-stage biogas plant with dry fermentation of MOW. Results confirm that in comparison to drying, composting of MOW digestates leads to a significant increase of K, P, Mg, Ca, Cd and Cr in the digestates. Sieving of composted digestates showed that heavy metals are not evenly distributed and that heavy metal concentration in the digestate increases with decreasing mesh sizes (highest concentrations in the fractions organic carbon (DOC) release (R > 0.7, p<0.05). Results confirm that the extent of carbon elution depends on the degradation rate of digestates. DOC may therefore be a good measure to evaluate digestate stability and to decide on treatment measures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dry ripened mortar with quarry waste and rubber powder from unserviceable tires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Aparecido Canova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stone-quarry fines have been evaluated in mortar and concrete, but have presented drying shrinkage and consequently higher incidence of cracks than those with natural sand. This study compared the dry ripened mortar in two types of aggregates added of 8% rubber powder. It was used quicklime, artificial and natural sand in volumetric proportions of 1:6. Mixtures were oven-dried, received the cement, establishing the volumetric proportion of 1: 1.5:9. Inplastic state, we evaluated aspects such as consistence, air content, water retention and bleeding; whereas compressive strength, static deformation modulus and water absorption by capillarity was determined in hardened state. Cracking aspects were evaluated in substrate. As a result, the mortar with artificial sand showed higher increases in compressive strength, capillarity rate and cracking, and greater reductions in air content and bleeding. As for the rubber powder, exhibited a greater reduction in the cracking rate and capillarity was found.

  8. EARTHWORM PONTOSCOLEXCORETHRURUS AND NITROGEN MINERALIZATION RATE IN INCUBATION EXPERIMENT WITH DIFFERENT QUALITY ORGANIC MATTERS FROM SUGARAGRO-INDUSTRY WASTE

    OpenAIRE

    J.B.Naik; S.P.Zine

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of earthworm inoculation on N mineralization rates of different quality organic matters from sugar agro-industry waste, we conducted a green house incubation experiment for 14 weeks in pots containing 7 kg dry soil. There are 12 treatment combinations.Factor I waswith (P) and without inoculation of P.corethrurus (N). Factor II was the type of OM which consisted of six levels: (1) without application of OM (control), (2) cow manure (CM), (3) filter cake (FC), (4) suga...

  9. Performance and carcass yield of barrows fed dried poultry waste as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2007-02-19

    Feb 19, 2007 ... diet was inferior in terms of total weight gained (30.8 kg as opposed to 34.2 kg for the PKC diet). The daily weight gain and efficiency of feed utilization were also better in the PKC diet (610.70 g versus 550 g and 0.318 versus 0.288, ... The use of poultry waste as a protein supplement for livestock has been ...

  10. Conversion of waste Mn-Zn dry battery as efficient nano-adsorbents for hazardous metals removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yao-Jen; You, Chen-Feng; Chang, Chien-Kuei

    2013-08-15

    A novel technique was successfully developed for manufacturing Mn-Zn ferrite nano-particles by acid dissolution and ferrite processes. The powders of waste dry batteries (PWDBs) were used as starting raw materials because the Mn and Zn content inside the PWDBs is potentially high. Our data showed that the most abundant elements inside PWDBs are manganese (41.0%), oxygen (40.6%), zinc (15.3%), and carbon (3.1%). It was found that proper reductant was critical for dissolution where FeSO4 is essential for spinel ferrite formation. Synthesized Mn-Zn ferrite particles reached their saturation magnetization at 63.8 emu/g and were successfully applied for As, Cd, and Pb removal in aqueous solution. Under the conditions of Mn-Zn ferrite 0.005 g, volume 10 mL, temperature 27°C, and contact time 1h, As, Cd, and Pb removal could reach 99.9, 99.7, and 99.8%, respectively. We demonstrate a novel method that can be applied for transforming WDBs into resource materials. This not only reduces the amount of WDBs, but also supports the concept of waste-battery reusable green-energy policy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Ethanol production from waste processing tomato dry; Producao de etanol a partir de residuo do processamento de tomate seco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Carla A.P.; Dal Sotto, Jessica; Schutz, Fabiana Costa de Araujo [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Medianeira, PR (Brazil)], emails: carlaschmidt@utfpr.edu.br, jeh.dalsotto@hotmail.com, fabianaschutz@utfpr.edu.br

    2011-07-01

    The generation of waste increases with the development of a region and increases the power consumption. Research about the reuse of waste for energy generation favors solving these two problems. This study aimed to evaluate the potential use of tomato seeds discarded from the production process of tomato pulp dried in ethanol production. Any product that has sugar or other carbohydrate constituted a feedstock for ethanol production, in this study was observed that approximately 26% by weight of 2kg of tomatoes assessed were represented by seeds. We obtained the juice of tomato seeds by use a blender to grind the product to facilitate the process of fermentation. Added to the fermenting yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae producing a pre inoculum with Brix and pH adjusted, sterilized at 121 deg C for 15 minutes, which was subsequently incubated at 28-30 deg C until the end of process. Mixed up to follow this pre inoculum to the rest of the must was sterilized and incubated again at 28-30 deg C until the end of the process. The acquisition of ethanol was carried through a distillation. It was concluded that the seed discarded in the process of the product can be used for this purpose. (author)

  12. Dry anaerobic co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal waste with paperboard mill sludge and gelatin solid waste for enhancement of hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsamadony, M; Tawfik, A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the bio-H2 production via dry anaerobic co-fermentation of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) with protein and calcium-rich substrates such as gelatin solid waste (GSW) and paperboard mill sludge (PMS). Co-fermentation of OFMSW/GSW/PMS significantly enhanced the H2 production (HP) and H2 yield (HY). The maximum HP of 1082.5±91.4 mL and HY of 144.9±9.8 mL/gVSremoved were achieved at a volumetric ratio of 70% OFMSW:20% GSW:10% PMS. COD, carbohydrate, protein and lipids conversion efficiencies were 60.9±4.4%, 71.4±3.5%, 22.6±2.3% and 20.5±1.8% respectively. Co-fermentation process reduced the particle size distribution which is favorably utilized by hydrogen producing bacteria. The mean particle size diameters for feedstock and the digestate were 939.3 and 115.2μm, respectively with reduction value of 8.15-fold in the mixtures. The volumetric H2 production increased from 4.5±0.3 to 7.2±0.6 L(H2)/L(substrate) at increasing Ca(+2) concentrations from 1.8±0.1 to 6.3±0.5 g/L respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Industrial scale garage-type dry fermentation of municipal solid waste to biogas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, M Y; Li, R H; Li, J; Wedwitschka, H; Nelles, M; Stinner, W; Zhou, H J

    2016-10-01

    The objectives of this study was to through monitoring the 1st industrial scale garage-type dry fermentation (GTDF) MSW biogas plant in Bin County, Harbin City, Heilongjiang Province, China, to investigate its anaerobic digestion (AD) performance and the stability of process. After a monitoring period of 180days, the results showed that the volumetric biogas production of the digesters and percolate tank was 0.72 and 2.22m(3) (m(3)d)(-1), respectively, and the specific biogas yield of the feedstock was about 270m(3)CH4tVS(-1), which indicated that the GTDF is appropriate for the Chinese MSW. This paper also raised some problems aimed at improving the process stability and AD efficiency. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Development of a Plastic Melt Waste Compactor for Space Missions Experiments and Prototype Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Gregory; Wignarajah, Kanapathipillai; Pisharody, Suresh; Fisher, John

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes development at NASA Ames Research Center of a heat melt compactor that can be used on both near term and far term missions. Experiments have been performed to characterize the behavior of composite wastes that are representative of the types of wastes produced on current and previous space missions such as International Space Station, Space Shuttle, MIR and Skylab. Experiments were conducted to characterize the volume reduction, bonding, encapsulation and biological stability of the waste composite and also to investigate other key design issues such as plastic extrusion, noxious off-gassing and removal of the of the plastic waste product from the processor. The experiments provided the data needed to design a prototype plastic melt waste processor, a description of which is included in the paper.

  15. Test for Fauske and Associates to perform tube propagation experiments with simulated Hanford tank wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, C.D.

    1996-02-01

    This test plan, prepared at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for Westinghouse Hanford Company, provides guidance for performing tube propagation experiments on simulated Hanford tank wastes and on actual tank waste samples. Simulant compositions are defined and an experimental logic tree is provided for Fauske and Associates (FAI) to perform the experiments. From this guidance, methods and equipment for small-scale tube propagation experiments to be performed at the Hanford Site on actual tank samples will be developed. Propagation behavior of wastes will directly support the safety analysis (SARR) for the organic tanks. Tube propagation may be the definitive tool for determining the relative reactivity of the wastes contained in the Hanford tanks. FAI have performed tube propagation studies previously on simple two- and three-component surrogate mixtures. The simulant defined in this test plan more closely represents actual tank composition. Data will be used to support preparation of criteria for determining the relative safety of the organic bearing wastes.

  16. Chemical Engineering Division fuel cycle programs. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1979. [Pyrochemical/dry processing; waste encapsulation in metal; transport in geologic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steindler, M.J.; Ader, M.; Barletta, R.E.

    1980-09-01

    For pyrochemical and dry processing materials development included exposure to molten metal and salt of Mo-0.5% Ti-0.07% Ti-0.01% C, Mo-30% W, SiC, Si/sub 2/ON/sub 2/, ZrB/sub 2/-SiC, MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, AlN, HfB/sub 2/, Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/, BeO, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/, nickel nitrate-infiltrated W, W-coated Mo, and W-metallized alumina-yttria. Work on Th-U salt transport processing included solubility of Th in liquid Cd, defining the Cd-Th and Cd-Mg-Th phase diagrams, ThO/sub 2/ reduction experiments, and electrolysis of CaO in molten salt. Work on pyrochemical processes and associated hardware for coprocessing U and Pu in spent FBR fuels included a second-generation computer model of the transport process, turntable transport process design, work on the U-Cu-Mg system, and U and Pu distribution coefficients between molten salt and metal. Refractory metal vessels are being service-life tested. The chloride volatility processing of Th-based fuel was evaluated for its proliferation resistance, and a preliminary ternary phase diagram for the Zn-U-Pu system was computed. Material characterization and process analysis were conducted on the Exportable Pyrochemical process (Pyro-Civex process). Literature data on oxidation of fissile metals to oxides were reviewed. Work was done on chemical bases for the reprocessing of actinide oxides in molten salts. Flowsheets are being developed for the processing of fuel in molten tin. Work on encapsulation of solidified radioactive waste in metal matrix included studies of leach rate of crystalline waste materials and of the impact resistance of metal-matrix waste forms. In work on the transport properties of nuclear waste in geologic media, adsorption of Sr on oolitic limestone was studied, as well as the migration of Cs in basalt. Fitting of data on the adsorption of iodate by hematite to a mathematical model was attempted.

  17. Solidification of hesperidin nanosuspension by spray drying optimized by design of experiment (DoE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qionghua; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H

    2018-01-01

    To accelerate the determination of optimal spray drying parameters, a "Design of Experiment" (DoE) software was applied to produce well redispersible hesperidin nanocrystals. For final solid dosage forms, aqueous liquid nanosuspensions need to be solidified, whereas spray drying is a large-scale cost-effective industrial process. A nanosuspension with 18% (w/w) of hesperidin stabilized by 1% (w/w) of poloxamer 188 was produced by wet bead milling. The sizes of original and redispersed spray-dried nanosuspensions were determined by laser diffractometry (LD) and photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and used as effect parameters. In addition, light microscopy was performed to judge the redispersion quality. After a two-step design of MODDE 9, screening model and response surface model (RSM), the inlet temperature of spray dryer and the concentration of protectant (polyvinylpyrrolidone, PVP K25) were identified as the most important factors affecting the redispersion of nanocrystals. As predicted in the RSM modeling, when 5% (w/w) of PVP K25 was added in an 18% (w/w) of hesperidin nanosuspension, subsequently spray-dried at an inlet temperature of 100 °C, well redispersed solid nanocrystals with an average particle size of 276 nm were obtained. By the use of PVP K25, the saturation solubility of the redispersed nanocrystals in water was improved to 86.81 µg/ml, about 2.5-fold of the original nanosuspension. In addition, the dissolution velocity was accelerated. This was attributed to the additional effects of steric stabilization on the nanocrystals and solubilization by the PVP polymer from spray drying.

  18. Use of dry sludge from waste water treatment plants as an additive in prefabricated concrete brick

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagüe, A.

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Dry sludge from the Sabadell Water Treatment Plant was used to prepare prefabricated concrete bricks. After characterising the sludge and the manufacturing process used to make the bricks, we define the conditions of addition of the sludges in the manufacture. Reference samples not containing sludge and samples containing 2 % of dry sludge by cement weight were prepared. The variation in density, porosity, absorption coefficient and compressive strength of the bricks with the presence of sludge was determined over time. Leaching of the bricks was determined according to the NEN 7345 standard. In most cases the addition of sludge produces a decrease in porosity and absorption coefficients and an increase in compressive strength, so one could expect these bricks to have greater durability. As regards leaching pollutants in the bricks, they are below the limit of the Dutch NEN standard for construction materials and thus can be classified as inert material.

    El estudio ha consistido en la utilización de lodo seco de origen biológico de la depuradora de aguas residuales de Sabadell (Riu Sec, como adición en la preparación de adoquines de hormigón prefabricado. Después de caracterizar los lodos y el proceso de fabricación de los adoquines que utilizaremos, definimos las condiciones de adición de los lodos en esta fabricación. Se prepararon muestras de referencia, sin adición, y muestras con el 2 % de lodo seco sobrepeso de cemento. Se determinaron cómo variaban en el tiempo, con la presencia de lodos: la densidad, la porosidad y el coeficiente de absorción, y la resistencia mecánica a compresión de los adoquines. También se determinó la lixiviación que estas piezas presentaban de acuerdo a la norma NEN 7345. La adición de lodos produce, en la mayoría de los casos, una disminución de las porosidades y de los coeficientes de absorción y un aumento en las resistencias mecánicas, por lo que cabe esperar una mayor

  19. CFD modeling and experience of waste-to-energy plant burning waste wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajh, B.; Yin, Chungen; Samec, N.

    2013-01-01

    of waste wood combustion in a 13 MW grate-fired boiler in a WtE plant is presented. As a validation effort, the temperature profiles at a number of ports in the furnace are measured and the experimental results are compared with the CFD predictions. In the simulation, a 1D model is developed to simulate...... the conversion of the waste wood in the fuel bed on the grate, which provides the appropriate inlet boundary condition for the freeboard 3D CFD simulation. The CFD analysis reveals the detailed mixing and combustion characteristics in the waste wood-fired furnace, pinpointing how to improve the design......Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is being increasingly used in industry for in-depth understanding of the fundamental mixing, combustion, heat transfer and pollutant formation in combustion processes and for design and optimization of Waste-to-Energy (WtE) plants. In this paper, CFD modeling...

  20. Dynamics of soil water evaporation during soil drying: laboratory experiment and numerical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiangbo; Zhou, Zhifang

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory and numerical experiments were conducted to investigate the evolution of soil water evaporation during a continuous drying event. Simulated soil water contents and temperatures by the calibrated model well reproduced measured values at different depths. Results show that the evaporative drying process could be divided into three stages, beginning with a relatively high evaporation rate during stage 1, followed by a lower rate during transient stage and stage 2, and finally maintaining a very low and constant rate during stage 3. The condensation zone was located immediately below the evaporation zone in the profile. Both peaks of evaporation and condensation rate increased rapidly during stage 1 and transition stage, decreased during stage 2, and maintained constant during stage 3. The width of evaporation zone kept a continuous increase during stages 1 and 2 and maintained a nearly constant value of 0.68 cm during stage 3. When the evaporation zone totally moved into the subsurface, a dry surface layer (DSL) formed above the evaporation zone at the end of stage 2. The width of DSL also presented a continuous increase during stage 2 and kept a constant value of 0.71 cm during stage 3.

  1. Frictional strength of wet- and dry- talc gouge in high-velocity shear experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Reches, Z.; Elwood Madden, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    The strength of the creeping segment of the San Andres fault may be controlled by the distinct weakness and stability of talc (Moore & Rymer, 2007). We analyze talc frictional strength at high slip-velocity of 0.002 - 0.66 m/s, long slip-distances of 0.01 m to 33 m, and normal stresses up to 4.1 MPa. This analysis bridges the gap between nucleation stage of low velocity/distance, and the frictional behavior during large earthquakes. We tested wet and dry samples of pure talc gouge in a confined rotary cell, and continuously monitored the slip-velocity, stresses, dilation and temperature. We run 29 experiments of single and stepped velocities to obtain 243 values of quasi-static frictional coefficients. Dry talc gouge showed distinct slip-strengthening: friction coefficient of µ ~0.4 at short slip-distances of D 1 m, the frictional strength saturated at µ= 0.8 - 1 level. Wet talc gouge (16-20% water) displayed low frictional strength of µ= 0.1-0.3, in agreement with published triaxial tests. The stepped-velocity runs revealed a consistent velocity-strengthening trend. For a velocity jump from V1 to V2, we used VD = (µ2 -µ1)/ln (V2/V1), and found that on average VD = 0.06 and 0.03 for dry and wet talc, respectively, and for slip distances shorter than 1 m. Microstructural analysis of post-shearing wet talc gouge revealed extreme slip localization to a principal-slip-zone of a few microns, and significant shear compaction of 10-30%. In contrast, dry talc gouge exhibited distributed shear in a wide zone and systematic shear dilation (10-50%). We propose slip along weak interlayer talc plates and thermal-pressurization as the possible weakening mechanisms for wet talc. The development of distributed secondary fault network along with substantial grain crushing is responsible for slip-strengthening in dry condition. Fig. 1. Friction maps of talc gouge as function of slip-distance (left) and slip-velocity (right). Resuslts of both stepped-velocity and constant

  2. Crystal accumulation in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant high level waste melter: Summary of 2017 experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Fowley, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2018-01-11

    A full-scale, transparent mock-up of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Project High Level Waste glass melter riser and pour spout has been constructed to allow for testing with visual feedback of particle settling, accumulation, and resuspension when operating with a controlled fraction of crystals in the glass melt. Room temperature operation with silicone oil and magnetite particles simulating molten glass and spinel crystals, respectively, allows for direct observation of flow patterns and settling patterns. The fluid and particle mixture is recycled within the system for each test.

  3. Data sharing report characterization of population 7: Personal protective equipment, dry active waste, and miscellaneous debris, surveillance and maintenance project Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harpenau, Evan M. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2013-10-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM-OR) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Specifically, DOE EM-OR requested that ORAU plan and implement a sampling and analysis campaign targeting certain URS|CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) surveillance and maintenance (S&M) process inventory waste. Eight populations of historical and reoccurring S&M waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been identified in the Waste Handling Plan for Surveillance and Maintenance Activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, DOE/OR/01-2565&D2 (WHP) (DOE 2012) for evaluation and processing to determine a final pathway for disposal. Population 7 (POP 7) consists of 56 containers of aged, low-level and potentially mixed S&M waste that has been staged in various locations around ORNL. Several of these POP 7 containers primarily contain personal protective equipment (PPE) and dry active waste (DAW), but may contain other miscellaneous debris. This data sharing report addresses the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) specified waste in a 13-container subpopulation (including eight steel boxes, three 55-gal drums, one sealand, and one intermodal) that lacked sufficient characterization data for possible disposal at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) using the approved Waste Lot (WL) 108.1 profile.

  4. Sustainable management of waste in green nursery: the Tuscan experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Sarri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The green nursery sector in Europe involves 90,000 ha of cultivated land and 120,000 ha for the nurseries (MiPAAF, 2012, reaching 19.8 billions of Euros in 2011. Every year, nurseries produce waste about 4 kg of the residual biomass for each m2 of the potted plants cultivation. Nurseries waste make up a substantial quantity of organic materials e.g. wood biomass-substrate, which could be retrieved and valorized. With the expansion of potted plants cultivation and the resulting increase in discarded products a number of companies have begun to setting up solutions for the recovery of materials accumulated. Analysis led to the development of a separating system based on trunk vibration technology. To this end, two shaker yard were identified, developed and tested for the recovery of residual biomasses. With these solutions, green waste can be easily grasped by a clamp device able to convey strong vibrations to the trunk (or to the aerial part of the plant to the point that the soil materials are detached from the vegetable portions.

  5. Evaluation of Gas Retention in Waste Simulants: Tall Column Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Powell, Michael R.; Boeringa, Gregory K.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Karri, Naveen K.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Tran, Diana N.; Sande, Susan; Heldebrant, David J.; Meacham, Joseph E.; Smet, Dave; Bryan, Wesley E.; Calmus, Ronald B.

    2014-05-16

    Gas generation in Hanford’s underground waste storage tanks can lead to gas accumulation within the layer of settled solids (sludge) at the tank bottom. The gas, which typically has hydrogen as the major component together with other flammable species, is formed principally by radiation-driven chemical reactions. Accumulation of these gases within the sludge in a waste tank is undesirable and limits the amount of tank volume for waste storage. Further, accumulation of large amounts of gas in the sludge may potentially result in an unacceptable release of the accumulated gas if the sludge-layer density is reduced to less than that of the overlying sludge or that of the supernatant liquid. Rapid release of large amounts of flammable gases could endanger personnel and equipment near the tank. For this reason, a thorough understanding of the circumstances that can lead to a potentially problematic gas accumulation in sludge layers is needed. To respond to this need, the Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Program (DSGREP) was commissioned to examine gas release behavior in sludges.

  6. Metals control efficiency test at a dry-scrubber and baghouse-equipped hazardous-waste incinerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, S.; Holloway, J.R.

    1990-09-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Solid Waste is developing regulations to control emissions of toxic metals from hazardous waste incinerators. As part of an effort to gather data on control efficiencies that can be achieved by hazardous waste incineration facilities, equipped with various types of air pollution control devices, a test was performed at Unit No. 4 in Sauget, Illinois.

  7. A fractional factorial field experiment to study the decomposition of municipal solid wastes stored in wrapped bales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markidis, Ioannis; Komilis, Dimitrios; Tsagas, Fotios; Petalas, Anastasios

    2013-01-30

    Wrapped bales can be temporarily used to store municipal solid wastes (MSW) prior to treatment or final disposal. The degree of transformation of wastes within the bales can determine the method to treat MSW after their storage. Goal of the research described in this paper was to monitor the decomposition of the organic fraction of MSW stored in wrapped bales. The monitoring was based on the momentary volumetric concentrations of O(2), CO(2) and CH(4) that were regularly measured in the centre of 23 low density polyethylene (LDPE) wrapped bales over a 617-day period. The field experiment was designed at two levels and four factors, based on the principles of fractional factorial designs. The factors that were studied were: shredding, waste particle size and waste density, thickness of wrapping layers, and type of wrapping film. Two bales were randomly chosen and opened after one year of storage and their solid contents were analysed. Results indicate that carbon dioxide was the prevalent decomposition gaseous product that started from around 80% (v/v) and gradually diminished to around 20%. A non-steady methanogenic phase was established after 150 days from initial wrapping and lasted for approximately 150 days. Methane concentration never exceeded 17%, on average, in the interior of the bales. A 40% dry mass reduction was measured after one year of storage in two bales that contained 74% organics. The factorial analysis revealed that particle size/density and film type were the two main factors that significantly affected methane and carbon dioxide generation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Direct proteome profiling of human blood serum in the experiment with 5-day dry immersion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastushkova, L Kh; Pakharukova, N A; Trifonova, O P; Dobrokhotov, I V; Valeeva, O A; Larina, I M

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the investigation was to determine changes in blood plasma proteome in healthy human subjects (n = 14, 19 to 26 y.o.) in an experiment with dry immersion (DI). Plasma samples were drawn 7 and 2 days before the exposure, on DI days 2, 3 and 5, and on days 1, 3, 7 and 15 after the experiment. Previous to direct MALDI-TOF mass-spectrometric profiling, serum samples were pre-fractionated and enriched with magnetic particles MB WCX (WCX--a weak cation exchanger) on ClinProt (Bruker Daltonics). In each spectrum, 175 MS-peaks were detected on average within the mass range from 1000 to 17,000 Da with the signal/noise ratio = 5. Student's criterion (p profile peaks). On DI days 2 and 3, growth of peak areas was observed in fragments of complement system proteins C3 and C4, high-molecular kininogen and fibrinogen that can be attributed to organism adaptation to conditions of the experiment. Significant increases of the peak area of apolipoprotein CI (reduced form with segregated threonine and proline) and C4 enzymes of the complement system, and fibrinogen on the first day after the experiment can be related to changes in motor activities of the subjects.

  9. Experience of superheater tubes in municipal waste incineration plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, M.; Yakuwa, H.; Miyasaka, M. [Ebara Research Co., Ltd., Fujisawa-shi (Japan); Yokono, M.; Matsumoto, A. [Tokachi Association for Municipal Disposal and Treatment Services, Obihiro-shi (Japan); Miyoshi, K.; Kosaka, K. [Ebara Co., Ltd. Minatominami Minato-ku (Japan); Fukuda, Y. [Babcock-Hitachi K.K. Kure Research Lab., Hiroshima-ken (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    Two years after the start of operations at the Tokachi Association for Municipal Waste Disposal and Treatment Services municipal waste incineration plant (name: Kuririn Center), which generates 400 C steam, an investigation of the plant's superheater tubes was conducted. The investigation consisted primarily of analyzing ash deposits, measuring tube wall thickness loss and observing tube sections after removal. The concentration of Cl in the deposited ash was found to increase as the temperature of the gas rose, and the amount of deposited ash tended to increase as the temperature of the gas rose. Tube damage consisted primarily of a uniform loss in thickness. Intergranular corrosion and other local corrosion was not observed. The results of thickness-loss measurements showed that, after approximately two years in operation, tubes (SUS310) lost a maximum of 0.45 mm in thickness due to high-temperature corrosion in locations where the steam temperature reached 400 C. Superheater tubes were also apparently damaged from the effects of a soot blower, resulting in an observed maximum loss of 0.9 mm thickness after approximately two years. Furthermore, the rate of thickness loss tended to increase after one year had passed. (orig.)

  10. A Design of Experiment approach to predict product and process parameters for a spray dried influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanojia, Gaurav; Willems, Geert-Jan; Frijlink, Henderik W; Kersten, Gideon F A; Soema, Peter C; Amorij, Jean-Pierre

    2016-09-25

    Spray dried vaccine formulations might be an alternative to traditional lyophilized vaccines. Compared to lyophilization, spray drying is a fast and cheap process extensively used for drying biologicals. The current study provides an approach that utilizes Design of Experiments for spray drying process to stabilize whole inactivated influenza virus (WIV) vaccine. The approach included systematically screening and optimizing the spray drying process variables, determining the desired process parameters and predicting product quality parameters. The process parameters inlet air temperature, nozzle gas flow rate and feed flow rate and their effect on WIV vaccine powder characteristics such as particle size, residual moisture content (RMC) and powder yield were investigated. Vaccine powders with a broad range of physical characteristics (RMC 1.2-4.9%, particle size 2.4-8.5μm and powder yield 42-82%) were obtained. WIV showed no significant loss in antigenicity as revealed by hemagglutination test. Furthermore, descriptive models generated by DoE software could be used to determine and select (set) spray drying process parameter. This was used to generate a dried WIV powder with predefined (predicted) characteristics. Moreover, the spray dried vaccine powders retained their antigenic stability even after storage for 3 months at 60°C. The approach used here enabled the generation of a thermostable, antigenic WIV vaccine powder with desired physical characteristics that could be potentially used for pulmonary administration. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Radioactive waste storage facilities: 4 years experience; Almacen central de residuos radiactivos: una experiencia de cuatro anos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Manzano, P.; Rivas Ballarin, M. A.; Canellas Anoz, M.; Garcia Romero, A.; Pizarro Trigo, F.; Fernandez Cerezo, S. [Hospital Clinico Universitario Lozano Blesa. Zaragoza (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this study is to asses the management of the radioactive waste originated in HCU Lozano Blesa, after a four-year experience with a new radioactive waste store facility. The followed method for its disposal is shown , and the amount and characteristics of the radioactive waste are discussed. (Author)

  12. EXPERIENCES OF POLISH MECHANICAL HEAT TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY APPLIED TO MUNICIPAL WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurand Damian Bień

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In Poland and in several EU countries, the processing of mixed municipal waste is based on waste treatment in mechanical and biological installations and thermal processing plants. The experience gained from the operation of these installations, particularly in the aspect of material recycling, what is important in an aspect of the circular economy formulation is not satisfactory. To think about a high level of reuse and recycling of municipal waste, which is expected to be at least 65% by 2030, efforts to improve waste quality are needed. Certainly, one of the solution is a selective collection of waste at source, but here it is important to say that it should be conducted at a real high level. How costly it is, many countries already know. In search of other methods the UK countries are turning their attention to mechanical heat treatment technology. In Poland there is one such installation so the idea of this paper is discuss issues connected with it. The practical experience of operating of this installations shows so far that the process gives an ability to match good process parameters to a variable input. The very good quality of secondary raw materials obtained in the process has a higher attractiveness to the final consumer. Also levels of recycling for the four fractions of waste, such as: paper, metals, plastics and glass are high and exceeds significantly factors achieved in the process of mechanical and biological treatment.

  13. A choice experiment analysis for solid waste disposal option: a case study in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pek, Chuen-Khee; Jamal, Othman

    2011-11-01

    In Malaysia, most municipal wastes currently are disposed into poorly managed 'controlled tipping' systems with little or no pollution protection measures. This study was undertaken to assist the relevant governmental bodies and service providers to identify an improved waste disposal management strategy. The study applied the choice experiment technique to estimate the nonmarket values for a number of waste disposal technologies. Implicit prices for environmental attributes such as psychological fear, land use, air pollution, and river water quality were estimated. Compensating surplus estimates incorporating distance from the residences of the respondents to the proposed disposal facility were calculated for a number of generic and technology-specific choice sets. The resulting estimates were higher for technology-specific options, and the distance factor was a significant determinant in setting an equitable solid waste management fee. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dehydrated olive-waste cake as a source of high value-added bioproduct: Drying kinetics, physicochemical properties, and bioactive compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Uribe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Olive (Olea europaea L. oil processing produces significant amount of waste that can be utilized for the production of high value-added ingredients for various industrial applications. In this work, the effects of temperature on drying kinetics and quality indexes of the olive-waste cake during convective dehydration (40-90 °C were investigated. Results on effective moisture diffusivity, physicochemical parameters, fatty acid profile, total phenolic, flavonoid, and flavanol contents as well as antioxidant capacity are also reported. Most of the fatty acids increased their content with respect to control sample with a temperature increase, i.e. oleic and linoleic acids increased 48% and 43% at 70 and 40 °C, respectively. Total flavanol content increased with temperature (48-62 mg catechin equivalents [CTE] 100 g-1 DM except for 80 °C. Total phenolic and total flavonoid contents were highly correlated to antioxidant capacity (0.923 < r < 0.992, except for 70 and 80 °C, the rest of the samples maintained their initial antioxidant capacity by ORAC analysis. Thus, these parameters show that dried olive-waste cake has a high bioactive compounds with potential use as additives for the food or other industries.

  15. Effect of substrate concentration on dry mesophilic anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, J; Pérez, M; Romero, L I

    2008-09-01

    The influence of total solid contents during anaerobic mesophilic treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (MSW) has been studied in this work. The work was performed in batch reactors of 1.7L capacity, during a period of 85-95 days. Two different organic substrate concentrations were studied: 931.1 mgDOC/L (20% TS) and 1423.4 mgDOC/L (30% TS). Experimental results showed that the reactor with 20% total solids content had significantly higher performance. Thus, the startup phase ended at 14 days and the total DOC removal was 67.53%. The startup in reactor R30 ended at 28 days obtaining 49.18% DOC removal. Also, the initial substrate concentration contributed substantially to the amount of methane in the biogas. Hence, the total methane production in the methanogenic phase was 7.01 L and 5.53 L at the end of the experiments for R20 and R30, respectively.

  16. Crystal accumulation in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant high level waste melter: Summary of FY2016 experiements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Fowley, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Miller, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Five experiments were completed with the full-scale, room temperature Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) high-level waste (HLW) melter riser test system to observe particle flow and settling in support of a crystal tolerant approach to melter operation. A prototypic pour rate was maintained based on the volumetric flow rate. Accumulation of particles was observed at the bottom of the riser and along the bottom of the throat after each experiment. Measurements of the accumulated layer thicknesses showed that the settled particles at the bottom of the riser did not vary in thickness during pouring cycles or idle periods. Some of the settled particles at the bottom of the throat were re-suspended during subsequent pouring cycles, and settled back to approximately the same thickness after each idle period. The cause of the consistency of the accumulated layer thicknesses is not year clear, but was hypothesized to be related to particle flow back to the feed tank. Additional experiments reinforced the observation of particle flow along a considerable portion of the throat during idle periods. Limitations of the system are noted in this report and may be addressed via future modifications. Follow-on experiments will be designed to evaluate the impact of pouring rate on particle re-suspension, the influence of feed tank agitation on particle accumulation, and the effect of changes in air lance positioning on the accumulation and re-suspension of particles at the bottom of the riser. A method for sampling the accumulated particles will be developed to support particle size distribution analyses. Thicker accumulated layers will be intentionally formed via direct addition of particles to select areas of the system to better understand the ability to continue pouring and re-suspend particles. Results from the room temperature system will be correlated with observations and data from the Research Scale Melter (RSM) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

  17. Slaughterhouse waste co-digestion - Experiences from 15 years of full-scale operation

    OpenAIRE

    Ek, Anders; Hallin, Sara; Vallin, Lina; Schnurer, Anna; Karlsson, Martin

    2011-01-01

    At Tekniska Verken in Linköping AB (TVAB) there is a long time experience of handling and producing biogas from large volumes of slaughterhouse waste. Experiences from research and development and plant operations have lead to the implementation of several process improving technological/biological solutions. We can in this paper describe how the improvements have had several positive effects on the process, including energy savings, better odor control, higher gas quality, increased organic ...

  18. A fleet leader experience with dry low emissions aeroderivative gas turbines (LM6000PB and PD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandesteene, J.L.; De Witte, M.

    1998-07-01

    In January 1995, the world's first LM6000 dry low emissions (DLE) aeroderivative gas turbine supplied by GE M and I was successfully started up at Gent power plant. In November 1997, the world's first uprated LM6000, also equipped with the DLE combustion system, began commercial operation at Geel cogeneration facility. TEE handled the engineering, procurement, construction and commissioning of these projects as well as for several other repowering and cogeneration facilities based on high efficiency DLE aeroderivative gas turbines. By mid 1998, seven LM6000 DLE and one LM2500 DLE will be in commercial operation at several cogeneration and power plants in Belgium. The results of three years of experience with the LM engines are presented: the reasons why the LM engines were selected, the history of the different units, the maintenance organization, the fleet fired hours and availability, and the main technical issues like DLE combustor, LPT5 failures. The conclusion is that after having experienced several serious problems, the LM6000 and the DLE combustion system have matured and now seem sufficiently reliable. The actual performance data of the uprated engine are significantly better than initially expected.

  19. Aeolian process of the dried-up riverbeds of the Hexi Corridor, China: a wind tunnel experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Caixia; Wang, Xunming; Dong, Zhibao; Hua, Ting

    2017-08-01

    Wind tunnel studies, which remain limited, are an important tool to understand the aeolian processes of dried-up riverbeds. The particle size, chemical composition, and the mineral contents of sediments arising from the dried river beds are poorly understood. Dried-up riverbeds cover a wide area in the Hexi Corridor, China, and comprise a complex synthesis of different land surfaces, including aeolian deposits, pavement surfaces, and Takyr crust. The results of the present wind tunnel experiment suggest that aeolian transport from the dried-up riverbeds of the Hexi Corridor ranges from 0 to 177.04 g/m(2)/min and that dry riverbeds could be one of the main sources of dust emissions in this region. As soon as the wind velocity reaches 16 m/s and assuming that there are abundant source materials available, aeolian transport intensity increases rapidly. The dried-up riverbed sediment and the associated aeolian transported material were composed mainly of fine and medium sands. However, the transported samples were coarser than the bed samples, because of the sorting effect of the aeolian processes on the sediment. The aeolian processes also led to regional elemental migration and mineral composition variations.

  20. Using Artificial Soil and Dry-Column Flash Chromatography to Simulate Organic Substance Leaching Process: A Colorful Environmental Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Avellar, Isa G. J.; Cotta, Tais A. P. G.; Neder, Amarilis de V. Finageiv

    2012-01-01

    Soil is an important and complex environmental compartment and soil contamination contributes to the pollution of aquifers and other water basins. A simple and low-cost experiment is described in which the mobility of three organic compounds in an artificial soil is examined using dry-column flash chromatography. The compounds were applied on top…

  1. Pushing precipitation to the extremes in distributed experiments: Recommendations for simulating wet and dry years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Alan K.; Avolio, Meghan L.; Beier, Claus; Carroll, Charles J.W.; Collins, Scott L.; Dukes, Jeffrey S.; Fraser, Lauchlan H.; Griffin-Nolan, Robert J.; Hoover, David L.; Jentsch, Anke; Loik, Michael E.; Phillips, Richard P.; Post, Alison K.; Sala, Osvaldo E.; Slette, Ingrid J.; Yahdjian, Laura; Smith, Melinda D.

    2017-01-01

    Intensification of the global hydrological cycle, ranging from larger individual precipitation events to more extreme multiyear droughts, has the potential to cause widespread alterations in ecosystem structure and function. With evidence that the incidence of extreme precipitation years (defined statistically from historical precipitation records) is increasing, there is a clear need to identify ecosystems that are most vulnerable to these changes and understand why some ecosystems are more sensitive to extremes than others. To date, opportunistic studies of naturally occurring extreme precipitation years, combined with results from a relatively small number of experiments, have provided limited mechanistic understanding of differences in ecosystem sensitivity, suggesting that new approaches are needed. Coordinated distributed experiments (CDEs) arrayed across multiple ecosystem types and focused on water can enhance our understanding of differential ecosystem sensitivity to precipitation extremes, but there are many design challenges to overcome (e.g., cost, comparability, standardization). Here, we evaluate contemporary experimental approaches for manipulating precipitation under field conditions to inform the design of ‘Drought-Net’, a relatively low-cost CDE that simulates extreme precipitation years. A common method for imposing both dry and wet years is to alter each ambient precipitation event. We endorse this approach for imposing extreme precipitation years because it simultaneously alters other precipitation characteristics (i.e., event size) consistent with natural precipitation patterns. However, we do not advocate applying identical treatment levels at all sites – a common approach to standardization in CDEs. This is because precipitation variability varies >fivefold globally resulting in a wide range of ecosystem-specific thresholds for defining extreme precipitation years. For CDEs focused on precipitation extremes, treatments should be based

  2. Pushing precipitation to the extremes in distributed experiments: recommendations for simulating wet and dry years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Alan K; Avolio, Meghan L; Beier, Claus; Carroll, Charles J W; Collins, Scott L; Dukes, Jeffrey S; Fraser, Lauchlan H; Griffin-Nolan, Robert J; Hoover, David L; Jentsch, Anke; Loik, Michael E; Phillips, Richard P; Post, Alison K; Sala, Osvaldo E; Slette, Ingrid J; Yahdjian, Laura; Smith, Melinda D

    2017-05-01

    Intensification of the global hydrological cycle, ranging from larger individual precipitation events to more extreme multiyear droughts, has the potential to cause widespread alterations in ecosystem structure and function. With evidence that the incidence of extreme precipitation years (defined statistically from historical precipitation records) is increasing, there is a clear need to identify ecosystems that are most vulnerable to these changes and understand why some ecosystems are more sensitive to extremes than others. To date, opportunistic studies of naturally occurring extreme precipitation years, combined with results from a relatively small number of experiments, have provided limited mechanistic understanding of differences in ecosystem sensitivity, suggesting that new approaches are needed. Coordinated distributed experiments (CDEs) arrayed across multiple ecosystem types and focused on water can enhance our understanding of differential ecosystem sensitivity to precipitation extremes, but there are many design challenges to overcome (e.g., cost, comparability, standardization). Here, we evaluate contemporary experimental approaches for manipulating precipitation under field conditions to inform the design of 'Drought-Net', a relatively low-cost CDE that simulates extreme precipitation years. A common method for imposing both dry and wet years is to alter each ambient precipitation event. We endorse this approach for imposing extreme precipitation years because it simultaneously alters other precipitation characteristics (i.e., event size) consistent with natural precipitation patterns. However, we do not advocate applying identical treatment levels at all sites - a common approach to standardization in CDEs. This is because precipitation variability varies >fivefold globally resulting in a wide range of ecosystem-specific thresholds for defining extreme precipitation years. For CDEs focused on precipitation extremes, treatments should be based on

  3. Assessment of the recycling potential of fresh concrete waste using a factorial design of experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, S L; Souza, F L; Dienstmann, G; Segadães, A M

    2009-11-01

    Recycling of industrial wastes and by-products can help reduce the cost of waste treatment prior to disposal and eventually preserve natural resources and energy. To assess the recycling potential of a given waste, it is important to select a tool capable of giving clear indications either way, with the least time and work consumption, as is the case of modelling the system properties using the results obtained from statistical design of experiments. In this work, the aggregate reclaimed from the mud that results from washout and cleaning operations of fresh concrete mixer trucks (fresh concrete waste, FCW) was recycled into new concrete with various water/cement ratios, as replacement of natural fine aggregates. A 3(2) factorial design of experiments was used to model fresh concrete consistency index and hardened concrete water absorption and 7- and 28-day compressive strength, as functions of FCW content and water/cement ratio, and the resulting regression equations and contour plots were validated with confirmation experiments. The results showed that the fresh concrete workability worsened with the increase in FCW content but the water absorption (5-10 wt.%), 7-day compressive strength (26-36 MPa) and 28-day compressive strength (32-44 MPa) remained within the specified ranges, thus demonstrating that the aggregate reclaimed from FCW can be recycled into new concrete mixtures with lower natural aggregate content.

  4. Utilization of food waste materials for energy, food and/or animal feeds production. I. Biogas from dried banana peelings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverio, C.M.; Tan, B.V.; Pacheco, M.V.G.; Anglo, P.G.; Alamis, M.L.A.; Abad, E.J.

    1984-01-01

    Dried banana peelings as a possible substrate for biogas production was investigated. Important fermentation parameters such as particle size, inoculum size, total solid requirements, predigestion treatment, pH, and nutrient supplementation for maximum production of biogas were determined.

  5. A PRELIMINARY EXPERIMENT ON DENITRIFICATION OF WASTE LANDFILL LEACHATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Nariaki; Nakamichi, Tamihiro; Yagi, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Toshihide; Kugimiya, Akikazu; Michioku, Kohji

    A laboratory experiment on denitrification was carried out in order to reduce nitrogen load from municipal landfill leachate. Nitrogen was efficiently removed by feeding sludge of the leachate pond into the tanks, which could activate denitrification bacteria. Although inorganic reducing agent such as iron powder was not able to make the whole water mass anoxic, denitrification took place by supplying organic matters such as methanol, hydrogen feeding agent, etc.. It is considered that small amount of anoxic water film produced on surfaces of container and carriers might contribute to denitrification, although the bulk water is kept aerobic. It is found that organic matters contained in the leachate is so insufficient that nitrification liquid circulation does not work well for denitrification.

  6. Waste Heat Approximation for Understanding Dynamic Compression in Nature and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanloz, R.

    2015-12-01

    Energy dissipated during dynamic compression quantifies the residual heat left in a planet due to impact and accretion, as well as the deviation of a loading path from an ideal isentrope. Waste heat ignores the difference between the pressure-volume isentrope and Hugoniot in approximating the dissipated energy as the area between the Rayleigh line and Hugoniot (assumed given by a linear dependence of shock velocity on particle velocity). Strength and phase transformations are ignored: justifiably, when considering sufficiently high dynamic pressures and reversible transformations. Waste heat mis-estimates the dissipated energy by less than 10-20 percent for volume compressions under 30-60 percent. Specific waste heat (energy per mass) reaches 0.2-0.3 c02 at impact velocities 2-4 times the zero-pressure bulk sound velocity (c0), its maximum possible value being 0.5 c02. As larger impact velocities are implied for typical orbital velocities of Earth-like planets, and c02 ≈ 2-30 MJ/kg for rock, the specific waste heat due to accretion corresponds to temperature rises of about 3-15 x 103 K for rock: melting accompanies accretion even with only 20-30 percent waste heat retained. Impact sterilization is similarly quantified in terms of waste heat relative to the energy required to vaporize H2O (impact velocity of 7-8 km/s, or 4.5-5 c0, is sufficient). Waste heat also clarifies the relationship between shock, multi-shock and ramp loading experiments, as well as the effect of (static) pre-compression. Breaking a shock into 2 steps significantly reduces the dissipated energy, with minimum waste heat achieved for two equal volume compressions in succession. Breaking a shock into as few as 4 steps reduces the waste heat to within a few percent of zero, documenting how multi-shock loading approaches an isentrope. Pre-compression, being less dissipative than an initial shock to the same strain, further reduces waste heat. Multi-shock (i.e., high strain-rate) loading of pre

  7. Rainfall and wet and dry cycle's impact on ash thickness. A laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Keestra, Saskia; Peters, Piet; Cerdà, Artemi

    2016-04-01

    Ash is the most important and effective soil protection in the immediate period after the fire (Cerda and Doerr, 2008; Pereira et al., 2015a). This protection can last for days or weeks depending on the fire severity, topography of the burned area and post-fire meteorological conditions. In the initial period after the fire, ash is easily transported by wind. However after the first rainfalls, ash is eroded, or bind in soil surface (Pereira et al., 2013, 2015a). Ash thickness has implications on soil protection. The soil protection against the erosion and the ash capacity to retain water increases with the ash thickness (Bodi et al., 2014). Ash cover is very important after fire because store water and releases into soil a large amount of nutrients, fundamental to vegetation recuperation (Pereira et al., 2014). Despite the importance of ash thickness in post fire environments, little information is available about the effects of rainfall and wet and dry cycle's effects on ash thickness. This work aims to fill this gap. The objective of this study is to investigate the impacts of rainfall and wet and dry cycles in the ash thickness of two different under laboratory conditions. Litter from Oak (Quercus robur) and Spruce (Picea abis) were collected to and exposed during 2 hours to produce ash at 200 and 400 C. Subsequently a layer of 15 mm ash was spread on soil surface in small boxes (24x32 cm) and then subjected to rainfall simulation. Boxes were placed at a 17% of inclination and a rainfall intensity of 55 mm/h during 40 minutes was applied. After the rainfall simulation the plots were stored in an Oven at the temperature of 25 C during four days, in order to identify the effects of wet and dry cycles (Bodi et al., 2013). Ash thickness was measured after the first rainfall (AFR), before the second rainfall (BSR) - after the dry period of 4 days - and after the second rainfall (ASR). In each box a grid with 57 points was designed in order to analyse ash thickness

  8. Willingness to Pay for Improving the Residential Waste Disposal System in Korea: A Choice Experiment Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Se-Ju; Yoo, Seung-Hoon; Kwak, Seung-Jun

    2009-08-01

    This study attempts to apply choice experiments with regard to the residential waste disposal system (RWDS) in Korea by considering various attributes that are related to RWDS. Using data from a survey conducted on 492 households, the empirical analysis yields estimates of the willingness to pay for a clean food-waste collection facility, the collection of small items (such as obsolete mobile phones and add-ons for personal computers), and a more convenient large waste disposal system. The estimation results of multinomial logit models are quite similar to those of nested logit models. The results reveal that residents have preferences for the cleanliness of facilities and the collection of small items. In Korea, residents are required to purchase and attach stickers for the disposal of large items; they want to be able to obtain stickers at not only village offices but also supermarkets. On the other hand, the frequency of waste collection is not a significant factor in the choice of the improved waste management program.

  9. Rapid optimization of protein freeze-drying formulations using ultra scale-down and factorial design of experiment in microplates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Yitzchak; Matejtschuk, Paul; Dalby, Paul A

    2009-12-01

    Retaining biopharmaceutical proteins in a stable form is critical to their safety and efficacy, and is a major factor for optimizing the final product. Freeze-dried formulations offer one route for improved stability. Currently the optimization of formulations for freeze-drying is an empirical process that requires many time-consuming experiments and also uses large quantities of product material. Here we describe a generic framework for the rapid identification and optimization of formulation excipients to prevent loss of protein activity during a lyophilization process. Using factorial design of experiment (DOE) methods combined with lyophilization in microplates a range of optimum formulations were rapidly identified that stabilized lactose dehydrogenase (derived from Lactobacillus leichmanii) during freeze-drying. The procedure outlined herein involves two rounds of factorially designed experiments-an initial screen to identify key excipients and potential interactions followed by a central composite face designed optimization experiment. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) and lactose were shown to have significant effects on maintaining protein stability at the screening stage and optimization resulted in an accurate model that was used to plot a window of operation. The variation of freezing temperatures and rates of sublimation that occur across a microplate during freeze-drying have been characterized also. The optimum formulation was then freeze-dried in stoppered vials to verify that the microscale data was relevant to the effects observed at larger pilot scales. This work provides a generic approach to biopharmaceutical formulation screening where possible excipients can be screened for single and interactive effects thereby increasing throughput while reducing costs in terms of time and materials.

  10. Design of experiment characterization of microneedle fabrication processes based on dry silicon etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, J.; Gaspar, J.; Ruther, P.; Hagner, M.; Cismak, A.; Heilmann, A.; Paul, O.

    2010-02-01

    This paper reports on the characterization of dry etching-based processes for the fabrication of silicon microneedles using a design of experiment (DoE) approach. The possibility of using such microneedles as protruding microelectrodes able to electroporate adherently growing cells and record intracellular potentials motivates the systematic analysis of the influence of etching parameters on the needle shape. Two processes are characterized: a fully isotropic etch process and a three-step etching approach. In the first case, the shape of the microneedles is defined by a single etch step. For the stepped method, the structures are realized using the following sequence: a first, isotropic step defines the tip; this is followed by anisotropic etching that increases the height of the needle; a final isotropic procedure thins the microneedle and sharpens its tip. From the various process parameters tested, it is concluded that the isotropic fabrication is influenced mostly by four process parameters, whereas six parameters dominantly govern the outcome of the stepped etching technique. The dependence of the needle shape on the etch mask diameter is also investigated. Microneedles with diameters down to the sub-micrometer range and heights below 10 µm are obtained. The experimental design is performed using the D-optimal method. The resulting geometry, i.e. heights, diameters and radii of curvature measured at different positions, is extracted from scanning electron micrographs of needle cross-sections obtained from cuts by focused ion beam. The process parameters are used as inputs and the geometry features of the microneedles as outputs for the analysis of the process.

  11. Producer responsibility for e-waste management: key issues for consideration - learning from the Swiss experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khetriwal, Deepali Sinha; Kraeuchi, Philipp; Widmer, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    E-waste, a relatively recent addition to the waste stream in the form of discarded electronic and electric equipment, is getting increasing attention from policy makers as the quantity being generated is rising rapidly. One of the most promising policy options to address this issue is to extend the producers responsibility for their products beyond the point of sale, until end-of-product-life. This paper briefly introduces the concept of extended producer responsibility (EPR) and its applicability in the area of the end-of-life management of electronic and electrical equipment (EEE). It then examines the decade-long experience of Switzerland in using EPR to manage its e-waste, elaborating on the experience of the Swiss system in overcoming specific issues, and finally wrapping up with a synopsis of the lessons for policy makers. We consider each issue as an enquiry of questions confronting a policy maker and the choices that may present themselves. The five issues discussed are: (i) the challenges in getting an EPR based system started; (ii) securing financing to ensure a self-sustaining and smooth functioning system; (iii) organising a logistics network for the take back and collection of the e-waste; (iv) ensuring compliance of the various actors involved; and finally (v) reducing the threat of monopolistic practices.

  12. Slaughterhouse waste co-digestion - Experiences from 15 years of full-scale operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ek, A.E.W. (Swedish Biogas International Korea Co., Ltd, Totaleco B/D 1302-7, Seocho-Dong, Seocho-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Hallin, S.; Vallin, L. (Dept. of Biogas R and D, Tekniska Verken i Linkoeping AB (Sweden)); Schnurer, A. (Dept. of Microbiology, Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden)); Karlsson, M. (Dept. of Biogas R and D, Tekniska Verken i Linkoeping AB (Sweden); Dept. of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linkoeping Univ., Linkoeping (Sweden)), E-mail: martin.karlsson@tekniskaverken.se

    2012-01-15

    At Tekniska Verken in Linkoeping AB (TVAB) there is a long time experience of handling and producing biogas from large volumes of slaughterhouse waste. Experiences from research and development and plant operations have lead to the implementation of several process improving technological/biological solutions. We can in this paper describe how the improvements have had several positive effects on the process, including energy savings, better odor control, higher gas quality, increased organic loading rates and higher biogas production with maintained process stability. In addition, it is described how much of the process stability in anaerobic digestion of slaughter house waste relates to the plant operation, which allow the microbiological consortia to adapt to the substrate. Since digestion of proteinaceous substrates like slaughterhouse waste lead to high ammonia loads, special requirements in ammonia tolerance are placed on the microbiota of the anaerobic digestion. Biochemical assays revealed that the main route for methane production proceed through syntrophic acetate oxidation, which require longer retention times than methane production by acetoclastic methanogens. Thus, the long retention time of the plant, accomplished by a low dilution of the substrate, is a vital component of the process stability when treating high protein substrates like slaughterhouse waste

  13. Characterizing differences in precipitation regimes of extreme wet and dry years: Implications for climate change experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Knapp, AK; Hoover, DL; Wilcox, KR; Avolio, ML; Koerner, SE; La Pierre, KJ; Loik, ME; Luo, Y; Sala, OE; Smith, MD

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Climate change is intensifying the hydrologic cycle and is expected to increase the frequency of extreme wet and dry years. Beyond precipitation amount, extreme wet and dry years may differ in other ways, such as the number of precipitation events, event size, and the time between events. We assessed 1614 long-term (100 year) precipitation records from around the world to identify key attributes of precipitation regimes, besides amount, that distinguish statist...

  14. A new approach for concurrently improving performance of South Korean food waste valorization and renewable energy recovery via dry anaerobic digestion under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dinh Duc; Yeop, Jeong Seong; Choi, Jaehoon; Kim, Sungsu; Chang, Soon Woong; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Guo, Wenshan; Ngo, Huu Hao

    2017-08-01

    Dry semicontinuous anaerobic digestion (AD) of South Korean food waste (FW) under four solid loading rates (SLRs) (2.30-9.21kg total solids (TS)/m 3 day) and at a fixed TS content was compared between two digesters, one each under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. Biogas production and organic matter reduction in both digesters followed similar trends, increasing with rising SLR. Inhibitor (intermediate products of the anaerobic fermentation process) effects on the digesters' performance were not observed under the studied conditions. In all cases tested, the digesters' best performance was achieved at the SLR of 9.21kg TS/m 3 day, with 74.02% and 80.98% reduction of volatile solids (VS), 0.87 and 0.90m 3 biogas/kg VS removed , and 0.65 (65% CH 4 ) and 0.73 (60.02% CH 4 ) m 3 biogas/kg VS fed , under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions, respectively. Thermophilic dry AD is recommended for FW treatment in South Korea because it is more efficient and has higher energy recovery potential when compared to mesophilic dry AD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Recovery of waste heat from propellant forced-air dry house. Final report, November 1976-April 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alario, J.; Bozza, E.F.; Mullaney, P.

    1978-12-01

    This report describes the design, installation, and test evaluation of a heat pipe heat exchanger for a multi-base propellant forced-air dry house for the purpose of recovering heat from the hot air exhausted to the atmosphere during a typical drying operation. Detailed descriptions of the special safety and operating features of the recovery unit are also presented. Evaluation of the unit showed that approximately 62% of the energy used to dry multi-base propellants can be saved by the heat recovery technique employed. Energy/cost saving projections are based upon the installation of similar recovery units at a major Army propellant manufacturing facility such Radford Army Ammunition Plant.

  16. Bioavailability and Digestibility of Nutrients from the Dried Oyster Culinary-Medicinal Mushroom, Pleurotus ostreatus (Agaricomycetes): In Vivo Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regula, Julita; Suliburska, Joanna; Siwulski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    There is a limited number of publications on the bioavailability and digestibility of nutrients contained in macrofungi. The aim of this study was to assess the bioavailability and digestibility of macronutrients using in vivo experiments on laboratory animals. The experiments were conducted with the commercial oyster mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus. Semisynthetic diets were prepared based on the modified AIN-93M diet and were supplemented with 4% and 8% mushroom powder. Between days 4 and 13, apparent digestibility indexes were determined for all animals using the conventional balance method. The hematological indexes-that is, hemoglobin, hematocrit, red blood cells, white blood cells, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration-were determined using a Sysmex K-1000 hematological analyzer. Feeding rats with semisynthetic diets supplemented with dried oyster mushroom had no negative effect on body weight gain or feeding efficiency, expressed in the amount of body weight gain per unit of metabolic energy uptake. Introduction of dried oyster mushroom to the diet resulted in reduced digestibility of the diet and the protein and fat it contained, as well as decreased apparent energy availability. These changes were dependent on the volume of dried mushroom added to the semisynthetic diet. The addition of dried oyster mushroom to the semisynthetic diet considerably reduced passage time through the alimentary tract of rats.

  17. PHYSICO-CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE WASTE FROM INSTALLATION OF SEMI-DRY FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION OF INDUSTRIAL CHP PLANT IN JANIKOWO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Plaskacz-Dziuba

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of the analysis of waste from semi-dry flue gas desulphurisation installation called Integrated Novel Desulphurisation (NID. A comprehensive analysis of the physicochemical properties was conducted, including analyzes of the content of ions SO32- and SO42- (relating to 2CaSO3·H2O i CaSO4·2H2O, moisture, SiO2 and R2O3 and SEM-EDX analysis. The original method for the determination of sulphates (IV using a potentiometric titrator was designed. Determined that the main component of both studied wastes was 2CaSO3·H2O, and its content is for NID 1 – 41,24±0,63%, for NID 2 – 45,53±0,33%. The content of CaSO4·2H2O, which was determined by gravimetric method amounted for the NID 1 – 8,92±0,12%, for the NID 2 – 8,27±0,08%. The moisture content for both tested materials was about 4%, the content of SiO2 was in the range of 8–10%, and R2O3 content was about 1%. It was also shown that the test material is not homogenous. Images from scanning electron microscope showed that in the waste occured irregularly agglomerates with a diameter between 30 and 100 microns. EDX analysis revealed that elements constituted NID wastes are oxygen, sulfur, calcium, chlorine, silicon, aluminum, copper and carbon.

  18. Recovery of different waste vegetable oils for biodiesel production: a pilot experience in Bahia State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Ednildo Andrade; Cerqueira, Gilberto S; Tiago, M Ferrer; Quintella, Cristina M; Raboni, Massimo; Torretta, Vincenzo; Urbini, Giordano

    2013-12-01

    In Brazil, and mainly in the State of Bahia, crude vegetable oils are widely used in the preparation of food. Street stalls, restaurants and canteens make a great use of palm oil and soybean oil. There is also some use of castor oil, which is widely cultivated in the Sertão Region (within the State of Bahia), and widely applied in industry. This massive use in food preparation leads to a huge amount of waste oil of different types, which needs either to be properly disposed of, or recovered. At the Laboratorio Energia e Gas-LEN (Energy & Gas lab.) of the Universidade Federal da Bahia, a cycle of experiments were carried out to evaluate the recovery of waste oils for biodiesel production. The experiences were carried out on a laboratory scale and, in a semi-industrial pilot plant using waste oils of different qualities. In the transesterification process, applied waste vegetable oils were reacted with methanol with the support of a basic catalyst, such as NaOH or KOH. The conversion rate settled at between 81% and 85% (in weight). The most suitable molar ratio of waste oils to alcohol was 1:6, and the amount of catalyst required was 0.5% (of the weight of the incoming oil), in the case of NaOH, and 1%, in case of KOH. The quality of the biodiesel produced was tested to determine the final product quality. The parameters analyzed were the acid value, kinematic viscosity, monoglycerides, diglycerides, triglycerides, free glycerine, total glycerine, clearness; the conversion yield of the process was also evaluated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment of a combined dry anaerobic digestion and post-composting treatment facility for source-separated organic household waste, using material and substance flow analysis and life cycle inventory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Bang; Møller, Jacob; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    coefficients for a combined dry anaerobic digestion and post-composting facility. All metals passed through the facility and ended up in compost or residues, but all concentrations of metals in the compost complied with legislation. About 23% of the carbon content of the organic waste was transferred...... and post-composting facility, including waste received, fuel consumption, energy use, gaseous emissions, products, energy production and chemical composition of the compost produced....

  20. Petrologic and geochemical characterization of the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff: outcrop samples used in waste package experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knauss, K.G.

    1984-06-01

    This report summarizes characterization studies conducted with outcrop samples of Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff (Tpt). In support of the Waste Package Task within the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI), Tpt is being studied both as a primary object and as a constituent used to condition water that will be reacted with waste form, canister, or packing material. These studies directly or indirectly support NNWSI subtasks concerned with waste package design and geochemical modeling. To interpret the results of subtask experiments, it is necessary to know the exact nature of the starting material in terms of the intial bulk composition, mineralogy, and individual phase geochemistry. 31 figures, 5 tables.

  1. Elastic Modulus Profiles in the Cross Sections of Drying Alkyd Coating Films: Modelling and Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirone, Giuseppe; Marton, B.; Marton, Beáta; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2004-01-01

    The temporal development of the modulus of elasticity and its profile were studied in water-borne alkyd coatings during the drying process of the coating films. Values of the Young’s moduli of elasticity of free coating films were measured using tensile tests. Since the elastic modulus is related to

  2. Licensing of spent fuel dry storage and consolidated rod storage: A Review of Issues and Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, W.J.

    1990-02-01

    The results of this study, performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), respond to the nuclear industry's recommendation that a report be prepared that collects and describes the licensing issues (and their resolutions) that confront a new applicant requesting approval from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for dry storage of spent fuel or for large-scale storage of consolidated spent fuel rods in pools. The issues are identified in comments, questions, and requests from the NRC during its review of applicants' submittals. Included in the report are discussions of (1) the 18 topical reports on cask and module designs for dry storage fuel that have been submitted to the NRC, (2) the three license applications for dry storage of spent fuel at independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs) that have been submitted to the NRC, and (3) the three applications (one of which was later withdrawn) for large-scale storage of consolidated fuel rods in existing spent fuel storage pools at reactors that were submitted tot he NRC. For each of the applications submitted, examples of some of the issues (and suggestions for their resolutions) are described. The issues and their resolutions are also covered in detail in an example in each of the three subject areas: (1) the application for the CASTOR V/21 dry spent fuel storage cask, (2) the application for the ISFSI for dry storage of spent fuel at Surry, and (3) the application for full-scale wet storage of consolidated spent fuel at Millstone-2. The conclusions in the report include examples of major issues that applicants have encountered. Recommendations for future applicants to follow are listed. 401 refs., 26 tabs.

  3. Stimulation of the anaerobic digestion of the dry organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) with carbon-based conductive materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Yan; Sun, Dezhi; Woodard, Trevor L; Wang, Li-Ying; Nevin, Kelly P; Holmes, Dawn E

    2017-08-01

    Growth of bacterial and archaeal species capable of interspecies electron exchange was stimulated by addition of conductive materials (carbon cloth or granular activated carbon (GAC)) to anaerobic digesters treating dog food (a substitute for the dry-organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW)). Methane production (772-1428mmol vs <80mmol), volatile solids removal (78%-81% vs 54%-64%) and COD removal efficiencies (∼80% vs 20%-30%) were all significantly higher in reactors amended with GAC or carbon cloth than controls. OFMSW degradation was also significantly accelerated and VFA concentrations were substantially lower in reactors amended with conductive materials. These results suggest that both conductive materials (carbon cloth and GAC) can promote conversion of OFMSW to methane even in the presence of extremely high VFA concentrations (∼500mM). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Response of soil microorganisms to radioactive oil waste: results from a leaching experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galitskaya, P.; Biktasheva, L.; Saveliev, A.; Ratering, S.; Schnell, S.; Selivanovskaya, S.

    2015-06-01

    Oil wastes produced in large amounts in the processes of oil extraction, refining, and transportation are of great environmental concern because of their mutagenicity, toxicity, high fire hazardousness, and hydrophobicity. About 40% of these wastes contain radionuclides; however, the effects of oil products and radionuclides on soil microorganisms are frequently studied separately. The effects on various microbial parameters of raw waste containing 575 g of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) kg-1 waste, 4.4 of 226Ra, 2.8 of 232Th, and 1.3 kBq kg-1 of 40K and its treated variant (1.6 g kg-1 of TPH, 7.9 of 226Ra, 3.9 of 232Th, and 183 kBq kg-1 of 40K) were examined in a leaching column experiment to separate the effects of hydrocarbons from those of radioactive elements. The raw waste sample (H) was collected from tanks during cleaning and maintenance, and a treated waste sample (R) was obtained from equipment for oil waste treatment. Thermal steam treatment is used in the production yard to reduce the oil content. The disposal of H waste samples on the soil surface led to an increase in the TPH content in soil: it became 3.5, 2.8, and 2.2 times higher in the upper (0-20 cm), middle (20-40 cm), and lower (40-60cm) layers, respectively. Activity concentrations of 226Ra and 232Th increased in soil sampled from both H- and R- columns in comparison to their concentrations in control soil. The activity concentrations of these two elements in samples taken from the upper and middle layers were much higher for the R-column compared to the H-column, despite the fact that the amount of waste added to the columns was equalized with respect to the activity concentrations of radionuclides. The H waste containing both TPH and radionuclides affected the functioning of the soil microbial community, and the effect was more pronounced in the upper layer of the column. Metabolic quotient and cellulase activity were the most sensitive microbial parameters as their levels were changed 5

  5. DYNAMICS OF CHANGES IN VEGETATION OF A MODEL EXPERIMENT ON COAL COMBUSTION WASTE DEPOSITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz H. Dyguś

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains the evaluation of the reclamation efficiencyon coal combustion waste deposits fertilized with composts and sewage sludge. Based on multiannual studies, the dynamics of changes in vegetation in the performed experiment have been shown. The firstphase of the experiment concerning the reclamation efficiencyof the employed fertilizers was carried out from 2006 to 2007. The second phase was carried out between 2011 and 2012. In order to show a broader spectrum of dynamics of changes in vegetation, the floristicobservation was repeated in 2013 and this paper is the presentation of its outcome. Based on the observation (2011–2013 and its results it was found that apart from plants cultivated in experimental containers also a self-sown florahas had a significantcontribution in shap-ing the vegetation cover. The results of floristic and ecological research have proven that composts and sewage sludge constitute a favorable environment for the development of spontaneous vegetation cover on coal combustion waste deposits. Based on the evaluation of the vegetation cover level in particular models it was shown that models with Complex composts (kC and Radiowo ones (kRa as well as the model with sewage sludge have pre-sented the highest reclamation efficienc. The lowest efficiencyhas been shown in models with ZUSOK composts (kZ and the plant ones (kr. The conclusions have highlighted the share of ecological, systematic and syntaxonomic plant groups in the process of reclamation of combustion waste deposits.

  6. EFFECT OF RICE HULL IN THE DRIED HOTEL FOOD WASTE BASED-DIET ON LIPID CHARACTERISTICS AND MEAT QUALITY OF BARROWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.M. Purnamartha

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The study was constructed to observe the effect of rice hull as a fiber sources in the dried hotelfood waste based-diet on fat and cholesterol level of pork. Twenty four heads of two months old ofLandrace x Yorkshire cross barrows were randomly divided into four treatment groups, i.e. without ricehull (R0, 10% rice hull (R1, 20% rice hull (R2, and 30% rice hull (R3. They placed in individualconcrete pen with 1.9 m in length and 0.5 m in width. Feed and water were given as ad libitum.Observation was done for 10 weeks prior to slaughter. Completely Randomized Design was used in thisstudy. Data obtained was analyzev by anova and mean comparison of Duncan's new Multiple RangeTest. Fat content of R0, R1, R2, dan R3 pork were 14.09±0.31, 13.30±0.44, 12.9±20.30 and11.95±0.56%, respectively. Fat content of pork of R0 was higher (P<0.05 than that of others groups.Cholesterol content of pork of R0, R1, R2 and R3 were 256.47±30.23, 252.34±26.56, 217.63±21.93 and199.21±25.94 mg/100 g, respectively. Cholesterol content of pork of R3 were lower (P<0.05 than thoseof R0. It is concluded that the use of rice hull up to 30% in the dried hotel food waste based-diet candecreases fat and cholesterol levels of pork.

  7. Comparison between conventional biofilters and biotrickling filters applied to waste bio-drying in terms of atmospheric dispersion and air quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Marco; Ragazzi, Marco; Torretta, Vincenzo; Rada, Elena Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Biofiltration has been widely applied to remove odours and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from industrial off-gas and mechanical-biological waste treatments. However, conventional open biofilters cannot guarantee an efficient dispersion of air pollutants emitted into the atmosphere. The aim of this paper is to compare conventional open biofilters with biotrickling filters (BTFs) in terms of VOC dispersion in the atmosphere and air quality in the vicinity of a hypothetical municipal solid waste bio-drying plant. Simulations of dispersion were carried out regarding two VOCs of interest due to their impact in terms of odours and cancer risk: dimethyl disulphide and benzene, respectively. The use of BTFs, instead of conventional biofilters, led to significant improvements in the odour impact and the cancer risk: when adopting BTFs instead of an open biofilter, the area with an odour concentration > 1 OU m(-3) and a cancer risk > 10(-6) was reduced by 91.6% and 95.2%, respectively. When replacing the biofilter with BTFs, the annual mean concentrations of odorants and benzene decreased by more than 90% in the vicinity of the plant. These improvements are achieved above all because of the higher release height of BTFs and the higher velocity of the outgoing air flow.

  8. Optimisation of single-phase dry-thermophilic anaerobic digestion under high organic loading rates of industrial municipal solid waste: population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedi, S; Sales, D; Romero, L I; Solera, R

    2013-10-01

    Different high feed organic loading rates (OLRs) (from 5.7 g to 46.0 g TVS/l/d) or hydraulic retention times (HRTs) (from 15 d to 2 d) in single-phase dry-thermophilic anaerobic digestion (AD) of organic fraction municipal solid waste (OFMSW) were investigated. The specific gas production (SGP) values (0.25-0.53 m(3)/kg TVS) and the percentages of Eubacteria, Archaea, H2-utilising methanogens (HUMs) and acetate-utilising methanogens (AUMs) were stable within the ranges 80.2-91.1%, 12.4-18.5%, 4.4-9.8% and 5.5-10.9%, respectively. A HUM/AUM ratio greater than 0.7 seems to be necessary to maintain very low partial pressures of H2 required for dry AD process. Increasing OLR resulted in an increase in all the populations, except for propionate-utilising acetogens (PUAs). Optimal conditions were obtained at 3d HRT (OLR=30.7 g TVS/l/d), which is lower than the doubling time of acetogens and methanogens. The methane production (MP) was clearly higher than those reported in AD of OFMSW. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Semi-dry mesophilic anaerobic digestion of water sorted organic fraction of municipal solid waste (WS-OFMSW).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li; Zhenhong, Yuan; Yongming, Sun

    2010-04-01

    An innovative municipal solid waste separation technology - water separation was developed in China recently. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of anaerobic digestion from water sorted organic fraction of municipal solid waste (WS-OFMSW) to methane. A group of bench-scale (35 L) mesophilic (30 + or - 2 degrees Celsius) batch anaerobic digestions were carried out with three total solids in reactor (TSr = 16.0%, 13.5% and 11.0%). The biodegradability of WS-OFMSW with VS/TS of 61.6% was better than that of mechanically sorted OFMSW but still poor than that of source sorted OFMSW. No inhibitions of metal ions, volatile fatty acids and ammonia on anaerobic digestion were found. The reactors with TSr 16.0%, 13.5% and 11.0% achieved methane yield of 273, 283 and 314 L/kgVS and VS removal rate of 26.1%, 35.8% and 41.8%, respectively. The average methane content in biogas was about 66% for all reactors. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Fertilization effects of organic waste resources and bottom wood ash: results from a pot experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Brod

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a pot experiment to study the fertilization effects of four N- and P-rich organic waste resources alone and in combination with K-rich bottom wood ash at two application rates (150 kg N ha–1 + 120 kg K ha–1, 300 kg N ha-1 + 240 kg K ha–1. Plant-available N was the growth-limiting factor. 48–73% of N applied with meat and bone meal (MBM and composted fish sludge (CFS was taken up in aboveground biomass, resulting in mineral fertilizer equivalents (MFE% of 53–81% for N uptake and 61–104% for yield. MFE% of MBM and CFS decreased for increasing application rates. Two industrial composts had weak N fertilization effects and are to be considered soil conditioners rather than fertilizers. Possible P and K fertilization effects of waste resources were masked by the soil’s ability to supply plant-available P and K, but effects on plant-available P and K contents in soil suggest that the waste resources may have positive effects under more nutrient-deficient conditions.

  11. Elaboration of phosphate ceramics as a safe form for halide salt waste immobilization of `dry` fuel reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlova, A.I.; Petkov, V.I.; Egorkova, O.V.; Kurazhkovskaya, V.S.; Kemenov, D.V. [Nizhny Novgorod State Univ. Chemical Dept., Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Skiba, O.V.

    1997-12-31

    The conception of high level radwaste immobilization from M{sup 1}-containing molten salts and their solid forms into NZP-like structure phosphate ceramics are considered. The crystal-chemical principle on radionuclide incorporation into this structure is described. The prepared NZP ceramics was tested and it was shown that they had stability to action of such factors as temperature (up to 1200-1600degC), pressure (up to 500 MPa), radiation ({gamma}, up to 5{center_dot}10{sup 8} Gy), water solutions (up to 400degC, 60 MPa). Their structure is able to contain alkali elements up to 30-40%. Such monophase phosphate compositions may be formed at process of alkali chloride wastes solidification. The reactions of alkali chlorides, radionuclides, with phosphates are taken up here. (author)

  12. Off-the-job microsurgical training on dry models: Siberian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belykh, Evgenii; Byvaltsev, Vadim

    2014-01-01

    Microsurgical training has become an obligatory part of many neurosurgical training programs. To assess the cost and effectiveness of acquiring and maintaining microneurosurgical skills by training on an off-the-job basis using dry models. A dry off-the-job microneurosurgical training module was set up. Training exercises involved microdissection in a deep operation field, suturing and tying on gauze, untying, pushing of thread end, and microanastomosis. The time to complete the task and success rate were evaluated. The total cost of all necessary equipment and expendables for the training module was US$910. Fifteen residents participated in the continuous off-the-job training. The average time taken to perform the anastomosis decreased after the month of training from 90 to 20 minutes. Authors revealed that at 2 months, the total time and time to complete anastomosis increased significantly for the participants who discontinued practice after the first month, compared with those who just practiced suturing on gauze after the first month (P job training showed to be readily available and can be helpful for microsurgical training in the low-income regions of the world. Our data suggest that microsurgical training should be continuous and repetitive. Simulation training may benefit from models for repetitive training of relevant technical part-skills. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. CASTOR {sup ®} and CONSTOR {sup ®}. A well established system for the dry storage of spent fuel and high level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wimmer, Hannes; Skrzyppek, Juergen; Koebl, Michael [GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH, Essen (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    The German company GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH today looks back on more than 30 years of operational experience with dual-purpose casks for the transport and storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from nuclear power plants and high level waste (HLW) from reprocessing. Following customer demands, GNS developed two different cask types for SNF. By now, almost 1,300 GNS-casks are in operation worldwide. This article gives an overview over several national and international projects and shows the bandwidth of customised solutions by GNS.

  14. Potential of biohydrogen production from organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) using pilot-scale dry anaerobic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsamadony, M; Tawfik, A

    2015-11-01

    A long-term evaluation of a mesophilic up-flow intermittently stirred tank reactor (UISTR) for hydrogen production from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste was investigated. UISTR was operated at five different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 10, 7.5, 5, 3 and 2days. This corresponds to organic loading rates (OLRs) of 18.1, 26.2, 41.3, 61.0, and 97.2gCOD/L/day, respectively. The highest volumetric H2 production of 2.20±0.19L/L/d and H2 yield of 2.05±0.33molH2/molCarbohydrate were achieved at HRT of 3days and OLR of 61.0gCOD/L/day. This revealed a higher sCOD/tCOD ratio of 0.46±0.08 and a lower particle size diameter of 307.6μm in the digestate, with a reduction of 72.0%. The maximum carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids conversions amounted to 68.2±13.0%, 37.5±6.7% and 48.6±4.7%, respectively recorded at HRT of 10days and OLR of 18.1gCOD/L/day. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Radioactive wastes Conditioning. Optimization of operating parameters by the experience plan method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    bouchra El hilal

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The conditioning of exhausted Resins Exchanging Ions (REI (radioactive wastes generated by nuclear operations was optimized using a full factorial experiments plan 24. Sixteen experiments with a suitable choice of four interpretable variables led to a mathematical model in the form of a first degree polynomial. After analysing the effects, this model showed that the most influential factor on the response (compression strength is the water/cement ratio (W/C with a positive effect of (+2.17, the second factor in order is the mixing time with a positive effect of (+1.54. The interaction between the (W/C and the number of vibration and interaction between the (W/C and the mixing time also have effects on the response.

  16. A process for treatment of residues from dry/semidry APC systems at municipal solid waste incinerators. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjelmar, O. [VKI, Hoersholm (Denmark)] Holland, D. [FLS miljoe a/s, Valby (Denmark)] Poulsen, B. [KARA, Roskilde (Denmark)

    1997-08-01

    The main objective of the project has been to establish and test a process for treatment of residues from the semidry (and dry) lime injection based APC processes at MSWIs, which will ensure that the residues can be managed in an environmentally safe manner. In pursuit of this goal, the following activities have been carried out: Performance of pilot scale extractions (approximately 50 kg of residue per batch) at the KARA MSWI in Roskilde of semidry APC system residues in order to establish and optimize process conditions. The optimization includes consideration of the possibilities for subsequent treatment/stabilization of the extracted solid phase as well as the possibility of treatment and safe discharge/utilization of the extract; Performance of chemical characterization, hydrogeochemical model calculations and experimental work in order to improve the understanding of the mechanisms and factors which for several contaminants control the equilibrium between the solid and liquid phases, both in the short and the long germ, and to use this information to obtain an environmentally acceptable method for stabilization/treatment of the extracted residues while at the same time minimizing the necessary amount of additives; production of treated residues and performance of leaching tests on these to assess and demonstrate the effectiveness of the entire process (extraction + stabilization/treatment); Evaluation of the technical, economical and environmental consequences of full scale implementation of the process. (EG) EFP-94. 19 refs.

  17. Validation Experiments for Spent-Fuel Dry-Cask In-Basket Convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Barton L. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    2016-08-16

    This work consisted of the following major efforts; 1. Literature survey on validation of external natural convection; 2. Design the experiment; 3. Build the experiment; 4. Run the experiment; 5. Collect results; 6. Disseminate results; and 7. Perform a CFD validation study using the results. We note that while all tasks are complete, some deviations from the original plan were made. Specifically, geometrical changes in the parameter space were skipped in favor of flow condition changes, which were found to be much more practical to implement. Changing the geometry required new as-built measurements, which proved extremely costly and impractical given the time and funds available

  18. Geological Disposal of Radioactive Waste: A Long-Term Socio-Technical Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Jantine

    2016-06-01

    In this article we investigate whether long-term radioactive waste management by means of geological disposal can be understood as a social experiment. Geological disposal is a rather particular technology in the way it deals with the analytical and ethical complexities implied by the idea of technological innovation as social experimentation, because it is presented as a technology that ultimately functions without human involvement. We argue that, even when the long term function of the 'social' is foreseen to be restricted to safeguarding the functioning of the 'technical', geological disposal is still a social experiment. In order to better understand this argument and explore how it could be addressed, we elaborate the idea of social experimentation with the notion of co-production and the analytical tools of delegation, prescription and network as developed by actor-network theory. In doing so we emphasize that geological disposal inherently involves relations between surface and subsurface, between humans and nonhumans, between the social, material and natural realm, and that these relations require recognition and further elaboration. In other words, we argue that geological disposal concurrently is a social and a technical experiment, or better, a long-term socio-technical experiment. We end with proposing the idea of 'actor-networking' as a sensitizing concept for future research into what geological disposal as a socio-technical experiment could look like.

  19. Influence of particle size and salinity on adsorption of basic dyes by agricultural waste: dried seagrape (Caulerpa lentillifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punjongharn, Pimol; Meevasana, Khanidtha; Pavasant, Prasert

    2008-01-01

    Green macroalga Caulerpa lentillifera was found to have reasonable adsorption capacity for basic dyes, Astrazon Blue FGRL (AB), Astrazon Red GTLN (AR), and Astrazon Golden Yellow GL-E (AY). The initial dye concentration was in the range of 100-1,800 mg/L. The dried algal sorbent was ground and sieved into 3 sizes: S (0.1-0.84 mm), M (0.84-2.0 mm), and L sizes (larger than 2.0 mm). For all conditions examined in this work (at 25 degrees C in batch systems), the adsorption reached equilibrium within the first hour. The kinetic data corresponded well with the pseudo second order kinetic model where the rate constant, k2, decreased as the sorbent size increased for all dyes. The adsorption isotherms followed both Langmuir and Freundlich models. Among three sorbent sizes, S size gave the highest adsorption capacity followed by M and L sizes. A reduction of sorbent size increased the specific surface area for mass transfer, and also increased the total pore volume, thus providing more active sites for adsorption. The adsorption of AB was adversely influenced by the protonation of algal surface at low pH. On the other hand, the adsorption of AR and AY could be due to weak electrostatic interaction, which was not significantly affected by pH. Increasing salinity of the system caused a decrease in adsorption capacity possibly due to the competition between Na+ and the dye cations for the binding sites on algal surface. Moreover, an increase in salinity generated a compressed electrical double layer on the algal surface which exerted repulsive force, retarding the adsorption of positive charged molecules such as the basic dyes.

  20. century drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Benjamin I.; Smerdon, Jason E.; Seager, Richard; Coats, Sloan

    2014-11-01

    Global warming is expected to increase the frequency and intensity of droughts in the twenty-first century, but the relative contributions from changes in moisture supply (precipitation) versus evaporative demand (potential evapotranspiration; PET) have not been comprehensively assessed. Using output from a suite of general circulation model (GCM) simulations from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, projected twenty-first century drying and wetting trends are investigated using two offline indices of surface moisture balance: the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). PDSI and SPEI projections using precipitation and Penman-Monteith based PET changes from the GCMs generally agree, showing robust cross-model drying in western North America, Central America, the Mediterranean, southern Africa, and the Amazon and robust wetting occurring in the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and east Africa (PDSI only). The SPEI is more sensitive to PET changes than the PDSI, especially in arid regions such as the Sahara and Middle East. Regional drying and wetting patterns largely mirror the spatially heterogeneous response of precipitation in the models, although drying in the PDSI and SPEI calculations extends beyond the regions of reduced precipitation. This expansion of drying areas is attributed to globally widespread increases in PET, caused by increases in surface net radiation and the vapor pressure deficit. Increased PET not only intensifies drying in areas where precipitation is already reduced, it also drives areas into drought that would otherwise experience little drying or even wetting from precipitation trends alone. This PET amplification effect is largest in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes, and is especially pronounced in western North America, Europe, and southeast China. Compared to PDSI projections using precipitation changes only, the projections incorporating both

  1. Space Flight Effects on Antioxidant Molecules in Dry Tardigrades: The TARDIKISS Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Maria Rizzo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The TARDIKISS (Tardigrades in Space experiment was part of the Biokon in Space (BIOKIS payload, a set of multidisciplinary experiments performed during the DAMA (Dark Matter mission organized by Italian Space Agency and Italian Air Force in 2011. This mission supported the execution of experiments in short duration (16 days taking the advantage of the microgravity environment on board of the Space Shuttle Endeavour (its last mission STS-134 docked to the International Space Station. TARDIKISS was composed of three sample sets: one flight sample and two ground control samples. These samples provided the biological material used to test as space stressors, including microgravity, affected animal survivability, life cycle, DNA integrity, and pathways of molecules working as antioxidants. In this paper we compared the molecular pathways of some antioxidant molecules, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and fatty acid composition between flight and control samples in two tardigrade species, namely, Paramacrobiotus richtersi and Ramazzottius oberhaeuseri. In both species, the activities of ROS scavenging enzymes, the total content of glutathione, and the fatty acids composition between flight and control samples showed few significant differences. TARDIKISS experiment, together with a previous space experiment (TARSE, further confirms that both desiccated and hydrated tardigrades represent useful animal tool for space research.

  2. Influence of substrate concentration and moisture content on the specific methanogenic activity of dry mesophilic municipal solid waste digestate spiked with propionate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hyaric, Ronan; Chardin, Caroline; Benbelkacem, Hassen; Bollon, Julien; Bayard, Rémy; Escudié, Renaud; Buffière, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of substrate concentration and moisture content on the specific methanogenic activity (SMA) of a fresh dry mesophilic digestate from a municipal solid waste digester plant. For this purpose, SMA tests were performed under mesophilic conditions into glass bottles of 500 mL volume used as batch reactors, during a period of 20-25 days. Propionate was used as substrate at concentrations ranging from 1 to 10 gCOD/kg. Four moisture contents were studied: 65%, 75%, 80% and 82%. Experimental results showed that propionate concentration and moisture content strongly influenced the SMA. The highest SMA was observed at a substrate concentration of 10 gCOD/kg (11.3 mgCOD gVS(-1) d(-1) for the second dose of propionate) and at a moisture content of 82% (7.8 mgCOD gVS(-1) d(-1) for the second dose of propionate, at a concentration of 5 gCOD/kg). SMA was found to decrease linearly when decreasing the moisture content. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Residents’ Preferences for Household Kitchen Waste Source Separation Services in Beijing: A Choice Experiment Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalin Yuan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A source separation program for household kitchen waste has been in place in Beijing since 2010. However, the participation rate of residents is far from satisfactory. This study was carried out to identify residents’ preferences based on an improved management strategy for household kitchen waste source separation. We determine the preferences of residents in an ad hoc sample, according to their age level, for source separation services and their marginal willingness to accept compensation for the service attributes. We used a multinomial logit model to analyze the data, collected from 394 residents in Haidian and Dongcheng districts of Beijing City through a choice experiment. The results show there are differences of preferences on the services attributes between young, middle, and old age residents. Low compensation is not a major factor to promote young and middle age residents accept the proposed separation services. However, on average, most of them prefer services with frequent, evening, plastic bag attributes and without instructor. This study indicates that there is a potential for local government to improve the current separation services accordingly.

  4. From waste minimization to ISO 14000: Taiwan`s experience and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen-Huei Chen; Wain-Sun Hou [China Technical Consultants, Inc., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-12-31

    Taiwan has completed a very successful five-year industrial waste minimization (IWM) demonstration and promotion project sponsored by the government. From 1990 to 1995, the project successfully disseminated the IWM concept of pollution prevention (P2) to industries. It effectively reduced industrial waste while significantly benefitting the economy by assisting industries in implementing in-plant IWM programs. In July 1995, the second stage of the five-year IWM and ISO 14000 promotion project was initiated for further promoting the IWM, P2, and cleaner production and, in particular, coping with the upcoming international environmental management standards (ISO 14000). To assist industries in establishing an environmental management system (EMS) and accumulating related experience, an EMS pilot demonstration project of five model industries and an ISO 14001 EMS demonstration and promotion project for 22 factories in 13 industries were initiated in October 1995 and August 1996, respectively. These projects can assist Taiwan`s industries in changing the constitution of their enterprises, enhancing competition in the international market, and helping our nation achieve the forerunner`s profits in sustainable development. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Scientific approach and practical experience for reconstruction of waste water treatment plants in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makisha Nikolay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Protection of water bodies has a strict dependence on reliable operation of engineering systems and facilities for water supply and sewage. The majority of these plants and stations has been constructed in 1970-1980's in accordance with rules and regulations of that time. So now most of them require reconstruction due to serious physical or/and technological wear. The current condition of water supply and sewage systems and facilities frequently means a hidden source of serious danger for normal life support and ecological safety of cities and towns. The article reveals an obtained experience and modern approaches for reconstruction of waste water and sludge treatment plants that proved their efficiency even if applied in limited conditions such as area limits, investments limits. The main directions of reconstruction: overhaul repair and partial modernization of existing facilities on the basis of initial project; - restoration and modernization of existing systems on the basis on the current documents and their current condition; upgrade of waste water treatment plants (WWTPs performance on the basis of modern technologies and methods; reconstruction of sewage systems and facilities and treatment quality improvement.

  6. Scientific approach and practical experience for reconstruction of waste water treatment plants in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makisha, Nikolay; Gogina, Elena

    2017-11-01

    Protection of water bodies has a strict dependence on reliable operation of engineering systems and facilities for water supply and sewage. The majority of these plants and stations has been constructed in 1970-1980's in accordance with rules and regulations of that time. So now most of them require reconstruction due to serious physical or/and technological wear. The current condition of water supply and sewage systems and facilities frequently means a hidden source of serious danger for normal life support and ecological safety of cities and towns. The article reveals an obtained experience and modern approaches for reconstruction of waste water and sludge treatment plants that proved their efficiency even if applied in limited conditions such as area limits, investments limits. The main directions of reconstruction: overhaul repair and partial modernization of existing facilities on the basis of initial project; - restoration and modernization of existing systems on the basis on the current documents and their current condition; upgrade of waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) performance on the basis of modern technologies and methods; reconstruction of sewage systems and facilities and treatment quality improvement.

  7. The impact of water table drawdown and drying on subterranean aquatic fauna in in-vitro experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Stumpp

    Full Text Available The abstraction of groundwater is a global phenomenon that directly threatens groundwater ecosystems. Despite the global significance of this issue, the impact of groundwater abstraction and the lowering of groundwater tables on biota is poorly known. The aim of this study is to determine the impacts of groundwater drawdown in unconfined aquifers on the distribution of fauna close to the water table, and the tolerance of groundwater fauna to sediment drying once water levels have declined. A series of column experiments were conducted to investigate the depth distribution of different stygofauna (Syncarida and Copepoda under saturated conditions and after fast and slow water table declines. Further, the survival of stygofauna under conditions of reduced sediment water content was tested. The distribution and response of stygofauna to water drawdown was taxon specific, but with the common response of some fauna being stranded by water level decline. So too, the survival of stygofauna under different levels of sediment saturation was variable. Syncarida were better able to tolerate drying conditions than the Copepoda, but mortality of all groups increased with decreasing sediment water content. The results of this work provide new understanding of the response of fauna to water table drawdown. Such improved understanding is necessary for sustainable use of groundwater, and allows for targeted strategies to better manage groundwater abstraction and maintain groundwater biodiversity.

  8. The impact of water table drawdown and drying on subterranean aquatic fauna in in-vitro experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpp, Christine; Hose, Grant C

    2013-01-01

    The abstraction of groundwater is a global phenomenon that directly threatens groundwater ecosystems. Despite the global significance of this issue, the impact of groundwater abstraction and the lowering of groundwater tables on biota is poorly known. The aim of this study is to determine the impacts of groundwater drawdown in unconfined aquifers on the distribution of fauna close to the water table, and the tolerance of groundwater fauna to sediment drying once water levels have declined. A series of column experiments were conducted to investigate the depth distribution of different stygofauna (Syncarida and Copepoda) under saturated conditions and after fast and slow water table declines. Further, the survival of stygofauna under conditions of reduced sediment water content was tested. The distribution and response of stygofauna to water drawdown was taxon specific, but with the common response of some fauna being stranded by water level decline. So too, the survival of stygofauna under different levels of sediment saturation was variable. Syncarida were better able to tolerate drying conditions than the Copepoda, but mortality of all groups increased with decreasing sediment water content. The results of this work provide new understanding of the response of fauna to water table drawdown. Such improved understanding is necessary for sustainable use of groundwater, and allows for targeted strategies to better manage groundwater abstraction and maintain groundwater biodiversity.

  9. Formation of mannitol hemihydrate in freeze-dried protein formulations-A design of experiment approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Helena Marie Lindholm; Trnka, Hjalte; Grohganz, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of mannitol hemihydrate, this form of mannitol has been seen as potentially negative with regard to the stability of pharmaceutical formulations. The formation of mannitol hemihydrate is reported in several case studies; however, no systematic investigation has been performed so...... far. In this study, design of experiments was applied for response surface modelling of mannitol hemihydrate formation. The formulation parameters investigated in a composite face-centred design were the overall solid content, protein concentration, protein type and the ratio between mannitol...... of similar quality. The successful application of design of experiments showed that the most prominent factors enhancing the formation of hemihydrate were a high protein concentration, low relative mannitol content and annealing at -20°C....

  10. Biochemical, hydrological and mechanical behaviors of high food waste content MSW landfill: Preliminary findings from a large-scale experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Liang-Tong; Xu, Hui; Chen, Yun-Min; Lü, Fan; Lan, Ji-Wu; Shao, Li-Min; Lin, Wei-An; He, Pin-Jing

    2017-05-01

    A large-scale bioreactor experiment lasting for 2years was presented in this paper to investigate the biochemical, hydrological and mechanical behaviors of high food waste content (HFWC) MSW. The experimental cell was 5m in length, 5m in width and 7.5m in depth, filled with unprocessed HFWC-MSWs of 91.3 tons. In the experiment, a surcharge loading of 33.4kPa was applied on waste surface, mature leachate refilling and warm leachate recirculation were performed to improve the degradation process. In this paper, the measurements of leachate quantity, leachate level, leachate biochemistry, gas composition, waste temperature, earth pressure and waste settlement were presented, and the following observations were made: (1) 26.8m3 leachate collected from the 91.3 tons HFWC-MSW within the first two months, being 96% of the total amount collected in one year. (2) The leachate level was 88% of the waste thickness after waste filling in a close system, and reached to over 100% after a surcharge loading of 33.4kPa. (3) The self-weight effective stress of waste was observed to be close to zero under the condition of high leachate mound. Leachate drawdown led to a gain of self-weight effective stress. (4) A rapid development of waste settlement took place within the first two months, with compression strains of 0.38-0.47, being over 95% of the strain recorded in one year. The compression strain tended to increase linearly with an increase of leachate draining rate during that two months. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Greening of a Campus through Waste Management Initiatives: Experience from a Higher Education Institution in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangwanichagapong, Siwaporn; Nitivattananon, Vilas; Mohanty, Brahmanand; Visvanathan, Chettiyappan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to describe the effects of 3R (reduce, reuse and recycle) waste management initiatives on a campus community. It ascertains the environmental attitudes and opinions of the residents and investigates their behavioral responses to waste management initiatives. Practical implications for enhancing sustainable waste management…

  12. Bench scale experiments for the remediation of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant low activity waste melter off-gas condensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Poirier, Michael [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-08-11

    The Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The plan for disposition of this stream during baseline operations is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. The primary reason to recycle this stream is so that the semi-volatile 99Tc isotope eventually becomes incorporated into the glass. This stream also contains non-radioactive salt components that are problematic in the melter, so diversion of this stream to another process would eliminate recycling of these salts and would enable simplified operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. This diversion from recycling this stream within WTP would have the effect of decreasing the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. The concept being tested here involves removing the 99Tc so that the decontaminated aqueous stream, with the problematic salts, can be disposed elsewhere.

  13. Mont Terri Project - Ventilation experiment in Opalinus Clay for the disposal of radioactive waste in underground repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayor, J. C. [Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radioactivos SA (ENRESA), Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Sineriz, J. [Asociacion para la Investigacion y Desarollo Industrial de los Recursos Naturales (AITEMIN), Madrid (Spain); Velasco, M. [DM Iberia SA, Madrid (Spain); Gomez-Hernandez, J. [Ingenieria Hidraulica y Medio Ambiente, Escuela de Ingenieros de Caminos (UPV), Valencia (Spain); Lloret, A.; Matray, J.-M. [IRSN/DEI/SARG/LETS, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Coste, F. [Aradis ESG, Sevres Cedex (France); Giraud, A. [LAEGO-ENSG, Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France); Rothfuchs, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Braunschweig (Germany); Marschall, P. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra), Wettingen (Switzerland); Roesli, U. [Solexperts AG, Moenchaltorf (Switzerland); Mayer, G. [Colenco Power Engineering Ltd, Baden (Switzerland)

    2007-07-01

    The ventilation of the underground drifts during the construction and operation of a radioactive waste repository could produce the partial desaturation of the rock around the drifts, modifying its thermo-hydro-mechanical properties, especially in clayey rocks. This change of rock properties may have an impact on the design of the repositories (drifts spacing and repository size), which depends on the thermal load that the clay barrier and the rock can accept. To evaluate 'in situ' and better understand the desaturation process of a hard clay formation, the Ventilation Experiment (VE) has been carried out at the Mont Terri underground laboratory (Switzerland), generating a flow of dry air during several months along a section of a microtunnel. Specifically, the VE test has been performed, under practically isothermal conditions (T {approx_equal} 15-16 {sup o}C), in a 10 m long section of a non-lined horizontal microtunnel (diameter = 1.3 m), excavated in 1999 in the shaly facies of the Opalinus Clay of Mont Terri. The microtunnel is oriented perpendicular to the bedding strike direction of the rock (mean value of the bedding dip {approx_equal} 25{sup o}). The VE experiment real data and its modelling have shown that the desaturation of clayey rocks of low hydraulic conductivity (K < 10{sup -12} m/s) due to ventilation is very small. Under real repository conditions, the thermal and hydro-mechanical rock characteristics will not be practically affected by the ventilation. Specifically, the monitoring of the VE test (mainly the hygrometer data, confirmed also by the geoelectrical measurements) indicates that, after about 5 months of ventilation with almost dry air, the rock relative humidity (and then the degree of saturation) was less than 95% only in a ring of thickness less than 40 cm. Nevertheless, a suction state (subatmospheric liquid pressures) developed up to a distance of about 2 m, but it should be kept in mind that a clayey rock such as the

  14. Dry hyperbaric gas metal arc welding of subsea pipelines: experiments and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azar, Amin S.

    2012-07-01

    amount of dissipated heat from each source should be differentiated. An intermediate heat source model was employed for this purpose. The latter model is after Myhr and Grong that is called distributed point heat sources. This model can be accurately fit to the weld cross section geometry if calibrated accurately. The calibrated parameters were found to be very close to the ones required by Double-ellipsoidal heat source model. By using this approach, not only the effect of welding parameters on weld bead geometry can be categorized, but also the spent time for double-ellipsoidal heat source adjustments will be cut by 90%.A Gaussian heat source was also employed for welding thermal cycle simulations. Accompanying experiments suggested that the thermal gradients hardly change as pressure elevates. However, it was found that the increased pressure level might not necessarily result in higher or lower cooling rates despite the geometrical changes. In a parallel investigation, the metallurgical effect of different shielding environments on phase transformation and mechanical properties of the bead-onplate weld samples was studies. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) techniques were used to identify the effect of five different shielding environments on the phase transformation. Argon and Helium chamber gases offer the conditions that facilitate the highest amount of acicular ferrite transformation, yet, they show some differences in a number of crystallographic details. Co2 gas provided conditions for a lot of porosity in addition to the dominant polygonal ferrite/bainite transformation. He+1/2Co2 mixture resulted in bainite transformation that was found to follow the maximum heat flow direction in terms of crystallographic orientations.(Author)

  15. Characterizing food waste substrates for co-digestion through biochemical methane potential (BMP) experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisboa, Maria Sol; Lansing, Stephanie

    2013-12-01

    Co-digestion of food waste with dairy manure is increasingly utilized to increase energy production and make anaerobic digestion more affordable; however, there is a lack of information on appropriate co-digestion substrates. In this study, biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests were conducted to determine the suitability of four food waste substrates (meatball, chicken, cranberry and ice cream processing wastes) for co-digestion with flushed dairy manure at a ratio of 3.2% food waste and 96.8% manure (by volume), which equated to 14.7% (ice-cream) to 80.7% (chicken) of the VS being attributed to the food waste. All treatments led to increases in methane production, ranging from a 67.0% increase (ice cream waste) to a 2940% increase (chicken processing waste) compared to digesting manure alone, demonstrating the large potential methane production of food waste additions compared to relatively low methane production potential of the flushed dairy manure, even if the overall quantity of food waste added was minimal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Participatory health impact assessment used to support decision-making in waste management planning: A replicable experience from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linzalone, Nunzia; Coi, Alessio; Lauriola, Paolo; Luise, Daniela; Pedone, Alessandra; Romizi, Roberto; Sallese, Domenico; Bianchi, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    The lack of participatory tools in Health Impact Assessment (HIA) to support decision-makers is a critical factor that negatively affects the impacts of waste policies. This study describes the participatory HIA used in deciding on the possible doubling of the municipal solid waste incinerating plant located near the city of Arezzo, Italy. Within the framework of the new waste management plan, a methodology for the democratic participation of stakeholders was designed adopting the Local Agenda 21 methodology. Communication and participation events with the stakeholders were set up from the plan's development to its implementation. Eleven different categories of stakeholders including individual citizens were involved in 21 local events, reaching over 500 participants in three years. Actions were performed to build the commitment and ownership of the local administrators. Then, together with the environment and health agencies and a representative from the local committees, the local administrators collaborated with scientists and technicians in the knowledge-building and scoping stages. Focus groups of voluntary citizens worked together with the researchers to provide qualitative and quantitative evidence in the assessment stage. Periodic public forums were held to discuss processes, methods and findings. The local government authority considered the HIA results in the final decision and a new waste strategy was adopted both in the short term (increased curbside collection, waste sustainability program) and in the long term (limited repowering of the incinerator, new targets for separate collection). In conclusion, an effective participatory HIA was carried out at the municipal level to support decision makers in the waste management plan. The HIA21 study contributed to evidence-based decisions and to make a broadly participatory experience. The authors are confident that these achievements may improve the governance of the waste cycle and the trust in the public

  17. Crystallization In High Level Waste (HLW) Glass Melters: Operational Experience From The Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-02-27

    processing strategy for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The basis of this alternative approach is an empirical model predicting the crystal accumulation in the WTP glass discharge riser and melter bottom as a function of glass composition, time, and temperature. When coupled with an associated operating limit (e.g., the maximum tolerable thickness of an accumulated layer of crystals), this model could then be integrated into the process control algorithms to formulate crystal tolerant high level waste (HLW) glasses targeting higher waste loadings while still meeting process related limits and melter lifetime expectancies. This report provides a review of the scaled melter testing that was completed in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. Testing with scaled melters provided the data to define the DWPF operating limits to avoid bulk (volume) crystallization in the un-agitated DWPF melter and provided the data to distinguish between spinels generated by K-3 refractory corrosion versus spinels that precipitated from the HLW glass melt pool. This report includes a review of the crystallization observed with the scaled melters and the full scale DWPF melters (DWPF Melter 1 and DWPF Melter 2). Examples of actual DWPF melter attainment with Melter 2 are given. The intent is to provide an overview of lessons learned, including some example data, that can be used to advance the development and implementation of an empirical model and operating limit for crystal accumulation for WTP. Operation of the first and second (current) DWPF melters has demonstrated that the strategy of using a liquidus temperature predictive model combined with a 100 °C offset from the normal melter operating temperature of 1150 °C (i.e., the predicted liquidus temperature (TL) of the glass must be 1050 °C or less) has been successful in preventing any detrimental accumulation of spinel in the DWPF melt pool, and spinel has not been

  18. Cassava Sun Drying Performance on Various Surfaces and Drying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    prolong its shelf life, and reduce its bulkiness. Traditional processing ... comparison with drying in a direct box solar dryer; by using trays with various bottom surfaces. The experiments .... experimented sun drying systems. The assessment.

  19. Experiments on torrefied wood pellet: study by gasification and characterization for waste biomass to energy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollinson, Andrew N; Williams, Orla

    2016-05-01

    Samples of torrefied wood pellet produced by low-temperature microwave pyrolysis were tested through a series of experiments relevant to present and near future waste to energy conversion technologies. Operational performance was assessed using a modern small-scale downdraft gasifier. Owing to the pellet's shape and surface hardness, excellent flow characteristics were observed. The torrefied pellet had a high energy density, and although a beneficial property, this highlighted the present inflexibility of downdraft gasifiers in respect of feedstock tolerance due to the inability to contain very high temperatures inside the reactor during operation. Analyses indicated that the torrefaction process had not significantly altered inherent kinetic properties to a great extent; however, both activation energy and pre-exponential factor were slightly higher than virgin biomass from which the pellet was derived. Thermogravimetric analysis-derived reaction kinetics (CO2 gasification), bomb calorimetry, proximate and ultimate analyses, and the Bond Work Index grindability test provided a more comprehensive characterization of the torrefied pellet's suitability as a fuel for gasification and also other combustion applications. It exhibited significant improvements in grindability energy demand and particle size control compared to other non-treated and thermally treated biomass pellets, along with a high calorific value, and excellent resistance to water.

  20. Design of experiment (DOE) based screening of factors affecting municipal solid waste (MSW) composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Khoshrooz; Zhang, Baiyu; Lye, Leonard M; Cai, Qinghong; Cao, Tong

    2016-12-01

    A design of experiment (DOE) based methodology was adopted in this study to investigate the effects of multiple factors and their interactions on the performance of a municipal solid waste (MSW) composting process. The impact of four factors, carbon/nitrogen ratio (C/N), moisture content (MC), type of bulking agent (BA) and aeration rate (AR) on the maturity, stability and toxicity of compost product was investigated. The statistically significant factors were identified using final C/N, germination index (GI) and especially the enzyme activities as responses. Experimental results validated the use of enzyme activities as proper indices during the course of composting. Maximum enzyme activities occurred during the active phase of decomposition. MC has a significant effect on dehydrogenase activity (DGH), β-glucosidase activity (BGH), phosphodiesterase activity (PDE) and the final moisture content of the compost. C/N is statistically significant for final C/N, DGH, BGH, and GI. The results provided guidance to optimize a MSW composting system that will lead to increased decomposition rate and the production of more stable and mature compost. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Experiments on torrefied wood pellet: study by gasification and characterization for waste biomass to energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollinson, Andrew N.; Williams, Orla

    2016-01-01

    Samples of torrefied wood pellet produced by low-temperature microwave pyrolysis were tested through a series of experiments relevant to present and near future waste to energy conversion technologies. Operational performance was assessed using a modern small-scale downdraft gasifier. Owing to the pellet's shape and surface hardness, excellent flow characteristics were observed. The torrefied pellet had a high energy density, and although a beneficial property, this highlighted the present inflexibility of downdraft gasifiers in respect of feedstock tolerance due to the inability to contain very high temperatures inside the reactor during operation. Analyses indicated that the torrefaction process had not significantly altered inherent kinetic properties to a great extent; however, both activation energy and pre-exponential factor were slightly higher than virgin biomass from which the pellet was derived. Thermogravimetric analysis-derived reaction kinetics (CO2 gasification), bomb calorimetry, proximate and ultimate analyses, and the Bond Work Index grindability test provided a more comprehensive characterization of the torrefied pellet's suitability as a fuel for gasification and also other combustion applications. It exhibited significant improvements in grindability energy demand and particle size control compared to other non-treated and thermally treated biomass pellets, along with a high calorific value, and excellent resistance to water. PMID:27293776

  2. Household behaviour and attitudes with respect to recycling food waste--experiences from focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refsgaard, Karen; Magnussen, Kristin

    2009-02-01

    It is a challenge to reduce the ever-increasing flow of waste. In Norway the systems for recycling of organic waste, paper, glass, metals, etc. differ between municipalities, both with regard to organizational and to technological structures. Our hypothesis is that people's attitudes and behaviour may differ with different systems of waste management. People's behaviour and attitudes regarding (organic) waste recycling were investigated in two municipalities with differing technical and organisational systems. Data came from interviews with municipal employees, questionnaires, focus groups and multi-criteria mapping. People seem to be better informed and more positive about organic waste recycling in one of the municipalities (MH, which has recycling of organic waste) than in the other (MS, which has no such recycling). The two municipalities had similar sets of important criteria for waste management (price, environmental friendliness, easy solutions, information). Many participants stated that they had learned from the group process, though only a few reported changed preferences. The institutional context seems to be important for people's behaviour and attitudes towards waste management. This implies that people's recycling behaviour does not only depend on technical and organisational aspects, but also on institutions. These are important messages for policy makers. On an individual basis, the different systems in the two municipalities seem to affect people's stated attitudes. These differences diminish when they are in a common setting where process and dialogue stimulate new thoughts and encourage people to act more altruistically.

  3. Investigating factors influencing construction waste management efforts in developing countries: an experience from Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manowong, Ektewan

    2012-01-01

    Rapid economic growth and urbanization in developing countries lead to extensive construction activities that generate a large amount of waste. A challenge is how to manage construction waste in the most sustainable way. In the developing world, research on construction waste management is scarce and such academic knowledge needs to be responsive to actual practices in the industry in order to be implemented. As construction projects involve a number of participants and stakeholders, their participation and commitment can have a major influence on the goals of green and sustainable construction for urban development. This study provides a significant step in conducting a very first research of this kind in Thailand by aiming to investigate the level of construction stakeholders' commitment as well as the achievement of construction waste management in order to improve short-term practices and to establish a long-term strategic construction waste management plan. In this study, a structural equation model was employed to investigate the influence of factors that are related to environmental aspects, social aspects, and economic aspect of construction waste management. Concern about health and safety was found to be the most significant and dominant influence on the achievement of sustainable construction waste management. Other factors affecting the successful management of construction waste in Thai construction projects were also identified. It is perceived that this study has potential to contribute useful guidelines for practitioners both in Thailand and other developing countries with similar contexts.

  4. Lidar Observations of Tropospheric Aerosols Over Northeastern South Africa During the ARREX and SAFARI-2000 Dry Season Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Spinhirne, James D.; Ji, Qiang; Tsay, Si-Chee; Piketh, Stuart J.; Barenbrug, Marguerite; Holben, Brent; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    During the ARREX-1999 and SAFARI-2000 Dry Season experiments a micropulse lidar (523 nm) instrument was operated at the Skukuza Airport in northeastern South Africa. The Mar was collocated with a diverse array of passive radiometric equipment. For SAFARI-2000 the processed Mar data yields a daytime time-series of layer mean/derived aerosol optical properties, including extinction-to-backscatter ratios and vertical extinction cross-section profile. Combined with 523 run aerosol optical depth and spectral Angstrom exponent calculations from available CIMEL sun-photometer data and normalized broadband flux measurements the temporal evolution of the near surface aerosol layer optical properties is analyzed for climatological trends. For the densest smoke/haze events the extinction-to-backscatter ratio is found to be between 60-80/sr, and corresponding Angstrom exponent calculations near and above 1.75. The optical characteristics of an evolving smoke event from SAFARI-2000 are extensively detailed. The advecting smoke was embedded within two distinct stratified thermodynamic layers, causing the particulate mass to advect over the instrument array in an incoherent manner on the afternoon of its occurrence. Surface broadband flux forcing due to the smoke is calculated, as is the evolution in the vertical aerosol extinction profile as measured by the Han Finally, observations of persistent elevated aerosol during ARREX-1999 are presented and discussed. The lack of corroborating observations the following year makes these observation; both unique and noteworthy in the scope of regional aerosol transport over southern Africa.

  5. How Do You Like Your Science, Wet or Dry? How Two Lab Experiences Influence Student Understanding of Science Concepts and Perceptions of Authentic Scientific Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Maureen; Knuth, Randy; Van Horne, Katie; Shouse, Andrew W.; Levias, Sheldon

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how two kinds of authentic research experiences related to smoking behavior--genotyping human DNA (wet lab) and using a database to test hypotheses about factors that affect smoking behavior (dry lab)--influence students' perceptions and understanding of scientific research and related science concepts. The study used pre and…

  6. Installation of a radioactive waste disposal facility. The necessity of building up durable links between the general public and radioactive waste. Feedback from experience in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comte, Annabelle; Farin, Sebastien [Andra, Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2015-07-01

    2013 has been a banner year for Andra with widespread discussions on the question of long-term management of radioactive waste: a nationwide public discussion about the planned Cigeo deep disposal facility has been organized and national discussions on the energy source transition had inevitably brought up the question of what to do with future radioactive waste to be produced under the various scenarios put forward. In spite of an open institutional framework, with numerous legal provisions for citizen participation, 2013 showed that creation of a radioactive waste disposal facility is not, and cannot be, a question dealt with like breaking news, within a given temporal or spatial perimeter. Any attempts to bring up the subject under the spotlight of public scrutiny inevitably shift the discussions away from their central theme and abandon the underlying question - what should be done with the existing radioactive waste and the waste that is bound to be produced? - to move on to the other major question: ''Should we stop using nuclear power or not?'', which takes us away from our responsibilities towards future generations. Daring to face the question, anchor it in citizen discussions, and create awareness of our duties towards coming generations: this is the challenge that Andra had already set itself several years ago. Our position is a strong one; rather than seeking to mask the problem of radioactive waste, we must face up to our responsibilities: the waste is already there, and we have to do something with it. It will take time to be successful here. Long-term management of radioactive waste is clearly a really long-term matter. All the experience in the field has shown that it involves patience and careful listening, and requires building up a basis for solid trust among the potential neighboring population, who are the most directly concerned. Durable proximity human investment is one of the key factors of success. For over 20 years now

  7. Assessment of a combined dry anaerobic digestion and post-composting treatment facility for source-separated organic household waste, using material and substance flow analysis and life cycle inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Morten Bang; Møller, Jacob; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2017-08-01

    The fate of total solids, volatile solids, total organic carbon, fossil carbon, biogenic carbon and 17 substances (As, Ca, CaCO 3 , Cd, Cl, Cr, Cu, H, Hg, K, Mg, N, Ni, O, P, Pb, S, Zn) in a combined dry anaerobic digestion and post-composting facility were assessed. Mass balances showed good results with low uncertainties for non-volatile substances, while balances for nitrogen, carbon, volatile solids and total organic carbon showed larger but reasonable uncertainties, due to volatilisation and emissions into the air. Material and substance flow analyses were performed in order to obtain transfer coefficients for a combined dry anaerobic digestion and post-composting facility. All metals passed through the facility and ended up in compost or residues, but all concentrations of metals in the compost complied with legislation. About 23% of the carbon content of the organic waste was transferred to the biogas, 24% to the compost, 13% to residues and 40% into the atmosphere. For nitrogen, 69% was transferred to the compost, 10% volatilised to the biofilter, 11% directly into the atmosphere and 10% to residues. Finally, a full life cycle inventory was conducted for the combined dry anaerobic digestion and post-composting facility, including waste received, fuel consumption, energy use, gaseous emissions, products, energy production and chemical composition of the compost produced. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Environmental system analysis of waste management. Experiences from applications of the ORWARE model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoerklund, Anna

    2000-11-01

    Waste management has gone through a history of shifting problems, demands, and strategies over the years. In contrast to the long prevailing view that the problem could be solved by hiding or moving it, waste is now viewed as a problem ranging from local to global concern, and as being an integral part of several sectors in society. Decisive for this view has been society's increasing complexity and thus the increasing complexity of waste, together with a general development of environmental consciousness, moving from local focus on point emission sources, to regional and global issues of more complex nature. This thesis is about the development and application ORWARE; a model for computer aided environmental systems analysis of municipal waste management. Its origin is the hypothesis that widened perspectives are needed in waste management decision-making to avoid severe sub-optimisation of environmental performance. With a strong foundation in life cycle assessment (LCA), ORWARE aims to cover the environmental impacts over the entire life cycle of waste management. It also performs substance flow analysis (SFA) calculations at a rather detailed level of the system. Applying ORWARE has confirmed the importance of applying systems perspective and of taking into account site specific differences in analysis and planning of waste management, rather than relying on overly simplified solutions. Some findings can be generalised and used as guidelines to reduce environmental impact of waste management. Recovery of material and energy resources from waste generally leads to net reductions in energy use and environmental impact, because of the savings this brings about in other sectors. Waste treatment with low rate of energy and materials recovery should therefore be avoided. The exact choice of technology however depends on what products can be recovered and how they are used. Despite the complexity of the model and a certain degree of user unfriendliness, involved

  9. Management of waste generation in the oil refining industry. The PETROBRAS - Henrique Lage Refinery experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, J.I.; Machado, J.B.; Linhares, C.A.; Mazarino, P.R. [PETROBRAS, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). REVAP. Refinaria Henrique Lage

    1993-12-31

    The PETROBRAS - Henrique Lages Refinery - located in Sao Paulo State (Southeast Brazil), has been developing for many years a systematic program for solid, liquid and gaseous wastes generation reduction. The waste minimization management program success has been built due to the structure behavioural modifications due to the new environment protection and quality politics; the training and equipment investments, and operational procedures changes. (author). 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Environmental center for integrated waste management: an experience in the Amazon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaramillo V, Jairo; Banalcazar, Fernando L.; Noboa Garcia, Gabriel [EnCanEcuador S.A., Houston, TX (United States)

    2004-07-01

    The creation of a large amount of both solid and liquid waste within the petroleum industry should be the reason for providing a facility that makes it possible to apply proper treatment to the waste matter, depending on the degree of complexity, especially if these operations are taking place within or in the area of influence of a national park or a biosphere reserve. EnCanEcuador has invested $1 200,000 in the construction of facilities and equipment for an integrated environmental management center, which will allow us to create in-house resources for the management of waste control. Organic waste is grinded, homogenized with sawdust and placed in a dynamic sanitary fill to form fertilizer. The leachates material will be used as foliage fertilizer. Inorganic waste is classified, grinded, compacted, packed and sent to different recycling companies or in some cases incinerated in a low emission incinerator. Drilling waste: Drilling mud water based potassium nitrate is treated through a de-nitrification process using bioremediation methods. Liquid waste: from well completion, washing vehicles, drains from production stations, is passed through an API separator system into two physical-chemical treatment pits for its later re-injection. Contaminated soil: that may be caused by petroleum activity is treated in a pit where the greatest possible amount of hydrocarbon is recovered by means of hot hydro-washing and is then treated with native bacteria in two land farming centers. Dangerous solid waste is transported to a secure fill for its confinement. Laboratory and Meteorological Station: For the control and monitoring of petroleum activities and to determine climatic variations. Plant nursery: it will have a capacity to produce 300,000 plants a year. Community Cooperatives will manage the center, enforcing our Social responsibility in our daily activities. (author)

  11. Development of high-level radioactive waste treatment and conversion technologies 'Dry decontamination technology development for highly radioactive contaminants'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Zin; Lee, K. W.; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. J.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K

    2001-04-01

    The followings were studied through the project entitled 'Dry Decontamination Technology Development for Highly Radioactive Contaminants'. 1.Contaminant Characteristics Analysis of Domestic Nuclear Fuel Cycle Projects(NFCP) and Applicability Study of the Unit Dry-Decontamination Techniques A. Classification of contaminated equipments and characteristics analysis of contaminants B. Applicability study of the unit dry-decontamination techniques 2.Performance Evaluation of Unit Dry Decontamination Technique A. PFC decontamination technique B. CO2 decontamination technique C. Plasma decontamination technique 3.Development of Residual Radiation Assessment Methodology for High Radioactive Facility Decontamination A. Development of radioactive nuclide diffusion model on highly radioactive facility structure B. Obtainment of the procedure for assessment of residual radiation dose 4.Establishment of the Design Concept of Dry Decontamination Process Equipment Applicable to Highly Radioactive Contaminants 5.TRIGA soil unit decontamination technology development A. Development of soil washing and flushing technologies B. Development of electrokinetic soil decontamination technology.

  12. Landfill leachate treatment using wetlands: experiences in Piraí municipality solid waste landfill and Gramacho metropolitan solid waste landfill

    OpenAIRE

    Camille Ferreira Mannarino; João Alberto Ferreira; Juacyara Carbonelli Campos; Elisabeth Ritter

    2006-01-01

    O Grupo de Resíduos Sólidos do Programa de Pós-Graduação em Engenharia Ambiental (PEAMB/UERJ) vem realizando, há cinco anos, pesquisas utilizando wetlands construídos em tratamento de lixiviados de aterros sanitários. Esses sistemas promovem a absorção de nutrientes pelas plantas e facilitam a degradação de material orgânico por microrganismos do solo e aderidos às raízes. Experiências desenvolvidas no Aterro Sanitário de Piraí mostram remoções, em termos de concentração de poluentes, de 41% ...

  13. International experience of Foster Wheeler in the incineration of urban solid wastes; Experiencia internacional de Foster Wheeler en el campo de la incineracion de residuos solidos urbanos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisen, C.; Florez, J. M.

    1996-12-01

    The enterprise Foster Wheeler presents its experience on incineration or urban solid wastes. The main examples of construction in the international area are the Camden and the Valorsul plants. (Author)

  14. Small-scale medical waste incinerators: experiences and trials in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rogers, DEC

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available with identical waste loads (Brent and Rogers, 1999b,c). C15 Qualitative (Phillips et al., 1999) and quantitative analy- ses (Brent et al., 1999) of the performance of the incin- erators during their use at actual clinics, with guidelines on waste loading... residual (waste) % 14.8 12.9 15.6 21.7 ? Cl as HCl mg/Nm3 46 13 25 35 & 542 <30 F as HF mg/Nm3 <6 <1 <2 <1 <30 Chromium (Cr)c mg/Nm3 <0.1 0.7 0.7 <0.1. 0.5 Manganese (Mn)c mg/Nm3 <0.1 0.3 0.3 <0.1 0.5 Nickel (Ni)c mg/Nm3 <0.1 0.3 <0.1 <0.1 0.5 Vanadium (V)c...

  15. Dry ice blasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonergan, Jeffrey M.

    1992-04-01

    As legal and societal pressures against the use of hazardous waste generating materials has increased, so has the motivation to find safe, effective, and permanent replacements. Dry ice blasting is a technology which uses CO2 pellets as a blasting medium. The use of CO2 for cleaning and stripping operations offers potential for significant environmental, safety, and productivity improvements over grit blasting, plastic media blasting, and chemical solvent cleaning. Because CO2 pellets break up and sublime upon impact, there is no expended media to dispose of. Unlike grit or plastic media blasting which produce large quantities of expended media, the only waste produced by CO2 blasting is the material removed. The quantity of hazardous waste produced, and thus the cost of hazardous waste disposal is significantly reduced.

  16. Patient preferences for dry powder inhaler attributes in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in France: a discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawken, Natalia; Torvinen, Saku; Neine, Mohamed-Elmoctar; Amri, Ikbel; Toumi, Mondher; Aballéa, Samuel; Plich, Adam; Roche, Nicolas

    2017-07-06

    Dry powder inhalers (DPIs) are often used in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) therapies. Using the discrete choice experiment (DCE) methodology, this study conducted in France was designed to assess patients' preferences for different attributes of DPIs. Attributes of DPIs were defined based on a literature review, patient focus group discussions and interviews with healthcare professionals (qualitative phase of the study). An online survey was then conducted among French patients with asthma or COPD to elicit patient preferences and willingness to pay (WTP) for these attributes using the DCE methodology (quantitative phase). A fractional factorial design including three blocks of 12 choice sets was created. Each choice set comprised three alternatives: two fictitious inhalers and the patient's current inhaler. Marginal utilities were estimated using a ranked ordered logit model. Interactions between attributes and disease (asthma or COPD) were tested. Six DPI attributes were defined based on the qualitative phase: ease of use/fool-proof priming; accurate and easy-to-read dose counter; dose confirmation; hygiene of the mouthpiece; flexibility of the device handling; ability to use the inhaler with breathing difficulties. Overall, 201 patients with asthma and 93 with COPD were included in the online survey. Patients with asthma placed most value on an inhaler that requires one step for dose preparation (WTP €4.83 [95% CI: €3.77-€5.90], relative to an inhaler requiring four steps) and one that could be used during episodes of breathing difficulties (WTP €4.49 [95% CI: €2.95-€6.02]). Patients with COPD placed most value on an inhaler that could be used during episodes of breathing difficulties (WTP €7.70 [95% CI: €5.65-€9.76]) and on the accuracy of the dose counter (WTP €5.87 [95% CI: €3.98-€ 7.77]). This study suggests that asthma and COPD patients would be willing to change their inhaler if they were offered the option

  17. Experiment, modeling and optimization of liquid phase adsorption of Cu(II) using dried and carbonized biomass of Lyngbya majuscula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Deepika; Dutta, Susmita

    2017-05-01

    The present work aims at evaluation of the potential of cyanobacterial biomass to remove Cu(II) from simulated wastewater. Both dried and carbonized forms of Lyngbya majuscula, a cyanobacterial strain, have been used for such purpose. The influences of different experimental parameters viz., initial Cu(II) concentration, solution pH and adsorbent dose have been examined on sorption of Cu(II). Kinetic and equilibrium studies on Cu(II) removal from simulated wastewater have been done using both dried and carbonized biomass individually. Pseudo-second-order model and Langmuir isotherm have been found to fit most satisfactorily to the kinetic and equilibrium data, respectively. Maximum 87.99 and 99.15 % of Cu(II) removal have been achieved with initial Cu(II) concentration of 10 and 25 mg/L for dried and carbonized algae, respectively, at an adsorbent dose of 10 g/L for 20 min of contact time and optimum pH 6. To optimize the removal process, Response Surface Methodology has been employed using both the dried and carbonized biomass. Removal with initial Cu(II) concentration of 20 mg/L, with 0.25 g adsorbent dose in 50 mL solution at pH 6 has been found to be optimum with both the adsorbents. This is the first ever attempt to make a comparative study on Cu(II) removal using both dried algal biomass and its activated carbon. Furthermore, regeneration of matrix was attempted and more than 70% and 80% of the adsorbent has been regenerated successfully in the case of dried and carbonized biomass respectively upto the 3rd cycle of regeneration study.

  18. The role of laboratory analog experiments in assessing the performance of waste package materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunnane, J.C.; Bates, J.K.

    1990-12-31

    There is an immediate need to begin to validate models that can be used for assessing the performance of waste package materials in an unsaturated repository environment. This paper examines available testing information and testing approaches that could support validation of models for engineering barrier system (EBS) radionuclide release. The content is presented in the context of the general methodology that has been proposed for validating performance assessment models. Available experimental observations are used to test some of the EBS release rate modeling premises. These observations include evidence of fluid film formation on waste glass surfaces in isothermal humid environments, accelerated waste glass reaction rates under repository service conditions of large glass surface area to water volume ratio, and mobilization of radionuclides as solutes and colloids. It is concluded that some important modeling premises may not be consistent with available experimental information. However, it is also concluded that future laboratory testing, which simulates the integrated waste package systems, is needed to evaluate the significance of these inconsistencies and to test the system level models. A small-scale apparatus which was developed and tested to examine the feasibility of laboratory analog testing for the unsaturated Yucca Mountain repository environment is described. 16 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF AN EXPERIMENT FOR ASSESSING CYANIDE IN GOLD MINING WASTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold mining wastes treated by heap leaching cyanidization typically contain several metallo-cyanide species. Accurate measurement of total cyanide by the most common methods in such a case may be hampered by the inadequate recoveries that occur for certain cyanide compounds (e.g....

  20. Exploring Effective Incentive Design to Reduce Food Waste: A Natural Experiment of Policy Change from Community Based Charge to RFID Based Weight Charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabinne Lee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This research explores the impact of the Radio Frequency Identification (RFID Household-Based Food Waste Charging System (RHWC on the reduction of food waste in Mapo-Gu district located in Seoul city from June 2013 to July 2016. Through comparing the amount of food waste disposal between 12 apartment complexes with the RHWC policy (treatment group and 61 apartment complexes (control group without the policy, we attempt to identify whether the RHWC can contribute in reducing food waste. In June 2013, all these apartment complexes adopted an apartment complex unit-based food-waste system (i.e., Community-Based Waste Charging system-CWC, but, in January 2016, the 12 apartment complexes introduced the RHWC policy, while the other 61 apartment complexes kept the CWC policy. This natural experiment setting allows us to compare the difference in the quantity of food waste disposal between these two payment policies. The RHWC uses a weight based payment design, through which each household is electronically charged for the weight of food waste they disposes, while the CWC uses a group incentive system where residents pay the same price by dividing total amount of waste charge by total number of household in apartment complex. We, relying on propensity score matching and Difference-In-Difference (PSM-DID methodology, found a significant difference in the amount of food waste disposal between these two payment systems. Our empirical finding shows that the RHWC deign can reduce more food waste than the CWC design. This study suggests that municipalities can reduce food waste through redesigning incentive mechanism in which it is able to reduce free riding by electronically identifying and monitoring how much residents throw out thanks to RFID technology.

  1. As(V)/Cr(VI) retention on un-amended and waste-amended soil samples: competitive experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Pérez, Ivana M; Conde-Cid, Manuel; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; Fernández-Sanjurjo, María J; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Esperanza; Núñez-Delgado, Avelino

    2017-01-01

    Focusing on simultaneous arsenic and chromium pollution, we used batch-type experiments to study As(V)/Cr (VI) competitive sorption on soil samples, pyritic material, mussel shell, oak ash, pine bark and hemp waste, as well as on binary mixtures (50 % mussel shell and 50 % another material-oak ash, pine bark, or hemp waste), and on forest and vineyard soil samples and pyritic material amended with 48 t ha(-1) of mussel shell, oak ash, pine bark, or hemp waste. Equal As(V) and Cr(VI) concentrations (0 to 6 mmol L(-1)) were added to the individual materials, binary mixtures, and 48 t ha(-1) amended materials. The individual forest soil sample, pyritic material, and oak ash showed clearly higher As(V) sorption, whereas Cr(VI) sorption was higher on pine bark. Sorption was up to 50 % higher for As(V) than for Cr(VI) on the forest soil sample, oak ash, and pyritic material, while pine bark sorbed 95 % more Cr(VI). Regarding binary mixtures, the presence of mussel shell increased As(V) sorption on pine bark and Cr(VI) sorption on hemp waste. As regards the amendments, in the case of the forest soil sample, the amendments with oak ash and mussel shell increased As(V) sorption, while pine bark amendment increased Cr(VI) sorption; in the vineyard soil sample, the mussel shell amendment increased As(V) sorption; in the pyritic material, pine bark amendment increased Cr(VI) sorption. These results could be useful to appropriately manage the soils and individual or mixed by-products assayed when As(V) and Cr(VI) pollution occurs.

  2. Preferential flow in municipal solid waste and implications for long-term leachate quality: valuation of laboratory-scale experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosqvist, N H; Dollar, L H; Fourie, A B

    2005-08-01

    In this paper, we study and quantify pollutant concentrations after long-term leaching at relatively low flow rates and residual concentrations after heavy flushing of a 0.14 m3 municipal solid waste sample. Moreover, water flow and solute transport through preferential flow paths are studied by model interpretation of experimental break-through curves (BTCs), generated by tracer tests. In the study it was found that high concentrations of chloride remain after several pore volumes of water have percolated through the waste sample. The residual concentration was found to be considerably higher than can be predicted by degradation models. For model interpretations of the experimental BTCs, two probabilistic model approaches were applied, the transfer function model and the Lagrangian transport formulation. The experimental BTCs indicated the presence of preferential flow through the waste mass and the model interpretation of the BTCs suggested that between 19 and 41% of the total water content participated in the transport of solute through preferential flow paths. In the study, the occurrence of preferential flow was found to be dependent on the flow rate in the sense that a high flow rate enhances the preferential flow. However, to fully quantify the possible dependence between flow rate and preferential flow, experiments on a broader range of experimental conditions are suggested. The chloride washout curve obtained over the 4-year study period shows that as a consequence of the water flow in favoured flow paths, bypassing other parts of the solid waste body, the leachate quality may reflect only the flow paths and their surroundings. The results in this study thus show that in order to improve long-term prediction of the leachate quality and quantity the magnitude of the preferential water flow through a landfill must be taken into account.

  3. Effect of microwave- and microwave-convection drying conditions on the total soluble phenolic content of 2-phase olive mill waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    The California olive oil industry produces tons of 2-phase olive mill waste (2POMW) every year as a byproduct of the olive oil milling process. 2POMW is rich in health-promoting phenolic compounds, but it is greater than 60% moisture (wet basis) in its native form and thus expensive to store and tr...

  4. Crystallization in high level waste (HLW) glass melters: Savannah River Site operational experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Kevin M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Peeler, David K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-06-12

    This paper provides a review of the scaled melter testing that was completed for design input to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. Testing with prototype melters provided the data to define the DWPF operating limits to avoid bulk (volume) crystallization in the un-agitated DWPF melter and provided the data to distinguish between spinels generated by refractory corrosion versus spinels that precipitated from the HLW glass melt pool. A review of the crystallization observed with the prototype melters and the full-scale DWPF melters (DWPF Melter 1 and DWPF Melter 2) is included. Examples of actual DWPF melter attainment with Melter 2 are given. The intent is to provide an overview of lessons learned, including some example data, that can be used to advance the development and implementation of an empirical model and operating limit for crystal accumulation for a waste treatment and immobilization plant.

  5. Cold-cap reactions in vitrification of nuclear waste glass: experiments and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Jaehun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pierce, David A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pokorny, Richard [Inst. of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Hrma, Pavel R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pohang Univ. of Science and Techology (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-01

    Cold-cap reactions are multiple overlapping reactions that occur in the waste-glass melter during the vitrification process when the melter feed is being converted to molten glass. In this study, we used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to investigate cold-cap reactions in a high-alumina high-level waste melter feed. To separate the reaction heat from both sensible heat and experimental instability, we employed the run/rerun method, which enabled us to define the degree of conversion based on the reaction heat and to estimate the heat capacity of the reacting feed. Assuming that the reactions are nearly independent and can be approximated by the nth order kinetics, we obtained the kinetic parameters using the Kissinger method combined with least squares analysis. The resulting mathematical simulation of the cold-cap reactions provides a key element for the development of an advanced cold-cap model.

  6. Clinical experiences: development of a medical surveillance protocol for hazardous waste workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favata, E A; Barnhart, S; Bresnitz, E A; Campbell, V; Hoffman, B H; Pepper, L; Sokas, R

    1990-01-01

    Medical surveillance of hazardous waste workers is essential for the health of these workers, who have unique, complex exposures. In order for this preventive tool to be effective, the supervising and/or examining physician must be educated about the specific health risks of hazardous waste workers and also must perform a comprehensive examination. Results of testing should be evaluated both for remarkable abnormalities as well as longitudinal subtle changes in individuals, and also for trends in workers with similar exposures. Fitness for duty determinations should be then made with appropriate communication of abnormalities and follow-up recommendations to both employers and employees. To date, clinical and research findings from clinical centers performing surveillance examinations on hazardous waste workers have not revealed remarkable abnormalities related to their potential exposures. The possible causes for these results include: (1) the workers have been well protected; (2) the current diagnostic methodologies are not sensitive enough to detect pathophysiologic changes; and (3) disease may not yet be manifest due to latency or cumulative effects of long-term low-dose exposure. In addition, one must keep in mind that previous clinical and research data were collected from test results of workers who were mainly involved in feasibility, as opposed to remediation, activities. With the prospective change of more clean-up involvement of hazardous waste workers, their potential for exposure may increase. Therefore, periodic collaborative evaluation of existing surveillance programs' results (e.g., every 5 years) is advised. This would allow determination of the efficacy of the current diagnostic methods in detecting disease, as well as the possible inclusion of more sensitive and/or specific newer technologies for use on a more routine basis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. On performance experience and measurements with Ningyo Waste Assay System (NWAS)

    OpenAIRE

    在間 直樹; 中島 伸一; 金田 弘司; 門 一実

    2011-01-01

    The uranium mass assay systems for 200-litter wastes drums applied neutron and gamma measurements by NDA method had been developed. The measurement systems and trial data are described in this preliminary report. The systems are composed of the 16 pieces of helium-3 proportional counters for neutron detection and a large sized NaI(Tl) scintillation detector for gamma ray detection. The extensive testing trials using the calibrated uranium sources with different enrichment and some kinds of ma...

  8. Experiment on the treatment of waste extraction solvent from the molybdenum-99 process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsien-Ming Hsiao; Chang-Liang Hu; Kuang-Li Chien; Wen-Cheng Lee; Tsong-Yang Wei [Division of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, P.O. Box 3-7, Longtan 32546 Taiwan (China)

    2013-07-01

    In the Mo-99 (Molybdenum-99) isotope extraction test process for radiopharmaceutical applications, organic solvent is used to extract Mo-99 from an irradiated UO{sub 2} dissolution. The extraction solvent was stored when the test work was stopped. A total of about 120 liters of waste solvent was stored at INER (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan). The extraction solvent consisted of 5% di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) and kerosene. The radionuclides found in the waste solvent include Cs-137, Am-241, Tc-99, and Sr-90, which give off gross alpha and beta radioactivity of 1898 and 471 Bq/ml, respectively. This study aims to remove radionuclides from the waste solvent using sodium carbonate and sodium hydroxide solutions in different concentrations. After mixing the waste solvent with the alkaline solution followed by settling, a third phase other than organic and aqueous phase appeared which is expected due to the saponification reaction. The experimental results showed that increasing the number of washing and the alkaline solution concentration could enhance the radionuclides removal rate. An optimal removal method was proposed using 2 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution twice followed by 1 M NaOH solution one time for the third phase generated early in the mixing stages. The remaining gross alpha and beta radioactivity of the treated organic solvent was 2 and 3 Bq/ml, respectively. The treated solvent could be stabilized by ashing at 500 deg. C and then immobilized. The alkaline solution would be neutralized by hydrochloric or nitric acid and then treated using a variety of adsorbents or bone char via adsorption to remove nuclides to meet the wastewater discharge limitation. (authors)

  9. "Brain drain" and "brain waste": experiences of international medical graduates in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofters, Aisha; Slater, Morgan; Fumakia, Nishit; Thulien, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    "Brain drain" is a colloquial term used to describe the migration of health care workers from low-income and middle-income countries to higher-income countries. The consequences of this migration can be significant for donor countries where physician densities are already low. In addition, a significant number of migrating physicians fall victim to "brain waste" upon arrival in higher-income countries, with their skills either underutilized or not utilized at all. In order to better understand the phenomena of brain drain and brain waste, we conducted an anonymous online survey of international medical graduates (IMGs) from low-income and middle-income countries who were actively pursuing a medical residency position in Ontario, Canada. Approximately 6,000 physicians were contacted by email and asked to fill out an online survey consisting of closed-ended and open-ended questions. The data collected were analyzed using both descriptive statistics and a thematic analysis approach. A total of 483 IMGs responded to our survey and 462 were eligible for participation. Many were older physicians who had spent a considerable amount of time and money trying to obtain a medical residency position. The top five reasons for respondents choosing to emigrate from their home country were: socioeconomic or political situations in their home countries; better education for children; concerns about where to raise children; quality of facilities and equipment; and opportunities for professional advancement. These same reasons were the top five reasons given for choosing to immigrate to Canada. Themes that emerged from the qualitative responses pertaining to brain waste included feelings of anger, shame, desperation, and regret. Respondents overwhelmingly held the view that there are not enough residency positions available in Ontario and that this information is not clearly communicated to incoming IMGs. Brain waste appears common among IMGs who immigrate to Canada and should be

  10. Research experiences on the reuse of industrial waste for concrete production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbà Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of concrete production using different kinds of industrial wastes as “recycled aggregate”. The wastes studied in this work were: fly ashes and slags from Electric Arc Furnace (EAF steel plant; foundry sands produced from foundry dies; slags from lead processing; Waelz slags; solid residues from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI plant (with mass-burning kiln and fluidized bed reactor; sludge from industrial wastewater treatment plants. Good compressive strength (similar to natural concrete was achieved after 28 days of curing by concrete mixtures obtained with the partial replacement (from 7% to 40% by weight of natural aggregates with slags from lead processing, foundry sands, Waelz slags and bottom ashes from MSW incineration. The worst mechanical and leaching behaviours were shown by concrete samples containing EAF fly ashes and sludge from industrial wastewater treatment. For the residues with the best performance, concrete products (kerbs and flat tiles were casted. Their mechanical and leaching characterization has shown that the reuse of these residues for concrete product is feasible.

  11. Cold-cap reactions in vitrification of nuclear waste glass: Experiments and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Jaehun; Pierce, David A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Pokorný, Richard [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Hrma, Pavel, E-mail: pavelhrma@postech.ac.kr [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: ► We measured enthalpy-based conversion degree of overlapping reactions using DSC. ► We employed the run/rerun technique to obtain heat flow associated with reactions. ► Batch-to-glass conversion advances via multiple overlapping reactions. ► The kinetic model is intended for the source term in the energy transfer equation. ► The results are relevant for industrial glass making and nuclear waste vitrification. - Abstract: Cold-cap reactions are multiple overlapping reactions that occur in the waste-glass melter during the vitrification process when the melter feed is being converted to molten glass. In this study, we used simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry–thermogravimetry (DSC–TGA) to investigate cold-cap reactions in a high-alumina high-level waste melter feed. To separate the reaction heat from both the heat associated with the heat capacity of the feed and experimental artifacts, we employed the run/rerun method, which enabled us to define the degree of conversion based on the reaction heat and to estimate the heat capacity of the reacting feed. Assuming that the reactions are nearly independent and can be approximated by an nth order kinetic model, we obtained the kinetic parameters using the Kissinger method combined with least squares analysis. The resulting mathematical simulation of the cold-cap reactions provides a key element for the development of an advanced cold-cap model.

  12. Treatment of Sludge Produced From AL-Dubaiee Station using Drying Beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    مزهر ابراهيم

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present drying beds of Al-Dubaiee waste water treatment station is not enough, thus, the present study is performed. In this work, many experiments have been made in order to find out the optimum thickness of the drying bed and to find suitable filtration agents from local materials. Moreover the effect of flocculent agents is tested. The results show that optimum thickness is 30 cm of brick and 25 cm of sand. Ferric concentration of 100 mg/l gives the best results. It is also found that drying efficiency is improved with reducing specific filtration resistance. The effluent waste water is found suitable for agriculture purpose concerned heavy metal concentration. Special drying bed (handy slop towards center is constructed and it is found that the required area is reduced by 50%.

  13. Treatment of sludge produced from AL-Dubaiee Station using Drying beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Taha Hamood

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present drying beds of Al-dubaiee waste water treatment station is not enough, thus, the present study is performed. In this work, many experiments have been made in order to find out the optimum thickness of the drying bed and to find suitable filtration agents from local materials. Moreover the effect of flocculent agents is tested. The results show that optimum thickness is 30 cm of brick and 25 cm of sand. Ferric concentration of 100 mg/l gives the best results. It is also found that drying efficiency is improved with reducing specific filtration resistance. The effluent waste water is found suitable for agriculture purpose concerned heavy metal concentration. special drying bed (handy slop towards center is constructed and it is found that the required area is reduced by 50%.

  14. Main outcomes from in situ thermo-hydro-mechanical experiments programme to demonstrate feasibility of radioactive high-level waste disposal in the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Armand

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the context of radioactive waste disposal, an underground research laboratory (URL is a facility in which experiments are conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of constructing and operating a radioactive waste disposal facility within a geological formation. The Meuse/Haute-Marne URL is a site-specific facility planned to study the feasibility of a radioactive waste disposal in the Callovo-Oxfordian (COx claystone. The thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM behaviour of the host rock is significant for the design of the underground nuclear waste disposal facility and for its long-term safety. The French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra has begun a research programme aiming to demonstrate the relevancy of the French high-level waste (HLW concept. This paper presents the programme implemented from small-scale (small diameter boreholes to full-scale demonstration experiments to study the THM effects of the thermal transient on the COx claystone and the strategy implemented in this new programme to demonstrate and optimise current disposal facility components for HLW. It shows that the French high-level waste concept is feasible and working in the COx claystone. It also exhibits that, as for other plastic clay or claystone, heating-induced pore pressure increases and that the THM behaviour is anisotropic.

  15. Nitrogen turnover, crop use efficiency and soil fertility in a long-term field experiment amended with different qualities of urban and agricultural waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez Muñoz, Beatriz; Magid, Jakob; Jensen, Lars Stoumann

    2017-01-01

    Organic wastes contain significant amounts of organic matter and nutrients and their recycling into agriculture can potentially contribute to closing the natural ecological cycle. The aim of this study was to evaluate the improvement in overall soil fertility and soil nitrogen (N) supply capacity...... availability, crop uptake and NUE the most, while the most C-rich and high C:N organic wastes (cattle deep litter and household waste compost) had a negative effect on crop NUE over time....... in a long-term field experiment with repeated application of different urban and agricultural organic waste amendments. Soils from the CRUCIAL field experiment in Denmark, in which diverse types of urban (human urine, sewage sludge, composted household waste) and agricultural wastes (cattle slurry, farmyard...... manure and deep litter) have been applied annually for 11 years (at normal and accelerated rates), were used to estimate the effects of the different qualities of organic wastes on soil fertility, N turnover and crop N availability. Soil physical fertility parameters, such as water retention and total...

  16. Radioactive Dry Process Material Treatment Technology Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. J.; Hung, I. H.; Kim, K. K. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The project 'Radioactive Dry Process Material Treatment Technology Development' aims to be normal operation for the experiments at DUPIC fuel development facility (DFDF) and safe operation of the facility through the technology developments such as remote operation, maintenance and pair of the facility, treatment of various high level process wastes and trapping of volatile process gases. DUPIC Fuel Development Facility (DFDF) can accommodate highly active nuclear materials, and now it is for fabrication of the oxide fuel by dry process characterizing the proliferation resistance. During the second stage from march 2005 to February 2007, we carried out technology development of the remote maintenance and the DFDF's safe operation, development of treatment technology for process off-gas, and development of treatment technology for PWR cladding hull and the results was described in this report.

  17. Environmental impact of rejected materials generated in organic fraction of municipal solid waste anaerobic digestion plants: Comparison of wet and dry process layout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colazo, Ana-Belén; Sánchez, Antoni; Font, Xavier; Colón, Joan

    2015-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion of source separated organic fraction of municipal solid waste is an increasing waste valorization alternative instead of incineration or landfilling of untreated biodegradable wastes. Nevertheless, a significant portion of biodegradable wastes entering the plant is lost in pre-treatments and post-treatments of anaerobic digestion facilities together with other improper materials such as plastics, paper, textile materials and metals. The rejected materials lost in these stages have two main implications: (i) less organic material enters to digesters and, as a consequence, there is a loss of biogas production and (ii) the rejected materials end up in landfills or incinerators contributing to environmental impacts such as global warming or eutrophication. The main goals of this study are (i) to estimate potential losses of biogas in the rejected solid materials generated during the pre- and post-treatments of two full-scale anaerobic digestion facilities and (ii) to evaluate the environmental burdens associated to the final disposal (landfill or incineration) of these rejected materials by means of Life Cycle Assessment. This study shows that there is a lost of potential biogas production, ranging from 8% to 15%, due to the loss of organic matter during pre-treatment stages in anaerobic digestion facilities. From an environmental point of view, the Life Cycle Assessment shows that the incineration scenario is the most favorable alternative for eight out of nine impact categories compared with the landfill scenario. The studied impact categories are Climate Change, Fossil depletion, Freshwater eutrophication, Marine eutrophication, Ozone depletion, Particulate matter formation, Photochemical oxidant formation, Terrestrial acidification and Water depletion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Biodegradation of Agro-industrial Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kučić

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of agro-industrial waste is growing worldwide and these wastes cannot be disposed on the ground without treatment. The objective of this work was to conduct composting process and anaerobic digestion of a mixture of agro-industrial waste (W, grape (GW, olive (OW and tobacco (TW waste. The composting process and anaerobic digestion of the mixture of GW, OW and TW in the ratio GW:OW:TW = 1:1:1.98 (dry matter were carried out in column reactors with effective volume of 10 dm3 and 124 cm3, respectively, during 21 days. The composting experiment was carried out under forced aeration, while anaerobic digestion was conducted without aeration at temperature of 37 °C in anaerobic digester. Three different anaerobic experiments were conducted, without inoculum (E1 and with different ratio of inoculum and waste (E2, E3. During 21 days of composting of agro-industrial waste, the obtained conversion was 50 %. The volume of biogas produced during 21 days in experiments E1, E2 and E3 was 256 cm3, 280 cm3 and 162 cm3, respectively.

  19. Cassava Sun Drying Performance on Various Surfaces and Drying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cassava Sun Drying Performance on Various Surfaces and Drying Bed Depths. ... Tanzania Journal of Agricultural Sciences ... The experiments were done using kiroba cassava variety obtained from the University farm, which was peeled and sliced into thin chips (2-3 mm) then sun dried on wire mesh, black polythene, ...

  20. Experimenting with Different Bulking Agents in an Aerobic Food Waste Composter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chann, S.

    2016-12-01

    With one third of Hong Kong's solid wastage being food scraps, reducing food waste has become crucial. The ISF Academy, a Hong Kong private school, had an A900 Rocket Food Composter installed in 2013, hoping to reduce its carbon footprint. The 27 metric tons of food wastage produced annually by the school is put through an aerobic process and the wastage is converted into humus. The composter has a capacity of 1750 litres of food and it produces humus every 14 days. The base of the humus consists of a bulking agent and food waste (2:1). A bulking agent is a carbon based material used to absorb moisture and odors, add structure and air and eliminate bugs from humus. This study contains comparative data on a few of the listed bulking agents: Hemp, Kenaf, rapeseed oil straw, miscanthus and shredded cardboard. The aim of this study is to determine an alternative reliable, affordable and suitable bulking agent to wood shavings: the current agent used. The humus produced must pass regulations for "general agricultural use" as it is used for experiential learning and gardening with primary school students. Over 500 children are participating in the school's plantation project, producing legumes for the school cafeteria. ISF pioneers and sets an example for other Hong Kong schools, showing that a composting and plantation scheme, not only proves to have environmental benefits but also educational uses.

  1. Succession change of microorganisms on plant waste decomposition in simulation modelling field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Julia; Perminova, Evgenia; Khabibullina, Fluza; Kovaleva, Vera; Lapteva, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Plant waste decomposition processes are closely associated with living activity of soil microbiota in aboveground ecosystems. Functional activity of microorganisms and soil invertebrates determines plant material transformation rate whereby changes in plant material chemical composition during destruction - succession change of soil biota. The purpose of the work was revealing the mechanism of microorganisms succession change during plant waste decomposition in middle-taiga green-moss spruce forests and coniferous-deciduous secondary stands formed after earlier cut bilberry spruce forests. The study materials were undisturbed bilberry spruce forest (Sample Plot 1 - SP1) and coniferous-deciduous secondary stands which were formed after tree cutting activities of 2001-2002 (SP2) and 1969 and 1970 (SP3). Plant material decomposition intensity was determined in microcosms isolated into kapron bags with cell size of 1 mm. At SP1 and SP2, test material was living mosses and at SP3 - fallen birch and aspen leaves. Every test material was exposed for 2 years. Destruction rate was calculated as a weight loss for a particular time period. Composition of micromycetes which participated in plant material decomposition was assessed by the method of inoculation of soil extract to Getchinson's medium and acidified Czapek's medium (pH=4.5). Microbe number and biomass was analyzed by the method of luminescent microscopy. Chemical analysis of plant material was done in the certified Ecoanalytical Laboratory of the Institute of Biology Komi SC UrD RAS. Finally, plant material destruction intensity was similar for study plots and comprised 40-44 % weight loss for 2 years. The strongest differences in plant material decomposition rate between undisturbed spruce forests and secondary after-cut stands were observed at first stages of destruction process. In the first exposition year, mineralizing processes were most active in undisturbed spruce forest. Decomposition rate in cuts at that

  2. Certifying the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Lessons Learned from the WIPP Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, D.R.(Rip); Chu, Margaret S.Y.; Froehlich, Gary K.; Howard, Bryan A.; Howarth, Susan M.; Larson, Kurt W.; Pickering, Susan Y.; Swift, Peter N.

    1999-07-13

    In May 1998, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as being in compliance with applicable long-term regulations governing the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel, high-level, and transuranic radioactive wastes. The WIPP is the first deep geologic repository in the US to have successfully demonstrated regulatory compliance with long-term radioactive waste disposal requirements. The first disposal of TRU waste at WIPP occurred on March 26, 1999. Many of the lessons learned during the WIPP Project's transition from site characterization and experimental research to the preparation of a successful application may be of general interest to other repository programs. During a four-year period (1992 to 1996), the WIPP team [including the DOE Carlsbad Area Office (CAO), the science advisor to CAO, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the management and operating contractor of the WIPP site, Westinghouse Electric Corporation (WID)] met its aggressive schedule for submitting the application without compromising the integrity of the scientific basis for the long-term safety of the repository. Strong leadership of the CAO-SNL-WID team was essential. Within SNL, a mature and robust performance assessment (PA) allowed prioritization of remaining scientific activities with respect to their impact on regulatory compliance. Early and frequent dialog with EPA staff expedited the review process after the application was submitted. Questions that faced SNL are familiar to geoscientists working in site evaluation projects. What data should be gathered during site characterization? How can we know when data are sufficient? How can we know when our understanding of the disposal system is sufficient to support our conceptual models? What constitutes adequate ''validation'' of conceptual models for processes that act over geologic time? How should we use peer review

  3. Quantitative studies and taste reconstitution experiments of the sour and lingering mouthful orosensation in a debittered extract of traditional Japanese dried and fermented skipjack tuna (hongarebushi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseleu, Gesa; Lubian, Elisabetta; Mueller, Stefan; Shi, Feng; Koenig, Thorsten

    2013-04-03

    Hongarebushi, Japanese dried skipjack tuna and a high quality ingredient of Japanese dashi, was investigated for its taste active composition. The recent investigation focused on a debittered fish fraction, which revealed a strong umami and salt impact accompanied with a pleasant and pronounced sourness. Whereas the umami and salt tastes could be correlated to monosodium glutamate (MSG), ribonucleotides, and mineral salts, the pleasant sourness was not exclusively induced by organic acids. The essential compound imparting the sour orosensation, persistence, and mouthfulness of the debittered skipjack tuna extract was investigated, and omission experiments emphasized the impact of N-acetylglutamic acid (NAG) on the overall taste sensation of the debittered fish extract. This metabolite, which is known to be present as a minor constituent in animal- and plant-derived foods, was quantified in this study for the first time in seafood, soybean products, dried shiitake mushrooms, and dried fish in notable amounts. Furthermore, it was described for the first time as an essential taste contributor to the nonvolatile profile of a foodstuff, in this case of a debittered extract of hongarebushi.

  4. How Do You Like Your Science, Wet or Dry? How Two Lab Experiences Influence Student Understanding of Science Concepts and Perceptions of Authentic Scientific Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Maureen; Knuth, Randy; Van Horne, Katie; Shouse, Andrew W.; Levias, Sheldon

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how two kinds of authentic research experiences related to smoking behavior—genotyping human DNA (wet lab) and using a database to test hypotheses about factors that affect smoking behavior (dry lab)—influence students’ perceptions and understanding of scientific research and related science concepts. The study used pre and post surveys and a focus group protocol to compare students who conducted the research experiences in one of two sequences: genotyping before database and database before genotyping. Students rated the genotyping experiment to be more like real science than the database experiment, in spite of the fact that they associated more scientific tasks with the database experience than genotyping. Independent of the order of completing the labs, students showed gains in their understanding of science concepts after completion of the two experiences. There was little change in students’ attitudes toward science pre to post, as measured by the Scientific Attitude Inventory II. However, on the basis of their responses during focus groups, students developed more sophisticated views about the practices and nature of science after they had completed both research experiences, independent of the order in which they experienced them. PMID:28572181

  5. A proposal for a test method for assessment of hazard property HP 12 ("Release of an acute toxic gas") in hazardous waste classification - Experience from 49 waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebert, Pierre; Samaali, Ismahen; Molina, Pauline

    2016-12-01

    A stepwise method for assessment of the HP 12 is proposed and tested with 49 waste samples. The hazard property HP 12 is defined as "Release of an acute toxic gas": waste which releases acute toxic gases (Acute Tox. 1, 2 or 3) in contact with water or an acid. When a waste contains a substance assigned to one of the following supplemental hazards EUH029, EUH031 and EUH032, it shall be classified as hazardous by HP 12 according to test methods or guidelines (EC, 2014a, 2014b). When the substances with the cited hazard statement codes react with water or an acid, they can release HCl, Cl 2 , HF, HCN, PH 3 , H 2 S, SO 2 (and two other gases very unlikely to be emitted, hydrazoic acid HN 3 and selenium oxide SeO 2 - a solid with low vapor pressure). Hence, a method is proposed:For a set of 49 waste, water addition did not produce gas. Nearly all the solid waste produced a gas in contact with hydrochloric acid in 5 min in an automated calcimeter with a volume >0.1L of gas per kg of waste. Since a plateau of pressure is reached only for half of the samples in 5 min, 6 h trial with calorimetric bombs or glass flasks were done and confirmed the results. Identification of the gases by portable probes showed that most of the tested samples emit mainly CO 2 . Toxic gases are emitted by four waste: metallic dust from the aluminum industry (CO), two air pollution control residue of industrial waste incinerator (H 2 S) and a halogenated solvent (organic volatile(s) compound(s)). HF has not been measured in these trials started before the present definition of HP 12. According to the definition of HP 12, only the H 2 S emission of substances with hazard statement EUH031 is accounted for. In view of the calcium content of the two air pollution control residue, the presence of calcium sulphide (EUH031) can be assumed. These two waste are therefore classified potentially hazardous for HP 12, from a total of 49 waste. They are also classified as hazardous for other properties (HP 7

  6. Effect of air-flow on biodrying method of municipal solid waste in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristanto, Gabriel Andari; Hanany, Ismi

    2017-11-01

    The process of bio-drying could be an interesting solution for municipal solid waste management and energy demand in Indonesia. By using the heat from bio-degradation process consists in bio-drying, moisture content in a solid waste can be reduced. Solid wastes with a low moisture content, could be used as a fuel with a good energy content. In this study, 85% of garden wastes and 15% of food waste from Indonesia's municipal solid waste were bio-dried in aerobic condition using 3 variations of air flow-rates, which were 8 L/min.kg; 10 L/min.kg; and 12 L/min.kg. The experiment performs with three different reactors with known volume 75cm × 50cm × 40cm and using Styrofoam as an insulation. The process of bio-drying lasted 21 days. In the end, the experiment with 10 L/min.kg aeration, has the lowest moisture contents about 23% with high temperature and NHV about 3595.29 kcal/kg.

  7. Biogas production from solid pineapple waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanticharoen, M.; Bhumiratana, S.; Tientanacom, S.; Pengsobha, L.

    1984-01-01

    Solid pineapple waste composed of shell and core was used as substrate in anaerobic fermentation producing CH4. The experiments were carried out using four 30-L vessels and no mixing, a 200-L plug-flow reactor, and a 5-cubic m stirred tank. Because of high acidity of the substrate, the loading rate is as low as 2.5 g dry solid added/L-day. The average gas yield is 0.3-0.5 L/g dry substrate. A pretreatment of wet solid with sludge effluent prior loading to the digester resulted in better stability of the biodigester than without pretreatment. These studies showed that loading rate can be much higher than those previously used. The 2-stage process was tested to determine a conversion efficiency of high loading and at much shorter reactor retention times. The results of the entire program indicated that biogas production from cannery pineapple waste is technically feasible.

  8. Cost function analysis for solid waste management: a developing country experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthan, Shantha R; Milke, Mark W; Wilson, David C; Cocks, John H

    2012-05-01

    The need for improved cost planning methods for solid waste management (SWM) is particularly strong in emerging economies where problems are severe, expectations for improvements are high, but finances are constrained. Estimating cost functions is suggested as an improved cost planning method. The research uses 1999 data from 298 Indian municipalities, covering over 140 million people. Stepwise multiple regression involving eight predictor variables was conducted on costs to detect any statistically significant correlations. The average costs on either a per tonne or per capita basis are most influenced by the total number of staff employed per capita or per tonne. The results are believed to be due to labour costs being such a high fraction of total costs in developing countries. Due to high variability in labour intensity between municipalities the data showed no clear correlation between per tonne or per capita costs and population, indicating no economy-of-scale. The data used here are subject to significant conjecture over their quality and age; however, the unique nature of the study should help future researchers investigating costs in emerging economies.

  9. Reducing ion exchange resins rad-wastes, experience at EDF PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fene, G. [Rohm and Haas Co. (France); Hoffman, B. [Rohm and Haas Co. (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Life time of an ion exchange resin in a Nuclear Power Station (EDF PWR). At the end of its life, an ion exchange resin which has been used to treat radioactive streams becomes a radwaste itself. Its level of radioactivity depends on the point of use and consequently on the circuit where it was used. Roughly speaking, in a Nuclear Power Station PWR we can consider two types of radwaste families: High radioactive family Ion exchange resins which come from primary circuit: reactor control and storage pools. Ion exchange resins which have worked in a decontamination circuit: waste water treatment. Low radioactive family Ion exchange resins which come from secondary circuit: Steam Generator Blowdown By understanding and carefully applying some critical properties of ion exchange resins, such as total capacity, selectivity, and physical structure, it is possible for nuclear power stations to minimize radwaste volumes, while at the same time improving plant performance. This type of improvement can be facilitated by close cooperation and communication between the resin producer and the nuclear power user. (authors)

  10. Microwave applications to rock specimen drying in laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jihwan; Park, Hyeong-Dong

    2014-05-01

    Microwave heating is the process in which electromagnetic wave with 300 MHz - 300 GHz heats dielectric material. Although in the beginning microwave was mainly used in food industry to cook or heat the food, it soon became clear that microwave had a large potential for other applications. It was thus introduced in geological fields of investigation like mineral processing, oil sand and oil shale extraction, soil remediation, waste treatment. However, the drying techniques using microwave was rarely treated in geology field. According to the ISRM suggested methods, experimental rock specimens in laboratory test were dried in 105°C oven for a period of at least 24 hours. In this method, hot air transmits heats to material by means of thermal conduction, and the heat was transferred from the surface to the inside of the rock specimens. The thermal gradient and moisture gradient can deteriorate the specimens, and energy can be wasted in bulk heating the specimens. The aim of our study was to compare physical property, microstructural property, and energy efficiency between microwave drying method and conventional oven drying method, and to suggest new method for rock drying. Granite, basalt, and sandstone were selected as specimens and were made in cylinder shape with 54 mm diameter. To compare two different methods, one set of saturated specimens were dried in 105°C conventional oven and the other set of saturated specimens were dried in microwave oven. After dried, the specimens were cooled and saturated in 20°C water 48 hours. The saturation-drying were repeated 50 cycles, and the physical property and microstructural property were measured every 10 cycles. Absorption and elastic wave velocity were measured to investigate the change of physical property, and microscope image and X-ray computed tomography image were obtained to investigate the change of microstructural property of rock specimens. The electricity consumption of conventional oven and microwave oven

  11. Experiment Analysis of Concrete’s Mechanical Property Deterioration Suffered Sulfate Attack and Drying-Wetting Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Tian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of concrete deterioration in sodium sulfate solution is investigated. The macroperformance was characterized via its apparent properties, mass loss, and compressive strength. Changes in ions in the solution at different sulfate attack periods were tested by inductively coupled plasma (ICP. The damage evolution law, as well as analysis of the concrete’s meso- and microstructure, was revealed by scanning electron microscope (SEM and computed tomography (CT scanning equipment. The results show that the characteristics of concrete differed at each sulfate attack period; the drying-wetting cycles generally accelerated the deterioration process of concrete. In the early sulfate attack period, the pore structure of the concrete was filled with sulfate attack products (e.g., ettringite and gypsum, and its mass and strength increased. The pore size and porosity decreased while the CT number increased. As deterioration progressed, the swelling/expansion force of products and the salt crystallization pressure of sulfate crystals acted on the inner wall of the concrete to accumulate damage and accelerate deterioration. The mass and strength of concrete sharply decreased. The number and volume of pores increased, and the pore grew more quickly resulting in initiation and expansion of microcracks while the CT number decreased.

  12. Dry kiln operator's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    William T. Simpson

    1991-01-01

    The modern dry kiln is a unique product of research, development, and experience. It is the only practical means now in wide use for rapid, high- volume drying of lumber to conditions necessary for maximum serviceability in housing, furniture, millwork, and many other wood products. As part of our charge to help further the efficient utilization of our nation’s timber...

  13. Water Reclamation using Spray Drying Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This purpose of this project is to develop a spray drying prototype to for the recovery and recycle of water from concentrated waste water recovery system brine....

  14. Water Reclamation using Spray Drying Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a new spray drying technology for the recovery and recycle of water while stabilizing the solid wastes or residues as found in advanced life support...

  15. Use of waste plastic in concrete mixture as aggregate replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Zainab Z; Al-Hashmi, Enas A

    2008-11-01

    Industrial activities in Iraq are associated with significant amounts of non-biodegradable solid waste, waste plastic being among the most prominent. This study involved 86 experiments and 254 tests to determine the efficiency of reusing waste plastic in the production of concrete. Thirty kilograms of waste plastic of fabriform shapes was used as a partial replacement for sand by 0%, 10%, 15%, and 20% with 800 kg of concrete mixtures. All of the concrete mixtures were tested at room temperature. These tests include performing slump, fresh density, dry density, compressive strength, flexural strength, and toughness indices. Seventy cubes were molded for compressive strength and dry density tests, and 54 prisms were cast for flexural strength and toughness indices tests. Curing ages of 3, 7, 14, and 28 days for the concrete mixtures were applied in this work. The results proved the arrest of the propagation of micro cracks by introducing waste plastic of fabriform shapes to concrete mixtures. This study insures that reusing waste plastic as a sand-substitution aggregate in concrete gives a good approach to reduce the cost of materials and solve some of the solid waste problems posed by plastics.

  16. Vacuum drying plant for evaporator concentrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benavides, E. [ENSA, Madrid (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Volume reduction systems applied to evaporator concentrates in PWR and BWR save a significant amount of drums. The concentration to dry product is a technique that reaches the maximum volume reduction, compared to conventional techniques (cementation, polymerisation). Four Spanish N.P.P. (3 PWR and 1 BWR) have selected ENSA's process by means of fixed ''in drum vacuum drying system''. A 130-litre steel drum is used for drying without any additional requirement except vacuum resistance. This steel drum is introduced into a standard 200-litre drum. Five centimeters concrete shielding cylinder exists between both drums. Final package is classified as 19 GO according to ENRESA's acceptance code (dry waste with 5 cm concrete between 130-l and 200-l drum). The generation of cemented waste in five N.P.P. versus dried waste will be reduced 83%. This reduction will save a considerable amount in disposal costs. (authors)

  17. Monitoring of volatile compound emissions during dry anaerobic digestion of the Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste by Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papurello, Davide; Soukoulis, Christos; Schuhfried, Erna; Cappellin, Luca; Gasperi, Flavia; Silvestri, Silvia; Santarelli, Massimo; Biasioli, Franco

    2012-12-01

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) formed during anaerobic digestion of aerobically pre-treated Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste (OFMSW), have been monitored over a 30 day period by a direct injection mass spectrometric technique: Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS). Most of the tentatively identified compounds exhibited a double-peaked emission pattern which is probably the combined result from the volatilization or oxidation of the biomass-inherited organic compounds and the microbial degradation of organic substrates. Of the sulfur compounds, hydrogen sulfide had the highest accumulative production. Alkylthiols were the predominant sulfur organic compounds, reaching their maximum levels during the last stage of the process. H(2)S formation seems to be influenced by the metabolic reactions that the sulfur organic compounds undergo, such as a methanogenesis induced mechanism i.e. an amino acid degradation/sulfate reduction. Comparison of different batches indicates that PTR-ToF-MS is a suitable tool providing information for rapid in situ bioprocess monitoring. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Colorful Drying

    OpenAIRE

    Lakio, Satu; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2009-01-01

    Drying is one of the standard unit operations in the pharmaceutical industry and it is important to become aware of the circumstances that dominate during the process. The purpose of this study was to test microcapsulated thermochromic pigments as heat indicators in a fluid bed drying process. The indicator powders were manually granulated with α-lactose monohydrate resulting in three particle-size groups. Also, pellets were coated with the indicator powders. The granules and pellets were flu...

  19. A Design of Experiment Study of Nanoprecipitation and Nano Spray Drying as Processes to Prepare PLGA Nano- and Microparticles with Defined Sizes and Size Distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draheim, Christina; de Crécy, Francois; Hansen, Steffi; Collnot, Eva-Maria; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2015-08-01

    Aim of this study was to explore the potential of a design of experiments approach to nanoprecipitation (NPR) and nano spray drying (NSD) as processes for preparing poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid, PLGA) nano- and microparticles. In particular, we determined the feasible size range, critical factors influencing particle size, size distribution or yield, and the robustness towards variations of the batch size. A fractional factorial design for response surface was applied to study the influence on continuous, categorical and discrete factors. NPR yielded nanoparticles (150-200 nm) with narrow size distribution (PDI drug delivery systems, as well as to optimize these processes regarding particle size, size distribution and yield. Such understanding of these processes is instrumental for their subsequent scale up and quality control as needed for preclinical and clinical test batches.

  20. HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW) VITRIFICATION EXPERIENCE IN THE US: APPLICATION OF GLASS PRODUCT/PROCESS CONTROL TO OTHERHLW AND HAZARDOUS WASTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C; James Marra, J

    2007-09-17

    Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. At the Savannah River Site (SRS) actual HLW tank waste has successfully been processed to stringent product and process constraints without any rework into a stable borosilicate glass waste since 1996. A unique 'feed forward' statistical process control (SPC) has been used rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the melter is controlled prior to vitrification. In SQC, the glass product is sampled after it is vitrified. Individual glass property models form the basis for the 'feed forward' SPC. The property models transform constraints on the melt and glass properties into constraints on the feed composition. The property models are mechanistic and depend on glass bonding/structure, thermodynamics, quasicrystalline melt species, and/or electron transfers. The mechanistic models have been validated over composition regions well outside of the regions for which they were developed because they are mechanistic. Mechanistic models allow accurate extension to radioactive and hazardous waste melts well outside the composition boundaries for which they were developed.

  1. Critical perspectives on the definition of waste in South Africa : experiences within the steelmaking industry / Taljaard A.C.

    OpenAIRE

    Taljaard, Adriana Cecilia.

    2011-01-01

    During the past few decades the focus of waste management in South Africa has been emphasised, especially in view of the increase in economic development which has resulted in an increase in commercial, industrial, hazardous, mining, power generation as well as radioactive waste. The iron and steel making industry in South Africa provides for a vast amount of recycling opportunities of various materials resulting from the iron and steelmaking process. The regulation of waste ma...

  2. Dry cell battery poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batteries - dry cell ... Acidic dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide Ammonium chloride Alkaline dry cell batteries contain: Sodium hydroxide Potassium hydroxide Lithium dioxide dry cell batteries ...

  3. Utilization of inorganic industrial wastes in producing construction ceramics. Review of Russian experience for the years 2000-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltakova, N V; Faseeva, G R; Kabirov, R R; Nafikov, R M; Zakharov, Yu A

    2017-02-01

    This paper analyzes the significant scientific publications worldwide for the last 15years concerning construction ceramics (predominantly brick) made with various inorganic industrial wastes added to the ceramic raw material for the improvement of properties and for eco-friendly disposal. The information gap resulting from the lack of mentions of the Russian publications on this subject in English-language reviews is filled. The paper includes brief summaries of 34 dissertations and 29 patents issued in Russia since 2000. The waste additives described in these summaries are grouped by origin type (mining industry waste, ore enrichment waste, metallurgical waste, sludge, ashes, cullet, large-capacity building wastes and waste from various chemical production processes) with the ceramic mixture compositions, molding and firing conditions, final strength, water absorption and other parameters of the final ceramic samples reported. Russian scientists have expanded the nomenclature of each group of wastes significantly upon addition to the list described in English-language reviews for 2000-2015. References to the recent Russian developments in the field of ecological management in ceramic industry are provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Regulation of solid waste management at Brazilian ports: analysis and proposals for Brazil in light of the European experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccoud, Cristiane; Magrini, Alessandra

    2014-02-15

    With a coastline of 8500 km, Brazil has 34 public ports and various private terminals, which together in 2012 handled 809 million tonnes of goods. The solid wastes produced (from port activities, ships and cargoes) pose a highly relevant problem, both due to the quantity and diversity, requiring a complex and integrated set of practices resulting from legal requirements and proactive initiatives. The main Brazilian law on solid waste management is recent (Law 12,305/2010) and the specific rules on solid waste in ports are badly in need of revision to meet the challenges caused by expansion of the sector and to harmonize them with the best global practices. This paper analyzes the current legal/regulatory framework for solid waste management at Brazilian ports and compares this structure with the practice in Europe. At the end, we suggest initiatives to improve the regulation of solid wastes at Brazilian ports. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Machinability study on discontinuously reinforced aluminium composites (DRACs using response surface methodology and Taguchi’s design of experiments under dry cutting condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raviraj Shetty1

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of metal matrix composites with discontinuous reinforcement represents a well-established method for improving the strength and stiffness of a material. This paper discusses the use of Taguchi’s design of experiments and response surface methodology (RSM for minimising the surface roughness in turning of discontinuously reinforced aluminium composites (DRACs having aluminum alloy 6061 as the matrix and containing 15 vol. % of silicon carbide particles with a mean diameter of 25µm under dry cutting condition. The measured results are then collected and analysed with the help of a commercial software package MINITAB15. The experiments are conducted using Taguchi’s experimental design technique. The matrices of test conditions include cutting speed, feed rates and depth of cut. The effect of cutting parameters on surface roughness is evaluated and the optimum cutting condition for minimising the surface roughness is determined. A second-order model is established between the cutting parameters and the surface roughness using RSM. The experimental results reveal that the most significant machining parameter for surface roughness is feed, followed by cutting speed. The predicted values and measured values are fairly close, which indicates that the developed model can be effectively used to predict the surface roughness in the machining of DRACs.

  6. Lyophilization -Solid Waste Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwiller, Eric; Flynn, Michael; Fisher, John; Reinhard, Martin

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a solid waste treatment system that has been designed for a Mars transit exploration mission. The technology described is an energy-efficient lyophilization technique that is designed to recover water from spacecraft solid wastes. Candidate wastes include feces, concentrated brines from water processors, and other solid wastes that contain free water. The system is designed to operate as a stand-alone process or to be integrated into the International Space Station Waste Collection System. In the lyophilization process, water in an aqueous waste is frozen and then sublimed, separating the waste into a dried solid material and liquid water. The sublimed water is then condensed in a solid ice phase and then melted to generate a liquid product. In the subject system the waste solids are contained within a 0.2 micron bio-guard bag and after drying are removed from the system and stored in a secondary container. This technology is ideally suited to applications such as the Mars Reference Mission, where water recovery rates approaching 100% are desirable but production of CO2 is not. The system is designed to minimize power consumption through the use of thermoelectric heat pumps. The results of preliminary testing of a prototype system and testing of the final configuration are provided. A mathematical model of the system is also described.

  7. Dry Etching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamate, Eugen; Yeom, Geun Young

    2016-01-01

    for the higher processing rates in FPDs, high-density plasma processing tools that can handle larger-area substrate uniformly are more intensively studied especially for the dry etching of polysilicon thin films. In the case of FPD processing, the current substrate size ranges from 730 × 920 mm (fourth...

  8. Dry socket

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The bone and nerves are exposed to the air. This causes pain and delays healing. Risk Factors You may be more at risk for dry socket if you: Have poor oral health Have a difficult tooth extraction Use birth control pills, which may interfere with healing Smoke or use ...

  9. Colorful drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakio, Satu; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2010-03-01

    Drying is one of the standard unit operations in the pharmaceutical industry and it is important to become aware of the circumstances that dominate during the process. The purpose of this study was to test microcapsulated thermochromic pigments as heat indicators in a fluid bed drying process. The indicator powders were manually granulated with alpha-lactose monohydrate resulting in three particle-size groups. Also, pellets were coated with the indicator powders. The granules and pellets were fluidized in fluid bed dryer to observe the progress of the heat flow in the material and to study the heat indicator properties of the indicator materials. A tristimulus colorimeter was used to measure CIELAB color values. Color indicator for heat detection can be utilized to test if the heat-sensitive API would go through physical changes during the pharmaceutical drying process. Both the prepared granules and pellets can be used as heat indicator in fluid bed drying process. The colored heat indicators give an opportunity to learn new aspects of the process at real time and could be exploded, for example, for scaling-up studies.

  10. Comparison of drying characteristic and uniformity of banana cubes dried by pulse-spouted microwave vacuum drying, freeze drying and microwave freeze drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Min; Mujumdar, Arun S; Lim, Rui-Xin

    2014-07-01

    To overcome the flaws of high energy consumption of freeze drying (FD) and the non-uniform drying of microwave freeze drying (MFD), pulse-spouted microwave vacuum drying (PSMVD) was developed. The results showed that the drying time can be dramatically shortened if microwave was used as the heating source. In this experiment, both MFD and PSMVD could shorten drying time by 50% as compared to the FD process. Depending on the heating method, MFD and PSMVD dried banana cubes showed trends of expansion while FD dried samples demonstrated trends of shrinkage. Shrinkage also brought intensive structure and highest fracturability of all three samples dried by different methods. The residual ascorbic acid content of PSMVD dried samples can be as high as in FD dried samples, which were superior to MFD dried samples. The tests confirmed that PSMVD could bring about better drying uniformity than MFD. Besides, compared with traditional MFD, PSMVD can provide better extrinsic feature, and can bring about improved nutritional features because of the higher residual ascorbic acid content. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Research advances in dry anaerobic digestion process of solid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dry anaerobic digestion process is an innovative waste-recycling method to treat high-solidcontent bio-wastes. This can be done without dilution with water by microbial consortia in an oxygenfree environment to recover potential renewable energy and nutrient-rich fertilizer for sustainable solid waste management.

  12. 47{sup th} Annual meeting on nuclear technology (AMNT 2016). Key Topics / Enhanced safety and operation excellence and decommissioning experience and Waste management solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salnikova, Tatiana [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Schaffrath, Andreas [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Garching (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Summary report on the Key Topics ''Enhanced Safety and Operation Excellence'' and ''Decommissioning Experience and Waste Management Solutions'' of the 47{sup th} Annual Conference on Nuclear Technology (AMNT 2016) held in Hamburg, 10 to 12 May 2016. Other Sessions of AMNT 2016 have been and will be covered in further issues of atw.

  13. Mont Terri Project - Engineered barrier emplacement experiment in Opalinus Clay for the disposal of radioactive waste in underground repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayor, J. C. [Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radioactivos SA (ENRESA), Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Sineriz, J. [Asociacion para la Investigacion y Desarollo Industrial de los Recursos Naturales (AITEMIN), Madrid (Spain); Alonso, E. [Centre Internacional de Metodos Numerics en Ingenyeria (CIMNE), Barcelona (Spain); Alheid, H.-J. [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), Hannover (Germany); Bluemling, P. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra), Wettingen (Switzerland)

    2007-07-01

    The Engineered Barrier (EB) experiment was a full-scale test for the demonstration, in a horizontal drift, of an emplacement technics of the clay barrier, using a granular bentonite material in the upper part of this barrier and bentonite blocks at the bottom. The test has been carried out in a 6 m long section of a niche excavated in Opalinus Clay of the Mont Terri underground laboratory. A steel dummy canister, with the same dimensions and weight as the real reference canisters, was placed on top of a bed of highly compacted bentonite blocks (in turn lying on a concrete bed), and the rest of the clay barrier volume was backfilled with a Granular Bentonite Material (GBM), made of very highly compacted pellets of different sizes. Hydro-mechanical instrumentation and an artificial hydration system (to accelerate the saturation of the clay barrier) were installed, and the test section sealed with a concrete plug. The evolution of the hydro-mechanical parameters along the hydration, both in the barrier and in the clayey rock formation, has been monitored during about 1.5 years, and modelled using the CODE-BRIGHT code. The EB experiment has proved that fully automated production of a Granular Bentonite Material (GBM) is possible and large quantities can be produced in due time in the required quality. Only minor modifications of existing production lines in industry for other applications were necessary to achieve this result. In the EB test section, a dry density of 1.36 g/cm{sup 3} of the emplaced GBM has been obtained. With this value it is estimated that the hydraulic conductivity of this material is lower than 5 x 10{sup -12} m/s and the swelling pressure is about 1.3 MPa. Even though the EB test section conditions are now not considered as representative of a true demonstration, it is deemed that the model emplacement testing results (dry density of about 1.40 g/cm{sup 3}) serve well to demonstrate the achievable densities expected in the real world setting. The

  14. Transport of contaminants from energy-process-waste leachates through subsurface soils and soil components: laboratory experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wangen, L.E.; Stallings, E.A.; Walker, R.D.

    1982-08-01

    The subsurface transport and attenuation of inorganic contaminants common to a variety of energy process waste leachates are being studied using laboratory column methods. Anionic species currently being emphasized are As, B, Mo, and Se. Transport of the cations Cd and Ni is also being studied. The solid adsorbents consist of three soil mineral components (silica sand, kaolinite, and goethite), and four subsurface soils (a dunal sand, an oxidic sandy clay loam, an acidic clay loam, and an alkaline clay loam). Breakthrough patterns of these species from packed soil columns are followed by monitoring eluent concentrations vs time under carefully controlled laboratory conditions. This report describes the experimental methods being used, the results of preliminary batch adsorption studies, and the results of column experiments completed through calendar year 1981. Using column influent concentrations of about 10 mg/l, adsorption (mmoles/100 g) has been determined from the eluent volume corresponding to 50% breakthrough. On silica sand, kaolinite, dunal sand, and goethite, respectively, these are 2.0 x 10/sup -4/, 0.020, 0.013, and 0.31 for cadmium, 4.4 x 10/sup -4/, 0.039, 0.020, and 0.98 for nickel. On kaolinite, dunal sand, and goethite, respectively, adsorption values (mmoles/100 g) are As (0.24, 0.019, and 20.5), B (0.041, 0.0019, and 1.77), Mo (0.048, 0.0010, and 5.93), and Se (0.029, 0.00048, and 1.30). Arsenic is the most highly adsorbed contaminant species and goethite has the largest adsorption capacity of the adsorbents.

  15. THERMAL POWER LOSS COMPENSATION IN THE PRODUCTION OF COOKED AND DRIED GRAINS WITH HEAT PUMPS USING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Shevtsov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Using scientificand practical experience and analysis of recent innovative activity on modernization of food concentrates production, a new variant of the energy-efficient processing of cereal crops using superheated steam and direct involvement in the cooking and drying process waste energy using the vapor compression heat pump was suggested. A method for production of cereal concentrates, which is realized using microprocessor control of technological parameters. According to the information on the processes of cereals washing, cooking, drying and cooling microprocessor provides regime parameters control under the restrictions due to both yield of cooked and dried cereal of high quality and economic feasibility. At the same time the amount of moisture is continuously determined in the recirculation loop formed by the evaporation from the cereals in the drying process. To implement the proposed method of cooked and dried cereals production it is offered to use refrigerationand compressor unit operating in a heat pump mode. The refrigerant to be used is khladon 12V1 CF2ClBr with a boiling point in the evaporator of 4°C and the condensing temperature of 153.7 °C. The use of the heat pump in the heat supply system of cooked and dried cereals production instead of electric heaters will reduce power costs by 1.72 times. The proposed method for the production and control of technological parameters in the field of the product acceptable technological properties will provide high quality cooked and dried cereals; an increase in thermal efficiency by making full use of the waste heat of superheated steam; the reduction of specific energy consumption by 25-30 %; the creation of waste-free and environmentally friendly technologies for cereal production.

  16. Producing a solid fuel from agricultural wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khigasikuni, T.; Fudziki, A.; Koisi, K.

    1982-08-21

    Agricultural wastes, in particular, the peels and seeds of mandarine oranges, used for canning, were ground, dried, mixed with a binder, molded in cylindrical or pyramidal forms of a piece of the desired size, heated and impregnated with a water repellant substance, for instance, paraffin. A material is produced with a d = 1. PVA was used as the binder. The wastes were partially gasified and the obtained gas was used as a heat source in drying the wastes.

  17. Liquid secondary waste: Waste form formulation and qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzi, A. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Dixon, K. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hill, K. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nichols, R. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-07-31

    The Hanford Site Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) currently treats aqueous waste streams generated during site cleanup activities. When the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) begins operations, including Direct Feed Low Activity Waste (DFLAW) vitrification, a liquid secondary waste (LSW) stream from the WTP will need to be treated. The volume of effluent for treatment at the ETF will increase significantly. The powdered salt waste form produced by the ETF will be replaced by a stabilized solidified waste form for disposal in Hanford’s Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Washington River Protection Solutions is implementing a Secondary Liquid Waste Immobilization Technology Development Plan to address the technology needs for a waste form and solidification process to treat the increased volume of waste planned for disposal at the IDF. Waste form testing to support this plan is composed of work in the near term to provide data as input to a performance assessment (PA) for Hanford’s IDF. In 2015, three Hanford Liquid Secondary Waste simulants were developed based on existing and projected waste streams. Using these waste simulants, fourteen mixes of Hanford Liquid Secondary Waste were prepared and tested varying the waste simulant, the water-to-dry materials ratio, and the dry materials blend composition.1 In FY16, testing was performed using a simulant of the EMF process condensate blended with the caustic scrubber—from the Low Activity Waste (LAW) melter—, processed through the ETF. The initial EMF-16 simulant will be based on modeling efforts performed to determine the mass balance of the ETF for the DFLAW.2 The compressive strength of all of the mixes exceeded the target of 3.4 MPa (500 psi) to meet the requirements identified as potential IDF Waste Acceptance Criteria in Table 1 of the Secondary Liquid Waste Immobilization Technology Development Plan.3 The hydraulic properties of the waste forms tested (hydraulic conductivity

  18. A Review and Analysis of European Industrial Experience in Handling LWR Spent Fuel and Vitrified High-Level Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomeke, J.O.

    2001-07-10

    The industrial facilities that have been built or are under construction in France, the United Kingdom, Sweden, and West Germany to handle light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and canisters of vitrified high-level waste before ultimate disposal are described and illustrated with drawings and photographs. Published information on the operating performance of these facilities is also given. This information was assembled for consideration in planning and design of similar equipment and facilities needed for the Federal Waste Management System in the United States.

  19. Waste Sites - Municipal Waste Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — A Municipal Waste Operation is a DEP primary facility type related to the Waste Management Municipal Waste Program. The sub-facility types related to Municipal Waste...

  20. Prevalence and associated factors of dry eye: Our experience in patients above 40 years of age at a Tertiary Care Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchi Shah

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Dry eye is a very common condition with a high prevalence among the elderly. We recommend the screening of all out-patients by TBUT, which is a simple test to perform and examination of lids for meibomian gland disease, which if present can be treated. Further studies are needed to establish uniform diagnostic criteria for dry eye, which will help to get more concrete prevalence data, as well as its etiological factors.

  1. Drying of a model soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, P; Coussot, P

    2010-09-01

    Drying experiments have been carried out with model soils made of different pastes filling granular packings. A detailed information concerning the time evolution of the water saturation distribution inside the sample was obtained from magnetic resonance imaging measurements. This study makes it possible to understand the physical origin of the drying characteristics of these materials. The drying curves exhibit a constant-rate period (CRP) and a falling-rate period (FRP) but the relative durations of these periods depend on the paste structure. With a kaolin suspension the CRP lasts down to very low water densities and is associated with a homogeneous drying of the paste throughout the sample. With a bentonite suspension the CRP is shorter and the drying in the FRP results from a complex process involving fractures progressing downward through the pasty matrix. With a gel the CRP period is even shorter and the drying in the FRP results from the progression of a dry front through the packing as a result of the shrinkage of the gel matrix. This provides an overview of the main possible processes at work when drying a soil as a function of its components along with some practical means for slowing down drying from soils.

  2. Experiences from risk communication in the siting of a geological repository for high level waste in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thegerstroem, C.; Engstroem, S. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    SKB is planning in the year 2001 to designate two siting alternatives for further site characterisation. The work in the municipalities of Oesthammar, Nykoeping, Oskarshamn and Tierp is taking place in an atmosphere of constructive discussions. There is a growing feeling in Sweden among broad categories of the public that the nuclear waste exists and should be taken care of by our generation, without many of these people ever getting positive to the use of nuclear energy. While the NIMBY syndrome might still have a good grip on some, there has never been a more constructive debate about the nuclear waste than now, even though there still is a lot of work to do. Siting a geological repository for high level waste puts our democratic system under hard tests. The decision making process is about openness, skills in interacting with the public, respect of people's fears and concerns and at last but not the least independent, competent and visible participation by other stakeholders (politicians locally and nationally, regulatory bodies etc). Good skills in risk communication are important ingredients that might facilitate SKB's task as a developer. Far more important however, is the trust we might get from past and present record of handling the waste and from the way we work and behave in the feasibility studies in the municipalities where SKB is involved.

  3. Acid-Catalyzed Preparation of Biodiesel from Waste Vegetable Oil: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladt, Don; Murray, Steve; Gitch, Brittany; Trout, Haylee; Liberko, Charles

    2011-01-01

    This undergraduate organic laboratory exercise involves the sulfuric acid-catalyzed conversion of waste vegetable oil into biodiesel. The acid-catalyzed method, although inherently slower than the base-catalyzed methods, does not suffer from the loss of product or the creation of emulsion producing soap that plagues the base-catalyzed methods when…

  4. The Scenario Approach to the Development of Regional Waste Management Systems (Implementation Experience in the Regions of Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Eugene P.; Alekseev, Audrey A.; Fomina, Natalia E.; Dorozhkin, Vladimir E.

    2016-01-01

    The article illustrates a theoretical approach to scenario modeling of economic indicators of regional waste management system. The method includes a three-iterative algorithm that allows the executive authorities and investors to take a decision on logistics, bulk, technological and economic parameters of the formation of the regional long-term…

  5. Methane potential of sterilized solid slaughterhouse wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitk, Peep; Kaparaju, Prasad; Vilu, Raivo

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine chemical composition and methane potential of Category 2 and 3 solid slaughterhouse wastes rendering products (SSHWRP) viz. melt, decanter sludge, meat and bone meal (MBM), technical fat and flotation sludge from wastewater treatment. Chemical analyses showed that SSHWRP were high in protein and lipids with total solids (TS) content of 96-99%. Methane yields of the SSHWRP were between 390 and 978 m(3) CH(4)/t volatile solids (VS)(added). Based on batch experiments, anaerobic digestion of SSHWRP from the dry rendering process could recover 4.6 times more primary energy than the energy required for the rendering process. Estonia has technological capacity to sterilize all the produced Category 2 and 3 solid slaughterhouse wastes (SSHW) and if separated from Category 1 animal by-products (ABP), it could be further utilized as energy rich input material for anaerobic digestion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Waste statistics 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    Reports to the ISAG (Information System for Waste and Recycling) for 2001 cover 402 Danish waste treatment plants owned by 295 enterprises. The total waste generation in 2001 amounted to 12,768,000 tonnes, which is 2% less than in 2000. Reductions are primarily due to the fact that sludge for mineralization is included with a dry matter content of 20% compared to 1,5% in previous statistics. This means that sludge amounts have been reduced by 808,886 tonnes. The overall rate of recycling amounted to 63%, which is 1% less than the overall recycling target of 64% for 2004. Since sludge has a high recycling rate, the reduction in sludge amounts of 808,886 tonnes has also caused the total recycling rate to fall. Waste amounts incinerated accounted for 25%, which is 1% more than the overall target of 24% for incineration in 2004. Waste going to landfill amounted to 10%, which is better than the overall landfill target for 2004 of a maximum of 12% for landfilling. Targets for treatment of waste from the different sectors, however, are still not complied with, since too little waste from households and the service sector is recycled, and too much waste from industry is led to landfill. (BA)

  7. Coal Waste Powder Amendment and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Enhance the Growth of Jabon (Anthocephalus cadamba Miq Seedling in Ultisol Soil Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Wilarso Budi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Coal powder waste application on low nutrient media is expected to be able to increase plant growth and to improve Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF development. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of coal waste powder on the growth of Anthocephallus cadamba Jack and AMF development grown on ultisol soil. Two factors in a completely randomised experimental design was conducted under greenhouse conditions and Duncan Multiple Range Test was used to analyse of the effect the treatment. The first factor was ultisol soil ammended with coal waste powder (control, soil amanded with coal waste 5%, soil amanded with coal waste 10% and soil amanded with coal waste 15% and the second factor was AMF inoculation (uninoculated control, inoculated with Gigaspora margarita. Plant height, diameter, shoot dry weight, percentage of AMF colonization and nutrient uptake were measured in this experiment. Results of this study showed that coal amendment and AMF when applied separately significantly increased height, diameter, shoot dry weight, root dry weight and nutrient uptake of 12 weeks A. cadamba seedling, but when the coal waste powder and AMF were combined the plant growth parameters were lower than those applied separately but significantly higher than control. The application of coal waste powder or AMF in ultisol soil could increase A. cadamba growth and development.

  8. Production of Valuables Organic Acids from Organic Wastes with Hydrothermal Treatment Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Faisal

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reports production of valuables organic acids from the hydrothermal treatment of representative organic wastes and compounds (i. e. domestic sludge, proteinaceous, cellulosic and plastic wastes with or without oxidant (H2O2. Organic acids such as acetic, formic, propionic, succinic and lactic acids were obtained in significant amounts. At 623 K (16.5 MPa, acetic acid of about 26 mg/g-dry waste fish entrails was obtained. This increased to 42 mg/g dry waste fish entrails in the presence of H2O2. Experiments on glucose to represent cellulosic wastes were also carried out, getting acetic acid of about 29 mg/g-glucose. The study was extended to terephthalic acid and glyceraldehyde, reaction intermediates of hydrothermal treatment of PET plastic wastes and glucose, respectively. Studies on temperature dependence of formation of organic acids showed thermal stability of acetic acid, whereas, formic acid decomposed readily under hydrothermal conditions. In general, results demonstrated that the presence of oxidants favored formation of organic acids with acetic acid being the major product. Keywords: hydrothermal treatment, organic acids, organic wastes, oxidant, supercritical water oxidation

  9. Drying of α-amylase by spray drying and freeze-drying - a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. de Jesus

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at comparing two traditional methods of drying of enzymes and at verifying the efficiency of each one and their advantages and disadvantages. The experiments were performed with a laboratory spray dryer and freeze-dryer using α-amylase as the model enzyme. An experimental design in star revealed that spray drying is mainly influenced by the inlet air temperature and feed flow rate, which were considered to be the main factors influencing the enzymatic activity and water activity; the long period of material exposure to high temperatures causes a partial activity loss. In the experiments of freeze drying, three methods of freezing were used (freezer, acetone and dry ice, and liquid nitrogen and samples subsequently freeze-dried for times ranging between 0-24 hours. The product obtained from the two techniques showed high enzymatic activity and low water activity. For the drying of heat-resistant enzymes, in which the product to be obtained does not have high added value, spray drying may be more economically viable because, in the freeze drying process, the process time can be considered as a limiting factor when choosing a technique.

  10. Mimicking spray drying by drying of single droplets deposited on a flat surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdana, J.A.; Fox, M.B.; Schutyser, M.A.I.; Boom, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    The inactivation of bioactive ingredients during spray drying is often matrix specific. Therefore, the design of new processes or the optimisation of existing spray drying processes is usually highly product specific and requires numerous experiments. Rapid experimentation methods that facilitate

  11. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye Sections What Is Dry Eye? Dry Eye Symptoms ... Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es el Ojo Seco? ...

  12. Dry Skin (Xerosis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dry skin: Symptoms Dry skin: Causes Dry skin: Treatment Dry skin: Tips Tips Dry skin: Tips for managing Here are tips that can prevent dry skin or keep it from getting worse. Do not use hot water . Hot water removes your natural skin oils more ...

  13. Process-based modeling of coupled energy and water cycle under dry tropical conditions: an experiment at local scale in the cultivated Sahel (South-West Niger)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velluet, C.; Demarty, J.; Cappelaere, B.; Braud, I.; Boulain, N.; Charvet, G.; Chazarin, J.-P.; Mainassara, I.; Boucher, M.; Issoufou, H. B.-A.; Ibrahim, M.; Oi, M.; Ramier, D.; Benarrosh, N.; Yahou, H.

    2012-04-01

    In the dry tropics in general and, particularly in the African Sahel, agro-ecosystems and hydrosystems are very sensitive to climate variability and land management. In turn, it has been shown that soil moisture, vegetation and surface fluxes produce substantial feedback effects on rainfall-producing atmospheric convection. Therefore, it is of prime importance to understand and to model the dynamics of the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum in response to contrasted meteorological and terrestrial conditions for this area. The objective of this study is to produce a process-based model of water and energy transfers in the soil and land-atmosphere interface over an entire 5-year period, at local scale, for the two main land cover types of South-West Niger: millet-crop and fallow savannah. A comprehensive dataset is available over that whole period in two such fields of the Wankama catchment, making it a rather unique asset for West Africa. This area is typical of the central Sahel conditions, with ~400-600 mm annual rainfall concentrated in the 4-5 months wet season, followed by the 7-8 months dry season. Soils are essentially sandy and prone to surface crusting, which induces a strong vertical contrast in hydrodynamic properties. The dataset used here includes 5 years of atmospheric forcing (rainfall, wind speed, sun and atmosphere radiation, air temperature and moisture) and validation variables (net radiation, turbulent fluxes and soil temperature and moisture profiles), recorded every 30 min. The seasonal course of vegetation phenology (LAI, height, biomass) and soil characteristics (particle size and density profiles) are also available. The SiSPAT (Simple Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Transfer, Braud et al., 1995) physically-based model is used for this study. It solves the mass and heat transfer system of equations in the soil, with vapour phase, coupled with a two-component (bare soil and one vegetation layer) water and energy budget at the surface-atmosphere interface

  14. FEBEX project: full-scale engineered barriers experiment for a deep geological repository for high level radioactive waste in crystalline host rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberid, J.; Barcala, J. M.; Campos, R.; Cuevas, A. M.; Fernandez, E. [Ciemat. Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    FEBEX has the multiple objective of demonstrating the feasibility of manufacturing, handling and constructing the engineered barriers and of developing codes for the thermo-hydro-mechanical and thermo-hydro-geochemical performance assessment of a deep geological repository for high level radioactive wastes. These objectives require integrated theoretical and experimental development work. The experimental work consists of three parts: an in situ test, a mock-up test and a series of laboratory tests. The experiments is based on the Spanish reference concept for crystalline rock, in which the waste capsules are placed horizontally in drifts surround by high density compacted bentonite blocks. In the two large-scale tests, the thermal effects of the wastes were simulated by means of heaters; hydration was natural in the in situ test and controlled in the mock-up test. The large-scale tests, with their monitoring systems, have been in operation for more than two years. the demonstration has been achieved in the in situ test and there are great expectation that numerical models sufficiently validated for the near-field performance assessment will be achieved. (Author)

  15. Health care waste management in community-based care: experiences of community health workers in low resource communities in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Hangulu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In South Africa, community health workers (CHWs working in community-based care (CBC programmes provide care to patients most of whom are living with HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis (TB. Although studies have shown that the caregiving activities provided by the CHWs generate health care waste (HCW, there is limited information about the experiences of CHWs on health care waste management (HCWM in CBC. This study explored HCWM in CBC in Durban, South Africa from the perspectives CHWs. Methods We used three ethnographic approaches to collect data: focus group discussions, participant observations and informal discussions. Data was collected from 85 CHWs working in 29 communities in the Durban metropolis, South Africa. Data collection took place from July 2013 to August 2014. Results CHWs provided nursing care activities to patients many of whom were incontinent or bedridden. Some the patients were living with HIV/AIDS/TB, stroke, diabetes, asthma, arthritis and high blood pressure. These caregiving activities generate sharps and infectious waste but CHWs and family members did not segregate HCW according to the risk posed as stipulated by the HCWM policy. In addition, HCW was left with domestic waste. Major barriers to proper HCWM identified by CHWs include, lack of assistance from family members in assisting patients to use the toilet or change diapers and removing HCW from homes, irregular waste collection by waste collectors, inadequate water for practicing hygiene and sanitation, long distance between the house and the toilets and poor conditions of communal toilets and pit latrines. As a result of these barriers, HCW was illegally dumped along roads or in the bush, burnt openly and buried within the yards. Liquid HCW such as vomit, urine and sputum were disposed in open spaces near the homes. Conclusion Current policies on primary health care (PHC and HCWM in South Africa have not paid attention to HCWM. Findings suggest the

  16. Health care waste management in community-based care: experiences of community health workers in low resource communities in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangulu, Lydia; Akintola, Olagoke

    2017-05-15

    In South Africa, community health workers (CHWs) working in community-based care (CBC) programmes provide care to patients most of whom are living with HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis (TB). Although studies have shown that the caregiving activities provided by the CHWs generate health care waste (HCW), there is limited information about the experiences of CHWs on health care waste management (HCWM) in CBC. This study explored HCWM in CBC in Durban, South Africa from the perspectives CHWs. We used three ethnographic approaches to collect data: focus group discussions, participant observations and informal discussions. Data was collected from 85 CHWs working in 29 communities in the Durban metropolis, South Africa. Data collection took place from July 2013 to August 2014. CHWs provided nursing care activities to patients many of whom were incontinent or bedridden. Some the patients were living with HIV/AIDS/TB, stroke, diabetes, asthma, arthritis and high blood pressure. These caregiving activities generate sharps and infectious waste but CHWs and family members did not segregate HCW according to the risk posed as stipulated by the HCWM policy. In addition, HCW was left with domestic waste. Major barriers to proper HCWM identified by CHWs include, lack of assistance from family members in assisting patients to use the toilet or change diapers and removing HCW from homes, irregular waste collection by waste collectors, inadequate water for practicing hygiene and sanitation, long distance between the house and the toilets and poor conditions of communal toilets and pit latrines. As a result of these barriers, HCW was illegally dumped along roads or in the bush, burnt openly and buried within the yards. Liquid HCW such as vomit, urine and sputum were disposed in open spaces near the homes. Current policies on primary health care (PHC) and HCWM in South Africa have not paid attention to HCWM. Findings suggest the need for primary health care reform to develop the competencies

  17. Corrosion mechanisms for metal alloy waste forms: experiment and theory Level 4 Milestone M4FT-14LA0804024 Fuel Cycle Research & Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Taylor, Christopher D. [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Fontana Corrosion Center; Kim, Eunja [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Goff, George Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kolman, David Gary [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-31

    This document meets Level 4 Milestone: Corrosion mechanisms for metal alloy waste forms - experiment and theory. A multiphysics model is introduces that will provide the framework for the quantitative prediction of corrosion rates of metallic waste forms incorporating the fission product Tc. The model requires a knowledge of the properties of not only the metallic waste form, but also the passive oxide films that will be generated on the waste form, and the chemistry of the metal/oxide and oxide/environment interfaces. in collaboration with experimental work, the focus of this work is on obtaining these properties from fundamental atomistic models. herein we describe the overall multiphysics model, which is based on MacDonald's point-defect model for passivity. We then present the results of detailed electronic-structure calculations for the determination of the compatibility and properties of Tc when incorporated into intermetallic oxide phases. This work is relevant to the formation of multi-component oxides on metal surfaces that will incorporate Tc, and provide a kinetic barrier to corrosion (i.e. the release of Tc to the environment). Atomistic models that build upon the electronic structure calculations are then described using the modified embedded atom method to simulate metallic dissolution, and Buckingham potentials to perform classical molecular dynamics and statics simulations of the technetium (and, later, iron-technetium) oxide phases. Electrochemical methods were then applied to provide some benchmark information of the corrosion and electrochemical properties of Technetium metal. The results indicate that published information on Tc passivity is not complete and that further investigation is warranted.

  18. A drying coefficient for building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheffler, Gregor Albrecht; Plagge, Rudolf

    2009-01-01

    The drying experiment is an important element of the hygrothermal characterisation of building materials. Contrary to other moisture transport experiments as the vapour diffusion and the water absorption test, it is until now not possible to derive a simple coefficient for the drying. However...... characterisation of building materials on which the attempt is based to standardize the drying experiment as well as to derive a single number material coefficient. The drying itself is briefly reviewed and existing approaches are discussed. On this basis, possible definitions are evaluated. Finally, a drying...... coefficient is defined which can be determined based on measured drying data. The correlation of this coefficient with the water absorption and the vapour diffusion coefficient is analyzed and its additional information content is critically challenged. As result, a drying coefficient has been derived...

  19. Residential Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Fruergaard, Thilde; Matsufuji, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Residential waste comes from residential areas with multi-family and single-family housing and includes four types of waste: household waste, garden waste, bulky waste and household hazardous waste. Typical unit generation rates, material composition, chemical composition and determining factors...... are discussed in this chapter. Characterizing residential waste is faced with the problem that many residences already divert some waste away from the official collection systems, for example performing home composting of vegetable waste and garden waste, having their bundled newspaper picked up by the scouts...... twice a year or bringing their used furniture to the flea markets organized by charity clubs. Thus, much of the data available on residential waste represents collected waste and not necessarily all generated waste. The latter can only be characterized by careful studies directly at the source...

  20. Fermentation of solid wastes in Switzerland; Feststoff-Vergaerung in der Schweiz. Schlussbericht 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liesch, B.; Mueller, C.

    2007-06-15

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a study on dry fermentation technologies. Information on the state-of-the-art of current dry fermentation systems is presented and the potential of implementing dry fermentation in Swiss agriculture is discussed. The study reveals that the current dry fermentation technologies provided by various enterprises are partly not suitable (complex, continuous operating digestion reactors, developed for handling municipal solid waste). Batch digestion reactors, however, are said by the authors to be mature for application in the Swiss agricultural area. Wet fermentation technologies are also quoted as being able to utilise organic substrates with high dry-matter content and are thus said to be economically more competitive than dry fermentation systems. Dry fermentation is quoted as being a technology with a high development potential. Details are presented on several continuous and non-continuous processes used. Also, the potential for the fermentation of solid wastes in Switzerland is reviewed. Experience made in Germany is also examined.

  1. Equipment for the management of spent fuels and radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bower, C. C. F.; Carter, C. C.; Doubt, H. A. [GEC Alsthom Engineering System Ltd., Leicester (United Kingdom)

    1996-04-15

    UK experience over the last thirty years with the design and implementation of equipment for the management of spent fuels and radioactive wastes has ranged from remote handling, through encapsulation and containerisation, to the medium-term storage of heat-producing fuels and wastes in the dry state. The design principles involved in handling, transporting and storing hazardous materials safely and reliably, while ensuring biological shielding, containment and cooling of radioactive materials, are common to the various kinds of equipment presented in this paper, even though the individual requirements may be very different. The UK nuclear programme over the last thirty years has encouraged the development of extensive expertise in the engineering of equipment for the management of spent fuel and radioactive waste. This expertise can be applied with benefit to the Korean nuclear programme.

  2. Low temperature waste form process intensification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Cozzi, A. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hansen, E. K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hill, K. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-30

    This study successfully demonstrated process intensification of low temperature waste form production. Modifications were made to the dry blend composition to enable a 50% increase in waste concentration, thus allowing for a significant reduction in disposal volume and associated costs. Properties measurements showed that the advanced waste form can be produced using existing equipment and processes. Performance of the waste form was equivalent or better than the current baseline, with approximately double the amount of waste incorporation. The results demonstrate the feasibility of significantly accelerating low level waste immobilization missions across the DOE complex and at environmental remediation sites worldwide.

  3. Influence of regulation on the productivity of waste utilities. What can we learn with the Portuguese experience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Pedro; Marques, Rui Cunha

    2012-06-01

    This paper examines the merits and the perverse effects of quality of service regulation in the performance of urban waste services when implemented alone and compares the performance of different economic regulatory methods. By means of a productivity analysis, we investigate the influence of a five-year period of regulation on the performance of Portuguese urban waste utilities using an unbalanced panel data for the period 2001-2008. Different non-parametric methods were applied to estimate the productivity change, all leading to similar outcomes. We observed a tendency of productivity decline in the urban waste utilities and concluded that in spite of the unequivocal improvements in the quality of service induced by sunshine regulation, more should be done as far as economic regulation is concerned. We also found that the use of sunshine regulation together with low incentive economic regulatory methods is not positive, leading to overinvestment rather than to value for money. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Performance and Analysis of Floating dome Anaerobic Digester with Wet and Dry Feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathish, S.; Parthiban, A.; Venugopal, S.; Jothi Prakash, V. M.

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of anaerobic digestion to generate biogas yield and it’s performed using wet and dry feed stock. The laboratory experiment is conducted in a floating dome type anaerobic digester with 1m3 capacity. It is made up of fibre material at continues process. The starter cowdung used as an inoculum of the anaerobic digester. Then raw materials feeded as a wet type wheat straw and dry type wheat straw is the ratio of 1:1 waste/water in both the experiments wet and dry wheat straw. In this experiments are fermented at 30ºC to 35ºC temperature is maintained. The daily biogas yield, cumulative biogas yield, pH, CH4, and hydro retention time these parameters is studied and analysed. The maximum daily biogas is 25liters and 42% of methane is achieved in dry wheat straw at 15th day of digestion. The highest gas yield obtained in dry condition compare to wet condition and acid level also decreased in wet digestion.

  5. Nutritive and Antioxidant properties of Shade Dried Leafy Vegetables Consumed in Northern Côte d’Ivoire

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Dehegnan Oulaï; Lessoy Yves Thierry Zoue; Sébastien Lamine Niamké

    2016-01-01

    Leafy vegetables are highly perishable and often subjected to post-harvest wastes. Among the various methods of preservation, the effect of shadow drying on the nutritive value and antioxidant properties of five (5) leafy vegetables species widely consumed in Northern Côte d’Ivoire was investigated. These species were Amaranthus hybridus, Andasonia digitata, Ceiba patendra, Hibiscus sabdariffa and Vigna unguiculata. Experiment was conducted as follow: portions of washed and drained fresh leaf...

  6. Conversion of food industrial wastes into bioplastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, P H; Chua, H; Huang, A L; Lo, W; Chen, G Q

    1998-01-01

    The usage of plastics in packaging and disposable products, and the generation of plastic waste, have been increasing drastically. Broader usage of biodegradable plastics in packaging and disposable products as a solution to environmental problems would heavily depend on further reduction of costs and the discovery of novel biodegradable plastics with improved properties. In the authors' laboratories, various carbohydrates in the growth media, including sucrose, lactic acid, butyric acid, valeric acid, and various combinations of butyric and valeric acids, were utilized as the carbon (c) sources for the production of bioplastics by Alcaligenes eutrophus. As the first step in pursuit of eventual usage of industrial food wastewater as nutrients for microorganisms to synthesize bioplastics, the authors investigated the usage of malt wastes from a beer brewery plant as the C sources for the production of bioplastics by microorganisms. Specific polymer production yield by A. Latus DSM 1124 increased to 70% polymer/cell (g/g) and 32 g/L cell dry wt, using malt wastes as the C source. The results of these experiments indicated that, with the use of different types of food wastes as the C source, different polyhydroxyalkanoate copolymers could be produced with distinct polymer properties.

  7. Virtual DRI dataset development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hixson, Jonathan G.; Teaney, Brian P.; May, Christopher; Maurer, Tana; Nelson, Michael B.; Pham, Justin R.

    2017-05-01

    The U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD MSD's target acquisition models have been used for many years by the military analysis community for sensor design, trade studies, and field performance prediction. This paper analyzes the results of perception tests performed to compare the results of a field DRI (Detection, Recognition, and Identification Test) performed in 2009 to current Soldier performance viewing the same imagery in a laboratory environment and simulated imagery of the same data set. The purpose of the experiment is to build a robust data set for use in the virtual prototyping of infrared sensors. This data set will provide a strong foundation relating, model predictions, field DRI results and simulated imagery.

  8. Hazardous Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you throw these substances away, they become hazardous waste. Some hazardous wastes come from products in our homes. Our garbage can include such hazardous wastes as old batteries, bug spray cans and paint ...

  9. Conversion of industrial food wastes by Alcaligenes latus into polyhydroxyalkanoates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, P H; Chua, H; Huang, A L; Ho, K P

    1999-01-01

    Broader usage of biodegradable plastics in packaging and disposable products as a solution to environmental problems would heavily depend on further reduction of costs and the discovery of novel biodegradable plastics with improved properties. As the first step in our pursuit of eventual usage of industrial food wastewater as nutrients for microorganisms to synthesise environmental-friendly bioplastics, we investigated the usage of soya wastes from a soya milk dairy, and malt wastes from a beer brewery plant as the carbon sources for the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) by selected strain of microorganism. Bench experiments showed that Alcaligenes latus DSM 1124 used the nutrients from malt and soya wastes to biosynthesise PHAs. The final dried cell mass and specific polymer production of A. latus DSM 1124 were 32g/L and 70% polymer/cells (g/g), 18.42 g/L and 32.57% polymer/cell (g/g), and 28 g/L and 36% polymer/cells (g/g), from malt waste, soya waste, and from sucrose, respectively. These results suggest that many types of food wastes might be used as the carbon source for the production of PHA.

  10. Experience in radioactive wastes management in Jose Cabrera Nuclear Power Plant; Experiencia en la gestion de residuos radiactivos en C.N. Jose Cabrera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Socorro Garcia, G.; Rodriguez Gomez, M. A.; Garcia Acosta, F.

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents the problems and subsequent procedures carried out for eight years to manage the following types of wastes: resins produced in the preparatory decommissioning activities; metal wastes with high dose rate; low activity wastes; and prepared wastes of different natures and volumes.

  11. Use of preservative-free hyaluronic acid (Hylabak® for a range of patients with dry eye syndrome: experience in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brzhesky VV

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Vladimir Vsevolodovich Brjesky,1 Yury Fedorovich Maychuk,2 Alexey Vladimirovich Petrayevsky,3 Peter Gerrievich Nagorsky41Department of Ophthalmology, Pediatric State Medical Academy, Saint Petersburg, 2Moscow Research Institute of Eye Diseases, Moscow, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Volgograd State Medical University, Volgograd, 4Novosibirsk Branch of the Federal State Institute MNTK Eye Microsurgery, Novosibirsk, Russian Federation, RussiaAbstract: Artificial tear preparations are important in the management of dry eye syndrome. We present the findings from four recently published studies conducted in Russia assessing Hylabak® (marketed as Hyabak® in Europe, a preservative-free hyaluronic acid preparation, for the treatment of dry eye syndrome. All studies had an open, noncomparative design, but one compared the findings with those from 25 patients treated with Tear Naturale® in previous studies. A total of 134 children and adults were enrolled, and the etiologies of dry eye syndrome included contact lens use, intensive office work, adenovirus eye infection, postmenopausal status, persistent meibomian blepharitis, Sjögren's syndrome, phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation, and refractive surgery. The patients were treated with Hylabak for 2 weeks to 2 months. All studies showed that Hylabak resulted in marked improvement as assessed by subjective sensations/complaints, Schirmer's test, Norn’s test, impression cytology and biomicroscopy, staining, and tear osmolarity. Greater benefits were also reported compared with Tear Naturale, including a faster onset of action. Hylabak was well tolerated. In conclusion, Hylabak provided rapid and safe relief from the signs and symptoms of dry eye syndrome, as well as improvement in objective measures, in a wide range of patients.Keywords: dry eye, eye drops, artificial tears, hyaluronic acid, Hylabak®, preservative-free

  12. Hazardous Waste Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) is playing a major role in development of technologies for cleanup of toxic and hazardous waste in military...

  13. Drying of liquid food droplets : enzyme inactivation and multicomponent diffusion

    OpenAIRE

    Meerdink, G.

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis the drying of liquid food droplets is studied from three different points of view: drying kinetics, enzyme inactivation and multicomponent diffusion. Mathematical models are developed and validated experimentally.

    Drying experiments are performed with suspended droplets and with free falling droplets under spray-drying conditions. The experiments with the free falling droplets are performed in a specially designed drying tower using a resonance nozzle. The reso...

  14. Quantification of urban atmospheric boundary layer greenhouse gas dry mole fraction enhancements in the dormant season: Results from the Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha L. Miles

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We assess the detectability of city emissions via a tower-based greenhouse gas (GHG network, as part of the Indianapolis Flux (INFLUX experiment. By examining afternoon-averaged results from a network of carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4, and carbon monoxide (CO mole fraction measurements in Indianapolis, Indiana for 2011–2013, we quantify spatial and temporal patterns in urban atmospheric GHG dry mole fractions. The platform for these measurements is twelve communications towers spread across the metropolitan region, ranging in height from 39 to 136 m above ground level, and instrumented with cavity ring-down spectrometers. Nine of the sites were deployed as of January 2013 and data from these sites are the focus of this paper. A background site, chosen such that it is on the predominantly upwind side of the city, is utilized to quantify enhancements caused by urban emissions. Afternoon averaged mole fractions are studied because this is the time of day during which the height of the boundary layer is most steady in time and the area that influences the tower measurements is likely to be largest. Additionally, atmospheric transport models have better performance in simulating the daytime convective boundary layer compared to the nighttime boundary layer. Averaged from January through April of 2013, the mean urban dormant-season enhancements range from 0.3 ppm CO2 at the site 24 km typically downwind of the edge of the city (Site 09 to 1.4 ppm at the site at the downwind edge of the city (Site 02 to 2.9 ppm at the downtown site (Site 03. When the wind is aligned such that the sites are downwind of the urban area, the enhancements are increased, to 1.6 ppm at Site 09, and 3.3 ppm at Site 02. Differences in sampling height affect the reported urban enhancement by up to 50%, but the overall spatial pattern remains similar. The time interval over which the afternoon data are averaged alters the calculated urban enhancement by an average of 0.4 ppm

  15. Solar Trap for Banana Drying Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Food drying methods nowadays are mostly in high use of electricity and fuel which lead to high operational cost. This has resulted in a waste of energy and money due to the use of modern tools requires significant costs for implementation. Meanwhile, the traditional food drying process only uses sun rays in their process, where the process is far more efficient than the modern drying method. In this study, the test was conducted to determine the trapped solar heat energy requirements for the process of drying foods such as agricultural products, particularly bananas. The solar trap test by using solar trap container was carried out include determining the thermal energy requirement for drying, preparing equipment (solar trap container to trap solar energy, handling and drying tests on samples of bananas. The percentage amount of water removal and energy required for the drying process was found to be 48% and 134 J. The results of this study can determine that solar trap drying method is easier, quicker and more effective than the usual method of drying because it use natural solar energy. Several proposals have been suggested for improvement for future study, such as controlling the solar trap air in the container, replacing the trap solar wall with a darker color, examining the floors slope so that more solar traps collected and installing a small hose on the base of the container so that the water evaporated in the solar trap may exit through the route.

  16. Large-scale vertical velocity, diabatic heating and drying profiles associated with seasonal and diurnal variations of convective systems observed in the GoAmazon2014/5 experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the characteristics of large-scale vertical velocity, apparent heating source (Q1 and apparent moisture sink (Q2 profiles associated with seasonal and diurnal variations of convective systems observed during the two intensive operational periods (IOPs that were conducted from 15 February to 26 March 2014 (wet season and from 1 September to 10 October 2014 (dry season near Manaus, Brazil, during the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5 experiment. The derived large-scale fields have large diurnal variations according to convective activity in the GoAmazon region and the morning profiles show distinct differences between the dry and wet seasons. In the wet season, propagating convective systems originating far from the GoAmazon region are often seen in the early morning, while in the dry season they are rarely observed. Afternoon convective systems due to solar heating are frequently seen in both seasons. Accordingly, in the morning, there is strong upward motion and associated heating and drying throughout the entire troposphere in the wet season, which is limited to lower levels in the dry season. In the afternoon, both seasons exhibit weak heating and strong moistening in the boundary layer related to the vertical convergence of eddy fluxes. A set of case studies of three typical types of convective systems occurring in Amazonia – i.e., locally occurring systems, coastal-occurring systems and basin-occurring systems – is also conducted to investigate the variability of the large-scale environment with different types of convective systems.

  17. Large-scale vertical velocity, diabatic heating and drying profiles associated with seasonal and diurnal variations of convective systems observed in the GoAmazon2014/5 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Shuaiqi; Xie, Shaocheng; Zhang, Yunyan; Zhang, Minghua; Schumacher, Courtney; Upton, Hannah; Jensen, Michael P.; Johnson, Karen L.; Wang, Meng; Ahlgrimm, Maike; Feng, Zhe; Minnis, Patrick; Thieman, Mandana

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the characteristics of large-scale vertical velocity, apparent heating source (Q1) and apparent moisture sink (Q2) profiles associated with seasonal and diurnal variations of convective systems observed during the two intensive operational periods (IOPs) that were conducted from 15 February to 26 March 2014 (wet season) and from 1 September to 10 October 2014 (dry season) near Manaus, Brazil, during the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) experiment. The derived large-scale fields have large diurnal variations according to convective activity in the GoAmazon region and the morning profiles show distinct differences between the dry and wet seasons. In the wet season, propagating convective systems originating far from the GoAmazon region are often seen in the early morning, while in the dry season they are rarely observed. Afternoon convective systems due to solar heating are frequently seen in both seasons. Accordingly, in the morning, there is strong upward motion and associated heating and drying throughout the entire troposphere in the wet season, which is limited to lower levels in the dry season. In the afternoon, both seasons exhibit weak heating and strong moistening in the boundary layer related to the vertical convergence of eddy fluxes. A set of case studies of three typical types of convective systems occurring in Amazonia – i.e., locally occurring systems, coastal-occurring systems and basin-occurring systems – is also conducted to investigate the variability of the large-scale environment with different types of convective systems.

  18. Composting potential of different inoculum sources in the modified SEBAC system treatment of municipal solid wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster-Carneiro, T; Pérez, M; Romero, L I

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the work described here was to analyse the biomethanization process for three types of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) using two different inoculum sources in a sequential leach-bed anaerobic reactor under thermophilic (55 degrees C) and dry conditions (20%TS). The OFMSWs studied were: separately collected food waste (SC_OFMSW) from restaurants, synthetic waste (ST_OFMSW) and mechanically selected municipal waste (MS_OFMSW). The inoculum studied were digested mesophilic sludge (SLUDGE) and digested SC_OFMSW. The results show that SLUDGE gave the best performance and this was therefore selected for the rest of the experiments. Three assays were performed to analyse the biomethanization processes of three types of organic waste. The results suggest that all three wastes give rise to an acclimation stage with acidogenic/acetogenic activity between days 5 and 20-30 and a stabilization phase associated with methanogenic activity. In conclusion, a mixture of OFMSW (regardless of its origin) and SWINE arranged in layers in the reactor, as well as SLUDGE used with an inoculum source, enhanced the fast start up phase of a modified sequential leach-bed system under dry thermophilic conditions.

  19. Infrared drying of herbs (Research Note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. PÄÄKKÖNEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Drying experiments on peppermint (Mentha piperita L., anise hyssop (Agastache foeniculum L., parsley (Petroselinum crispum L. and garden angelica (Angelica archangelica L. were conducted using near infrared drying, operating at a product temperature of 35-50°C. The oil content, composition and residual water content of the dried herbs were determined. The microbiological quality of the fresh and the dried material was determined for total bacterial count and coliforms, moulds and yeasts. The results indicate that infrared radiation is has potential for drying herbs since it is gentle and shortens the processing time.

  20. Closed Loop Waste Processing Dryer (DRYER) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this proposal is to develop a gravity-independent pasteurization and hot air drying process suitable for stabilization of ALS wet cabin waste,...

  1. The effect of drying techniques on the elastoplastic properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the effect of three different drying techniques i.e. microwave, sun and oven drying on the physicochemical and compressional characteristics of microcrystalline cellulose obtained from sawdust, an agricultural waste product. The physicochemical properties were investigated by assessing the tapped ...

  2. The Effect of Supplementation Urea and Sulfur in Mixed Cassava Waste Fermented and Soyabean Cake Waste on Digestibility of Protein and Blood Urea Male Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Bata

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen local male sheep were divided into 3 groups I,II and III based on the body weight 18.55±1.27, 15.79±0.67 and 13.14±1.33 kg respectively. Two level urea (2 and 3% and three levels Sulfur (0.02 and 0.3% as treatment, so pattern factorial 2x3 with Randomized Block Design used this experiment. All of the treatment get a same basal feed namely land-grass and concentrate with dry matter ratio 70:30.  The total intake of  dry matter was 4 % of body weight. The concentrate consist of cassava waste fermented  and soyabean cake waste with dry matter  ratio 77.50 : 22.50. Supplementation of urea and sulfur shown not significant interaction, but supplementation urea had effect high significantly (P<0.01 on digestibility of protein and sulfur only had effect significant  (P<0.05 on blood urea. These result had indication that enriched urea in the diet could increase protein digestibility and sulfur level 0.2% could prevent NH3 absorption from rumen. (Animal Production 1(2: 75-81 (1999   Key Words: cassava waste, soyabean cake waste, fermentation, digestibility, urea blood.

  3. Mimicking spray drying by drying of single droplets deposited on a flat surface

    OpenAIRE

    Perdana, J.A.; Fox, M.B.; Schutyser, M. A. I.; Boom, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    The inactivation of bioactive ingredients during spray drying is often matrix specific. Therefore, the design of new processes or the optimisation of existing spray drying processes is usually highly product specific and requires numerous experiments. Rapid experimentation methods that facilitate fast data generation are therefore desired. A novel method for drying single droplets to mimic spray drying is proposed. The approach involves droplet deposition on a hydrophobic flat surface followe...

  4. Utilization of biocatalysts in cellulose waste minimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, J.; Evans, B.R.

    1996-09-01

    Cellulose, a polymer of glucose, is the principal component of biomass and, therefore, a major source of waste that is either buried or burned. Examples of biomass waste include agricultural crop residues, forestry products, and municipal wastes. Recycling of this waste is important for energy conservation as well as waste minimization and there is some probability that in the future biomass could become a major energy source and replace fossil fuels that are currently used for fuels and chemicals production. It has been estimated that in the United States, between 100-450 million dry tons of agricultural waste are produced annually, approximately 6 million dry tons of animal waste, and of the 190 million tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) generated annually, approximately two-thirds is cellulosic in nature and over one-third is paper waste. Interestingly, more than 70% of MSW is landfilled or burned, however landfill space is becoming increasingly scarce. On a smaller scale, important cellulosic products such as cellulose acetate also present waste problems; an estimated 43 thousand tons of cellulose ester waste are generated annually in the United States. Biocatalysts could be used in cellulose waste minimization and this chapter describes their characteristics and potential in bioconversion and bioremediation processes.

  5. Mathematical modelling of cucumber (cucumis sativus) drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahari, N.; Hussein, S. M.; Nursabrina, M.; Hibberd, S.

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigates the applicability of using an experiment based mathematical model (empirical model) and a single phase mathematical model with shrinkage to describe the drying curve of cucumis sativus (cucumber). Drying experiments were conducted using conventional air drying and data obtained from these experiments were fitted to seven empirical models using non-linear least square regression based on the Levenberg Marquardt algorithm. The empirical models were compared according to their root mean square error (RMSE), sum of square error (SSE) and coefficient of determination (R2). A logarithmic model was found to be the best empirical model to describe the drying curve of cucumber. The numerical result of a single phase mathematical model with shrinkage was also compared with experiment data for cucumber drying. A good agreement was obtained between the model predictions and the experimental data.

  6. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Eye Symptoms Causes of Dry Eye Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Leer en Español: ¿Qué ... Your Eyelid Nov 29, 2017 New Dry Eye Treatment is a Tear-Jerker Jul 21, 2017 Three ...

  7. Permeability and hydraulic diffusivity of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository salt inferred from small-scale brine inflow experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McTigue, D.F.

    1993-06-01

    Brine seepage to 17 boreholes in salt at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility horizon has been monitored for several years. A simple model for one-dimensional, radial, darcy flow due to relaxation of ambient pore-water pressure is applied to analyze the field data. Fits of the model response to the data yield estimates of two parameters that characterize the magnitude of the flow and the time scale over which it evolves. With further assumptions, these parameters are related to the permeability and the hydraulic diffusivity of the salt. For those data that are consistent with the model prediction, estimated permeabilities are typically 10{sup {minus}22} to 10{sup {minus}21} m{sup 2}. The relatively small range of inferred permeabilities reflects the observation that the measured seepage fluxes are fairly consistent from hole to hole, of the order of 10{sup {minus}10} m/s. Estimated diffusivities are typically 10{sup {minus}10} to 10{sup {minus}8} m{sup 2}/s. The greater scatter in inferred hydraulic diffusivities is due to the difficulty of matching the idealized model history to the observed evolution of the flows. The data obtained from several of the monitored holes are not consistent with the simple model adopted here; material properties could not be inferred in these cases.

  8. Optimization of Saltcake Removal Flowsheet at SRS through Incorporation of Testing and In-Tank Waste Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Adam G. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Tihey, John R. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Saltcake removal at SRS may be performed for several reasons: to provide space for evaporator operation (i.e., to precipitate more salt in the drop tank), to provide feed for salt processing (i.e. immobilize the waste), or to remove the salt for tank closure. Many different salt dissolution techniques have been employed in the 40 years that SRS has been performing salt removal, from a basic “Add, Sit, Remove” method (water is added on top of the saltcake and time is allowed for diffusion), to performing interstitial liquid removal, or using mixing devices to promote contact with the liquid. Lessons learned from previous saltcake removal campaigns, in addition to testing and modeling, have led to opportunities for improvements to the overall saltcake removal process. This includes better understanding of salt properties and behavior during dissolution; the primary concerns for salt dissolution are the release of radiolytic hydrogen and criticality prevention (post-dissolution). Recent developments in salt dissolution include the reuse of dilute supernate and a semi-continuous dissolution (SCD) process, where low volume mixing eductors are used to deliver water near the surface of the saltcake at the same rate as the salt solution is removed and transferred to a receipt tank.

  9. Drying kinetic of industrial cassava flour: Experimental data in view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwole A. Odetunmibi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this data article, laboratory experimental investigation results on drying kinetic properties: the drying temperature (T, drying air velocity (V and dewatering time (Te, each of the factors has five levels, and the experiment was replicated three times and the output: drying rate and drying time obtained, were observed. The experiment was conducted at National Centre for Agricultural Mechanization (NCAM for a period of eight months, in 2014. Analysis of variance was carried out using randomized complete block design with factorial experiment on each of the outputs: drying rate and drying times of the industrial cassava flour. A clear picture on each of these outputs was provided separately using tables and figures.It was observed that all the main factors as well as two and three ways interactions are significant at 5% level for both drying time and rate. This also implies that the rate of drying grated unfermented cassava mash, to produce industrial cassava flour, depend on the dewatering time (the initial moisture content, temperature of drying, velocity of drying air as well as the combinations of these factors altogether. It was also discovered that all the levels of each of these factors are significantly difference from one another. In summary, the time of drying is a function of the dewatering time which was responsible for the initial moisture content. The higher the initial moisture content the longer the time of drying, and the lower the initial moisture content, the lower the time of drying. Also, the higher the temperature of drying the shorter the time of drying and vice versa. Also, the air velocity effect on the drying process was significant. As velocity increases, rate of drying also increases and vice versa. Finally, it can be deduced that the drying kinetics are influenced by these processing factors. Keywords: Drying rate, Drying time, Drying kinetic, Industrial cassava flour, Temperature, Velocity, Dewatering, Moisture

  10. Low temperature ozone oxidation of solid waste surrogates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabity, James A.; Lee, Jeffrey M.

    2015-09-01

    Solid waste management presents a significant challenge to human spaceflight and especially, long-term missions beyond Earth orbit. A six-month mission will generate over 300 kg of solid wastes per crewmember that must be dealt with to eliminate the need for storage and prevent it from becoming a biological hazard to the crew. There are several methods for the treatment of wastes that include oxidation via ozone, incineration, microbial oxidation or pyrolysis and physical methods such as microwave drying and compaction. In recent years, a low temperature oxidation process using ozonated water has been developed for the chemical conversion of organic wastes to CO2 and H2O. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the rate and effectiveness with which ozone oxidized several different waste materials. Increasing the surface area by chopping or shredding the solids into small pieces more than doubled the rate of oxidation. A greater flow of ozone and agitation of the ozonated water system also increased processing rates. Of the materials investigated, plastics have proven the most difficult to oxidize. The processing of plastics above the glass transition temperatures caused the plastics to clump together which reduced the exposed surface area, while processing at lower temperatures reduced surface reaction kinetics.

  11. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF ORANGE SEED DRYING KINETICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Penteado Rosa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Drying of orange seeds representing waste products from juice processing was studied in the temperatures of 40, 50, 60 and 70 °C and drying velocities of 0.6, 1.0 and 1.4 m/s. Experimental drying kinetics of orange seeds were obtained using a convective air forced dryer. Three thin-layer models: Page model, Lewis model, and the Henderson-Pabis model and the diffusive model were used to predict the drying curves. The Henderson-Pabis and the diffusive models show the best fitting performance and statistical evaluations. Moreover, the temperature dependence on the effective diffusivity followed an Arrhenius relationship, and the activation energies ranging from 16.174 to 16.842 kJ/mol

  12. Sun drying of residual annatto seed powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyego da Costa Santos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Residual annatto seeds are waste from bixin extraction in the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Most of this by-product is currently discarded; however, the use of these seeds in human foods through the elaboration of powder added to other commercial powders is seen as a viable option. This study aimed at drying of residual annatto powder, with and without the oil layer derived from the industrial extraction of bixin, fitting different mathematical models to experimental data and calculating the effective moisture diffusivity of the samples. Powder containing oil exhibited the shortest drying time, highest drying rate (≈ 5.0 kg kg-1 min-1 and highest effective diffusivity (6.49 × 10-12 m2 s-1. All mathematical models assessed were a suitable representation of the drying kinetics of powders with and without oil, with R2 above 0.99 and root mean square error values lower than 1.0.

  13. Thermal drying of the solid fraction from biogas digestate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantelopoulos, Athanasios; Magid, Jakob; Jensen, Lars Stoumann

    2016-01-01

    Drying of solids produced from digestate is prone to N losses through NH3 volatilisation. The applicability of acidification as an NH3 emission mitigation technique during the drying of solids from digestate was assessed in a drying experiment. Operating conditions comprised four drying temperatu......Drying of solids produced from digestate is prone to N losses through NH3 volatilisation. The applicability of acidification as an NH3 emission mitigation technique during the drying of solids from digestate was assessed in a drying experiment. Operating conditions comprised four drying...... temperatures (70-160°C), two air ventilation rates (natural, 420ml/min) and three pH levels (9.2, 6.5 and 5.5) of the solids, modified by the addition of concentrated sulphuric acid. Acidification of the solids from digestate significantly decreased the NH3 emission during drying, irrespective of the drying...

  14. Dry corrosion prediction of radioactive waste containers in long term interim storage: mechanisms of low temperature oxidation of pure iron and numerical simulation of an oxide scale growth; Prevision de la corrosion seche des conteneurs de dechets radioactifs en condition d'entreposage: etude des mecanismes d'oxydation du fer a basse temperature et simulation numerique de la croissance d'une couche d'oxyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, N

    2006-10-15

    In the framework of research on long term behaviour of radioactive waste containers, this work consists on the one hand in the study of low temperature oxidation of iron and on the other hand in the development of a numerical model of oxide scale growth. Isothermal oxidation experiments are performed on pure iron at 300 and 400 C in dry and humid air at atmospheric pressure. Oxide scales formed in these conditions are characterized. They are composed of a duplex magnetite scale under a thin hematite scale. The inner layer of the duplex scale is thinner than the outer one. Both are composed of columnar grains, that are smaller in the inner part. The outer hematite layer is made of very small equiaxed grains. Markers and tracers experiments show that a part of the scale grows at metal/oxide interface thanks to short-circuits diffusion of oxygen. A model for iron oxide scale growth at low temperature is then deduced. Besides this experimental study, the numerical model EKINOX (Estimation Kinetics Oxidation) is developed. It allows to simulate the growth of an oxide scale controlled by mixed mechanisms, such as anionic and cationic vacancies diffusion through the scale, as well as metal transfer at metal/oxide interface. It is based on the calculation of concentration profiles of chemical species and also point defects in the oxide scale and in the substrate. This numerical model does not use the classical quasi-steady-state approximation and calculates the future of cationic vacancies at metal/oxide interface. Indeed, these point defects can either be eliminated by interface motion or injected in the substrate, where they can be annihilated, considering sinks as the climb of dislocations. Hence, the influence of substrate cold-work can be investigated. The EKINOX model is validated in the conditions of Wagner's theory and is confronted with experimental results by its application to the case of high temperature oxidation of nickel. (author)

  15. Reductive capacity measurement of waste forms for secondary radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong; Yang, Jung-Seok; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2015-12-01

    The reductive capacities of dry ingredients and final solid waste forms were measured using both the Cr(VI) and Ce(IV) methods and the results were compared. Blast furnace slag (BFS), sodium sulfide, SnF2, and SnCl2 used as dry ingredients to make various waste forms showed significantly higher reductive capacities compared to other ingredients regardless of which method was used. Although the BFS exhibits appreciable reductive capacity, it requires greater amounts of time to fully react. In almost all cases, the Ce(IV) method yielded larger reductive capacity values than those from the Cr(VI) method and can be used as an upper bound for the reductive capacity of the dry ingredients and waste forms, because the Ce(IV) method subjects the solids to a strong acid (low pH) condition that dissolves much more of the solids. Because the Cr(VI) method relies on a neutral pH condition, the Cr(VI) method can be used to estimate primarily the waste form surface-related and readily dissolvable reductive capacity. However, the Cr(VI) method does not measure the total reductive capacity of the waste form, the long-term reductive capacity afforded by very slowly dissolving solids, or the reductive capacity present in the interior pores and internal locations of the solids.

  16. Converting citrus waste to ethanol and other co-products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conversion of citrus processing waste (CPW) generated during juice production into value added co-products is an important aspect of the juice industry as it offers a solution to waste disposal issues. Currently the practice of drying citrus waste to produce citrus pulp pellets (CPP) for use as catt...

  17. Experience the declassification of radioactive waste from Spanish nuclear power plants as an alternative route of administration; Experiencia de la desclasificacion de los residuos radiactivos procedentes de Centrales Nucleares Espanolas como alternativa de via de gestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Gomez, M. A.; Gonzalez Crespo, M.

    2011-07-01

    During the operation of the plants generated several slightly contaminated materials that can be managed conventionally by declassification. Declassification activity is incorporated into the Waste Management Plan of each plant considered a {sup g}ood practice{sup .} However experience to date demonstrates that there are difficulties to carry out the practice.

  18. Waste management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun Hansen, Karsten; Jamison, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark.......The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark....

  19. Food waste

    OpenAIRE

    Arazim, Lukáš

    2015-01-01

    This thesis looks into issues related to food waste and consists of a theoretical and a practical part. Theoretical part aims to provide clear and complex definition of wood waste related problems, summarize current findings in Czech and foreign sources. Introduction chapter explains important terms and legal measures related to this topic. It is followed by description of causes, implications and possibilities in food waste reduction. Main goal of practical part is analyzing food waste in Cz...

  20. Emission of volatile organic compounds during composting of municipal solid wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komilis, Dimitris P; Ham, Robert K; Park, Jae K

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this study was to identify and quantify volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during composting of the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes (MSW). A laboratory experiment was conducted using organic components of MSW that were decomposed under controlled aerobic conditions. Mixed paper primarily produced alkylated benzenes, alcohols and alkanes. Yard wastes primarily produced terpenes, alkylated benzenes, ketones and alkanes, while food wastes primarily produced sulfides, acids and alcohols. Among 13 aromatic VOCs found in MSW composting facilities, toluene, ethylbenzene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, p-isopropyl toluene, and naphthalene were in the largest amounts. Unseeded mixed paper, seeded mixed paper, seeded yard wastes, unseeded yard wastes, seeded food wastes and unseeded food wastes produced approximately 6.5, 6.1, 2.1, 0.83, 2.5 and 0.33 mg of 13 volatile and semi-volatile aromatic organic compounds combined, respectively, per dry kg. All VOCs were emitted early during the composting process and their production rates decreased with time at thermophilic temperatures.

  1. Automotive Wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guigard, Selma E; Shariaty, Pooya; Niknaddaf, Saeid; Lashaki, Masoud Jahandar; Atkinson, John D; Hashisho, Zaher

    2015-10-01

    A review of the literature from 2014 related to automotive wastes is presented. Topics include solid wastes from autobodies and tires as well as vehicle emissions to soil and air as a result of the use of conventional and alternative fuels. Potential toxicological and health risks related to automotive wastes are also discussed.

  2. Radioactive Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaylock, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of radioactive waste disposal, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the studies included are: (1) high-level and long-lived wastes, and (2) release and burial of low-level wastes. A list of 42 references is also presented. (HM)

  3. Impacts on waste planning and management

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oelofse, Suzan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available the skills or experience to manage this waste responsibly. Available waste water infrastructure in the study area is under pressure and requires urgent intervention. The technologies and capacity at these already stressed facilities are not sufficient...

  4. A consumption approach to wastes from economic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beylot, Antoine; Boitier, Baptiste; Lancesseur, Nicolas; Villeneuve, Jacques

    2016-03-01

    In a context of waste management policies aimed at promoting waste prevention and recycling and, conversely, reducing waste landfilling, this study investigates how waste is generated and treated in a consumption perspective. A Waste Input-Output Analysis is implemented that considers 14 waste fractions and four waste management techniques. Input-Output Tables extended to wastes are initially compiled for the year 2008 considering France and five of its main import suppliers, and further completed with data on waste treatment. Wastes from economic activities are accordingly reallocated to the product categories of household consumption that induce their production. In particular, considering five waste categories (dry recyclable wastes, mixed wastes, mineral wastes, organic wastes, and total wastes) as an aggregation of the 14 waste fractions studied, the ten product categories with the highest contribution account for 64-86% of the total generation of wastes. Waste intensity and volume of expenses are analyzed as the drivers for the amounts of wastes induced by each product category. Similarly, the products responsible for the largest amounts of waste landfilling and incineration without energy recovery, i.e. the management techniques at the bottom of the "waste management hierarchy", are identified. Moreover, this study highlights the relative importance of waste produced abroad as compared to that produced in France, regarding the total amount of waste induced by French household consumption. The sensitivity of results to the modeling of import production is subsequently discussed. Finally, the potential perspectives for this type of consumption approach are considered with respect to its utility and current limitations in a context of waste policy planning, and more particularly regarding the way waste policy targets are set. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Experiments for evaluation of corrosion to develop storage criteria for interim dry storage of aluminum-alloy clad spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peacock, H.B.; Sindelar, R.L.; Lam, P.S.; Murphy, T.H.

    1994-11-01

    The technical bases for specification of limits to environmental exposure conditions to avoid excessive degradation are being developed for storage criteria for dry storage of highly-enriched, aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuels owned by the US Department of Energy. Corrosion of the aluminum cladding is a limiting degradation mechanism (occurs at lowest temperature) for aluminum exposed to an environment containing water vapor. Attendant radiation fields of the fuels can lead to production of nitric acid in the presence of air and water vapor and would exacerbate the corrosion of aluminum by lowering the pH of the water solution. Laboratory-scale specimens are being exposed to various conditions inside an autoclave facility to measure the corrosion of the fuel matrix and cladding materials through weight change measurements and metallurgical analysis. In addition, electrochemical corrosion tests are being performed to supplement the autoclave testing by measuring differences in the general corrosion and pitting corrosion behavior of the aluminum cladding alloys and the aluminum-uranium fuel materials in water solutions.

  6. Energy recovery from distillery wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, M.

    1981-01-01

    Energy and inorganic substances, principally K in the form of dry ash, are recovered from distillery wastes by evaporation of the water content of the wastes followed by combustion. At the same time, the serious pollution problem associated with molasses distilleries is eliminated. A typical stillage from a 60,000 L molasses/day distillery of conventional design consists of 31.2 tons liquid with 8% dry solids (DS) content/h. To concentrate this to 60% DS, 27.0 tons water/h must be evaporated which requires 6.2 tons steam/h. Subsequent combustion generates 9.6 tons steam/h, and additional K/sub 2/O-containing dry ash suitable for fertilizer is recovered. Approximately 2/3 of the K assimilated by sugarcane during its growth can be recycled in this way.

  7. A Computer Program for Modeling the Conversion of Organic Waste to Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Namuli, Rachel; Laflamme, Claude B.; Pillay, Pragasen

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a tool for the analysis of conversion of organic waste into energy. The tool is a program that uses waste characterization parameters and mass flow rates at each stage of the waste treatment process to predict the given products. The specific waste treatment process analysed in this paper is anaerobic digestion. The different waste treatment stages of the anaerobic digestion process are: conditioning of input waste, secondary treatment, drying of sludge, conditioning of di...

  8. Agricultural Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ling; Zhang, Panpan; Shu, Huajie; Chang, Chein-Chi; Wang, Renqing; Zhang, Shuping

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, the quantity of agricultural waste has been rising rapidly all over the world. As a result, the environmental problems and negative impacts of agricultural waste are drawn more and more attention. Therefore, there is a need to adopt proper approaches to reduce and reuse agricultural waste. This review presented about 200 literatures published in 2015 relating to the topic of agricultural waste. The review examined research on agricultural waste in 2015 from the following four aspects: the characterization, reuse, treatment, and management. Researchers highlighted the importance to reuse agricultural waste and investigated the potential to utilize it as biofertilizers, cultivation material, soil amendments, adsorbent, material, energy recycling, enzyme and catalyst etc. The treatment of agricultural waste included carbonization, biodegradation, composting hydrolysis and pyrolysis. Moreover, this review analyzed the differences of the research progress in 2015 from 2014. It may help to reveal the new findings and new trends in this field in 2015 comparing to 2014.

  9. Implications of drying temperature and humidity on the drying kinetics of seaweed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Majid Khan Majahar; Fudholi, Ahmad; Muthuvalu, M. S.; Sulaiman, Jumat; Yasir, Suhaimi Md

    2017-11-01

    A Low Temperature and Humidity Chamber Test tested in the Solar Energy Laboratory, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia. Experiments are attempted to study the effect of drying air temperature and humidity on the drying kinetics of seaweed Kappaphycus species Striatum besides to develop a model to estimate the drying curves. Simple method using a excel software is used in the analysis of raw data obtained from the drying experiment. The values of the parameters a, n and the constant k for the models are determined using a plot of curve drying models. Three different drying models are compared with experiment data seaweed drying at 30, 40, 50 and 60°C and relative humidity 20, 30 and 40% for seaweed. The higher drying temperatures and low relative humidity effects the moisture content that will be rapidly reduced. The most suitable model is selected to best describe the drying behavior of seaweed. The values of the coefficient of determination (R2), mean bias error (MBE) and root mean square error (RMSE) are used to determine the goodness or the quality of the fit. The Page model is showed a better fit to drying seaweed. The results from this study crucial for solar dryer development on pilot scale in Malaysia.

  10. Cocoa Bean (Theobroma cacao L.) Drying Kinetics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chinenye, Ndukwu MacManus; Ogunlowo, A.S; Olukunle, O.J

    2011-01-01

    .... In this work, the experimental drying kinetics of foreign species was investigated, and the experiments were carried out under isothermal conditions, using heated batch drier at 55, 70 and 81 °C...

  11. Determination of spatial and energy distributions of neutrons in experiments on transmutation of radioactive waste using relativistic protons

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuk, I V; Boulyga, S F; Kievitskaia, A I; Rakhno, I L; Chigrinov, S E; Bradnova, V; Krivopustov, M I; Kulakov, B A; Brandt, R; Ochs, M; Wan, J S

    1999-01-01

    The experiments on transmutation of sup 1 sup 2 sup 9 I and sup 2 sup 3 sup 7 Np using uranium-lead targets surrounded by a paraffin moderator were performed at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Russia). The targets were irradiated by 1.5 GeV and 7.4 GeV protons at the Synchrophasotron of JINR. In the frame of present work spatial and energy distributions of neutrons on the surface of the paraffin moderator were measured using SSNTD technique. It is shown that measured values of spectral indices do not depend on the energy of incident protons but depend on the target composition. The presence of the uranium insertion softens neutron spectra.

  12. [Effects of stabilization treatment on migration and transformation of heavy metals in mineral waste residues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shu-Hua; Chen, Zhi-Liang; Zhang, Tai-Ping; Pan, Wei-Bin; Peng, Xiao-Chun; Che, Rong; Ou, Ying-Juan; Lei, Guo-Jian; Zhou, Ding

    2014-04-01

    Different forms of heavy metals in soil will produce different environmental effects, and will directly influence the toxicity, migration and bioavailability of heavy metals. This study used lime, fly ash, dried sludge, peanut shells as stabilizers in the treatment of heavy metals in mineral waste residues. Morphological analyses of heavy metal, leaching experiments, potted plant experiments were carried out to analyze the migration and transformation of heavy metals. The results showed that after adding stabilizers, the pH of the acidic mineral waste residues increased to more than neutral, and the organic matter content increased significantly. The main existing forms of As, Pb, and Zn in the mineral waste residues were the residual. The contents of exchangeable and organic matter-bound As decreased by 65.6% and 87.7% respectively after adding fly ash, dried sludge and peanut shells. Adding lime, fly ash and peanut shells promoted the transformation of As from the Fe-Mn oxide-bound to the carbonate-bound, and adding lime and fly ash promoted the transformation of Pb and Zn from the exchangeable, Fe-Mn oxide-bound, organic matter-bound to the residual. After the early stage of the stabilization treatment, the contents of As, Pb and Zn in the leachate had varying degrees of decline, and adding peanut shells could reduce the contents of As, Pb and Zn in the leachate further. Among them, the content of As decreased most significantly after treatment with fly ash, dried sludge and peanut shells, with a decline of 57.4%. After treatment with lime, fly ash and peanut shells, the content of Zn decreased most significantly, by 24.9%. The addition of stabilizers was advantageous to the germination and growth of plants. The combination of fly ash, dried sludge and peanut shell produced the best effect, and the Vetiveria zizanioides germination rate reached 76% in the treated wasted mineral residues.

  13. Sun drying of residual annatto seed powder

    OpenAIRE

    Dyego da Costa Santos; Alexandre José de Melo Queiroz; Rossana Maria Feitosa de Figueirêdo; Emanuel Neto Alves de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Residual annatto seeds are waste from bixin extraction in the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Most of this by-product is currently discarded; however, the use of these seeds in human foods through the elaboration of powder added to other commercial powders is seen as a viable option. This study aimed at drying of residual annatto powder, with and without the oil layer derived from the industrial extraction of bixin, fitting different mathematical models to experimental data and ...

  14. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Strawberry Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuat TAN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Strawberry drying was investigated experimentally and numerically in this study. In the experiments, samples of strawberry slices with 1 cm thicknesses were used to investigate the effect of the drying air velocity. 5-hour experiments were conducted for three different velocities (0.5, 1 and 2m/s at 70°C air temperature. It was observed that increasing the drying air velocity up to 2 m/s decreased the drying duration by 17% on average.  Moreover, the data obtained from the experimental study were compared to the numerical results. The results were found compatible with each other. Finally, the effect of air temperature and product thickness on drying was examined numerically.

  15. Anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste and agricultural waste and the effect of co-digestion with dairy cow manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias-Corral, Maritza; Samani, Zohrab; Hanson, Adrian; Smith, Geoffrey; Funk, Paul; Yu, Hui; Longworth, John

    2008-11-01

    Anaerobic digestion of dairy cow manure (CM), the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), and cotton gin waste (CGW) was investigated with a two-phase pilot-scale anaerobic digestion (AD) system. The OFMSW and CM were digested as single wastes and as combined wastes. The single waste digestion of CM resulted in 62m3 methane/ton of CM on dry weight basis. The single waste digestion of OFMSW produced 37m3 methane/ton of dry waste. Co-digestion of OFMSW and CM resulted in 172m3 methane/ton of dry waste. Co-digestion of CGW and CM produced 87m3 methane/ton of dry waste. Comparing the single waste digestions with co-digestion of combined wastes, it was shown that co-digestion resulted in higher methane gas yields. In addition, co-digestion of OFMSW and CM promotes synergistic effects resulting in higher mass conversion and lower weight and volume of digested residual.

  16. Development of the Laboratory Anaerobic Bioreactor for Wet and Dry Digestion Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusín Jiří

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents partial results of the laboratory development of an anaerobic bioreactor designed for the physical modelling of (semicontinuous dry or wet anaerobic digestion processes. A horizontal cylindrical tank reactor of 0.4 m3 total capacity has been developed. The reactor allows the continuous stirring of a liquid batch or the intermittent stirring of a solid batch. The bioreactor has been used as a lab-scale digestor in the research project dealing with high-solids (dry anaerobic co-digestion organic fraction of mixed municipal solid waste. The first experiment was performed on the mixture of MSW with corn silage (1:1 with the weight of 300 kg.

  17. Dry Sliding Friction and Wear Studies of Fly Ash Reinforced AA-6351 Metal Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Uthayakumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash particles are potentially used in metal matrix composites due to their low cost, low density, and availability in large quantities as waste by-products in thermal power plants. This study describes multifactor-based experiments that were applied to research and investigation on dry sliding wear system of stir-cast aluminum alloy 6351 with 5, 10, and 15 wt.% fly ash reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs. The effects of parameters such as load, sliding speed, and percentage of fly ash on the sliding wear, specific wear rate, and friction coefficient were analyzed using Grey relational analysis on a pin-on-disc machine. Analysis of variance (ANOVA was also employed to investigate which design parameters significantly affect the wear behavior of the composite. The results showed that the applied load exerted the greatest effect on the dry sliding wear followed by the sliding velocity.

  18. Technical Basis Document No. 6: Waste Package and Drip Shield Corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J; Pasupathi, V; Nair, P; Gordon, G; McCright, D; Gdowski, G; Carroll, S; Steinborn, T; Summers, T; Wong, F; Rebak, R; Lian, T; Ilevbare, G; Lee, J; Hua, F; Payer, J

    2003-08-01

    The waste package and drip shield will experience a wide range of interactive environmental conditions and degradation modes that will determine the overall performance of the waste package and repository. The operable modes of degradation are determined by the temperature regime of operation (region), and are summarized here. Dry-Out Region (T {ge} 120 C; 50 to 400 Years): During the pre-closure period, the waste package will be kept dry by ventilation air. During the thermal pulse, heat generated by radioactive decay will eventually increase the temperature of the waste package, drip shield and drift wall to a level above the boiling point, where the probability of seepage into drifts will become insignificant. Further heating will push the waste package surface temperature above the deliquescence point of expected salt mixtures, thereby preventing the formation of deliquescence brines from dust deposits and humid air. Phase and time-temperature-transformation diagrams predicted for Alloy 22, and validated with experimental data, indicates no significant phase instabilities (LRO and TCP precipitation) at temperatures below 300 C for 10,000 years. Neither will dry oxidation at these elevated temperatures limit waste package life. After the peak temperature is reached, the waste package will begin to cool, eventually reaching a point where deliquescence brine formation may occur. However, corrosion testing of Alloy 22 underneath such films has shown no evidence of life-limiting localized corrosion. Transition Region (120 C {ge} T {ge} 100 C; 400 to 1,000 Years): During continued cooling, the temperature of the drift wall will drop to a level close to the boiling point of the seepage brine, thus permitting the onset of seepage. Corrosion in a concentrated, possibly aggressive, liquid-phase brine, evolved through evaporative concentration, is possible while in this region. However, based upon chemical divide theory, most ({ge} 99%) of the seepage water entering the

  19. Method of preparing nuclear wastes for tansportation and interim storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Gautam; Galvin, Thomas M.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear waste is formed into a substantially water-insoluble solid for temporary storage and transportation by mixing the calcined waste with at least 10 weight percent powdered anhydrous sodium silicate to form a mixture and subjecting the mixture to a high humidity environment for a period of time sufficient to form cementitious bonds by chemical reaction. The method is suitable for preparing an interim waste form from dried high level radioactive wastes.

  20. Drying kinetic of industrial cassava flour: Experimental data in view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odetunmibi, Oluwole A; Adejumo, Oluyemisi A; Oguntunde, Pelumi E; Okagbue, Hilary I; Adejumo, Adebowale O; Suleiman, Esivue A

    2017-12-01

    In this data article, laboratory experimental investigation results on drying kinetic properties: the drying temperature (T), drying air velocity (V) and dewatering time (Te), each of the factors has five levels, and the experiment was replicated three times and the output: drying rate and drying time obtained, were observed. The experiment was conducted at National Centre for Agricultural Mechanization (NCAM) for a period of eight months, in 2014. Analysis of variance was carried out using randomized complete block design with factorial experiment on each of the outputs: drying rate and drying times of the industrial cassava flour. A clear picture on each of these outputs was provided separately using tables and figures. It was observed that all the main factors as well as two and three ways interactions are significant at 5% level for both drying time and rate. This also implies that the rate of drying grated unfermented cassava mash, to produce industrial cassava flour, depend on the dewatering time (the initial moisture content), temperature of drying, velocity of drying air as well as the combinations of these factors altogether. It was also discovered that all the levels of each of these factors are significantly difference from one another. In summary, the time of drying is a function of the dewatering time which was responsible for the initial moisture content. The higher the initial moisture content the longer the time of drying, and the lower the initial moisture content, the lower the time of drying. Also, the higher the temperature of drying the shorter the time of drying and vice versa. Also, the air velocity effect on the drying process was significant. As velocity increases, rate of drying also increases and vice versa. Finally, it can be deduced that the drying kinetics are influenced by these processing factors.

  1. Using mixture design of experiments to assess the environmental impact of clay-based structural ceramics containing foundry wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, M; Segadães, A M; Andrés, A

    2015-12-15

    This work describes the leaching behavior of potentially hazardous metals from three different clay-based industrial ceramic products (wall bricks, roof tiles, and face bricks) containing foundry sand dust and Waelz slag as alternative raw materials. For each product, ten mixtures were defined by mixture design of experiments and the leaching of As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, and Zn was evaluated in pressed specimens fired simulating the three industrial ceramic processes. The results showed that, despite the chemical, mineralogical and processing differences, only chrome and molybdenum were not fully immobilized during ceramic processing. Their leaching was modeled as polynomial equations, functions of the raw materials contents, and plotted as response surfaces. This brought to evidence that Cr and Mo leaching from the fired products is not only dependent on the corresponding contents and the basicity of the initial mixtures, but is also clearly related with the mineralogical composition of the fired products, namely the amount of the glassy phase, which depends on both the major oxides contents and the firing temperature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Issues related to the construction and operation of a geological disposal facility for nuclear fuel waste in crystalline rock - the Canadian experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, C.J.; Baumgartner, P.; Ohta, M.M.; Simmons, G.R.; Whitaker, S.H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs

    1997-12-31

    This paper covers the overview of the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program, the general approach to the siting, design, construction, operation and closure of a geological disposal facility, the implementing disposal, and the public involvement in implementing geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste. And two appendices are included. 45 refs., 5 tabs., 10 figs.

  3. Organic wastes from bioenergy and ecological sanitation as soil fertility improver: a field experiment in a tropical Andosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, A.; Nehls, T.; George, E.; Kaupenjohann, M.

    2015-11-01

    Andosols require the regular application of phosphorus (P) to sustain crop productivity. In a practice oriented field experiment at an Andosol site in NW Tanzania, the effects of various soil amendments (standard compost, urine, biogas slurry and CaSa-compost [biochar and sanitized human excreta]) on (i) the productivity of locally grown crop species, on (ii) the plants' nutrient status and on (iii) the soil's physico-chemical properties were studied. None of the amendments had any significant effect on soil moisture, so the observed variation in crop yield and plant nutrition reflected differences in nutrient availability. The application of CaSa-compost increased the level of available P in the top-soil from 0.5 to 4.4 mg kg-1 and the soil pH from 5.3 to 5.9. Treatment with biogas slurry, standard compost and CaSa-compost increased the above-ground biomass of Zea mays by, respectively, 140, 154 and 211 %. The grain yields of maize on soil treated with biogas slurry, standard compost and CaSa-compost were, respectively, 2.63, 3.18 and 4.40 t ha-1, compared to only 1.10 t ha-1 on unamended plots. All treatments enhanced crop productivity and increased the uptake of nutrients into the maize grains. The CaSa-compost was especially effective in mitigating P deficiency and soil acidification. We conclude that all treatments are viable as substitute for synthetic fertilizers. However, further steps are required to integrate the tested soil amendments into farm-scale nutrient management and to balance the additions and removals of nutrients, so that the loop can be closed.

  4. Carbon pools and flows during lab-scale degradation of old landfilled waste under different oxygen and water regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandstätter, Christian, E-mail: bran.chri@gmail.com; Laner, David, E-mail: david.laner@tuwien.ac.at; Fellner, Johann, E-mail: johann.fellner@tuwien.ac.at

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • 40 year old waste from an old MSW landfill was incubated in LSR experiments. • Carbon balances for anaerobic and aerobic waste degradation were established. • The transformation of carbon pools during waste degradation was investigated. • Waste aeration resulted in the formation of a new, stable organic carbon pool. • Water addition did not have a significant effect on aerobic waste degradation. - Abstract: Landfill aeration has been proven to accelerate the degradation of organic matter in landfills in comparison to anaerobic decomposition. The present study aims to evaluate pools of organic matter decomposing under aerobic and anaerobic conditions using landfill simulation reactors (LSR) filled with 40 year old waste from a former MSW landfill. The LSR were operated for 27 months, whereby the waste in one pair was kept under anaerobic conditions and the four other LSRs were aerated. Two of the aerated LSR were run with leachate recirculation and water addition and two without. The organic carbon in the solid waste was characterized at the beginning and at the end of the experiments and major carbon flows (e.g. TOC in leachate, gaseous CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}) were monitored during operation. After the termination of the experiments, the waste from the anaerobic LSRs exhibited a long-term gas production potential of more than 20 NL kg{sup −1} dry waste, which corresponded to the mineralization of around 12% of the initial TOC (67 g kg{sup −1} dry waste). Compared to that, aeration led to threefold decrease in TOC (32–36% of the initial TOC were mineralized), without apparent differences in carbon discharge between the aerobic set ups with and without water addition. Based on the investigation of the carbon pools it could be demonstrated that a bit more than 10% of the initially present organic carbon was transformed into more recalcitrant forms, presumably due to the formation of humic substances

  5. Initial Clinical Experience with (68)Ga-DOTA-NOC Prepared Using (68)Ga from Nanoceria-polyacrylonitrile Composite Sorbent-based (68)Ge/(68)Ga Generator and Freeze-dried DOTA-NOC Kits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Piyush; Shetye, Bhakti; Chakravarty, Rubel; Mukherjee, Archana; Pandey, Usha; Jha, Ashish Kumar; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Ram, Ramu; Dash, Ashutosh; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2017-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) with (68)Ga-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) peptides have become an indispensable part of disease assessment in patients with neuroendocrine tumors and forms the basis of personalized therapy with peptide receptor-based radionuclide therapy. With growing utilization of PET/CT in developing countries, availability of the indigenous GMP-certified (68)Ge/(68)Ga generators is expected to further promote cost-effective molecular imaging service to the cancer patients. We present our initial clinical experience in 32 patients injected with (68)Ga-DOTA-NOC prepared using (68)Ga eluted from Bhabha Atomic Research Centre nanoceria-polyacrylonitrile sorbent-based (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator and freeze-dried DOTA-NOC cold kits.

  6. Initial Clinical Experience with 68Ga-DOTA-NOC Prepared Using 68Ga from Nanoceria-polyacrylonitrile Composite Sorbent-based 68Ge/68Ga Generator and Freeze-dried DOTA-NOC Kits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Piyush; Shetye, Bhakti; Chakravarty, Rubel; Mukherjee, Archana; Pandey, Usha; Jha, Ashish Kumar; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Ram, Ramu; Dash, Ashutosh; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2017-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography–computed tomography (PET/CT) with 68Ga-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) peptides have become an indispensable part of disease assessment in patients with neuroendocrine tumors and forms the basis of personalized therapy with peptide receptor-based radionuclide therapy. With growing utilization of PET/CT in developing countries, availability of the indigenous GMP-certified 68Ge/68Ga generators is expected to further promote cost-effective molecular imaging service to the cancer patients. We present our initial clinical experience in 32 patients injected with 68Ga-DOTA-NOC prepared using 68Ga eluted from Bhabha Atomic Research Centre nanoceria-polyacrylonitrile sorbent-based 68Ge/68Ga generator and freeze-dried DOTA-NOC cold kits. PMID:28553181

  7. Organic wastes from bioenergy and ecological sanitation as a soil fertility improver: a field experiment in a tropical Andosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Ariane; Nehls, Thomas; George, Eckhard; Kaupenjohann, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Andosols require the regular application of phosphorus (P) to sustain crop productivity. On an Andosol in NW Tanzania, we studied the short-term effects of amending standard compost, biogas slurry and CaSa compost (containing biochar and sanitized human excreta) on (i) the soil's physico-chemical properties, on (ii) biomass growth and crop productivity, and on (iii) the plants' nutrient status. The practice-oriented experiment design included the intercropping of seven locally grown crop species planted on 9 m2 plots with five repetitions arranged as a Latin rectangle. Differences in plant growth (biomass production and crop yield, e.g., of Zea mays) and crop nutrition (total C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, etc.) were related to pH, CEC (cation exchange capacity), total C and the availability of nutrients (N, P, K, etc.) and water (water retention characteristics, bulk density, etc.) in the soil. None of the amendments had any significant effect on soil water availability, so the observed variations in crop yield and plant nutrition are attributed to nutrient availability. Applying CaSa compost increased the soil pH from 5.3 to 5.9 and the level of available P from 0.5 to 4.4 mg per kg. Compared to the control, adding biogas slurry, standard compost and CaSa compost increased the aboveground biomass of Zea mays by, respectively, 140, 154 and 211 %. The grain yields of maize on soil treated with biogas slurry, standard compost and CaSa compost were, respectively, 2.63, 3.18 and 4.40 t ha-1, compared to only 1.10 t ha-1 on unamended plots. All treatments enhanced crop productivity and increased the uptake of nutrients into the maize grains. The CaSa compost was most effective in mitigating P deficiency and soil acidification. We conclude that all treatments are viable as a substitute for synthetic fertilizers. Nevertheless, further steps are required to integrate the tested soil amendments into farm-scale nutrient management and to balance the additions and removals of

  8. Industrial Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Industrial waste is waste from industrial production and manufacturing. Industry covers many industrial sectors and within each sector large variations are found in terms of which raw materials are used, which production technology is used and which products are produced. Available data on unit...... generation rates and material composition as well as determining factors are discussed in this chapter. Characterizing industrial waste is faced with the problem that often only a part of the waste is handled in the municipal waste system, where information is easily accessible. In addition part...... of the industrial waste may in periods, depending on market opportunities and prices, be traded as secondary rawmaterials. Production-specificwaste from primary production, for example steel slag, is not included in the current presentation. In some countries industries must be approved or licensed and as part...

  9. Biochemical, hydrological and mechanical behaviors of high food waste content MSW landfill: Liquid-gas interactions observed from a large-scale experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Liang-Tong; Xu, Hui; Chen, Yun-Min; Lan, Ji-Wu; Lin, Wei-An; Xu, Xiao-Bing; He, Pin-Jing

    2017-10-01

    The high food waste content (HFWC) MSW at a landfill has the characteristics of rapid hydrolysis process, large leachate production rate and fast gas generation. The liquid-gas interactions at HFWC-MSW landfills are prominent and complex, and still remain significant challenges. This paper focuses on the liquid-gas interactions of HFWC-MSW observed from a large-scale bioreactor landfill experiment (5m×5m×7.5m). Based on the connected and quantitative analyses on the experimental observations, the following findings were obtained: (1) The high leachate level observed at Chinese landfills was attributed to the combined contribution from the great quantity of self-released leachate, waste compression and gas entrapped underwater. The contribution from gas entrapped underwater was estimated to be 21-28% of the total leachate level. (2) The gas entrapped underwater resulted in a reduction of hydraulic conductivity, decreasing by one order with an increase in gas content from 13% to 21%. (3) The "breakthrough value" in the gas accumulation zone was up to 11kPa greater than the pore liquid pressure. The increase of the breakthrough value was associated with the decrease of void porosity induced by surcharge loading. (4) The self-released leachate from HFWC-MSW was estimated to contribute to over 30% of the leachate production at landfills in Southern China. The drainage of leachate with a high organic loading in the rapid hydrolysis stage would lead to a loss of landfill gas (LFG) potential of 13%. Based on the above findings, an improved method considering the quantity of self-released leachate was proposed for the prediction of leachate production at HFWC-MSW landfills. In addition, a three-dimensional drainage system was proposed to drawdown the high leachate level and hence to improve the slope stability of a landfill, reduce the hydraulic head on a bottom liner and increase the collection efficiency for LFG. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Electrodialytic remediation of solid waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik K.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Karlsmose, Bodil

    1996-01-01

    Electrodialytic remediation of heavy metal polluted solid waste is a method that combines the technique of electrodialysis with the electromigration of ions in the solid waste. Results of laboratory scale remediation experiments of soil are presented and considerations are given on how to secure...

  11. Waste indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall, O.; Lassen, C.; Hansen, E. [Cowi A/S, Lyngby (Denmark)

    2003-07-01

    The Waste Indicator Project focuses on methods to evaluate the efficiency of waste management. The project proposes the use of three indicators for resource consumption, primary energy and landfill requirements, based on the life-cycle principles applied in the EDIP Project. Trial runs are made With the indicators on paper, glass packaging and aluminium, and two models are identified for mapping the Danish waste management, of which the least extensive focuses on real and potential savings. (au)

  12. Production of dry, high purity nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, O.W.; Prasad, R.; Smolarek, J.

    1991-04-02

    This patent describes an improved process for the production of dry, high purity nitrogen from air. It comprises passing a wet, high purity nitrogen from a pressure swing adsorption system or wet feed air stream to a dryer membrane system capable of selectively permeating water from the wet stream; passing relatively dry purge gas to the low pressure permeate side of the dryer membrane system to facilitate the carrying away of water vapor from the surface of the membrane and maintaining the driving force for removal of water vapor through the membrane from the high purity nitrogen or feed air stream for enhanced moisture removal therefrom. The relatively dry purge gas comprising waste gas from the pressure swing adsorption system or nitrogen product gas, whereby the provision of the purge gas on the permeate side of the dryer membrane system facilitates the desired moisture removal with minimum loss of product gas.

  13. Mont Terri Project - Heater experiment : rock and bentonite thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes in the near field of a thermal source for development of deep underground high level radioactive waste repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goebel, I.; Alheid, H.-J.; Kaufhold, St.; Naumann, M.; Pletsch, Th.; Plischke, I.; Schnier, H.; Schuster, K.; Sprado, K. [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), Hannover (Germany); Meyer, T.; Miehe, R.; Wieczorek, K. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Braunschweig (Germany); Mayor, J.C. [Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radioactivos SA (ENRESA), Madrid (Spain); Garcia-Sineriz, J.; Rey, M. [Asociacion para la Investigacion y Desarollo Industrial de los Recursos Naturales (AITEMIN), Madrid (Spain); Alonso, E.; Lloret, A.; Munoz, J.J. [Centre Internacional de Metodos Numerics en Ingenyeria (CIMNE), Barcelona (Spain); Weber, H. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra), Wettingen (Switzerland); Ploetze, M. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule Zuerich, Institut fuer Geotechnik, Zuerich (Switzerland); Klubertanz, G. [Colenco Power Engineering Ltd, Baden (Switzerland); Ammon, Ch. [Rothpletz Lienhard und Cie AG, Aarau (Switzerland); Graf, A.; Nussbaum, Ch.; Zingg, A. [Goetechnical Institute Ltd, Saint-Ursanne (Switzerland); Bossart, P. [Federal Office of Topography (swisstopo), Wabern (Switzerland); Buehler, Ch.; Kech, M.; Trick, Th. [Solexperts AG, Moenchaltorf (Switzerland); Emmerich, K. [ITC-WGT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Fernandez, A. M. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    The long-term safety of underground permanent repositories for radioactive waste relies on a combination of several engineered and geological barriers. The interactions between a host rock formation of the type 'Opalinus Clay' and an engineered barrier of the type 'bentonite buffer' are observed in the Heater Experiment (HE) during a hydration and a heating phase. The objective of the experiment is an improved understanding of the coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes in a host rock-buffer system achieved by experimental observations as well as numerical modelling. The basic objectives are in detail: a) Long-term monitoring in the vicinity of the heater during hydration and heating; especially observation and study of coupled THM processes in the near field, i.e. continuous measurements of temperatures, pore pressures, displacements, electric conductivity, and analysis of the gases and water released into the rock by effect of heating; b) Determination of the properties of barrier and host rock done mainly by laboratory and in situ experiments, i.e. general mechanical and mineralogical properties, mechanical state in-situ, and changes induced by the experiment; c) Study of the interaction between host rock and bentonite buffer as well as validation and refinement of existing tools for modelling THM processes; d) Study of the behaviour and reliability of instrumentation and measuring techniques, i.e. inspection of sensors after dismantling the experimental setting. To achieve the objectives, the experiment was accompanied by an extensive programme of continuous monitoring, experimental investigations on-site as well as in laboratories, and numerical modelling of the coupled THM processes. Finally, the experiment was dismantled to provide laboratory specimens of post-heating buffer and host rock material. The continuous monitoring of the experiment by a multitude of sensors (for temperature, pore pressure, total pressure, relative

  14. Rates of Dry Deposition Determined Using Wet/Dry Collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feely, H. W.; Bogen, D. C.; Nagourney, S. J.; Torquato, C. C.

    1985-02-01

    Daily samples of dryfall were collected during the June 1982 Dry Deposition Measurement Intercomparison Study at Champaign, Illinois, using six Aerochem Metrics wet/dry collectors. Upon completion of the field experiment, these samples were analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory for pH and for their concentrations of major inorganic constituents. Contamination by rain and bird droppings rendered a number of dryfall samples unusuable. When data for these samples were removed, the remaining data displayed acceptable precision for sulfate, calcium, and magnesium. The measured deposition rates varied between 7 and 73 ng/m2/s for sulfate, between 7 and 44 for calcium, and between 0.8 and 8.1 for magnesium. The precision of the data for ammonium, nitrate, and phosphate was poor, so we have not calculated deposition rates for these constituents. The measurements of the atmospheric concentrations of sulfate reported by the Illinois State Water Survey have been used to calculate deposition velocities for particulate sulfate for 18 daily samples, even though the aerosol sampler and the dry bucket of the wet/dry collector may not sample the same size population of particulates. These velocities ranged from 0.1 to 1.2 cm/s, with a median value of 0.4 cm/s and a mean of 0.45±0.31 cm/s.

  15. Eletrólise de resíduos poluidores: I - Efluente de uma indústria liofilizadora de condimentos Electrolysis of polluting wastes: I - Wastewater from a seasoning freeze-drying industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejanira F. de Angelis

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater from a seasoning freeze-drying industry was electrolysed to increase its biodegradability. Stainless-steel electrodes were used at 9.09 A/m², for up to 80 min. Conductivity, pH, biochemical (BOD and chemical (COD oxygen demands, Daphnia similis acute toxicity bioassays, and bacteria counting through the plate count agar method were determined after different times of electrolysis. The results (e.g. higher BOD and lower COD showed that the biodegradability of the wastewater was significantly increased; furthermore, Fe2+ ions liberated by the electrodes cause microorganisms to die and, when oxidised to Fe3+, contribute for the flocculation and sedimentation of solid residues.

  16. Establishment of a model experiment system to elucidate the mechanism by which Zn-protoporphyrin IX is formed in nitrite-free dry-cured ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamatsu, J; Okui, J; Ikeda, Y; Nishimura, T; Hattori, A

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a model experiment system to elucidate the mechanism by which Zn-protoporphyrin IX (ZPP) is formed in Parma ham. The established model consisted of myoglobin, meat and antibiotics, and incubation under anaerobic conditions resulted in a greater yield of ZPP. Formation of ZPP was observed even in the presence of various antiseptics. The amount of ZPP formed increased as the period of incubation increased. ZPP formation was inhibited by heating meat homogenate depending on the heating temperature. Our results show that anaerobic conditions are suitable for the formation of ZPP in meat products without nitrate or nitrite and that endogenous enzymes as well as microorganisms may be involved in ZPP formation.

  17. Responses of enchytraeids to increased temperature, drought and atmospheric CO2: Results of an eight-year field experiment in dry heathland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Martin; Schmelz, Rüdiger M.; Carrera, Noela

    2015-01-01

    In a long-term field trial we investigated the responses of enchytraeids to simulated future climatic conditions predicted for Denmark. At a semi-natural Danish heathland site we exposed 9.1 m2 plots to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (510 ppm), extended summer drought and passive night...... in spring 2013, perhaps indicating that warming stimulates fragmentation (reproduction) rates at this time of the year. Increased drought in MayeJune 2012 did not have lasting effects on abundance or biomass 3 months after the termination of drought treatment. However, comparison with earlier assessments...... of enchytraeids in the CLIMAITE experiment shows that the severity of drought and the time elapsed since the last drought is the best predictor of the biovolume (or biomass) of enchytraeids. Moreover, species richness was significantly impacted by the average soil water content experienced by enchytraeids during...

  18. (AJST) THIN- LAYER DRYING OF DICED CASSAVA ROOTS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    opiyo

    accepted thin layer drying equations were fitted to the drying data of cassava cubes, and the Page model was found to agree with the ... The most common processing methods are direct sun- drying of peeled roots for days in to a ..... nature of solar radiation and the fact that the experiment was done continuously including ...

  19. Drying of liquid food droplets : enzyme inactivation and multicomponent diffusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerdink, G.

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis the drying of liquid food droplets is studied from three different points of view: drying kinetics, enzyme inactivation and multicomponent diffusion. Mathematical models are developed and validated experimentally.

    Drying experiments are performed with suspended

  20. Drying and energy technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Lima, A

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of essential topics related to conventional and advanced drying and energy technologies, especially motivated by increased industry and academic interest. The main topics discussed are: theory and applications of drying, emerging topics in drying technology, innovations and trends in drying, thermo-hydro-chemical-mechanical behaviors of porous materials in drying, and drying equipment and energy. Since the topics covered are inter- and multi-disciplinary, the book offers an excellent source of information for engineers, energy specialists, scientists, researchers, graduate students, and leaders of industrial companies. This book is divided into several chapters focusing on the engineering, science and technology applied in essential industrial processes used for raw materials and products.

  1. CORROSION AND CHEMICAL WASTE IN SAWBLADES STEEL USED IN WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Fernando Trugilho

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective this work was to evaluate the chemical waste provoked by the wood on the sheets of steel used in the making of the mountains and cut tools. It was certain the correlationbetween the chemical waste and the extractive soluble in cold water, hot water and in the sequencetoluene and ethanol content. Two types of steel and twenty-seven species different from wood wereused. The corrosive agent, constituted of 50 g of fresh sawdust (moist mixed to 50 ml of distilledwater, it was prepared and placed inside of the plastic box, hermetically closed, on the samples ofsteel, which were totally immersed. The box was placed in a water bath pre-heated to 75°C, that themedium temperature of reaction is considered, that affects the sheet of the sawblade in operation. Thisgroup was operated to 80 rotations per minute (rpm. The time of reaction was of four hours. Afterthat time the corrosive agent was discarded and the samples were washed, dried and weighed. At theend, each sample was processed by a total period of forty hours. The chemical waste was evaluated by the weight difference suffered from beginning at the end of the experiment. For theresults it was observed that the Eucalyptus tradryphloia and the Eucalyptus phaeotricha the speciesthat provoked were, respectively, the largest and smaller chemical waste for the two types of steelappraised. Great variation exists in the chemical waste due to the effect of the species. The corrosionand chemical waste are especially related with the quality of the material solved in ethanol. The 1070steel were more attached than the 6170 steel.

  2. Integrated solid waste management in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This report covers Germany`s experience with integrated solid waste management programs. The municipal solid waste practices of four cities include practices and procedures that waste facility managers with local or state governments may consider for managing their own day-to-day operations.

  3. Classification of waste packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, H.P.; Sauer, M.; Rojahn, T. [Versuchsatomkraftwerk GmbH, Kahl am Main (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    A barrel gamma scanning unit has been in use at the VAK for the classification of radioactive waste materials since 1998. The unit provides the facility operator with the data required for classification of waste barrels. Once these data have been entered into the AVK data processing system, the radiological status of raw waste as well as pre-treated and processed waste can be tracked from the point of origin to the point at which the waste is delivered to a final storage. Since the barrel gamma scanning unit was commissioned in 1998, approximately 900 barrels have been measured and the relevant data required for classification collected and analyzed. Based on the positive results of experience in the use of the mobile barrel gamma scanning unit, the VAK now offers the classification of barrels as a service to external users. Depending upon waste quantity accumulation, this measurement unit offers facility operators a reliable and time-saving and cost-effective means of identifying and documenting the radioactivity inventory of barrels scheduled for final storage. (orig.)

  4. The effect of drying on the nutritional composition of fresh and dried ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two samples each of fresh and dried Moringa Oeifera leaves were used for the experiment and the mean values in their nutritional qualities compared. The results revealed higher nutritional qualities in the dried samples compared to the fresh samples. The percentage fat, crude protein, crude fibre,ash, carbohydrate, ...

  5. Dry etching for microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Powell, RA

    1984-01-01

    This volume collects together for the first time a series of in-depth, critical reviews of important topics in dry etching, such as dry processing of III-V compound semiconductors, dry etching of refractory metal silicides and dry etching aluminium and aluminium alloys. This topical format provides the reader with more specialised information and references than found in a general review article. In addition, it presents a broad perspective which would otherwise have to be gained by reading a large number of individual research papers. An additional important and unique feature of this book

  6. Spontaneous exfoliation of a drying gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jun Young; Regev, Ido; Mahadevan, L

    2016-09-20

    Wet starch cracks when it dries inhomogeneously, while hot glass cracks when it cools non-uniformly. In both cases, differential shrinkage induced by drying/cooling from the surface causes superficial cracks to grow perpendicular to the surface in different patterns. In contrast with these observations of bulk cracking in brittle materials, when a soft and homogeneously swollen polymer gel dries, differential strains lead to the peeling of a thin layer that spontaneously tears away from the bulk. Continued drying leads to the process repeating itself, forming a peeled-layered structure. The emergent thickness of the exfoliated layer is a function of both the geometry of the original gel and the physical parameters associated with the drying rate and external temperature. We characterize the experimental conditions under which layer peeling can arise, and use simulations to corroborate these observations. Finally, a minimal theory explains the scaling of the peel thickness, consistent with our experiments.

  7. Waste streams in a crewed space habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wydeven, T.; Golub, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    A judicious compilation of generation rates and chemical compositions of potential waste feed streams in a typical crewed space habitat was made in connection with the waste-management aspect of NASA's Physical/Chemical Closed-Loop Life Support Program. Waste composition definitions are needed for the design of waste-processing technologies involved in closing major life support functions in future long-duration human space missions. Tables of data for the constituents and chemical formulas of the following waste streams are presented and discussed: human urine, feces, hygiene (laundry and shower) water, cleansing agents, trash, humidity condensate, dried sweat, and trace contaminants. Tables of data on dust generation and pH values of the different waste streams are also presented and discussed.

  8. Total phenolics, antioxidant activity, and functional properties of 'Tommy Atkins' mango peel and kernel as affected by drying methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogi, Dalbir Singh; Siddiq, Muhammad; Greiby, Ibrahim; Dolan, Kirk D

    2013-12-01

    Mango processing produces significant amount of waste (peels and kernels) that can be utilized for the production of value-added ingredients for various food applications. Mango peel and kernel were dried using different techniques, such as freeze drying, hot air, vacuum and infrared. Freeze dried mango waste had higher antioxidant properties than those from other techniques. The ORAC values of peel and kernel varied from 418-776 and 1547-1819 μmol TE/g db. The solubility of freeze dried peel and kernel powder was the highest. The water and oil absorption index of mango waste powders ranged between 1.83-6.05 and 1.66-3.10, respectively. Freeze dried powders had the lowest bulk density values among different techniques tried. The cabinet dried waste powders can be potentially used in food products to enhance their nutritional and antioxidant properties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Community vermicomposting of biodegradable municipal waste

    OpenAIRE

    Klubalová, Kateřina

    2016-01-01

    The method of vermicomposting experiences a big boom nowadays. The people living in flats can process bio-waste, which they produce on their own. Therefore, the amount of biodegradable municipal waste contained in the dumped mixed municipal waste slightly reduces. In addition, people can benefit from high-quality products called vermicompost and its leachate called worm tea. In this work I summarize acquired knowledge about the vermicomposting focusing on kitchen waste, about conditions, whic...

  10. Liquid Secondary Waste Grout Formulation and Waste Form Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Williams, B. D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Snyder, Michelle M. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Guohui [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-05-23

    This report describes the results from liquid secondary waste (LSW) grout formulation and waste form qualification tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate new formulations for preparing a grout waste form with high-sulfate secondary waste simulants and the release of key constituents from these grout monoliths. Specific objectives of the LSW grout formulation and waste form qualification tests described in this report focused on five activities: 1.preparing new formulations for the LSW grout waste form with high-sulfate LSW simulants and solid characterization of the cured LSW grout waste form; 2.conducting the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 1313 leach test (EPA 2012) on the grout prepared with the new formulations, which solidify sulfate-rich Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) off-gas condensate secondary waste simulant, using deionized water (DIW); 3.conducting the EPA Method 1315 leach tests (EPA 2013) on the grout monoliths made with the new dry blend formulations and three LSW simulants (242-A evaporator condensate, Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) leachate, and WTP off-gas condensate) using two leachants, DIW and simulated Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) Site vadose zone pore water (VZPW); 4.estimating the 99Tc desorption Kd (distribution coefficient) values for 99Tc transport in oxidizing conditions to support the IDF performance assessment (PA); 5.estimating the solubility of 99Tc(IV)-bearing solid phases for 99Tc transport in reducing conditions to support the IDF PA.

  11. Effects of treated waste water irrigation on some qualitative charcterstics of forage sorghum, corn and millet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    alireza emami

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effects of irrigation with different levels of urban treated waste water on feeding value of forage sorghum (Var. Speed feed and Sugar graze, maize (Var. SC 704 and millet (Var. Nutrifeed an experiment was conducted at Experimental Station No.1, Astan Qods Razavi Mashhad, and Animal Nutrition Laboratory, College of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. Four varieties of forage plants with five levels of treated waste water: %0, %25, %50, %75 and %100 were compared in a split-plot experiment based on Randomized Complete Block Design with four replications per treatment. Feeding values of forage plants such as Crude Protein content (CP, Neutral Detergent Fiber content (NDF, in vitro Dry Matter Digestibility (DMD, Organic Matter Digestibility (OMD and D-Value were measured. Results showed that treated waste water irrigation had a significant effect on crude protein content. The highest crude protein content was shown at % 100 treated waste water ( %13.76 and the lowest was shown at % treated waste water (%9.54. There were no significant differences between %0 and %25, and also %75 and %100 treated waste water in terms of crude protein content, but there were significant differences between %50 and other treated waste water treatments (except 75% treatments. There were no significant difference between irrigation with different levels of treated waste water in terms of NDF, in vitro DMD, OMD, and D-Value. There were significant differences between forage plants in all studied characteristics, but there were no significant differences on interactions between forage plants and different levels of treated waste water treatments. Forage maize had the highest in vitro DMD at %75 treated waste water and forage sorghum (var. Speed feed had the lowest in vitro DMD at %0 treated waste water treatments with averages of %77.57 and %61.6, respectively. The results indicated that treated waste water increased the percentage of crude

  12. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips & Prevention News Ask an Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye ... Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es el Ojo Seco? Written By: Kierstan ...

  13. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Find an Ophthalmologist Academy Store Eye Health A-Z Symptoms Glasses & Contacts Tips & Prevention News Ask ... Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye Sections What Is Dry Eye? ...

  14. Optimization of Convective Drying of Apricots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donka Ivanova

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to realize multi-criterial optimization of the parameters of apricot drying. The drying experiments were conducted at a temperature of T=50÷80°C and velocity of ν=0.5÷2m/s of the drying agent. The dependence of the modified Page model’s parameters to the temperature and the velocity of the drying agent were obtained. The impact of the drying parameters on the quality indicators colour, β-carotene and vitamin С content in the dried apricots was studied. The optimal values of the drying parameters were determined applying different criteria: the quality of the final product, the quality of the final product and process duration, the quality of the final product and minimum energy consumption. The optimal values of the temperature and velocity of the drying agent according the criteria for the quality of the final product, the process duration and the energy consumption are T=63.5°C and ν=0.5m/s.

  15. Eliminating cracking during drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qiu; Tan, Peng; Schofield, Andrew B; Xu, Lei

    2013-03-01

    When colloidal suspensions dry, stresses build up and cracks often occur -a phenomenon undesirable for important industries such as paint and ceramics. We demonstrate an effective method which can completely eliminate cracking during drying: by adding emulsion droplets into colloidal suspensions, we can systematically decrease the amount of cracking, and eliminate it completely above a critical droplet concentration. Since the emulsion droplets eventually also evaporate, our technique achieves an effective function while making little changes to the component of final product, and may therefore serve as a promising approach for cracking elimination. Furthermore, adding droplets also varies the speed of air invasion and provides a powerful method to adjust drying rate. With the effective control over cracking and drying rate, our study may find important applications in many drying- and cracking-related industrial processes.

  16. Infrared drying of strawberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adak, Nafiye; Heybeli, Nursel; Ertekin, Can

    2017-03-15

    The effects of different drying conditions, such as infrared power, drying air temperature and velocity, on quality of strawberry were evaluated. Drying time decreased with increased infrared power, air temperature and velocity. An increase in power from 100W to 300W, temperature from 60 to 80°C and velocity from 1.0m.s(-1) to 2.0m.s(-1) decreased fruit color quality index. For total phenol and anthocyanin content, 300W, 60°C, and 1.0m.s(-1) were superior to the other experimental conditions. The drying processes increased N, P and K and decreased Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu contents. The optimal conditions to preserve nutrients in infrared drying of strawberry were 200W, 100°C and 1.5m.s(-1). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cultivation of Agaricus bisporus on wheat straw and waste tea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cultivation of Agaricus bisporus on wheat straw and waste tea leaves based composts and locally available casing materials Part III: Dry matter, protein, and carbohydrate contents of Agaricus bisporus.

  18. Operating experience in the gasification of municipal waste and other waste at the `secondary feedstocks recycling centre` (SVZ) Schwarze Pumpe; Betriebserfahrungen zur Vergasung von Hausmuell und anderen Abfaellen im Sekundaerrohstoffverwertungszentrum Schwarze Pumpe (SVZ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttker, B. [Sekundaerrohstoffverwertungszentrum Schwarze Pumpe GmbH, Schwarze Pumpe (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The business purpose of SVZ Schwarze Pumpe is the production of synthesis gas from hydro-carbon-containing waste material and the use of synthesis gas in gas production or energy generation. For synthesis gas production, the techniques of packed-bed pressure gasification (FDV) and entrained-flow gasification (FSV) are used in close interconnection. Process control is such that only inert slags accrue, apart from the final products methanol and gypsum as well as generated energy in the form of electricity, process steam and heat. Currently, the following materials are mainly used in gasification: plastic materials after being subjected to conditioning, industrial and municipal sewage sludge, shredded goods, contaminated used wood, contaminated used oil, oil components obtained from oil/water mixtures, and slurry products. A special in-house know-how for waste oil gasification, and for the combined gasification of solid waste and coal by packed-bed pressure gasification with gradual stepping-up of the waste portion was realized. (orig.) [Deutsch] Der Geschaetszweck des SVZ Schwarze Pumpe besteht in der Herstellung von Synthesegas aus kohlenwasserstoffhaltigen Einsatzstoffen und in der stofflichen und energetischen Nutzung des Wertstoffes Synthesegas. Zur Synthesegasgewinnung werden die Verfahren der Festbettdruckvergasung (FDV) und Flugstromvergasung (FSV) in einer engen verbundwirtschaftlichen Kopplung angewandt. Die Betriebsfuehrung ist so gestaltet, dass neben den Endprodukten Methnaol und Gips sowie erzeugter Energie in Form von Strom, Prozessdampf und Waerme nur noch inerte Schlacken entstehen. Die Haupteinsatzprodukte fuer die Vergasung sind ggw. aufbereitete Altkunststoffe, industrielle und kommunale Klaerschlaemme, Shreddergueter, kontaminiertes Altholz, kontaminierte Altoele, Oelkomponenten, die aus Oel-Wasser-Gemischen gewonnen werden, und Slurry-Produkte. Es wurde ein spezielles Betriebs-Know-how zur Abfalloel-Vergasung und zur kombinierten Vergasung

  19. Carbon pools and flows during lab-scale degradation of old landfilled waste under different oxygen and water regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstätter, Christian; Laner, David; Fellner, Johann

    2015-06-01

    Landfill aeration has been proven to accelerate the degradation of organic matter in landfills in comparison to anaerobic decomposition. The present study aims to evaluate pools of organic matter decomposing under aerobic and anaerobic conditions using landfill simulation reactors (LSR) filled with 40 year old waste from a former MSW landfill. The LSR were operated for 27 months, whereby the waste in one pair was kept under anaerobic conditions and the four other LSRs were aerated. Two of the aerated LSR were run with leachate recirculation and water addition and two without. The organic carbon in the solid waste was characterized at the beginning and at the end of the experiments and major carbon flows (e.g. TOC in leachate, gaseous CO2 and CH4) were monitored during operation. After the termination of the experiments, the waste from the anaerobic LSRs exhibited a long-term gas production potential of more than 20 NL kg(-1) dry waste, which corresponded to the mineralization of around 12% of the initial TOC (67 g kg(-1) dry waste). Compared to that, aeration led to threefold decrease in TOC (32-36% of the initial TOC were mineralized), without apparent differences in carbon discharge between the aerobic set ups with and without water addition. Based on the investigation of the carbon pools it could be demonstrated that a bit more than 10% of the initially present organic carbon was transformed into more recalcitrant forms, presumably due to the formation of humic substances. The source of anaerobic degradation could be identified mainly as cellulose which played a minor role during aerobic degradation in the experiment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Comparative Study of the Drying Rate Constant, Drying Efficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adoption of the drying techniques would ensure steady availability of these vegetables all the year round as well as reduce carbon emissions from the conventional drying methods and hence mitigate global warming. KEYWORDS: Solar drying, open- air sun drying, drying rate constant, falling rate, climate change, food ...

  1. Effect of Organic Manures on the Growth of Cymbopogon citratus and Chrysopogon zizanioides for the Phytoremediation of Chromite-Asbestos Mine Waste: A Pot Scale Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Adarsh; Maiti, Subodh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The abandoned chromite-asbestos mines are located in the Roro hills, West Singhbhum, Jharkhand, India, where mining operation ceased in 1983, and since then these mines are causing environmental pollution. The present study was planned to phytoremediate these metalloid and metal contaminated mine waste by using two aromatic grasses, Cymbopogon citratus and Chrysopogon zizanioides by applying different proportions of amendments (chicken manure, farmyard manure and garden soil). Mine waste has neutral pH, low electrical conductivity and organic carbon with higher concentration of total metals (Cr and Ni) as compared to soil. Application of manures resulted significant improvements of mine waste characteristics and plant growth, reduction in the availability of total extractable toxic metals (Cr, Ni) and increase in Mn, Zn and Cu concentration in the substrate. The maximum growth and biomass production for C. citratus and C. zizanioides were found in T-IV combination comprising of mine waste (90%), chicken manure (2.5%), farmyard manure (2.5%) and garden soil (5%). Addition of T-IV combination also resulted in low Cr and Ni accumulation in roots and reduction in translocation to shoots. Study indicates that C. citratus and C. zizanioides can be used for phytostabilization of abandoned chromite-asbestos mine waste with amendments.

  2. Electrochemical incineration of wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, R. C.; Sharma, D. K.; Bockris, J. Om.

    1990-08-01

    The novel technology of waste removal in space vehicles by electrochemical methods is presented to convert wastes into chemicals that can be eventually recycled. The important consideration for waste oxidation is to select a right kind of electrode (anode) material that should be stable under anodic conditions and also a poor electrocatalyst for oxygen and chlorine evolution. On the basis of long term electrolysis experiments on seven different electrodes and on the basis of total organic carbon reduced, two best electrodes were identified. The effect of redox ions on the electrolyte was studied. Though most of the experiments were done in mixtures of urine and waste, the experiments with redox couples involved 2.5 M sulfuric acid in order to avoid the precipitation of redox ions by urea. Two methods for long term electrolysis of waste were investigated: (1) the oxidation on Pt and lead dioxide electrodes using the galvanostatic methods; and (2) potentiostatic method on other electrodes. The advantage of the first method is the faster rate of oxidation. The chlorine evolution in the second method is ten times less then in the first. The accomplished research has shown that urine/feces mixtures can be oxidized to carbon dioxide and water, but current densities are low and must be improved. The perovskite and Ti4O7 coated with RuO2 are the best electrode materials found. Recent experiment with the redox agent improves the current density, however, sulphuric acid is required to keep the redox agent in solution to enhance oxidation effectively. It is desirable to reduce the use of acid and/or find substitutes.

  3. Waste Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset was developed from the Vermont DEC's list of certified solid waste facilities. It includes facility name, contact information, and the materials...

  4. Carbon dioxide and ammonia emissions during composting of mixed paper, yard waste and food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komilis, Dimitris P; Ham, Robert K

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the work was to provide a method to predict CO2 and NH3 yields during composting of the biodegradable fraction of municipal solid wastes (MSW). The compostable portion of MSW was simulated using three principal biodegradable components, namely mixed paper wastes, yard wastes and food wastes. Twelve laboratory runs were carried out at thermophilic temperatures based on the principles of mixture experimental and full factorial designs. Seeded mixed paper (MXP), seeded yard waste (YW) and seeded food waste (FW), each composted individually, produced 150, 220 and 370 g CO2-C, and 2.0, 4.4 and 34 g NH3-N per dry kg of initial substrate, respectively. Several experimental runs were also carried out with different mixtures of these three substrates. The effect of seeding was insignificant during composting of food wastes and yard wastes, while seeding was necessary for composting of mixed paper. Polynomial equations were developed to predict CO2 and NH3 (in amounts of mass per dry kg of MSW) from mixtures of MSW. No interactions among components were found to be significant when predicting CO2 yields, while the interaction of food wastes and mixed paper was found to be significant when predicting NH3 yields.

  5. THE EFFECT OF STORAGE ON PHYSICAL, CHEMICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF FISH WASTE ACIDIFIED USING FERMENTED VEGETABLES WASTE EXTRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sulistiyanto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Fish waste (“ikan rucah” is part of discarded fishing product, which is composed by non-food categorized fish (NFC-fish. Quality of NFC-fish meal that was made by dipping in extract of fermented vegetable’s waste has been reported better than commercial fish meal, but the effect after storing remained in question. Experiment was conducted to study the effect of different time of storing on physic-organoleptical, chemical and microbiological characteristics of the acidified NFC-fish meal that was made by dipped in extract of fermented vegetable’s waste (FVW-exctract. The NFC-Fish was soaked in the FVW-exctract by the ratio 1:1 (w/v for 4 hours, and then it was dripped out and dried. The dried fish was ground passed through 20 mesh, kept into plastic bags and stored at the room temperature (23-25 °C and 70-80% RH for 0, 1, 2 and 4 months. Physic-organoleptical, chemical and biologycal characteristics were parameters observed. Experiment was conducted by completely randomized design (CRD. Data were analysed by the GLM of SAS. Actual number of moisture, crude protein, extract ether, and proteolytic bacteria of fish meal were significantly influenced by time of storing (P<0.05. Dipping NFC-fish in the FVW-exctract effectively maintain the physical characteristics, pH, moisture, crude protein, extract ether and the number of proteolytic bacteria of fish meal up to 2 months of storage. Dipping NFC-fish in the FVW-exctract provide better characteristics on physical, chemical and microbiologycal than the commercial fish meal at the same condition of storage.

  6. Experimental characterization of jet static forces impacting waste tank components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamberger, J.A.; Bates, J.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Waters, E.D. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company plans to install mixer pumps in doubleshell waste tanks to mobilize and suspend settled sludge to allow eventual retrieval for treatment and permanent storage. The mixer pumps produce high momentum, horizontally directed jets that impact and mobilize the sludge and mix it into slurry for removal. There is concern that the force of the jet may damage tank internal components in its path. Scaled experiments were conducted to characterize the velocity profiles of the floor jet and to quantify the drag coefficients and impact forces for three tank components: radiation dry well, air lift circulator, and steam coil. Jet impact forces were measured on the scaled models at a 4 to 1 range of hydraulically scaled flow rates and a scaled range of distances between discharge nozzle and test component. The test were designed to provide hydraulic similarity between test conditions and expected actual waste tank conditions by using equal Reynolds number the jet maximum velocity impacted the test component. Forces measured on the models were used to calculate expected forces on the full scale components. Correlations of force on the test article versus distance from the nozzle were derived for the radiation dry well and air lift circulator based on the velocity correlation and drag parameter. The force data were also used to derive equivalent drag parameters which accounted for component shape factors including variation of jet impact area on the test article with distance from the nozzle. 8 refs., 44 figs., 42 tabs.

  7. Drying and Radial Shrinkage Characteristics and Changes in Color ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nahimana

    2011-08-12

    Aug 12, 2011 ... The heat pump-assisted equipment used during drying. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Drying experiments. Carrots roots were bought from a local market, washed and cleaned. A pre-test experiment was carried out following the. Thompson method (Thompson, 1969) to determine roots cylindricality.

  8. Solar Dryer Application for Olive Oil Mill Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Montero

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Global waste production has raised recently due to numerous agricultural and industrial activities. Among other actions devoted to waste reduction, revaluation seems to be the most advantageous one from an environmental and economic point of view. In the olive oil sector, by-product management (namely olive pomace, olive mill wastewater, and sludge residue poses serious problems for companies, with the energy use of these wastes being a feasible option to solve these problems. Due to their high moisture content, drying constitutes the main stage for a possible bio-fuel conversion. This research work deals with the analysis of drying for the three main wastes from olive oil by using a prototype dryer. This equipment has different working regimes depending on the kind of convection (natural or forced for passive and active mode, respectively, the incidence of solar radiation on the product (indirect or mixed type and the use of an additional system for energy supply (hybrid type. From the results, it could be said that all the wastes were suitable for solar drying. However, drying conditions were different for each case. Olive pomace and olive mill wastewater showed promising results for solar drying application in mixed active mode. Concerning sludge residue, its special physical structure could employ the use of turners for drying, in order to improve heat transfer to the product. Moreover, hybrid active mode enabled a considerable reduction in drying time, being an aspect to take into account for its use during low solar radiation or at night time.

  9. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 12, 2017 Can lupus affect my vision? May 27, 2017 Is stopping Restasis dangerous? Mar 06, 2017 ... link between seasonal allergens and dry eye Apr 27, 2015 Choosing Wisely When It Comes to Eye ...

  10. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dry Eye Symptoms Related Ask an Ophthalmologist Answers Can a six-month dissolvable punctal plug be removed ... insert a permanent punctal plug? Sep 12, 2017 Can you explain why I have halos and blurry ...

  11. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dry Eye Symptoms Related Ask an Ophthalmologist Answers Can a six-month dissolvable punctal plug be removed ... insert a permanent punctal plug? Sep 12, 2017 Can lupus affect my vision? May 27, 2017 Is ...

  12. Dry Mouth (Xerostomia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum Disease TMJ Disorders Oral Cancer Dry Mouth Burning Mouth Tooth Decay See All Oral Complications of Systemic Diseases Cancer Treatment Developmental Disabilities Diabetes Heart Disease HIV/ ...

  13. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the K-Basins (see K-Basins link) in Hanford's 100 Area is a facility called the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF).Between 2000 and 2004, workers at the...

  14. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Inside of Your Eyelid Nov 29, 2017 New Dry Eye Treatment is a Tear-Jerker Jul ... Privacy Policy Terms of Service For Advertisers For Media Ophthalmology Job Center © American Academy of Ophthalmology 2017 ...

  15. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also when your eyes do not make the right type of tears or tear film. How do ... information about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy Policy Related New Dry Eye Treatment is a ...

  16. Freeze drying method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppa, Nicholas V.; Stewart, Paul; Renzi, Ernesto

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  17. Freeze drying apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppa, Nicholas V.; Stewart, Paul; Renzi, Ernesto

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  18. Tribal Waste Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA’s Tribal Waste Management Program encourages environmentally sound waste management practices that promote resource conservation through recycling, recovery, reduction, clean up, and elimination of waste.

  19. Anaerobic bioleaching of metals from waste activated sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meulepas, Roel J.W., E-mail: roel.meulepas@wetsus.nl [UNESCO-IHE, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft (Netherlands); Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela [UNESCO-IHE, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft (Netherlands); King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Water Desalination and Reuse Center, Thuwal 13955-69000 (Saudi Arabia); Teshager, Fitfety Melese; Witharana, Ayoma [UNESCO-IHE, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft (Netherlands); Saikaly, Pascal E. [King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Water Desalination and Reuse Center, Thuwal 13955-69000 (Saudi Arabia); Lens, Piet N.L. [UNESCO-IHE, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-05-01

    Heavy metal contamination of anaerobically digested waste activated sludge hampers its reuse as fertilizer or soil conditioner. Conventional methods to leach metals require aeration or the addition of leaching agents. This paper investigates whether metals can be leached from waste activated sludge during the first, acidifying stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion without the supply of leaching agents. These leaching experiments were done with waste activated sludge from the Hoek van Holland municipal wastewater treatment plant (The Netherlands), which contained 342 μg g{sup −1} of copper, 487 μg g{sup −1} of lead, 793 μg g{sup −1} of zinc, 27 μg g{sup −1} of nickel and 2.3 μg g{sup −1} of cadmium. During the anaerobic acidification of 3 g{sub dry} {sub weight} L{sup −1} waste activated sludge, 80–85% of the copper, 66–69% of the lead, 87% of the zinc, 94–99% of the nickel and 73–83% of the cadmium were leached. The first stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion can thus be optimized as an anaerobic bioleaching process and produce a treated sludge (i.e., digestate) that meets the land-use standards in The Netherlands for copper, zinc, nickel and cadmium, but not for lead. - Highlights: • Heavy metals were leached during anaerobic acidification of waste activated sludge. • The process does not require the addition of chelating or oxidizing agents. • The metal leaching efficiencies (66 to 99%) were comparable to chemical leaching. • The produced leachate may be used for metal recovery and biogas production. • The produced digested sludge may be used as soil conditioner.

  20. Ethanol and other products from citrus processing waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greater than 80 percent of citrus produced in Florida is processed for juice production. The bulk of this waste material is dried as citrus pulp and sold as a cattle feed by-product, often at a price lower than the cost of production. While not profitable, this does solve the problem of waste dispos...

  1. The management of plant cover on mine wastes in Zimbabwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors limiting plant growth on mining wastes containing total values of 1 980 ppm arsenic, 1 180 ppm copper and 2 130 ppm nickel were investigated. Responses to 80 kg nitrogen/ha were significant (p = 0,01) on all wastes and mean increases in herbage dry matter were 5 410, 2 462 and 2 690 kg/ha respectively.

  2. Co-digestion of food waste in a municipal wastewater treatment plant: Comparison of batch tests and full-scale experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Konrad; Plabst, Markus; Schmidt, Andreas; Helmreich, Brigitte; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    The effects of co-digestion of food waste in a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) were studied in batch tests. The results obtained were compared with the mass balance of a digester at a full-scale WWTP for a one-year period without and with the addition of co-substrate. The specific methane yield calculated from the balance was 18% higher than the one in the batch tests, suggesting a stimulation of methane generation by co-digestion. It was hypothesized that this increase was caused by shifting the C/N ratio of raw sludge (8.8) to a more favourable ratio of the added food waste (17.7). In addition, potential benefits by adding food waste for energy autarky was investigated. While just 25% of the total energy demand of the plant could be recovered by biogas generation when no co-substrate was fed, this percentage has more than doubled when food waste was added at a ratio of 10% (w/w). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Status report on the disposal of radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culler, F.L. Jr.; McLain, S. (comps.)

    1957-06-25

    A comprehensive survey of waste disposal techniques, requirements, costs, hazards, and long-range considerations is presented. The nature of high level wastes from reactors and chemical processes, in the form of fission product gases, waste solutions, solid wastes, and particulate solids in gas phase, is described. Growth predictions for nuclear reactor capacity and the associated fission product and transplutonic waste problem are made and discussed on the basis of present knowledge. Biological hazards from accumulated wastes and potential hazards from reactor accidents, ore and feed material processing, chemical reprocessing plants, and handling of fissionable and fertile material after irradiation and decontamination are surveyed. The waste transportation problem is considered from the standpoints of magnitude of the problem, present regulations, costs, and cooling periods. The possibilities for ultimate waste management and/or disposal are reviewed and discussed. The costs of disposal, evaporation, storage tanks, and drum-drying are considered.

  4. Wet and Dry Anaerobic Digestion of Biowaste and of Co-substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chaoran

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of municipal solid waste by anaerobic digestion can solve the environmental problems caused by this organic solid waste and also supply biogas as renewable energy for a sustainable development. In this study the improvement of wet anaerobic digestion by addition of co-substrates and the effect of moisture on dry anaerobic digestion were investigated.

  5. Acoustoconvective Drying of Cellular Gas Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhilin, A. A.; Fedorov, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    The present paper is devoted to the investigation of the gas dynamics of cellular gas concrete by the acoustoconvective method developed at the ITPM of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences and its comparison with traditional thermoconvective and natural drying. A series of experiments have been performed on humidifying specimens and the dependence has been obtained of the rate of moisture absorption for two humidifying regimes: capillary impregnation and sorption. In the acoustoconvective drying regime, it has been shown that the frequency and intensity of the operating flow strongly influence the dynamics of moisture extraction from the specimens being dried. The obtained kinetic data for thermoconvective drying have a bilinear distribution, and their mathematical treatment permitted determining the velocities of the proceeding processes. The process of natural drying is extremely slow, and the drying velocity is strongly influenced thereby by the environment parameters. For mathematical description of the obtained experimental data, a relaxation model was used, which has made it possible to determine the relaxation time for each drying regime.

  6. Wetlands para tratamento de lixiviados de aterros sanitários: experiências no aterro sanitário de Piraí e no aterro metropolitano de Gramacho (RJ Landfill leachate treatment using wetlands: experiences in Piraí municipality solid waste landfill and Gramacho metropolitan solid waste landfill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Ferreira Mannarino

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available O Grupo de Resíduos Sólidos do Programa de Pós-Graduação em Engenharia Ambiental (PEAMB/UERJ vem realizando, há cinco anos, pesquisas utilizando wetlands construídos em tratamento de lixiviados de aterros sanitários. Esses sistemas promovem a absorção de nutrientes pelas plantas e facilitam a degradação de material orgânico por microrganismos do solo e aderidos às raízes. Experiências desenvolvidas no Aterro Sanitário de Piraí mostram remoções, em termos de concentração de poluentes, de 41% de DQO e 51% de nitrogênio amoniacal. Os resultados obtidos no Aterro Metropolitano de Gramacho apresentam redução, em termos de carga de poluição, de 86% de DQO e 89% de nitrogênio amoniacal. Os sistemas implantados mostram-se boas alternativas no tratamento de lixiviados, sobretudo em regiões de clima tropical, onde as elevadas temperaturas potencializam a evapotranspiração.The Group of Solid Waste of Environmental Engineering Program (PEAMB/UERJ has been conducting research using constructed wetlands in landfill leachate treatment in the last five years. These systems promote the absorption of nutrients by the vegetation and facilitate the degradation of organic material by microorganisms in the soil and the ones adhered to the roots. Experiments carried out in Piraí Municipality Landfill show removal of pollutants about 41% of COD and 51% of ammonium nitrogen. The results obtained in Gramacho's landfill, present a reduction of 86% of COD load and 89% of ammonium nitrogen load. Wetlands seens to be a good alternative in the treatment of landfill leachate, especially in regions of tropical climate, where high temperatures improve effects of evapotranspiration.

  7. Feedback from recent operating experience in nuclear power plants regarding fire safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forell, Burkhard [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Koeln (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    The paper provides insights from the operating experience in German nuclear power plants with reportable fire safety related events. The three reportable events outlined in more detail resulted in German Information Notices prepared by GRS and distributed on behalf of the Federal German regulatory body. The events concerned deficiencies at pipe penetration seals, which were not filled with mineral wool. Also at fire doors deficiencies of the insulation inside the door wings occurred. One event concerned a smouldering fire of rubber material in a waste drum which was placed in a plant internal drying facility for radioactive waste.

  8. Foreign programs for the storage of spent nuclear power plant fuels, high-level waste canisters and transuranic wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, K.M.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1984-04-01

    The various national programs for developing and applying technology for the interim storage of spent fuel, high-level radioactive waste, and TRU wastes are summarized. Primary emphasis of the report is on dry storage techniques for uranium dioxide fuels, but data are also provided concerning pool storage.

  9. Hot, Dry and Cloudy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of Hot, Dry and Cloudy This artist's concept shows a cloudy Jupiter-like planet that orbits very close to its fiery hot star. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope was recently used to capture spectra, or molecular fingerprints, of two 'hot Jupiter' worlds like the one depicted here. This is the first time a spectrum has ever been obtained for an exoplanet, or a planet beyond our solar system. The ground-breaking observations were made with Spitzer's spectrograph, which pries apart infrared light into its basic wavelengths, revealing the 'fingerprints' of molecules imprinted inside. Spitzer studied two planets, HD 209458b and HD 189733b, both of which were found, surprisingly, to have no water in the tops of their atmospheres. The results suggest that the hot planets are socked in with dry, high clouds, which are obscuring water that lies underneath. In addition, HD209458b showed hints of silicates, suggesting that the high clouds on that planet contain very fine sand-like particles. Capturing the spectra from the two hot-Jupiter planets was no easy feat. The planets cannot be distinguished from their stars and instead appear to telescopes as single blurs of light. One way to get around this is through what is known as the secondary eclipse technique. In this method, changes in the total light from a so-called transiting planet system are measured as a planet is eclipsed by its star, vanishing from our Earthly point of view. The dip in observed light can then be attributed to the planet alone. This technique, first used by Spitzer in 2005 to directly detect the light from an exoplanet, currently only works at infrared wavelengths, where the differences in brightness between the planet and star are less, and the planet's light is easier to pick out. For example, if the experiment had been done in visible light, the total light from the system would appear to be unchanged, even as the planet

  10. “A Step Towards Environmental Waste Management And Sustainable Biofuel (Ethanol) Production From Waste Banana Peelings”

    OpenAIRE

    Nazim Ali; Pravin Ubhrani; Mohit Tagotra; Manohar Ahire

    2016-01-01

    Most nations, whether economically advanced or at different stages of development are facing two major challenges, energy crisis and proper waste disposal. In this paper a study has been done on environmental waste management and sustainable biofuel (ethanol) production from waste banana peelings. The peels of BASRAI variety of bananas are taken as they are rich in cellulose and are kept in hot oven at 338K and dried sample is taken and is dissolved in hot water for starch extract...

  11. Investigation of solid organic waste processing by oxidative pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolibaba, O. B.; Sokolsky, A. I.; Gabitov, R. N.

    2017-11-01

    A thermal analysis of a mixture of municipal solid waste (MSW) of the average morphological composition and its individual components was carried out in order to develop ways to improve the efficiency of its utilization for energy production in thermal reactors. Experimental studies were performed on a synchronous thermal analyzer NETZSCH STA 449 F3 Jupiter combined with a quadrupole mass spectrometer QMC 403. Based on the results of the experiments, the temperature ranges of the pyrolysis process were determined as well as the rate of decrease of the mass of the sample of solid waste during the drying and oxidative pyrolysis processes, the thermal effects accompanying these processes, as well as the composition and volumes of gases produced during oxidative pyrolysis of solid waste and its components in an atmosphere with oxygen content of 1%, 5%, and 10%. On the basis of experimental data the dependences of the yield of gas on the moisture content of MSW were obtained under different pyrolysis conditions under which a gas of various calorific values was produced.

  12. The antisickling effects of dried fish (tilapia) And dried prawn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antisickling effect of dried fish (Tilapia) and dried prawn (Astacus red) were investigated to ascertain the ability of the extracts of these samples to inhibit polymerisation ... Dried fish (Tilapia) and dried prawn (Astacus red) could both be nutritionally and therapeutically beneficial in the management of sickle cell disease.

  13. Autochthonous "Bjelovars dried cheese"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Kirin

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available «Dried cheese» is in autochthonous group of Bjelovar region cheeses which is still produced in rural domestic scale. The name of cheese originates from production procedure - drying for longer or shorter period in airy place after which the cheese is smoked, or is smoked only without drying. This type of cheese is produced in whole central region of Croatia which includes Međimurje, Podravina, Bilogora; Moslavina, Posavina and region around the capital. The aim of this paper is to describe and determine sensory, chemical and microbiological composition to determine its characteristics and production standards. As standards for sensory properties following characteristics can be used: a Outer shape: dimensions: diameter: 140-145 mm, height: 58-61 mm, mass: 700-750 g, equal, rounded shape, smooth skin, equal colour; b Consistency: easily cut, elastic, soft; c Cut: nicely combined white body, few improper holes of equal size; d Odour: pleasant milky acid odour, fairly smoky; e Taste: Fairly milky acidic taste, medium salty, fairly smoky taste. Depending on fat in dry matter content and water content in non fat dry matter, analyzed samples can be characterized as quarter fat, soft and semidry cheese. Higher acidity and saltiness was determined in some samples, microbiological analyses has shown that the most common contaminants are yeasts and moulds.

  14. Biometanização seca de resíduos sólidos urbanos: estado da arte e análise crítica das principais tecnologias Dry biomethanation of municipal solid waste: state-of-the-art and critical analysis of major technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Correia de Souza Pereira Gomes

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A utilização da tecnologia de digestão anaeróbia (biometanização para a gestão da fração orgânica dos resíduos sólidos urbanos é uma realidade que vem se disseminando mundialmente. Os sistemas via seca vem se destacando pela maior robustez do sistema biológico e pela minimização da geração de efluentes líquidos. Para avaliar o desempenho de sistemas de digestão via seca, foram realizadas visitas técnicas a plantas das principais tecnologias - Valorga, Laran, Kompogas e Dranco - e, a partir de constatações in loco e de dados levantados junto aos fabricantes, elaborou-se uma metodologia para avaliação das mesmas, com 35 indicadores, divididos em 4 grupos (Histórico; Aspectos Operacionais; Desempenho de Projeto; Desempenho Real. Na soma ponderada, as tecnologias que obtiveram os dois melhores desempenhos foram aquelas denominadas de 4 e 2, respectivamente, que empregam digestor retangular horizontal com agitação mecânica por pás com eixo no sentido transversal ao fluxo do material em digestão.The employment of anaerobic digestion technology (biomethanation for the management of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste is a reality that has been spreading out all around the world. The dry biomethanation, in particular, has been highlighted due to its biological system higher robustness and to the low generation of liquid effluents. In order to assess the dry biomethanation technologies performance, technical visits were carried out at different plants representing the major technologies available - Valorga, Laran, Kompogas, and Dranco - and, based on in situ observations as well as on projected performance data, it was developed an assessment methodology, composed by 35 indexes, divided into 4 groups: Historic; Operational Aspects; Projected Performance; Real Performance. After all, the best performance was presented by technologies referred to as 4 and 2 that employs rectangular horizontal digesters stirred by

  15. Optimized drying parameters of water hyacinths (Eichhornia crassipes. L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo V. Casas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the optimum drying conditions of water hyacinth to contribute in the improvement of present drying processes. The effects of independent parameters (drying temperature, airflow rate, and number of passes on the responses were determined using the Response Surface Methodology. The response parameters were composed of (1 final moisture content, (2 moisture ratio, (3 drying rate,(4 tensile strength, and (5 browning index. Box and Behnken experimental design represented the design of experiments that resulted in 15 drying runs. Statistical analysis evaluated the treatment effects. Drying temperature significantly affected the drying rate, moisture ratio, and browning index. Airflow rate had a significant effect only on the drying rate, while the number of passes significantly affected both the drying rate and browning index. The optimized conditions for drying the water hyacinth were at drying temperature of 90C, airflow rate of 0.044m3/s, and number of passes equivalent to five. The best modelthat characterizes the drying of water hyacinth is a rational function expressed as:

  16. Valorization of the eastern waste biogas. Biogas converted in electricity: clean industrial proceeding and energy solution of the city of oujda from a pilot experience of controlled discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhaj, Siham; Bahi, Lahcen; Akhssas, Ahmed

    2017-04-01

    The city of Oujda is located in the eastern region of Morocco. As a result of population and industrial growth, the town of Oujda produces annually 140,000 tons of very humid waste, rich in organic matter, about 73%. These wastes were stored in the uncontrolled Sidi Yahya landfill and contaminated by the leachate Surface and subterranean waters of the city, this leachate formed into son-in-law 12 million Nm3 of biogas annually. This large volume of biogas is transformed into an energy source that is part of the sustainable development agenda while transferring the landfill from Sidi Yahya to a controlled landfill in international standards, the latter is located to the south of the city. This landfill is the first in Morocco to treat and recycle all waste and is used to produce electricity, it is the second in Africa. Thus, electricity production in the eastern region will increase from 700 KWh to 3 Mwh. In this work we will show the problems that the city of Oujda was experiencing in the presence of the uncontrolled dump of Sidi Yahya and then we will show the process of harvesting biogas and its transformation into electricity. Keywords: Biogas, Landfill, Oujda, Sustainable Development, Energy

  17. ARK-o-hol community experiment group: a cooperatively operated greenhouse heated with low-grade waste heat from an adjacent alcohol distillation plant. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    In order to prove that low-grade waste heat (from an alcohol distillation plant, in this case) could successfully be transported and recycled, a 28' x 60' greenhouse was designed and constructed adjacent to and connected by plumbing with an operating alcohol distillation plant. Hot water in the return lines of heat exchangers in the distillation column of the alcohol plant was emptied into a 20' x 20' in ground heat storage tank within the greenhouse. This heated water was then circulated throughout the greenhouse by means of 7' x 10' floor plates (surplus reefer heat exchangers). The heat-storage tank, drawing its heat from the distillation column waste-heat, in addition to daytime solar gain, maintained a temperature of 62 to 65 degrees by day, dropping to 60 degrees at night, provided the greenhouse with an average of 60,000 Btu's per hour of nighttime usable heat. The greenhouse was operated throughout the winter 1982/1983 which had unpredictable temperatures climbing to 85 degrees, followed immediately by a week of 18 degrees. In April 1983, 18,500 tomato plants and more than 5000 other vegetables and house plants, were ready for harvest, although no supplemental heater was used, the only heat being distillation plant waste heat and daytime solar gain.

  18. Drying of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Geiker, Mette Rica; Nygaard, Peter Vagn

    2002-01-01

    Estimated and measured relative humidity (RH) change during drying are compared for two concretes, 1: w/c=0.46 and 2: w/(c+0.5fa+2sf)=0.50. The estimations were undertaken by means of the Swedish program TorkaS 1.0. Measurements were performed by RH-sensors type Humi-Guard. Drying of 150 mm thick...... samples from sides at 60% RH and 22 °C took place from 4 to 56 days after casting. At the end of the drying period the measured RH was about 4% lower than the estimated RH at 1/5th depth from the exposed surface for both concretes. In the middle of the samples, the measured RH of concretes 1 and 2 were 2...

  19. Trigger Point Dry Needling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Increasingly, physical therapists in the United States and throughout the world are using dry needling to treat musculoskeletal pain, even though this treatment has been a controversial addition to practice. To better generalize to physical therapy practice the findings about dry needling thus far, the authors of a study published in the March 2017 issue of JOSPT identified the need for a systematic review examining the effectiveness of dry needling performed by physical therapists on people with musculoskeletal pain. Their review offers a meta-analysis of data from several included studies and assesses the evidence for risks of bias. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(3):150. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.0502.

  20. Particulate Matter Oxidative Potential from Waste Transfer Station Activity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krystal J. Godri; Sean T. Duggan; Gary W. Fuller; Tim Baker; David Green; Frank J. Kelly; Ian S. Mudway

    ...). The highest PM concentrations in London occur in proximity to waste transfer stations (WTS), sites that experience high numbers of dust-laden, heavy-duty diesel vehicles transporting industrial and household waste. Objective...

  1. Hydrothermal carbonization of food waste for nutrient recovery and resuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food waste represents a rather large and currently underutilized source of potentially available and reusable nutrients. Laboratory-scale experiments evaluating the hydrothermal carbonization of food wastes collected from restaurants were conducted to understand how changes in feedstock composition ...

  2. Waste disposal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    We should like to remind you that you can have all commonplace, conventional waste (combustible, inert, wood, etc.) disposed of by the TS-FM Group. Requests for the removal of such waste should be made by contacting FM Support on tel. 77777 or by e-mail (Fm.Support@cern.ch). For requests to be acted upon, the following information must be communicated to FM Support: budget code to be debited for the provision and removal of the skip / container; type of skip required (1m3, 4 m3, 7 m3, 15 m3, 20 m3, 30 m3); nature of the waste to be disposed of (bulky objects, cardboard boxes, etc.); building concerned; details of requestor (name, phone number, department, group, etc.). We should also like to inform you that the TS-FM Group can arrange for waste to be removed from work-sites for firms under contract to CERN, provided that the prior authorisation of the CERN Staff Member in charge of the contract is obtained and the relevant disposal/handling charges are paid. You are reminded that the selective sorting...

  3. Waste disposal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    We should like to remind you that you can have all commonplace, conventional waste (combustible, inert, wood, etc.) disposed of by the TS-FM Group. Requests for the removal of such waste should be made by contacting FM Support on tel. 77777 or by e-mail (Fm.Support@cern.ch). For requests to be acted upon, the following information must be communicated to FM Support: budget code to be debited for the provision and removal of the skip / container. type of skip required (1m3, 4 m3, 7 m3, 15 m3, 20 m3, 30 m3). nature of the waste to be disposed of (bulky objects, cardboard boxes, etc.). building concerned. details of requestor (name, phone number, department, group, etc.). We should also like to inform you that the TS-FM Group can arrange for waste to be removed from work-sites for firms under contract to CERN, provided that the prior authorisation of the CERN Staff Member in charge of the contract is obtained and the relevant disposal/handling charges are paid. You are reminded that the selective sorting o...

  4. Human waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, Md Nurul; Kroeze, Carolien; Strokal, Maryna

    2017-01-01

    Many people practice open defecation in south Asia. As a result, lot of human waste containing nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) enter rivers. Rivers transport these nutrients to coastal waters, resulting in marine pollution. This source of nutrient pollution is, however, ignored in

  5. Dairy Wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pico, Richard F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastes from the dairy industry covering publications of 1976-77. This review covers: (1) government regulations; (2) ion-plant control of dairy effluents; (3) dairy effluent treatment methods; and (4) research on dairy effluents. A list of 26 references is also presented. (HM)

  6. Development of iron phosphate ceramic waste form to immobilize radioactive waste solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jongkwon; Um, Wooyong; Choung, Sungwook

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this research was to develop an iron phosphate ceramic (IPC) waste form using converter slag obtained as a by-product of the steel industry as a source of iron instead of conventional iron oxide. Both synthetic off-gas scrubber solution containing technetium-99 (or Re as a surrogate) and LiCl-KCl eutectic salt, a final waste solution from pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel, were used as radioactive waste streams. The IPC waste form was characterized for compressive strength, reduction capacity, chemical durability, and contaminant leachability. Compressive strengths of the IPC waste form prepared with different types of waste solutions were 16 MPa and 19 MPa for LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and the off-gas scrubber simulant, respectively, which meet the minimum compressive strength of 3.45 MPa (500 psi) for waste forms to be accepted into the radioactive waste repository. The reduction capacity of converter slag, a main dry ingredient used to prepare the IPC waste form, was 4136 meq/kg by the Ce(IV) method, which is much higher than those of the conventional Fe oxides used for the IPC waste form and the blast furnace slag materials. Average leachability indexes of Tc, Li, and K for the IPC waste form were higher than 6.0, and the IPC waste form demonstrated stable durability even after 63-day leaching. In addition, the Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure measurements of converter slag and the IPC waste form with LiCl-KCl eutectic salt met the universal treatment standard of the leachability limit for metals regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This study confirms the possibility of development of the IPC waste form using converter slag, showing its immobilization capability for radionuclides in both LiCl-KCl eutectic salt and off-gas scrubber solutions with significant cost savings.

  7. Fast Drying of Agriculture Commodities by Using Microwave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ode Ngkoimani, La; Megawati; Purwana Saputra, Gde; Cahyono, Edi; Aripin, Haji; Gde Suastika, Komang; Nyoman Sudiana, I.

    2017-05-01

    Some progress has been made and reported previously due to investigate microwave effects to materials. The microwave applications for material processing by using wide range microwave frequencies such as in sintering, chemical reaction, and drying have been performed. Microwave drying is based on a unique volumetric heating mode with electromagnetic radiation at 2,450 MHz. However, the quest for a what a true microwave effect is still plagued with difficulties. This paper provides a experimental and theoretical analysis of drying materials using microwave. For drying experiments, in this investigation, we were using a domestic microwave oven which operated at three power levels for drying chamber. The samples are agriculture commodity collected from local farmers. The experimental results show that microwave accelerate drying in most materials. The experimental data were analyzed by using an available model constructed from fundamental physics by other scholars. The model has been applied to more understanding the behavior of the microwave drying material.

  8. Study of Energy Consumption of Potato Slices During Drying Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafezi Negar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the new methods of food drying using infrared heating under vacuum is to increase the drying rate and maintain the quality of dried product. In this study, potato slices were dried using vacuum-infrared drying. Experiments were performed with the infrared lamp power levels 100, 150 and 200 W, absolute pressure levels 20, 80, 140 and 760 mmHg, and with three thicknesses of slices 1, 2 and 3 mm, in three repetitions. The results showed that the infrared lamp power, absolute pressure and slice thickness have important effects on the drying of potato. With increasing the radiation power, reducing the absolute pressure (acts of vacuum in the dryer chamber and also reducing the thickness of potato slices, drying time and the amount of energy consumed is reduced. In relation to thermal utilization efficiency, results indicated that with increasing the infrared radiation power and decreasing the absolute pressure, thermal efficiency increased.

  9. Heat of Hydration of Low Activity Cementitious Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasol, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-07-23

    During the curing of secondary waste grout, the hydraulic materials in the dry mix react exothermally with the water in the secondary low-activity waste (LAW). The heat released, called the heat of hydration, can be measured using a TAM Air Isothermal Calorimeter. By holding temperature constant in the instrument, the heat of hydration during the curing process can be determined. This will provide information that can be used in the design of a waste solidification facility. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), the heat of hydration and other physical properties are being collected on grout prepared using three simulants of liquid secondary waste generated at the Hanford Site. From this study it was found that both the simulant and dry mix each had an effect on the heat of hydration. It was also concluded that the higher the cement content in the dry materials mix, the greater the heat of hydration during the curing of grout.

  10. Guava waste to sustain guava (Psidium guajava agroecosystem: nutrient "balance" concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Antunes de Souza

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian guava processing industry generates 5.5 M Mg guava waste yr-1 that could be recycled sustainably in guava agro-ecosystems as slow-release fertilizer. Our objectives were to elaborate nutrient budgets and to diagnose soil, foliar and fruit nutrient balances in guava orchards fertilized with guava waste. We hypothesized that (1 guava waste are balanced fertilizer sources that can sustain crop yield and soil nutrient stocks, and (2 guava agroecosystems remain productive within narrow ranges of nutrient balances. A 6-yr experiment was conducted in 8-yr old guava orchard applying 0-9-18-27-36 Mg ha-1 guava waste (dry mass basis and the locally recommended mineral fertilization. Nutrient budgets were compiled as balance sheets. Foliar and fruit nutrient balances were computed as isometric log ratios to avoid data redundancy or resonance due to nutrient interactions and closure to measurement unit. The N, P and several other nutrients were applied in excess of crop removal while K was in deficit whatever the fertilizer treatment. The foliar diagnostic accuracy of reached 93 % using isometric log ratios and knn classification, generating reliable foliar nutrient and concentration ranges at high yield level. The plant mined the soil K reserves without any significant effect on fruit yield and foliar nutrient balances involving K. High guava productivity can be reached at lower soil test K and P values than thought before. Parsimonious dosage of fresh guava waste should be supplemented with mineral K fertilizers to recycle guava waste sustainably in guava agroecosystems. Brazilian growers can benefit from this research by lowering soil test P and K threshold values to avoid over-fertilization and using fresh guava waste supplemented with mineral fertilizers, especially K. Because yield was negatively correlated with fruit acidity and Brix index, balanced plant nutrition and fertilization diagnosis will have to consider not only fruit yield

  11. Economic Floating Waste Detectionfor Surface Cleaning Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumroengrit Jakkrit

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Removing waste out of water surface is a routine task and can be operated by using autonomous surface cleaning robots. This paper presents amethodoflaser-based floating waste detection for surface robot guidance when waste positions are unknown beforehand. Basing on concept of refraction and reflection of laser ray, the proposed laser-based technique is proven to be applicable on floating waste detection. The economic waste detector is constructed and mounted on the robot. Five DOF equations of motion are formulated for calculation of waste position incorporating distance measured by the laser and also the robot motion caused by external wind force as well as water surface tension. Experiments were conducted on a pond with calm water and results show that the presented economic waste detection successfully identify and locate position of plastic bottles floating on water surface within the range of 5 meters.

  12. Sulfate removal from waste chemicals by precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatti, Cláudia Telles; Tavares, Célia Regina Granhen; Lenzi, Ervim

    2009-01-01

    Chemical oxidation using Fenton's reagent has proven to be a viable alternative to the oxidative destruction of organic pollutants in mixed waste chemicals, but the sulfate concentration in the treated liquor was still above the acceptable limits for effluent discharge. In this paper, the feasibility of sulfate removal from complex laboratory wastewaters using barium and calcium precipitation was investigated. The process was applied to different wastewater cases (two composite samples generated in different periods) in order to study the effect of the wastewater composition on the sulfate precipitation. The experiments were performed with raw and oxidized wastewater samples, and carried out according to the following steps: (1) evaluate the pH effect upon sulfate precipitation on raw wastewaters at pH range of 2-8; (2) conduct sulfate precipitation experiments on raw and oxidized wastewaters; and (3) characterize the precipitate yielded. At a concentration of 80 g L(-1), barium precipitation achieved a sulfate removal up to 61.4% while calcium precipitation provided over 99% sulfate removal in raw and oxidized wastewaters and for both samples. Calcium precipitation was chosen to be performed after Fenton's oxidation; hence this process configuration favors the production of higher quality precipitates. The results showed that, when dried at 105 degrees C, the precipitate is composed of hemidrate and anhydrous calcium sulfate ( approximately 99.8%) and trace metals ( approximately 0.2%: Fe, Cr, Mn, Co, Ag, Mg, K, Na), what makes it suitable for reuse in innumerous processes.

  13. Remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated soil through composting with fresh organic wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Houot, Sabine; Qiao, Min; Nunan, Naoise; Garnier, Patricia

    2011-11-01

    Composting may enhance bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soils by providing organic substrates that stimulate the growth of potential microbial degraders. However, the influence of added organic matter (OM) together with the microbial activities on the dissipation of PAHs has not yet been fully assessed. An in-vessel composting-bioremediation experiment of a contaminated soil amended with fresh wastes was carried out. Four different experimental conditions were tested in triplicate during 60 days using laboratory-scale reactors: treatment S (100% soil), W (100% wastes), SW (soil/waste mixture), and SWB (soil/waste mixture with inoculation of degrading microorganisms). A dry mass loss of 35 ± 5% was observed in treatments with organic wastes during composting in all the treatments except treatment S. The dissipation of the 16 USEPA-listed PAHs was largely enhanced from no significant change to 50.5 ± 14.8% (for SW)/63.7 ± 10.0% (for SWB). More obvious dissipation was observed when fresh wastes were added at the beginning of composting to the contaminated soil, without significant difference between the inoculated and non-inoculated treatments. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiling showed that fungi and G-bacteria dominated at the beginning of experiment and were probably involved in PAH dissipation. Subsequently, greater relative abundances of G + bacteria were observed as PAH dissipation slowed down. The results suggest that improving the composting process with optimal organic compositions may be a feasible remediation strategy in PAH-contaminated soils through stimulation of active microbial populations.

  14. Properties of Spray Dried Food and Spray Drying Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Fumio

    The following conclusions are obtained, studying properties of spray dried food and drying characteristics. (a) Dried particles are similar to spray droplets in size distribution (y=2.5), and particle count distribution is arranged as (dn/dx = ae-bx). (b) The ratio of the particle diameters before and after drying is calculated with moisture before and after drying, and porosity is given as (εp = ww4). (c) The standard drying method is presented to evaluate accurately drying problems at a certain standard. (d) Equilibrium moisture at 20 up to 100°C are summarized in terms of adsorption potential. (e) It makes clear that calulation based on the theory of residence time and drying time represents well complex spray drying characteristics.

  15. Energy content of municipal solid waste bales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbay, Ismail; Durmusoglu, Ertan

    2013-07-01

    Baling technology is a preferred method for temporary storage of municipal solid waste (MSW) prior to final disposal. If incineration is intended for final disposal of the bales, the energy content of the baled MSW gains importance. In this study, nine cylindrical bales containing a mix of different waste materials were constructed and several parameters, including total carbon (TC), total organic carbon (TOC), total Kjeldahl nitrogen, moisture content, loss on ignition, gross calorific value and net calorific value (NCV) were determined before the baling and at the end of 10 months of storage. In addition, the relationships between the waste materials and the energy contents of the bales were investigated by the bivariate correlation analyses. At the end, linear regression models were developed in order to forecast the decrease of energy content during storage. While the NCVs of the waste materials before the baling ranged between 6.2 and 23.7 MJ kg(-1) dry basis, they ranged from 1.0 to 16.4 MJ kg(-1) dry basis at the end of the storage period. Moreover, food wastes exhibited the highest negative correlation with NCVs, whereas plastics have significant positive correlation with both NCVs and TCs. Similarly, TOCs and carbon/nitrogen ratios decreased with the increase in food amounts inside the bales. In addition, textile, wood and yard wastes increase the energy content of the bales slightly over the storage period.

  16. Use of slaughterhouse waste and tannery-based organic compost for management of reniform nematode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme L. Asmus

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A greenhouse experiment was carried out with the objective of evaluating the effect of increasing soil amendments (1, 3, 9, 15 and 30%, v/v of organic compost produced from slaughterhouse waste and tannery residues on the reproduction of reniform nematodes and cotton development. The addition of organic composts to soil proportionately reduced the number of nematodes per gram of root and the reproduction factor. However, depending on the concentration of the compost, there was a reduction of height and dry mass of cotton shoots. We concluded that the organic compost produced with slaughterhouse and tannery waste has potential for controlling reniform nematodes, but requires dose adjustments or improvements in its composition to reduce the risk of phytotoxicity.

  17. Laboratory tests of purifying coking plant waste water using coke dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karcz, A.; Burmistrz, P.; Rozwadowski, A. (Akademia Gorniczo-Hutnicza, Cracow (Poland). Wydzial Energochemii Wegla i Fizykochemii Sorbentow)

    1993-04-01

    Studies suitability of coke dust from dry coke quenching for cleaning waste water. Sorptive properties were compared to those of powdered Carbopol Z-4 activated carbon. The following factors were evaluated: chemical oxygen demand, total content of organic carbon, content of phenols, cyanides, thiocyanates, ammonia, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and benzopyrene. Amount of dust used was optimized in a series of experiments. Coke sedimentation was also studied within the range of 1, 5, 10, 20 and 30 g/dm[sup 3] concentrations, showing that the dust separates well after absorption. Special attention was paid to removal of phenols. Coke dust was found to have 38 to 98% of the sorptive power of activated carbon. Both adsorption materials made waste water lose its color and odor. Findings are provided in 5 tables. 2 refs.

  18. Dried plums vs. psyllium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stanghellini, V; Cogliandro, R. F

    2011-01-01

    ... that ‘… treatment with dried plums is efficacious and … better than treatment with psyllium …’. In this respect, we would like to put forward some considerations. First, psyllium is not an ideal control treatment, as it has never been convincingly shown to exert positive therapeutic results in chronic constipation, and fibres, in general, are not d...

  19. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a film of tears spreads over the eye. This keeps the eye’s surface smooth and clear. The ... and keeps tears from drying up too quickly. This layer is made in the eye’s meibomian glands . ...

  20. Essays on Dry Ports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.G. Chandrakant (Gujar)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractDue to several reasons, currently the global supply chains are getting stretched further away into the hinterlands from the gateway seaports. This single fact enhances the importance of dry ports. It would not be against logic, to state that in coming times, as a result of ever-growing

  1. dry vs irrigated

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... (dry vs irrigated) on the genetic relationships among the selected cotton lines from F6 population was studied using a ... a crop plant to produce its economic product with mini- mum loss in a water-deficit ..... Analysis System (NTSYS-pc) Version 2.0 software package (Rohlf,. 1993). The resulting genetic ...

  2. Polyethylene solidification of low-level wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1985-02-01

    This topical report describes the results of an investigation on the solidification of low-level radioactive waste in polyethylene. Waste streams selected for this study included those which result from advanced volume reduction technologies (dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash) and those which remain problematic for solidification using contemporary agents (ion exchange resins). Four types of commercially available low-density polyethylenes were employed which encompass a range of processing and property characteristics. Process development studies were conducted to ascertain optimal process control parameters for successful solidification. Maximum waste loadings were determined for each waste and polyethylene type. Property evaluation testing was performed on laboratory-scale specimens to assess the potential behavior of actual waste forms in a disposal environment. Waste form property tests included water immersion, deformation under compressive load, thermal cycling and radionuclide leaching. Recommended waste loadings of 70 wt % sodium sulfate, 50 wt % boric acid, 40 wt % incinerator ash, and 30 wt % ion exchange resins, which are based on process control and waste form performance considerations are reported. 37 refs., 33 figs., 22 tabs.

  3. High-intensity drying processes: Impulse drying. Progress report on furnish evaluations for impulse drying commercialization demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orloff, D.I.; Phelan, P.M.; Rudman, I.

    1995-02-01

    Laboratory and pilot scale experiments were performed to identify potential furnishes and operating parameters for upcoming high-speed pilot scale trials and commercial demonstration of impulse drying of heavy weight grades of paper. Results indicate that hydrodynamic specific surface is highly dependent on sheet formation and prehandling. Mill refined pulp and machine paper were comparable to laboratory prepared samples in regards to permeability and impulse drying. Process variables such as platen surface coating, felt type, felt moisture, and presteaming temperature profiles were investigated. Substantial improvements in sheet smoothness were achieved.

  4. Nutritive and Antioxidant properties of Shade Dried Leafy Vegetables Consumed in Northern Côte d’Ivoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Dehegnan Oulaï

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Leafy vegetables are highly perishable and often subjected to post-harvest wastes. Among the various methods of preservation, the effect of shadow drying on the nutritive value and antioxidant properties of five (5 leafy vegetables species widely consumed in Northern Côte d’Ivoire was investigated. These species were Amaranthus hybridus, Andasonia digitata, Ceiba patendra, Hibiscus sabdariffa and Vigna unguiculata. Experiment was conducted as follow: portions of washed and drained fresh leafy vegetables (500 g were spread on clean filter paper and kept in a well-ventilated room of the laboratory at 25°C for 5, 10 and 15 days. The results of proximate composition after 15 days of shadow drying were: moisture (15.19 – 20.36%, ash (9.14 -19.54%, crude fiber (11.04 – 27.40%, proteins (11.14 - 17.94%, lipids (2.41 – 5.86% and carbohydrates (16.59 – 45.14%. The concentration of minerals increased with respective values after 15 days of shadow drying: calcium (68.14-408.09 mg/100 g, magnesium (50.62-317.23 mg/100 g, iron (27.52-92.03 mg/100 g and zinc (10.17-16.73 mg/100 g. During shadow drying, vitamin C and carotenoids were subjected to losses estimated to 35.52 – 70.50% and 22.82 – 45.63%, respectively. Contrary to these losses, antioxidant activity increased and ranged from 57.45 to 75.55 % after 15 days of shadow drying. All these results suggest that the considerable nutrient contents of shade dried leafy vegetables make them good source of food supplements in order to meet the nutritional requirements of Ivorian population.

  5. Solar-augmented foam-mat drying of fruits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tayeb, A.M. (El-Minia Univ. (Egypt). Faculty of Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    The foam-mat drying technique is used to dry fruit syrups into powder. Literature has indicated that solar energy has not yet been used in this field. Thus, it is the object of the present work to dry the foamed syrups of different fruits in a solar energy augmented drying unit. This leads to a saving in both energy and environmental pollution. An auxiliary heater along with a control unit, is used to ensure drying at constant temperature. Foaming is effected by suitable edible additives and in some cases a stabilizer is needed as well. The drying experiments were run on orange, lemon, grapefruit, tomatoes, strawberry, guava and apple. The results showed that foaming decreased the time of drying by 30.8-41.5% in the case of direct sun drying and by 47.1-73.2% in the case of solar drying compared to the drying time of unfoamed syrup. The study showed that the technique proves to be of sufficient efficiency and acceptability to replace spray drying. (author)

  6. Microwave-vacuum drying of flax fiber for biocomposite production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Satyanarayan; Rana, Anup; Meda, Venkatesh; Chang, Peter R

    2009-01-01

    Flax fiber is one of the important bast fiber available in North America which has low density and good mechanical properties for reinforcing various polymers to develop industrial biocomposite. But the hydrophilic nature of the fiber leads to poor adhesion between the fiber and the polymer matrices which, in turn, leads to poor dimensional stability. To enhance the adhesion between polymer matrix and fiber, chemical treatments of the fiber are necessary. After these treatments, the fiber needs to be uniformly dried to minimum moisture content for better compounding of flax in polymer matrices. Drying by conventional dryers at higher temperature usually results in overall quality loss due to surface drying, and it is also time consuming and energy intensive. In recent years, the microwave has been effectively used for enhancing bulk drying of biomaterials especially when coupled with vacuum. Such a volumetric heat transfer mechanism coupled with drying in vacuum provides an ideal low-temperature drying technique resulting in better organoleptic quality. In this study, the drying characteristics of flax fiber were studied under microwave-vacuum condition. The drying experiments were conducted in Enwave Microwave-vacuum dryer using three different process variables viz., microwave power (750 W and 375 W), vacuum level (25, 10, and 0 in Hg) and time of drying (0 to 14 mins). In order to select the appropriate drying curve equation, the drying data was fitted in three different models viz., Page model, single exponential model and approximation of diffusion model.

  7. Evaluation of energy consumption in different drying methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motevali, Ali; Minaei, Saeid; Khoshtagaza, Mohammad Hadi [Department of Agricultural Machinery Engineering, Agricultural Faculty, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran 14115-111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate energy consumption in various drying systems including hot-air convection, use of microwave pretreatment with convection dryer, microwave drying, vacuum drying and infrared drying. Tests were conducted using pomegranate arils under various experimental conditions as follows. In convection dryer at six temperature levels (45, 50, 55, 60, 65 and 70 C) and three air velocity levels (0.5, 1 and 1.5 m/s) at three pretreatments of control, 100 W microwave pretreatment for 20 min and 200 W microwave pretreatment for 10 min. Experiments in the microwave dryer were done at three power levels of 100, 200 and 300 W and in vacuum dryer at five temperature levels (50, 60, 70, 80, and 90 C) under 250 kPa pressure. For infrared drying, there were four air velocity levels (0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 1 m/s) and three illumination levels (0.22, 0.31 and 0.49 W/cm{sup 2}). Experimental results showed that minimum and maximum energy consumption in pomegranate drying were associated with microwave and vacuum dryers, respectively. The use of microwave pretreatment in drying pomegranate arils in hot air dryer decreased drying time and energy consumption in comparison with pure convection drying. In infrared drying, it was found that drying time increased with air velocity which resulted in increased energy consumption. (author)

  8. DRY TRANSFER FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.S. Tang

    2004-09-23

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Dry Transfer Facility No.1 (DTF-1) performing operations to receive transportation casks, transfer wastes, prepare waste packages, and ship out loaded waste packages and empty casks. Doses received by workers due to maintenance operations are also included in this revision. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation from normal operation, excluding the remediation area of the building. The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the DTF-1 and to provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application. The calculations contained in this document were developed by Environmental and Nuclear Engineering of the Design and Engineering Organization and are intended solely for the use of the Design and Engineering Organization in its work regarding facility operation. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering should be consulted before use of the calculations for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering.

  9. Model Stickiness in Spray Drying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Thomas

    The work presented in this thesis concerns wall deposits encountered in spray drying caused by products that exhibit so-called 'stickiness'. The thesis delves into the understanding of the phenomenon of sticky wall deposits in spray drying and proposes a simple criterion for use in industrial...... design of spray dryers. The experimental work centers around a new technique for measuring when, during drying, a particle becomes non-sticky based on a single droplet drying technique used to study drying kinetics. An acoustic levitator is used to dry a levitated droplet in conditions similar to those...... a droplet would encounter in a spray dryer. The droplet is recorded using a CCD-camera during drying and the subsequent stickiness test. After a user-specifed drying time a piston strikes the partially dried particle at a user-specifed velocity. After the impact the piston surface is inspected...

  10. Impact of ultrasound on solid–liquid extraction of phenolic compounds from maritime pine sawdust waste. Kinetics, optimization and large scale experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Meullemiestre, Alice; Petitcolas, Emmanuel; Maache-Rezzoug, Z.; Chemat, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Maritime pine sawdust, a by-product from industry of wood transformation, has been investigated as a potential source of polyphenols which were extracted by ultrasound-assisted maceration (UAM). UAM was optimized for enhancing extraction efficiency of polyphenols and reducing time-consuming. In a first time, a preliminary study was carried out to optimize the solid/liquid ratio (6 g of dry material per mL) and the particle size (0.26 cm2) by conventional maceration (CVM). Under these conditio...

  11. Video: Taste - no waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mithril, Charlotte Elisabeth; Kamuk, Anette; Mortensen, Birthe Kofoed

    2017-01-01

    The aim of a so-called research day was to give schoolchildren from 6th to 7th grade a day of learning about taste, sustainability and future foods. The children were invited to University College Absalon in Soroe, Denmark to a day with workshops involving taste experiments. Based on sensory...... experiments related to taste and through involvement and dialogue, the aim was to create knowledge, competences and awareness about taste and to challenge food courage among the children. Focus was to explore taste and taste preferences through sensory experiments and to bring awareness to the taste...... of different foods. In addition, the aim was to create experiences which could show how taste and taste courage are influenced by social interactions and relations. A final aim was to bring awareness of how you can reduce waste with the example of how to use all parts of fruits and vegetables. In total...

  12. Abstract: Taste - no waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mithril, Charlotte Elisabeth; Kamuk, Anette; Hoffmeyer, Agnete

    The aim of a so-called research day was to give schoolchildren from 6th to 7th grade a day of learning about taste, sustainability and future foods. The children were invited to University College Absalon in Soroe, Denmark to a day with workshops involving taste experiments. Based on sensory...... experiments related to taste and through involvement and dialogue, the aim was to create knowledge, competences and awareness about taste and to challenge food courage among the children. Focus was to explore taste and taste preferences through sensory experiments and to bring awareness to the taste...... of different foods. In addition, the aim was to create experiences which could show how taste and taste courage are influenced by social interactions and relations. A final aim was to bring awareness of how you can reduce waste with the example of how to use all parts of fruits and vegetables. In total...

  13. Effect of municipal solid waste compost and sewage sludge on yield and heavy metal accumulation in soil and black cumin (Nigella sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Akbarnejad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effect of municipal solid waste (MSw compost and sewage sludge (SS on yield and concentration of heavy metals in soil and black cumin (Nigella sativa L. an experiment with MSW compost at 0, 15, 30 t.ha-1 (C0, C15 and C30 and sewage sludge at 0, 15, 30 t.ha-1 (S0, S15 and S30 in a factorial experiment based on completely randomized design with three replications was conducted in greenhouse of Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran. Results showed that MSW compost and SS had significant effects on plant dry matter. Increasing the amounts of SS increased dry matter of plant. But increasing MSW compost from 15 to 30 t.ha-1 was decreased in dry matter. The Effect of MSW compost and SS on concentration of heavy metals (Ni and Pb in plant except Cd was significant. Addition of MSW compost and sewage sludge increased availability of Pb, Ni and Cd in soil. But effect of MSW compost and sewage sludge on Cd availability was not significant. Results showed that the amounts of Ni exceed the standard limits in dry matter. Therefore in use of organic wastes for medicinal plants we should be careful..

  14. Pretreatment of different waste streams for improvement in biogas production; Foerbehandlingsteknikers betydelse foer oekat biogasutbyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarvari Horvath, Ilona (Hoegskolan i Boraas (Sweden)); del Pilar Castillo, Maria (JTI (Sweden)); Loren, Anders; Brive, Lena; Ekendahl, Susanne; Nordman, Roger (SP, Boraas (Sweden)); Kanerot, Mija (Boraas Energi och Miljoe AB (Sweden))

    2010-07-01

    Biological breakdown of organic municipal and industrial waste to biogas is already in use today. The technology is of outmost importance to attain the environmental goals that our society has set regarding to sustainable development. Of decisive economic importance is the ability to obtain an increased amount of biogas from the same amount of substrate. Alternative resources for biogas production are at the same time of great interest in order to enable a large expansion of biogas production. The goal of applying a suitable pre-treatment step before anaerobic digestion is to open up the molecular structure of inaccessible biopolymers in order to facilitate access to the carbon for microorganisms involved in biological breakdown and fermentation to biogas. Our study shows that introducing a pretreatment step opens new perspectives for biogas production. Treatment of paper residuals by steam explosion increased methane production up to 400 Nm3/ton dry matter, to a double amount of methane yield compared to that of untreated paper. A novel method for pretreatment with an environment-friendly solvent N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide (NMMO) was also tested on lignocellulose-rich waste fractions from forest and agricultural. The NMMO-treatment increased the methane yields of spruce chips and triticale straw by 25 times (250 Nm3/ton dry matter), and by 6 times (200 Nm3/ton dry matter), respectively, compared to that of the untreated materials. Keratin-rich feather waste yielded around 200 Nm3 methane/ton dry matter, which could be increased to 450 Nm3/ton after enzymatic treatment and to 360 Nm3/ton after either chemical treatment with lime, or after biological treatment with a recombinant bacterial strain of Bacillus megaterium. However, the gain in increased amount of methane after a pretreatment step should be weighted against a possible increase in energy usage generated by the pretreatment. We have therefore performed a case study in which the energy balance for a biogas

  15. Researches of odour emitted by household waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eglė Marčiulaitienė

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with odour emitted by household waste, the chemical composition of household waste. The experiment was made with food waste (1000 g placed in 5 litter containers. Food waste was containing products of animal origin (meat, fish, dairy products and plant origin (vegetables, fruit waste. Time of the experiment was 14 days 19±3 °C at environment temperature. Odour concentration is determined by dynamic olfactometry method. Studies have shown that the strongest odour of all household waste used in this experiment was emitted by meat and fish waste (76 444 OUE/m3. Meat and fish waste emits the strongest odour as waste contains proteins, their decomposition releases into the environment a strong unpleasant odour, hydrogen sulphide and ammonia. Protein degradation releases into the environment are, characterized by a strong unpleasant smell of hydrogen sulphide and ammonia gas. During the anaerobic decomposition of organic matter a variety of other fragrant compounds: alcohols (e.g., ethanol and methanol, vinegar, formic acid, etc. is found.

  16. Effects of Different Agricultural Wastes on Some Growth Factors, Yield and Crude Polysaccharide Content of Fruit of “Reishi” A Medicinal Mushroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Azimi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays, mushroom and fungi are one of the most promising organisms which are used in biotechnology research (industry, medicine and agriculture. In the meantime, medicinal mushroom (mostly consumed as edible and medicinal products have become a valuable biological resourcesin the pharmaceutical industry. Ganoderma the most legendary species of fungi in China with a long history dating back more than two thousand years.Ganodermalucidum (Fr. Karst isa species belonging to the order of Aphyllophorales and family Basidiomycetes. The mushroom only growth on two or three types of trees among 10,000 known trees in the world and therefore is very rare. Ganoderma fruiting bodies and spores contain about 400 different bioactive compounds, which mainly includeTriterpenes, polysaccharides, nucleotides, sterols, steroids, fatty acids, proteins andpeptides. The mushroom polysaccharides, in addition to cancer treatment have showed antiviral properties, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, anti-hypertensive and prevent blood clotting. Tavana et al (1 in the evaluation of the use of some agricultural and forest wastes material for production of the mushroom stated that the residue are suitable as a helpful supplements for the activity. Gonzalez-Matute et al (11 used sunflower seed shell after oil extraction as a substrate. They concluded that the sunflower seed shell can be used as the main energy source in the substrate to grow the mushroom. There are different agricultural wastematerials which are good sources for growing mushroom in our country. The use of agricultural residues has attracted much attention in recent years. To the best of our knowledge there are a few published studieson the production of Ganoderma in the field condition. This study was performed on Reishi mushroom (Ganodermalucidum to investigate the effects of different agricultural wastes on some morphological characteristics (growth rate, fresh weight and dry weight of mycelia

  17. Summary Report for Capsule Dry Storage Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JOSEPHSON, W S

    2003-09-04

    There are 1.936 cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) capsules stored in pools at the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). These capsules will be moved to dry storage on the Hanford Site as an interim measure to reduce risk. The Cs/Sr Capsule Dry Storage Project (CDSP) is conducted under the assumption the capsules will eventually be moved to the repository at Yucca Mountain, and the design criteria include requirements that will facilitate acceptance at the repository. The storage system must also permit retrieval of capsules in the event vitrification of the capsule contents is pursued. A cut away drawing of a typical cesium chloride (CsCI) capsule and the capsule property and geometry information are provided in Figure 1.1. Strontium fluoride (SrF{sub 2}) capsules are similar in design to CsCl capsules. Further details of capsule design, current state, and reference information are given later in this report and its references. Capsule production and life history is covered in WMP-16938, Capsule Characterization Report for Capsule Dry Storage Project, and is briefly summarized in Section 5.2 of this report.

  18. Relationship Between Dry Eye Symptoms and Pain Sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vehof, Jelle; Kozareva, Diana; Hysi, Pirro G.; Harris, Juliette; Nessa, Ayrun; Williams, Frances K.; Bennett, David L. H.; McMahon, Steve B.; Fahy, Samantha J.; Direk, Kenan; Spector, Tim D.; Hammond, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Dry eye disease (DED) is common, but little is known about factors contributing to symptoms of dry eye, given the poor correlation between these symptoms and objective signs at the ocular surface. OBJECTIVE To explore whether pain sensitivity plays a role in patients' experience of DED

  19. Simulation-integrated Design of Dry Bulk Terminals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Vianen, T.A.

    2015-01-01

    To meet the expected increase of seaborne trade flows for coal and iron ore dry bulk terminals need to be designed or expanded. A comprehensive design method for dry bulk terminals is missing. Designs are currently based on rules-of-thumb, practical experiences and average values for specific design

  20. influence of drying temperature and storage duration on fissuring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    yahoo.co.uk. ABSTRACT. Moisture and temperature gradients induce the ... peratures (45°C, 50°C, 55°C) as treatments and direct sun drying as control. The drying experi- ment was performed under three replications using a completely ...

  1. correlation between maximum dry density and cohesion of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    Due to the ever increasing cost of laboratory equipment to determine soil parameters such as cohesion and maximum dry density and the enormous time and energy dissipated in such experiment, this research work was attempted in order to investigate the possible correlation between cohesion and maximum dry density.

  2. Alleviating poverty in the dry zones of Sri Lanka

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    This paper describes the experience gained by the dry zone Agricultural Project in four Dry Zone districts of Sri Lanka in alleviating ... aspects. It was established that one of the reasons for the success of the project is the partnership strategy it has adopted in both ... increasing migration of youth to other areas in search of.

  3. Chemical Composition, Dry Matter Intake by West African Dwarf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The experiment was conducted to determine dry matter intake (DMI) by West African dwarf (WAD) goats, chemical composition, in vitro gas production and dry matter digestibility of Panicum maximum (common name: Guinea grass or Panicum) with graded levels of palm kernel cake (PKC). Five diets were evaluated: ...

  4. Optimization of waste combinations during in-vessel composting of agricultural waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, V Sudharsan; Kalamdhad, Ajay S; Kumar, Bimlesh

    2017-01-01

    In-vessel composting of agricultural waste is a well-described approach for stabilization of compost within a short time period. Although composting studies have shown the different combinations of waste materials for producing good quality compost, studies of the particular ratio of the waste materials in the mix are still limited. In the present study, composting was conducted with a combination of vegetable waste, cow dung, sawdust and dry leaves using a 550 L rotary drum composter. Application of a radial basis functional neural network was used to simulate the composting process. The model utilizes physico-chemical parameters with different waste materials as input variables and three output variables: volatile solids, soluble biochemical oxygen demand and carbon dioxide evolution. For the selected model, the coefficient of determination reached the high value of 0.997. The complicated interaction of agricultural waste components during composting makes it a nonlinear problem so it is difficult to find the optimal waste combinations for producing quality compost. Optimization of a trained radial basis functional model has yielded the optimal proportion as 62 kg, 17 kg and 9 kg for vegetable waste, cow dung and sawdust, respectively. The results showed that the predictive radial basis functional model described for drum composting of agricultural waste was well suited for organic matter degradation and can be successfully applied.

  5. Drying of Foods with Foam mat Drying Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Varhan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The foam mat drying is one of drying methods applied to produce powdered food in the food industry. Foam mat drying, which is better than other methods of drying in terms of drying time and cost, is used to convert powder form of various foods such as fruit, milk and seafood. The formation of the foam structure is provided with foaming agents and/or stabilizers. The surface area and drying efficiency of food product increase with conversion to foam structure. In this review, knowledge about the process conditions applied during the process of converting the food into powder form by foam drying method, the obtained product properties and the applicability of foam mat drying to various foods are presented.

  6. Impact of ultrasound on solid-liquid extraction of phenolic compounds from maritime pine sawdust waste. Kinetics, optimization and large scale experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meullemiestre, A; Petitcolas, E; Maache-Rezzoug, Z; Chemat, F; Rezzoug, S A

    2016-01-01

    Maritime pine sawdust, a by-product from industry of wood transformation, has been investigated as a potential source of polyphenols which were extracted by ultrasound-assisted maceration (UAM). UAM was optimized for enhancing extraction efficiency of polyphenols and reducing time-consuming. In a first time, a preliminary study was carried out to optimize the solid/liquid ratio (6g of dry material per mL) and the particle size (0.26 cm(2)) by conventional maceration (CVM). Under these conditions, the optimum conditions for polyphenols extraction by UAM, obtained by response surface methodology, were 0.67 W/cm(2) for the ultrasonic intensity (UI), 40°C for the processing temperature (T) and 43 min for the sonication time (t). UAM was compared with CVM, the results showed that the quantity of polyphenols was improved by 40% (342.4 and 233.5mg of catechin equivalent per 100g of dry basis, respectively for UAM and CVM). A multistage cross-current extraction procedure allowed evaluating the real impact of UAM on the solid-liquid extraction enhancement. The potential industrialization of this procedure was implemented through a transition from a lab sonicated reactor (3 L) to a large scale one with 30 L volume. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Increasing thermal drying temperature of biosolids reduced nitrogen mineralisation and soil N2O emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Case, Sean; Gomez Muñoz, Beatriz; Magid, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies found that thermally dried biosolids contained more mineralisable organic nitrogen (N) than the raw or anaerobically digested (AD) biosolids they were derived from. However, the effect of thermal drying temperature on biosolid N availability is not well understood. This will be o......Previous studies found that thermally dried biosolids contained more mineralisable organic nitrogen (N) than the raw or anaerobically digested (AD) biosolids they were derived from. However, the effect of thermal drying temperature on biosolid N availability is not well understood....... This will be of importance for the value of the biosolids when used to fertilise crops. We sourced AD biosolids from a Danish waste water treatment plant (WWTP) and dried it in the laboratory at 70, 130, 190 or 250 °C to >95 % dry matter content. Also, we sourced biosolids from the WWTP dried using its in-house thermal...

  8. Rethinking the waste hierarchy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, C.; Vigsoe, D. (eds.)

    2005-03-01

    There is an increasing need to couple environmental and economic considerations within waste management. Consumers and companies alike generate ever more waste. The waste-policy challenges of the future lie in decoupling growth in waste generation from growth in consumption, and in setting priorities for the waste management. This report discusses the criteria for deciding priorities for waste management methods, and questions the current principles of EU waste policies. The basis for the discussion is the so-called waste hierarchy which has dominated the waste policy in the EU since the mid-1970s. The waste hierarchy ranks possible methods of waste management. According to the waste hierarchy, the very best solution is to reduce the amount of waste. After that, reuse is preferred to recycling which, in turn, is preferred to incineration. Disposal at a landfill is the least favourable solution. (BA)

  9. Effects of thermal drying on phosphorus availability from iron-precipitated sewage sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemming, Camilla; Scheutz, Charlotte; Bruun, Sander

    2017-01-01

    Thermal drying of sewage sludge implies sanitation and improves practical handling options of the sludge prior to land application. However, it may also affect its value as a fertilizer. The objective of this study was to assess whether thermal drying of sewage sludge, as well as drying temperature...... experiments, thermal drying reduced P availability, as shown by 37 and 23% lower DGT and WEP values, respectively, and a 16% lower P uptake by barley in the pot experiment. The specific drying temperature did not appear to have much effect. Overall, our results suggest that thermal drying of iron...

  10. Other Special Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Line Kai-Sørensen; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    separately from MSW. Some of these other special wastes are briefly described in this chapter with respect to their definition, quantity and composition, and management options. The special wastes mentioned here are batteries, tires, polyvinylchloride (PVC) and food waste.......In addition to the main types of special waste related to municipal solid waste (MSW) mentioned in the previous chapters (health care risk waste, WEEE, impregnated wood, hazardous waste) a range of other fractions of waste have in some countries been defined as special waste that must be handled...

  11. Dried Yoghurts: Kurut and Kashk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Say

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The removal of water from the foods by the drying process is a known method since ancient times. Among drying methods, drying under sun is a method that cheap, quite easily implemented, needing less labour and equipment. Drying yoghurt (Kurut is a form of dried yoghurt or buttermilk. Kurut is made with plenty of milk in summer seasons and consumed in winter in eastern and southeastern region of our country. Dried yoghurt is consumed with pasting after softened thoroughly by into hot water or granulating. Drying yoghurt (Kashk is manufactured traditionally in dried form and produced industrially in liquid form in Iran and it is used flavoring agents as a food ingredient in the preparation of various food. According to Institute of Standard and Industrial Researches of Iran, dried kashk is obtained by heating of homemade yoghurt, yoghurt drink or the remaining buttermilk. Traditional liquid kashk is produced by milling of dried kashk and industrial liquid kashk is also produced by industrially produced yoghurt. Kurut and dried kashk as dried milk products are high in protein and mineral contents, but their fat and water content are low level. With this study it was summarized some characteristics of these products with the production methods of dried yoghurt produced in Turkey and Iran.

  12. Effects of waste treatment technique and quality of waste on bioaerosols in Finnish waste treatment plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolvanen, O.

    2004-07-01

    The last fifteen years have seen immense changes in waste treatment in Finland. The number of landfill sites has been reduced and new waste treatment plants have been constructed; source separation of the various waste fractions has been become increasingly effective. At the same time, considerable attention has been paid to environmental factors such as odour problems. Another important factor at waste treatment plants is the working conditions of employees. Earlier, there were numerous problems with occupational hygiene in sewage treatment plants and landfills. The present study was undertaken to determine whether serious problems with bioaerosols still exist now that there are new waste treatment techniques and waste is sorted. The concentrations of dust, microbes and endotoxins were investigated at one windrow composting site in 1993-1994 and at eight waste treatment plants in 1998-2003. The best environment in regard to occupational hygiene was the combined drum and tunnel composting plant in Heinola. The most problematic area in the plant was the storage room (tunnel) for compost, but the concentrations of bioaerosols were low even there. At the composting plant in Hyvinkaeae, where the same kind of technique was in use, there were problems with bioaerosols in all working areas investigated. The same problems were encountered in dirty working areas in a drum composting plant in Oulu; in the control room number of bioaerosols was low. Conditions were worst in the dry waste treatment plant in Tampere, where viable microbes were a particular problem in the processing hall. As well, the concentrations of dust and endotoxin were occasionally increased to a level harmful to human health. The dry waste was most affected with microbes, while the treatment of wood waste caused problems with dust. In the other plants of the study, sorting and crushing of waste caused the highest concentrations of bioaerosols. The two most common air-borne fungi at every plant were

  13. Waste Handeling Building Conceptual Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.W. Rowe

    2000-11-06

    The objective of the ''Waste Handling Building Conceptual Study'' is to develop proposed design requirements for the repository Waste Handling System in sufficient detail to allow the surface facility design to proceed to the License Application effort if the proposed requirements are approved by DOE. Proposed requirements were developed to further refine waste handling facility performance characteristics and design constraints with an emphasis on supporting modular construction, minimizing fuel inventory, and optimizing facility maintainability and dry handling operations. To meet this objective, this study attempts to provide an alternative design to the Site Recommendation design that is flexible, simple, reliable, and can be constructed in phases. The design concept will be input to the ''Modular Design/Construction and Operation Options Report'', which will address the overall program objectives and direction, including options and issues associated with transportation, the subsurface facility, and Total System Life Cycle Cost. This study (herein) is limited to the Waste Handling System and associated fuel staging system.

  14. a comparative study of the drying rate constant, drying efficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J., 2011. A comparative study of direct and indirect solar drying of mango. Global Journal of Pure and. Applied Sciences. 17, (3): 273- 294. Doymaz, I., 2004a. Drying kinetics of white mulberry. Journal of Food Engineering (74): 341-346. Doymaz, I., 2004b. Pretreatment effect on sun drying of mulberry fruit (Morusalba L).

  15. Formation of dry gram-negative bacteria biocontrol products and small pilot tests against potato dry rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains S11:P:12, P22:Y:05, and S22:T:04 reduce important potato maladies in storage including dry rot, late blight, pink rot, and sprouting. Experiments were conducted to identify methods for producing a dried, efficacious biological control product from one or more of these...

  16. Spinal anesthesia in a caesarian case after dry tap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Hridoy Kumar; Gunjal, M K; Toshikhane, Hemant D

    2014-01-01

    The case report here is a case of cesarean operation under subarachnoid block, which resulted after a failed lumber puncture, known to be "dry tap." The result is that it was uneventful surgery without any additive anesthetics being required after injecting 2.2 ml Bupivacaine 0.5% (H). Although cases have been reported with mixed experiences of dry tap and different causes are also explained, but still there is a need to find few other reasons for "dry tap." Hence, thought to present the case for putting forward a question that if there is any more cause for dry tap.

  17. SOME STUDIES ABOUT CEREALS BEHAVIOR DURING FREEZE DRYING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GABRIELA-VICTORIA MNERIE

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some special method and equipment and the principal advantages of freeze-dried food. The freeze drying is a good method of freeze-drying for make some experiments with many kind of cereals, for the improvement that in food production. It is necessary and is possible to study the corn oil extract, wheat flour, the maltodextrin from corn, modified cornstarch, spice extracts, soy sauce, hydrolyzed wheat gluten, partially hydrogenated soybean and cottonseed oil etc. That is very porous, since it occupies the same volume as the original and so rehydrates rapidly. There is less loss of flavour and texture than with most other methods of drying.

  18. 76 FR 76677 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Proposed Exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ...); or (3) the wastes are mixed with or derived from the treatment, storage or disposal of such... the Refinery's process area, as well as some dry-weather flow consisting of water from wash- down, maintenance, and cleaning activities, steam condensate and heat exchanger back-flushing. This sediment is...

  19. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

  20. Global Warming and 21st Century Drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Benjamin I.; Smerdun, Jason E.; Seager, Richard; Coats, Sloan

    2014-01-01

    Global warming is expected to increase the frequency and intensity of droughts in the twenty-first century, but the relative contributions from changes in moisture supply (precipitation) versus evaporative demand (potential evapotranspiration; PET) have not been comprehensively assessed. Using output from a suite of general circulation model (GCM) simulations from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, projected twentyfirst century drying and wetting trends are investigated using two offline indices of surface moisture balance: the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). PDSI and SPEI projections using precipitation and Penman- Monteith based PET changes from the GCMs generally agree, showing robust cross-model drying in western North America, Central America, the Mediterranean, southern Africa, and the Amazon and robust wetting occurring in the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and east Africa (PDSI only). The SPEI is more sensitive to PET changes than the PDSI, especially in arid regions such as the Sahara and Middle East. Regional drying and wetting patterns largely mirror the spatially heterogeneous response of precipitation in the models, although drying in the PDSI and SPEI calculations extends beyond the regions of reduced precipitation. This expansion of drying areas is attributed to globally widespread increases in PET, caused by increases in surface net radiation and the vapor pressure deficit. Increased PET not only intensifies drying in areas where precipitation is already reduced, it also drives areas into drought that would otherwise experience little drying or even wetting from precipitation trends alone. This PET amplification effect is largest in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes, and is especially pronounced in western North America, Europe, and southeast China. Compared to PDSI projections using precipitation changes only, the projections incorporating both

  1. Methodology to remediate a mixed waste site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, J.B.

    1994-08-01

    In response to the need for a comprehensive and consistent approach to the complex issue of mixed waste management, a generalized methodology for remediation of a mixed waste site has been developed. The methodology is based on requirements set forth in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and incorporates ``lessons learned`` from process design, remediation methodologies, and remediation projects. The methodology is applied to the treatment of 32,000 drums of mixed waste sludge at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. Process technology options are developed and evaluated, first with regard to meeting system requirements and then with regard to CERCLA performance criteria. The following process technology options are investigated: (1) no action, (2) separation of hazardous and radioactive species, (3) dewatering, (4) drying, and (5) solidification/stabilization. The first two options were eliminated from detailed consideration because they did not meet the system requirements. A quantitative evaluation clearly showed that, based on system constraints and project objectives, either dewatering or drying the mixed waste sludge was superior to the solidification/stabilization process option. The ultimate choice between the drying and the dewatering options will be made on the basis of a technical evaluation of the relative merits of proposals submitted by potential subcontractors.

  2. Solid waste digestors: process performance and practice for municipal solid waste digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissens, G; Vandevivere, P; De Baere, L; Biey, E M; Verstrae, W

    2001-01-01

    The most common types of anaerobic digesters for solid wastes have been compared based on biological and technical performance and reliability. Batch systems have the most simple designs and are the least expensive solid waste digesters. They have high potential for application in developing countries. Two-stage systems are the most complex and most expensive systems. Their greatest advantage lies in the equalisation of the organic loading rate in the first stage, allowing a more constant feeding rate of the methanogenic second stage. Two-stage systems with biomass accumulation devices in the second stage display a larger resistance toward toxicants and inhibiting substances such as ammonia. However, the large majority of industrial applications use one-stage systems and these are evenly split between "dry" systems (wastes are digested as received) and "wet" systems (wastes are slurried to about 12% total solids). Regarding biological performance, this study compares the different digester systems in terms of organic loading rates and biogas yields considering differences in input waste composition. As a whole, "dry" designs have proven reliable due to their higher biomass concentration, controlled feeding and spatial niches. Moreover, from a technical viewpoint the "dry" systems are more robust and flexible than "wet' systems.

  3. Performance of metal compound on thermolysis and electrolysis on sugar industries waste water treatment: COD and color removal with sludge analysis (batch-experiment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Omprakash

    2017-10-01

    The sugar cane industry is one of the most water demanding industries. Sugar industries consume and generate excess amount of water. The generated water contains organic compounds, which would cause pollution. The aim of this research work is to study the effectiveness of metal compound for treatment of sugar industry waste water by thermolysis and electrolysis process. The result shows ferrous metal catalyst shows 80 and 85 % chemical oxygen demand and color removal at pH 6, optimum mass loading 4 kg/m3, treatment temperature 85 °C and treatment time 9 h. When ferrous material was used as electrode, maximum 81 % chemical oxygen demand and 84 % color removal at pH 6, current density 156 Am-2, treatment time 120 min and anode consumption 0.7 g for 1.5 L wastewater were obtained.

  4. Nitramine Drying & Fine Grinding Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Nitramine Drying and Fine Grinding Facility provides TACOM-ARDEC with a state-of-the-art facility capable of drying and grinding high explosives (e.g., RDX and...

  5. Attenuation of heavy metal leaching from hazardous wastes by co-disposal of wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Wookeun; Shin, Eung Bai [Hanyang Univ., Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kil Chul; Kim, Jae Hyung [National Institute of Environmental Research, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The potential hazard of landfill wastes was previously evaluated by examining the extraction procedures for individual waste, although various wastes were co-disposed of in actual landfills. This paper investigates the reduction of extraction-procedure toxicity by co-disposing various combinations of two wastes. When two wastes are mixed homogeneously, the extraction of heavy metals from the waste mixture is critically affected by the extract pH. Thus, co-disposal wastes will have a resultant pH between the pH values of its constituent. The lower the resultant pH, the lower the concentrations of heavy metals in the extract. When these wastes are extracted sequentially, the latter extracted waste has a stronger influence on the final concentration of heavy metals in the extract. Small-scale lysimeter experiments confirm that when heavy-metal-bearing leachates Generated from hazardous-waste lysimeters are passed through a nonhazardous-waste lysimeter filled with compost, briquette ash, or refuse-incineration ashes, the heavy-metal concentration in the final leachates decreases significantly. Thus, the heavy-metal leaching could be attenuated if a less extraction-procedure-toxic waste were placed at the bottom of a landfill. 3 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Polyethylene encapsulation of mixed wastes: Scale-up feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H.; Colombo, P.

    1991-12-31

    A polyethylene process for the improved encapsulation of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes have been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Improvements in waste loading and waste form performance have been demonstrated through bench-scale development and testing. Maximum waste loadings of up to 70 dry wt % mixed waste nitrate salt were achieved, compared with 13--20 dry wt % using conventional cement processes. Stability under anticipated storage and disposal conditions and compliance with applicable hazardous waste regulations were demonstrated through a series of lab-scale waste form performance tests. Full-scale demonstration of this process using actual or surrogate waste is currently planned. A scale-up feasibility test was successfully conducted, demonstrating the ability to process nitrate salts at production rates (up to 450 kg/hr) and the close agreement between bench- and full-scale process parameters. Cored samples from the resulting pilot-scale (114 liter) waste form were used to verify homogeneity and to provide additional specimens for confirmatory performance testing.

  7. Waste form development program. Annual report, October 1982-September 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colombo, P.; Kalb, P.D.; Fuhrmann, M.

    1983-09-01

    This report provides a summary of the work conducted for the Waste Form Development/Test Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory in FY 1983 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program. The primary focus of this work is the investigation of new solidification agents which will provide improved immobilization of low-level radioactive wastes in an efficient, cost-effective manner. A working set of preliminary waste form evaluation criteria which could impact upon the movement of radionuclides in the disposal environment was developed. The selection of potential solidification agents for further investigation is described. Two thermoplastic materials, low-density polyethylene and a modified sulfur cement were chosen as primary candidates for further study. Three waste types were selected for solidification process development and waste form property evaluation studies which represent both new volume reduction wastes (dried evaporator concentrates and incinerator ash) and current problem wastes (ion exchange resins). Preliminary process development scoping studies were conducted to verify the compatibility of selected solidification agents and waste types and the potential for improved solidification. Waste loadings of 60 wt % Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, 25 wt % H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/, 25 wt % incinerator ash and 50 wt % dry ion exchange resin were achieved using low density polyethylene as a matrix material. Samples incorporating 65 wt % Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, 40 wt % H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/, 20 wt % incinerator ash and 40 wt % dry ion exchange resin were successfully solidified in modified sulfur cement. Additional improvements are expected for both matrix materials as process parameters are optimized. Several preliminary property evaluation studies were performed to provide the basis for an initial assessment of waste form acceptability. These included a two-week water immersion test and compressive load testing.

  8. Hydrothermal carbonization of food waste and associated packaging materials for energy source generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Diederick, Ryan; Flora, Joseph R V; Berge, Nicole D

    2013-11-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a thermal conversion technique that converts food wastes and associated packaging materials to a valuable, energy-rich resource. Food waste collected from local restaurants was carbonized over time at different temperatures (225, 250 and 275°C) and solids concentrations to determine how process conditions influence carbonization product properties and composition. Experiments were also conducted to determine the influence of packaging material on food waste carbonization. Results indicate the majority of initial carbon remains integrated within the solid-phase at the solids concentrations and reaction temperatures evaluated. Initial solids concentration influences carbon distribution because of increased compound solubilization, while changes in reaction temperature imparted little change on carbon distribution. The presence of packaging materials significantly influences the energy content of the recovered solids. As the proportion of packaging materials increase, the energy content of recovered solids decreases because of the low energetic retention associated with the packaging materials. HTC results in net positive energy balances at all conditions, except at a 5% (dry wt.) solids concentration. Carbonization of food waste and associated packaging materials also results in net positive balances, but energy needs for solids post-processing are significant. Advantages associated with carbonization are not fully realized when only evaluating process energetics. A more detailed life cycle assessment is needed for a more complete comparison of processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Improving anaerobic digestion of a cellulosic waste via routine bioaugmentation with cellulolytic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Ryals, Ana; Schideman, Lance; Li, Peng; Wilkinson, Henry; Wagner, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated routine bioaugmentation in the acid-phase of a two-phase anaerobic digestion (AD) process treating a largely cellulosic waste material generated from sweet corn processing. A proprietary cellulolytic bioculture was used for bioaugmentation with the aim of increasing substrate hydrolysis to improve overall methanogenic efficiency. In a sequencing batch experiment routine bioaugmentation achieved significantly greater soluble chemical oxygen demand (sCOD) generation (+25%) and methane production (+15%) compared to one-time bioaugmentation. In a continuous bench-scale system, routine bioaugmentation increased acid-phase sCOD by 29-68% and acetic acid concentrations by 31-34%. This benefit to hydrolysis and acetogenesis subsequently led to sustained increase in methane production (+56%) compared to non-bioaugmentation. A cursory economic analysis indicated that routine bioaugmentation could improve the economics of corn waste AD by $27-$34/dry tonne of waste. Overall, routine bioaugmentation showed significant promise for improving AD of corn waste by achieving sustained increases in substrate hydrolysis and methane production. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Chemical stabilization of metals in mine wastes by transformed red mud and other iron compounds: laboratory tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardau, C; Lattanzi, P; Peretti, R; Zucca, A

    2014-01-01

    A series of static and kinetic laboratory-scale tests were designed in order to evaluate the efficacy of transformed red mud (TRM) from bauxite refining residues, commercial zero-valent iron, and synthetic iron (III) hydroxides as sorbents/reagents to minimize the generation of acid drainage and the release of toxic elements from multi-contaminant-laden mine wastes. In particular, in some column experiments the percolation of meteoric water through a waste pile, alternated with periods of dryness, was simulated. Wastes were placed in columns together with sorbents/reagents in three different set-ups: as blended amendment (mixing method), as a bed at the bottom of the column (filtration method), or as a combination of the two previous methods. The filtration methods, which simulate the creation of a permeable reactive barrier downstream of a waste pile, are the most effective, while the use of sorbents/reagents as amendments leads to unsatisfactory results, because of the selective removal of only some contaminants. The efficacy of the filtration method is not significantly affected by the periods of dryness, except for a temporary rise of metal contents in the leachates due to dissolution of soluble salts formed upon evaporation in the dry periods. These results offer original information on advantages/limits in the use of TRM for the treatment of multi-contaminant-laden mine wastes, and represent the starting point for experimentation at larger scale.

  11. The effect of slicing type on drying kinetics and quality of dried carrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Naghipour zadeh mahani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Carrot is one of the most common vegetables used for human nutrition because of its high vitamin and fiber contents. Drying improves the product shelf life without addition of any chemical preservative and reduces both the size of package and the transport cost. Drying also aidsto reduce postharvest losses of fruits and vegetables especially, which can be as high as 70%. Dried carrots are used in dehydrated soups and in the form of powder in pastries and sauces. The main aim of drying agricultural products is decrease the moisture content to a level which allows safe storage over an extended period. Many fruits and vegetables can be sliced before drying.because of different tissue of a fruit or vegetable, cutting them in different direction and shape created different tissue slices. Due to drying is the exiting process of the moisture from internal tissue so different tissue slices caused different drying kinetics. Therefore, the study on effect of cutting parameters on drying is necessary. Materials and Methods: Carrots (Daucus carota L. were purchased from the local market (Kerman, Iran and stored in a refrigerator at 5°C. The initial moisture contents of the Carrot samples were determined by the oven drying method. The sample was dried in an oven at 105±2°C about 24 hours. The carrots cut by 3 models blade at 3 directions. The samples were dried in an oven at 70°C. Moisture content of the carrot slices were determined by weighting of samples during drying. Volume changes because of sample shrinkage were measured by a water displacement method. Rehydration experiment was performed by immersing a weighted amount of dried samples into hot water 50 °C for 30 min. In this study the effect of some cutting parameters was considered on carrot drying and the quality of final drying product. The tests were performed as a completely random design. The effects of carrot thickness at two levels (3 and 6 mm, blade in 3 models (flat blade

  12. Assessment of Fevicol (adhesive Drying Process through Dynamic Speckle Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Z. Ansari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic laser speckle (or biospeckle analysis is a useful measurement tool to analyze micro-motion on a sample surface via temporal statistics based on a sequence of speckle images. The aim of this work was to evaluate the use of dynamic speckles as an alternative tool to monitoring Fevicol drying process. Experimental demonstration of intensity-based algorithm to monitor Fevicol drying process is reported. The experiment was explored with the technique called Inertia Moment of co-occurrence matrix. The results allowed verifying the drying process and it was possible to observe different activity stages during the drying process. Statistical Tukey test at 5% significance level allowed differentiating different stages of drying. In conclusion, speckle activity, measured by the Inertia Moment, can be used to monitor drying processes of the Fevicol.

  13. Drying kinetics and colour change of lemon slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvishi, Hosain; Khoshtaghaza, Mohammad H.; Minaei, Saeid

    2014-03-01

    The effect of microwave-convective heating on drying characteristics and colour change of lemon slices was investigated. The drying experiments were carried out at 180, 360, 540 and 720Wand at 22°C, with air velocity of 1ms-1. The values of effective moisture diffusivity were found to be in the range between 1.87 10-8 and 3.95 10-8 m2 s-1, and the activation energy was estimated to be 10.91 Wg-1. The drying data were fitted with ten mathematical models available in the literature. The model describing drying kinetics of lemon slices in the best way was found. The colour change of the dried lemon slices was analysed and considered as a quality index affecting the drying quality of the product. The values of lightness/darkness, yellowness/blueness and hue angle increased, while the value of redness/greenness decreased with increasing microwave power.

  14. SILAGE CANE SUGAR ADDED WITH DRIED BREWER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. R. Castro

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the fermentative parameters and chemical composition of silage cane sugar added with residue dried brewery. The experimental design was completely randomized with four treatments and four replications: 100% cane sugar; 90% of cane sugar + 10% residue dried brewer; 80% of cane sugar + 20% residue dried brewer and 70% cane sugar + 30% dried brewer based on natural matter, composed silages. The sugar cane was chopped in a stationary machine with forage particle size of approximately 2 cm, and homogenized manually with the additives. For storage chopped fresh weight were used in experimental silos capacity of about 4 liters. The results showed that the contents of dry matter and crude protein showed positive linear (P0.05 with mean value of 3.81, while for ether extract and ash results were positive linear (P0.05 for N ammonia presented average value of 4.18. It is concluded that the addition of brewer dehydrated improves the fermentation process of silage cane sugar, in addition to improving their nutritional characteristics.

  15. Waste remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halas, Nancy J.; Nordlander, Peter; Neumann, Oara

    2017-01-17

    A system including a steam generation system and a chamber. The steam generation system includes a complex and the steam generation system is configured to receive water, concentrate electromagnetic (EM) radiation received from an EM radiation source, apply the EM radiation to the complex, where the complex absorbs the EM radiation to generate heat, and transform, using the heat generated by the complex, the water to steam. The chamber is configured to receive the steam and an object, wherein the object is of medical waste, medical equipment, fabric, and fecal matter.

  16. Precipitation-filtering technology for uranium waste solution generated on washing-electrokinetic decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gye-Nam, E-mail: kimsum@kaeri.re.kr; Park, Uk-Ryang; Kim, Seung-Soo; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2015-05-15

    Graphical abstract: A recycling process diagram for the volume reduction of waste solution generated from washing-electrokinetic decontamination. - Highlights: • A process for recycling a waste solution generated was developed. • The total metal precipitation rate by NaOH in a supernatant after precipitation was the highest at pH 9. • The uranium radioactivity in the treated solution upon injection of 0.2 g of alum was lower. • After drying, the volume of sludge was reduced to 35% of the initial sludge volume. - Abstract: Large volumes of uranium waste solution are generated during the operation of washing-electrokinetic decontamination equipment used to remove uranium from radioactive soil. A treatment technology for uranium waste solution generated upon washing-electrokinetic decontamination for soil contaminated with uranium has been developed. The results of laboratory-size precipitation experiments were as follows. The total amount of metal precipitation by NaOH for waste solution was highest at pH 11. Ca(II), K(I), and Al(III) ions in the supernatant partially remained after precipitation, whereas the concentration of uranium in the supernatant was below 0.2 ppm. Also, when NaOH was used as a precipitant, the majority of the K(I) ions in the treated solution remained. The problem of CaO is to need a long dissolution time in the precipitation tank, while Ca(OH){sub 2} can save a dissolution time. However, the volume of the waste solution generated when using Ca(OH){sub 2} increased by 8 mL/100 mL (waste solution) compared to that generated when using CaO. NaOH precipitant required lower an injection volume lower than that required for Ca(OH){sub 2} or CaO. When CaO was used as a precipitant, the uranium radioactivity in the treated solution at pH 11 reached its lowest value, compared to values of uranium radioactivity at pH 9 and pH 5. Also, the uranium radioactivity in the treated solution upon injection of 0.2 g of alum with CaO or Ca(OH){sub 2} was

  17. Drying Of Brazilian Pepper-tree Fruits (schinus Terebinthifolius Raddi): Development Of Classical Models And Artificial Neural Network Approach

    OpenAIRE

    da Silva; Bruno Guzzo; Frattini Fileti; Ana Maria; Taranto; Osvaldir Pereira

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the drying process of Brazilian pepper-tree fruits (Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi) was investigated, with emphasis on the development of models for the drying kinetics. A central composite rotable design (CCRD) with 11 experiments was carried out. In each experiment, the drying kinetics and the drying rate were observed. Classical models were fitted to the drying data, as well as a model based on Artificial Intelligence. The results revealed that the air temperature has the gr...

  18. Microwave drying of wood strands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guanben Du; Siqun Wang; Zhiyong Cai

    2005-01-01

    Characteristics of microwave drying of wood strands with different initial moisture contents and geometries were investigated using a commercial small microwave oven under different power inputs. Temperature and moisture changes along with the drying efficiency were examined at different drying scenarios. Extractives were analyzed using gas chromatography=mass...

  19. SELECTED DRYING CHARACTERISTICS OF PLANTATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    There are few wood based industries in Nigeria that appreciate the importance of wood seasoning nowadays; hence ... rate), moisture gradient and the associated drying characteristics in wood during drying must be known ... or blemish in a wood product that occurs during the drying process and reduces the product‟s ...

  20. Simulation analysis of wastes gasification technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stępień Leszek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Each year a significant growth in the amount of wastes generated is observed. Due to this fact technologies enabling utilization of wastes are needed. One of the ways to utilizes wastes is thermal conversion. Most widely used technology for thermal conversion is gasification that enables to produce syngas that can be either combusted or directed to further synthesis to produce methanol or liquid fuels. There are several commercially available technologies that enable to gasify wastes. The first part of this study is subjected to general description of waste gasification process. Furthermore the analysis and comparison of commercially available gasification technologies is presented, including their process arrangement, limits and capabilities. Second part of the study is dedicated to the development of thermodynamic model for waste gasification. The model includes three zones of gasification reactors: drying, gasification and eventually ash melting. Modified Gibbs minimization method is used to simulate gasification process. The model is capable of predicting final gas composition as a function of temperature or equivalence ratio. Calculations are performed for a specified average wastes composition and different equivalence ratios of air to discuss its influence on the performance of gasification (temperature of the process and gas composition. Finally the model enables to calculate total energy balance of the process as well as gasification and final gas temperature.