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Sample records for waste decontamination krypton

  1. Dry decontamination for tritiated wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Zhengkun; Wu Tao; Dan Guiping; Xie Yun

    2009-01-01

    To aim at decontamination of tritiated wastes, we have developed and fabricated a dry tritium decontamination system, which is designed to reduce tritium surface contamination of various alloy by UV, ozone and heating. The result indicates that the elevation of temperature can obviously improve decontamination effect. With 3 h irradiation by 365 nm UV at 220 degree C, it has a decontamination rate of 99% to stainless steel surface. Ozone can more obviously improve decontamination effect when metal was heated. Ozone has a decontamination effect beyond 95% to stainless steel, aluminum and brass at 220 degree C. Tritium surface concentration of metal has a little increase after decontamination. (authors)

  2. Decontamination of organic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, W.

    1977-01-01

    Decontamination stands for the sack collecting of wc-waste water of nuclear-medical tracts and especially the collecting of primary urine and primary faeces of patients after application of radio-isotopes (e.g. iodine 131). They are tied up in the sacks, treated with antiseptic and decomposition-preventing agents, and finally stored in a decupation depot over the time constant. The decupation depot can, for example, be a deep-freezor with separations and clocks, which is radiation-isolated. After the time constant a chemical and/or physical destruction (e.g. comminution) takes place, with simultaneous disinfection and thawing (vapour heating) and the transfer to the canalization. (DG) [de

  3. A decontamination technique for decommissioning waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heki, H.; Hosaka, K.; Kuribayashi, N.; Ishikura, T.

    1993-01-01

    A large amount of radioactive metallic waste is generated from decommissioned commercial nuclear reactors. It is necessary from the point of environmental protection and resource utilization to decontaminate the contaminated metallic waste. A decommissioning waste processing system has been previously proposed considering such decommissioning waste characteristics as its large quantity, large radioactivity range, and various shapes and materials. The decontamination process in this system was carried out by abrasive blasting as pretreatment, electrochemical decontamination as the main process, and ultrasonic cleaning in water as post-treatment. For electrochemical decontamination, electrolytic decontamination for simple shaped waste and REDOX decontamination for complicated shaped waste were used as effective decontamination processing. This time, various kinds of actual radioactive contaminated samples were taken from operating power plants to simulate the decontamination of decommissioning waste. After analyzing the composition, morphogenesis and surface observation, electrolytic decontamination, REDOX decontamination, and ultrasonic cleaning experiments were carried out by using these samples. As a result, all the samples were decontaminated below the assumed exemption level(=4 x 10 -2 Bq/g). A maximum decontamination factor of over 104 was obtained by both electrolytic and REDOX decontamination. The stainless steel sample was easy to decontaminate in both electrochemical decontaminations because of its thin oxidized layer. The ultrasonic cleaning process after electrochemical decontamination worked effectively for removing adhesive sludge and the contaminated liquid. It has been concluded from the results mentioned above that electrolytic decontamination and REDOX decontamination are effective decontamination process for decontaminating decommissioning waste

  4. Decontamination liquid waste processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enda, Masami; Hosaka, Katsumi.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid wastes after electrolytic reduction are caused to flow through an anionic exchange membrane in a diffusion dialysis step, and liquid wastes and dialyzed water are passed in a countercurrent manner. Since acids in the liquid wastes transfer on the side of the dialyzed water due to the difference of concentration between the liquid wastes and the dialyzed water, acids can be easily recovered from the liquid wastes. If the acid-removed liquid wastes are put to electrodeposition in an electrodepositing step, the electrodepositing reactions between radioactive materials such as Co ion, Mn ion and leached metals such as Fe ions and Cr ions are caused preferentially to hydrogen generation reaction on a metal deposition cathode. Accordingly, metal ions can be easily separated from the liquid wastes. Since the separated liquid wastes are an aqueous solution in which cerium ions as a decontaminant and an acid at low concentration are dissolved, the concentration thereof is controlled by mixing them to acid recovering water after the diffusion dialysis and they can be reused as the decontaminant. (T.M.)

  5. Decontamination processes for waste glass canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.N.

    1981-06-01

    The process which will be used to decontaminate waste glass canisters at the Savannah River Plant consists of: decontamination (slurry blasting); rinse (high-pressure water); and spot decontamination (high-pressure water plus slurry). No additional waste will be produced by this process because glass frit used in decontamination will be mixed with the radioactive waste and fed into the glass melter. Decontamination of waste glass canisters with chemical and abrasive blasting techniques was investigated. The ability of a chemical technique with HNO 3 -HF and H 2 C 2 O 4 to remove baked-on contamination was demonstrated. A correlation between oxide removal and decontamination was observed. Oxide removal and, thus, decontamination by abrasive blasting techniques with glass frit as the abrasive was proposed and demonstrated

  6. Decontamination processes for waste glass canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.N.

    1981-01-01

    The process which will be used to decontaminate waste glass canisters at the Savannah River Plant consists of: decontamination (slurry blasting); rinse (high-pressure water); and spot decontamination (high-pressure water plus slurry). No additional waste will be produced by this process because glass frit used in decontamination will be mixed with the radioactive waste and fed into the glass melter. Decontamination of waste glass canisters with chemical and abrasive blasting techniques was investigated. The ability of a chemical technique with HNO 3 -HF and H 2 C 2 O 4 to remove baked-on contamination was demonstrated. A correlation between oxide removal and decontamination was observed. Oxide removal and, thus, decontamination by abrasive blasting techniques with glass frit as the abrasive was proposed and demonstrated

  7. Properties and solidification of decontamination wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, M.S.; Piciulo, P.L.; Bowerman, B.S.; Adams, J.W.; Milian, L.

    1983-01-01

    LWRs will require one or more chemical decontaminations to achieve their designed lifetimes. Primary system decontamination is designed to lower radiation fields in areas where plant maintenance personnel must work. Chemical decontamination methods are either hard (concentrated chemicals, approximately 5 to 25 weight percent) or soft (dilute chemicals less than 1 percent by weight). These methods may have different chemical reagents, some tailor-made to the crud composition and many methods are and will be proprietary. One factor common to most commercially available processes is the presence of organic acids and chelates. These types of organic reagents are known to enhance the migration of radionuclides after disposal in a shallow land burial site. The NRC sponsors two programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory that are concerned with the management of decontamination wastes which will be generated by the full system decontamination of LWRs. These two programs focus on potential methods for degrading or converting decontamination wastes to more acceptable forms prior to disposal and the impact of disposing of solidified decontamination wastes. The results of the solidification of simulated decontamination resin wastes will be presented. Recent results on combustion of simulated decontamintion wastes will be described and procedures for evaluating the release of decontamination reagents from solidified wastes will be summarized

  8. Method of processing decontaminating liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusaka, Ken-ichi

    1989-01-01

    When decontaminating liquid wastes are processed by ion exchange resins, radioactive nuclides, metals, decontaminating agents in the liquid wastes are captured in the ion exchange resins. When the exchange resins are oxidatively deomposed, most of the ingredients are decomposed into water and gaseous carbonic acid and discharged, while sulfur ingredient in the resins is converted into sulfuric acid. In this case, even less oxidizable ingredients in the decontaminating agent made easily decomposable by oxidative decomposition together with the resins. The radioactive nuclides and a great amount of iron dissolved upon decontamination in the liquid wastes are dissolved in sulfuric acid formed. When the sulfuric acid wastes are nuetralized with sodium hydroxide, since they are formed into sodium sulfate, which is most popular as wastes from nuclear facilities, they can be condensated and solidified by existent waste processing systms to thereby facilitate the waste processing. (K.M.)

  9. Method for decontaminating radiation metal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Akio; Akimoto, Hidetoshi

    1991-01-01

    This report describes a method for decontaminating radiation metal waste characterized by the following properties: in order to decontaminate radiation metal waste of various shapes produced by facilities involved with radioactive substances, non-complex shapes are decontaminated by electropolishing the materials in a neutral saline solution. Complex shapes are chemically decontaminated by means of an acid solution containing permanganic acid or an alkaline solution and a mineral acid solution. After neutralizing the solutions used for chemical decontamination, the radioactive material is separated and removed. Further, in the decontamination method for radioactive metal waste, a supernatant liquid is reused as the electrolyte in electropolishing decontamination. Permanganic ions (MnO 4 - ) are reduced to manganese dioxide (MnO 2 ) and deposited prior to neutralizing the solution used for chemical decontamination. Once manganese dioxide (MnO 2 ) has been separated and removed, it is re-used as the electrolyte in electropolishing decontamination by means of a process identical to the separation process for radioactive substances. 3 figs

  10. Chemical decontamination method for radioactive metal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Akimoto, Hidetoshi

    1991-01-01

    The invention relates to a decontamination method for radioactive metal waste products derived from equipment that handles radioactive materials whose surfaces have been contaminated; in particular it concerns a decontamination method that reduces the amount of radioactive waste by decontaminating radioactive waste substances to a level of radioactivity in line with normal waste products. In order to apply chemical decontamination to metal waste products whose surfaces are divided into carbon steel waste and stainless steel waste; the carbon steel waste is treated using only a primary process in which the waste is immersed in a sulfuric acid solution, while the stainless steel waste must be treated with both the primary process and then electrolytically reduces it for a specific length of time and a secondary process that uses a solution of sulfuric acid mixed with oxidizing metal salts. The method used to categorize metal waste into carbon steel waste and stainless steel waste involves determining the presence, or absence, of magnetism. Voltage is applied for a fixed duration; once that has stopped, electrolytic reduction repeats the operative cycle of applying, then stopping voltage until the potential of the radioactive metal waste is retained in the active region. 1 fig. 2 tabs

  11. Chemical decontamination method for radioactive metal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Akio; Shibuya, Sadao.

    1991-01-01

    When contaminants mainly composed of copper remained on the surface of stainless steel wastes sent from an electrolytic reduction as a first step are chemically decontaminated, metal wastes are discriminated to carbon steel wastes and stainless steel wastes. Then, the carbon steel wastes are applied only with the first step of immersing in a sulfuric acid solution, and stainless steel wastes are applied with a first step of immersing into a sulfuric acid solution for electrolytic reduction for a predetermined period of time and a second step of immersing into a liquid in which an oxidative metal salt is added to sulfuric acid. The decontamination liquid which is used for immersing the stainless steel wastes in the second step and the oxidation force of which is lowered is used as the sulfuric acid solution in the first step for the carbon steel wastes. In view of the above, the decontamination liquid of the second step can be utilized most effectively, enabling to greatly decrease the secondary wastes and to improve decontamination efficiency. (T.M.)

  12. Processing of waste solutions from electrochemical decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlot, L.A.; Allen, R.P.; Arrowsmith, H.W.; Hooper, J.L.

    1979-09-01

    The use of electropolishing as a decontamination technique will be effective only if we can minimize the amount of secondary waste requiring disposal and economically recycle part of the decontamination electrolyte. Consequently, a solution purification method is needed to remove the dissolved contamination and metal in the electrolyte. This report describes the selection of a purification method for a phosphoric acid electrolyte from the following possible acid reclamation processes: ion exchange, solvent extraction, precipitation, distillation, electrolysis, and membrane separation

  13. Presolidification treatment of decontamination wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habayeb, M.A.

    1982-02-01

    Unsatisfactory leaching performance of several solidified decontamination solutions indicated a need for presolidification treatments to reduce the water sensitivity of the active chemicals. Chemical treatments examined in this work include pH adjustment, precipitation and oxidation-reduction reactions. The reactions involved in these treatments are discussed. The most suitable presolidification treatment for each decontamination solution has been identified. Further research is needed to test the effectivenss of these treatments

  14. Decontamination processes for waste glass canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.N.

    1982-01-01

    A Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently being designed to convert Savannah River Plant liquid, high-level radioactive waste into a solid form, such as borosilicate glass. To prevent the spread of radioactivity, the outside of the canisters of waste glass must have very low levels of smearable radioactive contamination before they are removed from the DWPF. Several techniques were considered for canister decontamination: high-pressure water spray, electropolishing, chemical dissolution, and abrasive blasting. An abrasive blasting technique using a glass frit slurry has been selected for use in the DWPF. No additional equipment is needed to process waste generated from decontamination. Frit used as the abrasive will be mixed with the waste and fed to the glass melter. In contrast, chemical and electrochemical techniques require more space in the DWPF, and produce large amounts of contaminated by-products, which are difficult to immobilize by vitrification

  15. HAZARDOUS WASTE DECONTAMINATION WITH PLASMA REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of electrical energy in the form of plasma has been considered as a potentially efficient means of decontaminating hazardous waste, although to date only a few attempts have been made to do so. There are a number of relative advantages and some potential disadvantages to...

  16. DWTF [decontamination and waste treatment facilities] assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maimoni, A.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study has been to evaluate the adequacy of present and proposed decontamination and waste treatment facilities (DWTF) at LLNL, to determine the cost effectiveness for proposed improvements, and possible alternatives for accomplishing these improvements. To the extent possible, we have also looked at some of the proposed environmental compliance and cleanup (ECC) projects

  17. Solid waste handling and decontamination facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampton, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The Title 1 design of the decontamination part of the SWH and D facility is underway. Design criteria are listed. A flowsheet is given of the solid waste reduction. The incinerator scrubber is described. Design features of the Gunite Tank Sludge Removal and a schematic of the sluicer, TV camera, and recirculating system are given. 9 figures

  18. Dry blasting decontaminating method for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiwaki, Hitoshi.

    1993-01-01

    In the present invention, when abrasives are dry blasted on the surface of radioactive wastes and the recovered abrasives are classified for re-use, abrasives having a microvicker's hardness (HMV) of greater than 600 and a grain size of greater than 1mm are used in a case where the radioactive wastes to be abraded are stainless steels. This enables dry blasting decontamination for stainless steels which has been considered to be impossible. In addition since the amount of secondary wastes are reduced, it is extremely effective. (T.M.)

  19. Chemical decontamination of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, H.I.

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive wastes are generated in a number of different kinds of facilities and arise in a wide range of concentrations of radioactive materials and in a variety of physical and chemical forms. There is also a variety of alternatives for treatment and conditioning of the wastes prior disposal. The importance of treatment of radioactive waste for protection of human and environment has long been recognized and considerable experience has gained in this field. Generally, the methods used for treatment of radioactive wastes can be classified into three type's biological, physical and chemical treatment this physical treatment it gives good result than biological treatment. Chemical treatment is fewer hazards and gives good result compared with biological and physical treatments. Chemical treatment is fewer hazards and gives good result compared with biological and physical treatments. In chemical treatment there are different procedures, solvent extraction, ion exchange, electro dialysis but solvent extraction is best one because high purity can be optioned on the other hand the disadvantage that it is expensive. Beside the solvent extraction technique one can be used is ion exchange which gives reasonable result, but requires pretreatment that to avoid in closing of column by colloidal and large species. Electro dialysis technique gives quite result but less than solvent extraction and ion exchange technique the advantage is a cheep.(Author)

  20. Chemical decontamination method for radioactive metal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Akio; Onuma, Tsutomu; Yamazaki, Sei; Miura, Haruki.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention provides a chemical decontamination method for radioactive metal wastes, which are generated from radioactive material handling facilities and the surfaces of which are contaminated by radioactive materials. That is, it has a feature of applying acid dissolution simultaneously with mechanical grinding. The radioactive metal wastes are contained in a vessel such as a barrel together with abrasives in a sulfuric acid solution and rotated at several tens rotation per minute. By such procedures for the radioactive metal wastes, (1) cruds and passive membranes are mechanically removed, (2) exposed mother metal materials are uniformly brought into contact with sulfuric acid and further (3) the mother metal materials dissolve the cruds and the passive membranes also chemically by a reducing dissolution (so-called local cell effect). According to the method of the present invention, stainless steel metal wastes having cruds and passive membranes can rapidly and efficiently be decontaminated to a radiation level equal with that of ordinary wastes. (I.S.)

  1. Decontamination impacts on solidification and waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempf, C.R.; Soo, P.

    1988-01-01

    Research to determine chemical and physical conditions which could lead to thermal excursions, gas generation, and/or general degradation of decontamination-reagent-loaded resins has shown that IRN-78, IONAC A-365, and IRN-77 organic ion exchange resin moisture contents vary significantly depending on the counter ion ''loading.'' The extent/vigor of the reaction is very highly dependent on the degree of dewatering of the resins and on the method of solution addition. The heat generation may be due, in part, to the heat of neutralization. In studies of the long-term compatibility effects of decontamination waste resins in contact with waste package container materials in the presence of decontamination reagents, radiolysis products and gamma irradiation, it has been found that the corrosion of carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel in mixed bed resins is enhanced by gamma irradiation. However, cracking in high density polyethylene is essentially eliminated because of the rapid removal of oxygen from the environment by gamma-induced oxidation of the large resin mass. 13 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Krypton separation from waste gas of a reprocessing plant by low temperature rectification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    6 lectures at this seminar describe and evaluate the results of the research and development work on low temperature krypton separation from the waste gas of the reprocessing of nuclear fuels. They are used for making decisions for the process to be used in the future on a large scale at the Wackersdorf reprocessing plant. 2 further lectures deal with alternatives to this process, which were also developed: the freon washing and low temperature adsorption of krypton. All the lectures were included separately in the INIS and ENERGY databases. (RB) [de

  3. Decontamination of high-level waste canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesbitt, J.F.; Slate, S.C.; Fetrow, L.K.

    1980-12-01

    This report presents evaluations of several methods for the in-process decontamination of metallic canisters containing any one of a number of solidified high-level waste (HLW) forms. The use of steam-water, steam, abrasive blasting, electropolishing, liquid honing, vibratory finishing and soaking have been tested or evaluated as potential techniques to decontaminate the outer surfaces of HLW canisters. Either these techniques have been tested or available literature has been examined to assess their applicability to the decontamination of HLW canisters. Electropolishing has been found to be the most thorough method to remove radionuclides and other foreign material that may be deposited on or in the outer surface of a canister during any of the HLW processes. Steam or steam-water spraying techniques may be adequate for some applications but fail to remove all contaminated forms that could be present in some of the HLW processes. Liquid honing and abrasive blasting remove contamination and foreign material very quickly and effectively from small areas and components although these blasting techniques tend to disperse the material removed from the cleaned surfaces. Vibratory finishing is very capable of removing the bulk of contamination and foreign matter from a variety of materials. However, special vibratory finishing equipment would have to be designed and adapted for a remote process. Soaking techniques take long periods of time and may not remove all of the smearable contamination. If soaking involves pickling baths that use corrosive agents, these agents may cause erosion of grain boundaries that results in rough surfaces

  4. Decontamination Study for Mixed Waste Storage Tanks RCRA Closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaphart, D.M.; Reed, S.R.; Rankin, W.N.

    1995-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) plans to close six underground tanks storing mixed waste under RCRA regulations. In support of this closure effort, a study was performed to determine the optimal method of decontaminating these tanks to meet the closure requirements. Items consaidered in the evaluation of the decontamination methods included effectiveness, compatibility with existing waste residues, possible cleaning solution disposal methods, and cost

  5. Impact of decontamination on LWR radioactive waste treatment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoenes, G.R.; Perrigo, L.D.; Divine, J.R.; Faust, L.G.

    1979-01-01

    Only at N-Reactor is there a means to accommodate radwaste produced during decontamination. The Dresden system is expected to be ready to accommodate such solutions by the summer of 1979. Solidification of the processed decontamination waste may be a significant problem. There is doubt that the materials in current radwaste treatment systems can handle chemicals from a concentrated process. The total storage volume, for concentrated decontamination, is not sufficient in existing radwaste treatment systems. Greater attention should be placed on designing reactors and radwaste treatment systems for decontamination. A means of handling waste material resulting from leaks in the primary system during the decontamination must be developed. On-site storage of solidified decontamination wastes may be a viable option, but license amendments will be necessary

  6. Active Waste Materials Corrosion and Decontamination Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielson, M.J.; Elmore, M.R.; Pitman, S.G.

    2000-01-01

    Stainless steel alloys, 304L and 316L, were corrosion tested in representative radioactive samples of three actual Hanford tank waste solutions (Tanks AW-101, C-104, AN-107). Both the 304L and 316L exhibited good corrosion performance when immersed in boiling waste solutions. The maximum general corrosion rate was 0.015 mm/y (0.60 mils per year). Generally, the 304L had a slightly higher rate than the 316L. No localized attack was observed after 122 days of testing in the liquid phase, liquid/vapor phase, or vapor phase. Radioactive plate-out decontamination tests indicated that a 24-hour exposure to 1 und M HNO 3 could remove about 99% of the radioactive components in the metal film when exposed to the C-104 and AN-107 solutions. The decontamination results are less certain for the AW-101 solution, since the initial contamination readings exceeded the capacity of the meter used for this test

  7. Decontamination system study for the Tank Waste Retrieval System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reutzel, T.; Manhardt, J.

    1994-05-01

    This report summarizes the findings of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's decontamination study in support of the Tank Waste Retrieval System (TWRS) development program. Problems associated with waste stored in existing single shell tanks are discussed as well as the justification for the TWRS program. The TWRS requires a decontamination system. The subsystems of the TWRS are discussed, and a list of assumptions pertinent to the TWRS decontamination system were developed. This information was used to develop the functional and operational requirements of the TWRS decontamination system. The requirements were combined with a comprehensive review of currently available decontamination techniques to produced a set of evaluation criteria. The cleaning technologies and techniques were evaluated, and the CO 2 blasting decontamination technique was chosen as the best technology for the TWRS

  8. Treatment of wastes arising from decontamination process using citric acid as a decontaminate agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mierzwa, J.C.; Riella, H.G.; Carvalho, E.U. de

    1993-01-01

    Wastes arising from equipment decontamination processes from nuclear fuel cycle facilities at Coordenacao de Projetos Especiais - Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Sao Paulo (COPESP-CNEN/SP) has been studied after using citric acid as a decontaminate agent. Precipitation of uranium and metallic impurities resulted from use of sodium hydroxide or calcium oxide plus a flocculation agent. The removal efficient of uranium was 95% and 99% for sodium hydroxide and calcium oxide respectively. The results shows that this process can be used to test wastes from decontamination processes which use citric acid. (B.C.A.). 03 refs, 08 figs, 04 tabs

  9. Chemical and mechanical decontamination processes to minimize secondary waste decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enda, M.; Ichikawa, N.; Yaita, Y.; Kanasaki, T.; Sakai, H.

    2008-01-01

    In the decommissioning of commercial nuclear reactors in Japan, prior to the dismantling of the nuclear power plants, there are plans to use chemical techniques to decontaminate reactor pressure vessels (RPVs), internal parts, primary loop recirculation systems (PLRs), reactor water clean up systems (RWCUs), etc., so as to minimize radiation sources in the materials to be disposed of. After dismantling the nuclear power plants, chemical and mechanical decontamination techniques will then be used to reduce the amounts of radioactive metallic waste. Toshiba Corporation has developed pre-dismantling and post-dismantling decontamination systems. In order to minimize the amounts of secondary waste, the T-OZON process was chosen for decontamination prior to the dismantling of nuclear power plants. Dismantling a nuclear power plant results in large amounts of metallic waste requiring decontamination; for example, about 20,000 tons of such waste is expected to result from the dismantling of a 110 MWe Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Various decontamination methods have been used on metallic wastes in preparation for disposal in consideration of the complexity of the shapes of the parts and the type of material. The materials in such nuclear power plants are primarily stainless steel and carbon steel. For stainless steel parts having simple shapes, such as plates and pipes, major sources of radioactivity can be removed from the surface of the parts by bipolar electrolysis (electrolyte: H 2 SO 4 ). For stainless steel parts having complicated shapes, such as valves and pumps, major sources of radioactivity can be removed from the surfaces by redox chemical decontamination treatments (chemical agent: Ce(IV)). For carbon steel parts having simple shapes, decontamination by blasting with zirconia grit is effective in removing major sources of radioactivity at the surface, whereas for carbon steel parts having complicated shapes, major sources of radioactivity can be removed from

  10. Evaluation of destructive methods for managing decontamination wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piciulo, P.L.; Adams, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Results are discussed of a laboratory evaluation of destructive methods for processing chemical decontamination wastes. Incineration, acid digestion and wet-air oxidation are capable of degrading decontamination reagents and organic ion-exchange resins. The extent of destruction as a function of operating parameters was waste specific. The reagents used in the testing were: EDTA, oxalic acid, citric acid, picolinic acid and LND-101A

  11. Chemical hazards from decontamination solutions in low level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leventhal, L.; Miller, A.; Turney, J.; Naughton, M.; IMPELL Corp., Walnut Creek, CA; Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA)

    1985-01-01

    Recent regulations are focussing more attention on the non-radioactive matrix materials associated with radioactive wastes. Decontamination of operating facilities is becoming a more significant source of low-level waste. This study reviewed the chemical and biological hazards of over 50 decontamination processes. Seventeen of the most prominent hard and soft decontamination processes were examined in detail. The chemical and biological hazards of these seventeen are presented in this paper. These hazards influence the choice of radwaste processing and packaging operations and methods. Federal, state and local regulations further impact on operations and waste disposal. Hazards to personnel, in plant and off-site, resulting from the decontamination cycle are evaluated. 1 fig., 5 tabs

  12. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Salt Decontamination Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rick Demmer; Stephen Reese

    2014-09-01

    On February 14, 2014, americium and plutonium contamination was released in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) salt caverns. At the request of WIPP’s operations contractor, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) personnel developed several methods of decontaminating WIPP salt, using surrogate contaminants and also americium (241Am). The effectiveness of the methods is evaluated qualitatively, and to the extent possible, quantitatively. One of the requirements of this effort was delivering initial results and recommendations within a few weeks. That requirement, in combination with the limited scope of the project, made in-depth analysis impractical in some instances. Of the methods tested (dry brushing, vacuum cleaning, water washing, strippable coatings, and mechanical grinding), the most practical seems to be water washing. Effectiveness is very high, and it is very easy and rapid to deploy. The amount of wastewater produced (2 L/m2) would be substantial and may not be easy to manage, but the method is the clear winner from a usability perspective. Removable surface contamination levels (smear results) from the strippable coating and water washing coupons found no residual removable contamination. Thus, whatever is left is likely adhered to (or trapped within) the salt. The other option that shows promise is the use of a fixative barrier. Bartlett Nuclear, Inc.’s Polymeric Barrier System (PBS) proved the most durable of the coatings tested. The coatings were not tested for contaminant entrapment, only for coating integrity and durability.

  13. Dilute chemical decontamination resins and the mixed waste issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denault, R.P.; Hallman, J.T.

    1988-01-01

    The decontamination of reactor primary systems, sub-systems and components is an important method used to reduce the occupational radiation exposure of nuclear plant personnel. The waste produced by the application of this technology is mainly solid in the form of ion exchange resins. As a result of a recent agreement between the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), all radioactive waste must meet EPA burial criteria. The chemicals used in a decontamination and certain metals dissolved during the process, primarily chromium, could render the waste hazardous as well as radioactive or more commonly called a mixed waste. This paper defines mixed waste as described in the EPA directive 9432.00-2, and examine the criteria by which waste is categorized as hazardous. The decontamination waste resin generated by two processes, the CAN-DEREM and the LOMI process, is described in detail. Waste data obtained from decontaminations performed by LN Technologies Corporation including chemical, metal and radionuclide loadings on resins from both PWR and BWR applications are presented

  14. Chemical Decontamination of Metallic Waste from Uranium Conversion Plant Dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, D. S.; Choi, Y. D.; Hwang, S. T.; Park, J. H.; Byun, J. I.; Jang, N. S.

    2005-01-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) started a decommissioning program of the uranium conversion plant. Pre-work was carried as follows; installation of the access control facility, installation of a changing room and shower room, designation of an emergency exit way and indicating signs, installation of a radiation management facility, preparation of a storage area for tools and equipments, inspection and load test of crane, distribution and packaging of existing waste, and pre-decontamination of the equipment surface and the interior. First, decommissioning work was performed in kiln room, which will be used for temporary radioactive waste storage room. Kiln room housed hydro fluorination rotary kiln for production of uranium tetra-fluoride. The kiln is about 0.8 m in diameter and 5.5 m long. The total dismantled waste was 6,690 kg, 73 % of which was metallic waste and 27 % the others such as cable, asbestos, concrete, secondary waste, etc. And effluent treatment room and filtration room were dismantled for installation of decontamination equipment and lagoon sludge treatment equipment. There were tanks and square mixer in these rooms. The total dismantled waste was 17,250 kg, 67% of which was metallic waste and 33% the others. These dismantled metallic wastes consist of stainless and carbon steel. In this paper, the stainless steel plate and pipe were decontaminated by the chemical decontamination with ultrasonic

  15. The reuse of scrap and decontamination waste water from decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Junxian; Li Xin; Xie Xiaolong

    2010-01-01

    Huge amount of radioactive scrap with low activity will be generated from reactor decommissioning; the decontamination is concentrated in the surface layer of the scrap. The decontaminated substance can be removed by high pressure water jet to appear the base metal and to reuse the metal. Big amount of radioactive waste water will be generated by this decontamination technology; the radioactive of the waste water is mainly caused by the solid particle from decontamination. To remove the solid particle as clean as possible, the waste water can be reused. Different possible technology to remove the solid particle from the water had been investigated, such as the gravity deposit separation, the filtration and the centrifugal separation etc. The centrifugal separation technology is selected; it includes the hydraulic vortex, the centrifugal filtration and the centrifugal deposit. After the cost benefit analysis at last the centrifugal deposit used butterfly type separator is selected. To reuse the waste water the fresh water consumption and the cost for waste water treatment can be reduced. To reuse the radioactive scrap and the waste water from decommissioning will minimize the radioactive waste. (authors)

  16. Development of chemical decontamination for low level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Seigo; Omata, Kazuo; Obinata, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Yoshihiko; Kanamori, Osamu.

    1995-01-01

    During routine intermittent inspection and maintenance at nuclear power plants, a considerable quantity of low level radioactive waste is generated requiring release from the nuclear site or treating additionally. To decontaminate this waste for safe release from the nuclear power plant, the first step could be washing the waste in Methylene chloride, CH 2 Cl 2 , to remove most of the paint coating. However, CH 2 Cl 2 washing does not completely remove the paint coating from the waste, which in the next step is shot blasted with plastic bead media to loose and remove the remaining paint coating. Following in succession, in the third step, the waste is washed in a chelate solution, after which most waste is decontaminated and suitable to be released for recycling. The residual chelate solution may be decomposed into nontoxic carbon dioxide and water by an electrolysis process and then safely discharged into the environment. (author)

  17. Localization of decontamination waste in the territory of Ukraine.; Lokalizatsiya otkhodov dezaktivatsionnykh rabot na territorii Ukrainy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodin, L P; Zhivotenko, A N [Naukovo-Tekhnyichnij Tsentr z dezaktivatsyiyi ta kompleksnogo povodzhennya z radyioaktivnimi vyidkhodami, Zhovtyi Vodi (Ukraine)

    1994-12-31

    Various environmental conditions in decontamination waste storage areas in the Zhitomir, Kiev, Chernigov, Rovno, Cherkassy, Sumy Regions of Ukraine are analyzed. Typical designs and basic parameters of decontamination waste storage areas implemented in 17 contractor designs are described. Theoretical grounds of safe storage of decontamination waste in the areas are discussed.

  18. Decontamination of Savannah River Plant waste glass canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.N.

    1982-01-01

    A Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently being designed to convert Savannah River Plant (SRP) liquid, high-level radioactive waste into a solid form, such as borosilicate glass. The outside of the canisters of waste glass must have very low levels of smearable radioactive contamination before they are removed from the DWPF to prevent the spread of radioactivity. Several techniques were considered for canister decontamination: high-pressure water spray, electropolishing, chemical dissolution, and abrasive blasting. An abrasive blasting technique using a glass frit slurry has been selected for use in the DWPF. No additional equipment is needed to process waste generated from decontamination. Frit used as the abrasive will be mixed with the waste and fed to the glass melter. In contrast, chemical and electrochemical techniques require more space in the DWPF, and produce large amounts of contaminated byproducts which are difficult to immobilize by vitrification

  19. Low level radioactive liquid waste decontamination by electrochemical way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronche, E.

    1994-10-01

    As part of the work on decontamination treatments for low level radioactive aqueous liquid wastes, the study of an electro-chemical process has been chosen by the C.E.A. at the Cadarache research centre. The first part of this report describes the main methods used for the decontamination of aqueous solutions. Then an electro-deposition process and an electro-dissolution process are compared on the basis of the decontamination results using genuine radioactive aqueous liquid waste. For ruthenium decontamination, the former process led to very high yields (99.9 percent eliminated). But the elimination of all the other radionuclides (antimony, strontium, cesium, alpha emitters) was only favoured by the latter process (90 percent eliminated). In order to decrease the total radioactivity level of the waste to be treated, we have optimized the electro-dissolution process. That is why the chemical composition of the dissolved anode has been investigated by a mixture experimental design. The radionuclides have been adsorbed on the precipitating products. The separation of the precipitates from the aqueous liquid enabled us to remove the major part of the initial activity. On the overall process some operations have been investigated to minimize waste embedding. Finally, a pilot device (laboratory scale) has been built and tested with genuine radioactive liquid waste. (author). 77 refs., 41 tabs., 55 figs., 4 appendixes

  20. Decontamination factors of ceramic filter in radioactive waste incineration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanbe, Hiromi; Mayuzumi, Masami; Ono, Tetsuo; Yoshiki, Shinya; Kouyama, Hiroaki; Nagae, Madoka; Sekiguchi, Ryosaku; Takaoku, Yoshinobu; Hozumi, Masahiro.

    1987-01-01

    A suspension-firing type radioactive waste incineration system is developed and cold demonstration testing of ceramic filters for the system are carried out. The incineration system, which is useful for a wide variety of waste materials, can serve to simplify the facilities and to reduce the costs for waste disposal. The incineration system can be used for drying-processing of concentrated waste liquids and disposal of flame resistant materials including ion exchange resins and rubber, as well as for ordinary combustible solid materials. An on-line backwash system is adopted to allow the ceramic filters to operate stably for a long period of time. For one-step filtering using the ceramic filter, the decontamination factor is greater than 10 5 for the processing of various wastes. In a practical situation, there exist vapor produced by the spray drier and the cladding in used ion exchange resin, which act to increase the decontamination performance of the ceramic filters to ensure safe operation. For the waste incineration system equipped with a waste gas processing apparatus consisting of a ceramic filter and HEPA filter, the overall decontamination factor is expected to be greater than 10 6 at portions down to the outlet of the ceramic filter and greater than 10 8 at portions down to the outlet of the HEPA filter. (Nogami, K.)

  1. Metal decontamination for waste minimization using liquid metal refining technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joyce, E.L. Jr.; Lally, B.; Ozturk, B.; Fruehan, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    The current Department of Energy Mixed Waste Treatment Project flowsheet indicates that no conventional technology, other than surface decontamination, exists for metal processing. Current Department of Energy guidelines require retrievable storage of all metallic wastes containing transuranic elements above a certain concentration. This project is in support of the National Mixed Low Level Waste Treatment Program. Because of the high cost of disposal, it is important to develop an effective decontamination and volume reduction method for low-level contaminated metals. It is important to be able to decontaminate complex shapes where surfaces are hidden or inaccessible to surface decontamination processes and destruction of organic contamination. These goals can be achieved by adapting commercial metal refining processes to handle radioactive and organic contaminated metal. The radioactive components are concentrated in the slag, which is subsequently vitrified; hazardous organics are destroyed by the intense heat of the bath. The metal, after having been melted and purified, could be recycled for use within the DOE complex. In this project, we evaluated current state-of-the-art technologies for metal refining, with special reference to the removal of radioactive contaminants and the destruction of hazardous organics. This evaluation was based on literature reports, industrial experience, plant visits, thermodynamic calculations, and engineering aspects of the various processes. The key issues addressed included radioactive partitioning between the metal and slag phases, minimization of secondary wastes, operability of the process subject to widely varying feed chemistry, and the ability to seal the candidate process to prevent the release of hazardous species

  2. Nuclear engineering questions: power, reprocessing, waste, decontamination, fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, R.D. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the chemical engineering symposium on nuclear questions. Specific questions addressed by the speakers included: nuclear power - why and how; commercial reprocessing - permanent death or resurrection; long-term management of commercial high-level wastes; long-term management of defense high-level waste; decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities, engineering aspects of laser fusion I; and engineering aspects of laser fusion II. Individual papers have been input to the Energy Data Base previously

  3. Decontamination processes for low level radioactive waste metal objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longnecker, E.F.; Ichikawa, Sekigo; Kanamori, Osamu

    1996-01-01

    Disposal and safe storage of contaminated nuclear waste is a problem of international scope. Although the greatest volume of such waste is concentrated in the USA and former Soviet Union, Western Europe and Japan have contaminated nuclear waste requiring attention. Japan's radioactive nuclear waste is principally generated at nuclear power plants since it has no nuclear weapons production. However, their waste reduction, storage and disposal problems may be comparable to that of the USA on an inhabited area basis when consideration is given to population density where Japan's population, half that of the USA, lives in an area slightly smaller than that of California's. If everyone's backyard was in California, the USA might have insoluble radioactive waste reduction, storage and disposal problems. Viewing Japan's contaminated nuclear waste as a national problem requiring solutions, as well as an economic opportunity, Morikawa began research and development for decontaminating low level radioactive nuclear waste seven years ago. As engineers and manufacturers of special machinery for many years Morikawa brings special electro/mechanical/pneumatic Skills and knowledge to solving these unique problems. Genden Engineering Services and Construction Company (GESC), an affiliate of Japan Atomic Power Company, recently joined with Morikawa in this R ampersand D effort to decontaminate low level radioactive nuclear waste (LLW) and to substantially reduce the volume of such nuclear waste requiring long term storage. This paper will present equipment with both mechanical and chemical processes developed over these several years by Morikawa and most recently in cooperation with GESC

  4. Method of heat decomposition for chemical decontaminating resin waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Akira.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To make resin wastes into non-deleterious state, discharge them into a resin waste storage tank of existent radioactive waste processing facility and store and dispose them. Constitution: In the processing of chemical decontaminating resin wastes, iron exchange resins adsorbing chemical decontaminating agents comprising a solution of citric acid, oxalic acid, formic acid and EDTA alone or as a mixture of them are heated to dry, thermally decomposed and then separated from the ion exchange resins. That is, the main ingredients of the chemical decontaminating agents are heat-decomposed when heated and dried at about 250 deg C in air and converted into non-toxic gases such as CO, CO 2 , NO, NO 2 or H 2 O. Further, since combustion or carbonization of the basic materials for the resin is not caused at such a level of temperature, the resin wastes removed with organic acid and chelating agents are transferred to an existent resin waste storage tank and stored therein. In this way, facility cost and radiation exposure can remarkably be decreased. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. DECONTAMINATION/DESTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR ORGANICS IN TRANSURANIC WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chris Jones; Javier Del Campo; Patrick Nevins; Stuart Legg

    2002-08-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site has approximately 5000 55-gallon drums of {sup 238}Pu contaminated waste in interim storage. These may not be shipped to WIPP in TRUPACT-II containers due to the high rate of hydrogen production resulting from the radiolysis of the organic content of the drums. In order to circumvent this problem, the {sup 238}Pu needs to be separated from the organics--either by mineralization of the latter or by decontamination by a chemical separation. We have conducted ''cold'' optimization trials and surrogate tests in which a combination of a mediated electrochemical oxidation process (SILVER II{trademark}) and ultrasonic mixing have been used to decontaminate the surrogate waste materials. The surrogate wastes were impregnated with copper oxalate for plutonium dioxide. Our process combines both mineralization of reactive components (such cellulose, rubber, and oil) and surface decontamination of less reactive materials such as polyethylene, polystyrene and polyvinylchloride. By using this combination of SILVER II and ultrasonic mixing, we have achieved 100% current efficiency for the destruction of the reactive components. We have demonstrated that: The degree of decontamination achieved would be adequate to meet both WIPP waste acceptance criteria and TRUPACT II packaging and shipping requirements; The system can maintain near absolute containment of the surrogate radionuclides; Only minimal pre-treatment (coarse shredding) and minimal waste sorting are required; The system requires minimal off gas control processes and monitoring instrumentation; The laboratory trials have developed information that can be used for scale-up purposes; The process does not produce dioxins and furans; Disposal routes for secondary process arisings have already been demonstrated in other programs. Based on the results from Phase 1, the recommendation is to proceed to Phase 2 and use the equipment at Savannah

  6. Electromagnetic mixed waste processing system for asbestos decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasevich, R.S.; Vaux, W.G.; Nocito, T.

    1995-01-01

    DOE sites contain a broad spectrum of asbestos materials (cloth, pipe lagging, sprayed insulation and other substances) which are contaminated with a combination of hazardous and radioactive wastes due to its use during the development of the U.S. nuclear weapons complex. These wastes consist of cutting oils, lubricants, solvents, PCB's, heavy metals and radioactive contaminants. The radioactive contaminants are the activation, decay and fission products of DOE operations. The asbestos must be converted by removing and separating the hazardous and radioactive materials to prevent the formation of mixed wastes and to allow for both sanitary disposal and effective decontamination. Currently, no technology exists that can meet these sanitary and other objectives

  7. Decomposition Technology Development of Organic Component in a Decontamination Waste Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Oh, W. Z.; Won, H. J.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K.

    2007-11-01

    Through the project of 'Decomposition Technology Development of Organic Component in a Decontamination Waste Solution', the followings were studied. 1. Investigation of decontamination characteristics of chemical decontamination process 2. Analysis of COD, ferrous ion concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration 3. Decomposition tests of hardly decomposable organic compounds 4. Improvement of organic acid decomposition process by ultrasonic wave and UV light 5. Optimization of decomposition process using a surrogate decontamination waste solution

  8. Decomposition Technology Development of Organic Component in a Decontamination Waste Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Oh, W. Z.; Won, H. J.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K

    2007-11-15

    Through the project of 'Decomposition Technology Development of Organic Component in a Decontamination Waste Solution', the followings were studied. 1. Investigation of decontamination characteristics of chemical decontamination process 2. Analysis of COD, ferrous ion concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration 3. Decomposition tests of hardly decomposable organic compounds 4. Improvement of organic acid decomposition process by ultrasonic wave and UV light 5. Optimization of decomposition process using a surrogate decontamination waste solution.

  9. Assessment of microwave-based clinical waste decontamination unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, P N; Hanley, M J

    1994-12-01

    A clinical waste decontamination unit that used microwave-generated heat was assessed for operator safety and efficacy. Tests with loads artificially contaminated with aerosol-forming particles showed that no particles were detected outside the machine provided the seals and covers were correctly seated. Thermometric measurement of a self-generated steam decontamination cycle was used to determine the parameters needed to ensure heat disinfection of the waste reception hopper, prior to entry for maintenance or repair. Bacterial and thermometric test pieces were passed through the machine within a full load of clinical waste. These test pieces, designed to represent a worst case situation, were enclosed in aluminium foil to shield them from direct microwave energy. None of the 100 bacterial test pieces yielded growth on culture and all 100 thermal test pieces achieved temperatures in excess of 99 degrees C during their passage through the decontamination unit. It was concluded that this method may be used to render safe the bulk of of ward-generated clinical waste.

  10. Waste management aspects of entire PWR LOOP decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, A.P.; Roesmer, J.

    1988-01-01

    The waste management parameters for decontamination of an entire PWR primary circuit have been determined for dilute alkaline-permanganate/citric acid (APCA), LOMI, ozone and cerium acid process variations. APCA processes generate the largest waste volumes; over 140 m 3 (5000 ft 3 ) in some cases. This represents a potential disposal cost of one million dollars. The cation regeneration column makes the greatest contribution to the disposal volume. In contrast, the LOMI process generates approximately half as much waste, but it is expected to contain relatively high metal concentrations (200-800 ppm). The ozone and cerium acid processes product the least waste, usually under 45 m 3 . These waste volume estimates represent considerable fractions of a utility's annual disposal volume. Consequently, improved waste processing technology is required, and several approaches are suggested

  11. Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montford, B.

    1975-01-01

    Development of special techniques has permitted the use of mild decontamination processes for the CANDU type reactor primary coolant circuit, overcoming many of the problems associated with conventional decontamination processes, which use strong, acidic reagents. (Author)

  12. Electropolishing decontamination system for high-level waste canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, D.E.; Berger, D.N.; Allen, R.P.; Bryan, G.H.; Place, B.G.

    1988-10-01

    As part of a US Department of Energy (DOE) project agreement with the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT) in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). The Nuclear Waste Treatment Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is preparing 30 radioactive canisters containing borosilicate glass for use in high-level waste repository related tests at the Asse Salt Mine. After filling, the canisters will be welded closed and decontaminated in preparation for shipping to the FRG. Electropolishing was selected as the primary decontamination approach, and an electropolishing system with associated canister inspection equipment has been designed and fabricated for installation in a large hot cell. This remote electropolishing system, which is currently undergoing preliminary testing, is described in this report. 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  13. Decontamination of alpha-bearing solid wastes and plutonium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehly, G.; Madic, C.; Lecomte, M.; Bourges, J.; Saulze, J.L.; Broudic, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear activities in the Radiochemistry building of Fontenay-aux-Roses Nuclear Research Center concern principally the study of fuel reprocessing and the production of transuranium isotopes. During these activities solid wastes are produced. In order to improve the management of these wastes, it has been decided to build new facilities: a group of three glove-boxes named ELISE for the treatment of α active solid waste and a hot-cell, PROLIXE, for the treatment of solid wastes. Leaching processes were developed in order to: decontaminate these wastes and recover actinide elements, particularly the highly valuable plutonium, from the leachates. The processes developed are sufficiently flexible to be able to accommodate solid wastes produced in other facilities. Laboratory studies were conducted to develop the leaching process based on the use of electrogenerated Ag(II) species which is particularly suitable to provoke the dissolution of PuO 2 . Successful exhaustive Pu decontaminations with DF(Pu) higher than 10 4 were achieved for the first time during the treatment of stainless steel PuO 2 cans (future MELOX plant) by electrogenerated Ag (II) in nitric acid medium

  14. Assessment of radiological properties of wastes from urban decontamination procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva, D.N.G.; Guimarães, J.R.D.; Rochedo, E.R.R.; Rochedo, P.R.R.; De Luca, C.

    2015-01-01

    One important activity associated to urban areas contaminated from accidental releases to the atmosphere of nuclear power plants is the management of radioactive wastes generated from decontamination procedures. This include the collection, conditioning, packing, transport and temporary/final disposition. The final destination is defined usually through a political decision. Thus, transport of packed radioactive wastes shall depend on decisions not just under the scope of radiological protection issues. However, the simulations performed to assess doses for the public and decontamination workers allows the estimate of radiological aspects related to the waste generated and these characteristics may be included in a multi-criteria decision tool aiming to support, under the radiological protection point of view, the decision-making process on post-emergency procedures. Important information to decision makers are the type, amount and activity concentration of wastes. This work describes the procedures to be included in the urban area model to account for the assessment of qualitative and quantitative description of wastes. The results will allow the classification of different procedures according to predefined criteria that shall then feed the multi-criteria assessment tool, currently under development, considering basic radiological protection aspects of wastes generated by the different available cleanup procedures on typical tropical urban environments. (authors)

  15. Method of decontaminating radioactive metal wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaji, Nobuyoshi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To completely prevent the surface contamination of an equipment and decrease the amount of radioactive wastes to be resulted. Method: The surfaces of vessels, pipeways or the likes of nuclear reactor facilities to be contaminated with radioactive materials are appended with thin plates of metals identical or different from the constituents of the surfaces so as to be releasable after use. The material and the thickness of the plates and the method of appending then are determined depending on the state of use of the appended portions. Since only the stripped plates have to be processed as radioactive wastes, the amount of wastes can be decreased and, since the scrap materials can be reused, it is advantageous in view of the resource-saving. (Sekiya, K.)

  16. Radioactive Waste Decontamination Using Selentec Mag*SepSM Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.D.

    1998-01-01

    A sorbent containing crystalline silicotitanate (CST) tested for cesium removal from simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) soluble high activity waste showed rapid kinetics (1 h contact time) and high distribution coefficients (Kd 4000 mL/g of CST). The sorbent was prepared by Selective Environmental Technologies, Inc., (Selentec) as a MAG*SEP particle containing CST obtained from the Molecular Sieve Department of UOP, LLC, Results of preliminary tests suggest potential applications of the Selentec MAG*SEP particles to radioactive waste decontamination at SRS

  17. Decontamination of organic wastes containing radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unsworth, T.J.; Pimblott, S.M.; Brown, N.W.

    2015-01-01

    An electrochemical oxidation treatment has been developed by Arvia Technology for organic wastes containing radionuclides, in which GIC-bisulphate is used as an adsorbent and electrode. Significant work has been carried out in the irradiation of graphite for medical and nuclear applications and in the use of carbonaceous adsorbents but knowledge of the applicability of graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) in these roles is limited. This project will attempt to fill this gap. It will investigate the suitability of GIC-bisulphate as an adsorbent in an electrochemical treatment process for radioactive organic liquids. The process was initially used to treat waste-water from non-nuclear operations and now requires technical knowledge and research to adapt the treatment for the nuclear industry. Adsorption processes involving organic wastes containing mobile radionuclides such as 137 Cs are difficult to understand. The effects of gamma radiation on the chemistry of water and organics could complicate the treatment process further. To ensure the suitability and effectiveness of the electrochemical oxidation treatment for radioactive organic wastes, the following effects are being investigated: -) radiolytic degradation of GIC-bisulphate in solution, -) leaching of intercalated ions due to gamma radiation, -) effect of gamma radiation on the adsorption of organics by GIC-bisulphate, -) changes in the sorption behaviour of radioactive contaminants, -) distribution coefficients of contaminants in organic and aqueous phases, and -) selective or competitive adsorption on graphite surface sites

  18. Safety analysis of the Chernobyl accident origin decontamination waste burials in Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skurat, V.V.; Shiryaeva, N.M.; Myshkina, N.K.; Gvozdev, A.A.; Serebryanyj, G.Z.; Golikova, N.B.

    2002-01-01

    Potential dangerous of the decontamination waste burials was estimated by means of the generalized multicompartmental model. Characteristics of 24 the most large and unfavorable decontamination waste burials are shown and an estimate of their safety is given. The burial effect zones were determined (100-300 m). A reliability of the forecasting estimate of potential dangerous radioactive contamination of ground waters near the burials was checked on example of the Dudichi decontamination waste burial

  19. Precipitation-adsorption process for the decontamination of nuclear waste supernates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L.M.; Kilpatrick, L.L.

    1982-05-19

    High-level nuclear waste supernate is decontaminated of cesium by precipitation of the cesium and potassium with sodium tetraphenyl boron. Simultaneously, strontium-90 is removed from the waste supernate sorption of insoluble sodium titanate. The waste solution is then filtered to separate the solution decontaminated of cesium and strontium.

  20. Study of decontamination and waste management technologies for contaminated rural and forest environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebenkov, A.; Davydchuk, V.; Firsakova, S.; Jouve, A.; Kutlakhmedov, Y.; Rose, K.; Zhouchenko, T.; Antzypaw, G.

    1996-01-01

    Pilot and demonstrative scale in situ trials of several decontamination technologies proposed in the framework of ECP-4 project were carried out in real conditions of Chernobyl Zone. Their results proved that industrial scale decontamination of various types of land is feasible. The management of radioactive waste arising from decontamination techniques can be provided by ecologically sound and efficient technologies

  1. Decontamination of liquid radioactive waste by thorium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousselle, J.; Grandjean, S.; Dacheux, N.; Genet, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the field of the complete reexamination of the chemistry of thorium phosphate and of the improvement of the homogeneity of Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (TPD, Th 4 (PO 4 ) 4 P 2 O 7 ) prepared at high temperature, several crystallized compounds were prepared as initial powdered precursors. Due to the very low solubility products associated to these phases, their use in the field of the efficient decontamination of high-level radioactive liquid waste containing actinides (An) was carefully considered. Two main processes (called 'oxalate' and 'hydrothermal' chemical routes) were developed through a new concept combining the decontamination of liquid waste and the immobilization of the actinides in a ceramic matrix (TPD). In phosphoric media ('hydrothermal route'), the key-precursor was the Thorium Phosphate Hydrogen Phosphate hydrate (Th 2 (PO 4 ) 2 (HPO 4 ). H 2 O, TPHP, solubility product log(K S,0 0 ) ∼ - 67). The replacement of thorium by other tetravalent actinides (U, Np, Pu) in the structure, leading to the preparation of Th 2-x/2 An x/2 (PO 4 ) 2 (HPO 4 ). H 2 O solid solutions, was examined. A second method was also considered in parallel to illustrate this concept using the more well-known precipitation of oxalate as the initial decontamination step. For this method, the final transformation to single phase TPD containing actinides was purchased by heating a mixture of phosphate ions with the oxalate precipitate at high temperature. (authors)

  2. Low-waste electrochemical decontamination of stainless-steel surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babain, V.A.; Smirnov, I.V.; Shadrin, A.Yu.; Firsin, N.G.; Zakharchuk, G.A.; Pavlov, A.B.; Shilov, V.V.

    2002-01-01

    An electrochemical decontamination method using a formic acid-based recycling electrolyte was proposed to remove firmly fixed contaminants from stainless-steel surfaces. The following provisions make for minimisation of the amounts of waste: (i) use of specially designed electrodes with vacuum removal of spent electrolyte; (ii) inter-cycle removal of radionuclides from the electrolyte by using an inorganic sorbent; (iii) periodic regeneration of the spent electrolyte. the dissolved metals (Fe, Cr, Ni) being transformed into acidic phosphates; (iv) solidification of residues arising from the regeneration of the electrolyte and spent sorbent into iron-phosphate ceramics. The technology and equipment developed were used for decontamination of a plutonium glove-box. The level of surface contamination was reduced 100-fold in two decontamination cycles. The depth of metal skimming was 1.5 μ for the ceiling and walls and 4.5 μ for the table top. Each square meter of stainless-steel surface provides about 100 g of solid radioactive waste in the form of iron-phosphate ceramic blocks

  3. Melting decontamination and free release of metal waste at Studsvik RadWaste Co. in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawatsuma, Shinji; Ishikawa, Keiji; Matsubara, Tatsuo; Donomae, Yasushi; Imagawa, Yasuhiro

    2006-01-01

    The Studsvik RadWaste Co. in Sweden was visited on August 29, 2005 by members of radioactive waste and decommissioning subgroup of central safety task force in old Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute as 'Overseas investigation'. The visit afforded us the chance to survey melting and decontaminating of metallic waste in this company and the status of free release. Domestic and foreign radioactive metallic waste is accepted in this company after 1987, and the majority of the decontaminated waste have been released freely. In the background of the big effort of this company and the strong leadership of the regulator (SSI: Swedish radiation protection Authority), prosperous operation was able to have been achieved. This survey was done based on 'Free release of radioactive metallic waste in Europe: the free release experience for 17 years at Studsvik RadWaste Co. in Sweden' by Dr. J. Lorenzen. (author)

  4. Development of waste minimization and decontamination technologies at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, R.L.; Archibald, K.E.; Demmer, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    Emphasis on the minimization of decontamination secondary waste has increased because of restrictions on the use of hazardous chemicals and Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) waste handling issues. The Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co. (LITCO) Decontamination Development Subunit has worked to evaluate and introduce new performed testing, evaluations, development and on-site demonstrations for a number of novel decontamination techniques that have not yet previously been used at the ICPP. This report will include information on decontamination techniques that have recently been evaluated by the Decontamination Development Subunit

  5. Method and device of decontaminating radioactive solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Tamada, Masami.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To surely enable grinding for the inner surface of hollow radioactive solid wastes such as pipeways or valves, as well as enable to decontaminate these solid wastes to such a level as being capable of processing in the same manner for the ordinary wastes. Method: A grinding piece abutting resiliently against the inner surface of a hollow radioactive solid wastes to be contaminated is attached at the top end of a flexible shaft, and the inner surface of the radioactive solid wastes is ground while rotating and slightly reciprocating, as well as axially moving the flexible shaft. Consequently, since the grinding piece is always abutted against the inner surface of the radioactive solid wastes just following after the profile of the inner surface, and the flexible shaft is resiliently flexed corresponding to the profile of the inner surface of the radioactive solid wastes, even an inner surface of radioactive solid wastes with a complicated configuration can surely be ground entirely. This surely enables to remove radioactive claddings and contaminated layers deposited on the surface. (Yoshihara, H.)

  6. Electromagnetic mixed waste processing system for asbestos decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasevich, R.S. [KAI Technologies, Inc., Portsmouth, NH (United States); Vaux, W.G. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Nocito, T. [Ohio DSI Corp., New York (United States)

    1995-10-01

    DOE sites contain a broad spectrum of asbestos materials (cloth, pipe lagging, sprayed insulation and other substances) which are contaminated with a combination of hazardous and radioactive wastes due to its use during the development of the U.S. nuclear weapons complex. These wastes consist of cutting oils, lubricants, solvents, PCB`s, heavy metals and radioactive contaminants. The radioactive contaminants are the activation, decay and fission products of DOE operations. The asbestos must be converted by removing and separating the hazardous and radioactive materials to prevent the formation of mixed wastes and to allow for both sanitary disposal and effective decontamination. Currently, no technology exists that can meet these sanitary and other objectives.

  7. Decontamination of liquid radioactive wastes using seeded ultrafiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavanagh, P.; Goldsmith, A.

    1997-01-01

    A number of techniques may be used to treat radioactive wastes. This paper presents a discussion of the relative merits of two of these: ion exchange and membrane filtration, and discusses the overall benefit of using seeded filtration to combine the advantages of each, with selected examples of where these techniques have been used. Evaporation is another technique that can be used, however, because of its high capital and operating costs its use is limited and it is not discussed here. Examples of the decontamination of standard solutions by novel materials tested by the Novel Absorber Evaluation Club are presented, and the advantages of the new PAN-based absorbers discussed

  8. Reuse of waste water from high pressure water jet decontamination for reactor decommissioning scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Junxian; Li Xin; Hou Huijuan

    2011-01-01

    For recycle and reuse of reactor decommissioning scrap metal by high pressure water jet decontamination, large quantity of radioactive waste water will be generated. To save the cost of radioactive waste water treatment and to reduce the cost of the scrap decontamination, this part of radioactive waste water should be reused. Most of the radioactivities in the decontamination waste water come from the solid particle in the water. Thus to reuse the waste water, the solid particle in the waster should be removed. Different possible treatment technologies have been investigated. By cost benefit analysis the centrifugal separation technology is selected. (authors)

  9. Application of a modified electrochemical system for surface decontamination of radioactive metal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Lim, Y.K.; Yang, H.Y.; Shin, S.W.; Song, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Conventional and modified electrolytic decontamination experiments were performed in a solution of sodium sulfate for the decontamination of carbon steel as the simulated metal wastes which are generated in large amounts from nuclear power plants. The effect of reaction time, current density and concentration of electrolytes in the modified electrolytic decontamination system were examined to remove the surface contamination of the simulated radioactive metal wastes. As for the results of this research, the modified electrochemical decontamination process can decontaminate more effectively than the conventional decontamination process by applying different anode material which causes higher induced electro-motive forces. When 0.5 M sodium sulfate, 0.4 A/cm 2 current density and 30 minutes reaction time were applied in the modified process, a 16 μm thickness change that is expected to remove most surface contamination in radioactive metal wastes was achieved on carbon steel which is the main material of radioactive metal waste in nuclear power plants. The decontamination efficiency of metal waste showed similar results with the small and large lab-scale modified electrochemical system. The application of this modified electrolytic decontamination system is expected to play a considerable role for decontamination of radioactive metal waste in nuclear power plants in the near future. (author)

  10. TRU-waste decontamination and size reduction review, June 1983, US DOE/PNC technology exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.W. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A review of transuranic (TRU) noncombustible waste decontamination and size reduction technology is presented. Electropolishing, vibratory cleaning, and spray decontamination processes developed at Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) are highlighted. TRU waste size reduction processes at (PNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), and SRL are also highlighted

  11. Electromagnetic mixed waste processing system for asbestos decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasevich, R.S.; Nocito, T.; Vaux, W.G.; Snyder, T.

    1994-01-01

    DOE sites contain a broad spectrum of asbestos materials (cloth, pipe lagging, sprayed insulation and other substances) which are contaminated with a combination of hazardous and radioactive wastes due to its use during the development of the US nuclear weapons complex. These wastes consist of cutting oils, lubricants, solvents, PCBs, heavy metals and radioactive contaminants. The radioactive contaminants are the activation, decay, and fission products of DOE operations. To allow disposal, the asbestos must be converted chemically, followed by removing and separating the hazardous and radioactive materials to prevent the formation of mixed wastes and to allow for both sanitary disposal and effective decontamination. Currently, no technology exists that can meet these sanitary and other objectives. An attempt was made to apply techniques that have already proved successful in the mining, oil, and metals processing industries to the development of a multi-stage process to remove and separate hazardous chemical radioactive materials from asbestos. This process uses three methods: ABCOV chemicals which converts the asbestos to a sanitary waste; dielectric heating to volatilize the organic materials; and electrochemical processing for the removal of heavy metals, RCRA wastes and radionuclides. This process will result in the destruction of over 99% of the asbestos; limit radioactive metal contamination to 0.2 Bq alpha per gram and 1 Bq beta and gamma per gram; reduce hazardous organics to levels compatible with current EPA policy for RCRA delisting; and achieve TCLP limits for all solidified waste

  12. Conversion of transuranic waste to low level waste by decontamination: a technical and economic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.P.; Hazelton, R.F.

    1984-12-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of using in-situ decontamination techniques to convert glove boxes and other large TRU-contaminated components directly into LLW. The results of the technical evaluation indicate that in-situ decontamination of these types of components to non-TRU levels is technically feasible. Applicable decontamination techniques include electropolishing, hand scrubbing, chemical washes/sprays, strippable coatings and Freon spray-cleaning. The removal of contamination from crevices and other holdup areas remains a problem, but may be solved through further advances in decontamination technology. Also, the increase in the allowable maximum TRU level from 10 nCi/g to 100 nCi/g as defined in DOE Order 5820.2 reduces the removal requirement and facilitates measurement of the remaining quantities. The major emphasis of the study was on a cost/benefit evaluation that included a review and update of previous analyses and evaluations of TRU-waste volume reduction and conversion options. The results of the economic evaluation show, for the assumptions used, that there is a definite cost incentive to size reduce large components, and that decontamination of sectioned material has become cost competitive with the size reduction options. In-situ decontamination appears to be the lowest cost option when based on routine-type operations conducted by well-trained and properly equipped personnel. 16 references, 1 figure, 7 tables

  13. Estimation and characterization of decontamination and decommissioning solid waste expected from the Plutonium Finishing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millar, J.S.; Pottmeyer, J.A.; Stratton, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose of the study was to estimate the amounts of equipment and other materials that are candidates for removal and subsequent processing in a solid waste facility when the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant is decontaminated and decommissioned. (Building structure and soil are not covered.) Results indicate that ∼5,500 m 3 of solid waste is expected to result from the decontamination and decommissioning of the Pu Finishing Plant. The breakdown of the volumes and percentages of waste by category is 1% dangerous solid waste, 71% low-level waste, 21% transuranic waste, 7% transuranic mixed waste

  14. Decontamination of waste radioactive polluted solutions in radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simova, G.; Boyadzhiev, A.; Mikhajlov, M.G.; Shopov, N.

    1979-01-01

    The decontamination capacity of solutions of the trivial cleaning Bulgarian preparations ''Mipro'', ''Sana'', ''Synthek'' and ''Univer'' for different surfaces (steel, glass, PVC and linoleum) contaminated with cesium-134, strontium-85 or cerium-144 chlorides, was studied. Concentrations from 5 to 15 g/l of the solutions used in this study displayed a degree of cleaning over 90%. Higher concentration of the solution does not improve its cleaning capacity. For evaluation of foam formation by the solutions, the so called ''foam column stability coefficient'' has been adopted. This coefficient represents the ratio between the height of the foam column and the time of its half life, referred to the time for the foam column formation when blown through with a constant air current. On the basis of this index, solutions of the preparation ''Mipro'' proved to be the best ones for decontamination - in the whole investigated concentration span, the foam column stability coefficient for the solutions of this preparation is with two orders lower than the respective coefficient of the other preparations. It was experimentally established that radiation treatment of radio-contaminated solutions reduces the foam column stability coefficient. Radiation treatment should be carried out in a gamma field, realizing at least one megarad within an acceptable for the liquid wastes time period. (A.B.)

  15. Decontamination and Waste Management from90Sr Coated Dice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantaraprachoom, Nanthavan; Komolsuk, Sunthorn; Nuanjan, Panya; Thiangtrongjit Sutat

    2003-06-01

    The US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) investigated the source of several packages containing with dice coated with Sr-90, mini detectors and sensors was sent to USA. The Thai Crime Suppression Division charged three smugglers with illicit trafficking and possessing of radioactive materials. Thai police and OAEP officers sealed off and office where used for storing Sr-90 and making the coated radioactive dice and measure the radiation level and contamination. The radiation level was within the background limit, but the contamination level was around 100 times higher than background, maximum about 150 Bq/cm 2 . Most household appliances including some ceramic tiles were contaminated with Sr-90. Decontamination was performed and those radioactive dice and devices using for gambling including contaminated household appliances were collected and transported to OAEP as radioactive wastes

  16. Decontamination of alpha contaminated metallic waste by cerium IV redox process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, J.G.; Dhami, P.S.; Gandhi, P.M.; Wattal, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Decontamination of alpha contaminated metallic waste is an important aspect in the management of waste generated during dismantling and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Present work on cerium redox process targets decontamination of alpha contaminated metallic waste till it qualifies for the non alpha waste category for disposal in near surface disposal facility. Recovery of the alpha radio nuclides and cerium from aqueous secondary waste streams was also studied deploying solvent extraction process and established. The alpha-lean secondary waste stream has been immobilised in cement based matrix for final disposal. (author)

  17. Final remediation of the provisional storage near Zavratec. Separation of waste, decontamination and radiological measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepisnik, M.; Zeleznik, N.; Mele, I.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents remedial activities in Zavratec during winter 1999 - 2000. The difficult and slow process of separation radioactive from non-radioactive waste is explained, and the measuring techniques and equipment for separation are presented. The measurements of storage contamination and its decontamination, involving different practical problems, are described in detail. As a result, the initial volume of the waste was reduced to 50%, in spite of the extended decontamination works. The waste has been relocated to the Brinje storage facility. Measurements inside and outside the Zavratec facility after decontamination showed that no radioactivity higher than the natural background was present. The facility was released for unrestricted use. (author)

  18. Forming of information support for estimate of potential danger of storage points of the decontamination wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skurat, V.V.; Shiryaeva, N.M.; Myshkina, N.K.; Gvozdev, A.A.; Serebryannyj, G.Z.; Golikova, N.B.

    2002-01-01

    By now 92 storage points of the decontamination wastes that formed in result of decontamination of settlements after the Chernobyl accident is registered on the territory of Belarus. The most of theirs were placed in the unfavorable for storage of radioactive wastes places. It was examine the forming of information support for estimate of potential danger of the storage points of decontamination wastes that base on results of investigations of objects, field and laboratory investigations, theoretical researches, using of literary information about features of radionuclides migration through engineering and natural barriers to water-bearing horizon is examination

  19. Use of titanates in decontamination of defense waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosch, R.G.

    1978-06-01

    Sodium titanate, an inorganic ion exchange material, has been evaluated for use in a process to remove strontium from Defense Waste or other high-sodium, caustic solutions. Distribution coefficients on the order of 10 5 were observed at sub part per million concentrations of Sr, and the effects of other cation impurities and complexants in the waste were investigated. The preparation and general chemical properties of the exchange material are discussed. This information was used in developing a commercial source which has since supplied a 200 kg batch of the material for evaluation. In column ion exchange experiments with 85 Sr-doped simulated waste, decontamination factors of 500 or greater were observed in the first 2000 to 3500 bed volumes of effluent, depending on the impurities in the simulant. A -40 to +130 mesh range of sodium titanate powder was used as the baseline material, but a study to produce alternate forms of the titanate was carried in parallel. This has resulted in two materials which appear promising with respect to both simplification of handling and chemical properties. One of the materials is an agglomerated form of the titanate formed by extrusion pelletizing using water as a binder, and the second is a macroreticular organic anion resin which was loaded with 30 to 40% (by weight) of sodium titanate. The results of initial testing of these materials are discussed

  20. Developing technique for waste water cleaning of a division for equipment decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gromoglasov, A.A.; Solyakov, V.K.; Novikov, V.N.; Pil'shchikov, A.P.; Chekalov, A.G.; Sinyukov, M.A.; Pshenichnykh, V.N.

    1989-01-01

    Results are described of developing technique for radionuclide cleaning solutions after metal product decontamination. The method is based on the adagulation with usage of quicklime. The conclusion is method permits to consider it as the main technique for waste water decontamination. 3 refs.; 2 figs.; 3 tabs

  1. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

    1980-06-01

    Reported are: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions, engineered barriers, criteria for defining waste isolation, and spent fuel and pool component integrity. (DLC)

  2. Analysis of the application of decontamination technologies to radioactive metal waste minimization using expert systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayrakal, Suna [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-09-30

    Radioactive metal waste makes up a significant portion of the waste currently being sent for disposal. Recovery of this metal as a valuable resource is possible through the use of decontamination technologies. Through the development and use of expert systems a comparison can be made of laser decontamination, a technology currently under development at Ames Laboratory, with currently available decontamination technologies for applicability to the types of metal waste being generated and the effectiveness of these versus simply disposing of the waste. These technologies can be technically and economically evaluated by the use of expert systems techniques to provide a waste management decision making tool that generates, given an identified metal waste, waste management recommendations. The user enters waste characteristic information as input and the system then recommends decontamination technologies, determines residual contamination levels and possible waste management strategies, carries out a cost analysis and then ranks, according to cost, the possibilities for management of the waste. The expert system was developed using information from literature and personnel experienced in the use of decontamination technologies and requires validation by human experts and assignment of confidence factors to the knowledge represented within.

  3. Analysis of the application of decontamination technologies to radioactive metal waste minimization using expert systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayrakal, S.

    1993-01-01

    Radioactive metal waste makes up a significant portion of the waste currently being sent for disposal. Recovery of this metal as a valuable resource is possible through the use of decontamination technologies. Through the development and use of expert systems a comparison can be made of laser decontamination, a technology currently under development at Ames Laboratory, with currently available decontamination technologies for applicability to the types of metal waste being generated and the effectiveness of these versus simply disposing of the waste. These technologies can be technically and economically evaluated by the use of expert systems techniques to provide a waste management decision making tool that generates, given an identified metal waste, waste management recommendations. The user enters waste characteristic information as input and the system then recommends decontamination technologies, determines residual contamination levels and possible waste management strategies, carries out a cost analysis and then ranks, according to cost, the possibilities for management of the waste. The expert system was developed using information from literature and personnel experienced in the use of decontamination technologies and requires validation by human experts and assignment of confidence factors to the knowledge represented within

  4. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities: Decontamination, disassembly and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The term 'decommissioning', as used within the nuclear industry, means the actions taken at the end of a facility's useful life to retire the facility from service in a manner that provides adequate protection for the health and safety of the decommissioning workers, the general public, and for the environment. These actions can range from merely closing down the facility and a minimal removal of radioactive material coupled with continuing maintenance and surveillance, to a complete removal of residual radioactivity in excess of levels acceptable for unrestricted use of the facility and its site. This latter condition, unrestricted use, is the ultimate goal of all decommissioning actions at retired nuclear facilities. The purpose of this report is to provide an information base on the considerations important to decommissioning, the methods available for decontamination and disassembly of a nuclear facility, the management of the resulting radioactive wastes, and the areas of decommissioning methodology where improvements might be made. Specific sections are devoted to each of these topics, and conclusions are presented concerning the present status of each topic. A summary of past decommissioning experience in Member States is presented in the Appendix. The report, with its discussions of necessary considerations, available operational methods, and waste management practices, together with supporting references, provides an appreciation of the activities that comprise decommissioning of nuclear facilities. It is anticipated that the information presented in the report should prove useful to persons concerned with the development of plans for the decommissioning of retired nuclear facilities

  5. Low-level liquid waste decontamination by ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, D.O.; Lee, D.D.; Dillow, T.A.

    1991-12-01

    Improved processes are being developed to treat contaminated liquid wastes that have been and continue to be generated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Both inorganic and organic ion-exchange methods have given promising results. Nickel and cobalt hexacyanoferrate(2) compounds are extremely selective for cesium removal, with distribution coefficients in excess of 10 6 and remarkable insensitivity to competition from sodium and potassium. They tend to lose effectiveness at pH > ∼11, but some formulations are useful for limited periods of time up to pH ∼13. Sodium titanate is selective for strontium removal at high pH. The separations are so efficient that simple batch processes can yield large decontamination factors while generating small volumes of solid waste. A resorcinol-based resin developed at the Savannah River Site gave superior cesium removal, compared with other organic ion exchangers; the distribution coefficient was limited primarily by competition from potassium and was nearly independent of sodium. The optimum pH was ∼12.5. It was much less effective for strontium removal, which was limited by competition from sodium. 8 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs

  6. Decontamination method for radiation-contaminated metal waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwa, Takeshi; Kuribayashi, Nobuhide; Yasumune, Taketoshi.

    1991-01-01

    In immersing radiation-contaminated metal wastes into a sulfuric acid solution thereby peeling and removing radioactive deposition cruds and dissolving the surface of the matrix metals to eliminate radioactive contaminants, when the potential of the sulfuric acid solution is shifted to a higher direction by more than a certain level due to the increase of the amount of metal ions leached from the cruds and the matrix material, the leached metal ions are electrolytically reduced to control the potential of the sulfuric acid solution to less than a predetermined potential level. Although the dissolving rate is increased as the concentration of the sulfuric acid solution is higher, it is preferably from 0.5 to 2 mol/l, since higher concentration increases the load on the waste liquid processing. Further, the temperature for solution is set to higher than a room temperature and, preferably from 50 to 90degC. Further, the potential level of the solution, although varies somewhat depending on the concentration of the leached metal ions and the temperature, is preferably controlled to less than 0.1 to 0.2 V. This can attain high decontaminating effect in a short period of time by using a sulfuric acid solution alone. (T.M.)

  7. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

    1980-04-01

    Progress and activities are reported on the following: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, nuclear waste materials characterization, TRU waste immobilization programs, TRU waste decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, iodine-129 fixation, monitoring of unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation development, mobile organic complexes of fission products, waste management system and safety studies, assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions technology, spent fuel and fuel pool integrity program, and engineered barriers. (DLC)

  8. Radioactivity decontamination efficiency of ceramic filter in an incineration volume reduction system of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanbe, Hiromi; Mayuzumi, Masami; Yoshiki, Sinya; Sema, Toru; Koyama, Hiroaki; Ono, Tetsuo; Nagae, Madoka; Takaoku, Yoshinobu; Hozumi, Masahiro.

    1987-01-01

    The small pilot facility of a cyclone type suspension incineration system of radioactive waste was set up in order to evaluate the decontamination efficiency of a high efficiency ceramic filter. The evaluation was made by use of 54 Mn, 59 Fe, 60 Co, 65 Zn and 137 Cs. 1. The decontamination factor by one line of ceramic filter for every species were over 10 5 . 2. The decontamination factor increased by one oder when water vapor exists in off-gas. The same tendency was also observed when iron dioxide existed at the incineration of cation exchange resin. (author)

  9. Krypton retention on solid adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monson, P.R. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive krypton-85 is released to the atmosphere in the off-gas from nuclear reprocessing plants. Three main methods have been suggested for removal of krypton from off-gas streams: cryogenic distillation; fluorocarbon absorption; and adsorption on solid sorbents. Use of solid adsorbents is the least developed of these methods, but offers the potential advantages of enhanced safety and lower operating costs. An experimental laboratory program was developed that will be used to investigate systematically many solid adsorbents (such as zeolites, i.e., mordenites) for trapping krypton in air. The objective of this investigation is to find an adsorbent that is more economical than silver-exchanged mordenite. Various physical and chemical characteristics such as adsorption isotherms, decontamination factors, co-adsorption, regeneration, and the mechanism and kinetics of noble gas adsorption were used to characterize the adsorbents. In the experimental program, a gas chromatograph using a helium ionization detector was used to measure the krypton in air before and after the adsorbent bed. This method can determine directly decontamination factors greater than 100

  10. Development of a universal solvent for the decontamination of acidic liquid radioactive wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, T. A.; Brewer, K. N.; Law, J. D.; Wood, D. J.; Herbest, R. S.; Romanovskiy, V. N.; Esimantovskiy, V. M.; Smirnov, I. V.; Babain, V. A.

    1999-01-01

    A teritiary solvent containing chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, polyethylene glycol and diphenylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide was evaluated in different non-nitroaromatic diluents for the separation of cesium, strontium, actinides and rare earth elements from acidic liquid radioactive waste. Decontamination factors of >95% for Cs, 99.7% for Sr, and 99.99% for actinides were achieved in four successive batch contacts using actual radioactive waste. Pilot plant testing in centrifugal contactors using simulated wastes, has demonstrated removal of >99% of all targeted ions.

  11. Basic study on decontamination of TRU wastes with cerium mediated electrolytic oxidation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Junichi; Kobayashi, Fuyumi; Uchida, Shoji; Sumiya, Masato; Kida, Takashi; Shirahashi, Koichi; Umeda, Miki; Sakuraba, Koichi

    2010-03-01

    At Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility (NUCEF), the cerium mediated electrolytic oxidation method which is a decontamination technique to decrease the radioactivity of TRU wastes to the clearance-level has been developed for the effective reduction of TRU wastes generated from the decommissioning of a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility and so on. This method corrodes the oxide layer and the surface of metallic TRU metal wastes by the strong oxidation power of Ce 4+ in nitric acid. In this study, parameter tests were conducted to optimize the solution condition of Ce 3+ initial concentrations and nitric acid concentrations. The target corrosion rate of metallic TRU wastes set to be 2 - 4 μm/h for the practical use of this method. Under the optimized solution condition, a dissolution test of stainless steel simulating wastes was carried out. From the result of the dissolution test, the average corrosion rate was 3.3 μm/h during the test time of 90 hours. Based on the supposition that the corrosion depth of metallic TRU wastes was 20 μm enough to achieve the clearance-level, the treatment time for the decontamination was about 6 hours. It was confirmed from the result that the decontamination could be performed within one day and the decontamination solution could repeatedly reuse 15 times. (author)

  12. Assessment of the proposed decontamination and waste treatment facility at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    To provide a centralized decontamination and waste treatment facility (DWTF) at LLNL, the construction of a new installation has been planned. Objectives for this new facility were to replace obsolete, structurally and environmentally sub-marginal liquid and solid waste process facilities and decontamination facility and to bring these facilities into compliance with existing federal, state and local regulations as well as DOE orders. In a previous study, SAIC conducted a preliminary review and evaluation of existing facilities at LLNL and cost effectiveness of the proposed DWTF. This document reports on a detailed review of specific aspects of the proposed DWTF

  13. Electrolytic decontamination of conductive materials for hazardous waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedman, D.E.; Martinez, H.E.; Nelson, T.O.

    1996-01-01

    Electrolytic removal of plutonium and americium from stainless steel and uranium surfaces has been demonstrated. Preliminary experiments were performed on the electrochemically based decontamination of type 304L stainless steel in sodium nitrate solutions to better understand the metal removal effects of varying cur-rent density, pH, and nitrate concentration parameters. Material removal rates and changes in surface morphology under these varying conditions are reported. Experimental results indicate that an electropolishing step before contamination removes surface roughness, thereby simplifying later electrolytic decontamination. Sodium nitrate based electrolytic decontamination produced the most uniform stripping of material at low to intermediate pH and at sodium nitrate concentrations of 200 g L -1 and higher. Stirring was also observed to increase the uniformity of the stripping process

  14. Programs of recovery of radioactive wastes from the trenches and land decontamination of the radioactive waste storage center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez D, J.; Reyes L, J.

    1999-06-01

    In this report there are the decontamination program of the land of the Radioactive Waste Storage Center, the Program of Recovery of the radioactive waste of the trenches, the recovery of polluted bar with cobalt 60, the recovery of minerals and tailings of uranium and of earth with minerals and tailings of uranium, the recovery of worn out sealed sources and the waste recovery with the accustomed corresponding actions are presented. (Author)

  15. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikalla, T.D.

    1980-11-01

    Research is reported on: high-level waste immobilization, alternative waste forms, TRU waste immobilization and decontamination, krypton solidification, thermal outgassing, /sup 129/I fixation, unsaturated zone transport, well-logging instrumentation, waste management system and safety studies, effectiveness of geologic isolation systems, waste/rock interactions, engineered barriers, backfill material, spent fuel storage (criticality), barrier sealing and liners for U mill tailings, and revegetation of inactive U tailings sites. (DLC)

  16. Solid Waste Decontamination by Thermal Desorption and Catalytic Oxidation Methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolcová, Olga; Topka, Pavel; Soukup, Karel; Jirátová, Květa; Váňová, H.; Kaštánek, František

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 9 (2014), s. 1279-1282 ISSN 0366-6352 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/059 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : thermal desorption * catalytic oxidation * soil decontamination Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.468, year: 2014

  17. Technical soaps - a possibility of decontaminating thorium-contaminated waste waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drathen, H.; Erichsen, L. v.

    1977-01-01

    Thorium-contaminated waste waters showing a concentration of thorium higher than 10sup(-5) mol/l can be quantitatively decontaminated by adding soaps. Concentrations of impurity ions of both tap and sea waters have been taken into consideration. As there is no difference between soaps and soap mixtures concerning the quantity of precipitation rates, technical soaps are from the economic point of view best suited for decontaminating thorium-contaminated waste waters. Having a soap concentration of 200% of the stoichiometric amount of thorium and a concentration of impurity ions of 10sup(-2) mol/l, it is assumed that decontamination factors of more than 20 can be reached in one step. (orig.) [de

  18. The study of radiochemical separation methods on gaseous Fission product krypton-88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhihong; Zhang Shengdong; Yang Lei; Ding Youqian; Sun Hongqing; Ma Peng

    2012-01-01

    Half-life of krypton-88 is 2.84 hours, high fission yields and a relatively large gamma branching ratio is had. The gas is short-lived fission products in burnup measurements. Only New fission products can extract from extraction in gas of fissile irradiation target. But krypton-88 with krypton-85, krypton-87, xenon -135, and xenon-138 is coexisted together, thus radiochemical separation must quickly taken. selected the irradiation time is 1-2 hours and cooling time is best 2 hours for sample preparation, krypton and xenon were separated using activated carbon adsorption, the ratio of krypton and xenon were measured by gamma spectroscopy. Then according to the ratio of krypton-85 and xenon-125 count rate coefficient around separation were calculated yield of krypton and decontamination factor of xenon and the final the yield of krypton-85 is calculated. (authors)

  19. Decontamination flowsheet development for a waste oil containing mixed radioactive contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayan, S.; Buckley, L.P.

    1993-01-01

    The majority of waste oils contaminated with both radioactive and hazardous components are generated in nuclear power plant, research lab. and uranium-refinery operations. The waste oils are complex, requiring a detailed examination of the waste management strategies and technology options. It may appear that incineration offers a total solution, but this may not be true in all cases. An alternative approach is to decontaminate the waste oils to very low contaminant levels, so that the treated oils can be reused, burned as fuel in boilers, or disposed of by commercial incineration. This paper presents selected experimental data and evaluation results gathered during the development of a decontamination flowsheet for a specific waste oil stores at Chalk River Labs. (CRL). The waste oil contains varying amounts of lube oils, grease, paint, water, particulates, sludge, light chloro- and fluoro-solvents, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), complexing chemicals, uranium, chromium, iron, arsenic and manganese. To achieve safe management of this radioactive and hazardous waste, several treatment and disposal methods were screened. Key experiments were performed at the laboratory-scale to confirm and select the most appropriate waste-management scheme based on technical, environmental and economic criteria. The waste-oil-decontamination flowsheet uses a combination of unit operations, including prefiltration, acid scrubbing, and aqueous-leachage treatment by precipitation, microfiltration, filter pressing and carbon adsorption. The decontaminated oil containing open-quotes de minimisclose quotes levels of contaminants will undergo chemical destruction of PCBs and final disposal by incineration. The recovered uranium will be recycled to a uranium milling process

  20. Decontamination and inspection plan for Phase 3 closure of the 300 area waste acid treatment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LUKE, S.N.

    1999-01-01

    This decontamination and inspection plan (DIP) describes decontamination and verification activities in support of Phase 3 closure of the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System (WATS). Phase 3 is the third phase of three WATS closure phases. Phase 3 attains clean closure conditions for WATS portions of the 334 and 311 Tank Farms (TF) and the 333 and 303-F Buildings. This DIP also describes designation and management of waste and debris generated during Phase 3 closure activities. Information regarding Phase 1 and Phase 2 for decontamination and verification activities closure can be found in WHC-SD-ENV-AP-001 and HNF-1784, respectively. This DIP is provided as a supplement to the closure plan (DOE/RL-90-11). This DIP provides the documentation for Ecology concurrence with Phase 3 closure methods and activities. This DIP is intended to provide greater detail than is contained in the closure plan to satisfy Ecology Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 requirement that closure documents describe the methods for removing, transporting, storing, and disposing of all dangerous waste at the unit. The decontamination and verification activities described in this DIP are based on the closure plan and on agreements reached between Ecology and the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) during Phase 3 closure activity workshops and/or project manager meetings (PMMs)

  1. Reactor component chemical decontamination-developments in waste handling and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papesch, R.; Atwood, K.L.

    1989-01-01

    Because of restrictive limits on man-rem exposure in European nuclear plants, a company has developed and applied a number of chemical decontamination techniques for components that must be periodically maintained. These techniques are particularly effective for components that can be placed in a decontamination bath for dose reduction prior to performing maintenance. The cleaning technique has the ability to achieve decontamination factors of at least 20 and in some cases much greater. For components with before cleaning dose rates of between 1 to as high as 80 R/hr, significant man-rem reductions are achieved when hundreds of manhours may be required to complete required component maintenance. Transferring this solvent technology to the U.S. required a program to develop solidification formulas to allow the solvent wastes to be disposed of in accordance with regulations and in a cost effective manner. This paper demonstrates in chemical decontaminations with small liquid volume systems that concentrated decontamination solvents can be employed to achieve high decontamination factors

  2. Minimization of waste volumes by means of pin-pointed decontamination during decommissioning measures. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henschel, K.; Jacobs, W.; Kanitz, L.; Schildbach, T.

    1992-06-01

    This semi-automated equipment is able to remove surface building contamination as well as take radioactive measurements. This equipment is newly developed. The goal of the equipment is to improve the identification of areas of contamination and the compounding decontamination of epoxy layer building construction material by using commercially available components minimizing the waste volume. A system design for decommissioning of building surfaces was developed, selected components were tested and their function certified. With this systems concept the decontamination of fixed epoxy layers up to 20 m in height is possible. Operational data for the system are available. (orig.) [de

  3. A Planning Tool for Estimating Waste Generated by a Radiological Incident and Subsequent Decontamination Efforts - 13569

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boe, Timothy; Lemieux, Paul; Schultheisz, Daniel; Peake, Tom; Hayes, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Management of debris and waste from a wide-area radiological incident would probably constitute a significant percentage of the total remediation cost and effort. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Waste Estimation Support Tool (WEST) is a unique planning tool for estimating the potential volume and radioactivity levels of waste generated by a radiological incident and subsequent decontamination efforts. The WEST was developed to support planners and decision makers by generating a first-order estimate of the quantity and characteristics of waste resulting from a radiological incident. The tool then allows the user to evaluate the impact of various decontamination/demolition strategies on the waste types and volumes generated. WEST consists of a suite of standalone applications and Esri R ArcGIS R scripts for rapidly estimating waste inventories and levels of radioactivity generated from a radiological contamination incident as a function of user-defined decontamination and demolition approaches. WEST accepts Geographic Information System (GIS) shape-files defining contaminated areas and extent of contamination. Building stock information, including square footage, building counts, and building composition estimates are then generated using the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA's) Hazus R -MH software. WEST then identifies outdoor surfaces based on the application of pattern recognition to overhead aerial imagery. The results from the GIS calculations are then fed into a Microsoft Excel R 2007 spreadsheet with a custom graphical user interface where the user can examine the impact of various decontamination/demolition scenarios on the quantity, characteristics, and residual radioactivity of the resulting waste streams. (authors)

  4. A Planning Tool for Estimating Waste Generated by a Radiological Incident and Subsequent Decontamination Efforts - 13569

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boe, Timothy [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Lemieux, Paul [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Schultheisz, Daniel; Peake, Tom [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States); Hayes, Colin [Eastern Research Group, Inc, Morrisville, NC 26560 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Management of debris and waste from a wide-area radiological incident would probably constitute a significant percentage of the total remediation cost and effort. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Waste Estimation Support Tool (WEST) is a unique planning tool for estimating the potential volume and radioactivity levels of waste generated by a radiological incident and subsequent decontamination efforts. The WEST was developed to support planners and decision makers by generating a first-order estimate of the quantity and characteristics of waste resulting from a radiological incident. The tool then allows the user to evaluate the impact of various decontamination/demolition strategies on the waste types and volumes generated. WEST consists of a suite of standalone applications and Esri{sup R} ArcGIS{sup R} scripts for rapidly estimating waste inventories and levels of radioactivity generated from a radiological contamination incident as a function of user-defined decontamination and demolition approaches. WEST accepts Geographic Information System (GIS) shape-files defining contaminated areas and extent of contamination. Building stock information, including square footage, building counts, and building composition estimates are then generated using the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA's) Hazus{sup R}-MH software. WEST then identifies outdoor surfaces based on the application of pattern recognition to overhead aerial imagery. The results from the GIS calculations are then fed into a Microsoft Excel{sup R} 2007 spreadsheet with a custom graphical user interface where the user can examine the impact of various decontamination/demolition scenarios on the quantity, characteristics, and residual radioactivity of the resulting waste streams. (authors)

  5. Decontamination of irradiated-fuel processing waste using manganese dioxide hydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auchapt, J.M.; Gaudier, J.F.

    1969-01-01

    The 'manganese dioxide' process is designed to replace the 'calcium carbonate' treatment for low and medium activity wastes. The objective to attain during the research for a new process was the diminution of the volume of the sludge without decreasing the decontamination factor of the wastes. The new process involves addition in series of twice over 100 ppm of Mn 2+ in the waste which has previously been made basic and oxidizing; the precipitate formed in situ is separated after each addition. The process has the advantage of increasing the decontamination of strontium. The treatment can be used in a plant including two decantation units and has given effective results when applied in such a plant. (author) [fr

  6. Behavior of radioactive cesium during incineration of radioactively contaminated wastes from decontamination activities in Fukushima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Kuramochi, Hidetoshi; Nomura, Kazutaka; Maeseto, Tomoharu; Osako, Masahiro

    2017-11-01

    Large volumes of decontamination wastes (DW) generated by off-site decontamination activities in Fukushima Prefecture have been incinerated since 2015. The behavior of radioactive cesium during incineration of DW was investigated at a working incineration plant. The incineration discharged bottom ash (BA) and fly ash (FA) with similar levels of radiocesium, and the leachability of the radiocesium from both types of ash was very low (incineration of contaminated municipal solid waste (CMSW) reported in earlier studies. The source of radiocesium in DW-FA is chiefly small particles derived from DW and DW-BA blown into the flue gas, not the deposition of gaseous synthesized radiocesium compounds on the surfaces of ash particles in the flue gas as observed in CMSW incineration. This source difference causes the behavior of radiocesium during waste incineration to differ between DW and CMSW. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Decontamination by ultrafiltration of low radioactivity waste water from fuel element fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, H.M.

    1984-01-01

    It could be demonstrated that waste waters which contain uranium in a filterable form, such as laundry and floor-cleaning waste, can be sufficiently decontaminated by means of ultra-filtration. In the case of process waste solutions, which contain uranium in a dissolved form, high decontamination factors could be achieved by means of flocculation or coprecipitation. The following methods were tested: - flocculation with Fe (OH) 3 , - coprecipitation with CaHPO 4 , - precipitation with K 4 (Fe(CN) 6 ). The phosphate precipitation, whereby the uranium is probably coprecipitated as Ca(UO 2 ) 2 (PO 4 ) 2 , was found to be the most reliable method. Difficulties were encountered when complex-forming anions, notably carbonate, oxalate and fluoride were present. These necessitate specific pretreatment steps. Whether ultrafiltration then still remains an economical option must be judged in each individual case. The application of the methods so far developed on combined waste streams remains an object for further research. In combination with a phosphate precipitation, ultrafiltration is a suitable method for the decontamination of low-activity, uranium-contaminated waste waters

  8. Melting metal waste for volume reduction and decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, G.L.; Heshmatpour, B.; Heestand, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Melt-slagging was investigated as a technique for volume reduction and decontamination of radioactively contaminated scrap metals. Experiments were conducted using several metals and slags in which the partitioning of the contaminant U or Pu to the slag was measured. Concentrations of U or Pu in the metal product of about 1 ppM were achieved for many metals. A volume reduction of 30:1 was achieved for a typical batch of mixed metal scrap. Additionally, the production of granular products was demonstrated with metal shot and crushed slag

  9. The separation of silica nanoparticle by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide from decontamination foam waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Man Soo; Yoon, In Ho; Jung, Chong Hun; Moon, Jei Kwon; Choi, Wang Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Decontamination foam has been considered as a potential application for the cleaning of radioactive contaminant in the field of metallic walls, overhead surfaces, and complex components. Moreover, foam decontamination could generate the low secondary waste amount owing to its volume expansion. In order to increase the decontamination efficiency, it is essential to improve the foam stability with low amount of chemical decontamination agent. Yoon et al. reported that the silica nanoparticle containing surfactant increased the foam stability compared to only surfactant solution[3]. Nanoparticle has been used with surfactant, which they adsorb at fluid/fluid interface, to stabilize emulsions or bubbles in foams. Despite of improving foam stability, they still used the surfactant, silica nanoparticle (1 wt%), and viscosifier. In addition, it is difficult to separate silica nanoparticle from decontamination solution. Because nanoparticles differ from classical solid particles due to smaller particle size and their specific properties. Thus, the separation method for nanoparticle should be also developed with high recovery rates. The flocculation of silica nanoparticle added by CTAB could be quickly achieved for only 30 min. The particle size of SiO_2 was larger as CTAB amount increased, and SiO_2 contents in the top solution were decreased after centrifugation

  10. The separation of silica nanoparticle by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide from decontamination foam waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Man Soo; Yoon, In Ho; Jung, Chong Hun; Moon, Jei Kwon; Choi, Wang Kyu [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Decontamination foam has been considered as a potential application for the cleaning of radioactive contaminant in the field of metallic walls, overhead surfaces, and complex components. Moreover, foam decontamination could generate the low secondary waste amount owing to its volume expansion. In order to increase the decontamination efficiency, it is essential to improve the foam stability with low amount of chemical decontamination agent. Yoon et al. reported that the silica nanoparticle containing surfactant increased the foam stability compared to only surfactant solution[3]. Nanoparticle has been used with surfactant, which they adsorb at fluid/fluid interface, to stabilize emulsions or bubbles in foams. Despite of improving foam stability, they still used the surfactant, silica nanoparticle (1 wt%), and viscosifier. In addition, it is difficult to separate silica nanoparticle from decontamination solution. Because nanoparticles differ from classical solid particles due to smaller particle size and their specific properties. Thus, the separation method for nanoparticle should be also developed with high recovery rates. The flocculation of silica nanoparticle added by CTAB could be quickly achieved for only 30 min. The particle size of SiO{sub 2} was larger as CTAB amount increased, and SiO{sub 2} contents in the top solution were decreased after centrifugation.

  11. Decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dlouhy, Z.

    1978-01-01

    A survey and characteristics are given of the main sources of wastes from the operation of nuclear installations. The amounts are compared of liquid and gaseous wastes from PWR and BWR reactors. The main trends of radioactive waste processing in the world are described. In Czechoslovakia, two methods of waste fixation have been developed: vacuum cementation and bituminization. The demands are summed up on radioactive waste storage sites and it is stated that there are a number of suitable localities, namely abolished granite quarries with a very deep ground water level and a low-permeable overburden and exhausted quarries of kaolinitic clays, which meet all criteria and secure the safe disposal of wastes from Czechoslovak nuclear power plants up to the year 2020. (Z.M.)

  12. Decontamination process applied to radioactive solid wastes from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, Milton B.; Kastner, Geraldo F.; Monteiro, Roberto Pellacani G.

    2009-01-01

    The process of decontamination is an important step in the economic operation of nuclear facilities. A large number of protective clothing, metallic parts and equipment get contaminated during the handling of radioactive materials in laboratory, plants and reactors. Safe and economic operation of these nuclear facilities will have a bearing on the extent to which these materials are reclaimed by the process of decontamination. The most common radioactive contaminants are fission products, corrosion products, uranium and thorium. The principles involved in decontamination are the same as those for an industrial cleaning process. However, the main difference is in the degree of cleaning required and at times special techniques have to be employed for removing even trace quantities of radioactive materials. This paper relate decontaminations experiences using acids and acids mixtures (HCl, HF, HNO 3 , KMnO 4 , C 2 H 2 O 4 , HBF 4 ) in several kinds of radioactive solid wastes from nuclear power plants. The result solutions were monitored by nuclear analytical techniques, in order to contribute for radiochemical characterization of these wastes. (author)

  13. Separation of cobalt from synthetic intermediate and decontamination radioactive wastes using polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, S.V.S.; Lal, K.B.; Narasimhan, S.V.; Ahmed, J.

    1997-01-01

    Studies have been carried out on the removal of radioactive cobalt ( 60 Co) from synthetic intermediate level waste (ILW) and decontamination waste using neat polyurethane (PU) foam as well as n-tributyl phosphate-polyurethane (TBP-PU) foam. The radioactive cobalt has been extracted on the PU foam as cobalt thiocyanate from the ILW. Maximum removal of cobalt has been observed when the concentration of thiocyanate in the solution is about 0.4 M. Cobalt can be separated from decontamination waste containing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and iron(II). The extent of extraction of cobalt is slow and the separation of iron and cobalt is better with the neat PU foam compared to the TBP-PU foam. The presence of iron in the decontamination waste facilitates the extraction of cobalt thiocyanate on the PU foam. Column studies have been carried out in order to extend these studies to the plant scale. The capacities of the PU foams for cobalt have been determined. The effect of density and the surface area of PU foam have been investigated. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectral studies have been conducted to find out the interaction between PU foam and cobalt thiocyanate species

  14. Method of decontamination for uranium oxide particles floating in liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terakado, Tsutomu; Ebara, Tsuneo; Sato, Kuniaki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To rapidly treat liquid waste containing uranium oxide particles floating in it and to enable substantially complete decontamination. Method: An iron salt such as ferrous sulfate or the like is added to liquid waste with floating uranium oxide particles, an alkaline solution such as caustic soda or the like is then added to the liquid waste while feeding compressed air at 0.1 to 0.02 l/sec. per ton of liquid waste, and the pH of the liquid waste is made to from 6.5 to 7.5. Thereafter, the feed of compressed air is stopped, the liquid waste is allowed to stand, and is then filtered. (Aizawa, K.)

  15. Chromatographic decontamination of medium-activity waste concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faubel, W.; Menzler, P.M.; Sameh, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    The chromatographic decontamination of a MAW concentrate was carried out in a laboratory plant in 1-l-batches in the following way: In order to purify the nitric MAW concentrate from its solid and organic contamination products, it is passed through a filter and an absorber (SM7) for organic species. Subsequently the purified solution runs on-line through all following columns. First the main activity carrier cesium ( 137 Cs, 134 Cs) is transferred to ammonium molybdate phosphate (AMP-1) by means of a newly developed fluidized bed process. In the further course, 125 Sb is separated on metal oxides (Sb 2 O 5 , MnO 2 ) and the three-valued actinides/lanthanides on an extraction-chromatographic CMPO column. Finally the remaining 106 Ru and 60 Co activities are separated on dimethylglyoximes (DMG) coated on active carbon. (orig./RB) [de

  16. Membrane treatment of liquid wastes from radiological decontamination operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svittsov, A A; Khubetsov, S B; Volchek, K

    2011-01-01

    The paper focuses on the evaluation of membrane filtration for the treatment of liquid radioactive streams generated in area decontamination operations. In this work, semi-permeable membranes were demonstrated to be effective reducing the volume of wastewater containing cesium and cobalt by two orders of a magnitude. The efficiency of membrane separation was enhanced by employing additives that enlarged the size of target radionuclide species and improved their rejection by the membranes. This was achieved by chelation with synthetic water-soluble polymers and by adsorption on micro particles of adsorbent coupled with micelle formation. The effect of wastewater composition and that of the radionuclide-binding additives on the volume reduction was investigated. Membrane treatment is expected to help simplify further processing and decrease disposal costs.

  17. Krypton-81 in groundwater of the Culebra Dolomite near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturchio, Neil C; Kuhlman, Kristopher L; Yokochi, Reika; Probst, Peter C; Jiang, Wei; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Mueller, Peter; Yang, Guo-Min

    2014-05-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico is the first geologic repository for disposal of transuranic nuclear waste from defense-related programs of the US Department of Energy. It is constructed within halite beds of the Permian-age Salado Formation. The Culebra Dolomite, confined within Rustler Formation evaporites overlying the Salado Formation, is a potential pathway for radionuclide transport from the repository to the accessible environment in the human-disturbed repository scenario. Although extensive subsurface characterization and numerical flow modeling of groundwater has been done in the vicinity of the WIPP, few studies have used natural isotopic tracers to validate the flow models and to better understand solute transport at this site. The advent of Atom-Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) has enabled routine measurement of cosmogenic (81)Kr (half-life 229,000 yr), a near-ideal tracer for long-term groundwater transport. We measured (81)Kr in saline groundwater sampled from two Culebra Dolomite monitoring wells near the WIPP site, and compared (81)Kr model ages with reverse particle-tracking results of well-calibrated flow models. The (81)Kr model ages are ~130,000 and ~330,000 yr for high-transmissivity and low-transmissivity portions of the formation, respectively. Compared with flow model results which indicate a relatively young mean hydraulic age (~32,000 yr), the (81)Kr model ages imply substantial physical attenuation of conservative solutes in the Culebra Dolomite and provide limits on the effective diffusivity of contaminants into the confining aquitards. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of waste management issues arising from a field study evaluating decontamination of a biological agent from a building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, P; Wood, J; Drake, J; Minamyer, S; Silvestri, E; Yund, C; Nichols, T; Ierardi, M; Amidan, B

    2016-01-01

    The Bio-response Operational Testing and Evaluation (BOTE) Project was a cross-government effort designed to operationally test and evaluate a response to a biological incident (release of Bacillus anthracis [Ba] spores, the causative agent for anthrax) from initial public health and law enforcement response through environmental remediation. The BOTE Project was designed to address site remediation after the release of a Ba simulant, Bacillus atrophaeus spp. globigii (Bg), within a facility, drawing upon recent advances in the biological sampling and decontamination areas. A key component of response to a biological contamination incident is the proper management of wastes and residues, which is woven throughout all response activities. Waste is generated throughout the response and includes items like sampling media packaging materials, discarded personal protective equipment, items removed from the facility either prior to or following decontamination, aqueous waste streams, and materials generated through the application of decontamination technologies. The amount of residual contaminating agent will impact the available disposal pathways and waste management costs. Waste management is an integral part of the decontamination process and should be included through "Pre-Incident" response planning. Overall, the pH-adjusted bleach decontamination process generated the most waste from the decontamination efforts, and fumigation with chlorine dioxide generated the least waste. A majority of the solid waste generated during pH-adjusted bleach decontamination was the nonporous surfaces that were removed, bagged, decontaminated ex situ, and treated as waste. The waste during the two fumigation rounds of the BOTE Project was associated mainly with sampling activities. Waste management activities may represent a significant contribution to the overall cost of the response/recovery operation. This paper addresses the waste management activities for the BOTE field test

  19. Decontamination of hospital wastes by the combined action of ionising radiation and heat - the thermorad process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Icre, P.; Rocquigny, H. de

    1995-01-01

    The Thermorad process is used for decontaminating hospital wastes at the hospital as they are collected from the different departments. The process utilises the combined microbiological effects of ionising radiation (5 kGy) and dry heat (60 o C). The treatment unit, which is compact and of small size, contains a cobalt 60 source of under 100,000 curies and has an annual treatment capacity of 5000 m 3 . (author)

  20. On-Site Decontamination System for Liquid Low Level Radioactive Waste - 13010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OSMANLIOGLU, Ahmet Erdal [Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center, Kucukcekmece Istanbul (Turkey)

    2013-07-01

    This study is based on an evaluation of purification methods for liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) by using natural zeolite. Generally the volume of liquid low-level waste is relatively large and the specific activity is rather low when compared to other radioactive waste types. In this study, a pilot scale column was used with natural zeolite as an ion exchanger media. Decontamination and minimization of LLLW especially at the generation site decrease operational cost in waste management operations. Portable pilot scale column was constructed for decontamination of LLW on site. Effect of temperature on the radionuclide adsorption of the zeolite was determined to optimize the waste solution temperature for the plant scale operations. In addition, effect of pH on the radionuclide uptake of the zeolite column was determined to optimize the waste solution pH for the plant scale operations. The advantages of this method used for the processing of LLLW are discussed in this paper. (authors)

  1. Assessment of the Characteristic Aggregates during a Decontamination of Contaminated Concrete Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B. Y.; Choi, W. K.; Oh, W. Z.; Jung, C. H.; Park, J. W.

    2008-01-01

    During a decommissioning of nuclear plants and facilities, large quantities of slightly contaminated concrete wastes are generated. The exposure to radiation over many years could be hazardous to human health. In Korea, the decontamination and decommissioning of the retired TRIGA MARK II and III research reactors and a uranium conversion plant at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been under way. Hundreds of tons of concrete wastes are expected from the D and D of these facilities. Typically, the contaminated layer is only 1∼10mm thick because cementitious materials are porous media, the penetration of radionuclides may occur up to several centimeters from the surface of a material. Contaminated concrete waste can be of two forms, either a surface or bulk contamination. Bulk contamination usually arises from a neutron activation of nuclides during the service life on a component. Surface activity can be a loose contamination arising from a deposition of nuclides from an interfacing medium, and it also can be tightly bound. Most of the dismantled concrete wastes are slightly contaminated rather than activated. This decontamination can be accomplished during the course of a separation of the concrete wastes contaminated with radioactive materials through a thermal treatment step of the radionuclide (e.g. cesium and strontium), transportation of the radionuclide to fine aggregates through a mechanical treatment step such as a crushing, milling and sieving. Produced fine powder (paste) should be stabilized for the final disposal. Melting technology has been known as the one of the most effective technologies for a stabilization and volume reduction to the paste. Therefore, a melting may be a last step in the decontamination of a contaminated paste. The aim of this study was to establish the separation conditions for an optimum decontamination for the treatment of concrete wastes contaminated with radionuclides. The separation tests had been

  2. Krypton purification (1961); Purification du krypton (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larher, Y [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Institut Fourier, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1961-07-01

    The amount of xenon in otherwise very pure krypton can be reduced from 1.5 to 0.0025 per cent approximately by passage through an activated carbon column at dry-ice temperature. The circulation of the krypton is effected by condensing at -196 deg. C and then evaporating. (author) [French] Le taux de xenon dans du krypton par ailleurs tres pur est ramene de 1,5 pour cent a 0,0025 pour cent environ au cours d'un passage a travers une colonne de charbon actif a la temperature de la carboglace. La circulation du krypton se fait par condensation a -196 deg. C, puis evaporation. (auteur)

  3. Waste and decontamination services FY 94 Multi-Year Program Plan Phase II WBS No. 1.2.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, E.A.

    1994-05-01

    During the remediation of the Hanford Site large volumes of radioactive and mixed solid waste are expected to be produced, thus creating the need for subsequent decontamination, treatment, storage, and/or waste disposal. The program mission is to manage current and future contaminated solid waste streams in a safe, responsible, cost effective and legally compliant manner. This document presents the strategy and technical requirements, along with key objectives and deliverables for the waste and decontamination services program for fiscal year 1994. Time schedules, cost estimates, and justification for each proposed activity are given in tables and charts

  4. Decontamination of irradiated-fuel processing waste using manganese dioxide hydrate; Decontamination des effluents de traitement des combustibles irradies par le bioxyde de manganese hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auchapt, J M; Gaudier, J F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Chusclan (France). Centre de Production de Plutonium de Marcoule

    1969-07-01

    The 'manganese dioxide' process is designed to replace the 'calcium carbonate' treatment for low and medium activity wastes. The objective to attain during the research for a new process was the diminution of the volume of the sludge without decreasing the decontamination factor of the wastes. The new process involves addition in series of twice over 100 ppm of Mn{sup 2+} in the waste which has previously been made basic and oxidizing; the precipitate formed in situ is separated after each addition. The process has the advantage of increasing the decontamination of strontium. The treatment can be used in a plant including two decantation units and has given effective results when applied in such a plant. (author) [French] Le procede au ''bioxyde de manganese'' est destine a remplacer le traitement ''carbonate de calcium'' dans les effluents de moyenne activite. L'objectif poursuivi lors de la recherche d'un procede nouveau etait de diminuer le volume des boues sans diminuer le facteur de decontamination des effluents. Le nouveau traitement consiste a effectuer en cascade sur les effluents rendus basiques et oxydants une double precipitation de 100 ppm de Mn{sup 2+} avec separation intermediaire du precipite. Il presente en outre l'avantage d'ameliorer la decontamination en strontium. Le traitement est utilisable dans la chaine des deux decanteurs et a donne satisfaction lors de son exploitation industrielle. Le volume des boues seches a ete reduit d'un facteur 3 a 4 par rapport au traitement carbonate. (auteur)

  5. Low-waste technology of prevention, decontamination and localization of radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizhnerov, L. V.; Konstantinov, Ye. A.; Prokopenko, V. A.; Sorokin, N. M.

    1997-01-01

    The report presents the results of research in developing a low-waste technology of prevention, decontamination and localization of radioactive contamination founded on the of easily removed protective polymeric coating based on water and alcohol latexes and dispersion of polymers with special activating additives. The developed technology provides for the reduction of weakly fixed radioactive contamination of non-painted and painted surfaces to admissible levels (as a rule), it securely prevents and localizes contamination and does not generate secondary liquid radioactive wastes

  6. Study on decontamination of radioactive ruthenium by steel wool in waste solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, S; Sakaki, T [Radia Industry Co. Ltd., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan)

    1979-06-01

    Tracer experiments were done in order to establish a decontamination process of /sup 106/Ru in radioactive waste solution by column method paying special attention on the solution of nitrato-nitrosyl complex of Ru which is often encountered as a low level radioactive solution. It turned out that metallic iron was the most effective decontaminating agent among the several tens of materials tested. The decontamination factor (DF) of /sup 106/Ru increased in proportion to the total surface area of iron and it sensitively depended on the oxidation state of the surface as revealed by the batchwise and columnwise tests. Iron samples with high corrosiveness gave a much larger DF than those with low corrosiveness. The decontamination process proceeded as iron was being oxidized via Fe(metal) ..-->.. Fe(II) ..-->.. Fe(III). As the results, the DF initially increased after initiating the passage of water through the column but it then decreased as the oxidation process became inactive. An excellent durability up to 10000 bed volumes was demonstrated by the column method at a high average DF of 150.

  7. Options for the decontamination of alpha-bearing liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carley-Macauly, K.W.; Gutman, R.G.; Hooper, E.W.; Logsdail, D.H.; Rees, J.H.; Simpson, M.P.; Smyth, M.J.; Turner, A.D.

    1984-08-01

    This document reviews the processes potentially available, and their state of development, for the removal of alpha activity from aqueous waste streams. In present practice, most such streams are treated by precipitation, usually with an iron hydroxide, but the potential role and limitations of other precipitants, of ion exchange techniques and solvent extraction are also discussed as well as newer electrochemical methods. Because of the importance of precipitation, and the fact the α-activity often occurs in suspended form in wastes, the methods for solids separation and concentration are considered in some detail, together with other physical processes such as evaporation. The equipment and operational aspects are also discussed, particularly for precipitation, ion exchange and solvent extraction treatments. The conclusions relate to an extensive table in which the different methods are compared. The optimum treatment or combination of treatments will depend on the waste stream and other circumstances (particularly on the chemical and radiological constituents of the waste, and its rate of arising) and the aim of this work is to give an initial guide to the choice among the options. (author)

  8. Cement waste form qualification report: WVDP [West Valley Demonstration Project] PUREX decontaminated supernatant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVay, C.W.; Stimmel, J.R.; Marchetti, S.

    1988-08-01

    This report provides a summary of work performed to develop a cement-based, low-level waste formulation suitable for the solidification of decontaminated high-level waste liquid produced as a by-product of PUREX spent fuel reprocessing. The resultant waste form is suitable for interim storage and is intended for ultimate disposal as low-level Class C waste; it also meets the stability requirements of the NRC Branch Technical Position on Waste Form Qualification, May 1983 and the requirements of 10 CFR 61. A recipe was developed utilizing only Portland Type I cement based on an inorganic salts simulant of the PUREX supernatant. The qualified recipe was tested full scale in the production facility and was observed to produce a product with entrained air, low density, and lower-than-expected compressive strength. Further laboratory scale testing with actual decontaminated supernatant revealed that set retarders were present in the supernatant, precluding setting of the product and allowing the production of ''bleed water.'' Calcium nitrate and sodium silicate were added to overcome the set retarding effect and produced a final product with improved performance when compared to the original formulation. This report describes the qualification process and qualification test results for the final product formulation. 7 refs., 38 figs., 21 tabs

  9. Radioactive krypton gas separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    Radioactive krypton is separated from a gas mixture comprising nitrogen and traces of carbon dioxide and radioactive krypton by selective adsorption and then cryogenic distillation of the prepurified gas against nitrogen liquid to produce krypton bottoms concentrate liquid, using the nitrogen gas from the distillation for two step purging of the adsorbent. 16 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures

  10. Method of electrolytically decontaminating of radioactive metal wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oonuma, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Akio; Yamadera, Toshio.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To significantly reduce the volume of secondary wastes by separating from electrolytes metal ions containing radioactive metal ions dissolved therein in the form of elemental metals of a reduced volume with ease, as well as regenerating the electrolytes for re-use. Method: Contaminated portions at the surface of the radioactive metal wastes are dissolved in electrolytes and, when the metal ion concentration in the electrolytes reaches a predetermined level, the electrolytes are introduced to an acid recovery step and an electrodeposition step. The recovered acid is re-used as the electrolytes, while dissolved metal ions containing radioactive metal ions are deposited as elemental metals in the electrodeposition step. The electrolytes usable herein include those acids easily forming stable complex compounds with the metals or those not forming hydroxides of the contaminated metals. Combination of sodium sulfate and sulfuric acid, sodium chloride and hydrochloride or the like is preferred. (Kamimura, M.)

  11. Low-level liquid waste decontamination by inorganic ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, D.O.; Lee, D.D.; Dillow, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    Improved processes are being developed to treat contaminated liquid wastes that have been and continue to be generated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The most serious contaminants are 137 Cs and 90 Sr, and certain inorganic ion-exchange material have given promising results. Nickel and cobalt hexacyanoferrate (II) compounds are extremely selective for cesium removal, with distribution coefficients in excess of 10 6 even in the presence of high cesium and moderate potassium concentrations. Sodium titanate is selective for strontium removal from solutions with high alkali metal concentrations, especially at high pH. These separations are so efficient that one or two stages of simple, batch separation can yield large DFs (∼10 4 ) while still generating small volumes of solid waste

  12. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

    1979-09-01

    Progress is reported on: decontamination and densification of chop-leach cladding residues; monitoring methods for particulate and gaseous effluents from waste solidification process; TRU waste immobilization; krypton solidification; /sup 14/C and /sup 129/I fixation; waste management system and safety studies; waste isolation safety assessment; well logging instrumentation development for shallow land burial; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; detection and characterization of mobile organic complexes of fission products; and electropolishing for surface decontamination of metals. 9 figures, 14 tables. (DLC)

  13. Effects of slag composition and process variables on decontamination of metallic wastes by melt refining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heshmatpour, B.; Copeland, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    Melt refining has been suggested as an alternative for decontamination and volume reduction of low-level-contaminated metallic wastes. Knowledge of metallurgical and thermochemical aspects of the process is essential for effective treatment of various metals. Variables such as slag type and composition, melting technique, and refractory materials need to be identified for each metal or alloy. Samples of contaminated metals were melted with fluxes by resistance furnace or induction heating. The resulting ingots as well as the slags were analyzed for their nuclide contents, and the corresponding partition ratios were calculated. Compatibility of slags and refractories was also investigated, and proper refractory materials were identified. Resistance furnace melting appeared to be a better melting technique for nonferrous scrap, while induction melting was more suitable for ferrous metals. In general uranium contents of the metals, except for aluminum, could be reduced to as low as 0.01 to 0.1 ppM by melt refining. Aluminum could be decontaminated to about 1 to 2 ppM U when certain fluoride slags were used. The extent of decontamination was not very sensitive to slag type and composition. However, borosilicate and basic oxidizing slags were more effective on ferrous metals and Cu; NaNO 3 -NaCl-NaOH type fluxes were desirable for Zn, Pb, and Sn; and fluoride type slags were effective for decontamination of Al. Recrystallized alumina proved to be the most compatible refractory for melt refining both ferrous and nonferrous metals, while graphite was suitable for nonferrous metal processing. In conclusion, melt refining is an effective technique for volume reduction ad decontamination of contaminated metal scrap when proper slags, melting technique, and refractories are used

  14. New sorption-reagent materials for decontamination of liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avramenko, V.A.; Golikov, A.P.; Zheleznov, V.V.; Kaplun, E.V.; Marinin, D.V.; Sokolnitskaya, T.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Use of selective sorbents in liquid radioactive waste (LRW) management is widely spread in the field of nuclear power objects liquid waste decontamination, since the main objective there is to remove long-lived radionuclides of the nuclear cycle. The latter include, first of all, cesium-137, strontium-90, cobalt-60 and a number of α-irradiators. In this case LRW composition for most of the nuclear power objects is rather simple, except acidic deactivation solutions. At the same time, liquid radioactive wastes of different research centers have a variable chemical and radiochemical composition depending on objectives and tasks of a given center research activities. As a result, application of sorption technologies in such waste decontamination determines special requirements to these sorbents selectivity: a wide spectrum of radionuclides that can be removed and fairly high selectivity enabling to remove radionuclides from solutions of complex chemical composition (containing surfactants, complexing agents etc.). This paper is concerned with studying properties of new materials selective to different radionuclides. These materials are capable to interact with solution components whether already contained in the waste or deliberately added into resulting solution. Such sorption-reagent materials combine universal character of co-precipitation methods with simplicity of sorption methods. In this work we studied sorption-reagent inorganic ion-exchange materials interacting with sulfate-, carbonate-, oxalate-, sulfide-, and permanganate-ions. Insoluble compounds formed as a result of this interaction increase tens- and hundreds-fold the sorption selectivity of different radionuclides - strontium, cobalt, mercury, iron, and manganese as compared to conventional ion-exchange system. By means of X-ray phase analysis, IR-spectroscopy, chemical and radiochemical analysis, we have studied the mechanism of radionuclide sorption on different sorption

  15. Cement matrix solidification of decontamination ion-exchange resin waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, N. S.; Hebditch, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Crossflow membrane separation has been evaluated as an alternative to more conventional separation methods for the removal of oil from nuclear power station aqueous effluents and liquid wastes. Three commercially available membranes were investigated at small pilot scale; sintered metal power and metal fibre membranes, both of tubular geometries, and hollow fibre polypropylene. The sintered powder membrane gave by far the best oil water separation performance. Less than 10 ppm oil in the aqueous permeate was readily achieved and the oil was concentrated up to 75% by volume from feed concentrations in the range 1000 ppm to 10%. The presence of solids was found to have a profound influence on permeation rates. On the basis of the data presented, a single stage scheme for the treatment of oily effluents is proposed

  16. Decontamination of radioactive liquid wastes by hydrophytic vegetal organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecal, Al; Popa, K.; Potoroaca, V.; Melniciuc-Puica, N.

    2001-01-01

    Bioaccumulation of some radioactive ions from contaminated waste solutions, on hydrophytic vegetal organisms is discussed. In order to follow the distribution of radioactive ions 137 Cs + , 60 Co 2+ and 51 Cr 3+ in various cell components extracted from Spirulina platensis, Porphiridium cruentum, Scenedesmus quadricauda, Lemna minor, Elodea canadensis, Pistia stratiotes and Riccia fluitans, the plants were cultivated in radioactive solutions. The resulting complexes were extracted with acetone or acetic acid and separated chromatographically. The results show an intense activity of the polysaccharide and lipoid fractions in the bioaccumulation process. The bioaccumulation varies in the series: Spirulina > Scenedesmus > Porphiridium > Riccia > Pistia > Lemna ≥ Elodea for 137 Cs + and 60 Co 2+ ; Spirulina > Porphiridium > Scenedesmus > Riccia > Pistia > Lemna > Elodea for 51 Cr 3+ . (author)

  17. Low-level liquid waste decontamination by organic ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.D.; Campbell, D.O.; Dillow, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    Improved processes are being developed to treat contaminated liquid wastes that have been and continue to be generated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Promising results have been obtained for cesium removal with a new resorcinol-based organic resin developed at the Savannah River Site. In tests of cesium removal, it was superior to other available resins, such as Duolite CS-100, with the distribution coefficient being limited primarily by competition from potassium and nearly independent of the sodium concentration. The optimum pH was approximately 12.5 in high NaNO 3 concentrations (>2 M). A fairly low flow velocity was required to yield sharp breakthrough of the loaded cesium. The resin was much less effective for strontium removal, which was limited by competition from sodium. If both cesium and strontium must be removed, another resin column or a mixed bed with a chelating resin should be used

  18. Electromagnetic mixed-waste processing system for asbestos decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    The first phase of a program to develop and demonstrate a cost-effective, integrated process for remediation of asbestos-containing material that is contaminated with organics, heavy metals, and radioactive compounds was successfully completed. Laboratory scale tests were performed to demonstrate initial process viability for asbestos conversion, organics removal, and radionuclide and heavy metal removal. All success criteria for the laboratory tests were met. (1) Ohio DSI demonstrated greater than 99% asbestos conversion to amorphous solids using their commercial process. (2) KAI demonstrated 90% removal of organics from the asbestos suspension. (3) Westinghouse STC achieved the required metals removal criteria on a laboratory scale (e.g., 92% removal of uranium from solution, resin loadings of 0.6 equivalents per liter, and greater than 50% regeneration of resin in a batch test.) Using the information gained in the laboratory tests, the process was reconfigured to provide the basis for the mixed waste remediation system. An integrated process is conceptually developed, and a Phase 2 program plan is proposed to provide the bench-scale development needed in order to refine the design basis for a pilot processing system

  19. Decontamination of concentrated medium level radioactive wastes by a chromatographic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faubel, W.; Mehret, R.; Menzler, P.M.

    1990-01-01

    The technical feasibility of partitioning concentrated nitric acid intermediate-level waste (ILWC) solutions from the Purex process into a small volume of high-level waste and a large volume of low-level waste using sorption methods is demonstrated for 1-l and 11-l batches. Cesium-134 and 137 are selectively separated with a decontamination factor (DF) > 1 x 10 5 in a newly developed suspended-bed column filled with the microporous inorganic exchanger ammonium molybdophosphate. The 125 Sb and the actinides and lanthanides (3 +) are retained with DFs between 40 and 1000 on metal oxides of Sb and Mn and on an extraction column containing n-octyl (phenyl)N,N-disobutyl carbamoyl methyl phosphine oxide, respectively. Ruthenium-106 and 60 Co are removed in a column loaded with dimethyl glyoxime and have DFs > 20. The amount of secondary wastes arising from absorber materials was estimated on the basis of 1 l experiments to be 300 kg for a 350 t/yr reprocessing plant with an ILWC volume of about 0.5 m 3 /t of heavy metal. One of the main goals was to check out the influence of a scaling up from laboratory scale to pilot plant operations. The hydraulic behaviour of the apparatus was tested for 1, 20, and 100 liters of solutions. The second important aim was to reach a decontamination of the ILWC, sufficient to meet the requirements of regulations limiting the dose to 2 mSv/h at a 1-m distance, calculations with the PROMAX program, for cementing the LLW effluent into 400-l drums at a 10 wt% loading, lead to a value of about 100 μSv/h; thus, this waste can be handled without any shielding. The secondary waste can be treated individually

  20. Waste handling and storage in the decontamination pilot projects of JAEA for environments of Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, S.; Kawase, K.; Iijima, K.; Kato, M. [Fukushima Environmental Safety Center, Headquarters of Fukushima Partnership Operations, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Fukushima (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    After the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) was chosen by the national government to conduct decontamination pilot projects at selected sites in Fukushima prefecture. Despite tight boundary conditions in terms of timescale and resources, the projects served their primary purpose to develop a knowledge base to support more effective planning and implementation of stepwise regional remediation of the evacuated zone. A range of established, modified and newly developed techniques were tested under realistic field conditions and their performance characteristics were determined. The results of the project can be summarized in terms of site characterization, cleanup and waste management. A range of options were investigated to reduce the volumes of waste produced and to ensure that decontamination water could be cleaned to the extent that it could be discharged to normal drainage. Resultant solid wastes were packaged in standard flexible containers, labelled and stored at the remediation site (temporary storage until central interim storage becomes available). The designs of such temporary storage facilities were tailored to available sites, but all designs included measures to ensure mechanical stability (e.g., filling void spaces between containers with sand, graded cover with soil) and prevent releases to groundwater (impermeable base and cap, gravity flow drainage including radiation monitors and catch tanks). Storage site monitoring was also needed to check that storage structures would not be perturbed by external events that could include typhoons, heavy snowfalls, freeze/thaw cycles and earthquakes. (authors)

  1. A new method for decontamination of radioactive waste using low-pressure arc discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Kazutoshi; Furukawa, Shizue; Adachi, Kazuo; Amakawa, Tadashi; Kanbe, Hiromi

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the decontamination features of the low-pressure arc-discharge method for radioactive waste generated in the operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants were examined. The low-pressure arc-discharge method was applied to type 304 stainless-steel, type 316L stainless-steel, alloy 600 and carbon-steel covered with radioactive corrosion products. Approximately, 80% of the radioactivity build up on stainless-steels could be removed by the low-pressure arc discharge

  2. Overview of NORM and activities by a NORM licensed permanent decontamination and waste processing facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirro, G.A. [Growth Resources, Inc., Lafayette, LA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    This paper presents an overview of issues related to handling NORM materials, and provides a description of a facility designed for the processing of NORM contaminated equipment. With regard to handling NORM materials the author discusses sources of NORM, problems, regulations and disposal options, potential hazards, safety equipment, and issues related to personnel protection. For the facility, the author discusses: description of the permanent facility; the operations of the facility; the license it has for handling specific radioactive material; operating and safety procedures; decontamination facilities on site; NORM waste processing capabilities; and offsite NORM services which are available.

  3. Precipitation-filtering technology for uranium waste solution generated on washing-electrokinetic decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gye-Nam, E-mail: kimsum@kaeri.re.kr; Park, Uk-Ryang; Kim, Seung-Soo; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2015-05-15

    Graphical abstract: A recycling process diagram for the volume reduction of waste solution generated from washing-electrokinetic decontamination. - Highlights: • A process for recycling a waste solution generated was developed. • The total metal precipitation rate by NaOH in a supernatant after precipitation was the highest at pH 9. • The uranium radioactivity in the treated solution upon injection of 0.2 g of alum was lower. • After drying, the volume of sludge was reduced to 35% of the initial sludge volume. - Abstract: Large volumes of uranium waste solution are generated during the operation of washing-electrokinetic decontamination equipment used to remove uranium from radioactive soil. A treatment technology for uranium waste solution generated upon washing-electrokinetic decontamination for soil contaminated with uranium has been developed. The results of laboratory-size precipitation experiments were as follows. The total amount of metal precipitation by NaOH for waste solution was highest at pH 11. Ca(II), K(I), and Al(III) ions in the supernatant partially remained after precipitation, whereas the concentration of uranium in the supernatant was below 0.2 ppm. Also, when NaOH was used as a precipitant, the majority of the K(I) ions in the treated solution remained. The problem of CaO is to need a long dissolution time in the precipitation tank, while Ca(OH){sub 2} can save a dissolution time. However, the volume of the waste solution generated when using Ca(OH){sub 2} increased by 8 mL/100 mL (waste solution) compared to that generated when using CaO. NaOH precipitant required lower an injection volume lower than that required for Ca(OH){sub 2} or CaO. When CaO was used as a precipitant, the uranium radioactivity in the treated solution at pH 11 reached its lowest value, compared to values of uranium radioactivity at pH 9 and pH 5. Also, the uranium radioactivity in the treated solution upon injection of 0.2 g of alum with CaO or Ca(OH){sub 2} was

  4. Investigations regarding the wet decontamination of fluorescent lamp waste using iodine in potassium iodide solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunsu, Cristian; Ekberg, Christian; Foreman, Mark; Retegan, Teodora

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A wet-based decontamination process for fluorescent lamp waste is proposed. • Mercury can be leached using iodine in potassium iodide solution. • The efficiency of the process increases with an increase in leachant concentration. • Selective leaching of mercury from rare earth elements is achieved. • Mercury is furthered recovered using ion exchange, reduction or solvent extraction. - Abstract: With the rising popularity of fluorescent lighting, simple and efficient methods for the decontamination of discarded lamps are needed. Due to their mercury content end-of-life fluorescent lamps are classified as hazardous waste, requiring special treatment for disposal. A simple wet-based decontamination process is required, especially for streams where thermal desorption, a commonly used but energy demanding method, cannot be applied. In this study the potential of a wet-based process using iodine in potassium iodide solution was studied for the recovery of mercury from fluorescent lamp waste. The influence of the leaching agent’s concentration and solid/liquid ratio on the decontamination efficiency was investigated. The leaching behaviour of mercury was studied over time, as well as its recovery from the obtained leachates by means of anion exchange, reduction, and solvent extraction. Dissolution of more than 90% of the contained mercury was achieved using 0.025/0.05 M I 2 /KI solution at 21 °C for two hours. The efficiency of the process increased with an increase in leachant concentration. 97.3 ± 0.6% of the mercury contained was dissolved at 21 °C, in two hours, using a 0.25/0.5 M I 2 /KI solution and a solid to liquid ratio of 10% w/v. Iodine and mercury can be efficiently removed from the leachates using Dowex 1X8 anion exchange resin or reducing agents such as sodium hydrosulphite, allowing the disposal of the obtained solution as non-hazardous industrial wastewater. The extractant CyMe 4 BTBP showed good removal of mercury, with an

  5. Investigations regarding the wet decontamination of fluorescent lamp waste using iodine in potassium iodide solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunsu, Cristian, E-mail: tunsu@chalmers.se; Ekberg, Christian; Foreman, Mark; Retegan, Teodora

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • A wet-based decontamination process for fluorescent lamp waste is proposed. • Mercury can be leached using iodine in potassium iodide solution. • The efficiency of the process increases with an increase in leachant concentration. • Selective leaching of mercury from rare earth elements is achieved. • Mercury is furthered recovered using ion exchange, reduction or solvent extraction. - Abstract: With the rising popularity of fluorescent lighting, simple and efficient methods for the decontamination of discarded lamps are needed. Due to their mercury content end-of-life fluorescent lamps are classified as hazardous waste, requiring special treatment for disposal. A simple wet-based decontamination process is required, especially for streams where thermal desorption, a commonly used but energy demanding method, cannot be applied. In this study the potential of a wet-based process using iodine in potassium iodide solution was studied for the recovery of mercury from fluorescent lamp waste. The influence of the leaching agent’s concentration and solid/liquid ratio on the decontamination efficiency was investigated. The leaching behaviour of mercury was studied over time, as well as its recovery from the obtained leachates by means of anion exchange, reduction, and solvent extraction. Dissolution of more than 90% of the contained mercury was achieved using 0.025/0.05 M I{sub 2}/KI solution at 21 °C for two hours. The efficiency of the process increased with an increase in leachant concentration. 97.3 ± 0.6% of the mercury contained was dissolved at 21 °C, in two hours, using a 0.25/0.5 M I{sub 2}/KI solution and a solid to liquid ratio of 10% w/v. Iodine and mercury can be efficiently removed from the leachates using Dowex 1X8 anion exchange resin or reducing agents such as sodium hydrosulphite, allowing the disposal of the obtained solution as non-hazardous industrial wastewater. The extractant CyMe{sub 4}BTBP showed good removal of mercury

  6. Development of Decontamination Technology for Separating Radioactive Constituents from Contaminated Concrete Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B. Y.; Kim, G. N.; Lee, G. W.; Choi, W. K.; Jung, U. S.

    2010-01-01

    The large amount of contaminated concrete produced during decommissioning procedures and available decontamination. In Korea, more than more than 60 tons of concrete wastes contaminated with uranium compounds have been generated from UCP (Uranium Conversion Plant) by dismantling. A recycling or a volume reduction of the concrete wastes through the application of appropriate treatment technologies have merits from the view point of an increase in a resource recycling as well as a decrease in the amount of wastes to be disposed of resulting in a reduction of a disposal cost and an enhancement of the disposal safety. For unconditional release of building and reduction of radioactive concrete waste, mechanical methods and thermal stress methods have been selected. In the advanced countries, such as France, Japan, Germany, Sweden, and Belgium, techniques for reduction and reuse of the decommissioning concrete wastes have applied to minimize the total radioactive concrete waste volume by thermal and mechanical processes. It was found that volume reduction of contaminated concrete can be achieved by separation of the fine cement stone and coarse gravel. Typically, the contaminated layer is only 1∼10mm thick because cementitious materials are porous media, the penetration of radionuclides may occur up to several centimenters from the surface of a material. Most of the dismantled concrete wastes are slightly contaminated rather than activated. This decontamination can be accomplished during the course of a separation of the concrete wastes contaminated with radioactive materials through a thermal treatment step of the radionuclide (e.g. cesium and strontium), transportation of the radionuclide to fine aggregates through a mechanical treatment step. Concrete is a structural material which generally consists of a binder (cement), water, and aggregate. The interaction between highly charged calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) particles in the presence of divalent calcium

  7. Investigations regarding the wet decontamination of fluorescent lamp waste using iodine in potassium iodide solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunsu, Cristian; Ekberg, Christian; Foreman, Mark; Retegan, Teodora

    2015-02-01

    With the rising popularity of fluorescent lighting, simple and efficient methods for the decontamination of discarded lamps are needed. Due to their mercury content end-of-life fluorescent lamps are classified as hazardous waste, requiring special treatment for disposal. A simple wet-based decontamination process is required, especially for streams where thermal desorption, a commonly used but energy demanding method, cannot be applied. In this study the potential of a wet-based process using iodine in potassium iodide solution was studied for the recovery of mercury from fluorescent lamp waste. The influence of the leaching agent's concentration and solid/liquid ratio on the decontamination efficiency was investigated. The leaching behaviour of mercury was studied over time, as well as its recovery from the obtained leachates by means of anion exchange, reduction, and solvent extraction. Dissolution of more than 90% of the contained mercury was achieved using 0.025/0.05 M I2/KI solution at 21 °C for two hours. The efficiency of the process increased with an increase in leachant concentration. 97.3 ± 0.6% of the mercury contained was dissolved at 21 °C, in two hours, using a 0.25/0.5M I2/KI solution and a solid to liquid ratio of 10% w/v. Iodine and mercury can be efficiently removed from the leachates using Dowex 1X8 anion exchange resin or reducing agents such as sodium hydrosulphite, allowing the disposal of the obtained solution as non-hazardous industrial wastewater. The extractant CyMe4BTBP showed good removal of mercury, with an extraction efficiency of 97.5 ± 0.7% being achieved in a single stage. Better removal of mercury was achieved in a single stage using the extractants Cyanex 302 and Cyanex 923 in kerosene, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Krypton oxides under pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Zaleski-Ejgierd, Patryk; Łata, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Under high pressure, krypton, one of the most inert elements is predicted to become sufficiently reactive to form a new class of krypton compounds; krypton oxides. Using modern ab-initio evolutionary algorithms in combination with Density Functional Theory, we predict the existence of several thermodynamically stable Kr/O species at elevated pressures. In particular, our calculations indicate that at approx. 300?GPa the monoxide, KrO, should form spontaneously and remain thermo- and dynamical...

  9. Decontamination and decommissioning of TAN radioactive liquid-waste-evaporator system (PM-2A). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.

    1983-03-01

    This report describes the decontamination and decommissioning of the Test Area North (TAN) liquid waste evaporator (PM-2A). The PM-2A facility included the aboveground evaporator system, two underground holding tanks and feedlines, an electrical distribution subsystem, and one above ground concrete tank. Much surface soil of the PM-2A area was also radioactively contaminated. Stabilization of the liquid and sludge in the holding tanks, a major task, was achieved by pumping most of the liquid into 55-gal drums and mixing it with cement. The drums were buried in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The remaining liquid and sludge were dried in place by layers of diatomaceous earth. The most contaminated surface soil was removed, and the area backfilled with clean topsoil and graded, reducing the surface radiation field to background. A 6-ft-high chain link fence now surrounds the area. Most of the area was seeded to crested wheatgrass. 46 figures, 9 tables

  10. Decontamination sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Emiko; Kanesaki, Ken.

    1995-01-01

    The decontamination sheet of the present invention is formed by applying an adhesive on one surface of a polymer sheet and releasably appending a plurality of curing sheets. In addition, perforated lines are formed on the sheet, and a decontaminating agent is incorporated in the adhesive. This can reduce the number of curing operation steps when a plurality steps of operations for radiation decontamination equipments are performed, and further, the amount of wastes of the cured sheets, and operator's exposure are reduced, as well as an efficiency of the curing operation can be improved, and propagation of contamination can be prevented. (T.M.)

  11. Decontamination factor Improvement and Waste Reduction of Full-scaled Evaporation System for Liquid Radioactive Waste Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Tae; Ju, Young Jong; Seol, Jeung Gun; Cho, Nam Chan [KNF, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Dong Hwan; Kim, Yun Kwan [Jeontech Co., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Liquid radioactive waste is produced from nuclear power plants, nuclear research centers, radiopharmaceuticals and nuclear fuel fabrication plants, etc. Ion-exchange, chemical precipitation, evaporation, filtration, liquid/solid extraction and centrifugal are applied to treat the liquid waste. Chemical precipitation requires low capital and operation cost. However, it produces large amount of secondary waste and has low DF (decontamination factor). Evaporation process removes variety of radionuclides in high DF. But, it also has problems in scaling and foaming [3, 4]. In this study, it is investigated that the effect of switching lime precipitation and centrifugal processes to evaporation system for improvement of removal efficiency and decrease of waste in full-scaled radioactive wastewater treatment plant. By swapping full-scaled wastewater treatment system from the centrifugal and the lime precipitation to the evaporator and the crystallizer in the nuclear fuel fabrication plant, it was possible to increase removal efficiency and to minimize waste productivity. Radioactivity concentration of effluent is decreased from 0.01 Bq/mL to ND level. Besides, waste production was reduced from 15 drums/yr to 2 drums/yr (87%).

  12. Technical report on natural evaporation system for radioactive liquid waste treatment arising from TRIGA research reactors' decontamination and decommissioning activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, J. S.; Jung, K. J.; Baek, S. T.; Jung, U. S.; Park, S. K.; Jung, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    This technical report described that radioactive liquid waste treatment for dismantling/decontamination of TRIGA Mark research reactor in Seoul. That is, we try safety treatment of operation radioactive liquid waste during of operating TRIGA Mark research reactor and dismantling radioactive liquid waste during R and D of research reactor hereafter, and by utilizing of new natural evaporation facility with describing design criteria of new natural evaporation facility. Therefore, this technical report described the quantity of present radioactive liquid waste and dismantling radioactive liquid waste hereafter, analysis the status of radial-rays/radioactivity, and also treatment method of this radioactive liquid waste. Also, we derived the method that the safeguard of outskirts environment and the cost down of radioactive liquid waste treatment by minimize of the radioactive liquid waste quantities, through-out design/operation of new natural evaporation facility for treatment of operation radioactive liquid waste and dismantling radioactive liquid waste. (author). 6 refs., 12 tabs., 5 figs

  13. Treatment plan for aqueous/organic/decontamination wastes under the Oak Ridge Reservation FFCA Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backus, P.M.; Benson, C.E.; Gilbert, V.P.

    1994-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-Region IV have entered into a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) which seeks to facilitate the treatment of low-level mixed wastes currently stored at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in violation of the Resource, Conservation and Recovery Act Land Disposal Restrictions. The FFCA establishes schedules for DOE to identify treatment for wastes, referred to as Appendix B wastes, that current have no identified or existing capacity for treatment. A development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DDT ampersand E) program was established to provide the support necessary to identify treatment methods for mixed was meeting the Appendix B criteria. The Program has assembled project teams to address treatment development needs for major categories of the Appendix B wastes based on the waste characteristics and possible treatment technologies. The Aqueous, Organic, and Decontamination (A OE D) project team was established to identify pretreatment options for aqueous and organic wastes which will render the waste acceptable for treatment in existing waste treatment facilities and to identify the processes to decontaminate heterogeneous debris waste. In addition, the project must also address the treatment of secondary waste generated by other DDT ampersand E projects. This report details the activities to be performed under the A OE D Project in support of the identification, selection, and evaluation of treatment processes. The goals of this plan are (1) to determine the major aqueous and organic waste streams requiring treatment, (2) to determine the treatment steps necessary to make the aqueous and organic waste acceptable for treatment in existing treatment facilities on the ORR or off-site, and (3) to determine the processes necessary to decontaminate heterogeneous wastes that are considered debris

  14. Study and modelling of an innovative coprecipitation reactor for radioactive liquid wastes decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flouret, Julie

    2013-01-01

    In order to decontaminate radioactive liquid wastes of low and intermediate levels, the coprecipitation is the process industrially used. The aim of this PhD work is to optimize the continuous process of coprecipitation. To do so, an innovative reactor is designed and modelled: the continuous reactor/classifier. Two model systems are studied: the coprecipitation of strontium by barium sulphate and the sorption of cesium by PPFeNi. The simulated effluent contains sodium nitrate in order to consider the high ionic strength of radioactive liquid wastes. First, each model system is studied on its own, and then a simultaneous treatment is performed. The kinetic laws of nucleation and crystal growth of barium sulphate are determined and incorporated into the coprecipitation model. Kinetic studies and sorption isotherms of cesium by PPFeNi are also performed in order to acquire the necessary data for process modelling. The modelling realised enables accurate prediction of the residual strontium and cesium concentrations according to the process used: it is a valuable tool for the optimization of existing units, but also the design of future units. The continuous reactor/classifier presents many advantages compared to the classical continuous process: the decontamination efficiency of strontium and cesium is highly improved while the volume of sludge generated by the process is reduced. A better liquid/solid separation is observed in the reactor/classifier and the global installation is significantly more compact. Thus, the radioactive liquid wastes treatment processes can be intensified by the continuous reactor/classifier, which represents a very promising technology for future industrial application. (author) [fr

  15. Krypton purification (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larher, Y.

    1961-01-01

    The amount of xenon in otherwise very pure krypton can be reduced from 1.5 to 0.0025 per cent approximately by passage through an activated carbon column at dry-ice temperature. The circulation of the krypton is effected by condensing at -196 deg. C and then evaporating. (author) [fr

  16. Process and device for the adsorptive separation of krypton from a krypton/nitrogen gas mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringel, H.; Messler, M.

    1985-01-01

    The gas mixture flows through an adsorption column, which is filled with a means of adsorbing Krypton and nitrogen. The adsorption column is desorbed after adsorption of the gas components by a gaseous flushing material, which flows through the adsorption column in the same direction as the gas mixture. In order to achieve a high degree of separation, the adsorption material is loaded with nitrogen and Krypton from the gas inlet, where Krypton is only absorbed over part of the length of the whole column by the adsorption material. The part of the length is such that on desorption of the adsorption column with the flushing material at first only nitrogen and later only Krypton is obtained at the outlet of the adsorption column. (Waste gas system of a reprocession plant). (orig./HP) [de

  17. Y-12 Plant decontamination and decommissioning technology logic diagram for Building 9201-4. Volume 3: Technology evaluation data sheets; Part B: Decontamination, robotics/automation, waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4 (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) problems at Bldg. 9201-4 to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD uses information from the Strategic Roadmap for the Oak Ridge Reservation, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram, and a previous Hanford logic diagram. This TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to D and D and waste management (WM) activities. It is essential that follow-on engineering studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in the TLD and by finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk. This report consists of the decontamination, robotics/automation, and WM data sheets

  18. Decontamination and decommissioning assessment for the Waste Incineration Facility (Building 232-Z) Hanford Site, [Hanford], WA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, L.N.

    1994-02-01

    Building 232-Z is an element of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. From 1961 until 1972, plutonium-bearing combustible materials were incinerated in the building. Between 1972 and 1983, following shutdown of the incinerator, the facility was used for waste segregation activities. The facility was placed in retired inactive status in 1984 and classified as a Limited Control Facility pursuant to DOE Order 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear Facilities, and 6430.1A, General Design Criteria. The current plutonium inventory within the building is estimated to be approximately 848 grams, the majority of which is retained within the process hood ventilation system. As a contaminated retired facility, Building 232-Z is included in the DOE Surplus Facility Management Program. The objective of this Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) assessment is to remove Building 232-Z, thereby elmininating the radiological and environmental hazards associated with the plutonium inventory within the structure. The steps to accomplish the plan objectives are: (1) identifying the locations of the most significant amounts of plutonium, (2) removing residual plutonium, (3) removing and decontaminating remaining building equipment, (4) dismantling the remaining structure, and (5) closing out the project

  19. Decontamination and decommissioning assessment for the Waste Incineration Facility (Building 232-Z) Hanford Site, [Hanford], WA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, L.N. [Advanced Sciences, Inc., (United States)

    1994-02-01

    Building 232-Z is an element of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. From 1961 until 1972, plutonium-bearing combustible materials were incinerated in the building. Between 1972 and 1983, following shutdown of the incinerator, the facility was used for waste segregation activities. The facility was placed in retired inactive status in 1984 and classified as a Limited Control Facility pursuant to DOE Order 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear Facilities, and 6430.1A, General Design Criteria. The current plutonium inventory within the building is estimated to be approximately 848 grams, the majority of which is retained within the process hood ventilation system. As a contaminated retired facility, Building 232-Z is included in the DOE Surplus Facility Management Program. The objective of this Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) assessment is to remove Building 232-Z, thereby elmininating the radiological and environmental hazards associated with the plutonium inventory within the structure. The steps to accomplish the plan objectives are: (1) identifying the locations of the most significant amounts of plutonium, (2) removing residual plutonium, (3) removing and decontaminating remaining building equipment, (4) dismantling the remaining structure, and (5) closing out the project.

  20. Decontamination of stainless steel canisters that contain high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    At the West Valley Nuclear Services Company (WVNSC) in West Valley, New York, high-level radioactive waste (HLW) will be vitrified into a borosilicate glass form and poured into large, stainless steel canisters. During the filling process, volatile fission products, principally 137 Cs, condense on the exterior of the canisters. The smearable contamination that remains on the canisters after they are filled and partially cooled must be removed from the canisters' exterior surfaces prior to their storage and ultimate shipment to a US Department of Energy (DOE) repository for disposal. A simple and effective method was developed for decontamination of HLW canisters. This method of chemical decontamination is applicable to a wide variety of contaminated equipment found in the nuclear industry. The process employs a reduction-oxidation system [Ce(III)/Ce(IV)] in nitric acid solution to chemically mill the surface of stainless steel, similar to the electropolishing process, but without the need for an applied electrical current. Contaminated canisters are simply immersed in the solution at controlled temperature and Ce(IV) concentration levels

  1. Technical Safety Requirements for the B695 Segment of the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, H L

    2007-01-01

    This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) Division's B695 Segment of the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the B695 Segment of the DWTF. The TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the B695 Segment of the DWTF (LLNL 2004). The analysis presented there determined that the B695 Segment of the DWTF is a low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 3, nonreactor nuclear facility. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits as well as controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard analyses. Furthermore, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls section of the TSRs. The B695 Segment of the DWTF (B695 and the west portion of B696) is a waste treatment and storage facility located in the northeast quadrant of the LLNL main site. The approximate area and boundary of the B695 Segment of the DWTF are shown in the B695 Segment of the DWTF DSA. Activities typically conducted in the B695 Segment of the DWTF include container storage, lab-packing, repacking, overpacking, bulking, sampling, waste transfer, and waste treatment. B695 is used to store and treat radioactive, mixed, and hazardous waste, and it also contains equipment used in conjunction with waste processing operations to treat various liquid and solid wastes. The portion of the building called Building 696 Solid Waste Processing Area (SWPA), also referred to as B696S in this report, is used primarily to manage solid radioactive waste. Operations specific to the SWPA include sorting and segregating low-level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste, lab-packing, sampling, and crushing empty drums that previously contained LLW. A permit modification for B696S was submitted to DTSC in January 2004 to store and treat hazardous and mixed

  2. Technical Safety Requirements for the B695 Segment of the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, H L

    2007-09-07

    This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) Division's B695 Segment of the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the B695 Segment of the DWTF. The TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the B695 Segment of the DWTF (LLNL 2004). The analysis presented there determined that the B695 Segment of the DWTF is a low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 3, nonreactor nuclear facility. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits as well as controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard analyses. Furthermore, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls section of the TSRs. The B695 Segment of the DWTF (B695 and the west portion of B696) is a waste treatment and storage facility located in the northeast quadrant of the LLNL main site. The approximate area and boundary of the B695 Segment of the DWTF are shown in the B695 Segment of the DWTF DSA. Activities typically conducted in the B695 Segment of the DWTF include container storage, lab-packing, repacking, overpacking, bulking, sampling, waste transfer, and waste treatment. B695 is used to store and treat radioactive, mixed, and hazardous waste, and it also contains equipment used in conjunction with waste processing operations to treat various liquid and solid wastes. The portion of the building called Building 696 Solid Waste Processing Area (SWPA), also referred to as B696S in this report, is used primarily to manage solid radioactive waste. Operations specific to the SWPA include sorting and segregating low-level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste, lab-packing, sampling, and crushing empty drums that previously contained LLW. A permit modification for B696S was submitted to DTSC in January 2004 to store and treat hazardous and

  3. Laboratory Scoping Tests Of Decontamination Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, Charles A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Crawford, Charles L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, William R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-01-21

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also

  4. Decontamination and decommissioning waste characterization and cost estimates from historical records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hootman, H.E.

    1994-01-01

    There are more than 600 facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) that are contaminated with either radioactivity, hazardous chemicals, or asbestos. The more significant facilities can be separated into broad categories for decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) planning such as plutonium facilities, waste tanks, chemical separations canyons, and nuclear reactors. Uncertainties exist in the timing, extent of stabilization, and D ampersand D required for these production facilities. Detailed analyses of the risk, costs, and engineering feasibility are needed to define production facility end states to ensure expected reduction in health and environmental risk. In the meantime, scoping projections are required to satisfy Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for 30 year plans, and to indicate where detailed analysis should be funded

  5. Decontamination possibilities of high-toxic wastes by means of dense plasma generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutberg, P.G.; Kolikov, V.A.; Bogomaz, A.A.; Budin, A.V.

    1997-01-01

    In present time the idea of plasma generators application for the high-toxic agents and wastes decontamination has become very urgent. It is known that chemical bonds energy of some molecules being part of these substances is so high that it is impossible to destroy them using traditional methods. Taking into account the fact that the temperature of plasma generator's arc column may be of tens eV, and its energy of hundreds kJ, one may state that any known chemical substances taken in quite large amount, may be dissociated to the atoms. In this paper simplified construction of plasma generator and technological scheme of plasmachemical installation are presented. (author)

  6. Treatment of Simulated Soil Decontamination Waste Solution by Ferrocyanide-Anion Exchange Resin Beads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Hui Jun; Kim, Min Gil; Kim, Gye Nam; Jung, Chung Hun; Park, Jin Ho; Oh, Won Zin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    Preparation of ferrocyanide-anion exchange resin and adsorption test of the prepared resin on the Cs{sup -} ion were performed. Adsorption capability of the prepared resin on the Cs{sup -} ion in the simulated citric acid based soil decontamination waste solution was 4 times greater than that of the commercial cation exchange resin. Adsorption equilibrium of the prepared resin on the Cs{sup -} ion reached within 360 minutes. Adsorption capability on the Cs{sup -} ion became to decrease above the necessary Co{sup 2-} ion concentration in the experimental range. Recycling test of the spent ion exchange resin by the successive application of hydrogen peroxide and hydrazine was also performed. It was found that desorption of Cs{sup -} ion from the resin occurred to satisfy the electroneutrality condition without any degradation of the resin.

  7. Characterization of decontamination factors for evaporators used in the treatment of low and intermediate level liquid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rood, L.B.; Law, C.G. Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Evaporator decontamination factors were studied as functions of boiloff rate, volume reduction, and feed pH. A bench-scale vertical tube evaporator operating on simulated intermediate level nuclear wastes was used. Decontamination factors were not found to be strong functions of volume reduction or boiloff below vapor velocities of 25 lb/ft 2 -hr. At higher vapor fluxes, splashing was encountered. Foaming occurred at a feed pH of 6 but not at higher values. The presence of radioisotopes in the feed had no effect on evaporator performance

  8. Retrofit design of remotely removable decontamination spray nozzles for the new waste calcining facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    High level radioactive liquid waste is converted to a solid form at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The conversion is done by a fluidized bed combustion process in the calciner vessel. The interior decontamination system for the calciner vessel uses a common header bolted to four decontamination nozzles around the upper head. The retrofit was required to eliminate hands-on maintenance and difficulty in nozzle removal because of nozzle plugging. The retrofit design for this project demonstrates the solution of problems associated with thermal phenomena, structural supports, seismic requirements, remote handling and installations into extremely restricted spaces

  9. Krypton oxides under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski-Ejgierd, Patryk; Lata, Pawel M

    2016-02-02

    Under high pressure, krypton, one of the most inert elements is predicted to become sufficiently reactive to form a new class of krypton compounds; krypton oxides. Using modern ab-initio evolutionary algorithms in combination with Density Functional Theory, we predict the existence of several thermodynamically stable Kr/O species at elevated pressures. In particular, our calculations indicate that at approx. 300 GPa the monoxide, KrO, should form spontaneously and remain thermo- and dynamically stable with respect to constituent elements and higher oxides. The monoxide is predicted to form non-molecular crystals with short Kr-O contacts, typical for genuine chemical bonds.

  10. A study on source term assessment and waste disposal requirement of decontamination and decommissioning for the TRIGA research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whang, Joo Ho; Lee, Kyung JIn; Lee, Jae Min; Choi, Gyu Seup; Shin, Byoung Sun [Kyunghee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-15

    The objective and necessity of the project : TRIGA is the first nuclear facility that decide to decommission and decontamination in our nation. As we estimate the expected life of nuclear power generation at 30 or 40 years, the decommissioning business should be conducted around 2010, and the development of regulatory technique supporting it should be developed previously. From a view of decommissioning and decontamination, the research reactor is just small in scale but it include all decommissioning and decontamination conditions. So, the rules by regulatory authority with decommissioning will be a guide for nuclear power plant in the future. The basis of regulatory technique required when decommissioning the research reactor are the radiological safety security and the data for it. The source term is very important condition not only for security of worker but for evaluating how we dispose the waste is appropriate for conducting the middle store and the procedure after it when the final disposal is considered. The content and the scope in this report contain the procedure of conducting the assessment of the source term which is most important in understanding the general concept of the decommissioning procedure of the decommissioning and decontamination of TRIGA research reactor. That is, the sampling and measuring method is presented as how to measure the volume of the radioactivity of the nuclear facilities. And also, the criterion of classifying the waste occurred in other countries and the site release criteria which is the final step of decommissioning and decontamination presented through MARSSIM. Finally, the program to be applicable through comparing the methods of our nation and other countries ones is presented as plan for disposal of the waste in the decommissioning.

  11. Preparation of SiO2-KCoFC composite ion-exchanger for removal of Cs in the soil decontamination waste solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Joon; Moon, Jei kwon; Lee, Kune Woo

    2009-01-01

    The soil decontamination process has been developed for remediate the soil wastes excavated from the TRIGA research reactor sites. Even though the process was proven to be very effective for decontaminate the radioactive nuclides such as cesium and cobalt, the secondary spent solution should be treated with an appropriate method to minimize the waste volume. There are mainly two components in the spent decontamination solution of Cs and Co. The Co in the waste solution can be removed easily by precipitation under a basic condition. However, since the Cs is hardly removed by precipitation, an appropriate selective removal method should be employed. In this study, an inorganic composite ion exchanger of SiO 2 -KCoFC was prepared by sol-gel method for a removal of Cs in the decontamination waste solution. An optimum condition for a preparation of the composite ion exchanger and the adsorption performances of the prepared composite ion exchangers were evaluated

  12. Characterization of decontamination and decommissioning wastes expected from the major processing facilities in the 200 Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amato, L.C.; Franklin, J.D.; Hyre, R.A.; Lowy, R.M.; Millar, J.S.; Pottmeyer, J.A.; Duncan, D.R.

    1994-08-01

    This study was intended to characterize and estimate the amounts of equipment and other materials that are candidates for removal and subsequent processing in a solid waste facility when the major processing and handling facilities in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site are decontaminated and decommissioned. The facilities in this study were selected based on processing history and on the magnitude of the estimated decommissioning cost cited in the Surplus Facilities Program Plan; Fiscal Year 1993 (Winship and Hughes 1992). The facilities chosen for this study include B Plant (221-B), T Plant (221-T), U Plant (221-U), the Uranium Trioxide (UO 3 ) Plant (224-U and 224-UA), the Reduction Oxidation (REDOX) or S Plant (202-S), the Plutonium Concentration Facility for B Plant (224-B), and the Concentration Facility for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and REDOX (233-S). This information is required to support planning activities for current and future solid waste treatment, storage, and disposal operations and facilities

  13. Characterization of decontamination and decommissioning wastes expected from the major processing facilities in the 200 Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amato, L.C.; Franklin, J.D.; Hyre, R.A.; Lowy, R.M.; Millar, J.S.; Pottmeyer, J.A. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States); Duncan, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    This study was intended to characterize and estimate the amounts of equipment and other materials that are candidates for removal and subsequent processing in a solid waste facility when the major processing and handling facilities in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site are decontaminated and decommissioned. The facilities in this study were selected based on processing history and on the magnitude of the estimated decommissioning cost cited in the Surplus Facilities Program Plan; Fiscal Year 1993 (Winship and Hughes 1992). The facilities chosen for this study include B Plant (221-B), T Plant (221-T), U Plant (221-U), the Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant (224-U and 224-UA), the Reduction Oxidation (REDOX) or S Plant (202-S), the Plutonium Concentration Facility for B Plant (224-B), and the Concentration Facility for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and REDOX (233-S). This information is required to support planning activities for current and future solid waste treatment, storage, and disposal operations and facilities.

  14. Waste Volume Reduction Using Surface Characterization and Decontamination By Laser Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellin, Michael J.; Savina, Michael R.; Reed, Claude B.; Zhiyue, Xu; Yong, Wang

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's nuclear complex, a nation-wide system of facilities for research and production of nuclear materials and weapons, contains large amounts of radioactively contaminated concrete[1]. This material must be disposed of prior to the decommissioning of the various sites. Often the radioactive contaminants in concrete occupy only the surface and near-surface (∼3-6 mm deep) regions of the material. Since many of the structures such as walls and floors are 30 cm or more thick, it makes environmental and economic sense to try to remove and store only the thin contaminated layer rather than to treat the entire structure as waste. Current mechanical removal methods, known as scabbling, are slow and labor intensive, suffer from dust control problems, and expose workers to radiation fields. Improved removal methods are thus in demand[2-5]. Prior to decontamination, the surface must be characterized to determine the types and amounts of contaminants present i n order to decide on an appropriate cleaning strategy. Contamination occurs via exposure to air and water-borne radionuclides and by neutron activation. The radionuclides of greatest concern are (in order of abundance) [1]: 137Cs and 134Cs, 238U, 60Co, and 90Sr, followed by 3H, radioactive iodine, and a variety of Eu isotopes and transuranics. A system capable of on- line analysis is valuable since operators can determine the type of contaminants in real time and make more efficient use of costly sampling and characterization techniques. Likewise, the removed waste itself must be analyzed to insure that proper storage and monitoring techniques are used. The chemical speciation of radionuclides in concrete is largely unknown. Concrete is a complex material comprising many distinct chemical and physical phases on a variety of size scales[6-8]. Most studies of radionuclides in cements and concrete are for the most part restricted to phenomenological treatments of diffusion of ion s, particularly

  15. Chemical decontamination method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiwaki, Hitoshi.

    1996-01-01

    Metal wastes contaminated by radioactive materials are contained in a rotational decontamination vessel, and the metal wastes are rotated therein while being in contact with a slight amount of a decontamination liquid comprising a mineral acid. As the mineral acid, a mixed acid of nitric acid, hydrochloric acid and fluoric acid is preferably used. Alternatively, chemical decontamination can also be conducted by charging an acid resistant stirring medium in the rotational decontamination vessel. The surface of the metal wastes is uniformly covered by the slight amount of decontamination liquid to dissolve the surface layer. In addition, heat of dissolution generated in this case is accumulated in the inside of the rotational decontamination vessel, the temperature is elevated with no particular heating, thereby enabling to obtain an excellent decontamination effect substantially at the same level as in the case of heating the liquid to 70degC in a conventional immersion decontamination method. Further, although contact areas between the metal wastes and the immersion vessel are difficult to be decontaminated in the immersion decontamination method, all of areas can be dissolved uniformly in the present invention. (T.M.)

  16. LABORATORY OPTIMIZATION TESTS OF TECHNETIUM DECONTAMINATION OF HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT LOW ACTIVITY WASTE OFF-GAS CONDENSATE SIMULANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Nash, C.; McCabe, D.

    2014-09-29

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also

  17. Treatment of liquid wastes from decontamination of nuclear power plants by heterogeneous photocatalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgada, Maria Eugenia

    2002-01-01

    In nuclear power plants high radiation fields are produced, not only in the core but also in the auxiliary systems, due, mainly, to the activation of corrosion products by means of a mechanism known as 'Activity Transport'.With the purpose of reducing at minimum values the intensity of radiation fields and of avoiding the operative problems generated by the deposition of oxides in tanks and pipelines, it is necessary to remove the oxide films, carriers of activity, from the components in auxiliary systems in nuclear power plants and this is usually carried on by chemical cleaning.This process, known as decontamination, is done employing mixtures of oligocarboxilic acids such as NTA, EDTA, oxalic acid, citric acid, etc., at concentration nearly 1% and pH 3-4.The resulting liquid wastes of this process cannot be discharged directly to the environment but must be properly treated.Conventional treatments such as thermolysis, chemical oxidation and others show some problems and, in addition, some of these substances are resistant to degradation.Previous work done in the Unidad de Actividad Quimica del Centro Atomico Constituyentes (UAQ-CAC) indicated that Heterogeneous Photocatalysis, belonging to the Advanced Oxidation Technologies (AOTs), could be a useful procedure for the treatment of liquid decontamination wastes. This method consists on the irradiation of an aqueous suspension of a semiconductor, generally TiO 2 , containing the substrate to be degraded, employing wavelengths shorter than the semiconductor's 'band-gap'.In this way, oxidant and reducing molecules are generated.The advantages compared to other AOTs are its low cost, the ability to work at room temperature and pressure, it uses only oxygen as oxidizing agent and can be operated in 'batch' and continuum.In the present work we employed a recycling system, with a black-light tubular UV lamp (366nm) installed inside as the source of illumination, to study the degradation of oxalic and citric acid by

  18. Decontamination of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine waste water by hydrodynamic cavitation-induced advanced Fenton process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi Angaji, Mahmood; Ghiaee, Reza

    2015-03-01

    A pilot scale hydrodynamic cavitation (HC) reactor, using iron metal blades, as the heterogeneous catalyst, with no external source of H₂O₂ was developed for catalytic decontamination of unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) waste water. In situ generation of Fenton reagents suggested an induced advanced Fenton process (IAFP) to explain the enhancing effect of the used catalyst in the HC process. The effects of the applied catalyst, pH of the initial solution (1.0-9.7), initial UDMH concentration (2-15 mg/l), inlet pressure (5.5-7.8bar), and downstream pressure (2-6 bar), have been investigated. The results showed that the highest cavitation yield can be obtained at pH 3 and initial UDMH concentration of 10mg/l. Also, an increase in the inlet pressure would lead to an increase in the extent of UDMH degradation. In addition, the optimum value of 3 bar was determined for the downstream pressure that resulted to 98.6% degradation of UDMH after 120 min of processing time. Neither n-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) nor any other toxic byproduct (/end-product) was observed in the investigated samples. Formic acid and acetic acid, as well as nitromethane, were identified as oxidation by-products. The present work has conclusively established that hydrodynamic cavitation in combination with Fenton's chemistry can be effectively used for the degradation of UDMH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Decontamination of radioactive process waste water by foam separation. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakir, K.; Aziz, M.; Beheir, Sh.G.; Benyamin, K.; Samy, S.; Salama, H.N.

    1996-01-01

    On the basis of new studies and previous work from this laboratory, several foam separation techniques are considered feasible methods to carry out the separation of radioactive nuclides from simulated radioactive process waste water. Anionic or cationic collectors were used depending on the type of charge on the ion or precipitate to be removed. Sodium lauryl sulphate, aerosol-18 potassium oleate, acetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide, dodecyl pyridinium chloride and gelation were examined as the collector. Aluminium hydroxide, iron (III) oxyhydroxide and hydrous manganese dioxide were studied as the adsorbing floc adsorbing colloid flotation and copper ferrocyanide as the co precipitating agent in co precipitate flotation. The effects of varying the collector, the adsorbing colloid floc, co precipitant and metal ion concentrations, the PH, the gas flow rate, the ionic strength, length of the flotation column and multistage separation on the percentage removal, volume reduction and enrichment ratio were investigated. According to experimental results, adsorbing colloid flotation, whenever applicable, is the preferred method for decontamination. Radionuclide removal up to 100% were obtained. 4 figs., 13 tabs

  20. Decontamination of radioactive process waste water by foam separation. Vol. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakir, K; Aziz, M; Beheir, Sh G; Benyamin, K; Samy, S; Salama, H N [Nuclear Chemistry, and Radiation Protection Departments, Hot Laboratories and Nuclear Research Centers, atomic Energy Authority, P.O. Box 13759, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    On the basis of new studies and previous work from this laboratory, several foam separation techniques are considered feasible methods to carry out the separation of radioactive nuclides from simulated radioactive process waste water. Anionic or cationic collectors were used depending on the type of charge on the ion or precipitate to be removed. Sodium lauryl sulphate, aerosol-18 potassium oleate, acetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide, dodecyl pyridinium chloride and gelation were examined as the collector. Aluminium hydroxide, iron (III) oxyhydroxide and hydrous manganese dioxide were studied as the adsorbing floc adsorbing colloid flotation and copper ferrocyanide as the co precipitating agent in co precipitate flotation. The effects of varying the collector, the adsorbing colloid floc, co precipitant and metal ion concentrations, the PH, the gas flow rate, the ionic strength, length of the flotation column and multistage separation on the percentage removal, volume reduction and enrichment ratio were investigated. According to experimental results, adsorbing colloid flotation, whenever applicable, is the preferred method for decontamination. Radionuclide removal up to 100% were obtained. 4 figs., 13 tabs.

  1. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1993, Part II, Decontamination and actions, collection of liquid effluents and solid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandic, M.; Vukovic, Z.; Lazic, S.; Plecas, I.; Voko, A.

    1993-01-01

    Certain amount of solid waste results from RA reactor operation, the mean quantity of which depends on the duration of reactor operation and related activities. During repair, when reactor is not operated as well under accidental conditions, the quantity of waste is higher, dependent on the type of repair and comprehensiveness of decontamination of the working surface, contaminated tools and components. The waste is sorted and packed on the spot where they appeared according to the existing regulations and principles of radiation protection with aim to minimize unnecessary exposure of the radiation protection personnel who deals with control, transport, radioactive waste treatment and decontamination. During exceptional operations (decontamination, repair, bigger volume of contaminated material, etc.) professional staff of the Radiation protection department gives recommendations and helps in planning the actions related to repair, sorting and packaging of radioactive waste in special containers, identification of the contaminants, etc. [sr

  2. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1998, Part 2, Annex 2, Decontamination and actions, collection of liquid effluents and solid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandic, M.; Vukovic, Z.; Bacic, S.; Plecas, I.

    1998-01-01

    Certain amount of solid waste results from RA reactor operation, the mean quantity of which depends on the duration of reactor operation and related activities. During repair, when reactor is not operated as well under accidental conditions, the quantity of waste is higher, dependent on the type of repair and comprehensiveness of decontamination of the working surface, contaminated tools and components. The waste is sorted and packed on the spot where they appeared according to the existing regulations and principles of radiation protection with aim to minimize unnecessary exposure of the radiation protection personnel who deals with control, transport, radioactive waste treatment and decontamination. During exceptional operations (decontamination, repair, bigger volume of contaminated material, etc.) professional staff of the Radiation protection department gives recommendations and helps in planning the actions related to repair, sorting and packaging of radioactive waste in special containers, identification of the contaminants, etc. [sr

  3. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1995, Part -2, Annex 2, Decontamination and actions, collection of liquid effluents and solid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandic, M.; Vukovic, Z.; Lazic, S.; Plecas, I.; Voko, A.

    1995-01-01

    Certain amount of solid waste results from RA reactor operation, the mean quantity of which depends on the duration of reactor operation and related activities. During repair, when reactor is not operated as well under accidental conditions, the quantity of waste is higher, dependent on the type of repair and comprehensiveness of decontamination of the working surface, contaminated tools and components. The waste is sorted and packed on the spot where they appeared according to the existing regulations and principles of radiation protection with aim to minimize unnecessary exposure of the radiation protection personnel who deals with control, transport, radioactive waste treatment and decontamination. During exceptional operations (decontamination, repair, bigger volume of contaminated material, etc.) professional staff of the Radiation protection department gives recommendations and helps in planning the actions related to repair, sorting and packaging of radioactive waste in special containers, identification of the contaminants, etc. [sr

  4. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1989, Part -2, Decontamination, collection of treatment of fluid and solid radioactive waste, Annex 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandic, M.; Vukovic, Z.; Plecas, I.; Knezevic, Lj.; Lazic, S.; Bacic, S.

    1989-01-01

    Certain amount of solid waste results from RA reactor operation, the mean quantity of which depends on the duration of reactor operation and related activities. During repair, when reactor is not operated as well under accidental conditions, the quantity of waste is higher, dependent on the type of repair and comprehensiveness of decontamination of the working surface, contaminated tools and components. The waste is sorted and packed on the spot where they appeared according to the existing regulations and principles of radiation protection with aim to minimize unnecessary exposure of the radiation protection personnel who deals with control, transport, radioactive waste treatment and decontamination. During exceptional operations (decontamination, repair, bigger volume of contaminated material, etc.) professional staff of the Radiation protection department gives recommendations and helps in planning the actions related to repair, sorting and packaging of radioactive waste in special containers, identification of the contaminants, etc. [sr

  5. Solid state storage of radioactive krypton in a silica matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tingey, G.L.; Lytle, J.M.; Gray, W.J.; Wheeler, K.R.

    1980-12-01

    The feasibility of loading a low density SiO 2 glass with krypton for storage of radioactive 85 Kr has been demonstrated by studies using non-radioactive krypton. A 96% SiO 2 glass with 28% porosity was heated at an elevated pressure of Kr gas to a temperature of 850 to 900 0 C and held at that temperature to sinter the glass-krypton composite to a density of about 2 g/cm 3 . A krypton content of 30 cm 3 of Kr(STP)/cm 3 of glass has been demonstrated when loading pressures of 140 MPa are used. Krypton release rates from the glass are lower than reported for any other waste form considered currently. At 420 0 C a diffusion parameter, D/r 0 2 , of 8.66 x 10 -13 min -1 was determined which leads to a total release of 0.7% of the krypton in 10 years. Release rates increase moderately with increasing temperature up to 600 0 C and increase rapidly above 600 0 C. The lower loading pressures (about 40 MPa) may appear to yield a more favorable product from the point of view of krypton release than the high pressures. Advantages and disadvantages of the technique are given in the conclusions section

  6. Solubility of krypton in hydrofracture grout at elevated pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, C.L.; Mailen, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    The solubilities of krypton in water, simulated waste solution, and simulated grout at about 25 0 C and to pressures of 150 atm have been determined. The results of these studies show that preliminary calculations of krypton solubility based on the aqueous component of the hydrofracture grout were overly pessimistic. The volume of noble gas generated annually by the reference reprocessing plant would be soluble in the annual hydrofracture grout injection at ORNL at about 10 atm. The amount of krypton in the gas phase would depend on the amount of air in the hydrofracture grout mixture. At 34 atm, and with a small air volume relative to the injected krypton, the krypton would constitute about 30% of the gas bubbles. The disposal of krypton via injection with hydrofracture grout seems to be a viable process. The next logical steps would be to determine the krypton diffusion rate at injection conditions, and possibly to perform a test injection. At present, the schedule for future work is uncertain since funds for this project have been reduced significantly

  7. Decontamination and partial dismantling of the Eurochemic reprocessing plant. Lessons learnt with respect to health physics and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osipenco, A.; Detilleux, E.; Ferrari, P.

    1980-01-01

    After nine years in use, the installations of the Eurochemic reprocessing plant were washed down and decontaminated to enable access to be gained to all the cells and some items of equipment, the reuse of which is not envisaged, and dismantled. The procedures followed to ensure the radiation protection of the workers and the means and results of individual dosimetry are described. Some suggestions, mainly covering the lay-out of the cells and the items of equipment, are made in order to reduce still more the doses incurred. The production and control of the liquid and solid waste resulting from the decontamination and dismantling illustrate the advantage of using very high pressure water jets on the one hand and a careful covering of the walls and floors on the other [fr

  8. Behaviour of bituminized waste under gamma irradiation. Effect of STE3 decontamination process components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernat, Ph.

    1994-10-01

    Liquid wastes of light and medium activity are treated by chemical co-precipitation and sludge are mixed with bitumen. Irradiation is responsible of gas production and potential swelling of the embedded. It prevails on limitation of filling of storage containers and activity to 140 Ci. The aim of this work is the study of influence of the components of the decontamination process on the behaviour of bituminous wastes, in order to control swelling and to state radiolysis mechanisms, both for production and storage of wastes. For pure bitumen, mechanism of production of H 2 and CH 4 are specified. Oxygen consumption, localised on the surface of samples, leads to conversion of aromatic oils and resins to asphaltenes, by a chain reaction mechanism. CO 2 et CO are reaction products of gaseous oxygen, respectively with bitumen and light hydrocarbons. The composition of bitumen is slightly modified to heavier and higher polarity products, with parallel hardening. NaNO 3 , Na 2 SO 4 , BaSO 4 , PPFNi, K 2 SO 4 , NiSO 4 , et diatoms DIT3R et DIC3 have strictly a dilution effect towards gas generation. CoS, above 1% embedded, strongly inhibits production of H 2 , CH 4 and light hydrocarbons. Degradation of bitumen being reduced, a radical mechanism with both radicals H· et R· might exist. Kinetic shows that a bi-radicals mechanism (or more) is probable. In the same way, Raney's nickel induces a important decrease of production of H 2 , CH 4 et C 2 , with a capacity of 7,7 ml/g. Swelling depends on dimension of sample gas production and dose rate. Solid content and particle size are not determining parameters. Low swelling is obtained for penetrability higher than 70 1/10 mm, This can be realised by addition of a solvent as TBP and by increasing temperature above 40 deg C. Rheological characterizations (oscillation and creeping mode) have not been successful to correlate swelling with a physical parameter. (author)

  9. Possibilities of final disposal of radioactive krypton in the framework of the German radioactive waste management concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehling, A.; Langer, G.

    1986-01-01

    Kr-85 can be stored gaseous in gas cylinders or fixed in solid matter like metal-alloys (by ion implantation) or zeolithes. Kr-85 contained in gas cylinders can be stored in above-ground buildings for 100 years, with cooling provided by natural air-convection. Kr-85 fixed in solid matter can also be stored in an above-ground building or in deep geological formations. For an above-ground storage of fixed Kr-85 cooling can be established by natural air-convection, too. Compared with gas cylinders, cooling need not to be performed within a narrow temperature range, and Kr-85 leakage is practically precluded, so that surveillance and control of the storage building could be minimized. Another possibility is to store the canisters with fixed Kr-85 in the transportation casks, as it is done with spent-fuel-elements for interim storage. These casks provide sufficient protection against thermal and mechanical loads. For storage fixed Kr-85 products in a geological repository at present only the Gorleben site is available, because heat generating waste must not be stored in the Konrad mine. A combined storage with high-active waste canisters within the same boreholes should be possible, provided the Kr-85-fixed-product-canisters have the same dimensions and mechanical stability. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Radioactive decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    This Code of Practice covers: (a) the decontamination of plant items, buildings and associated equipment; (b) decontamination of protective clothing; (c) simple personal decontamination; and (d) the basic mechanisms of contamination and their influence on decontaminability. (author)

  11. DEMONSTRATION AND EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL HIGH LEVEL WASTE MELTER DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weger, Hans; Kodanda, Raja Tilek Meruva; Mazumdar, Anindra; Srivastava, Rajiv Ph.D.; Ebadian, M.A. Ph.D.

    2003-01-01

    Four hand-held tools were tested for failed high-level waste melter decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). The forces felt by the tools during operation were measured using a tri-axial accelerometer since they will be operated by a remote manipulator. The efficiency of the tools was also recorded. Melter D and D consists of three parts: (1) glass fracturing: removing from the furnace the melted glass that can not be poured out through normal means, (2) glass cleaning: removing the thin layer of glass that has formed over the surface of the refractory material, and (3) K-3 refractory breakup: removing the K-3 refractory material. Surrogate glass, from a formula provided by the Savannah River Site, was melted in a furnace and poured into steel containers. K-3 refractory material, the same material used in the Defense Waste Processing Facility, was utilized for the demonstrations. Four K-3 blocks were heated at 1150 C for two weeks with a glass layer on top to simulate the hardened glass layer on the refractory surface in the melter. Tools chosen for the demonstrations were commonly used D and D tools, which have not been tested specifically for the different aspects of melter D and D. A jackhammer and a needle gun were tested for glass fracturing; a needle gun and a rotary grinder with a diamond face wheel (diamond grinder) were tested for glass cleaning; and a jackhammer, diamond grinder, and a circular saw with a diamond blade were tested for refractory breakup. The needle gun was not capable of removing or fracturing the surrogate glass. The diamond grinder only had a removal rate of 3.0 x 10-4 kg/s for K-3 refractory breakup and needed to be held firmly against the material. However, the diamond grinder was effective for glass cleaning, with a removal rate of 3.9 cm2/s. The jackhammer was successful in fracturing glass and breaking up the K-3 refractory block. The jackhammer had a glass-fracturing rate of 0.40 kg/s. The jackhammer split the K-3 refractory

  12. Pilot scale study of a chemical treatment process for decontamination of aqueous radioactive waste of pakistan research reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, F.; Hussain, M.; Ahmad, S.S.; Aslam, M.; Haq, E.U.

    2007-12-01

    Chemical treatment process for the low level liquid radioactive waste generated at PINSTECH was previously optimized on lab-scale making use of coprecipitation of hydrous oxides of iron in basic medium. Ferrous sulfate was used as coagulant. Batch wise application of this procedure on pilot scale has been tested on a 1200 L batch volume of typical PINSTECH liquid waste. Different parameters and unit operations have been evaluated. The required data for the construction of a small size treatment plant envisioned can be used for demonstration/teaching purpose as well as for the decontamination of the waste effluents of the Institute. The lab-scale process parameters were verified valid on pilot scale. It was observed that reagent doses can further be economized with out any deterioration of the Decontamination Factors (DF) achieved or of any other aspect of the process. This simple, cost- effective, DF-efficient and time-smart batch wise process could be coupled with an assortment of other treatment operations thus affording universal application. Observations recorded during this study are presented. (author)

  13. Study on immobilization technology of krypton gas by ion-implantation and sputtering process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, S.; Kamiya, S.; Ikeda, S.; Nakanishi, Y.

    1997-01-01

    At the Waste Technology Development Division of PNC''s Tokai Works, we have been carrying out the development of the recovering and storing technology of radioactive krypton to reduce the radioactive gaseous effluent released to the environment arising from reprocessing of nuclear spent fuels. As a part of this technical development, the method of storing radioactive krypton is an encapsulation in a metal matrix which appears to offer the most secure immobilization of krypton. From the result of the ion-implantation test used non-radioactive krypton and the evaluation of electrical characteristics, we have selected the metallic materials, they are Nickel and Yttrium, and designed the vessel and the apparatus which continuously immobilized the krypton into metal matrix. This article described the following experiment result. (1) The long-term immobilization technology was established with respect to handling a equipment and plasma controlling. (2) Stability of the krypton immobilized alloy was considered satisfactory because the release was tolerably small. (author)

  14. Examples of processing problematic waste and material. A-3. Processing of lead by mechanical decontamination at UKAEA Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The UKAEA and its contractor (NNC) have decontaminated lead blocks arising from the decommissioning of a metallurgical site that comprised three concrete shielded remote handling cells and 36 lead shielded enclosures. The primary decommissioning and dismantling work entailed the dismantling of the 36 lead enclosures, which were expected to yield over 1000 t of lead shielding bricks as waste. During the initial dismantling of the lead shielded enclosures, all the lead bricks were monitored for radioactive contamination; clean items were segregated and set aside for detailed clearance and assurance checks. The contaminated blocks were sent for assessment and decontamination treatment, as necessary. The decontamination process utilized a purpose built partitioned containment tent, ventilated with a HEPA filtration system, so that the receipt, decontamination and radiological monitoring of individual items could be segregated in order to minimize any cross-contamination. The dismantled lead blocks comprised a range of standard thicknesses (2, 4, 9 and 10 in, or 3, 8, 13 and 15 cm) and incorporated a variety of chevron, concave and convex shapes, which are utilized to avoid weaknesses within the assembled shielding. The primary technical issues for the mechanical processing of the contaminated lead blocks were consideration of the individual lead brick shapes (i.e. the bricks were contoured) and the individual weight of the bricks, which had a range of 10-75 kg. The preferred option was a manual dry cutting technique using a handheld rotary industrial planer (the selected planer is normally associated with the joinery trade). The dry cutting option considered the malleability of the lead, which under certain circumstances during dry cutting could give rise to localized heating effects, leading to melted lead over the cutting surface, resulting in limited effectiveness in the removal of the contaminated layer. To mitigate this effect the planer was set to take cuts

  15. Decontaminating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Toshiharu; Shibuya, Kiichiro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a method of eliminating radioactive contaminations capable of ease treatment for decontaminated liquid wastes and grinding materials. Method: Those organic grinding materials such as fine wall nuts shell pieces cause no secondary contaminations since they are softer as compared with inorganic grinding materials, less pulverizable upon collision against the surface to be treated, being capable of reusing and producing no fine scattering powder. In addition, they can be treated by burning. The organic grinding material and water are sprayed by a nozzle to the surface to be treated, and decontaminated liquid wastes are separated into solid components mainly composed of organic grinding materials and liquid components mainly composed of water by filtering. The thus separated solid components are recovered in a storage tank for reuse as the grinding material and, after repeating use, subjected to burning treatment. While on the other hand, water is recovered into a storage tank and, after repeating use, purified by passing through an ion exchange resin-packed column and decontaminated to discharge. (Horiuchi, T.)

  16. Novel Problems Associated with Accounting and Control of Nuclear Material from Decontamination and Decommissioning and in Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, Steven C.

    2007-01-01

    The reduction in nuclear arms and the production facilities that supported the weapons programs have produced some unique problems for nuclear material control and accountability (MC and A). Many of these problems are not limited to the weapons complex, but have the potential to appear in many legacy facilities as they undergo dismantlement and disposal. Closing facilities find that what was previously defined as product has become a waste stream bringing regulatory, human, and technological conflict. The sometimes unique compositions of these materials produce both storage and measurement problems. The nuclear material accounting and control programs have had to become very adaptive and preemptive to ensure control and protection is maintained. This paper examines some of the challenges to Safeguards generated by deinventory, decontamination decommissioning, dismantlement, demolition, and waste site remediation from predictable sources and some from unpredictable sources. 1.0 Introduction The United States is eliminating many facilities that support the nuclear weapons program. With the changing political conditions around the world and changes in military capabilities, the decreased emphasis on nuclear weapons has eliminated the need for many of the aging facilities. Additionally, the recovery of plutonium from dismantled weapons and reuse of components has eliminated the need to produce more plutonium for the near future. Because the nuclear weapons program and commercial applications generally do not mix in the United States, the facilities in the DOE complex that no longer have a weapon mission are being deinventoried, decontaminated, decommissioned, and dismantled/demolished. The materials from these activities are then disposed of in various ways but usually in select waste burial sites. Additionally, the waste in many historical burial sites associated with the weapons complex are being recovered, repackaged if necessary, and disposed of in either

  17. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A.

    1981-09-01

    Reports and summaries are presented for the following: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; TMI zeolite vitrification demonstration program; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton implantation; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; NWVP off-gas analysis; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; verification instrument development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclides in soils; handbook of methods to decrease the generation of low-level waste; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology program; high-level waste form preparation; development of backfill materials; development of structural engineered barriers; disposal charge analysis; and analysis of spent fuel policy implementation.

  18. Decontamination and dismantlement of the building 594 waste ion exchange facility at Argonne National Laboratory-East project final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiese, E. C.

    1998-01-01

    The Building 594 D and D Project was directed toward the following goals: Removal of any radioactive and hazardous materials associated with the Waste Ion Exchange Facility; Decontamination of the Waste Ion Exchange Facility to unrestricted use levels; Demolition of Building 594; and Documentation of all project activities affecting quality (i.e., waste packaging, instrument calibration, audit results, and personnel exposure) These goals had been set in order to eliminate the radiological and hazardous safety concerns inherent in the Waste Ion Exchange Facility and to allow, upon completion of the project, unescorted and unmonitored access to the area. The ion exchange system and the resin contained in the system were the primary areas of concern, while the condition of the building which housed the system was of secondary concern. ANL-E health physics technicians characterized the Building 594 Waste Ion Exchange Facility in September 1996. The characterization identified a total of three radionuclides present in the Waste Ion Exchange Facility with a total activity of less than 5 microCi (175 kBq). The radionuclides of concern were Co 60 , Cs 137 , and Am 241 . The highest dose rates observed during the project were associated with the resin in the exchange vessels. DOE Order 5480.2A establishes the maximum whole body exposure for occupational workers at 5 rem (50 mSv)/yr; the administrative limit at ANL-E is 1 rem/yr (10 mSv/yr)

  19. Krypton Ion Thruster Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Williams, George J.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary data were obtained from a 30 cm ion thruster operating on krypton propellant over the input power range of 0.4 to 5.5 kW. The data presented are compared and contrasted to the data obtained with xenon propellant over the same input power envelope. Typical krypton thruster efficiency was 70 percent at a specific impulse of approximately 5000 s, with a maximum demonstrated thrust to power ratio of approximately 42 mN/kW at 2090 s specific impulse and 1580 watts input power. Critical thruster performance and component lifetime issues were evaluated. Order of magnitude power throttling was demonstrated using a simplified power-throttling strategy.

  20. Development of high-level radioactive waste treatment and conversion technologies 'Dry decontamination technology development for highly radioactive contaminants'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Lee, K. W.; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. J.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K.

    2001-04-01

    The followings were studied through the project entitled 'Dry Decontamination Technology Development for Highly Radioactive Contaminants'. 1.Contaminant Characteristics Analysis of Domestic Nuclear Fuel Cycle Projects(NFCP) and Applicability Study of the Unit Dry-Decontamination Techniques A. Classification of contaminated equipments and characteristics analysis of contaminants B. Applicability study of the unit dry-decontamination techniques 2.Performance Evaluation of Unit Dry Decontamination Technique A. PFC decontamination technique B. CO2 decontamination technique C. Plasma decontamination technique 3.Development of Residual Radiation Assessment Methodology for High Radioactive Facility Decontamination A. Development of radioactive nuclide diffusion model on highly radioactive facility structure B. Obtainment of the procedure for assessment of residual radiation dose 4.Establishment of the Design Concept of Dry Decontamination Process Equipment Applicable to Highly Radioactive Contaminants 5.TRIGA soil unit decontamination technology development A. Development of soil washing and flushing technologies B. Development of electrokinetic soil decontamination technology

  1. Radioactive waste management: a series of bibliographies. Decontamination and decommissioning. Supplement 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    This bibliography contains information on decontamination and decommissioning added to the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base from November 1982 through December 1983. The abstracts are grouped by subject category. Entries in the subject index also facilitate access by subject, e.g., Fuel Reprocessing Plants/Decontamination. Within each category the arrangement is by report number for reports, followed by nonreports in reverse chronological order. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, these, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number

  2. Assessment, evaluation, and testing of technologies for environmental restoration, decontamination, and decommissioning and high level waste management. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzochukwu, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear and commercial non-nuclear technologies that have the potential of meeting the environmental restoration, decontamination and decommissioning, and high-level waste management objectives are being assessed and evaluated. A detailed comparison of innovative technologies available will be performed to determine the safest and most economical technology for meeting these objectives. Information derived from this effort will be matched with the multi-objectives of the environmental restoration, decontamination and decommissioning, and high-level waste management effort to ensure that the best, most economical, and the safest technologies are used in decision making at USDOE-SRS. Technology-related variables will be developed and the resulting data formatted and computerized for multimedia systems. The multimedia system will be made available to technology developers and evaluators to ensure that the best, most economical, and the safest technologies are used in decision making at USDOE-SRS. Technology-related variables will be developed and the resulting data formatted and computerized for multimedia systems. The multimedia system will be made available to technology developers and evaluators to ensure that the safest and most economical technologies are developed for use at SRS and other DOE sites

  3. Assessment, evaluation, and testing of technologies for environmental restoration, decontamination, and decommissioning and high level waste management. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uzochukwu, G.A.

    1997-12-31

    Nuclear and commercial non-nuclear technologies that have the potential of meeting the environmental restoration, decontamination and decommissioning, and high-level waste management objectives are being assessed and evaluated. A detailed comparison of innovative technologies available will be performed to determine the safest and most economical technology for meeting these objectives. Information derived from this effort will be matched with the multi-objectives of the environmental restoration, decontamination and decommissioning, and high-level waste management effort to ensure that the best, most economical, and the safest technologies are used in decision making at USDOE-SRS. Technology-related variables will be developed and the resulting data formatted and computerized for multimedia systems. The multimedia system will be made available to technology developers and evaluators to ensure that the best, most economical, and the safest technologies are used in decision making at USDOE-SRS. Technology-related variables will be developed and the resulting data formatted and computerized for multimedia systems. The multimedia system will be made available to technology developers and evaluators to ensure that the safest and most economical technologies are developed for use at SRS and other DOE sites.

  4. Decontamination of main coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roofthooft, R.

    1988-01-01

    Last year a number of main coolant pumps in Belgian nuclear power plants were decontaminated. A new method has been developed to reduce the time taken for decontamination and the volume of waste to be treated. The method comprises two phases: Oxidation with permanganate in nitric acid and dissolution in oxalic acid. The decontamination of main coolant pumps can now be achieved in less than one day. The decontamination factors attained range between 15 and 150. (orig.) [de

  5. Technology development for nuclear fuel cycle waste treatment - Decontamination, decommissioning and environmental restoration (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Jik; Won, Hui Jun; Yoon, Ji Sup and others

    1997-12-01

    Through the project of D econtamination, decommissioning and environmental restoration technology development , the following were studied. 1. Development of decontamination and repair technology for nuclear fuel cycle facilities 2. Development of dismantling technology 3. Environmental remediation technology development. (author). 95 refs., 45 tabs., 163 figs

  6. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

    1980-09-01

    The status of the following programs is reported: high-level waste immobilization; alternative waste forms; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of fission products in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; systems study on engineered barriers; criteria for defining waste isolation; spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and development of backfill material.

  7. Method for separating krypton isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for separating krypton isotopes utilizing low temperature selective infrared excitation of 85krypton difluoride in an isotopic compound mixture. Multiphoton ir excitation and uv excitation techniques are used, as well as cryogenic matrix isolation and inert buffer gas isolation techniques

  8. Environmental decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristy, G.A.; Jernigan, H.C. (eds.)

    1981-02-01

    The record of the proceedings of the workshop on environmental decontamination contains twenty-seven presentations. Emphasis is placed upon soil and surface decontamination, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and assessments of instrumentation and equipment used in decontamination. (DLS)

  9. Environmental decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, G.A.; Jernigan, H.C.

    1981-02-01

    The record of the proceedings of the workshop on environmental decontamination contains twenty-seven presentations. Emphasis is placed upon soil and surface decontamination, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and assessments of instrumentation and equipment used in decontamination

  10. Solid sources of krypton-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puig, J.R.; Sandier, J.

    1962-01-01

    Krypton-85, a β-emitter with a long half-life and low biological hazard, has considerable industrial potentialities. It is difficult, however, to manufacture sources since the element occurs in gaseous form and cannot be chemically fixed. The authors describe a method of krypton-fixation in a macromolecular matrix formed by mass polymerization of a liquid monomer containing krypton; they also give an account of the preparation of two types of source produced in this way-one enclosed in polystyrene, the other in polyvinyl acetate. Such sources lose krypton; the activity of the first decreases by 8 % daily, that of the second by 3 % daily. These apparent decays enable the diffusion coefficients of krypton in these polymers to be calculated. Diffusion appears to be prevented by the cross-linkages which exist in the polymers. (author) [fr

  11. Characterization of radionuclide-chelating agent complexes found in low-level radioactive decontamination waste. Literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serne, R.J.; Felmy, A.R.; Cantrell, K.J.; Krupka, K.M.; Campbell, J.A.; Bolton, H. Jr.; Fredrickson, J.K.

    1996-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is responsible for regulating the safe land disposal of low-level radioactive wastes that may contain organic chelating agents. Such agents include ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), picolinic acid, oxalic acid, and citric acid, and can form radionuclide-chelate complexes that may enhance the migration of radionuclides from disposal sites. Data from the available literature indicate that chelates can leach from solidified decontamination wastes in moderate concentration (1--100 ppm) and can potentially complex certain radionuclides in the leachates. In general it appears that both EDTA and DTPA have the potential to mobilize radionuclides from waste disposal sites because such chelates can leach in moderate concentration, form strong radionuclide-chelate complexes, and can be recalcitrant to biodegradation. It also appears that oxalic acid and citric acid will not greatly enhance the mobility of radionuclides from waste disposal sites because these chelates do not appear to leach in high concentration, tend to form relatively weak radionuclide-chelate complexes, and can be readily biodegraded. In the case of picolinic acid, insufficient data are available on adsorption, complexation of key radionuclides (such as the actinides), and biodegradation to make definitive predictions, although the available data indicate that picolinic acid can chelate certain radionuclides in the leachates

  12. Characterization of radionuclide-chelating agent complexes found in low-level radioactive decontamination waste. Literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R.J.; Felmy, A.R.; Cantrell, K.J.; Krupka, K.M.; Campbell, J.A.; Bolton, H. Jr.; Fredrickson, J.K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is responsible for regulating the safe land disposal of low-level radioactive wastes that may contain organic chelating agents. Such agents include ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), picolinic acid, oxalic acid, and citric acid, and can form radionuclide-chelate complexes that may enhance the migration of radionuclides from disposal sites. Data from the available literature indicate that chelates can leach from solidified decontamination wastes in moderate concentration (1--100 ppm) and can potentially complex certain radionuclides in the leachates. In general it appears that both EDTA and DTPA have the potential to mobilize radionuclides from waste disposal sites because such chelates can leach in moderate concentration, form strong radionuclide-chelate complexes, and can be recalcitrant to biodegradation. It also appears that oxalic acid and citric acid will not greatly enhance the mobility of radionuclides from waste disposal sites because these chelates do not appear to leach in high concentration, tend to form relatively weak radionuclide-chelate complexes, and can be readily biodegraded. In the case of picolinic acid, insufficient data are available on adsorption, complexation of key radionuclides (such as the actinides), and biodegradation to make definitive predictions, although the available data indicate that picolinic acid can chelate certain radionuclides in the leachates.

  13. Decontamination of some liquid wastes of medium activity with a new solvent type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparini, G.

    1986-01-01

    The decontamination of a reference MAWsub(s) (an alkaline solution coming from the solvent washing and an acidic solution consisting of the mixture of aqueous raffinates deriving from uranium and plutonium purification cycles) by hydroxamic acid is reported. The results of the ''in batch'' decontamination tests, using extraction chromatography techniques, are given. The extraction chromatography techniques do not give the expected performances for the tests in column. Discontinuous liquid extraction tests using traced solutions show that Pu, Am, Zr, Nb are extracted but not U and Ru. The strip of Pu, Am and Zr with an oxalic acid solution is quantitative. Continuous tests using mixer settler batteries, and a simulated alkaline solution and complete extraction-reextraction runs using a simulated solution are conducted. The results of a discontinuous conclusive experiments using a true alkaline solution coming from a reprocessing plant are given

  14. Krypton-enhanced ventilation CT with dual energy technique: experimental study for optimal krypton concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yong Eun; Hong, Sae Rom; Lee, Mi-Jung; Lee, Myungsu; Lee, Hye-Jeong

    2014-11-01

    To assess the feasibility of krypton-enhanced ventilation CT using dual energy (DE) technique for various krypton concentrations and to determine the appropriate krypton concentration for DE ventilation CT through an animal study. Baseline DECT was first performed on seven New Zealand white rabbits. The animals were then ventilated using 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, to 70% krypton concentration, and DECT was performed for each concentration. Krypton extraction was performed through a workstation, and results were displayed on a color map. Overlay Hounsfield unit (HU) values were obtained by two observers in consensus readings. A linear mixed model was used to correlate overlay HU values and krypton concentrations. Visual assessments of the homogeneity of krypton maps were also performed. Mean overlay HU values according to krypton concentration were as follows; 20% krypton, 1.68 ± 5.15; 30% krypton, 3.73 ± 5.93; 40% krypton, 6.92 ± 5.51; 50% krypton, 10.88 ± 5.17; 60% krypton, 14.54 ± 4.23; and 70% krypton, 18.79 ± 3.63. We observed a significant correlation between overlay HU values on krypton maps and krypton concentrations (P krypton color maps, all observers determined universal enhancement on the 70% krypton map for all animals. It is feasible to evaluate lung ventilation function using DECT with a krypton concentration of at least 70%.

  15. Radiation resistant and decontaminable coatings for shipping, interim storage and repository storage casks containing radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, S.

    1995-02-01

    All the Corrobesch-DF-Nukelar coatings - black, yellow, blue, red and white - have been excellently decontaminable without and after radiation exposure with 3x10 5 Gy, despite the slightly higher absorbed dose rate applied at KFA Juelich (DIN 55 991 requires ≤1.0 KGy/h). After a further increase to 3x10 6 Gy in the absorbed dose, with an absorbed dose rate up to 1.0 KGy/h conforming to the standard, the coatings black, yellow, blue were still excellent in their decontamination behavior. After exposure to 10 7 Gy all coatings irradiated at Gammaster in their irradiation room (150 m 3 ) with permanent air changes and at absorbed dose rates of 0.9-1.0 KGy/h have been well decontaminable, and the coatings irradiated at KFA Juelich in the 10 l vessel with discontinuous air changes and variable absorbed dose rate (0.22-2.7 KGy/h) have still been fairly well decontaminable only. To be able to evaluate possible changes occurring upon 10 7 Gy radiation exposure, the test specimens were exposed to the action of chemicals according to DIN 55 991 as well as to decontamination cleansing solutions. Different discolorations, very small reductions in brilliancy, and sometimes minor deteriorations in surface hardness occurred. Detrimental visible changes, e.g. bubble and crack formation, swelling, detachment from the base, etc., have not been found for any of the coatings. These results for the test specimens irradiated at Gammaster are identical with the results for the test specimens irradiated at KFA Juelich, except minor deviations. Contrary to expectations, Corrobesch-DF-Nuklear has proved to be a coating material, which, although it consists of organic base material, nevertheless tolerates radiation exposures without visible damage, i.e. conditions under which only electrodeposited nickel coatings have appeared appropriate until now. This means that application of Corrobesch-Nuklear-DF allows the costs of coating of fuel element shipping and storage casks to be reduced

  16. On-line, real-time measurements of decontamination factors for a low-level waste incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, D.A.; Draper, W.E.

    1982-01-01

    A method is described to monitor the distribution of radioactive isotopes through the off-gas treatment system of an incinerator. Simulated commercial waste spiked with known amounts of five fission products, 131 I, 106 Ru, 137 Cs, 59 Fe, 60 Co, were incinerated. High resolution photon detectors were installed on the off-gas handling system of the controlled air incinerator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to determine relative decontamination factors, which ranged from a low of 40 for 137 Cs to a high of 50O0 for 131 I. Background measurements were made to determine the residual activity in the incinerator. Due to the constant purging of the system to maintain a negative pressure with respect to the surrounding environment, the residual activity decays more rapidly than dictated by its half-life. (orig.)

  17. Programs of recovery of radioactive wastes from the trenches and land decontamination of the radioactive waste storage center; Programas de recuperacion de los desechos radiactivos de las trincheras y de descontaminacion del predio del centro de almacenamiento de desechos radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez D, J.; Reyes L, J. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    1999-06-15

    In this report there are the decontamination program of the land of the Radioactive Waste Storage Center, the Program of Recovery of the radioactive waste of the trenches, the recovery of polluted bar with cobalt 60, the recovery of minerals and tailings of uranium and of earth with minerals and tailings of uranium, the recovery of worn out sealed sources and the waste recovery with the accustomed corresponding actions are presented. (Author)

  18. Influence of Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knaack, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the influence of several decontamination techniques on the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. There are different kinds of decontamination methods like mechanical and chemical processes. The techniques specified, and their potential to change measured characteristics like the isotope vector of the contamination is demonstrated. It is common for all these processes, that the contamination is removed from the surface. Slightly adhered nuclides can be removed more effectively than strongly sticking nuclides. Usually a mixture of these nuclides forms the contamination. Problematically any kind of decontamination will influence the nuclide distribution and the isotope vector. On the one hand it is helpful to know the nuclide distribution and the isotope vector for the radiological characterization of the nuclear facility and on the other hand this information will be changed in the decontamination process. This is important especially for free release procedures, radiation protection and waste management. Some questions on the need of decontamination have been discussed. (authors)

  19. Decontamination of fast reactor hulls and properties of immobilised waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddle, P.; Brown, P.E.; Rees, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives of this contract are threefold: (i) to characterise the activities associated with genuine hulls generated in reprocessing fuel from the Prototype Fast Reactor; (ii) to examine the feasibility of decontaminating the hulls by the use of simple low-temperature techniques; and (iii) to immobilise the hulls in cement and evaluate the products. Over the last year, work has concentrated in areas (i) and (ii), but the balance of the programme is now shifting more towards topic (iii). Progress is reported. (author)

  20. Survey and decontamination trial of boat wastes contaminated with radioactive cesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takigami, Hidetaka; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Go; Takeuchi, Yukio; Tanosaki, Takao; Takata, Mitsuyasu; Okubo, Takuro

    2013-01-01

    Field survey was conducted to investigate radioactive cesium contamination status of the fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) boats which were damaged by the Great East Japan Earthquake and resulting tsunami, and further affected by nuclear fallout from the accident at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant. Radiation dose rate was measured targeted at some selected boats and the surrounding environment by using radiation survey meters (i.e., NaI (Tl) scintillation counter and GM counter) and a radiation-sensing camera in order to visualize a dose rate distribution within the area. In addition, FRP parts, sediment deposits and stagnant waters in the boats were sampled and their "1"3"4Cs and "1"3"7Cs radioactivity were measured by gamma-ray spectrometry using NaI (Tl) scintillation or Ge detector. From the monitoring results, materials or sediments in the boats enhanced the radiation levels, however, which can be significantly reduced by decontamination operations such as removal and wash-out of the materials or sediments (i.e., countermeasures for surface-deposited radioactivity). Consequently, the conducted survey and decontamination approaches became a good model and promoted a prompt dismantlement, removal and further disposal/recycle by the local authorities concerned. (author)

  1. Decontamination of fast reactor hulls and properties of immobilised waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biddle, P.; Brown, P.E.; Rees, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The studies described in this Report have been carried out on five batches of stainless steel hulls resulting from the reprocessing of fuel from the Prototype Fast Reactor at Dounreay. Direct immobilisation in cement and decontamination have been examined as possible routes for treating the hulls. A number of low temperature chemical techniques have been used to remove actinides and fission products from the hulls. The levels of α-activity could be reduced to less than 0.3 Ci/te of hulls. Thus decontamination might permit cheaper disposal than would be the case for undecontaminated hulls. 10mm sections of hulls have been immobilised in two cements in which either sand or blast furnace slag was used to extend the ordinary Portland cement. The level of Cs-137 leached from hulls immobilised in either of the cement compositions was about an order of magnitude lower than that leached from the bare hulls. For Sr-90, the BFS/OPC matrix gave a tenfold better retention than the sand/OPC. Ru-106 and Sb-125 were leached from the sand/OPC but not from the BFS/OPC samples. The preliminary studies suggested that cement was a satisfactory matrix for immobilising hulls and that the BFS/OPC was the better formulation. 30 refs, 26 tabs, 23 figs

  2. Toshiba's decontamination technologies for the decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yuki; Yaita, Yumi; Sakai, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    For the decommissioning, two types of decontamination process are necessary, 1) system decontamination before dismantling and 2) decontamination of dismantling waste. Toshiba has been developing the decontamination technologies for the both purposes from the viewpoint of minimizing the secondary waste. For the system decontamination before dismantling, chemical decontamination process, such as T-OZON, can be applicable for stainless steel or carbon steel piping. For the decontamination of dismantling waste, several types of process have been developed to apply variety of shapes and materials. For the simple shape materials, physical decontamination process, such as blast decontamination, is effective. We have developed new blast decontamination process with highly durable zirconia particle. It can be used repeatedly and secondary waste can be reduced compared with conventional blast particle. For the complex shape materials, chemical decontamination process can be applied that formic acid decontamination process for carbon steel and electrolytic reduction decontamination process with organic acid for stainless steel. These chemicals can be decomposed to carbon dioxide and water and amount of secondary waste can be small. (author)

  3. Decommissioning and Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massaut, V.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's decommissioning and decontamination programme are (1) to develop, test and optimise the technologies and procedures for decommissioning and decontamination of nuclear installations in order to minimise the waste arising and the distributed dose; (2) to optimise the environmental impact; (3) to reduce the cost of the end-of-life of the installation; (4) to make these new techniques available to the industry; (5) to share skills and competences. The programme and achievements in 1999 are summarised

  4. Methods for the minimization of radioactive waste from decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this report is to provide Member States and their decision makers (ranging from regulators, strategists, planners and designers, to operators) with relevant information on opportunities for minimizing radioactive wastes arising from the D and D of nuclear facilities. This will allow waste minimization options to be properly planned and assessed as part of national, site and plant waste management policies. This objective will be achieved by: reviewing the sources and characteristics of radioactive materials arising from D and D activities; reviewing waste minimization principles and current practical applications, together with regulatory, technical, financial and political factors influencing waste minimization practices; and reviewing current trends in improving waste minimization practices during D and D

  5. Waste management aspects of decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, B.D.

    1993-01-01

    History shows that waste management concepts have generally been overlooked during the planning stages of most projects and experiments. This is resulting,in the generation of vast amounts of waste during the clean up or D ampersand D of these facilities. Managers are not only being frustrated in their waste minimization efforts (a relatively new concept) but are also facing the prospect of not being able to dispose of the waste materials at all. At the least, managers are having to budget extraordinary amounts of time, money, and effort in defending their positions that the waste materials are not only humanly and environmentally safe, but that the waste materials are in fact what management says they are. The following discussion will attempt to provide some guidance to D ampersand D managers to help them avoid many of the common pitfalls associated with the ultimate disposal of the materials generated during these projects

  6. Decontamination of uranium-contaminated waste oil using supercritical fluid and nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, J.; Kim, J.; Lee, Y.; Seol, J.; Ryu, J.; Park, K.

    2011-01-01

    The waste oil used in nuclear fuel processing is contaminated with uranium because of its contact with materials or environments containing uranium. Under current law, waste oil that has been contaminated with uranium is very difficult to dispose of at a radioactive waste disposal site. To dispose of the uranium-contaminated waste oil, the uranium was separated from the contaminated waste oil. Supercritical R-22 is an excellent solvent for extracting clean oil from uranium-contaminated waste oil. The critical temperature of R-22 is 96.15 deg. C and the critical pressure is 49.9 bar. In this study, a process to remove uranium from the uranium-contaminated waste oil using supercritical R-22 was developed. The waste oil has a small amount of additives containing N, S or P, such as amines, dithiocarbamates and dialkyldithiophosphates. It seems that these organic additives form uranium-combined compounds. For this reason, dissolution of uranium from the uranium-combined compounds using nitric acid was needed. The efficiency of the removal of uranium from the uranium-contaminated waste oil using supercritical R-22 extraction and nitric acid treatment was determined. (authors)

  7. Determination of vapor-liquid equilibrium data and decontamination factors needed for the development of evaporator technology for use in volume reduction of radioactive waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betts, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    A program is currently in progress at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate and develop evaporator technology for concentrating radioactive waste streams. By concentrating radioactive waste streams, disposal costs can be significantly reduced. To effectively reduce the volume of waste, the evaporator must achieve high decontamination factors so that the distillate is sufficiently free of radioactive material. One technology that shows a great deal of potential for this application is being developed by LICON, Inc. In this program, Argonne plans to apply LICON's evaporator designs to the processing of radioactive solutions. Concepts that need to be incorporated into the design of the evaporator include, criticality safety, remote operation and maintenance, and materials of construction. To design an effective process for concentrating waste streams, both solubility and vapor-liquid equilibrium data are needed. The key issue, however, is the high decontamination factors that have been demonstrated by this equipment. Two major contributions were made to this project. First, a literature survey was completed to obtain available solubility and vapor-liquid equilibrium data. Some vapor-liquid data necessary for the project but not available in the literature was obtained experimentally. Second, the decontamination factor for the evaporator was determined using neutron activation analysis (NAA)

  8. Decontamination of Fast Reactor Hulls and Properties of Immobilised Waste Forms,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-01

    of the wace to be Immobilised was analysed radiochemically and it was assumed that this was representative of the complete batch of waste and hence...would be possible and economically desirable. The waste management of the effluents has not been studied in detail but could Involve reclamation of the

  9. Chemical decontaminating method for stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Akimoto, Hidetoshi.

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive metal wastes comprising passivated stainless steels are chemically decontaminated to such a radioactivity level as that of usual wastes. The present invention for chemically decontaminating stainless steels comprises a first step of immersing decontaminates into a sulfuric acid solution and a second step of immersing them into an aqueous solution prepared by adding oxidative metal salts to sulfuric acid, in which a portion of the surface of stainless steels as decontaminates are chemically ground to partially expose substrate materials and then the above-mentioned decontamination steps are applied. More than 90% of radioactive materials are removed in this method by the dissolution of the exposed substrate materials and peeling of cruds secured to the surface of the materials upon dissolution. This method is applicable to decontamination of articles having complicate shapes, can reduce the amount of secondary wastes after decontamination and also remarkably shorten the time required for decontamination. (T.M.)

  10. Application of titanates, niobates, and tantalates to neutralized defense waste decontamination: materials properties, physical forms, and regeneration techniques. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosch, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    A study of the application of sodium titanate (ST) to the decontamination of neutralized defense waste has been completed. The work was directed at Sr removal from dissolved salt cake, simulated in this work with a 6.0 N NaNO 3 - 0.6 N NaOH solution. Three physical forms of the titanates were developed including powder, pellets, and titanate-loaded resin beads and all were found to be superior to conventional organic ion exchange in this application. When spent, the titanate materials can be calcined to an oxide from which is a stable waste form in itself or can be added directly to a glass melter to become part of a vitrified waste form. Radiation stability of titanate powder and resin forms was assessed in tests in which these materials were exposed to 60 Co radiation. The strontium exchange capacity of the powder remained constant through a dose of 3 x 10 7 rads and retained 50% capacity after a dose of 2 x 10 9 rads. The primary mechanism involved in loss of capacity was believed to be heating associated with the irradiation. The resin forms were unchanged through a dose of 5 x 10 8 rads and retained 30% capacity after a dose of 2 x 10 9 rads. The latter dose resulted in visible degradation of the resin matrix. Anion exchange resins loaded with sodium niobate and sodium tantalate were also prepared by similar methods and evaluated for this application. These materials had Sr sorption properties comparable to the titanate material; however, they would have to provide a significant improvement to justify their higher cost

  11. Chemical decontamination method in nuclear facility system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Ryota; Sakai, Hitoshi; Oka, Shigehiro.

    1996-01-01

    Pumps and valves in a closed recycling loop system incorporating materials to be chemically decontaminated are decomposed, a guide plate having the decomposed parts as an exit/inlet of a decontaminating liquid is formed, and a decontaminating liquid recycling loop comprising a recycling pump and a heater is connected to the guide plate. Decontaminating liquid from a decontaminating liquid storage tank is supplied to the decontaminating liquid recycling loop. With such constitutions, the decontaminating liquid is filled in the recycling closed loop system incorporating materials to be decontaminated, and the materials to be decontaminated are chemically decontaminated. The decontaminating liquid after the decontamination is discharged and flows, if necessary, in a recycling system channel for repeating supply and discharge. After the decontamination, the guide plate is removed and returned to the original recycling loop. When pipelines of a reactor recycling system are decontaminated, the amount of decontaminations can be decreased, and reforming construction for assembling the recycling loop again, which requires cutting for pipelines in the system is no more necessary. Accordingly, the amount of wastes can be decreased, and therefore, the decontamination operation is facilitated and radiation dose can be reduced. (T.M.)

  12. Experience gained in the management of radioactive waste from maintenance, decontamination and partial decommissioning of a reprocessing plant and conclusions resulting for the management of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hild, W.

    1983-01-01

    After a short description of the historical background of Eurochemic, its main tasks and the various operational phases, a detailed description of the waste management principles applied is presented. The practical experience in the waste treatment is reported for both the operational phase of the reprocessing plant and its decontamination and partial decommissioning after shutdown. Based on this experience and the presented data, an assessment of the practical operations is made and conclusions are drawn. Finally, recommendations are formulated both for the general waste management policy and the practical waste treatment processes in nuclear power reactors. (author)

  13. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility: Documentation of impact analysis for design alternatives presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is proposing to construct and operate a new Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF). The proposed DWTF would replace the existing Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) facilities at LLNL. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) to assess the environmental consequences of the proposed DWTF and its alternatives. This report presents the assumptions, methodologies, and analyses used to estimate the waste flows, air emissions, ambient air quality impacts, and public health risks that are presented in the DEIS. Two DWTF design alternatives (Level I and Level II) have been designated as reasonable design alternatives considering available technologies, environmental regulations, and current and future LLNL waste generation. Both design alternatives would include new, separate radioactive and nonradioactive liquid waste treatment systems, a solidification unit, a new decontamination facility, storage and treatment facilities for reactive materials, a radioactive waste storage area, receiving and classification areas, and a uranium burn pan. The Level I design alternative would include a controlled-air incinerator system, while the Level II design alternative would include a rotary kiln incinerator system. 43 refs., 4 figs., 24 tabs

  14. A Novel and Cost Effective Approach to the Decommissioning and Decontamination of Legacy Glove Boxes - Minimizing TRU Waste and Maximizing LLW Waste - 13634

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pancake, Daniel; Rock, Cynthia M.; Creed, Richard [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Donohoue, Tom; Martin, E. Ray; Mason, John A. [ANTECH Corporation 9050 Marshall Court, Westminster, CO, 80031 (United States); Norton, Christopher J.; Crosby, Daniel [Environmental Alternatives, Inc., 149 Emerald Street, Suite R, Keene, NH 03431 (United States); Nachtman, Thomas J. [InstaCote, Inc., 160 C. Lavoy Road, Erie, MI, 48133 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the process of decommissioning two gloveboxes at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) that were employed for work with plutonium and other radioactive materials. The decommissioning process involved an initial phase of clearing tools and materials from the glove boxes and disconnecting them from the laboratory infrastructure. The removed materials, assessed as Transuranic (TRU) waste, were packaged into 55 gallon (200 litre) drums and prepared for ultimate disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) at Carlsbad New Mexico. The boxes were then sampled to determine the radioactive contents by means of smears that were counted with alpha and beta detectors to determine the residual surface contamination, especially in terms of alpha particle emitters that are an indicator of TRU activity. Paint chip samples were also collected and sent for laboratory analysis in order to ascertain the radioactive contamination contributing to the TRU activity as a fixed contamination. The investigations predicted that it may be feasible to reduce the residual surface contamination and render the glovebox structure low level waste (LLW) for disposal. In order to reduce the TRU activity a comprehensive decontamination process was initiated using chemical compounds that are particularly effective for lifting and dissolving radionuclides that adhere to the inner surfaces of the gloveboxes. The result of the decontamination process was a reduction in the TRU surface activity on the inner surfaces of the gloveboxes by four orders of magnitude in terms of disintegrations per unit area (DPA). The next phase of the process involved a comprehensive assay of the gloveboxes using a combination of passive neutron and gamma ray scintillation detectors and a shielded and collimated high purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma ray detector. The HPGe detector was used to obtain gamma ray spectra for a variety of measurement positions within the glovebox. The spectra were used to

  15. A Novel and Cost Effective Approach to the Decommissioning and Decontamination of Legacy Glove Boxes - Minimizing TRU Waste and Maximizing LLW Waste - 13634

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancake, Daniel; Rock, Cynthia M.; Creed, Richard; Donohoue, Tom; Martin, E. Ray; Mason, John A.; Norton, Christopher J.; Crosby, Daniel; Nachtman, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the process of decommissioning two gloveboxes at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) that were employed for work with plutonium and other radioactive materials. The decommissioning process involved an initial phase of clearing tools and materials from the glove boxes and disconnecting them from the laboratory infrastructure. The removed materials, assessed as Transuranic (TRU) waste, were packaged into 55 gallon (200 litre) drums and prepared for ultimate disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) at Carlsbad New Mexico. The boxes were then sampled to determine the radioactive contents by means of smears that were counted with alpha and beta detectors to determine the residual surface contamination, especially in terms of alpha particle emitters that are an indicator of TRU activity. Paint chip samples were also collected and sent for laboratory analysis in order to ascertain the radioactive contamination contributing to the TRU activity as a fixed contamination. The investigations predicted that it may be feasible to reduce the residual surface contamination and render the glovebox structure low level waste (LLW) for disposal. In order to reduce the TRU activity a comprehensive decontamination process was initiated using chemical compounds that are particularly effective for lifting and dissolving radionuclides that adhere to the inner surfaces of the gloveboxes. The result of the decontamination process was a reduction in the TRU surface activity on the inner surfaces of the gloveboxes by four orders of magnitude in terms of disintegrations per unit area (DPA). The next phase of the process involved a comprehensive assay of the gloveboxes using a combination of passive neutron and gamma ray scintillation detectors and a shielded and collimated high purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma ray detector. The HPGe detector was used to obtain gamma ray spectra for a variety of measurement positions within the glovebox. The spectra were used to

  16. Laboratory optimization tests of technetium decontamination of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant low activity waste melter off-gas condensate simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable simplified operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste.

  17. Decontamination of water polluted with oil through the use of tanned solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammoun, A.; Azzi, M.

    2007-01-01

    The ability of chrome shavings (CS) and buffing dusts of crust leather (BDCL) to remove oily wastes from demineralized water and natural seawater was investigated. The aim of the study was to discover environmentally friendly alternatives for the disposal of solid tannery wastes. The specific surface area of the CS and the BDCL were examined to determine ash content; chromium oxide; fat; and the pH of soluble matter. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was then used to examine the structure and morphology of the samples. Three types of oil were used in the experiment: diesel motor oil; premium motor oil; and used motor oil. Sorbent materials were added to a beaker containing 1000 ml of water and 5.5 g of oil. The amount of residual oil in the water was then extracted with petroleum ether. The amount of oil sorbed on the wastes was calculated by subtracting the amount of residual oil in water from the initial mass of oil added to the beakers. Results suggested that the tanned solid wastes efficiently removed the oil from the water. It was concluded that the waste materials were able to absorb many times their weight in oil. 21 refs., 4 tabs., 2 figs

  18. Some remarks about decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertini, A.

    1990-01-01

    Decontamination in itself is not the elimination of a problem, but corresponds to move that problem from one place to another. It is beneficial only if the contamination is less of a nuisance when moved to the ''other place''. Therefore any prospective decontamination process is to be considered essentially in terms of cost-benefit, and in particular in terms of reducing the burden on the waste management systems. The paper is not intended to deal with and to review critically the technical aspects of the various decontamination processes which are currently available. Its aim is to call the attention of those who may be faced with the problem of large-scale decontamination, so that this operation is carried out after all practical aspects have been examined. (author)

  19. Study on LOMI decontamination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Fuduan; Yu Degui; Lu Jingju; Xie Yinyan

    1993-10-01

    The results of decontamination technique of Low-Oxidation-State Metal-Ion (LOMI) reagents developed from 1986 to 1991 in the laboratory are introduced. The experiments included preparation of LOMI reagents, de-filming efficiency, corrosion behavior of typical alloys, decontamination factors of reagents for contaminated materials and components have proved that the NP/LOMI decontamination method and treatment technique of waste water are feasible and have some advantages. The preparation of LOMI reagent with low concentration of formic acid by reduced pressure distilling technique and the utilization ratio of vanadium reached to 95% by second electrolysis are the main contributions of the study to the decontamination technique

  20. Krypton retention on solid adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monson, P.R. Jr.

    1981-08-01

    Over a dozen prospective adsorbents for krypton were studied and evaluated with respect to adsorption capacity and cost for dissolver off-gas streams from nuclear reprocessing plants. Results show that, at subambient temperature (-40 0 to -80 0 C), the commercially available hydrogen mordenite has sufficient adsorptive capacity to be the most cost-effective material studied. Silver mordenite has a higher capacity for krypton retention, but is 50 times more expensive than hydrogen mordenite. The results indicate that a solid adsorbent system is feasible and competitive with other developing systems whih utilize fluorocarbon absorption and cryogenic distillation

  1. Transport of radioactive wastes arising from the decontamination work performed in Goiania-Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezrahi, A.; Heilbron, P.F.L.; Xavier, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    The present article describes the major aspects related to the packaging and transport operations performed in Goiania, Brazil, following the violation of a Cs-137 teletherapy source, in September 1987, which led to the generation of about 3,500 m 3 of radioactive wastes. The violation of a teletherapy source in the city of Goiania, State of Goias, Brazil, in the month of September 1987, and the subsequent spread of most of its radioactive contents over a large urban area, brought about the need for the establishment of specific provisions to ensure an adequate packaging and transportation of the radioactive wastes to an interim storage. The purpose of this article is to describe the main aspects related to the above mentioned operations, which were performed, as far as possible, according to the IAEA requirements, as well as to discuss the difficulties that were faced by the technical staff of CNEN

  2. Experimental studies on the krypton absorption in liquid CO2 (KALC) process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.W.; Beaujean, H.W.R.; Fowler, V.L.; Gilliam, T.M.; Inman, D.J.; Levins, D.M.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for a series of experiments to quantify krypton removal from simulated High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor reprocessing off-gas by the KALC process. The Experimental Engineering Section Off-Gas Decontamination Facility used in the campaign provides engineering-scale experiments with nominal gas and liquid flows of 5 scfm and 0.5 gpm respectively. Equilibrium and nonequilibrium mass transfer experiments for the CO 2 --O 2 --Kr system are described. Data analysis indicates values of HTU for krypton on the order of 0.5 ft for decontamination factors from 100 to 10,000. Recent flooding information for the packed columns is combined with previous data and is shown to be well represented by an empirical flooding equation

  3. Radioactive decontamination of equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    After a recall of some definitions relating to decontamination techniques and of the regulation into effect, the principles to be respected to arrange rationally work zones are quoted while insisting more particularly on the types of coatings which facilitate maintenance operations and the dismantling of these installations. Then, the processes and equipments to use in decontamination units for routine or particular operations are described; the list of recommended chemical products to decontaminate the equipment is given. The influence of these treatments on the state and the duration of life of equipments is studied, and some perfectible methods are quoted. In the appendix, are given: the limits of surface contamination accepted in the centers; a standard project which defines the criteria of admissible residual contamination in wastes considered as cold wastes; some remarks on the interest that certain special ventilation and air curtain devices for the protection of operators working on apparatus generating contaminated dusts [fr

  4. Decontaminating method for radioactive contaminant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Ken-ichi.

    1994-01-01

    After decontamination of radioactive contaminates with d-limonene, a radioactive material separating agent not compatible with liquid wastes caused by decontamination is added to the liquid wastes. Then after stirring, they are stood still to be separated into two phases, and the radioactive materials in the liquid waste phase caused by decontamination are transferred to the phase of the radioactive material separating agent. With such procedures, they can satisfactorily be separated into two phases of d-limonene and the radioactive material separating agent. Further, d-limonene remaining after the separation can be used again as a decontaminating agent for radioactive contaminates. Therefore, the amount of d-limonene to be used can be reduced, to lower the cost for cleaning, thereby enabling to reduce the amount of radioactive wastes formed. (T.M.)

  5. Retention of krypton on polymethyl methacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciric, M.M.; Cvjeticanin, N.M.; Radak, B.B.

    1975-01-01

    Retention of krypton on polymethyl methacrylate was studied as a function of kryptonation pressure (P), temperature (T) and time (t). It was found that the dependence of the retained quantity on P, T, and t is in accordance with the diffusion theory. The optimum results (i.e., the maximum retained quantity and the best stability of the kryptonate) were obtained at elevated kryptonation temperatures (200 0 C). The diffusion coefficients of krypton in polymethyl methacrylate, determined from the dekryptonation process, vary from 1 x 10 -10 cm 2 /s to 0.2 x 10 -10 cm 2 /s for samples kryptonated at 20 0 C and 200 0 C respectively. The results have been discussed from the viewpoint of radiation and thermal stability of kryptonated polymethyl methacrylate. Inadequate radiation stability could be the main obstacle for practical purposes. (U.S.)

  6. Decontamination of electronic waste-polluted soil by ultrasound-assisted soil washing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu; Yang, Baodan; Ma, Jing; Qu, Junfeng; Liu, Gangjun

    2016-10-01

    Laboratorial scale experiments were performed to evaluate the efficacy of a washing process using the combination of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD) and tea saponin (TS) for simultaneous desorption of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) and heavy metals from an electronic waste (e-waste) site. Ultrasonically aided mixing of the field contaminated soil with a combination of MCD and TS solutions simultaneously mobilizes most of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and the analyte metal (Pb, Cu, and Ni) burdens. It is found that 15 g/L MCD and 10 g/L TS is an efficient reagent combination reconciling extraction performance and reagent costs. Under these conditions, the removal efficiencies of HOCs and heavy metals are 93.5 and 91.2 %, respectively, after 2 cycles of 60-min ultrasound-assisted washing cycles. By contrast, 86.3 % of HOCs and 88.4 % of metals are removed from the soil in the absence of ultrasound after 3 cycles of 120-min washing. The ultrasound-assisted soil washing could generate high removal efficiency and decrease the operating time significantly. Finally, the feasibility of regenerating and reusing the spent washing solution in extracting pollutants from the soil is also demonstrated. By application of this integrated technology, it is possible to recycle the washing solution for a purpose to reduce the consumption of surfactant solutions. Collectively, it has provided an effective and economic treatment of e-waste-polluted soil.

  7. Study of a nuclear graphite waste 14C decontamination process by CO2 gasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pageot, Justin

    2014-01-01

    The decommissioning of French gas cooled nuclear reactors (UNGG), all arrested since 1994, will generate 23,000 tons of graphite waste classified Low Level and Long Lived and notably containing 14 C. The aim of this thesis is to study a new method for selective extraction of this radionuclide by CO 2 gasification.The multi-scale organization of virgin and irradiated graphite has been studied by a coupling between microspectrometry Raman and transmission electron microscopy. With the neutron fluence, the structure degrades and the nano-structure can be greatly changed. In extreme cases, the lamellar nano-structure nuclear graphite has become nano-porous. Furthermore, these damages are systematically heterogeneous. An orientation effect of 'crystallites', shown experimentally by ion implantation, could be a cause of these heterogeneities.This study also showed that from a specific fluence, there is an important development of nano-porous zones coinciding with a dramatic 14 C concentration increase. This radionuclide could be preferentially concentrated in the nano-porous areas which are potentially more reactive than the remaining laminar areas which could be less rich in 14 C. This process by CO 2 gasification was firstly tested on 'analogous' non-radioactive materials (mechanically milled graphite). These tests confirmed, for temperatures between 950 and 1000 C, the selective and complete elimination of nano-porous areas.Tests were then carried out on graphite waste from Saint-Laurent-des-Eaux A2 and G2 reactors. The results are promising with notably the quarter of 14 C inventory extracted for a weight loss of only few percent. Up to 68 % of 14 C inventory was extracted, but with an important gasification. Thus, this treatment could allow extracting selectively a share of 14 C inventory (mobile or linked to nano-porous areas) and allows imagining alternative scenarios for graphite waste managing. (author) [fr

  8. Modeling of Installations with a Rotary Kiln for Thermal Decontamination of Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krot O.P.

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The object of the study is a plant for incineration of solid wastes in a rotary kiln with an afterburning chamber and thermal catalytic emission purification. The aim of the study was to determine the rational layout of the solid wastes loading system and the location of the burner during combustion in the system - a rotary kiln and an afterburning chamber. The results of simulation countercurrent and concurrent gas flow and wastes in the form of temperature gradients in the rotary kiln and afterburner chamber are presented. It is found that in the initial part of the rotary kiln, a temperature of more than 1000 °C is created on its lower surface, almost one-third of the length of the furnace (2.5-3 times more than in the concurrent mode. In a zone close to unloading, the temperature is minimal (less than 100 °C, therefore, the slag does not tolerate heat from the furnace, it has time to cool down. Criteria for the efficiency of the rotary kiln have been proposed: the length of the section where the maximum combustion temperature is reached, the length of the section before discharge of the slag, the temperature of the slag. A more efficient configuration for all the criteria is one that ensures the counter movement of debris and gas. To effectively use the volume of the afterburner chamber, the burners must be located at the maximum distance from each other. The outlet flue must also be as far from the burners as possible.

  9. Application of a CCA-treated wood waste decontamination process to other copper-based preservative-treated wood after disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janin, Amelie, E-mail: amelie.janin@ete.inrs.ca [University of Toronto, Faculty of Forestry, 33, Willcocks St., Toronto, ON, M5S 3B3 (Canada); Coudert, Lucie, E-mail: lucie.coudert@ete.inrs.ca [Institut national de la recherche scientifique (Centre Eau, Terre et Environnement), Universite du Quebec, 490 rue de la Couronne, Quebec, QC, G1K 9A9 (Canada); Riche, Pauline, E-mail: pauline.riche@ete.inrs.ca [Institut national de la recherche scientifique (Centre Eau, Terre et Environnement), Universite du Quebec, 490 rue de la Couronne, Quebec, QC, G1K 9A9 (Canada); Mercier, Guy, E-mail: guy_mercier@ete.inrs.ca [Institut national de la recherche scientifique (Centre Eau, Terre et Environnement), Universite du Quebec, 490 rue de la Couronne, Quebec, QC, G1K 9A9 (Canada); Cooper, Paul, E-mail: p.cooper@utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, Faculty of Forestry, 33, Willcocks St., Toronto, ON, M5S 3B3 (Canada); Blais, Jean-Francois, E-mail: blaisjf@ete.inrs.ca [Institut national de la recherche scientifique (Centre Eau, Terre et Environnement), Universite du Quebec, 490 rue de la Couronne, Quebec, QC, G1K 9A9 (Canada)

    2011-02-28

    Research highlights: {yields} This paper describes a process for the metal removal from treated (CA-, ACQ- or MCQ-) wood wastes. {yields} This sulfuric acid leaching process is simple and economic. {yields} The remediated wood could be recycled in the industry. - Abstract: Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood was widely used until 2004 for residential and industrial applications. Since 2004, CCA was replaced by alternative copper preservatives such as alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ), copper azole (CA) and micronized copper quaternary (MCQ), for residential applications due to health concerns. Treated wood waste disposal is becoming an issue. Previous studies identified a chemical process for decontaminating CCA-treated wood waste based on sulfuric acid leaching. The potential application of this process to wood treated with the copper-based preservatives (alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ), copper azole (CA) and micronized copper quaternary (MCQ)) is investigated here. Three consecutive leaching steps with 0.1 M sulfuric acid at 75 deg, C for 2 h were successful for all the types of treated wood and achieved more than 98% copper solubilisation. The different acidic leachates produced were successively treated by coagulation using ferric chloride and precipitation (pH = 7) using sodium hydroxide. Between 94 and 99% of copper in leachates could be recovered by electrodeposition after 90 min using 2 A electrical current. Thus, the process previously developed for CCA-treated wood waste decontamination could be efficiently applied for CA-, ACQ- or MCQ-treated wood.

  10. Project W-026, Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility Module 1: Maximum possible fire loss (MPFL) decontamination and cleanup estimates. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkle, A.W.; Jacobsen, P.H.; Lucas, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    Project W-026, Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility Module 1, a 1991 Line Item, is planned for completion and start of operations in the spring of 1997. WRAP Module 1 will have the capability to characterize and repackage newly generated, retrieved and stored transuranic (TRU), TRU mixed, and suspect TRU waste for shipment to the Waste isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). In addition, the WRAP Facility Module 1 will have the capability to characterize low-level mixed waste for treatment in WRAP Module 2A. This report documents the assumptions and cost estimates for decontamination and clean-up of a maximum possible fire loss (MPFL) as defined by DOE Order 5480.7A, FIRE PROTECTION. The Order defines MPFL as the value of property, excluding land, within a fire area, unless a fire hazards analysis demonstrates a lesser (or greater) loss potential. This assumes failure of both automatic fire suppression systems and manual fire fighting efforts. Estimates were developed for demolition, disposal, decontamination, and rebuilding. Total costs were estimated to be approximately $98M

  11. Decontamination for free release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, K A; Elder, G R [Bradtec Ltd., Bristol (United Kingdom)

    1997-02-01

    Many countries are seeking to treat radioactive waste in ways which meet the local regulatory requirements, but yet are cost effective when all contributing factors are assessed. In some countries there are increasing amounts of waste, arising from nuclear plant decommissioning, which are categorized as low level waste: however with suitable treatment a large part of such wastes might become beyond regulatory control and be able to be released as non-radioactive. The benefits and disadvantages of additional treatment before disposal need to be considered. Several processes falling within the overall description of decontamination for free release have been developed and applied, and these are outlined. In one instance the process seeks to take advantage of techniques and equipment used for decontaminating water reactor circuits intermittently through reactor life. (author). 9 refs, 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  12. Adsorption decontamination of radioactive waste solvent by activated alumina and bauxites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, N.M.; Marra, J.C.; Kyser, E.A.

    1994-01-01

    An adsorption process utilizing activated alumina and activated bauxite adsorbents was evaluated as a function of operating parameters for the removal of low level radioactive contaminants from organic waste solvent generated in the fuel reprocessing facilities and support operations at Savannah River Site. The waste solvent, 30% volume tributyl phosphate in n-paraffin diluent, was degraded due to hydrolysis and radiolysis reactions of tributyl phosphate and n-paraffin diluent, producing fission product binding degradation impurities. The process, which has the potential for removing these activity-binding degradation impurities from the solvent, was operated downflow through glass columns packed with activated alumina and activated bauxite adsorbents. Experimental breakthrough curves were obtained under various operating temperatures and flow rates. The results show that the adsorption capacity of the activated alumina was in the order 10 4 dpm/g and the capacity of the activated bauxite was 10 5 dpm/g. The performance of the adsorption process was evaluated in terms of dynamic parameters (i.e. adsorption capacity, the height and the efficiency of adsorption zone) in such a way as to maximize the adsorption capacity and to minimize the height of the mass transfer or adsorption zone

  13. Surface decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, S. da; Teixeira, M.V.

    1986-06-01

    The general methods of surface decontamination used in laboratory and others nuclear installations areas, as well as the procedures for handling radioactive materials and surfaces of work are presented. Some methods for decontamination of body external parts are mentioned. The medical supervision and assistance are required for internal or external contamination involving or not lesion in persons. From this medical radiation protection decontamination procedures are determined. (M.C.K.) [pt

  14. Report of exploratory trenching for the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresen, M.D.; Weiss, R.B.

    1985-12-01

    Three exploratory trenches, totaling about 1,300 ft in length were excavated and logged across the site of a proposed Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF), to assess whether or not active Greenville fault zone, located about 4100 ft to the northeast, pass through or within 200 ft of the site. The layout of the trenches (12-16 ft deep) was designed to provide continuous coverage across the DWTF site and an area within 200 ft northeast and southwest of the site. Deposits exposed in the trench walls are primarily of clay, and are typical of weakly cemented silty sand to sandy silt with the alluvial deposits in the area. Several stream channels were encountered that appear to have an approximated east-west orintation. The channel deposits consist of well-sorted, medium to coarse-grained sand and gravel. A well-developed surface soil is laterally continuous across all three trenches. The soil reportedly formed during late Pleistocene time (about 35,000 to 40,000 yr before present) based on soil stratigraphic analyses. A moderately to well-developed buried soil is laterally continuous in all three trenches, except locally where it has been removed by channelling. This buried soil apparently formed about 100,000 yr before present. At least one older, discontinuous soil is present below the 100,000-yr-old soil in some locations. The age of the older soil is unknown. At several locations, two discontinuous buried soils were observed between the surface soil and the 100,000-yr-old soil. Various overlapping stratigraphic units could be traced across the trenches providing a continuous datum of at least 100,000 yr to assess the presence or absence of faulting. The continuity of stratigraphic units in all the trenches demonstrated that no active faults pass through or within 200 ft of the proposed DWTF site

  15. Optimisation of surfactant decontamination and pre-treatment of waste chicken feathers by using response surface methodology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tesfaye, T

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Commercially processed, untreated chicken feathers are biologically hazardous due to the presence of blood-borne pathogens. Prior to valorisation, it is crucial that they are decontaminated to remove the microbial contamination. The present study...

  16. An Applied Study on the Decontamination and Decommissioning of Hot Cell Facilities in the United States and Comparison with the Studsvik Facility for Solid and Liquid Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varley, Geoff; Rusch, Chris

    2006-07-01

    This report presents the plans, processes and results of the decontamination and decommissioning of the Hot Cell Facility in Building 23 at the General Atomics Torrey Pines Mesa Facility (HCF) and compares the program and cost of decommissioning HCF with the Swedish cost estimate for decontamination and decommissioning of the HM hot cell and wastes treatment facility at Studsvik in Sweden. The HCF had three main hot cells and was licensed to: Receive, handle and ship radioactive materials; Remotely handle, examine and store irradiated fuel materials; Extract tritium (engineering scale); Support new reactor production development; Develop, fabricate and inspect UO 2 - BeO fuel materials. The HM facility in Studsvik was constructed to handle and package medium-active solid and liquid wastes, prior to disposal. Central to the facility is a conventional hot cell including three work stations, serviced by master slave manipulators. Other parts of the facility include holding tanks for liquid wastes and slurries, a centrifuge room, as well as an encapsulation station where drummed wastes can be encapsulated in cement, offices, laboratories and workshops and so on, as well as building and cell ventilation systems. Decontamination and decommissioning of the HCF took place during 1993 through 2001. The objective was to obtain regulatory release of the site so that it could be used on an unrestricted basis. Based on data from extensive hazardous and radiological materials characterization, GA evaluated four decommissioning options and selected dismantling as the only option that would satisfy the decommissioning objective. The decontamination and decommissioning scope included the following actions. 1. Remove the legacy waste that consisted of radioactive wastes stored at the HCF consisting of 21,434 kg of irradiated fuel material (IFM) that was owned by the US DoE and store the waste in temporary storage set up at the GA site. 2. Actual Decontamination and Dismantlement

  17. An Applied Study on the Decontamination and Decommissioning of Hot Cell Facilities in the United States and Comparison with the Studsvik Facility for Solid and Liquid Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varley, Geoff; Rusch, Chris [NAC International, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2006-07-15

    This report presents the plans, processes and results of the decontamination and decommissioning of the Hot Cell Facility in Building 23 at the General Atomics Torrey Pines Mesa Facility (HCF) and compares the program and cost of decommissioning HCF with the Swedish cost estimate for decontamination and decommissioning of the HM hot cell and wastes treatment facility at Studsvik in Sweden. The HCF had three main hot cells and was licensed to: Receive, handle and ship radioactive materials; Remotely handle, examine and store irradiated fuel materials; Extract tritium (engineering scale); Support new reactor production development; Develop, fabricate and inspect UO{sub 2} - BeO fuel materials. The HM facility in Studsvik was constructed to handle and package medium-active solid and liquid wastes, prior to disposal. Central to the facility is a conventional hot cell including three work stations, serviced by master slave manipulators. Other parts of the facility include holding tanks for liquid wastes and slurries, a centrifuge room, as well as an encapsulation station where drummed wastes can be encapsulated in cement, offices, laboratories and workshops and so on, as well as building and cell ventilation systems. Decontamination and decommissioning of the HCF took place during 1993 through 2001. The objective was to obtain regulatory release of the site so that it could be used on an unrestricted basis. Based on data from extensive hazardous and radiological materials characterization, GA evaluated four decommissioning options and selected dismantling as the only option that would satisfy the decommissioning objective. The decontamination and decommissioning scope included the following actions. 1. Remove the legacy waste that consisted of radioactive wastes stored at the HCF consisting of 21,434 kg of irradiated fuel material (IFM) that was owned by the US DoE and store the waste in temporary storage set up at the GA site. 2. Actual Decontamination and

  18. Testing and comparison of seventeen decontamination chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demmer, R.L.

    1996-09-01

    This report details the testing and evaluation of seventeen decontamination chemicals. Tests were conducted with SIMCON (simulated contamination) coupons under controlled conditions to compare cleaning effectiveness, overall corrosion potential for plant equipment, interim waste generation and final waste generation

  19. Fiscal year 1996 decontamination and decommissioning activities photobriefing book for the Argonne National Laboratory-East Site, Technology Development Division, Waste Management Program, Decontamination and Decommissioning Projects Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Photobriefing Book describes the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program at the Argonne National Laboratory-East Site (ANL-E) near Lemont, Illinois. This book summarizes current D and D projects, reviews fiscal year (FY) 1996 accomplishments, and outlines FY 1997 goals. A section on D and D Technology Development provides insight on new technologies for D and D developed or demonstrated at ANL-E. Past projects are recapped and upcoming projects are described as Argonne works to accomplish its commitment to, ''Close the Circle on the Splitting of the Atom.'' Finally, a comprehensive review of the status and goals of the D and D Program is provided to give a snap-shot view of the program and the direction it's taking as it moves into FY 1997. The D and D projects completed to date include: Plutonium Fuel Fabrication Facility; East Area Surplus Facilities; Experimental Boiling Water Reactor; M-Wing Hot Cell Facilities; Plutonium Gloveboxes; and Fast Neutron Generator

  20. Design documentation: Krypton encapsulation preconceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knecht, D.A.

    1994-10-01

    US EPA regulations limit the release of Krypton-85 to the environment from commercial facilities after January 1, 1983. In order to comply with these regulations, Krypton-85, which would be released during reprocessing of commercial nuclear fuel, must be collected and stored. Technology currently exists for separation of krypton from other inert gases, and for its storage as a compressed gas in steel cylinders. The requirements, which would be imposed for 100-year storage of Krypton-85, have led to development of processes for encapsulation of krypton within a stable solid matrix. The objective of this effort was to provide preconceptual engineering designs, technical evaluations, and life cycle costing data for comparison of two alternate candidate processes for encapsulation of Krypton-85. This report has been prepared by The Ralph M. Parsons Company for the US Department of Energy

  1. Design documentation: Krypton encapsulation preconceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knecht, D.A. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-10-01

    US EPA regulations limit the release of Krypton-85 to the environment from commercial facilities after January 1, 1983. In order to comply with these regulations, Krypton-85, which would be released during reprocessing of commercial nuclear fuel, must be collected and stored. Technology currently exists for separation of krypton from other inert gases, and for its storage as a compressed gas in steel cylinders. The requirements, which would be imposed for 100-year storage of Krypton-85, have led to development of processes for encapsulation of krypton within a stable solid matrix. The objective of this effort was to provide preconceptual engineering designs, technical evaluations, and life cycle costing data for comparison of two alternate candidate processes for encapsulation of Krypton-85. This report has been prepared by The Ralph M. Parsons Company for the US Department of Energy.

  2. Immobilization technology for krypton in amorphous zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takusagawa, Atsushi; Ishiyama, Keiichi

    1989-01-01

    Radioactive krypton recovered from the offgas of a reprocessing plant requires long-term storage on the order of 100 years. Immobilization technology for krypton into amorphous zeolite 5A is considered one of the best methods for long-term storage. In this report, conditions for immobilization treatment and stability of amorphous zeolite 5A loaded krypton against heat, radiation and water are discussed, and a treatment system using this technology is described. (author)

  3. Krypton retention on solid adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monson, P.R. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental laboratory program was conducted to develop economical solid adsorbents for the retention of krypton from a dissolver off-gas stream. The study indicates that a solid adsorbent system is feasible and competitive with other developing systems which utilize fluorocarbon absorption nd cryogenic distillation. This technology may have potential applications not only in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, but also in nuclear reactors and in environmental monitoring. Of the 13 prospective adsorbents evaluated with respect to adsorption capacity and cost, the commercially available hydrogen mordenite was the most cost-effective material at subambient temperatures (-40 0 to -80 0 C). Silver mordenite has a higher capacity for krypton retention, but is 50 times more expensive than hydrogen mordenite

  4. Long-term storage of recovered krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horii, Yuji; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa

    1983-01-01

    Various storage methods for krypton-85 recovered from a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant are under development in many countries. These methods include:(1) direct storage in pressurized cylinders, (2) storage of krypton adsorbed on charcoal or zeolite in pressurized cylinders and (3) immobilization (encapsulation) in zeolite. A krypton storage facility using pressurized cylinders has been constructed in the krypton recovery pilot plant in Tokaimura and other methods are now under development. These three methods are evaluated and the features of the constructed facility are also reported. (author)

  5. Separation, storage and disposal of krypton-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Technical means available for the retention of 85 Kr and its immobilization, storage and disposal are reviewed. Cryogenic processes for the separation of krypton and xenon from diluting gases are discussed in more detail. Besides the cryogenic processes, a liquid adsorption process for reprocessing off-gases and charcoal adsorption and membrane processes for reactor off-gases are also dealt with. The retained krypton can be stored in pressurized containers with air or water cooling. The containers can be kept in engineered storage facilities for an intermediate period or until the 85 Kr has decayed. Alternatively, the krypton may be encapsulated in a solid. The injection of gases containing krypton into suitable geologic strata may also be possible. Much of the equipment required for the separation and storage of krypton, well known from ordinary technology, often needs some adaptation. Further R and D work is, however, needed to solve some problems which are specific to highly concentrated fission krypton. The subject is reviewed under the following headings: methods available for the separation of krypton from off-gases; separation of krypton from reactor off-gas; separation of krypton from reprocessing off-gas; conditioning methods; engineering storage; transportation; disposal

  6. An improved potential for krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    An improved potential for krypton is presented. It has the simple but realistic form used by Aziz and Chen for argon based on the HFD potential suggested by Ahlrichs et.al. The potential, with known long-range behaviour, was fitted to second virial, viscosity and thermal conductivity data. The potential appears to have the best overall predictive ability for dilute gas, bulk and microscopic data. (author)

  7. Decontamination and decommissioning of the initial engine test facility and the IET two-inch hot-waste line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, F.E.

    1987-04-01

    The Initial Engine Test Decommissioning Project is described in this report. The Initial Engine Test facility was constructed and operated at the National Reactor Testing Station, now known as the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, to support the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion Program and the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power Transient test program, circa 1950 through 1960s. Due to the severe nature of these nuclear test programs, a significant amount of radioactive contamination was deposited in various portions of the Initial Engine Test Facility. Characterizations, decision analyses, and plans for decontamination and decommissioning were prepared from 1982 through 1985. Decontamination and decommissioning activities were performed in such a way that no radiological health or safety hazard to the public or to personnel at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory remains. These decontamination and decommissioning activities began in 1985 and were completed in 1987. 13 figs

  8. Development of high-level radioactive waste treatment and conversion technologies 'Dry decontamination technology development for highly radioactive contaminants'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Zin; Lee, K. W.; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. J.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K

    2001-04-01

    The followings were studied through the project entitled 'Dry Decontamination Technology Development for Highly Radioactive Contaminants'. 1.Contaminant Characteristics Analysis of Domestic Nuclear Fuel Cycle Projects(NFCP) and Applicability Study of the Unit Dry-Decontamination Techniques A. Classification of contaminated equipments and characteristics analysis of contaminants B. Applicability study of the unit dry-decontamination techniques 2.Performance Evaluation of Unit Dry Decontamination Technique A. PFC decontamination technique B. CO2 decontamination technique C. Plasma decontamination technique 3.Development of Residual Radiation Assessment Methodology for High Radioactive Facility Decontamination A. Development of radioactive nuclide diffusion model on highly radioactive facility structure B. Obtainment of the procedure for assessment of residual radiation dose 4.Establishment of the Design Concept of Dry Decontamination Process Equipment Applicable to Highly Radioactive Contaminants 5.TRIGA soil unit decontamination technology development A. Development of soil washing and flushing technologies B. Development of electrokinetic soil decontamination technology.

  9. CONTAMINATED PROCESS EQUIPMENT REMOVAL FOR THE DECOMMISSIONG AND DECONTAMINATION OF THE 232-Z CONTAMINATED WASTE RECOVERY PROCESS FACILITY AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOPKINS, A.M.; MINETTE, M.J.; KLOS, D.B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the unique challenges encountered and subsequent resolutions to accomplish the deactivation and decontamination of a plutonium ash contaminated building. The 232-Z Contaminated Waste Recovery Process Facility at the Plutonium Finishing Plant was used to recover plutonium from process wastes such as rags, gloves, containers and other items by incinerating the items and dissolving the resulting ash. The incineration process resulted in a light-weight plutonium ash residue that was highly mobile in air. This light-weight ash coated the incinerator's process equipment, which included gloveboxes, blowers, filters, furnaces, ducts, and filter boxes. Significant airborne contamination (over 1 million derived air concentration hours [DAC]) was found in the scrubber cell of the facility. Over 1300 grams of plutonium held up in the process equipment and attached to the walls had to be removed, packaged and disposed. This ash had to be removed before demolition of the building could take place

  10. Precipitation process for supernate decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, L.M.; Kilpatrick, L.L.

    1982-11-01

    A precipitation and adsorption process has been developed to remove cesium, strontium, and plutonium from water-soluble, high-level radioactive waste. An existing waste tank serves as the reaction vessel and the process begins with the addition of a solution of sodium tetraphenylborate and a slurry of sodium titanate to the contained waste salt solution. Sodium tetraphenylborate precipitates the cesium and sodium titanate adsorbs the strontium and plutonium. The precipitate/adsorbate is then separated from the decontaminated salt solution by crossflow filtration. This new process offers significant capital savings over an earlier ion exchange process for salt decontamination. Chemical and small-scale engineering studies with actual waste are reported. The effect of many variables on the decontamination factors and filter performance are defined

  11. Decontamination and decommissioning techniques for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. H.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Lee, K. W.

    2002-05-01

    Evaluation of soil decontamination process and the liquid decontamination waste treatment technology are investigation of organic acid as a decontamination agent, investigation of the liquid waste purification process and identification of recycling the decontamination agents. Participation on IAEA CRP meeting are preparation of IAEA technical report on 'studies on decommissioning of TRIGA reactors and site restoration technologies' and exchange the research result, technology, experience and safety regulation of the research reactor D and D of USA, Great Britain, Canada, Belgium, Italy, India and so forth

  12. Decontamination and coating of lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.N.; Bush, S.P.; Lyon, C.E.; Walker, V.

    1988-01-01

    Technology is being developed to decontaminate lead used in shielding applications in contaminated environments for recycle as shieldings. Technology is also being developed to coat either decontaminated lead or new lead before it is used in contaminated environments. The surface of the coating is expected to be much easier to decontaminate than the original lead surface. If contamination becomes severely embedded in the coating and cannot be removed, it can be easily cut with a knife and removed from the lead. The used coating can be disposed of as radioactive (hot hazardous) waste. The lead can then be recoated for further use as a shielding material

  13. Decontamination method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimura, Hiroshi; Ono, Shigeki; Tada, Nobuo; Tamai, Yasumasa; Okada, Masaya; Kurihara, Masayuki; Onuki, Toyomitsu; Toyota, Seiichi

    1998-01-01

    Before contamination of materials to be decontaminated, a surface of a region where a strippable paint is to be coated is smoothed by an epoxy resin previously. Then, a waterproof sheet is extended to the material to be decontaminated, and the strippable paint is applied to the periphery or the entire surface of the sheet. In order to facilitate peeling, the strippable paint is not applied to a portion of the outer circumference of the sheet. Even if the contaminating circumstance is an air atmosphere or a liquid such as reactor water, since the sheet itself has waterproofness and the strippable paint excellent in gas and water tightness is applied to the periphery, contamination is eliminated. When decontaminating the material to be decontaminated having contaminated surfaces, if the sheet for the start of peeling is picked up and the sheet is peeled, the strippable paint at the periphery thereof can be peeled off together with the sheet. (N.H.)

  14. Decontamination method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimura, Hiroshi; Ono, Shigeki; Tada, Nobuo; Tamai, Yasumasa; Okada, Masaya; Kurihara, Masayuki [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Onuki, Toyomitsu; Toyota, Seiichi

    1998-10-27

    Before contamination of materials to be decontaminated, a surface of a region where a strippable paint is to be coated is smoothed by an epoxy resin previously. Then, a waterproof sheet is extended to the material to be decontaminated, and the strippable paint is applied to the periphery or the entire surface of the sheet. In order to facilitate peeling, the strippable paint is not applied to a portion of the outer circumference of the sheet. Even if the contaminating circumstance is an air atmosphere or a liquid such as reactor water, since the sheet itself has waterproofness and the strippable paint excellent in gas and water tightness is applied to the periphery, contamination is eliminated. When decontaminating the material to be decontaminated having contaminated surfaces, if the sheet for the start of peeling is picked up and the sheet is peeled, the strippable paint at the periphery thereof can be peeled off together with the sheet. (N.H.)

  15. Skin decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moehrle, G.

    1975-01-01

    A general survey of skin decontamination is given. The success of every decontamination treatments depends mainly on the speed, but also on the care, with which the action is taken. The best way to remove the skin contaminants is thorough washing under lukewarm running water with mild soap and a soft brush. This washing is to be repeated several times for a period of several minutes. If results are not satisfactory, light duty detergents and wetting agents available commercially may also be used. Some solutions which have proved useful are mentioned. The decontamination solutions are best used in the order given. When one has no satisfactory decontamination effect, the next one is to be used. If necessary, these agents must be used several times in the stated order as long as this does not involve too much strain for the skin. All the decontamination measures mentioned refer, of course, to intact healthy skin. After decontamination has been completed, the skin should be treated with a protective cream

  16. Atmospheric krypton-85 during 1962 and 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehhalt, D.; Muennich, K. O.; Roether, W.; Schoelch, J.; Stich, W.

    1963-11-15

    The krypton-85 found in the atmosphere presumably originates from two different sources, namely fission bomb tests and processing of burned-out fuel elements from nuclear reactors. This paper discusses the impact of the sources of krypton in the atmosphere in greater detail.

  17. Development and assessment of two decontamination processes: closed electropolishing system for decontamination of underwater surfaces -vibratory decontamination with abrasives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benavides, E.; Fajardo, M.

    1992-01-01

    Two decontamination processes have been developed to decontaminate the stainless steel components of nuclear power plants. The first process uses an underwater closed electropolishing system for the decontamination of large stainless steel surfaces in flooded systems without loss of electrolyte. Large underwater contaminated areas can be treated with an electropolishing head covering an area of 2 m 2 in one step. The decontamination factors achieved with this technique range between 100 and 1000. The second process consists in the decontamination of nuclear components using vibratory equipment with self-cleaning abrasives generating a minimum quantity of waste. This technique may reach contamination factors similar to those obtained with other abrasive methods (brush abrasion, abrasive blasting, etc...). The obtained decontamination factors range between 5 and 50. Only a small quantity of waste is generated, which is treated and reduced in volume by filtration and evaporation

  18. Absorption process for removing krypton from the off-gas of an LMFBR fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, M.J.; Dunthorn, D.I.; Reed, W.D.; Pashley, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant selective absorption process for the collection and recovery of krypton and xenon is being further developed to demonstrate, on a pilot scale, a fluorocarbon-based process for removing krypton from the off-gas of an LMFBR fuel reprocessing plant. The new ORGDP selective absorption pilot plant consists of a primary absorption-stripping operation and all peripheral equipment required for feed gas preparation, process solvent recovery, process solvent purification, and krypton product purification. The new plant is designed to achieve krypton decontamination factors in excess of 10 3 with product concentration factors greater than 10 4 while processing a feed gas containing typical quantities of common reprocessing plant off-gas impurities, including oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, water, xenon, iodine, and methyl iodide. Installation and shakedown of the facility were completed and some short-term tests were conducted early this year. The first operating campaign using a simulated reprocessing plant off-gas feed is now underway. The current program objective is to demonstrate continuous process operability and performance for extended periods of time while processing the simulated ''dirty'' feed. This year's activity will be devoted to routine off-gas processing with little or no deliberate system perturbations. Future work will involve the study of the system behavior under feed perturbations and various plant disturbances. (U.S.)

  19. Capture and immobilization of krypton-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitmell, D.S.; Geens, L.; Penzhorn, R.D.; Smith, M.J.S.

    1985-01-01

    It may become necessary to contain the krypton-85 released from nuclear fuel during reprocessing in order to reduce the exposure to the local population and the radioactive background throughout the world. A brief description is given of studies being carried out in the Indirect Action Programme. The separation of krypton from other off-gases by cryogenic distillation in the presence of oxygen is being studied at SCK/CEN Mol, together with the behavior of ozone in the distillation column. Two processes for the immobilization of krypton in solid forms have been successfully developed and demonstrated. At KfK Karlsruhe, krypton is encapsulated in vitrified zeolites; at AERE Harwell, krypton is immobilized within a metallic matrix. These processes offer excellent gas retention and either could be adopted for a reprocessing plant

  20. Decontamination in the Republic of Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antsipov, G.V.; Matveenko, S.A.; Mirkhaidarov, A.Kh.

    2002-01-01

    To continue the decontamination work in the Republic of Belarus, which was carried out by the military troops, the state specialized enterprises were formed in Gomel and Mogilev in 1991. The organization and regulations were developed inside the country: instructions, rules, radiological and hygienic criteria and norms. The enterprises concentrated on decontamination of the most socially significant facilities: kindergartens, schools, medical institutions and industrial enterprises. During 9 years Gomel State Specialized Enterprise 'Polessje' decontaminated 130 kindergartens, schools and hospitals. The total decontaminated area was 450 000 m 2 . The ventilation systems and equipment at 27 industrial enterprises in Gomel were decontaminated. The practical decontamination methods for areas, buildings, roofs, industrial equipment, ventilation systems were developed and tested. The special rules for handling wastes contaminated with Cs were elaborated. The paper analyzes and sums up the acquired experience which is important for implementation of rehabilitation programs and improvement of decontamination methods. (author)

  1. Decontamination Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Jung, Chong Hun; Choi, Wang Kyu; Won, Hui Jun; Kim, Gye Nam

    2004-02-01

    Technology development of surface decontamination in the uranium conversion facility before decommissioning, technology development of component decontamination in the uranium conversion facility after decommissioning, uranium sludge treatment technology development, radioactive waste soil decontamination technology development at the aim of the temporary storage soil of KAERI, Optimum fixation methodology derivation on the soil and uranium waste, and safety assessment methodology development of self disposal of the soil and uranium waste after decontamination have been performed in this study. The unique decontamination technology applicable to the component of the nuclear facility at room temperature was developed. Low concentration chemical decontamination technology which is very powerful so as to decrease the radioactivity of specimen surface under the self disposal level was developed. The component decontamination technology applicable to the nuclear facility after decommissioning by neutral salt electro-polishing was also developed. The volume of the sludge waste could be decreased over 80% by the sludge waste separation method by water. The electrosorption method on selective removal of U(VI) to 1 ppm of unrestricted release level using the uranium-containing lagoon sludge waste was tested and identified. Soil decontamination process and equipment which can reduce the soil volume over 90% were developed. A pilot size of soil decontamination equipment which will be used to development of real scale soil decontamination equipment was designed, fabricated and demonstrated. Optimized fixation methodology on soil and uranium sludge was derived from tests and evaluation of the results. Safety scenario and safety evaluation model were development on soil and uranium sludge aiming at self disposal after decontamination

  2. Decontamination impacts on solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piciulo, P.L.; Davis, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The increased occupational exposure resulting from the accumulation of activated corrosion products in the primary system of LWRs has led to the development of chemical methods to remove the contamination. In the past, the problem of enhanced migration of radionuclides away from trenches used to dispose of low-level radioactive waste, has been linked to the presence, at the disposal unit, of chelating or complexing agents such as those used in decontamination processes. These agents have further been found to reduce the normal sorptive capacity of soils for radionuclides. The degree to which these agents inhibit the normal sorptive processes is dependent on the type of complexing agent, the radionuclide of concern, the soil properties and whether the nuclide is present as a complex or is already sorbed to the soil. Since the quantity of reagent employed in a full system decontamination is large (200 to 25,000 kg), the potential for enhanced migration of radionuclides from a site used to dispose of the decontamination wastes should be addressed and guidelines established for the safe disposal of these wastes

  3. Decontamination of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Thirty-seven papers were presented at this conference in five sessions. Topics covered include regulation, control and consequences of decontamination; decontamination of components and facilities; chemical and non-chemical methods of decontamination; and TMI decontamination experience

  4. Chemically reducing decontamination method for radioactive metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Akio; Onuma, Tsutomu; Sato, Hitoshi.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a decontamination method of electrolytically reducing radioactive metal wastes, then chemically dissolving the surface thereof with a strong acid decontaminating solution. This method utilizes dissolving characteristics of stainless steels in the strong acid solution. That is, in the electrolytic reduction operation, a portion of the metal wastes is brought into contact with a strong acid decontaminating solution, and voltage and current are applied to the portion and keep it for a long period of time so as to make the potential of the immersed portion of the metal wastes to an active soluble region. Then, the electrolytic reduction operation is stopped, and the metal wastes are entirely immersed in the decontaminating solution to decontaminate by chemical dissolution. As the decontaminating solution, strong acid such as sulfuric acid, nitric acid is used. Since DC current power source capacity required for causing reaction in the active soluble region can be decreased, the decontamination facility can be minimized and simplified, and necessary electric power can be saved even upon decontamination of radioactive metal wastes made of stainless steels and having a great area. Further, chemical dissolution can be conducted without adding an expensive oxidizing agent. (N.H.)

  5. Iridotomy with red krypton laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassur, Y; David, R; Rosenblatt, I; Marmour, U

    1986-01-01

    Iridotomy with red krypton laser instead of blue-green argon laser was performed on 68 eyes with various types of angle-closure glaucoma. Patent iridotomy was obtained in all the eyes, mostly in one working session. In eight eyes secondary closure by pigment needed reopening with a few applications at the iridotomy site. There were no immediate or late complications of importance, the main advantage of the technique being the avoidance of the corneal epithelial and endothelial burns which commonly occur during argon laser iridotomy, particularly when the anterior chamber is shallow. PMID:3964628

  6. Decontamination of irradiated fuel processing waste using lead paraperiodate; Decontamination des effluents de traitement des combustibles irradies par le paraperiodate de plomb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auchapt, J M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Chusclan (France). Centre de Production de Plutonium de Marcoule

    1967-07-01

    The process is designed to eliminate ruthenium. It consists in an oxidation using para-periodic acid whose excess, acting then as a carrying-over agent, is precipitated in the form of a lead salt at a pH of 5 or 6. This process makes it possible to precipitate 80 to 98 per cent of the ruthenium which is not removed by the conventional precipitation techniques which follow it. If the waste is a reducing agent, it is pre-oxidized using ozone or potassium permanganate. The process was developed at Marcoule in 1963 and has since 1965 been applied industrially; its cost price is of the same order of magnitude as conventional processes and its results are satisfactory. (author) [French] Le procede est destine a l'elimination du ruthenium. Il consiste en une oxydation par l'acide par paraperiodique dont l'exces, jouant alors le role d'entraineur, est precipite sous forme de sel de plomb a pH 5 ou 6. Ce traitement permet de precipiter 80 a 98 pour cent du ruthenium rebelle aux traitements de precipitation classique, qui doivent le suivre. Si l'effluent est reducteur il est preoxyde a l'ozone ou au permanganate de potassium. Mis au point a Marcoule en 1963, il est depuis 1965 exploite industriellement, son prix de revient est du meme ordre de grandeur que celui des traitements habituels et les resultats ont donne satisfaction. (auteur)

  7. The Auburn Engineering Technical Assistance Program investigation of polyvinyl alcohol film developments pertaining to radioactive particle decontamination and industrial waste minimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mole, Tracey Lawrence

    In this work, an effective and systematic model is devised to synthesize the optimal formulation for an explicit engineering application in the nuclear industry, i.e. radioactive decontamination and waste reduction. Identification of an optimal formulation that is suitable for the desired system requires integration of all the interlacing behaviors of the product constituents. This work is unique not only in product design, but also in these design techniques. The common practice of new product development is to design the optimized product for a particular industrial niche and then subsequent research for the production process is conducted, developed and optimized separately from the product formulation. In this proposed optimization design technique, the development process, disposal technique and product formulation is optimized simultaneously to improve production profit, product behavior and disposal emissions. This "cradle to grave" optimization approach allowed a complex product formulation development process to be drastically simplified. The utilization of these modeling techniques took an industrial idea to full scale testing and production in under 18 months by reducing the number of subsequent laboratory trials required to optimize the formula, production and waste treatment aspects of the product simultaneously. This particular development material involves the use of a polymer matrix that is applied to surfaces as part of a decontamination system. The polymer coating serves to initially "fix" the contaminants in place for detection and ultimate elimination. Upon mechanical entrapment and removal, the polymer coating containing the radioactive isotopes can be dissolved in a solvent processor, where separation of the radioactive metallic particles can take place. Ultimately, only the collection of divided solids should be disposed of as nuclear waste. This creates an attractive alternative to direct land filling or incineration. This philosophy also

  8. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium trader pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of contaminated lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling

  9. Ultra-Trace Analysis of Krypton-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daerr, H.; Kalinowski, M.; Kohler, M.; Sahling, P.

    2010-01-01

    To strengthen the efficiency and effectiveness of nuclear safeguards for detecting undeclared nuclear material and activities we propose to use the radioactive krypton isotope Krypton-85 as a tracer for clandestine plutonium production. The main idea is to detect inexplicable atmospheric Kr85 concentration using the novel technology atom trap trace analysis (ATTA) in order to detect an undeclared reprocessing facility. The Additional Protocol (INFCIRC/540, 1997) establishes the possibility to take environmental samples. Krypton-85 has a combination of unique features which makes it an ideal tracer for plutonium separation activities anywhere in the world. It is always generated along with plutonium and 99.9% remains within the fuel cladding. Due to its half-life of 10.76 years, significant amounts of krypton-85 still remain in the spent fuel even after long cooling times. Krypton is not removed from the atmosphere by any processes like chemical reactions or wash-out. Furthermore, there are no other relevant sources of krypton-85 besides of reprocessing. The novel technology of atom trap trace analysis (ATTA) has been demonstrated by the physics group at Argonne National Laboratory in 1999. This is an ultra-sensitive trace analysis technique able to detect single krypton atoms. We are setting up an ATTA apparatus in our laboratory, which is designed to fulfill all requirements to detect clandestine plutonium production. Our goal is to determine Krypton-85 concentration of one liter samples of atmospheric air with an analysis time of 3 hours. This sample volume reduction is a significant step, since one liter can be taken as a grab sample by sucking it directly into pre-evacuated bottles at atmospheric pressure. The small samples size and the short analysis time of ATTA will make it possible to use krypton-85 as a tracer for clandestine plutonium production with routine operation. (author)

  10. Site decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicker, A.E.

    1981-01-01

    Among the several DOE sites that have been radiologically decontaminated under the auspices of the Nevada Operations Office are three whose physical characteristics are unique. These are the Tatum Dome Test Site (TDTS) near Hattiesburg, Mississippi; a location of mountainous terrain (Pahute Mesa) on the Nevada Test Site; and the GNOME site near Carlsbad, New Mexico. In each case the contamination, the terrain, and the climate conditions were different. This presentation includes a brief description of each site, the methods used to perform radiological surveys, the logistics required to support the decontamination (including health physics and sample analysis), and the specific techniques used to reduce or remove the contamination

  11. Recent developments in chemical decontamination technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, C.J. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Chemical decontamination of parts of reactor coolant systems is a mature technology, used routinely in many BWR plants, but less frequently in PWRs. This paper reviews recent developments in the technology - corrosion minimization, waste processing and full system decontamination, including the fuel. Earlier work was described in an extensive review published in 1990.

  12. Eleventh annual Department of Energy low-level waste management conference. Volume 2: Low-level waste strategy and planning, decontamination and decommissioning, compliance monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-11-01

    Nineteen papers are presented in volume 2. The 11 papers in the LLW Strategy and Planning section discuss plans for disposal facilities in Texas, Pennsylvania, Hanford, the Southwest and Southeast Compacts, and others. Three papers discuss decontamination technology and activities. Environmental monitoring requirements and recommendations at LLW facilities are discussed in 5 papers. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  13. Liquid decontaminants for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, Klaus; Gojowczyk, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Decontaminants used in the nuclear field must meet a variety of requirements. On the one hand, the washing process must remove radioactive contamination and conventional dirt from the items washed. On the other hand, subsequent disposal of the washing water arisings must be feasible by the usual waste disposal pathway. One aspect of particular importance is unproblematic treatment of the radioactively contaminated waste water, as a rule low to medium active, whose final storage must be ensured. Decontaminants must not impair waste treatment processes, such as evaporation, filtration, and centrifuging, as well as further treatment of the concentrates and residues arising which are worked into matrix materials (cementation, bituminization), in drum drying or roller mill drying. For reasons of safety at work and environmental quality, also aspects of human toxicology and ecotoxicology must be taken into account. In this way, handling decontaminants will not jeopardize the health of personnel or cause potential long-term environmental damage. Liquid decontaminants, compared to powders, offer the advantage of automatic dosage. The liquid product is dosed accurately as a function of the washing program used. Liquid decontaminants can be handled safely in hot laundries without causing skin and eye contacts. (orig.)

  14. Salt decontamination demonstration test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, E.B.; Heng, C.J.

    1983-06-01

    The Salt Decontamination Demonstration confirmed that the precipitation process could be used for large-scale decontamination of radioactive waste sale solution. Although a number of refinements are necessary to safely process the long-term requirement of 5 million gallons of waste salt solution per year, there were no observations to suggest that any fundamentals of the process require re-evaluation. Major accomplishments were: (1) 518,000 gallons of decontaminated filtrate were produced from 427,000 gallons of waste salt solution from tank 24H. The demonstration goal was to produce a minimum of 200,000 gallons of decontaminated salt solution; (2) cesium activity in the filtrate was reduced by a factor of 43,000 below the cesium activity in the tank 24 solution. This decontamination factor (DF) exceeded the demonstration goal of a DF greater than 10,000; (3) average strontium-90 activity in the filtrate was reduced by a factor of 26 to less than 10 3 d/m/ml versus a goal of less than 10 4 d/m/ml; and (4) the concentrated precipitate was washed to a final sodium ion concentration of 0.15 M, well below the 0.225 M upper limit for DWPF feed. These accomplishments were achieved on schedule and without incident. Total radiation exposure to personnel was less than 350 mrem and resulted primarily from sampling precipitate slurry inside tank 48. 3 references, 6 figures, 2 tables

  15. Decontaminating products for routine decontamination in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, K.

    2001-01-01

    Routine decontamination work that has to be carried out in practical operation includes the cleaning of all kinds of surfaces such as floors, walls and apparatus, the decontamination of professional clothes and of the personnel. In order to ensure a trouble-free functioning of plants for the treatment of waste water and concentrate in nuclear power plants, radioactive liquid wastes appearing in the controlled area should be compatible with the treatment methods in practice. Radioactive concentrates and resides obtained from the treatment methods are mixed with matrix materials like cement or bitumen or treated by roller frame drying and thus are conditioned for intermediate or final storage. Several requirements should be made on decontaminating agents used in the controlled area. Some of these physical-chemical criteria will be described in detail. (R.P.)

  16. Soil decontamination with Extraksol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paquin, J.; Mourato, D.

    1989-01-01

    The Extraksol process is a mobile decontamination technology which treats unconsolidated materials by solvent extraction. Treatment with Extraksol involves material washing, drying and solvent regeneration. Contaminant removal is achieved through desorption/dissolution mechanisms. The treated material is dry and acceptable to be reinstalled in its original location. The process provides a fast, efficient and versatile alternative for decontamination of soil and sludge. The organic contaminants extracted from the matrix are transferred to the extraction fluids. These are thereafter concentrated in the residues of distillation after solvent regeneration. Removal and concentration of the contaminants ensures an important waste volume reduction. This paper presents the process is operational principles and the steps involved in Extraksol's development with results of the pilot tests and full-scale demonstrations

  17. Sunflowers to decontaminate water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Sunflowers offer a new method of decontamination. 55 kilograms (dry weight) of sunflowers are able to decontaminate all the cesium 137 and the strontium 90 polluting a pond situated at one kilometer from Tchernobyl. These flowers are able to decrease 95% in 24 hours the uranium concentration in the american site of Ashtabula in Ohio getting this water from 350 parts by milliards to less than 5 parts by milliards. The radioactivity should stocked in the roots at concentrations 5 000 to 10 000 times higher than water concentration. The cost is cheaper than micro filtration and precipitation (2-6 dollars for 4 000 liters of water against 80 dollars for others technologies). when sunflowers are radioactive they can be reduced in dust and vitrified and stocked as solid radioactive wastes. (N.C.)

  18. Deuterium migration in nuclear graphite: Consequences for the behavior of tritium in CO{sub 2}-cooled reactors and for the decontamination of irradiated graphite waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guillou, M. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 4, rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Agence nationale pour la gestion des déchets radioactifs, DRD/CM – 1-7, rue Jean Monnet, Parc de la Croix-Blanche, F-92298 Châtenay-Malabry cedex (France); Toulhoat, N., E-mail: nelly.toulhoat@univ-lyon1.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 4, rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); CEA/DEN – Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Pipon, Y. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 4, rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Institut Universitaire Technologique, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 43, boulevard du 11 novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Moncoffre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon – 4, rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Khodja, H. [Laboratoire d’Etude des Eléments Légers, CEA/DSM/IRAMIS/NIMBE, UMR 3299 SIS2M – Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we aim at understanding tritium behavior in the graphite moderator of French CO{sub 2}-cooled nuclear fission reactors (called UNGG for “Uranium Naturel-Graphite-Gaz”) to get information on its distribution and inventory in the irradiated graphite waste after their dismantling. These findings should be useful both to improve waste treatment processes and to foresee tritium behavior during reactor decommissioning and waste disposal operations. The purpose of the present work is to elucidate the effects of temperature on the behavior of tritium during reactor operation. Furthermore, it aims at exploring options of thermal decontamination. For both purposes, annealing experiments were carried out in inert atmosphere as well as in thermal conditions as close as possible to those encountered in UNGG reactors and in view of a potential decontamination in humid gas. D{sup +} ions were implanted into virgin nuclear graphite in order to simulate tritium displaced from its original structural site through recoil during reactor operation. The effect of thermal treatments on the mobility of the implanted deuterium was then investigated at temperatures ranging from 200 to 1200 °C, in inert atmosphere (vacuum or argon), in a gas simulating the UNGG coolant gas (mainly CO{sub 2}) or in humid nitrogen. Deuterium was analyzed by Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) both at millimetric and micrometric scales. We have identified three main stages for the deuterium release. The first one corresponds to deuterium permeation through graphite open pores. The second and third ones are controlled by the progressive detrapping of deuterium located at different trapping sites and its successive migration through the crystallites and along crystallites and coke grains edges. Extrapolating the thermal behavior of deuterium to tritium, the results show that the release becomes significant above the maximum UNGG reactor temperature of 500 °C and should be lower than 30% of the

  19. Krypton based adsorption type cryogenic refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Schember, Helene R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Krypton and a monolithic porous carbon such as Saran carbon are used respectively as the sorbate and sorbent of an adsorption type refrigerator to improve refrigeration efficiency and operational longevity.

  20. Krypton-85 pollution and atmospheric electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, R.G.; ApSimon, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    Krypton-86 is a chemically inert radioactive gas present in the atmosphere, concentrations of which have been greatly increased by nuclear reprocessing and weapons testing since 1945. The long half-life (10.7 yr), allows the gas to mix thoroughly in the atmosphere. Ionization caused by krypton-85 increases the electrical conductivity of atmospheric air. Further increases in krypton-85 emissions seem inevitable. The increase in air conductivity due to release of krypton-85 will vary with height, and be larger over the oceans than over the land. Increases in conductivity will produce uncertain effects on atmospheric phenomena, so changes are compared in magnitude with other factors perturbing the conductivity, such as combustion aerosol burdens, volcanic eruptions and nuclear weapons testing. Conductivity changes are expected to have the greatest significance for meteorological phenomena close to the source. (Author)

  1. Process and device for the decontamination of the waste gas of the fuel cycle of a fusion reactor of waste gas components containing tritium and/or deuterium in chemically bound form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penzhorn, R.D.; Glugla, M.; Schuster, P.

    1987-01-01

    The waste gas of the fuel cycle of a fusion reactor consists of a mixture of about 85% He and Ar and about 15% of deuteriated and/or tritiated ammonia, methane, water and hydrogen, apart from impurities such as CO, CO 2 , N 2 and O 2 . According to the invention, after oxidation of CO to CO 2 on an oxidation catalyst and after the reduction of water to hydrogen and the removal of O 2 by an O 2 getter metal, ammonia and methane are catalytically decomposed. The released hydrogen isotopes are separated for reuse via a membrane permeable to hydrogen, while the decontaminated waste gas is taken away to the environment. (orig.) [de

  2. Liquid Krypton Calorimeter Calibration Software

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, Christina Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    Calibration of the liquid krypton calorimeter (LKr) of the NA62 experiment is managed by a set of standalone programs, or an online calibration driver. These programs are similar to those used by NA48, but have been updated to utilize classes and translated to C++ while maintaining a common functionality. A set of classes developed to handle communication with hardware was used to develop the three standalone programs as well as the main driver program for online calibration between bursts. The main calibration driver has been designed to respond to run control commands and receive burst data, both transmitted via DIM. In order to facilitate the process of reading in calibration parameters, a serializable class has been introduced, allowing the replacement of standard text files with XML configuration files.

  3. Electromagnetic calorimeter on liquid krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazzotti, M.; Bianco, G.L.; Lanni, F.; Maggi, B.; Palombo, F.; Sala, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on use of noble condensed gases as calorimeter media that is attractive due to the possibility to get not only good energy resolution (like in NaI and CsI calorimeters) but better space resolution for photons. Longitudinal segmentation can provide information for particle identification by dE/dx and also e/π-separation based on longitudinal structure of the shower. The best material for this aim is of course liquid Zenon, but it is impossible to get the necessary amount of it in reasonable time. Therefore, the authors have stopped their choice on the next candidate-liquid Krypton (LKr). Its sufficient amount can be obtained before to the beginning of the experiment

  4. Muonium localization in solid krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storchak, V.; Cox, S.F.J.; Brewer, J.H.; Morris, G.D.

    1995-06-01

    Muonium spin relaxation in zero, longitudinal and transverse magnetic fields has been studied in solid and liquid krypton in the temperature range from 2 K to 120 K. In the solid at low temperatures, the spin dynamics exhibit features characteristic of a magnetically dilute crystal, permitting measurements of exceptionally low muonium diffusion rates. At the lowest temperatures, a static Kubo-Toyabe relaxation function has been observed for the first time for the atomic muonium state, indicating strong interstitial localization in the Kr lattice at low temperatures; muonium is determined to be localized at the tetrahedral interstitial position. At high temperatures, muonium diffusion in solid Kr exhibits a non-classical behaviour. (author). 31 refs., 6 figs

  5. Chemical decontamination of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Akimoto, Hidetoshi

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method for chemical decontamination of radioactive metal waste materials contaminated with radioactive materials on the surface, generated in radioactive materials-handling facilities. The invention is comprised of a method of chemical decontamination of stainless steel, characterized by comprising a first process of immersing a stainless steel-based metal waste material contaminated by radioactive materials on the surface in a sulfuric acid solution and second process of immersing in an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid and oxidizing metal salt, in which a portion of the surface of the stainless steel to be decontaminated is polished mechanically to expose a portion of the base material before the above first and second processes. 1 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Electrochemical decontamination system for actinide processing gloveboxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedman, D.E.; Lugo, J.L.; Ford, D.K.; Nelson, T.O.; Trujillo, V.L.; Martinez, H.E.

    1998-03-01

    An electrolytic decontamination technology has been developed and successfully demonstrated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for the decontamination of actinide processing gloveboxes. The technique decontaminates the interior surfaces of stainless steel gloveboxes utilizing a process similar to electropolishing. The decontamination device is compact and transportable allowing it to be placed entirely within the glovebox line. In this way, decontamination does not require the operator to wear any additional personal protective equipment and there is no need for additional air handling or containment systems. Decontamination prior to glovebox decommissioning reduces the potential for worker exposure and environmental releases during the decommissioning, transport, and size reduction procedures which follow. The goal of this effort is to reduce contamination levels of alpha emitting nuclides for a resultant reduction in waste level category from High Level Transuranic (TRU) to low Specific Activity (LSA, less than or equal 100 nCi/g). This reduction in category results in a 95% reduction in disposal and disposition costs for the decontaminated gloveboxes. The resulting contamination levels following decontamination by this method are generally five orders of magnitude below the LSA specification. Additionally, the sodium sulfate based electrolyte utilized in the process is fully recyclable which results in the minimum of secondary waste. The process bas been implemented on seven gloveboxes within LANL's Plutonium Facility at Technical Area 55. Of these gloveboxes, two have been discarded as low level waste items and the remaining five have been reused

  7. Krypton tagging velocimetry of an underexpanded jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parziale, N J; Smith, M S; Marineau, E C

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we present the excitation/emission strategy, experimental setup, and results of an implementation of krypton tagging velocimetry (KTV). KTV is performed as follows: (i) seed a base flow with krypton; (ii) photosynthesize metastable krypton atoms with a frequency-doubled dye laser to form the tagged tracer; (iii) record the translation of the tagged metastable krypton by imaging the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) that is produced with an additional dye laser. The principle strength of KTV, relative to other tagging velocimetry techniques, is the use of a chemically inert tracer. KTV results are presented for an underexpanded jet of three mixtures of varying Kr/N2 concentration. It is demonstrated that KTV can be used in gas mixtures of relatively low krypton mole fraction (0.5% Kr/99.5% N2), and the KTV data from that experiment are found to be in good agreement with an empirical fit found in the literature. We find that KTV is useful to perform instantaneous velocity measurements with metastable krypton as a chemically inert, dilute, long-lifetime tracer in gas-phase flows.

  8. Atomic structure investigation of ionized krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotze, P.B.

    1981-12-01

    The experimental lifetimes of ionized Krypton are discussed. Theoretical, the Coulomb approximation proves to be a reliable tool for the performance of calculations in Krypton II, where in general good agreement between experimental and theoretical lifetimes is reached, but its vulnerability is exposed in the case of Krypton III, where only results concerning levels with a 4p 3 ( 4 S 0 ) parent core can be obtained. Although the single configuration Hartree-Fock approximation turns out to be an adequate way of obtaining wave functions of excited states in Krypton III, cancellation effects resulting from configuration-interaction mixing, make the calculated transition probabilities in Krypton II less reliable. Previous work on configuration-interaction effects in the spectrum of Krypton II (El 76a, El 76b) reveals that good agreement between experimental and theoretical results can be obtained. A systematic theoretical analysis based on the multi-configurarion Hartree-Fock approximation to account for configuration-interaction effects should contribute a great deal to the existing knowledge of the energy spectra of ionized atoms

  9. Preferential site occupancy observed in coexpanded argon-krypton clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundwall, M.; Bergersen, H.; Lindblad, A.; Oehrwall, G.; Svensson, S.; Bjoerneholm, O.; Tchaplyguine, M.

    2006-01-01

    Free heterogeneous argon-krypton clusters have been produced by coexpansion and investigated by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. By examining cluster surface and bulk binding energy shifts, relative intensities, and peak widths, we show that in the mixed argon-krypton clusters the krypton atoms favor the bulk and argon atoms are pushed to the surface. Furthermore, we show that krypton atoms in the surface layer occupy high-coordination sites and that heterogeneous argon-krypton clusters produced by coexpansion show the same surface structure as argon host clusters doped with krypton. These observations are supported by site-dependent calculations of chemical shifts

  10. Deuterium migration in nuclear graphite: consequences for the behavior of tritium in Gas Cooled Reactors and for the decontamination of irradiated graphite waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le-Guillou, Mael

    2014-01-01

    In France, 23 000 t of irradiated graphite that will be generated by the decommissioning of the first generation Uranium Naturel-Graphite-Gaz (UNGG) nuclear reactors are waiting for a long term management solution. This work focuses on the behavior of tritium, which is one of the main contributors to the radiological inventory of graphite waste after reactor shutdown. In order to anticipate tritium release during dismantling or waste management, it is mandatory to collect data on its migration, location and inventory. Our study is based on the simulation of tritium by implantation of approximately 3 at. % of deuterium up to around 3 μm in a virgin nuclear graphite. This material was then annealed up to 300 h and 1300 C in inert atmosphere, UNGG coolant gas and humid gas, aiming to reproduce thermal conditions close to those encountered in reactor and during waste management operations. The deuterium profiles and spatial distribution were analyzed using the nuclear reaction 2 H( 3 He,p) 4 He. The main results evidence a thermal release of implanted deuterium occurring essentially through three regimes controlled by the detrapping of atomic deuterium located in superficial or interstitial sites. The extrapolation of our data to tritium suggests that its purely thermal release during reactor operations may have been lower than 30 % and would be located close to the graphite free surfaces. Consequently, most of the tritium inventory after reactor shutdown could be trapped deeply within the irradiated graphite structure. Decontamination of graphite waste should then require temperatures higher than 1300 C, and would be more efficient in dry inert gas than in humid gas. (author)

  11. Chemical Gel for Surface Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Moon, J. K.; Won, H. J.; Lee, K. W.; Kim, C. K.

    2010-01-01

    Many chemical decontamination processes operate by immersing components in aggressive chemical solutions. In these applications chemical decontamination technique produce large amounts of radioactive liquid waste. Therefore it is necessary to develop processes using chemical gels instead of chemical solutions, to avoid the well-known disadvantages of chemical decontamination techniques while retaining their high efficiency. Chemical gels decontamination process consists of applying the gel by spraying it onto the surface of large area components (floors, walls, etc) to be decontaminated. The gel adheres to any vertical or complex surface due to their thixotropic properties and operates by dissolving the radioactive deposit, along with a thin layer of the gel support, so that the radioactivity trapped at the surface can be removed. Important aspects of the gels are that small quantities can be used and they show thixitropic properties : liquid during spraying, and solid when stationary, allowing for strong adherence to surfaces. This work investigates the decontamination behaviors of organic-based chemical gel for SS 304 metallic surfaces contaminated with radioactive materials

  12. Analysis of decontamination methods used at nuclear power plants and in other facilities. Research report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlaha, Josef

    2011-10-01

    Methods used in the Czech Republic and in other countries are described. The following topics are treated: Introduction into decontamination; Chemical methods; Foam methods; Electrochemical methods; Mechanical methods; Other methods; Decontamination of civil engineering structures; Technologies suitable for disposal decontamination; and Effect of decontamination on waste management. (P.A.)

  13. Nuclear decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeSurf, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    Decontamination may be accomplished by chemical, electrical, or mechanical means. Recently there have been significant developments in all three categories as well as an increased tendency to combine techniques, either simultaneously (e.g. by adding chemicals to water jets) or sequentially (e.g. by using a mechanical method to remove loose contamination, followed by a chemical method for more tightly bound activity). Some developments in the different techniques are discussed, together with typical applications of each. (author)

  14. Decontamination of CANDU primary coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettit, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    Decontamination of radioactive systems is necessary to reduce personnel radiation exposures and also to reduce exposure during special work. Mechanical decontamination methods are sometimes useful, but most contaminated surfaces are inaccessible, so chemical decontamination often is preferred. The A-P Citrox method will remove most contaminants from CANDU systems, but is costly and long, damages components, and produces large quantities of radioactive liquid waste. The Redox cycling process is fast and inexpensive, produces only solid wastes, but removes small quantities of deposit from Monel only. The CAN-DECON process removes deposits from most materials including fuel cladding and has many other advantages. (author)

  15. Survey of analytical methods for environmental monitoring of krypton-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaquish, R.E.; Moghissi, A.A.

    1973-01-01

    Numerous methods have been developed for measuring krypton-85 in air as krypton ultimately accumulates in air once it is released into the environment. However, krypton-85 can be present in other media such as natural gas from wells stimulated with nuclear devices or in water when krypton-85 is used for aeration studies. Methods for the measurement of ambient levels of krypton-85 require a concentration of krypton from a large air sample of one m 3 or more. If elevated levels are to be measured, carrier krypton may be used provided the contamination of atmospheric krypton with krypton-85 does not interfere with the measurement. In certain cases, such as in the vicinity of nuclear fuel processing plants, direct measurement techniques may be used. A variety of techniques are employed for krypton-85 counting. At low levels, internal gas counting or organic scintillation is used to measure the beta emission of this radionuclide. At higher levels the gamma emission of krypton-85 may be measured using scintillation or solid state gamma spectroscopic methods. Techniques for collection of the sample, concentration of krypton, and radioactivity measurement of krypton-85 are discussed and various processes are critically evaluated and compared

  16. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.

    1994-01-01

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially of planned decommissioning operations. Thus lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for contaminated lead is removing the superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium under pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a scaled-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling

  17. Full system decontamination feasibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denault, R.P.; LeSurf, J.E.; Walschot, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    Many chemical decontaminations have been performed on subsystems in light water reactors (BWRs and PWRs) but none on the full system (including the fuel) of large, (>500 MWe) investor owned reactors. Full system decontaminations on pressure-tubed reactors have been shown to facilitate maintenance, inspection, repair and replacement of reactor components. Further advantages are increased reactor availability and plant life extension. A conceptual study has been performed for EPRI (for PWRs) and Commonwealth Edison Co (for BWRs) into the applicability and cost benefit of full system decontaminations (FSD). The joint study showed that FSDs in both PWRs and BWRs, with or without the fuel included in the decontamination, are feasible and cost beneficial provided a large amount of work is to be done following the decontamination. The large amounts of radioactive waste generated can be managed using current technologies. Considerable improvements in waste handling, and consequent cost savings, can be obtained if new techniques which are now reaching commercial application are used. (author)

  18. Local strategies for decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, P [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); Ramzaev, V [Branch of Institute of Radiation Hygiene, Novozybkov, Bryansk region (Russian Federation); Antsypov, G [Chernnobyl State Committee of the Republic of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus); Sobotovich, E [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Ore formation, Kiev (Ukraine); Anisimova, L [EMERCOM, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-07-01

    The efficiencies of a great number of techniques for decontamination or dose reduction in contaminated areas have been investigated by several teams of E.C. and CIS scientists (ECP4 project). Modelling, laboratory and field experiments, t and return from experience allowed to assess radiological efficiencies (e.g. 'decontamination factor') and requirements for the operation of numerous practical solutions. Then, those data were supplemented with data on cost and waste generation in order to elaborate all the information for the optimization of decontamination strategies. Results will be presented for about 70 techniques. However, a technique cannot be compared to another from a generic point of view. Rather it is designed for a specific target and the best technology depends on the objectives. It has been decided to implement decision analyses on case studies, and the local conditions and objectives have been investigated. Individual doses ranged from 1 to 5 mSv, with contrasted contributions of internal and external doses. The desire to restore a normal activity in a partially depopulated settlement, and concerns about the recent increase in internal doses were typical incentives for action. The decision aiding analysis illustrated that actions can be usually recommended. Results are outlined here.

  19. Local strategies for decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, P.; Ramzaev, V.; Antsypov, G.; Sobotovich, E.; Anisimova, L.

    1996-01-01

    The efficiencies of a great number of techniques for decontamination or dose reduction in contaminated areas have been investigated by several teams of E.C. and CIS scientists (ECP4 project). Modelling, laboratory and field experiments, t and return from experience allowed to assess radiological efficiencies (e.g. 'decontamination factor') and requirements for the operation of numerous practical solutions. Then, those data were supplemented with data on cost and waste generation in order to elaborate all the information for the optimization of decontamination strategies. Results will be presented for about 70 techniques. However, a technique cannot be compared to another from a generic point of view. Rather it is designed for a specific target and the best technology depends on the objectives. It has been decided to implement decision analyses on case studies, and the local conditions and objectives have been investigated. Individual doses ranged from 1 to 5 mSv, with contrasted contributions of internal and external doses. The desire to restore a normal activity in a partially depopulated settlement, and concerns about the recent increase in internal doses were typical incentives for action. The decision aiding analysis illustrated that actions can be usually recommended. Results are outlined here

  20. Excimer laser decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentis, Marc L.; Delaporte, Philippe C.; Marine, Wladimir; Uteza, Olivier P.

    2000-04-01

    The application of excimer laser ablation process to the decontamination of radioactive surfaces is discussed. This technology is very attractive because it allows to efficiently remove the contaminated particles without secondary waste production. To demonstrate the capability of such technology to efficiently decontaminate large area, we studied and developed a prototype which include a XeCl laser, an optical fiber delivery system and an ablated particles collection cell. The main physical processes taking place during UV laser ablation will be explained. The influence of laser wavelength, pulse duration and absorption coefficient of material will be discussed. Special studies have been performed to understand the processes which limit the transmission of high average power excimer laser through optical fiber, and to determine the laser conditions to optimize the value of this transmission. An in-situ spectroscopic analysis of laser ablation plasma allows the real time control of the decontamination. The results obtained for painting or metallic oxides removal from stainless steel surfaces will be presented.

  1. Process and device for decontamination of the waste gas of the fuel circuit of a fusion reactor from tritium and/or deuterium in waste gas containing them in chemically bound form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penzhorn, R.D.; Glugla, M.

    1987-01-01

    The invention concerns a process and a device for the decontamination of the wate gases of the fuel circuit of a fusion reactor from tritum and/or deuterium in waste gas containing them in chemically bound form, in which the waste gas is taken over an oxidation catalyst and then over a hot metal bed, tritium and/or deuterium is released from its compounds, separated from the waste gas and is returned to the fuel circuit. The process is intended to prevent losses of tritum and/or deuterium by permeation and the high loading of the hot metal getter materials, as occurs in the previously known corresponding process, and to avoid the formation of nitrogen oxides. This is achieved by: a) The catalytic oxidation reaction being carried out at a temperature of 200 0 C to 300 0 C. b) The gas mixture then being brought into contact with a hot metal bed at 200 0 C to 300 0 C to remove the remaining O 2 and for the selective conversion of the proportion of water into the hydrogen isotope. c) The gas mixture being brought into contact with a diaphragm made of palladium or a palladium-silver alloy at 400 0 C to 450 0 C to decompose the ammonia, all the released hydrogen isotope being passed through the diaphragm, separated from the remaining waste gas flow and removed. (orig.) [de

  2. Final programmatic environmental impact statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979 accident, Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2, Docket No. 50-320

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1981-03-01

    A Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) related to the decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from the March 28, 1979, accident at Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-320) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in response to a directive issued by the Commission on November 21, 1979. This statement is an overall study of the activities necessary for decontamination of the facility, defueling, and disposition of the radioactive wastes. The available alternatives considered ranged from implementation of full cleanup to no action other than continuing to maintain the reactor in a safe shutdown condition. Also included are comments of governmental agencies, other organizations, and the general public on the Draft PEIS on this project, and staff responses to these comments. (author)

  3. CERN: From Russia with krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: Arecent arrival at CERN is a cryostat built under the auspices of thelnternational Science and Technology Center (ISTC), a programme funded by the European Union, Japan, Russia, and the US which aims to promote the integration of former Soviet Union scientists and industry into global research and development activities. The new cryostat, built by Moscowbased Krunichev Enterprises, better known for its involvement in the ''Proton'' space rocket and the ''Mir'' space station, will form a vital part of the NA48 experiment at the SPS synchrotron. NA48, a Cagliari/Cambridge/CERN/ Dubna/Edinburgh/Ferrara/Mainz/Orsay/Perugia/Pisa/Saclay/Siegen/ Turin/Vienna collaboration, aims to study the small asymmetry in the properties of matter and antimatter known as CP violation, and should be fully ready to collect data next year. Through its links with Dubna's Joint Institute of Nuclear Research (JINR), near Moscow, NA48 has launched a number of initiatives designed to involve Russian physicists and industry in the experiment. The bargain 22 tonnes of krypton for NA48's energy-measuring calorimeter were manufactured at a specially- built factory in Russia. INTAS, the European Union-backed scheme for the promotion of cooperation with former Soviet Union scientists, provides funds for Dubna physicists to visit Western Europe. INTAS will also provide computing and networking infrastructure allowing the Russian physicists to participate fully in NA48's programme. As well as the cryostat, NA48's collaborating institutes have placed other orders with Russian suppliers. INFN Pisa has ordered 14,000 electrical feed-though contacts from the Budker Institute in Novosibirsk, whilst Saclay has placed contracts elsewhere for vacuum and other equipment. The new cryostat forms part of a joint project of INFN Pisa and CERN, involving scientists from Dubna, Edinburgh, and Saclay. The Russian part was built by Krunichev

  4. Soil decontamination criteria report, November 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riordan, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    A program to access the extent of transuranic soil contamination at DOE sites and to develop methods for their decontamination is underway at Rocky Flats. As part of this program, acceptable soil contamination levels for plutonium proposed by a number of authorities over the past couple of decades were reviewed. From this review, goals for soil decontamination work are proposed. These goals, which relate to the disposition of the products of a decontamination process, are summarized as follows (dpm/g will refer to disintegrations per minute of transuranic nuclides per gram of soil): soil fractions having less than 30 dpm can be disposed of as surface soil with unrestricted usage. Fine soil fractions (less than 100 μm) that have less than 500 dpm and coarse soil fractions that have less than 1000 dpm can be disposed of as subsurface soil as long as usage is controlled to ensure compliance with EPA dosage guidance. Soil concentrates that have an activity greater than the above values but less than 22,000 dpm should be interred in an approved, low level waste burial site. Soil concentrates that are greater than 22,000 dpm should be stored as retrievable waste. Changes in the technical and legal areas of soil decontamination are rapid. Permissible soil decontamination levels will change as will decontamination technology and the ability to monitor the effectiveness of the decontamination processes. As a result, annual updates of decontamination criteria, goals, and monitoring are expected

  5. Decontamination Data - Blister Agents

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Decontamination efficacy data for blister agents on various building materials using various decontamination solutions. This dataset is associated with the following...

  6. Potential for beneficial use of krypton-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tingey, G.L.; Jensen, G.A.; McClanahan, E.D.; Lytle, J.M.; Rising, K.R.

    1983-03-01

    Large quantities of krypton-85 (about 42 MCi) are contained in stored power-reactor fuels and about 1 MCi/year in fuels processed at each of the Savannah River and Hanford defense fuel-processing plants. This nuclear byproduct could be a significant material resource if used in specialized applications. Recently a technique for implanting krypton in a growing sputter-deposited metallic film has been developed. This yields a stable, high-concentration source of krypton-85 which may have applications for small power generators. Metal deposits containing up to 14 at. % have been prepared that would give a heat source of 0.9 W/cm 3 if fully enriched krypton-85 were implanted. Potential applications for up to 10-W batteries include power for runway lighting and other specialized military applications in remote locations, power for telephone or radiocommunications in the far North, and power for monitoring equipment for tracking animals. Krypton-85 has the advantage of being environmentally the most acceptable heat-producing radioisotope available for power production. 1 figure

  7. The atmosphere of Mars - Detection of krypton and xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, T.; Biemann, K.; Biller, J. E.; Lafleur, A. L.; Rushneck, D. R.; Howarth, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    Krypton and xenon have been discovered in the Martian atmosphere with the mass spectrometer on the second Viking lander. Krypton is more abundant than xenon. The relative abundances of the krypton isotopes appear normal, but the ratio of xenon-129 to xenon-132 is enhanced on Mars relative to the terrestrial value for this ratio. Some possible implications of these findings are discussed.

  8. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, January-March, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A. (comp.)

    1981-06-01

    Reports and summaries are provided for the following programs: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; NWVP off-gas analysis; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; verification instrument development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclide in soils; low-level waste generation reduction handbook; waste management system studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology program; high-level waste form preparation; development of backfill materials; development of structural engineered barriers; disposal charge analysis; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; spent fuel and pool component integrity program; analysis of postulated criticality events in a storage array of spent LWR fuel; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; multilayer barriers for sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and revegetation of inactive uranium tailings sites.

  9. W-12 valve pit decontamination demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, C.E.; Parfitt, J.E.; Patton, B.D.

    1995-12-01

    Waste tank W-12 is a tank in the ORNL Low-Level Liquid Waste (LLLW) system that collected waste from Building 3525. Because of a leaking flange in the discharge line from W-12 to the evaporator service tank (W-22) and continual inleakage into the tank from an unknown source, W-12 was removed from service to comply with the Federal Facilities Agreement requirement. The initial response was to decontaminate the valve pit between tank W-12 and the evaporator service tank (W-22) to determine if personnel could enter the pit to attempt repair of the leaking flange. Preventing the spread of radioactive contamination from the pit to the environment and to other waste systems was of concern during the decontamination. The drain in the pit goes to the process waste system; therefore, if high-level liquid waste were generated during decontamination activities, it would have to be removed from the pit by means other than the available liquid waste connection. Remote decontamination of W-12 was conducted using the General Mills manipulator bridge and telescoping trolley and REMOTEC RM-10 manipulator. The initial objective of repairing the leaking flange was not conducted because of the repair uncertainty and the unknown tank inleakage. Rather, new piping was installed to empty the W-12 tank that would bypass the valve pit and eliminate the need to repair the flange. The radiological surveys indicated that a substantial decontamination factor was achieved

  10. Treatment of decontamination liquid waste of nuclear power plant components by heterogeneous photo catalysis with a continuous recirculation equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litter, Marta I.; La Gamma, Ana M.; Chocron, Mauricio; Blesa, Miguel A.; Repetto, Pablo

    1999-01-01

    It has been designed a bench scale, recirculation device, for testing the degradation of solutions of ethylendiamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) by heterogeneous photo catalysis under irradiation with UV and titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ). Solutions of EDTA have been employed at concentrations and pH values similar to those used when a decontamination of nuclear power plant equipment is carried out. The circuit is composed of a photo reactor, a heat exchanger, a reservoir tank and a peristaltic pump. In the present paper, the results of the experiments of photo catalytic degradation of aqueous suspensions of TiO 2 (Degussa P-25) 1 g/L with EDTA (10 g/L) at pH 3.7 and 25 degree C and two irradiation wavelengths (366 and 254 nm) have been presented. At 366 nm the full degradation of EDTA has occurred in 10 hours. The 95% degradation of total organic carbon (TOC) has been achieved after 39 hours of irradiation. The irradiation at 254 nm in the same conditions has been much less effective (EDTA and TOC reduction of approximately 1%), due to a screening effect produced by the semiconductor. (author)

  11. New techniques available for decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, J.R.; Cochaux, C.

    1996-01-01

    As nuclear industry dismantling operations become more widespread, one naturally sees the growth of specific needs in decontamination techniques. In this paper, the authors present two applications involving the decategorization of wastes from dismantling. Decategorization means using decontamination to transform the wastes into a lower, and thus cheaper, category. The first application is in decategorizing large mild steel pipes, which come from the stage decommissioning of the G2/G3 graphite gas reactors at Marcoule. A large number of these pipes (4000 t) have been contaminated by deposits and encrustations of 60 Co (95%) and 137 Cs (5%) to the extent of 200 Bq/cm 2 . The objective was to avoid having to store them on surface sites for 300 yr. This is achieved by decontaminating them to a level that enables the metal to be reused. The other application involves stainless steel waste cut into small sections, which comes from the stage decommissioning of a radiometallurgy laboratory (RM2) at Fontenay aux Roses. This waste was not acceptable to the surface storage center due to high levels of alpha contamination. A decategorization technique has been developed for part of the 13 tonnes of waste concerned, which avoids the need for it to be disposed of in extremely costly geologic repositories

  12. Final report on the decontamination of the Curium Source Fabrication Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaich, R.W.

    1983-12-01

    The Curium Source Fabrication Facility (CSFF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was decontaminated to acceptable contamination levels for maintenance activities, using standard decontamination techniques. Solid and liquid waste volumes were controlled to minimize discharges to the ORNL waste systems. This program required two years of decontamination effort at a total cost of approximately $700K. 5 references, 7 figures, 2 tables

  13. A scaffold easy to decontaminate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourek, D.

    1992-01-01

    The conventional scaffold used in the assembling work and in revisions of technological facilities at nuclear power plants has many drawbacks. The most serious of them are a high amount of radioactive waste arising from the decontamination (planing) of the floor timber and from the discarding of damaged irreparable parts, and a considerable corrosion of the carbon steel supporting structure after the decontamination. A detailed description is given of a novel scaffold assembly which can be decontaminated and which exhibits many assets, in particular a good mechanical resistance (also to bad weather), a lower weight, and the use of prepreg floor girders for the construction of service platforms or scaffold bridges which can readily be assembled from the pressed pieces in a modular way. (Z.S.). 4 figs., 4 refs

  14. Environmental behaviour and dosimetry of Krypton-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patek, P.

    1980-12-01

    Although 85 Kr has only small influence on the total radiation burden to man, monitoring and safety considerations have to be done, especially regarding the operation of fuel reprocessing plants. The natural, military and civilian sources of 85 Kr are discussed and a survey is given on the possibilities of Krypton removal from off-gas streams. Regarding the environmental behaviour of the released Krypton-amounts it was shown, that only the atmospheric dispersion is of influence to the succeeding irradiation of the population. Krypton is transferred to man only by inhalation and remains with different halflives in the human body. The highest absorbed dose is caused by beta-rays to the skin and in the airways of the lungs. While the highest dose equivalent rates to the most exposed individuals are reached by local sources from fuel reprocessing plants, the highest collective effective dose equivalent commitment is reached for global dispersed 85 Kr. (author)

  15. Evaluation of separation distance from the temporary storage facility for decontamination waste to ensure public radiological safety after Fukushima nuclear power plant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Jung; Go, A Ra; Kim, Kwang Pyo [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The object of this study was to evaluate the separation distance from a temporary storage facility satisfying the dose criteria. The calculation of ambient dose rates took into account cover soil thickness, facility size, and facility type by using MCNPX code. Shielding effects of cover soil were 68.9%, 96.9% and 99.7% at 10 cm, 30 cm and 50 cm respectively. The on-ground type of storage facility had the highest ambient dose rate, followed by the semi-ground type and the underground type. The ambient dose rate did not vary with facility size (except 5 × 5 × 2 m size) due to the self-shielding of decontamination waste in temporary storage. The separation distances without cover soil for a 50 × 50 × 2 m size facility were evaluated as 14 m (minimum radioactivity concentration), 33 m (most probably radioactivity concentration), and 57 m (maximum radioactivity concentration) for on-ground storage type, 9 m, 24 m, and 45 m for semi-underground storage type, and 6 m, 16 m, and 31 m for underground storage type.

  16. Development of surface decontamination technology for radioactive waste using plasma. Dust behaviors in the treatment of oxide films using a low-pressure arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Kazuo; Furukawa, Shizue; Amakawa, Tadashi; Fujiwara, Kazutoshi; Kanbe, Hiromu

    2002-01-01

    We are developing the surface treatment technique using low-pressure arc as a new decontamination technology for radioactive wastes from nuclear facilities. For the practical use, effective dust collection methods are necessary, because dust is generated from oxide films on the surface during the treatment. The method using gas stream and filters may be one of them, but the behavior of the dust has not been examined yet. We studied the basic behavior of the dust and the possibilities of dust control by gas stream as follows. 1. Most of the dust attached to the anode in the case of no gas blow. 2. Dust attachment to the anode was reduced to about half using small cross section type anode. It seems to be possible to reduce the dust attachment by proper choice of electrode shape. 3. The dust attachment was reduced to 10 to 40 percent by the gas blow to the side of arc. The dust control by gas stream might be possible. (author)

  17. Three Mile Island Cleanup: experiences, waste disposal, and environmental impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, L.J.; Opelka, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    These papers were presented in a two-session symposium during the American Institute of Chemical Engineers 1981 Summer National meeting in Detroit, Michigan, August 16-19, 1981. The cleanup activities described included the venting of the gases, mostly krypton-85, from the reactor containment building and several entries of personnel into the containment building to determine the physical conditions and the levels of radiation and radioactive contamination. Results of the latest process development tests of the flowsheet for the submerged Demineralizer Water Treatment System for decontaminating the water in the containment building were presented. The status of existing knowledge of radiation effects on ion exchange materials used in radioactive waste management were reviewed. A program to demonstrate incorporation of the loaded zeolite into a glass as a final waste form was also described. The generation, classification, treatment, and disposal of solid waste forms resulting from the cleanup were discussed with special consideration of the ion exchange media used for cleanup of liquids with relatively high radionuclide concentrations. The radiological, socioeconomic, and psychological impacts of the cleanup were evaluated. This work formed the basis for the recent issuance by the NRC of a programmatic environmental impact statement relative to decontamination and disposal of the radioactive wastes resulting from the accidents

  18. New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Waste Streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. E. Archibald

    1999-01-01

    This report addresses the issues of conducting debris treatment in the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF) decontamination area and the methods currently being used to decontaminate material at the NWCF

  19. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1985, Part -4, decontamination and treatment of solid radioactive materials for the needs of RA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plecas, I.; Vukovic, Z.; Blagojevic, R.; Kostadinovic, A.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the activity of the decontamination and treatment team for the needs of the RA reactor, its equipment, working conditions, methods for decontamination, means of decontamination, type and quantity of decontaminated surfaces, number of decontaminated objects, quantity of collected radioactive solid wastes, their packaging, transport to the storage place and topography od radiation field in the storage during 1985 [sr

  20. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radionuclides and is therefore a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Lab. decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 100 metric tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium under pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 280 kPa (40 psig) rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a pump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process

  1. Cylindrical ionization chamber with compressed krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'minov, V.V.; Novikov, V.M.; Pomanskii, A.A.; Pritychenko, B.V.; Viyar, J.; Garcia, E.; Morales, A.; Morales, J.; Nunes-Lagos, R.; Puimedon, J.; Saens, K.; Salinas, A.; Sarsa, M.

    1993-01-01

    A cylindrical ionization chamber with a grid is used to search for double positron decay and atomic electron conversion to a positron in 78 Kr. Krypton is the working gas material of the chamber. The spectrometric characteristics of the chamber filled with krypton and xenon are presented. The energy resolution is 2.1% for an energy of 1.84 MeV (the source of γ-quanta is 88 Y) when the chamber is filled with a mixture of Kr+0.2% H 2 under a pressure of 25 atm

  2. Formation of actinide hexafluorides at ambient temperatures with krypton difluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asprey, L.B.; Eller, P.G.; Kinkead, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    A second low-temperature agent, krypton difluoride, for generating volatile plutonium hexafluoride is reported (dioxygen difluoride is the only other reported agent). Plutonium hexafluoride is formed at ambient or lower temperature by the treatment of various solid substrates with krypton difluoride. Volatilization of uranium and neptunium from solid substrates using gaseous krypton difluoride is also reported for the first time. The formation of actinide hexafluorides has been confirmed for the reaction of krypton difluoride in anhydrous HF with UO 2 and with uranium and neptunium fluorides at ambient temperatures. Treatment of americium dioxide with krypton difluoride did not yield americium hexafluoride under the conditions studied. 15 references, 2 figures

  3. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1995, Part -2, Annex 2, Decontamination and actions, collection of liquid effluents and solid radioactive waste; Deo 2 - Prilog 2 - Dekontaminacija i intervencije, skupljanje tecnih efluenata i cvrstih radioaktivnih otpadnih materijala

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandic, M; Vukovic, Z; Lazic, S; Plecas, I; Voko, A [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1995-12-01

    Certain amount of solid waste results from RA reactor operation, the mean quantity of which depends on the duration of reactor operation and related activities. During repair, when reactor is not operated as well under accidental conditions, the quantity of waste is higher, dependent on the type of repair and comprehensiveness of decontamination of the working surface, contaminated tools and components. The waste is sorted and packed on the spot where they appeared according to the existing regulations and principles of radiation protection with aim to minimize unnecessary exposure of the radiation protection personnel who deals with control, transport, radioactive waste treatment and decontamination. During exceptional operations (decontamination, repair, bigger volume of contaminated material, etc.) professional staff of the Radiation protection department gives recommendations and helps in planning the actions related to repair, sorting and packaging of radioactive waste in special containers, identification of the contaminants, etc. [Serbo-Croat] Tokom rada reaktora RA dolazi do stvaranja odredjenih cvrstih otpadnih materijala cija prosecna kolicina zavisi od vremena rada reaktora i aktivnosti koje se tamo obavljaju. Tokom remonta, kada reaktor ne radi kao i pri akcidentalnim situacijama nastaju vece kolicine otpadnih materijala koje zavise od obima i vrste remontnih operacija i obima dekontaminacije kontaminirane radne povrsine i kontaminiranog alata, predmeta, opreme, itd. Nastali otpadni materijali se razvrstavaju i pakuju na mestu nastanka prema odgovarajucim propisima u skladu sa principima zastite od zracenja i aspekta bezbednosti u cilju minimiziranja nepotrebnog ozracivanja ljudstva za preuzimanje, kontrolu, transport, naknadnu obradu RAO i dekontaminaciju. Pri nerutinskim operacijama (dekontaminacija, remont, kontaminiarni otpadni materijal velike zapremine i sl.), strucna sluzba Institita ZASTITA pruza strucne konsultacije i pomaze pri planiranju

  4. Carbon dioxide-krypton separation and radon removal from nuclear-fuel-reprocessing off-gas streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, P.M.; Higuchi, K.Y.; Abraham, L.

    1982-07-01

    General Atomic Company (GA) is conducting pilot-plant-scale tests that simulate the treatment of radioactive and other noxious volatile and gaseous constituents of off-gas streams from nuclear reprocessing plants. This paper reports the results of engineering-scale tests performed on the CO 2 /krypton separation and radon holdup/decay subsystems of the GA integrated off-gas treatment system. Separation of CO 2 from krypton-containing gas streams is necessary to facilitate subsequent waste processing and krypton storage. Molecular sieve 5A achieved this separation in dissolver off-gas streams containing relatively low krypton and CO 2 concentrations and in krypton-rich product streams from processes such as the krypton absorption in liquid carbon dioxide (KALC) process. The CO 2 /krypton separation unit is a 30.5-cm-diameter x 1.8-m-long column containing molecular sieve 5A. The loading capacity for CO 2 was determined for gas mixtures containing 250 ppM to 2.2% CO 2 and 170 to 750 ppM krypton in either N 2 or air. Gas streams rich in CO 2 were diluted with N 2 to reduce the temperature rise from the heat of adsorption, which would otherwise affect loading capacity. The effluent CO 2 concentration prior to breakthrough was less than 10 ppM, and the adsorption capacity for krypton was negligible. Krypton was monitored on-line with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and its concentration determined quantitatively by a method of continuous analysis, i.e., selected-ion monitoring. Radon-220 was treated by holdup and decay on a column of synthetic H-mordenite. The Rn-220 concentration was monitored on-line with flow-through diffused-junction alpha detectors. Single-channel analyzers were utilized to isolate the 6.287-MeV alpha energy band characteristic of Rn-220 decay from energy bands due to daughter products

  5. Laboratory Optimization Tests of Technetium Decontamination of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Direct Feed Low Activity Waste Melter Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-12-23

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable less integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste.

  6. Laboratory Optimization Tests of Decontamination of Cs, Sr, and Actinides from Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-01-06

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable less integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also substantially decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste.

  7. Radioactive Iodine and Krypton Control for Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick R. Soelberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of volatile radionuclides generated during used nuclear fuel reprocessing in the US is almost certain to be necessary for the licensing of a reprocessing facility in the US. Various control technologies have been developed, tested, or used over the past 50 years for control of volatile radionuclide emissions from used fuel reprocessing plants. The US DOE has sponsored, since 2009, an Off-gas Sigma Team to perform research and development focused on the most pressing volatile radionuclide control and immobilization problems. In this paper, we focus on the control requirements and methodologies for 85Kr and 129I. Numerous candidate technologies have been studied and developed at laboratory and pilot-plant scales in an effort to meet the need for high iodine control efficiency and to advance alternatives to cryogenic separations for krypton control. Several of these show promising results. Iodine decontamination factors as high as 105, iodine loading capacities, and other adsorption parameters including adsorption rates have been demonstrated under some conditions for both silver zeolite (AgZ and Ag-functionalized aerogel. Sorbents, including an engineered form of AgZ and selected metal organic framework materials (MOFs, have been successfully demonstrated to capture Kr and Xe without the need for separations at cryogenic temperatures.

  8. Decontamination method for radiation contaminated metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enda, Masami; Hosaka, Katsumi; Sakai, Hitoshi.

    1997-01-01

    An organic acid solution is used as a decontamination liquid, and base materials of radiation contaminated metals are dissolved in the solution. The concentration of the organic acid is measured, and the organic acid is supplied by an amount corresponding to the lowering of the concentration. The decontamination liquid wastes generated during the decontamination step are decomposed, and metals leached in the organic acid solution are separated. With such procedures, contamination intruded into the inside of the mother materials of the metals can be removed, and radioactivity of the contaminated metals such as stainless steels and carbon steels can be eliminated, or the radiation level thereof can be reduced. In addition, the amount of secondary wastes generated along with the decontamination can be suppressed. (T.M.)

  9. Chemical decontamination process and device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Ryota; Sakai, Hitoshi

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a process and a device for chemical decontamination, which can suppress corrosion of low corrosion resistant materials, keep decontamination properties substantially as same as before and further, reduce the volume of secondary wastes. In a step of reductively melting oxide membranes on an objective material to be decontaminated, a mixture of oxalic acid and a salt thereof is used as a reducing agent, and the reductive melting is conducted while suppressing hydrogen ion concentration of an aqueous liquid system. In order to enhance the reducibility of the oxalic acid ions, it is desirable to add a cyclic hetero compound thereto. The device of the present invention comprises, a decontamination loop including a member to be decontaminated, a heater and a pH meter, a medical injection pump for injecting a reducing agent to the decontamination loop, a metal ion recovering loop including an ion exchange resin tower, a reducing agent decomposing loop including an electrolytic vessel and/or a UV ray irradiation cell, a circulation pump for circulating the decontamination liquid to each of the loops and a plurality of opening/closing valves for switching the loop in which the decontamination liquid is circulated. (T.M.)

  10. Testing and evaluation of eight decontamination chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demmer, R.

    1994-09-01

    This report covers experimental work comparing eight different decontamination chemicals. Seven of these chemicals have some novelty, or are not currently in use at the ICPP. The eighth is a common ICPP decontamination reagent used as a baseline for effective comparison. Decontamination factors, waste generation values, and corrosion rates are tabulated for these chemicals. Recommendations are given for effective methods of non-sodium or low-sodium decontamination chemicals. The two most effective chemical for decontamination found in these test were a dilute hydrofluoric and nitric acid (HF/HNO 3 ) mixture and a fluoroboric acid solution. The fluoroboric acid solution (1 molar) was by far the most effective decontamination reagent, but suffered the problem of generating significant final calcine volume. The HF/HNO 3 solution performed a very good decontamination of the SIMCON coupons while generating only small amounts of calcine volume. Concentration variables were also tested, and optimized for these two solutions. Several oxidation/reduction decon chemical systems were also tested. These systems were similar to the TURCO 4502 and TURCO 4521 solutions used for general decontamination at the ICPP. A low sodium alternative, nitric acid/potassium permanganate, to the ''high sodium'' TURCO 4502 was tested extensively, optimized and recommended for general ICPP use. A reductive chemical solution, oxalic acid/nitric acid was also shown to have significant advantages

  11. [Decontamination of chemical and biological warfare agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Yasuo

    2009-01-01

    Chemical and biological warfare agents (CBWA's) are diverse in nature; volatile acute low-molecular-weight toxic compounds, chemical warfare agents (CWA's, gaseous choking and blood agents, volatile nerve gases and blister agents, nonvolatile vomit agents and lacrymators), biological toxins (nonvolatile low-molecular-weight toxins, proteinous toxins) and microbes (bacteria, viruses, rickettsiae). In the consequence management against chemical and biological terrorism, speedy decontamination of victims, facilities and equipment is required for the minimization of the damage. In the present situation, washing victims and contaminated materials with large volumes of water is the basic way, and additionally hypochlorite salt solution is used for decomposition of CWA's. However, it still remains unsolved how to dispose large volumes of waste water, and the decontamination reagents have serious limitation of high toxicity, despoiling nature against the environments, long finishing time and non-durability in effective decontamination. Namely, the existing decontamination system is not effective, nonspecifically affecting the surrounding non-target materials. Therefore, it is the urgent matter to build up the usable decontamination system surpassing the present technologies. The symposiast presents the on-going joint project of research and development of the novel decontamination system against CBWA's, in the purpose of realizing nontoxic, fast, specific, effective and economical terrorism on-site decontamination. The projects consists of (1) establishment of the decontamination evaluation methods and verification of the existing technologies and adaptation of bacterial organophosphorus hydrolase, (2) development of adsorptive elimination technologies using molecular recognition tools, and (4) development of deactivation technologies using photocatalysis.

  12. LASL experience in decontamination of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlquist, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    This discussion represents one part of a major effort in soil decontamination at the Los Alamos site. A contaminated industrial waste line in the Los Alamos townsite was removed, and a plutonium incineration facility, and a filter building contaminated with actinium-227 were dismantled. The former plutonium handling facility has been decontaminated, and canyons and an old firing site contaminated with strontium-90 have been surveyed

  13. Depressurized pipes decontamination by using circulation foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damerval, Frederique; Belz, Jacques; Renouf, Marjorie; Janneau, Patrice

    2012-09-01

    Decontamination of pipes remains a necessity in order to reduce the radiation level during maintenance or dismantling operations but it is not so easy to do it, especially in case of a long pipe network. To achieve this operation, the use of chemistry is one of the more relevant methods; moreover, the liquid waste production still remains an issue that it can be avoided by the use of decontamination foams. (authors)

  14. Environmental consequences of atmospheric krypton-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, W.L.

    1978-01-01

    This project examines the thesis that atmospheric background ionization is relevant to the understanding of weather. Projections of future world-wide use of nuclear energy imply that sufficient krypton-85 will be produced and may be released to significantly alter the natural ionization background. The scope of the project includes an assessment of krypton-85 on the electrical aspects of the atmosphere as well as the consequences of an altered electrical state of the atmosphere. The results of a first approximation model for the effects of krypton-85 on the atmosphere show that the electric field at the surface of the ocean would be reduced by about 25 percent and at a continental station by about 15 percent. At about two kilometers altitude, the electric field would be reduced by about 14 percent over the oceans and 16 percent over the land. The effects decrease quickly with increasing altitude. Analytical studies of the equations for fair weather atmospheric electricity yield solutions suitable for the interpretation of time dependent phenomena with periods longer than a few seconds. A brief analysis shows that a perfect assessment is not necessary to make an error-free decision regarding krypton-85 control measures. From the viewpoint of a decision-maker, those aspects that could swing the decision from one alternative to another are priority areas for analysis

  15. Ambient krypton-85 air sampling at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevathan, M.S.; Price, K.R.

    1984-10-01

    In the fall of 1982, the Environmental Evaluations Section of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) initiated a network of continuous krypton-85 air samplers located on and around the Hanford Site. This effort was in response to the resumption of operations at a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant located onsite where krypton-85 was to be released during fuel dissolution. Preoperational data were collected using noble gas samplers designed by the Environmental Protection Agency-Las Vegas (EPA-LV). The samplers functioned erratically resulting in excessive maintenance costs and prompted a search for a new sampling system. State of the art krypton-85 sampling methods were reviewed and found to be too costly, too complex and inappropriate for field application, so a simple bag collection system was designed and field tested. The system is composed of a reinforced, heavy plastic bag, connected to a variable flow pump and housed in a weatherproof enclosure. At the end of the four week sampling period the air in the bag is transferred by a compressor into a pressure tank for easy transport to the laboratory for analysis. After several months of operation, the air sampling system has proven its reliability and sensitivity to ambient levels of krypton-85. 3 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  16. Criteria and evaluation of three decontamination techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripp, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Past decontamination and solvent recovery activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), which is part of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), have resulted in the accumulation of 1.5 million gallons of radioactively contaminated sodium-bearing liquid waste. Future decontamination activities at the ICPP could result in the production of 5 million gallons or more of sodium-bearing waste using the current decontamination techniques of chemical/water flushes and steam jet cleaning. This waste requires a large amount of cold chemical additive to process because the low melting temperatures of sodium and potassium salts cause agglomeration in the bed of the calciner vessel. Criteria have been established for evaluating methods and technologies available for decontaminating equipment and facilities. The criteria were weighted according to their relative importance using a Kepner-Tregoe Problem Solving process. These criteria were used to rank three decontamination techniques new to the ICPP: laser ablation, liquid abrasive blasting and CO{sub 2} pellet blasting, against the standard decontamination techniques of sodium-based chemical cleaning and water/steam jets used.

  17. Criteria and evaluation of three decontamination techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripp, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Past decontamination and solvent recovery activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), which is part of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), have resulted in the accumulation of 1.5 million gallons of radioactively contaminated sodium-bearing liquid waste. Future decontamination activities at the ICPP could result in the production of 5 million gallons or more of sodium-bearing waste using the current decontamination techniques of chemical/water flushes and steam jet cleaning. This waste requires a large amount of cold chemical additive to process because the low melting temperatures of sodium and potassium salts cause agglomeration in the bed of the calciner vessel. Criteria have been established for evaluating methods and technologies available for decontaminating equipment and facilities. The criteria were weighted according to their relative importance using a Kepner-Tregoe Problem Solving process. These criteria were used to rank three decontamination techniques new to the ICPP: laser ablation, liquid abrasive blasting and CO 2 pellet blasting, against the standard decontamination techniques of sodium-based chemical cleaning and water/steam jets used

  18. A survey of methods for separating and immobilizing krypton-85 arising from a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.

    1990-12-01

    This report reviews the literature on methods to separate and immobilize krypton-85 arising from dissolution or prior treatment of nuclear fuel in a reprocessing plant. It was prepared as part of a broader review of fuel reprocessing waste management methods that might find future applications in Canada. Cryogenic distillation is the most fully demonstrated method of separation of krypton from off-gases, but it is complex. In particular, it requires pretreatment of the gas stream to eliminate several other components before the final distillation. The most highly developed alternative process is fluorocarbon adsorption, while several other processes have been investigated on a bench scale. The simplest method of storing radioactive krypton is in compressed-gas cylinders, but the risks of accidental release are increased by the corrosive nature of the decay product, rubidium. Encapsulation in either a metal matrix or a hydrothermally vitrified zeolite appears to offer the most secure immobilization of krypton. Processes for both types of material have been demonstrated inactively on a scale approaching that required for treatment of off-gases from a commercial-scale fuel reprocessing plant. Low-operating temperatures and pressures of the metal encapsulation process, compared with encapsulation in zeolites, represent a definite advantage, but electrical power requirements for the former process are relatively high. It appears that suitable technology is available for separation and immobilization of radioactive krypton, should the need arise in Canada in the future

  19. Nuclear-waste-management. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

    1981-12-01

    Progress reports and summaries are presented for the following: high-level waste process development, alternate waste forms; TMI zeolite vitrification demonstration program; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton implantation; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; NWVP off-gas analysis; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; verification instrument development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclides in soils; handbook of methods to decrease the generation of low-level waste; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology program; high-level waste form preparation; development of backfill materials; development of structural engineered barriers; disposal charge analysis; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity program; analysis of postulated criticality events in a storage array of spent LWR fuel; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; multilayer barriers for sealing uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and revegetation of inactive uranium tailings sites.

  20. Chemical decontamination of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partridge, J.A.; Lerch, R.E.

    1979-10-01

    A metal decontamination process based upon removal of contamination by treatment with a cerium (IV)-nitric acid solution (or other redox agent in nitric acid) is feasible and highly promising. The technique is effective in dissolving the surface layer of stainless steel. Dissolution rates of approximately 1.5 mils/h were demonstrated with cerium (IV)-nitric acid solutions. Removal of plutonium contamination from stainless steel was demonstrated in laboratory tests, in which activity levels were reduced from greater than 5 x 10 5 counts per minute to nondetectable levels in approximately one hour at 90 0 C. Removal of paint from stainless steel surfaces was also demonstrated. Advantages of this process over other chemical solutions include: (1) The solutions are not high salt systems; therefore, there is potentially less waste generated. (2) Cerium(IV) in nitric acid is a good dissolution agent for plutonium oxide. (3) Regeneration of Ce(IV) during the decontamination is accomplished by electrolysis. (4) The process should be effective for irregularly shaped equipment. (5) It could be effective as a spray or a flow-through system. 13 figures

  1. Decontamination Technology Development for Nuclear Research Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, W. K.; Jung, C. H.; Oh, W. Z.

    2007-06-01

    The originative CO 2 pellet blasting equipment was developed by improving additional components such as feed screw, idle roller and air-lock feeder to clear up the problems of freezing and discontinuity of blasting and by adopting pneumatically operated vacuum suction head and vacuum cup to prevent recontamination by collecting contaminant particulates simultaneously with the decontamination. The optimum decontamination process was established according to the kind of materials such as metal, concrete and plastic and the type of contaminants such as particulate, fixed chemical compound and oil. An excellent decontamination performances were verified by means of the lab-scale hot test with radioactive specimen and the technology demonstration in IMEF hot cell. The PFC dry decontamination equipment applicable to the surface contaminated with high radioactive particulate was developed. This equipment consists of the unit processes such as spray, collection, filtration and dry distillation designed originatively applicable to inside of dry hot cell. Through the demonstration of PFC spray decontamination process in IMEF hot cell, we secured on-site applicability and the decontamination efficiency more than 90 %. We investigated the characteristics of dismantled metal waste melting and the radionuclide(Co, Cs, U) distribution into ingot and slag by melting decontamination experiments using electric arc melter. We obtained the decontamination factors greater than 100 for Cs and of 10∼100 for uranium. The pilot scale(200 kg/batch) demonstration for melting decontamination was carried out successfully using high temperature melting facility at KAERI. The volume reduction factor of 1/7 and the economical feasibility of the melting decontamination were verified.

  2. Stainless steel decontamination manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Three, large-volume coverage manipulator systems were designed and built for the Defense Water Processing Facility at the Savannah River Laboratory. These stainless steel systems will be used for high-pressure spray decontamination of waste containers and large process equipment modules. Each system has a manipulator arm, folding boom, and vertical drive and guide structure. Handling capacity is 45 kg, horizontal reach is 4.6 m with a 180-deg swing motion, and the vertical travel is 6 m. The system is remotely removable and replaceable in modules using an overhead crane and an impact wrench. The manipulator arm has seven motions: Shoulder rotation and pivot, elbow pivot, wrist pivot and rotation, and grip open-close. All motions are variable speed and are slip-clutch protected to prevent overloading from external forces (collisions)

  3. Glovebox decontamination technology comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana, D.M.; Rodriguez, J.B.; Cournoyer, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Reconfiguration of the CMR Building and TA-55 Plutonium Facility for mission requirements will require the disposal or recycle of 200--300 gloveboxes or open front hoods. These gloveboxes and open front hoods must be decontaminated to meet discharge limits for Low Level Waste. Gloveboxes and open front hoods at CMR have been painted. One of the deliverables on this project is to identify the best method for stripping the paint from large numbers of gloveboxes. Four methods being considered are the following: conventional paint stripping, dry ice pellets, strippable coatings, and high pressure water technology. The advantages of each technology will be discussed. Last, cost comparisons between the technologies will be presented

  4. Method of chemical decontamination of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Akimoto, Hidetoshi.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention concerns a decontamination method of chemically decontaminating radioactive metal wastes of passivated stainless steels to a radioactivity level identical with usual wastes, in which the amount of oxidizable metal salts used is decreased. Metal wastes of stainless steels contaminated at their surface with radioactive materials are immersed in a sulfuric acid solution. In this case, a voltage is applied for a certain period of time so that the potential of the stainless steels comes to an active region. Then, oxidizable metal salt (tetravalent cerium) is added into the sulfuric acid solution. According to this method, since most of radioactive materials are removed in the immersing step to the sulfuric acid solution, the amount of the tetravalent cerium used is as less as 1/700 and the decontamination time is as short as 1/4 as compared with those in the conventional method. (K.M.)

  5. Final programmatic environmental impact statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979 accident, Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2, Docket No. 50-320

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    The appendices included in this report include the following: Comments on the Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (A-1); Commission's Statement of Policy and Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (B-1); 'Final Environmental Assessment for Decontamination of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building Atmosphere, Final NRC Staff Report,' US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, NUREG-0662, May 1980 (C-1); 'Environmental Assessment for Use of EPICOR-Il at Three Mile Island Unit 2,' US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, NUREG-0591, October 3, 1979 (D-1); Fish and Fisheries of York Haven Pond and Conowingo Pond of the Susquehanna River and Upper Chesapeake Bay (E1); Reuse of Accident Water (F-1); Engineering Considerations for Treatment of TMI-2 Accident-Generated Liquid Waste G-1); Engineering Considerations Related to Immobilization of Radioactive Wastes (H-1); Justification for Radiation Fields Used in Section 6 I-1); Economic Cost Basis (K-1); Average Individual Quarterly Dose Limits Used in Determinations of Work Force Estimates (L-1); 'Long-Term Environmental Radiation Surveillance Plan for Three Mile Island,' US Environmental Protection Agency, 1981 (M-1); Occupational Radiation Exposure during Onsite Waste Handling (N-1); Decontamination Status of Auxiliary and Fuel Handling Buildings (0-1); Chemical Systems for Decontamination of Primary System Components (P-1); Onsite Storage Facility (Q-1); Proposed Additions to Technical Specifications for TMI-2 Cleanup Program (R-1); Calculations of Discharge of Processed Accident Water to the Atmosphere (S-1); The Behavior of Sorbable Radionuclides in the Susquehanna River and Chesapeake Bay (T-1); Decommissioning of TMI-2 (U-1); Assessment of Groundwater Liquid Pathway from Leakage of Containment Water at Three Mile Island, Unit 2 (V-1); Calculation Models and Parameters Used in Estimating Doses, and Interpretation of Model Results (W-1); Contributors to the PEIS X-1); Scheduled

  6. Krypton-85 removal and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez Fernandez, J.

    1978-01-01

    A literature survey was made in order to predict the atmospheric Kr-85 concentration in the future and it s effect on the population. As a consequence the need for its treatment and removal as a previous step to gaseous waste disposal is justified. A literature review of possible methods of Kr-85 removal and storage is also included. (Author) 43 refs

  7. Radioactive decontamination through UV laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaporte, Ph.; Gastaud, M.; Sentis, M.; Uteza, O.; Marine, W.; Thouvenot, P.; Alcaraz, J.L.; Le Samedy, J.M.; Blin, D.

    2003-01-01

    A device allowing the radioactive decontamination of metal surfaces through the use of a pulsed UV laser has been designed and tested. This device is composed of a 1 kW excimer laser linked to a bundle of optic fibers and of a system to recover particles and can operate in active zones. Metal surfaces have the peculiarities to trap radio-elements in a superficial layer of oxide that can be eaten away by laser radiation. Different contaminated metals (stainless steels, INCONEL and aluminium) issued from the nuclear industry have been used for the testing. The most important contaminants were 60 Co, 137 Cs, 154-155 Eu and 125 Sb. The ratio of decontamination was generally of 10 and the volume of secondary wastes generating during the process was very low compared with other decontamination techniques. A decontamination speed of 1 m 2 /h has been reached for aluminium. The state of the surface is an important parameter because radio-elements trapped in micro-cracks are very difficult to remove. (A.C.)

  8. Decommissioning and decontamination (burial ground stabilization) studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    The decommissioning and decontamination of retired Hanford facilities and the future use of surrounding landscapes require isolation of contaminated wastes from the biosphere. Burial ground stabilization studies were conducted to determine the effectiveness of physical barriers for isolating contaminated wastes in shallow-land burial sites from plants and animals. This study was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of using a layer of loose rock between the waste and the surface soil covering to prevent both plant root and animal penetrations

  9. Programmatic environmental impact statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979 accident, Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-320): Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act and the Commission's implementing regulations and its April 27, 1981 Statement of Policy, the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979, accident Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2 NUREG-0683 (PEIS) is being supplemented. This draft supplement updates the environmental evaluation of accident-generated water disposal alternatives published in the PEIS, utilizing more complete and current information. Also, the draft supplement includes a specific environmental evaluation of the licensee's recently submitted proposal for water disposition

  10. Facility for the separation of krypton and recuperation of xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boell-Djoa, S.H.

    1977-01-01

    A facility is described by means of which the fission inert gases krypton 85 and xenon from spent fuel particles can be separated by fractionated freezing-out and subsequent distillation to such an extent that the xenon contains less than 1 ppb krypton 85. Then, in accordance with the stringent regulations, the krypton can be conveyed to definitive storage in special bottles, whereas the xenon can be released for industrial uses. (orig.) [de

  11. Radioactivity 85Kr in krypton enriched with light isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'minov, V.V.; Novikov, V.M.; Pomanskij, A.A.

    1992-01-01

    85 Kr content in krypton enriched with 78 Kr is measured within the frames of experiment for search of binary position decay and conversion of atomic electron into 78 Kr. Voluminous activity in krypton enriched up to 98% 78 Kr equal to 0.206 -0.004 +0.001 Bq/L is obtained which is by 4000 less as compared to natural krypton. 7 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab

  12. Decontamination of Belarus research reactor installation by strippable coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voronik, N.I.; Shatilo, N.N.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop new strippable coatings using water-based solutions of polyvinyl alcohol and active additives for decontamination of research reactor equipment. The employment of strippable coatings makes it possible to minimize the quantity of liquid radioactive waste. The selection of strippable decontaminating coatings was carried out on the basis of general requirements to decontaminating solutions: successfully dissolve corrosion deposits; ensure the desorption of radionuclides from the surfaces and the absence of resorption; introduce minimal corrosion effect of construction materials; to be relatively cheap and available in reagents. The decontaminating ability and adhesion properties of these coatings depending on metal and deposit sorts were investigated. Research on the chemical stability of solid wastes was carried out. The data obtained were the base for recommendations on waste management procedure for used films and pastes. A full-scale case-study analysis was performed for comparing strippable coatings with decontaminating solutions. (author)

  13. Solubility of krypton in liquid CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notz, K.J.; Meservey, A.B.

    1976-06-01

    The solubility of krypton in liquid CO 2 was measured experimentally over essentially the entire liquid range of CO 2 , from -53 to 29 0 C. A tracer technique using 85 Kr was employed, and equilibrated gas-liquid samples were analyzed in situ with a collimated counter. Dilute concentrations of krypton were used, and the data are expressed as a distribution ratio, Y/sub Kr//X/sub Kr/, the log of which is nearly linear with respect to temperature from the lowest temperature to about 20 0 C, above which the values fall off rapidly toward a value of unity at the critical temperature. The numerical values obtained for the distribution ratio increase from 1.44 at 29 0 C to 29.4 at -53 0 C

  14. Surface temperature measurement with radioactive kryptonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruzinec, J.; Piatrik, M.

    1976-01-01

    The preparation and use of radioactive kryptonates is described for measuring surface temperatures within the region of 45 to 70 degC. Two samples each were prepared of kryptonated beechwood and hydroquinone on a paper carrier. One sample served as the standard which during the experiment was placed in a thermostat at a constant temperature of 45 degC. The second sample was placed in another thermostat where the temperature changed from 45 to 70 degC. Both samples were in the thermostat for 30 mins. The temperature was raised in steps of 2.5 degC and the time of measurement was constant in both samples. The dependences are given of the drop in activity on temperature for both types of samples. The difference was determined of the drop in activity between the standard and the second sample and the relation for measuring the temperature of the sample was determined therefrom. (J.B.)

  15. Immobilization of krypton in a metal matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitmell, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    The report presents the work carried out on the immobilization of krypton in a metallic matrix by combined ion implantation and sputtering. The process has been successfully tested using 100 curies of fully active krypton in order to demonstrate that the process operates in the radiation levels which will be obtained with active gas at a reprocessing plant. A design study for a plant for fuel reprocessing has shown that the process can be simply operated, without requiring shielded cells. These results, which complete the development programme, indicate that the process is ideal for the containment of kripton arising from the processing of nuclear fuel and that the product will retain the gas under normal storage conditions and also during simulated accident conditions

  16. Occlusion and storage of krypton in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vansant, E.F.; Thijs, A.; Peeters, G.; Bievre, P. de; Verhaert, I.

    1984-01-01

    The modification process in order to change in a controlled way the effective pore size of zeolites was optimized by investigating the reaction conditions such as degree of chemisorption, reaction temperature, extent of primary/secondary reactions, type of modifying agent, type of substrate, etc. Different reaction and adsorption conditions have been tested to increase the thermal stability of encapsulated krypton in modified zeolites. The possibilities for zeolite modification have been enlarged by combining boranation and silanation with a thermal treatment of sepiolite, and by the formation of boron-nitrogen compounds in zeolites. Screening experiments, on a semi-industrial scale, of the krypton removal from air were carried out. Two kinds of Kr/air separation have been tested suscessfully on modified mordenite

  17. Decontamination of medical radioisotopes from hard surfaces using peelable polymer-based decontamination agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draine, Amanda E.; Walter, Ken J.; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Medical radioisotopes used to treat and diagnose patients often contaminate surfaces in patient treatment rooms. They are typically short-lived and decay within a matter of days or weeks. However, down time in a medical facility related to radioisotope contamination is costly and can impact patient care. Most liquid or solid spills can be contained and disposed in radioactive wastes fairly completely and quickly; however residual contamination may remain on the contacted surface. Although liquid decontamination agents can be used to address the issue of residual contamination, they often require multiple applications with attendant scrubbing and wiping. Liquid decontamination can also produce large volumes of low-level radioactive waste. To look at reducing radioactive waste volumes, research was conducted on the efficacy of three low-volume peel able decontamination agents. Testing was performed on hard surfaces, such as vinyl composition floor tiles and stainless steel, which are found in many hospitals, research laboratories, and universities. The tiles were contaminated with the medical use isotopes of 99m Tc, Tl-201, and I-131 and subsequently decontaminated with one of the three decontamination agents. Quantitative and qualitative data were obtained for each of three different peel able decontamination agent formulations. Quantitative data included environmental temperature and relative humidity, application thickness, dry time, contact time, and decontamination efficacy of the agents on the tested surfaces. Qualitative factors included ease of application and pee lability, as well as sag resistance and odor of each agent. Initial studies showed that under standard conditions there were reproducible differences in the decontamination efficacies among the three different decontamination formulations. (author)

  18. Ventilation studies of the lung with krypton-81m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klopper, J.F.; Baard, W.P.; Van Heerden, P.D.R.

    1981-01-01

    During a 2-year study period it was found that krypton-81m was useful in clinical practice. During this period 1563 technetium-99m perfusion studies and 807 krypton-81m ventilation studies were performed. A distinct advantage of krypton-81m was the ease with which multiple views could be obtained. These views could be directly compared with those of preceding perfusion studies. However, interruptions in the regular supply of rubidium-81/krypton-81m generators affected 17,1% of perfusion studies and xenon-127 should be a suitable substitute for these periods

  19. Charge state distribution of ionic kryptons after photoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Xiaohong

    1992-01-01

    Monochromatic X-rays from the 2.3 GeV synchrotron at University Bonn (Germany) are employed for inner shell excitation of krypton. Various ionic kryptons and a number of electrons are produced due to photoionization. In order to study the equilibrium charge state distribution of ionic kryptons, a time of flight mass spectrometer is set up and used to measure the resulting ionic charge spectra with photo energies near the L 1 - , L 2 - and L 3 - absorption edges of krypton. The energy dependence of relative probabilities is presented

  20. Excitation mechanisms in singly ionized krypton laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sherbini, Th.M.

    1982-01-01

    Lifetimes for the low lying 4p 4 4d and 4p 4 5s levels of singly ionized krypton laser are calculated, taking into account configuration interaction effects. The results show that some of these levels are metastable. They also suggest a two step excitation from the ground state of the ion (or the atom) to the upper 4p 4 5p laser levels involving some intermediate metastable states as a possible excitation mechanism. (author)

  1. The NA48 liquid krypton calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Gorini, B

    1997-01-01

    The NA48 collaboration goal is to measure the CP violation parameter Re(ɛl/ɛ) at the level of 2 × 10−4. The neutral Kaon decays will be reconstructed by an electromagnetic liquid Krypton calorimeter with fine granularity and a volume almost totally sensible, to obtain excellent position and energy resolution, as well as time resolution. A description of the detector, results from tests of a prototype and the status of the final calorimeter are reported.

  2. Analysis of HARP TPC krypton data

    CERN Document Server

    Dydak, F

    2004-01-01

    This memo describes the procedure which was adopted to equalize the response of the 3972 pads of the HARP TPC, using radioactive 83mKr gas. The results obtained from the study of reconstructed krypton clusters in the calibration data taken in 2002 are reported. Two complementary methods were employed in the data analysis. Compatible results were obtained for channel-to-channel equalization constants. An estimate of the overall systematic uncertainty was derived.

  3. Method of decontaminating radioactive-contaminated instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Megumu; Fujii, Masaaki; Kitaguchi, Hiroshi.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To enable safety processing of liquid wastes by recovering radioactive metal ions remaining in the electrolytes after the decontamination procedure thereby decreasing the radioactivity. Method: In a decontamination tank containing electrolytes consisting of diluted hydrochloric acid and diluted sulfuric acid, are provided a radioactive contaminated instrument connected to an anode and a collector electrode made of stainless steel connected to a cathode respectively. Upon applying electrical current, the portion of the mother material to be decontaminated is polished electrolytically into metal ions and they are deposited as metal on the collection electrode. After completion of the decontamination, an ultrasonic wave generator is operated to strip and remove the oxide films. Thereafter, the anode is replaced with the carbon electrode and electrical current is supplied continuously, whereby the remaining metal ions are deposited and recovered as the metal on the collection electrode. (Yoshino, Y.)

  4. Urban Decontamination Experience at Pripyat Ukraine - 13526

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paskevych, Sergiy [Institute for Safety Problems of Nuclear Power Plants, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 36 a Kirova str. Chornobyl, Kiev region, 07200 (Ukraine); Voropay, Dmitry [Federal State Unitary Enterprise ' Russian State Center of Inventory and Registration and Real Estate - Federal Bureau of Technical Inventory' , 37-2 Bernadsky Prospekt, Moscow Russia 119415 (Russian Federation); Schmieman, Eric [Battelle Memorial Institute, PO Box 999 MSIN K6-90, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the efficiency of radioactive decontamination activities of the urban landscape in the town of Pripyat, Ukraine. Different methods of treatment for various urban infrastructure and different radioactive contaminants are assessed. Long term changes in the radiation condition of decontaminated urban landscapes are evaluated: 1. Decontamination of the urban system requires the simultaneous application of multiple methods including mechanical, chemical, and biological. 2. If a large area has been contaminated, decontamination of local areas of a temporary nature. Over time, there is a repeated contamination of these sites due to wind transport from neighboring areas. 3. Involvement of earth-moving equipment and removal of top soil by industrial method achieves 20-fold reduction in the level of contamination by radioactive substances, but it leads to large amounts of waste (up to 1500 tons per hectare), and leads to the re-contamination of treated areas due to scatter when loading, transport pollutants on the wheels of vehicles, etc.. (authors)

  5. Method of decontaminating radioactive-contaminated instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, M; Fujii, M; Kitaguchi, H

    1982-03-29

    Purpose: To enable safety processing of liquid wastes by recovering radioactive metal ions remaining in the electrolytes after the decontamination procedure thereby decreasing the radioactivity. Method: In a decontamination tank containing electrolytes consisting of diluted hydrochloric acid and diluted sulfuric acid, are provided a radioactive contaminated instrument connected to an anode and a collector electrode made of stainless steel connected to a cathode respectively. Upon applying electrical current, the portion of the mother material to be decontaminated is polished electrolytically into metal ions and they are deposited as metal on the collection electrode. After completion of the decontamination, an ultrasonic wave generator is operated to strip and remove the oxide films. Thereafter, the anode is replaced with the carbon electrode and electrical current is supplied continuously, whereby the remaining metal ions are deposited and recovered as the metal on the collection electrode.

  6. Chemical decontamination method for stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yomo, Nobuo; Onuma, Tsutomu; Akimoto, Hidetoshi.

    1991-01-01

    In a case where an object to be decontaminated has a restricted portion in which the passage of liquids is difficult, decontamination liquids are not circulated effectively upon decontamination for the inner surfaces, and it requires a quite long period of time. In view of the above, through holes are perforated by, for example, a drill in the restricted portion of metal wastes made of stainless steels. Then, they are immersed in a sulfuric acid solution, and further immersed in an aqueous solution in which oxidative metal salts are added to the sulfuric acid. With such procedures, substrates are exposed at the inner circumference of the holes even if they are fine holes, and a local cell is formed between the substrate and an oxidized membranes, which may cause dissolution due to the reduction of the oxidized membranes. Further, since it is possible to discharge bubbles formed upon the solution, even from such fine holes, decontamination can be conducted effectively. (T.M.)

  7. Electrolytic decontamination of stainless steel using a basic electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, E.L.; Long, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    An electrolytic plutonium decontamination process or stainless steel was developed for use as the final step in a proposed radioactive waste handling and decontamination facility to be construced at the Rockwell International Rocky Flats plutonium handling facility. This paper discusses test plan, which was executed to compare the basic electrolyte with phosphoric acid and nitric acid electrolytes. 1 ref

  8. Decontamination demonstration facility (D.D.F) modularization/mobility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzPatrick, V.F.; Butts, H.L.; Moles, R.G.; Lundgren, R.A.

    1980-11-01

    The component decontamination technology, developed under the DOE sponsored TRU Waste Decontamination Program, has potential benefits to nuclear utility owners in four strategic areas: (1) Meeting ALARA Criteria for Maintenance/Operations; (2) Management of wastes and waste forms; (3) Accident Response; (4) Decommissioning. The most significant step in transferring this technology directly to the nuclear industry is embodied in the TMI Decontamination Demonstration Facility

  9. Report of the krypton club: availability of sup(81m)krypton in europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.; Watson, I.

    1982-01-01

    An active group of producers of krypton 81m generators has been formed. They met in Liege 27th February 1981 to discuss the technical and logistics problems in making krypton 81m generators more widely available in Europe. A resume of that meeting was prepared and distributed at two major medicine meetings in 1981, Pisa and Berne, in an attempt to alert potential users to the current situation and encourage them to make contact with the production centre most favourably situated logistically. (Author)

  10. Ontario Hydro decontamination experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, C S; Patterson, R W; Upton, M S [Chemistry and Metallurgy Department, Central Production Services, Ontario Hydro, ON (Canada)

    1991-04-01

    Ontario Hydro currently operates 18 nuclear electric generating units of the CANDU design with a net capacity of 12,402 MW(e). An additional 1,762 MW(e) is under construction. The operation of these facilities has underlined the need to have decontamination capability both to reduce radiation fields, as well as to control and reduce contamination during component maintenance. This paper presents Ontario Hydro decontamination experience in two key areas - full heat transport decontamination to reduce system radiation fields, and component decontamination to reduce loose contamination particularly as practised in maintenance and decontamination centres. (author)

  11. Reactive decontamination formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giletto, Anthony [College Station, TX; White, William [College Station, TX; Cisar, Alan J [Cypress, TX; Hitchens, G Duncan [Bryan, TX; Fyffe, James [Bryan, TX

    2003-05-27

    The present invention provides a universal decontamination formulation and method for detoxifying chemical warfare agents (CWA's) and biological warfare agents (BWA's) without producing any toxic by-products, as well as, decontaminating surfaces that have come into contact with these agents. The formulation includes a sorbent material or gel, a peroxide source, a peroxide activator, and a compound containing a mixture of KHSO.sub.5, KHSO.sub.4 and K.sub.2 SO.sub.4. The formulation is self-decontaminating and once dried can easily be wiped from the surface being decontaminated. A method for decontaminating a surface exposed to chemical or biological agents is also disclosed.

  12. Ontario Hydro decontamination experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacy, C.S.; Patterson, R.W.; Upton, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    Ontario Hydro currently operates 18 nuclear electric generating units of the CANDU design with a net capacity of 12,402 MW(e). An additional 1,762 MW(e) is under construction. The operation of these facilities has underlined the need to have decontamination capability both to reduce radiation fields, as well as to control and reduce contamination during component maintenance. This paper presents Ontario Hydro decontamination experience in two key areas - full heat transport decontamination to reduce system radiation fields, and component decontamination to reduce loose contamination particularly as practised in maintenance and decontamination centres. (author)

  13. Radiological survey following decontamination activities near the TA-45 site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunderson, T.; Buhl, T.; Romero, R.; Salazar, J.

    1983-07-01

    Three areas at the site of a former radioactive liquid waste treatment plant at Los Alamos National Laboratory were decontaminated during 1982 by Bechtel Corporation, with health physics support provided by Eberline Instrument Corporation, under the Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Before decontamination, there were above-background concentrations of gross alpha, gross beta, 238 Pu, 239 240 Pu, 241 Am, 90 Sr, and 137 Cs in the surface soils. These combined concentrations were above operational decontamination guidelines for surface soil contamination. After cleanup operations, radionuclide concentrations in surface soils at all three sites were within decontamination guidelines

  14. Decontamination using the high-pressure wet jet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, D.

    1985-01-01

    For decontaminating machine components, tools, instruments and scrap in nuclear plants the most varying decontamination procedures are used. At the nuclear power plant Wuergassen a mobile high-pressure wet jet unit, developed by Ernst Schmutz GmbH, was successfully used for the first time in extensive decontamination work. The recycling system integrated in the decontamination unit substantially reduces secondary waste, which is usually produced in large quantities by the dry jet method, and continually extracts the contaminated dirt thus guaranteeing full utilisation of the jet agent while preventing secondary contamination of the components to be treated. (orig.) [de

  15. Los Alamos DP West Plutonium Facility decontamination project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garde, R.; Cox, E.J.; Valentine, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    The DP West Plutonium Facility operated by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, was decontaminated between April 1978 and April 1981. The facility was constructed in 1944 to 1945 to produce plutonium metal and fabricate parts for nuclear weapons. It was continually used as a plutonium processing and research facility until mid-1978. Decontamination operations included dismantling and removing gloveboxes and conveyor tunnels; removing process systems, utilities, and exhaust ducts; and decontaminating all remaining surfaces. This report describes glovebox and conveyor tunnel separations, decontamination techniques, health and safety considerations, waste management procedures, and costs of the operation

  16. Separation of krypton from dissolver off-gas of a reprocessing plant using preparative gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matoni, M.

    1984-02-01

    Kr-85 can be separated from the pre-purified purge air in the final processing step of the purification phase for dissolver off-gases of a reprocessing plant with the aid of preparative gas chromatography. Activated carbon adsorbers in combination with helium as carrier gas permits maximum gas mixture through-flow. A separation temperature of 30 0 C is considered optimal. An adsorbent volume of 40 dm 3 is necessary for processing the residual gas flow of 2.5 Nm 3 /h; the adsorbent is divided between 2 columns linked in series each of which are 2 m long with an internal diameter of 100 mm. The helium flow required is five times greater than the off-gas flow. The degree of purity for krypton is greater than 90% for a decontamination factor of greater than 1000. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Experimental Boiling Water Reactor decontamination and decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellhauer, C.

    1995-01-01

    The author begins by discussing the problems encountered during decontamination and decommissioning. Next, he discusses waste packaging and recycling. His last topic of lessons learned is subdivided into prevention and early detection, recovery issues, management issues, and noteworthy practices

  18. Dry Ice Blast Decontamination to in-service equipment in Japanese PWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    MHI had developed several mechanical decontamination methods. Mechanical decontamination is beneficial when it is applied to equipment whose surface is narrow. Especially in terms of secondary waste reduction, MHI started the study of application of Dry Ice Blast Decontamination to actual PWR plant. This paper provides an introduction to Dry Ice Blast Decontamination principle, its system and actual application result to PWR plant. (J.P.N.)

  19. Development of strippable gel for surface decontamination applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, D.; Sandhya, U.; Khot, S.A.; Srinivas, C.

    2015-07-01

    Strippable gels are an attractive option for decontamination of surfaces particularly when materials are to be reused after decontamination. The process in general results in good decontamination performance with minimal secondary waste generation. This paper reports on development of strippable gel formulation using polyvinyl alcohol as the gel former. Peeling behavior of the gel film improved when glycerol was used as plasticizer. Incorporation of decontaminating agents is essential for the gel to be effective, so a number of decontaminating agents were screened based on their miscibility with the gel, smooth peeling, and good decontamination performance. Based on this study, a strippable gel, ‘INDIGEL’ was formulated as a potential candidate for surface decontamination applications. Extensive trials on evaluation of decontamination performance of Indigel were done on simulated surfaces like stainless steel tray, stainless steel fume hood, PVC floor, granite and ceramic table tops. Results show that Indigel is highly effective for decontamination of surfaces contaminated with all types of radionuclides. Simplicity of its use coupled with good decontamination ability will find application in nuclear and other chemical industries. (author)

  20. Analysis of krypton-85 and krypton-81 in a few liters of air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Le-Yi; Yang, Guo-Min; Cheng, Cun-Feng; Liu, Gu-Liang; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Hu, Shui-Ming

    2014-04-15

    Long-lived radioactive krypton isotopes, (81)Kr (t1/2 = 229,000 year) and (85)Kr (t1/2 = 10.76 year), are ideal tracers. (81)Kr is cosmogenic and can be used for dating groundwater beyond the (14)C age. (85)Kr is a fission product and can be applied in atmospheric studies, nuclear safety inspections, and dating young groundwater. It has long been a challenge to analyze radio-krypton in small samples, in which the total number of such isotopes can be as low as 1 × 10(5). This work presents a system developed to analyze (81)Kr and (85)Kr from a few liters of air samples. A separation system based on cryogenic distillation and gas chromatographic separation is used to extract krypton gas with an efficiency of over 90% from air samples of 1-50 L. (85)Kr/Kr and (81)Kr/Kr ratios in krypton gases are determined from single-atom counting using a laser-based atom trap. In order to test the performance of the system, we have analyzed various samples collected from ambient air and extracted from groundwater, with a minimum size of 1 L. The system can be applied to analyze (81)Kr and (85)Kr in environmental samples including air, groundwater, and ices.

  1. Development and design application of cerium (IV) decontamination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, L.A.; Seay, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    A simple and effective method was developed for decontamination of high-level waste canisters. This method of chemical decontamination is applicable to a wide variety of contaminated equipment found in the nuclear industry. Conceptual design of the cerium [Ce(IV)] decontamination process equipment has been completed for the West Valley Demonstration project (WVDP) vitrification facility. This remote equipment, which is the first engineering scale application of this technology, will remove surface contamination from stainless-steel (SS) containers containing high-level waste (HLW) glass prior to placing them into temporary storage and ultimate shipment to a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) repository for disposal. The objective of the development and design study was to identify an effective chemical process and to design equipment to decontaminate the HLW glass canisters to limits that meet U.S. DOE requirements. The equipment includes canister-capping and smear stations in addition to the decontamination module and associated services

  2. Development and design application of cerium (IV) decontamination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, L.A.; Seay, J.M.

    1988-10-01

    A simple and effective method was developed for decontamination of high-level waste canisters. This method of chemical decontamination is applicable to a wide variety of contaminated equipment found in the nuclear industry. Conceptual design of the cerium [Ce(IV)] decontamination process equipment has been completed for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) vitrification facility. This remote equipment, which is the first engineering scale application of this technology, will remove surface contamination from stainless-steel (SS) containers containing high-level waste (HLW) glass prior to placing them into temporary storage and ultimate shipment to a US Department of Energy (DOE) repository for disposal. The objective of the development and design study was to identify an effective chemical process and to design equipment to decontaminate the HLW glass canisters to limits that meet USDOE requirements. The equipment includes canister-capping and smear stations in addition to the decontamination module and associated services. 2 refs., 1 fig

  3. Decontamination of process equipment using recyclable chelating solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jevec, J.; Lenore, C.; Ulbricht, S. [Babcock & Wilcox, Co., R& DD, Alliance, OH (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is now faced with the task of meeting decontamination and decommissioning obligations at numerous facilities by the year 2019. Due to the tremendous volume of material involved, innovative decontamination technologies are being sought that can reduce the volumes of contaminated waste materials and secondary wastes requiring disposal. This report describes the results of the performance testing of chelates and solvents for the dissolution of uranium.

  4. Design of a tritium decontamination workstation based on plasma cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoniazzi, A.B.; Shmayda, W.T.; Fishbien, B.F.

    1993-01-01

    A design for a tritium decontamination workstation based on plasma cleaning is presented. The activity of tritiated surfaces are significantly reduced through plasma-surface interactions within the workstation. Such a workstation in a tritium environment can routinely be used to decontaminate tritiated tools and components. The main advantage of such a station is the lack of low level tritiated liquid waste. Gaseous tritiated species are the waste products with can with present technology be separated and contained

  5. Ionization relaxation in shock-heated krypton-argon mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezumi, Hiromichi; Kawamura, Masahiko; Yokota, Toshiaki.

    1977-01-01

    The ionization relaxation processes behind shock waves in pure krypton and krypton-argon mixtures have been investigated using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer technique. The incident shock velocity was fixed in the neighborhood of Us=2800 m/sec, and the initial pressure was fixed at 0.95 Torr. The experimental results were compared with theoretical values based on the two-step collisional ionization model taking into account of the wall boundary-layer effect. The slope constants of excitation cross section against relative kinetic energy between krypton atom-atom collisions, krypton atom-electron collisions, and krypton-argon atom-atom collisions were determined to be 4.2 x 10 -19 cm 2 /eV, 1.2 x 10 -17 cm 2 /eV, and 4.2 x 10 -19 cm 2 /eV, respectively. (auth.)

  6. Radioactive kryptonates in the analysis of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolgyessy, J.

    1986-01-01

    The term ''radioactive Kryptonates'' is used for substances into which atoms or ions of the radioactive nuclide 85 Kr are incorporated. The basis of the use of radioactive Kryptonates in analytical chemistry is that during a chemical reaction the crystalline lattice of the kryptonated carrier is destroyed, the carrier consumed, and the radioactive krypton released (radio-release method). Analysis can be made with a calibration curve or by comparison with a standard. Radio-release methods with the aid of radioactive Kryptonates as analytical reagents are very useful for the analysis of environmental samples, e.g. for the determination of air pollutants (ozone, sulphur dioxide, fluorine, hydrogen fluoride, mercury); and water pollutants (oxygen, dichromate, vanadium, hydrochloric acid, sulphur dioxide). (author)

  7. Separation of the fission product noble gases krypton and xenon from dissolver off-gas in reprocessing HTGR-fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnenstingl, J.; Djoa, S. H.; Laser, M.; Mastera, S.; Merz, E.; Morschl, P.

    1976-04-15

    This paper describes a process developed for the retainment and separation of volatile (3H, 129 +131I) and gaseous (85Kr, Xe) fission products from the off-gas produced during dissolution of HTGR-fuel. To prevent unnecessary dilution of liberated noble gases by surrounding atmosphere, a helium purge-gas cycle is applied to enable a coarse fractionating of krypton and xenon by cold-trapping at about 80 deg K after precleaning the gas stream. The process consists of the following steps: deposition of droplets and solid aerosols; chemisorption of iodine on silver impregnated silica gel; catalytic removal of nitrogen oxides and oxygen; drying of the process gas stream; final filtering of abraded solids; deposition of xenon in solid form at 80 deg K and low subpressure; deposition of krypton in solid form at 80 deg K after compression to about 6 bar; decontamination of 85krypton-containing xenon by batch distillation for eventual industrial utilization; and removal of nitrogen and argon enrichment during continuous operation in the purge-gas stream by inleaking air with charcoal. A continuously operating dissolver vessel, closed to the surrounding atmosphere, yields a very high content of noble gases, e.g., 0.35 vol % krypton and 2.0 vol % xenon. The presented off-gas treatment unit is operated in cold runs with 1/3 of the full capacity and can treat about 1 m3 STP/h helium, corresponding to a quantity of about 10,000 MW(e) HTGR-fuel reprocessing plant.

  8. Research and development activities of the Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgungstechnik on the decontamination of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dippel, T.; Hentschel, D.; Kunze, S.

    1983-06-01

    After developing a procedure for the ''Testing of Surface Coating Materials for the Decontamination'' about 900 different surface coating materials had been tested and evaluated for the domestic and foreign industry. The results prove the following basic facts: Surface coatings, low in porosity, forming a smooth surface and containing limited amounts of filler are in the majority very effectively decontaminated if they are prepared of chemically stable, water repellent materials; Decontamination results are drastically poorer if the degree of filling of the materials is high especially if hygroscopic fillers and/or hygroscopic colouring matters are used. Currently available cleansers and washing powders used for decontamination did not fulfill the three basic demands for a decontamination agent: high efficiency, small foam generation and sufficient thermal stability. Therefore for the decontamination of walls, floors, etc. a water delutable, liquid cleanser was developed. In the same context a washing powder was optimized for the decontamination of contaminated clothing. The experiments on the decontamination of stainless steels ended up with the formulation of a pickling paste. Furthermore all investigations were aimed at a minimization of the waste generation by the decontamination process. This resulted in decontamination techniques, in which the decontaminating agents were applied in thin layers. A comparison of the currently practiced dipping technique with the coating technique showed that the latter one gave the better decontamination results and that the amount of decontamination waste was reduced. (orig./HP) [de

  9. Decontamination and decommissioning focus area. Technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This report presents details of the facility deactivation, decommissioning, and material disposition research for development of new technologies sponsored by the Department of Energy. Topics discussed include; occupational safety, radiation protection, decontamination, remote operated equipment, mixed waste processing, recycling contaminated metals, and business opportunities

  10. Decontamination techniques for buildings, structures and equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, M.P.; Clark, R.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides information on pollution protection. It describes decontamination process for such pertinent pollutants as asbestos, acids, explosives, cyanides, low level radiation, pesticides, P.C.B.'s and hazardous organic chemicals. The discussions include advantages, disadvantages, cost, effectiveness of the procedures and waste disposal

  11. Krypton-85 storage in sputter-deposited amorphous metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tingey, G.L.; McClanahan, E.D.; Lytle, J.M.; Gordon, N.R.; Knoll, R.W.

    1982-06-01

    After comparing options for storing radioactive krypton gas, the United States Department of Energy selected ion implantation of the gas into a sputter-deposited metal matrix as the reference process. This technique is being developed with pilot-scale testing and further characterization of the deposited product. The process involves implanting krypton atoms into a growing deposit during the sputtering process. An amorphous metal deposit of nominal composition Ni 0 81 La 0 09 Kr 0 10 has been selected for further studies because of the high krypton loading, high sputtering yield, relatively low cost of the metallic components, resistance to corrosion, and stability of the product. The krypton release from this amorphous metal is described as an activated diffusion process which increases linearly with the square root of time. Studies of krypton release rate as a function of temperature were completed and an activation energy for the diffusion of 70 kcal/mole obtained. From these data, we estimated that the krypton release during the first ten years would be 0.5% for a maximum temperature of 350 0 C. The actual release of the krypton during storage was projected to be lower by a factor of 10 7 with the maximum temperature only 220 0 C. Thermal analysis studies show two energy releases occurring with krypton-containing alloys: one associated with recrystallization of the amorphous alloy and a second associated with krypton release. The total energy release between 100 and 800 0 C was less than 50 cal/g. Estimates are given for the cost of operation of the ion implantation process for solidification of the krypton-85 from a 2000-tonne heavy metal/year reprocessing plant. The present value costs, in 1981 dollars including capital and operating costs and assuming a 30-year life, are about $26M for the lifetime of the plant. Annual energy consumption of the process was estimated to be 3.9 M kWh/year

  12. The distribution, atmospheric transfer, and assessment of krypton-85; Distribution, transfert atmospherique et bilan du krypton-85

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannetier, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-06-01

    Techniques for sampling and measuring krypton-85 have been developed which allowed to determine its geographical distribution. From its use as a tracer, an evaluation of the air masses which cross over the subtropical fronts has been derived. Besides, the stratospheric character of air pollution by krypton-85 at the level of the antarctic soil has been shown out. Levels of krypton-85 seem to point out to an underestimation of the assessment of nuclear explosion fission energies as adopted by the United Nations Scientific committee on the effects of atomic radiation and emphasize the need to set limits as soon as possible to the amounts of krypton-85 released to the atmosphere by fuel-reprocessing plants. (author) [French] La mise au point de techniques de prelevement et de mesure du krypton-85 atmospherique a permis de determiner sa repartition geographique. De son utilisation comme traceur on deduit une evaluation des masses d'air qui traversent les fronts subtropicaux. Par ailleurs, le caractere stratospherique de la pollution de l'air par le krypton-85 au niveau du sol antarctique est mis en evidence. Le bilan du krypton-85 semble reveler une sous-estimation du bilan des energies de fission des explosions adopte par le Comite scientifique des Nations Unies et souligne la necessite de limiter des que possible les quantites de krypton-85 rejetees dans l'atmosphere par les usines de traitement de combustibles irradies. (auteur)

  13. Understanding Mechanism of Photocatalytic Microbial Decontamination of Environmental Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chhabilal Regmi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Several photocatalytic nanoparticles are synthesized and studied for potential application for the degradation of organic and biological wastes. Although these materials degrade organic compounds by advance oxidation process, the exact mechanisms of microbial decontamination remains partially known. Understanding the real mechanisms of these materials for microbial cell death and growth inhibition helps to fabricate more efficient semiconductor photocatalyst for large-scale decontamination of environmental wastewater or industries and hospitals/biomedical labs generating highly pathogenic bacteria and toxic molecules containing liquid waste by designing a reactor. Recent studies on microbial decontamination by photocatalytic nanoparticles and their possible mechanisms of action is highlighted with examples in this mini review.

  14. Development of Decontamination and Decommissioning Technologies for Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jei Kwon; Lee, Kune Woo; Won, Hui Jun

    2010-04-01

    A laser ablation decontamination technology which is reportedly effective for a removal of fixed contaminants has been developed for three years as the first stage of the development. Lab scale experimental equipment was fabricated and the process variables have been assessed for determination of appropriate decontamination conditions at the laser wave lengths of 1,064 nm and 532 nm, respectively. The decontamination tests using radioactive specimens showed that the decontamination efficiency was about 100 which is quite a high value. An electrokinetic-flushing, an agglomeration leaching and a supercritical CO 2 soil decontamination technology were development for a decontamination of radioactive soil wastes from the decommissioned sites of the TRIGA research reactor and the uranium conversion facilities. An electrokinetic-flushing process was found to be effective for soil wastes aged for a long time and an agglomeration leaching process was effective for soil wastes of surface contamination. On the other hand, a supercritical CO 2 soil decontamination technology was found to be applicable for U or TRU bearing soil wastes. The remediation monitoring key technologies such as a representative sample taking and a measurement concept for the vertical distribution of radionuclides were developed for an assessment of the site remediation. Also an One-Dimensional Water Flow and Contaminant Transport in Unsaturated Zone (FTUNS) code was developed to interpretate the radionuclide migration in the unsaturated zone

  15. Theory of attosecond absorption spectroscopy in krypton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Jan Conrad; Lindroth, Eva; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2012-01-01

    A theory for time-domain attosecond pump–attosecond probe photoabsorption spectroscopy is formulated and related to the atomic response. The theory is illustrated through a study of attosecond absorption spectroscopy in krypton. The atomic parameters entering the formulation such as energies...... of the hole in this manner. In a second example, a hole is created in an inner shell by the first pulse, and the second probe pulse couples an even more tightly bound state to that hole. The hole decays in this example by Auger electron emission, and the absorption spectroscopy follows the decay of the hole...

  16. Decontamination device for pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harashina, Heihachi.

    1994-01-01

    Pipelines to be decontaminated are parts of pipelines contaminated with radioactive materials, and they are connected to a fluid transfer means (for example, a bladeless pump) and a ball collector by way of a connector. The fluid of a mixture of chemical decontaminating liquid and spheres is sent into pipelines to be decontaminated. The spheres are, for example, heat resistant porous hard or soft rubber spheres. The fluid discharged from the pipelines to be decontaminated are circulated by way of bypassing means. The inner surface of the pipelines is decontaminated by the circulation of the fluid. When the bypass means is closed, the fluid discharged from the pipelines to be decontaminated is sent to the ball collector, and the spheres are captured by a hopper. Further, the liquid is sent to the filtrating means to filter the chemical contaminating liquid, and sludges contained in the liquid are captured. (I.N.)

  17. Gross decontamination experiment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.; Kinney, K.; Dettorre, J.; Gilbert, V.

    1983-07-01

    A Gross Decontamination Experiment was conducted on various levels and surfaces of the TMI - Unit 2 reactor building in March 1982. The polar crane, D-rings, missile shields, refueling canals, refueling bridges, equipment, and elevations 305' and 347'-6'' were flushed with low pressure water. Additionally, floor surfaces on elevation 305' and floor surfaces and major pieces of equipment on elevation 347'-6'' were sprayed with high pressure water. Selective surfaces were decontaminated with a mechanical scrubber and chemicals. Strippable coating was tested and evaluated on equipment and floor surfaces. The effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of several decontamination techniques were established for the large, complex decontamination effort. Various decontamination equipment was evaluated and its effectiveness was documented. Decontamination training and procedures were documented and evaluated, as were the support system and organization for the experiment

  18. Decontamination of radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despotovic, R.; Music, S.; Subotic, B.; Wolf, R.H.H.

    1979-01-01

    Removal of radioactive isotopes under controlled conditions is determined by a number of physical and chemical properties considered radiocontaminating and by the characteristics of the contaminated object. Determination of quantitative and qualitative factors for equilibrium in a contamination-decontamination system provides the basis for rational and successful decontamination. The decontamination of various ''solid/liquid'' systems is interesting from the scientific and technological point of view. These systems are of great importance in radiation protection (decontamination of various surfaces, liquids, drinking water, fixation or collection of radiocontaminants). Different types of decontamination systems are discussed. The dependence of rate and efficiency of the preparation conditions and on the ageing of the scavenger is described. The influence of coagulating electrolyte on radioactive isotope fixation efficiency was also determined. The fixation of fission radionuclide on oxide scavengers has been studied. The connection between fundamental investigations and practical decontamination of the ''solid/liquid'' systems is discussed. (author)

  19. Gross decontamination experiment report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, R.; Kinney, K.; Dettorre, J.; Gilbert, V.

    1983-07-01

    A Gross Decontamination Experiment was conducted on various levels and surfaces of the TMI - Unit 2 reactor building in March 1982. The polar crane, D-rings, missile shields, refueling canals, refueling bridges, equipment, and elevations 305' and 347'-6'' were flushed with low pressure water. Additionally, floor surfaces on elevation 305' and floor surfaces and major pieces of equipment on elevation 347'-6'' were sprayed with high pressure water. Selective surfaces were decontaminated with a mechanical scrubber and chemicals. Strippable coating was tested and evaluated on equipment and floor surfaces. The effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of several decontamination techniques were established for the large, complex decontamination effort. Various decontamination equipment was evaluated and its effectiveness was documented. Decontamination training and procedures were documented and evaluated, as were the support system and organization for the experiment.

  20. ORO scrap metal decontamination program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jugan, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has approximately 80,000 tons of contaminated scrap metal at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon, Ohio; and the Feed Materials Production Center in Fernald, Ohio. After unsuccessful in-house attempts to eliminate/recycle the contaminated metal, DOE is allowing private enterprise the opportunity to participate in this program. DOE is making this opportunity available under a two-phase approach, which is being supported by two separate and corresponding Request for Proposals. Phase I, which is nearing completion, is a demonstration phase to establish a group of companies that the DOE will consider qualified to eliminate the scrap at one or more sites. In Phase I, the companies decontaminated 25-50 tons of scrap to demonstrate capabilities to DOE and to gain the knowledge required to plan/bid on elimination of the scrap at one or more sites. Phase II will request proposals for elimination of the total scrap at one or more of the above noted sites. Multiple awards for Phase II are also anticipated. Companies participating in Phase II will be required to take title to the contaminated scrap and decontaminate/process the scrap for beneficial reuse. Radioactive wastes and metal that cannot be successfully decontaminated/processed will be returned to DOE

  1. Initial decontamination of the equipment decontamination room at the West Valley Demonstration Project. Topical report, September 1983-May 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meigs, R.A.

    1985-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the initial decontamination of the Equipment Decontamination Room (EDR). The effort spanned a two-year period and included packaging and removal of waste; grinding away contaminated concrete floors; pump-out and spraydown of an equipment soaking pit; washing and painting of walls, equipment, and floors; refurbishment of utilities and various pieces of equipment; and load tests of EDR and Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cranes. After decontamination, the EDR was converted into a waste handling area for the decommissioning of the CPC

  2. Decontamination of body surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harase, Chieko.

    1989-01-01

    There are two important points for an effective application of decontamination procedures. One is the organizing method of responsible decontamination teams. The team should be directed by medical doctor with the knowledge of decontamination of radionuclides. The other point is the place of application of the decontamination. Hospitals and clinics, especially with a department of nuclear medicine, or specialized units such as an emergency medical center are preferable. Before decontamination procedures are initiated, adequate monitoring of the body surface should be undertaken by a competent person in order to demarcate the areas which are contaminated. There are fundamental principles which are applicable to all decontamination procedures. (1) Precautions must always be taken to prevent further spread of contamination during decontamination operations. (2) Mild decontamination methods should be tried before resorting to treatment which can damage the body surface. The specific feature of each contamination varies widely in radionuclides involved, place and area of the contamination, condition of the contaminated skin such as whether the skin is wounded or not, and others. Soap and water are usually good detergents in most cases. If they fail, orange oil cream (SUPERDECONCREAM, available from Tokyo Engineering Co.) specially prepared for decontamination of radionuclides of most fission and corrosion products may be used. Contaminated hair should be washed several times with an efficient shampoo. (author)

  3. Development of decontamination methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, S.; Dippel, T.; Hentschel, D.

    1976-01-01

    PVC floorings, fabricated by mixing of the basic components, showed no relation between content of fillers and decontamination results. Decontamination results are partly poorer, if the flooring contains a high concentration of the filler, especially if the latter consists mainly of hydrophilic materials. The coloring of the floorings seems to have no influence on the decontamination. Rubber floorings, fabricated by chemical reactions between polymers, vulcanization materials and fillers, show decontamination results depending definitely from the proper choice of the filler. Flooring types, containing lampblack, graphite, kaoline, barium sulfate and titanium oxide are easy to decontaminate. Increasing contents of hydrophilic filler cause a fall off in the decontamination results. The decontamination effectiveness and the homogenity of cleaning pastes based on hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, titanium oxide and polyethylene powders is strongly depended on the content of hydrochloric acid. Reduction of the content of this component to less than 2 w/O remains the effectiveness unchanged only if the titanium oxide-polyethylene powder mixture is substituted by a high density, highly surface active powder material. This type of paste containing no hydrochloric acid shows nearly the same decontamination effectiveness as standard pickling pastes containing about 30% hydrochlorid acid. Properly prepared salt powder turn out to be easily and successfully applied to metal surfaces by a flame spray technique. The thin layer of molten salts is a very effective decontamination to samples contaminated in the primary loop of a PWR. (orig.) [de

  4. Technology development and demonstration for TRIGA research reactor decontamination, decommissioning and site restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Jung, Ki Jung; Lee, Byung Jik

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the introduction to research reactor decommissioning plan at KAERI, the background of technology development and demonstration, and the current status of the system decontamination technology for TRIGA reactors, concrete decontamination and dust treatment technologies, wall ranging robot and graphic simulation of dismantling processes, soil decontamination and restoration technology, recycling or reuse technologies for radioactive metallic wastes, and incineration technology demonstration for combustible wastes. 9 figs

  5. Update and improvement of the global krypton-85 emission inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlswede, Jochen; Hebel, Simon; Ross, J Ole; Schoetter, Robert; Kalinowski, Martin B

    2013-01-01

    Krypton-85 is mainly produced in nuclear reactors by fission of uranium and plutonium and released during chopping and dissolution of spent fuel rods in nuclear reprocessing facilities. As noble gas it is suited as a passive tracer for evaluation of atmospheric transport models. Furthermore, research is ongoing to assess its quality as an indicator for clandestine reprocessing activities. This paper continues previous efforts to compile a comprehensive historic emission inventory for krypton-85. Reprocessing facilities are the by far largest emitters of krypton-85. Information on sources and calculations used to derive the annual krypton-85 emission is provided for all known reprocessing facilities in the world. In addition, the emission characteristics of two plants, Tokai (Japan) and La Hague (France), are analysed in detail using emission data with high temporal resolution. Other types of krypton-85 sources are power reactors, naval reactors and isotope production facilities. These sources contribute only little or negligible amounts of krypton-85 compared to the large reprocessing facilities. Taking the decay of krypton-85 into account, the global atmospheric inventory is estimated to about 5500 PBq at the end of 2009. The correctness if the inventory has been proven by meteorological simulations and its error is assumed to be in the range of a few percent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Radioactive 85Kr in krypton enriched with a light isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'minov, V.V.; Novikov, V.M.; Pomanskii, A.A.; Pritychenko, B.V.; Vieiar, J.; Garcia, E.; Morales, A.; Morales, J.; Nunes-Lagos, R.; Piumendon, J.

    1993-01-01

    Radioactive krypton 85, a product of nuclear power generation, is known to be accumulating in the atmosphere continuously. Its volumetric activity in natural krypton is 700-800 Bq/liter. This can cause difficulties, e.g., in the fabrication of nuclear radiation detector for high-mass krypton. Krypton with a reduced 85 Kr content can be obtained by isotope separation. As part of an experiment to look for two-positron decay and conversion of an atomic electron to a positron in 78 Kr, Saenz measured the 85 Kr content in 78 Kr-enriched krypton. A mixture of two 85 Kr samples was used as the working substance of a cylindrical ionization chamber. The useful volume (1.33 liter) of the chamber contained 35.3 liters of gas at ∼2.5 kPa. The energy resolution of the detector at an energy of 0.511 MeV was 3.8%. The measurements were made in a passive lead shield 20 cm thick in an underground laboratory at a depth of 675 m water equivalent. Results are presented for counting rates in low-energy regions, contribution of krypton-85 to background, and the volumetric activity of krypton-85

  7. Decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from the March 28, 1979 accident, Three-Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2, Pennsylvania-Docket No. 50-320 (final supplement 2 to the final environmental impact statement of March 1981)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    Implementation of actions necessary for decontamination of the facility, defueling of the reactor, and disposition of the radioactive wastes that resulted from the accident on March 28, 1979 at Unit 2 of the Three-Mile Island Nuclear Station in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania are discussed. This second final supplement to the final environmental impact statement, filed in March 1981 on facility decontamination, reevaluates the environmental impacts of accident-generated water disposal alternatives, using more complete and current information. This supplement also includes a specific evaluation of the recently submitted proposal for water disposition. The project would alleviate a radiological hazard that threatens the well-being of the surrounding population and downstream communities. Risks to the general public have been estimated to be very small fractions of the estimated normal incidence of cancer fatalities and genetic disorders. The most significant potential impact is the risk of physical injury associated with transportation accidents. Social impacts during the operation could result in reduced property values, competition between the work force and tourists for temporary housing, and congestion of local traffic arteries. Some psychological stress would experienced by area residents. Economic effects could include increased electricity rates, reduced tourism, and possible resistance to consumption of area goods that consumers might mistakenly think are contaminated

  8. High pressure freon decontamination of remote equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    A series of decontamination tests using high pressure FREON 113 was conducted in the 200 Area of the Hanford site. The intent of these tests was to evaluate the effectiveness of FREON 113 in decontamination of manipulator components, tools, and equipment items contaminated with mixed fission products. The test results indicated that high pressure FREON 113 is very effective in removing fissile material from a variety of objects and can reduce both the quantity and the volume of the radioactive waste material presently being buried

  9. New decontamination processes for liquid effluents and solid materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, S.

    2008-01-01

    New decontamination processes are being studied in order to protect workers and to reduce strongly the quantity of secondary wastes produced. 2 decontamination processes for liquid nuclear wastes are under studies. First, the coprecipitation process whose improvement is based on a better control of the 2 coupled mechanisms involved in the process: the formation of adsorbent particles and the uptake of radionuclides. Secondly, the column process whose development focuses on new materials that can be used to absorb cesium in a reversible way. 3 new decontamination processes for solid materials are being developed. First, processes using drying gels are under investigation in order to treat materials like lead, aluminium, iron and stainless steel. Real decontamination of hot cells by drying gel process has been performed and a decontamination factor between 16 and 25 has been obtained on stainless steels. Secondly, new foam decontamination processes have been developed, they are based on the use of new foams stabilized by biodegradable non-ionic surfactants: alkyl-poly-glucosides and viscofiers or nano-particles. The aim is to increase the foam lifetime. Thirdly, new surfactants in solution decontamination processes have been studied, the aim is to decontaminate through degreasing by using acidic surfactants. The idea is to combine emulsification and wetting power. (A.C.)

  10. Electroosmotic decontamination of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, W.D.; Bush, S.A.; Marsh, G.C.; Henson, H.M.; Box, W.D.; Morgan, I.L.

    1993-03-01

    A method is described for the electroosmotic decontamination of concrete surfaces, in which an electrical field is used to induce migration of ionic contaminants from porous concrete into an electrolyte solution that may be disposed of as a low-level liquid radioactive waste (LLRW); alternately, the contaminants from the solution can be sorbed onto anion exchange media in order to prevent contaminant buildup in the solution and to minimize the amount of LLRW generated. We have confirmed the removal of uranium (and infer the removal of 99 Tc) from previously contaminated concrete surfaces. In a typical experimental configuration, a stainless steel mesh is placed in an electrolyte solution contained within a diked cell to serve as the negative electrode (cathode) and contaminant collection medium, respectively, and an existing metal penetration (e.g., piping, conduit, or rebar reinforcement within the concrete surface) serves as the positive electrode (anode) to complete the cell. Typically we have achieved 70 to >90% reductions in surface activity by applying 2 )

  11. Update and improvement of the global krypton-85 emission inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlswede, Jochen; Hebel, Simon; Ross, J. Ole; Schoetter, Robert; Kalinowski, Martin B.

    2013-01-01

    Krypton-85 is mainly produced in nuclear reactors by fission of uranium and plutonium and released during chopping and dissolution of spent fuel rods in nuclear reprocessing facilities. As noble gas it is suited as a passive tracer for evaluation of atmospheric transport models. Furthermore, research is ongoing to assess its quality as an indicator for clandestine reprocessing activities. This paper continues previous efforts to compile a comprehensive historic emission inventory for krypton-85. Reprocessing facilities are the by far largest emitters of krypton-85. Information on sources and calculations used to derive the annual krypton-85 emission is provided for all known reprocessing facilities in the world. In addition, the emission characteristics of two plants, Tokai (Japan) and La Hague (France), are analysed in detail using emission data with high temporal resolution. Other types of krypton-85 sources are power reactors, naval reactors and isotope production facilities. These sources contribute only little or negligible amounts of krypton-85 compared to the large reprocessing facilities. Taking the decay of krypton-85 into account, the global atmospheric inventory is estimated to about 5500 PBq at the end of 2009. The correctness if the inventory has been proven by meteorological simulations and its error is assumed to be in the range of a few percent. - Highlights: ► Krypton-85 is mainly produced in nuclear reactors and released during reprocessing. ► Krypten-85 can be possibly used as an indicator for clandestine reprocessing. ► This work provides an up-to-date global krypton-85 emission inventory. ► The inventory includes emissions from all possible artificial sources.

  12. Chemical decontamination for decommissioning purposes. (Vigorous decontamination tests of steel samples in a special test loop)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregani, F.; Pascali, R.; Rizzi, R.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of the research activities described was to develop vigorous decontamination techniques for decommissioning purposes, taking into account the cost of treatment of the radwaste, to achieve possibly unrestricted release of the treated components, and to obtain know-how for in situ hard decontamination. The decontamination procedures for strong decontamination have been optimized in static and dynamic tests (DECO-loop). The best values have been found for: (i) hydrochloric acid: 4 to 5% vol. at low temperature, 0.7 to 1% vol. at high temperature (80 0 C); (ii) hydrofluoric plus nitric acid: 1.5% vol. HF + 5% vol. HNO 3 at low temperature; 0.3 to 0.5% vol. HF + 2.5 to 5% vol. HNO 3 at high temperature. High flow rates are not necessary, but a good re-circulation of the solution is needed. The final contamination levels, after total oxide removal, are in accordance with limits indicated for unrestricted release of materials in some countries. The arising of the secondary waste is estimated. Decontamination of a 10 m 2 surface would typically produce 0.5 to 3.0 kg of dry waste, corresponding to 1.6 to 10 kg of concrete conditioned waste

  13. Solidification of metal oxide from electrokinetic-electrodialytic decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Daeseo; Park, Uk-Ryang; Kim, Gye-Nam; Kim, Seung-Soo; Moon, Jei-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Electrokinectic-electrodialytic decontamination technology reduced 80% of the concentration of the uranium soil waste to below the concentration of self-disposal. After conducting electrokinectic-electrodialytic decontamination, more than 10% of the remainder of radioactive waste from the cathodes of electrokinectic-electrodialytic equipment were produced. To dispose of such waste, it is necessary to solidify second radioactive waste owing to the requirements of radioactive waste from public corporations. In this study, a solidification experiment was carried out using a polymer. At first, a sampling of second radioactive waste was conducted. Then, second radioactive waste and a polymer were mixed. Third, the solidified state between the second radioactive waste and polymer was checked. In our next study, an experiment for the requirements of a public radioactive waste corporation will be conducted.

  14. The Liquid Krypton Calorimeter Cryogenics for the NA48 Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bremer, J; Dauvergne, J P; Gonidec, A; Kesseler, G; Kubischta, Werner; Linser, G; Schinzel, D; Taureg, Hans; Wertelaers, Piet

    1998-01-01

    The NA48 cryogenic system has to provide stable thermal conditions (120 K) in a 9000 liter liquid krypton calorimeter, and has to ensure safe and loss free storage of the liquid during idle periods. Direct cooling of the krypton by nitrogen is used in emergency cases, while an intermediate cooler, containing saturated liquid argon at around 10 bar (117 K) is used under normal operation conditions when high thermal stability is needed. The krypton pressure is, during data taking, regulated to a value of (1.05 ± 0.01) bar for a period of about 8 months of continuous operation of the calorimeter.

  15. Technical feasibility of krypton-85 storage in sodalite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, R.W.; Christensen, A.B.; Del Debbio, J.A.; Keller, J.H.; Knecht, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    Based on these experimental results, the process that is technically feasible for a reference 2000 metric ton of heavy metal (MTHM) per year reprocessing plant producing approx. 17 MCi or approx. 190 m 3 at STP would encapsulate krypton at approx. 20 cm 3 /g from krypton at temperatures greater than 575 0 C and pressures greater than 1600 atm with one batch a day in a 58-L high pressure vessel. Based on preliminary measurements at 500 0 C, the same process also would be feasible for a 70% krypton and 30% xenon mixture. 7 figures

  16. Development of decontamination system for radioactive matter on paved road using dry ice blast method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamine, Haruo; Wakayama, Masanori; Nakamura, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    As a decontamination method for paved road surface, the 'Dry Ice Blast Decontamination System' has been developed. This decontamination system has characteristic as follows; 1) Generation of decontamination waste is extremely small, 2) not using water, 3) not damaging the pavement surface. In actual decontamination work, more than 60% average (maximum 84%) reduction rate of the radiation counting rate has been achieved. In addition to these features, this system prevent the diffusion into the surrounding and the radiation exposure of workers by sucking waste quickly using attached dust collecting function. This system is also characterized in that it does not cause a difference in skill by the operator because of faceted decontamination using repetitive motion by concatenating three pellet injection nozzle and self-propelled decontamination machine. (author)

  17. Planning guidance for nuclear-power-plant decontamination. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munson, L.F.; Divine, J.R.; Martin, J.B.

    1983-06-01

    Direct and indirect costs of decontamination are considered in the benefit-cost analysis. A generic form of the benefit-cost ratio is evaluated in monetary and nonmonetary terms, and values of dollar per man-rem are cited. Federal and state agencies that may have jurisiction over various aspects of decontamination and waste disposal activities are identified. Methods of decontamination, their general effectiveness, and the advantages and disadvantages of each are outlined. Dilute or concentrated chemical solutions are usually used in-situ to dissolve the contamination layer and a thin layer of the underlying substrate. Electrochemical techniques are generally limited to components but show high decontamination effectiveness with uniform corrosion. Mechanical agents are particularly appropriate for certain out-of-system surfaces and disassembled parts. These processes are catagorized and specific concerns are discussed. The treatment, storage, and disposal or discharge or discharge of liquid, gaseous, and solid wastes generated during the decontamination process are discussed. Radioactive and other hazardous chemical wastes are considered. The monitoring, treatment, and control of radioactive and nonradioactive effluents, from both routine operations and possible accidents, are discussed. Protecting the health and safety of personnel onsite during decontamination is of prime importance and should be considered in each facet of the decontamination process. The radiation protection philosophy of reducing exposure to levels as low as reasonably achievable should be stressed. These issues are discussed.

  18. Long-term decontamination engineering study. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geuther, W.J.

    1995-04-03

    This report was prepared by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) with technical and cost estimating support from Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) and Parsons Environmental Services, Inc. (Parsons). This engineering study evaluates the requirements and alternatives for decontamination/treatment of contaminated equipment at the Hanford Site. The purpose of this study is to determine the decontamination/treatment strategy that best supports the Hanford Site environmental restoration mission. It describes the potential waste streams requiring treatment or decontamination, develops the alternatives under consideration establishes the criteria for comparison, evaluates the alternatives, and draws conclusions (i.e., the optimum strategy for decontamination). Although two primary alternatives are discussed, this study does identify other alternatives that may warrant additional study. hanford Site solid waste management program activities include storage, special processing, decontamination/treatment, and disposal facilities. This study focuses on the decontamination/treatment processes (e.g., waste decontamination, size reduction, immobilization, and packaging) that support the environmental restoration mission at the Hanford Site.

  19. Long-term decontamination engineering study. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geuther, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    This report was prepared by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) with technical and cost estimating support from Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) and Parsons Environmental Services, Inc. (Parsons). This engineering study evaluates the requirements and alternatives for decontamination/treatment of contaminated equipment at the Hanford Site. The purpose of this study is to determine the decontamination/treatment strategy that best supports the Hanford Site environmental restoration mission. It describes the potential waste streams requiring treatment or decontamination, develops the alternatives under consideration establishes the criteria for comparison, evaluates the alternatives, and draws conclusions (i.e., the optimum strategy for decontamination). Although two primary alternatives are discussed, this study does identify other alternatives that may warrant additional study. hanford Site solid waste management program activities include storage, special processing, decontamination/treatment, and disposal facilities. This study focuses on the decontamination/treatment processes (e.g., waste decontamination, size reduction, immobilization, and packaging) that support the environmental restoration mission at the Hanford Site

  20. Decontamination of floor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirous, F.

    1983-01-01

    Requirements are presented put on the surfaces of floors of radiochemical workplaces. The mechanism is described of retaining the contaminant in the surface of the flooring, ways of reducing the hazards of floor surface contamination, decontamination techniques and used decontamination agents. (J.P.)

  1. Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement: related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979 accident Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-320). Final supplement dealing with occupational radiation dose. Supplement No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act, the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Related to Decontamination and Disposal of Radioactive Wastes Resulting from March 28, 1979 Accident Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2 has been supplemented. The supplement was required because current information indicates that cleanup may entail substantially more occupational radiation dose to the cleanup work force than originally anticipated. Cleanup was originally estimated to result in from 2000 to 8000 person-rem of occupational radiation dose. Although nearly 2000 person-rem have resulted from cleanup operations performed up to now, current estimates now indicate that between 13,000 and 46,000 person-rem are expected to be required. Alternative cleanup methods considered in the supplement either did not result in appreciable dose savings or were not known to be technically feasible

  2. Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979 accident at Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-320): Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act, the Commission's implementing regulations, and the Commission's April 27, 1981 Statement of Policy, the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979, accident Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2 NUREG-0683 (PEIS) is being supplemented. This supplement updates the environmental evaluation of accident-generated water disposal alternatives published in the PEIS, utilizing more complete and current information. Also, the supplement includes a specific environmental evaluation of the licensee's proposal for water disposition. Although no clearly preferable water disposal alternative was identified, the supplement concluded that a number of alternatives could be implemented without significant environmental impact. The NRC staff has concluded that the licensee's proposed disposal of the accident-generated water by evaporation will not significantly affect the quality of the human environment. Further, any impacts from the disposal program are outweighed by its benefits

  3. Programmatic environmental impact statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979 accident, Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-320). Draft supplement dealing with occupational radiation dose. Supplement No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act, the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Related to Decontamination and Disposal of Radioactive Waste for the 1979 Accident at Three Mile Island Nuclear Station Unit 2 has been supplemented. The supplement was required because current information indicates that cleanup will entail substantially more occupational radiation dose to the cleanup work force than originally anticipated. Cleanup was originally estimated to result in from 2000 to 8000 person-rem of occupational radiation dose. Although only 1700 person-rem have resulted from cleanup operations performed up to now, current estimates now indicate that between 13,000 and 46,000 person-rem are expected to be required. Alternate cleanup methods considered in the supplement either did not result in appreciable dose savings or were not known to be technically feasible

  4. Decontamination of polypropylene fabrics by dry cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severa, J.; Knajfl, J.

    1983-01-01

    Polypropylene fabrics can efficiently be decontaminated by dry cleaning in benzine or perchloroethylene, this also in case the fabric was greased in addition to radioactive contamination. For heavily soiled fabric, it is advantageous to first dry clean it and then wash it. The positive effect was confirmed of intensifiers on the cleaning process, especially of benzine soap. In practice, its concentration should be selected within 1 and 10 g.dm - 3 . Decontamination by dry cleaning and subsequent washing is advantageous in that that the resulting activity of waste water from the laundry is low. Radioactive wastes from the dry cleaning process have a low weight and can be handled as solid waste. (M.D.)

  5. Separations canyon decontamination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershey, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    Highly radioactive process equipment is decontaminated at the Savannah River Plant in specially equipped areas of the separations canyon building so that direct mechanical repairs or alterations can be made. Using these facilities it is possible to decontaminate and repair equipment such as 10- x 11-ft storage tanks, 8- x 8-ft batch evaporator pots and columns, 40-in. Bird centrifuges, canyon pumps and agitators, and various canyon piping systems or ''jumpers.'' For example, centrifuge or evaporator pots can be decontaminated and rebuilt for about 60 percent of the 1974 replacement cost. The combined facilities can decontaminate and repair 6 to 10 pieces of major equipment per year. Decontamination time varies with type of equipment and radioactivity levels encountered

  6. Separations canyon decontamination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershey, J.H.

    1975-05-01

    Highly radioactive process equipment is decontaminated at the Savannah River Plant in specially equipped areas of the separations canyon buildings so that direct mechanical repairs or alterations can be made. Using these facilities it is possible to decontaminate and repair equipment such as 10- x 11-ft storage tanks, 8- x 8-ft batch evaporator pots and columns, 40-in. Bird centrifuges, canyon pumps and agitators, and various canyon piping systems or ''jumpers.'' For example, centrifuge or evaporator pots can be decontaminated and rebuilt for about 60 percent of the 1974 replacement cost. The combined facilities can decontaminate and repair 6 to 10 pieces of major equipment per year. Decontamination time varies with type of equipment and radioactivity levels encountered. (U.S.)

  7. Cleanout and decontamination of radiochemical hot cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surma, J.E.; Holton, L.K. Jr.; Katayama, Y.B.; Gose, J.E.; Haun, F.E.; Dierks, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing and employing advanced remote and contact technologies in cleaning out and decontaminating six radiochemical hot cells at Hanford under the Department of Energy's Surplus Facilities Management Program. The program is using a series of remote and contact decontamination techniques to reduce costs and to significantly lower radiation doses to workers. Refurbishment of the cover blocks above the air lock trench reduced radiation exposure in the air lock and cleanout and decontamination of an analytical cell achieved a reduction in radioactive contamination. Nuclear Regulatory Commission-approved Type B burial boxes are also being used to reduce waste disposal costs and radiation doses. PNL is currently decommissioning its pilot-scale radioactive liquid-fed ceramic melter. Special tools have been developed and are being used to accomplish the world's first such effort. 4 refs., 5 figs

  8. Effluent treatment plant and decontamination centre, Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, C.P.; Agarwal, K.

    2017-01-01

    The Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, has a number of plants and laboratories, which generate Radioactive Liquid Waste and Protective Wears. Two facilities have been established in late 1960s to cater to this requirement. The Centre, on the average generates about 50,000 m"3 of active liquid effluents of varying specific activities. The Effluent Treatment Plant was setup to receive and process radioactive liquids generated by various facilities of BARC in Trombay. It also serves a single-point discharge facility to enable monitoring of radioactive effluents discharged from the Trombay site. About 120-150 Te of protective wears and inactive apparel are generated annually from various radioactive facilities and laboratories of BARC. In addition, contaminated fuel assembly components are generated by DHRUVA and formerly by CIRUS. These components require decontamination before its recycle to the fuel assembly process. The Decontamination Centre, setup in late 1960s, is mandated to carry out the above mentioned decontamination activities

  9. The distribution, atmospheric transfer, and assessment of krypton-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pannetier, R.

    1968-06-01

    Techniques for sampling and measuring krypton-85 have been developed which allowed to determine its geographical distribution. From its use as a tracer, an evaluation of the air masses which cross over the subtropical fronts has been derived. Besides, the stratospheric character of air pollution by krypton-85 at the level of the antarctic soil has been shown out. Levels of krypton-85 seem to point out to an underestimation of the assessment of nuclear explosion fission energies as adopted by the United Nations Scientific committee on the effects of atomic radiation and emphasize the need to set limits as soon as possible to the amounts of krypton-85 released to the atmosphere by fuel-reprocessing plants. (author) [fr

  10. General recommendations for decontamination procedures to individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohlenschlaeger, L.; Messerschmidt, J.P.

    1989-04-01

    The fundamental criteria in handling radioactive contaminated persons are discussed and methods of monitoring, including monitoring of contaminated wounds, as well as decontamination measures with reference to particularly exposed regions of the body are described. Each decontamination procedure has to be carried out cautiously and has to be stopped as soon as skin lesion would be ensured from too strong mechanical cleansing, in order to avoid any additional incorporation by an injured skin. As a rule, any residual radioactivity still adherent to the skin surface can be neglected as soon as avoidance of spreading of the contamination to surrounding areas is assured. Experience showed that contaminations with radioactive dust can be removed from the skin surface quite easily by such simple means like water and soap. Radioisotopes, however, as used in nuclear medicine, usually are having a higher adhesive effect to the skin surface, thus making conditions for decontamination more difficult. Measures related to the decontamination procedure such as monitoring, mode of sampling for bioassay in case of incidents, handling of waste resulting from decontamination, as well as self-protective aspects are discussed in the annex. (orig.) [de

  11. Decontamination of process equipment using recyclable chelating solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jevec, J.; Lenore, C.; Ulbricht, S.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is now faced with the task of meeting decontamination and decommissioning obligations at numerous facilities by the year 2019. Due to the tremendous volume of material involved, innovative decontamination technologies are being sought that can reduce the volumes of contaminated waste materials and secondary wastes requiring disposal. With sufficient decontamination, some of the material from DOE facilities could be released as scrap into the commercial sector for recycle, thereby reducing the volume of radioactive waste requiring disposal. Although recycling may initially prove to be more costly than current disposal practices, rapidly increasing disposal costs are expected to make recycling more and more cost effective. Additionally, recycling is now perceived as the ethical choice in a world where the consequences of replacing resources and throwing away reusable materials are impacting the well-being of the environment. Current approaches to the decontamination of metals most often involve one of four basic process types: (1) chemical, (2) manual and mechanical, (3) electrochemical, and (4) ultrasonic. open-quotes Hardclose quotes chemical decontamination solutions, capable of achieving decontamination factors (Df's) of 50 to 100, generally involve reagent concentrations in excess of 5%, tend to physically degrade the surface treated, and generate relatively large volumes of secondary waste. open-quotes Softclose quotes chemical decontamination solutions, capable of achieving Df's of 5 to 10, normally consist of reagents at concentrations of 0.1 to 1%, generally leave treated surfaces in a usable condition, and generate relatively low secondary waste volumes. Under contract to the Department of Energy, the Babcock ampersand Wilcox Company is developing a chemical decontamination process using chelating agents to remove uranium compounds and other actinide species from process equipment

  12. Krypton excimer laser oscillation by discharge pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Takahiro; Tabe, Yoshitaka; Kubodera, Shoichi; Sasaki, Wataru; Kawanaka, Junji

    2001-01-01

    We have demonstrated vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser oscillation of the krypton excimer (Kr 2 *) excited by a compact self-sustained discharge device. We have observed a spectral narrowing of the Kr 2 * emission centered at 147.8 nm. A deconvoluted spectral width is 0.5 nm (FWHM), which reveals a contrast to a 13 nm spectral width of the spontaneous emission. The Kr 2 * intensity has increased one order of magnitude when a charging voltage was increased larger than 29 kV. The success of the lasing in the VUV spectral region has been attributed to the success of a stable glow discharge of Kr at 10 atm. The pulse width of the VUV laser radiation is 400 ns (FWHM). The maximum output energy measured is as large as 150 μJ. (author)

  13. Application of krypton-85 in groundwater dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanski, K.

    1979-01-01

    The method for determination 85 Kr activity in groundwater and its application in isotope hydrology is presented. Various aspects of 85 Kr presence in the earth's ecosphere are discussed in the first part of the paper. The method for 85 Kr activity measurement in groundwater is presented in the second part of the paper. Analytical procedure consists of the following steps: extraction of the gases dissolved in water sample, separation of the Ar+Kr mixture from the gases, 85 Kr activity measurement in miniature proportional counter, mass spectrometry determination of the krypton gas volume in the proportional counter. About 7 days is necessary for complete analysis of one sample - the error of analysis not exceeds 10 per cent. The results of 85 Kr activity measurements (together with tritium and carbon 14 C determinations) in 14 different water samples allowed to verify usefulness of 85 Kr dating of young water. (author)

  14. Electron impact ionization of large krypton clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Shao-Hui; Li Ru-Xin; Ni Guo-Quan; Xu Zhi-Zhan

    2004-01-01

    We show that the detection of ionization of very large van der Waals clusters in a pulsed jet or a beam can be realized by using a fast ion gauge. Rapid positive feedback electron impact ionization and fragmentation processes,which are initially ignited by electron impact ionization of the krypton clusters with the electron current of the ion gauge, result in the appearance of a progressional oscillation-like ion spectrum, or just of a single fast event under critical conditions. Each line in the spectrum represents a correlated explosion or avalanche ionization of the clusters.The phenomena have been analysed qualitatively along with a Rayleigh scattering experiment of the corresponding cluster jet.

  15. Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 1: Primary cooling system chemical decontamination: Draft environmental statement (Docket No. 50-10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-05-01

    The staff has considered the environmental impact and economic costs of the proposed primary cooling system chemical decontamination at Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1. The staff has focused this statement on the occupational radiation exposure associated with the proposed Unit 1 decontamination program, on alternatives to chemical decontamination, and on the environmental impact of the disposal of the solid radioactive waste generated by this decontamination. The staff has concluded that the proposed decontamination will not significantly affect the quality of the human environment. Furthermore, any impacts from the decontamination program are outweighed by its benefits. 2 figs., 7 tabs

  16. Beam-foil level lifetimes in krypton III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coetzer, F.J.; Kotze, P.B.; Westhuizen, P. van der

    1982-01-01

    The radiative lifetimes of levels in doubly-ionized Krypton have been measured after foil excitation of a beam of Krypton particles in the wavelength range 120-500 nm. The results are compared with the experimental values obtained by Fink et al., as well as theoretical values resulting from Coulomb (C.A.) and single configuration Hartree-Fock (H.F.) calculations. (orig.)

  17. Climate aspects of radioactive trace gases, especially krypton-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollert, R.; Butzin, M.

    1990-01-01

    The amount of krypton 85 currently present in the atmosphere is 3.300 Peta Bq. This atmospheric krypton contamination stems from atom bomb tests of the past and from nuclear power plants as well as spent fuel reprocessing plants. The paper investigates the air-electric and air-chemical impact of Kr-85 on the atmosphere and makes a forecast of the future Kr-85 contamination. (DG) [de

  18. Desublimation of krypton from a noncondensable carrier gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eby, R.S.

    1978-09-01

    A study was conducted to obtain column concentration profiles and point buildup rates for a cold trap freezing out krypton from a nitrogen carrier gas stream and to compare those experimentally obtained profiles with profiles generated from a theoretical model. Profiles were obtained over a range of flow conditions from 0.14 to 1.06 standard cubic feet per minute, krypton feed gas concentrations varied from 5.2 to 13.5%, and cold trap operating temperatures from -281 to -312 0 F. Gamma scintillation techniques using tracer amounts of krypton-85 provided the major analytical tool employed in the investigation. Data obtained from the experiments indicate that if values for the density and thermal conductivity of the krypton frost are known, the model can accurately predict krypton loading profiles in the cold trap. The frost density and frost conductivity appear to be functions of the freeze-out temperature and condensable krypton concentration. A discussion of cold trapping theory, a description of the experimental apparatus and tests performed, and an explanation of the usefulness of the model as a design tool for engineering use are included

  19. Spectra of heliumlike krypton from tokamak fusion test reactor plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitter, M.; Hsuan, H.; Bush, C.; Cohen, S.; Cummings, C.J.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Schivell, J.; Zarnstorff, M.; Smith, A.; Fraenkel, B.

    1993-04-01

    Krypton has been injected into ohmically-heated TFTR plasmas with peak electron temperatures of 6 key to study the effects of krypton on the plasma performance and to investigate the emitted krypton line radiation, which is of interest for future-generation tokamaks such as ITER, both as a diagnostic of the central ion temperature and for the control of energy release from the plasma by radiative cooling. The emitted radiation was monitored with a bolometer array, an X-ray pulse height analysis system, and a high-resolution Johann-type crystal spectrometer; and it was found to depend very sensitively on the electron temperature profile. Satellite spectra of heliumlike krypton, KrXXXV, near 0.95 Angstrom including lithiumlike, berylliumlike and boronlike features were recorded in second order Bragg reflection. Radiative cooling and reduced particle recycling at the plasma edge region were observed as a result of the krypton injection for all investigated discharges. The observations are in reasonable agreement with modeling calculations of the krypton ion charge state distribution including radial transport

  20. Krypton recovery from reprocessing off-gases by cryogenic distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geens, L.P.; Goossens, W.R.A.; Marien, J.

    1987-01-01

    With the financial support of the C.E.C., krypton recovery by cryogenic distillation in presence of oxygen was investigated. Both oxygen and ozone behavior in the cryodistillation unit were observed. The ozone decay in the rectification column was studied in absence and in presence of a radiation source. Additionally a demonstration run with krypton-85 was performed. Experiments with different oxygen concentrations up to 21% volume in the feed gas were carried out. The oxygen was enriched up to 85% volume in a zone between the krypton layer and the entrance of the rectification column. No oxygen was found in the bottom product. On the other hand, the ozone accumulated in that bottom product. The decay of ozone in the bottom liquid was measured in absence and in presence of a 500 Ci thulium-170 source. Without the radiation source, it took almost 30 days to observe a decay from 0.90% volume to 0.45% volume. The decay rate decreased with decreasing ozone concentration. In presence of the 500 Ci thulium-170, a constant decay rate of 0.24% volume per day was measured. Finally, a demonstration run with 100 Ci krypton-85 was performed in the cryodistillation unit, with air as feed gas. The krypton-85 was fed at a concentration of 30 mCih -1 until the total krypton inventory of the rectification column amounted to 40-45 Ci. The active run had a duration of 900 hours, during which no operational problems occurred. (orig.)

  1. Physical properties and heat transfer characteristics of materials for krypton-85 storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, A.B.

    1977-09-01

    Krypton-85 decay results in heat generation, and the subsequent temperature increase in the krypton-85 storage media must be evaluated. This report compiles the physical properties of krypton and of potential krypton-85 storage materials which are required to calculate the maximum temperature developed during storage. Temperature calculations were made for krypton-85 stored as a gas or immobilized solid in steel storage cylinders. The effects of krypton-85 loading, cylinder radius, storage media properties, and exterior cooling on storage temperature were shown

  2. PWR decontamination feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silliman, P.L.

    1978-12-18

    The decontamination work which has been accomplished is reviewed and it is concluded that it is worthwhile to investigate further four methods for decontamination for future demonstration. These are: dilute chemical; single stage strong chemical; redox processes; and redox/chemical in combination. Laboratory work is recommended to define the agents and processes for demonstration and to determine the effect of the solvents on PWR materials. The feasibility of Indian Point 1 for decontamination demonstrations is discussed, and it is shown that the system components of Indian Point 1 are well suited for use in demonstrations.

  3. Long lasting decontamination foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmer, Ricky L.; Peterman, Dean R.; Tripp, Julia L.; Cooper, David C.; Wright, Karen E.

    2010-12-07

    Compositions and methods for decontaminating surfaces are disclosed. More specifically, compositions and methods for decontamination using a composition capable of generating a long lasting foam are disclosed. Compositions may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6. Such compositions may further include affinity-shifting chemicals. Methods may include decontaminating a contaminated surface with a composition or a foam that may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6.

  4. PWR decontamination feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silliman, P.L.

    1978-01-01

    The decontamination work which has been accomplished is reviewed and it is concluded that it is worthwhile to investigate further four methods for decontamination for future demonstration. These are: dilute chemical; single stage strong chemical; redox processes; and redox/chemical in combination. Laboratory work is recommended to define the agents and processes for demonstration and to determine the effect of the solvents on PWR materials. The feasibility of Indian Point 1 for decontamination demonstrations is discussed, and it is shown that the system components of Indian Point 1 are well suited for use in demonstrations

  5. Ultrasonic decontamination of nuclear fuel. Feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, A.; Libal, A.; Norbaeck, J.; Wegemar, B.

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasonic decontamination of nuclear fuel is an expeditious way to reduce radiation exposures resulting in a minimal volume of waste. The fuel assemblies are set up in the fuel preparation machine one at a time and treated without prior disassemblage. By decontaminating 20% of the BWR fuel assemblies annually, there is a potential to reduce the collective dose by approximately 40-50%. Including also improved reactivity of the fuel, this amounts to an economic benefit of about 4 MSEK per reactor and year. The costs for performing the decontamination can be economically justified if the plants do not plan for short outages each year. The decontamination method could also be used for the purpose of removing tramp Uranium following a fuel failure or minor core accident. An additional benefit is removal of loosely adherent crud. The waste produced will be handled in a closed filtering circuit. The method is suggested to be verified in a test on discharged burnt-up fuel at site. The next step will be to develop the method further in order to be able to remove also tenacious crud. 12 refs, 4 tabs

  6. Pipe Decontamination Involving String-Foam Circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turchet, J.P.; Estienne, G.; Fournel, B.

    2002-01-01

    Foam applications number for nuclear decontamination purposes has recently increased. The major advantage of foam decontamination is the reduction of secondary liquid wastes volumes. Among foam applications, we focus on foam circulation in contaminated equipment. Dynamic properties of the system ensures an homogeneous and rapid effect of the foam bed-drifted chemical reagents present in the liquid phase. This paper describes a new approach of foam decontamination for pipes. It is based on an alternated air and foam injections. We called it 'string-foam circulation'. A further reduction of liquid wastes is achieved compared to continuous foam. Secondly, total pressure loss along the pipe is controlled by the total foam length in the pipe. It is thus possible to clean longer pipes keeping the pressure under atmospheric pressure value. This ensures the non dispersion of contamination. This study describes experimental results obtained with a neutral foam as well with an acid foam on a 130 m long loop. Finally, the decontamination of a 44 meters pipe is presented. (authors)

  7. Investigation on safety of gel decontamination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhihui; Song Fengli; Wang Yongxian; Zhang Taoge

    2014-01-01

    Gel decontamination technology is an advanced decontamination process of metal contaminated by radionuclide. It has the advantages such as simple operation process, high decontaminating factor, etc. But the disadvantages are that it has high spraying pressure and is strongly corrosive, which has safety risk to the operator and equipment. The effect of such factors as spraying pressure on operators was analyzed based on process feature, and it is proposed that it be worthwhile to make further study on the corrosion of gels to spraying equipment, taking into account corrosion feature of gels to stainless steel. Meanwhile, the safety issue was demonstrated on collecting and handling wastes from gel decontamination process. And then, protective measures, study methods, and solutions are put forward. The results show that protection should be strengthened during spraying to reduce the effect of splashing and fogging on workers; the equipment should be cleaned in time to reduce the effect of corrosion, and reducers should be added into waste liquid to eliminate the effect of residual detergent. (authors)

  8. System decontamination as a tool to control radiation fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riess, R.; Bertholdt, H.O. [Siemens Power Generation Group, Erlangen (Germany)

    1995-03-01

    Since chemical decontamination of the Reactor Coolant Systems (RCS) and subsystems has the highest potential to reduce radiation fields in a short term this technology has gained an increasing importance. The available decontamination process at Siemens, i.e., the CORD processes, will be described. It is characterized by using permanganic acid for preoxidation and diluted organic acid for the decontamination step. It is a regenerative process resulting in very low waste volumes. This technology has been used frequently in Europe and Japan in both RCS and subsystems. An overview will be given i.e. on the 1993 applications. This overview will include plant, scope, date of performance, system volume specal features of the process removed activities, decon factor time, waste volumes, and personnel dose during decontamination. This overview will be followed by an outlook on future developments in this area.

  9. The releases of krypton-85 and tritium to the environment and tritium to krypton-85 ratios as source indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, K.J.P.; Roether, W.

    1975-01-01

    More than 95% of the krypton-85 that is at present observed in the environment on a global scale originates from the combined releases following nuclear-power generation and plutonium production, while atmospheric fusion-bomb testing accounts for the same percentage of the global tritium. The global inventories at the end of 1973 were 55 MCi (estimated uncertainty +- 10%) of krypton-85, and 2900 MCi (+- 25%) of tritium. From the excess of the global krypton-85 inventory over the amounts accounted for by the sources other than plutonium production, it is concluded that 130 tonnes of plutonium-239 have been produced up to 1970. Pronounced fractionation occurs between atmosphere and hydrosphere, in the sense that the concentration of krypton-85 is lowered, and that of tritium (being overwhelmingly in the form of a water molecule, HTO) is greatly increased, in the hydrosphere. Largely as a consequence of this fractionation, the environmental tritium to krypton-85 ratios cover a wide range, with values lowest in the troposphere (typical order of magnitude 10 -1 Ci/Ci) and highest in continental surface water (of the order of 10 5 ). Preliminary oceanic krypton-85 data are reported, which indicate that the concentration decrease with depth in the ocean is very similar for both nuclides. Effluents from nuclear power reactors and reprocessing plants have tritium to krypton-85 ratios that do not differ markedly from those found at present in the troposphere; on the other hand, the very high ratios that are typical of the hydrosphere may offer opportunities of detecting such effluents in the hydrosphere on the basis of tritium to krypton-85 ratios. Considerable uncertainties in the ratios of the effluents have, however, to be anticipated, arising from varying, and fluctuating, fractionation between the two nuclides in the release processes. (author)

  10. Validation of Autoclave Protocols for Successful Decontamination of Category A Medical Waste Generated from Care of Patients with Serious Communicable Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garibaldi, Brian T; Reimers, Mallory; Ernst, Neysa; Bova, Gregory; Nowakowski, Elaine; Bukowski, James; Ellis, Brandon C; Smith, Chris; Sauer, Lauren; Dionne, Kim; Carroll, Karen C; Maragakis, Lisa L; Parrish, Nicole M

    2017-02-01

    In response to the Ebola outbreak in 2014, many hospitals designated specific areas to care for patients with Ebola and other highly infectious diseases. The safe handling of category A infectious substances is a unique challenge in this environment. One solution is on-site waste treatment with a steam sterilizer or autoclave. The Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH) installed two pass-through autoclaves in its biocontainment unit (BCU). The JHH BCU and The Johns Hopkins biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) clinical microbiology laboratory designed and validated waste-handling protocols with simulated patient trash to ensure adequate sterilization. The results of the validation process revealed that autoclave factory default settings are potentially ineffective for certain types of medical waste and highlighted the critical role of waste packaging in successful sterilization. The lessons learned from the JHH validation process can inform the design of waste management protocols to ensure effective treatment of highly infectious medical waste. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Use of a CO2 pellet non-destructive cleaning system to decontaminate radiological waste and equipment in shielded hot cells at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bench, T.R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper details how the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory modified and utilized a commercially available, solid carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) pellet, non-destructive cleaning system to support the disposition and disposal of radioactive waste from shielded hot cells. Some waste materials and equipment accumulated in the shielded hot cells cannot be disposed directly because they are contaminated with transuranic materials (elements with atomic numbers greater than that of uranium) above waste disposal site regulatory limits. A commercially available CO 2 pellet non-destructive cleaning system was extensively modified for remote operation inside a shielded hot cell to remove the transuranic contaminants from the waste and equipment without generating any secondary waste in the process. The removed transuranic contaminants are simultaneously captured, consolidated, and retained for later disposal at a transuranic waste facility

  12. New decontamination techniques: chemical gels, electropolishing and abrasives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunel, G.; Gauchon, J.P.; Kervegant, Y.; Josso, F.

    1991-01-01

    The decommissioning of nuclear installations requires decontamination techniques that are efficient, simple to apply and producing a small amount of wastes, which are easy to process. With a view to this, three decontamination methods, which appear to be particularly suited to decommissioning, have been studied. These three methods are: - spraying of gels carrying chemical decontaminating agents, - electropolishing with a swab device, - abrasives blasting. After parametric tests on non-radioactive and active samples, the industrial application of these methods in the dismantling of installations was studied. These industrial applications concern: - decontamination of pieces coming from the German BWR ISAR by immersion and gel spraying, - decontamination, mainly by gel spraying, and dismantling of the BRENNILIS bituminisation plant, - decontamination of part of the cooling circuit of the graphite gas reactor G2 by gel spraying, - decontamination of a component of the FBR SuperPhenix, using dry abrasives blasting. During the first three applications, generated secondary wastes volume and form were determined. 33 tabs., 16 figs., 12 refs

  13. CO2 pellet blasting literature search and decontamination scoping tests report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archibald, K.E.

    1993-12-01

    Past decontamination and solvent recovery activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) have resulted in the accumulation of 1.5 million gallons of radioactively contaminated sodium-bearing liquid waste. Future decontamination activities at the ICPP could result in the production of 5 million gallons or more of sodium-bearing waste using current decontamination techniques. Chemical decontamination flushes have provided a satisfactory level of decontamination. However, this method generates large amounts of sodium-bearing secondary waste. Steam jet cleaning has also been used with a great deal of success but cannot be used on concrete or soft materials. With the curtailment of reprocessing at the ICPP, the focus of decontamination is shifting from maintenance for continued operation of the facilities to decommissioning. Treatment of sodium-bearing waste is a particularly difficult problem due to the high content of alkali metals in the sodium-bearing liquid waste. It requires a very large volume of cold chemical additive for calcination. In addition, the sodium content of the sodium-bearing waste exceeds the limit that can be incorporated into vitrified waste without the addition of glass-forming compounds (primarily silicon) to produce an acceptable immobilized waste form. The primary initiatives of the Decontamination Development Program is the development of methods to eliminate/minimize the use of sodium-bearing decontamination chemicals and to minimize all liquid decontamination wastes. One method chosen for cold scoping studies during FY-93 was CO 2 pellet blasting. CO 2 pellet blasting has been used extensively by commercial industries for general cleaning. However, using this method for decontamination of nuclear materials is a fairly new concept. The following report discusses the research and scoping tests completed on CO 2 pellet blasting

  14. Development of gamma camera and application to decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Akira; Moro, Eiji; Takahashi, Isao

    2013-01-01

    A gamma camera has been developed to support recovering from the contamination caused by the accident of Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant of Tokyo Electric Power Company. The gamma camera enables recognition of the contamination by visualizing radioactivity. The gamma camera has been utilized for risk communication (explanation to community resident) at local governments in Fukushima. From now on, the gamma camera will be applied to solve decontaminations issues; improving efficiency of decontamination, visualizing the effect of decontamination work and reducing radioactive waste. (author)

  15. Laser Decontamination of Surfaces Contaminated with Cs+ Ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baigalmaaa, B.; Won, H. J.; Moon, J. K.; Jung, C. H.; Lee, K. W.; Hyun, J. H.

    2008-01-01

    Laser decontamination technology has been proven to be an efficient method for a surface modification of metals and concretes contaminated with radioactive isotopes. Furthermore, the generation of a secondary waste is negligible. The radioactivity of hot cells in the DFDF (Dupic Fuel Development Facility) is presumed to be very high and the predominant radionuclide is Cs-137. A series of laser decontamination studies by a fabricated Q-switched Nd:YAG laser system were performed on stainless steel specimens artificially contaminated with Cs+ ion. Decontamination characteristics of the stainless steel were analyzed by SEM and EPMA

  16. Decontamination and decommissioning of the West Valley Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daugherty, H.F.; Keel, R.

    1986-11-01

    This report presents the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities at the West Valley Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant through September 1, 1986. The topics addressed are: D and D of areas for reuse by the Liquid Waste Treatment System (LWTS); D and D of areas for reuse as High Level Waste (HLW) canister storage; and technologies developed in D and D work

  17. Decommissioning and Decontamination Program: Battelle Plutonium Facility, Environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    This assessment describes the decontamination of Battelle-Columbus Plutonium Facility and removal from the site of all material contamination which was associated with or produced by the Plutonium Facility. Useable uncontaminated material will be disposed of by procedures normally employed in scrap declaration and transfer. Contaminated waste will be transported to approved radioactive waste storage sites. 5 refs., 1 fig

  18. An evaluation of krypton propellant in Hall thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnell, Jesse Allen

    Due to its high specific impulse and low price, krypton has long sparked interest as an alternate Hall thruster propellant. Unfortunately at the moment, krypton's relatively poor performance precludes it as a legitimate option. This thesis presents a detailed investigation into krypton operation in Hall thrusters. These findings suggest that the performance gap can be decreased to 4% and krypton can finally become a realistic propellant option. Although krypton has demonstrated superior specific impulse, the xenon-krypton absolute efficiency gap ranges between 2 and 15%. A phenomenological performance model indicates that the main contributors to the efficiency gap are propellant utilization and beam divergence. Propellant utilization and beam divergence have relative efficiency deficits of 5 and 8%, respectively. A detailed characterization of internal phenomena is conducted to better understand the xenon-krypton efficiency gap. Krypton's large beam divergence is found to be related to a defocusing equipotential structure and a weaker magnetic field topology. Ionization processes are shown to be linked to the Hall current, the magnetic mirror topology, and the perpendicular gradient of the magnetic field. Several thruster design and operational suggestions are made to optimize krypton efficiency. Krypton performance is optimized for discharge voltages above 500 V and flow rates corresponding to an a greater than 0.015 mg/(mm-s), where alpha is a function of flow rate and discharge channel dimensions (alpha = m˙alphab/Ach). Performance can be further improved by increasing channel length or decreasing channel width for a given flow rate. Also, several magnetic field design suggestions are made to enhance ionization and beam focusing. Several findings are presented that improve the understanding of general Hall thruster physics. Excellent agreement is shown between equipotential lines and magnetic field lines. The trim coil is shown to enhance beam focusing

  19. Advance in radioactive decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basteris M, J. A.; Farrera V, R.

    2010-09-01

    The objective of the present work was to determine if the application of the Na hypochlorite has some utility in the radioactive decontamination, in comparison with the water, detergent and alcohol. Several methods were compared for decontaminate the iodine 131 and technetium 99, the work table and the skin it was carried out an initial count with the Geiger Muller. Later on, in a single occasion, the areas were washed with abundant water, alcohol, clothes detergent and sodium hypochlorite (used commercially as domestic bleacher) without diluting. Observing that the percentage in the decrease of the counted radioactivity by the Geiger Muller, decreased in the following way: It was demonstrated that the Na hypochlorite presents the highest index of radioactive decontamination with 100% of effectiveness. The Na hypochlorite is an excellent substance that can be used with effectiveness and efficiency like decontamination element in the accident cases of radioactive contamination in the clinical laboratories of nuclear medicine. (Author)

  20. Concrete decontamination scoping tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archibald, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    This report details the research efforts and scoping tests performed at the Idaho Chemical Process Plant using scabbling, chemical, and electro-osmotic decontamination techniques on radiologically contaminated concrete

  1. Recommendations for skin decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Further to the reecommendations for determining the surface contamination of the skin and estimating the radiation exposure of the skin after contamination (SAAS-Mitt--89-16), measures for skin decontamination are recommended. They are necessary if (1) after simple decontamination by means of water, soap and brush without damaging the skin the surface contamination limits are exceeded and the radiation exposure to be expected for the undamaged healthy skin is estimated as to high, and if (2) a wound is contaminated. To remove skin contaminations, in general universally applicable, non-aggressive decontamination means and methods are sufficient. In special cases, nuclide-specific decontamination is required taking into account the properties of the radioactive substance

  2. Chemical decontamination: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, R.A.; Wood, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    The source of radioactive contamination in various types of power reactors is discussed. The methods of chemical decontamination vary with the manner in which the radioactive contaminants are deposited on the surface. Two types of dilute decontamination systems are available. One system uses organic acids and chelating agents, which are mildly reducing in nature. In this process, the oxide contaminants are removed by simple acidic dissolution and reductive dissolution. The second type of decontamination process is based on low oxidation state metal ions, which are more strongly reducing and do not require a corrosion inhibitor. All processes commercially available for decontamination of power reactors are not detailed here, but a few key issues to be considered in the selection of a process are highlighted. 2 figures, 2 tables

  3. Food decontamination using nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    The research indicates that nanomaterials including nanoemulsions are promising decontamination media for the reduction of food contaminating pathogens. The inhibitory effect of nanoparticles for pathogens could be due to deactivate cellular enzymes and DNA; disrupting of membrane permeability; and/...

  4. Decontamination of latex gloves; Decontamination de gants en latex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutot, P; Schipfer, P; Blachere, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Chusclan (France). Centre de Production de Plutonium de Marcoule

    1969-07-01

    Initially the latex gloves used in controlled zones were processed after use as radioactive waste. In view of the continually increasing number used, however, the persons in charge of the SPRAR have considered the possibility of decontaminating the gloves and using them again after control. The recovery installations which have been developed were initially designed rather crudely and operated irregularly; they have been progressively improved as a result of the experience acquired; today they are more really an industrial concern, equipped with automatic machinery. In 1967 it has been possible with this set-up to recover 247000 pairs of gloves, representing nearly 70 per cent of the number treated. (author) [French] Initialement, les gants de latex utilises dans les zones controlees etaient conditionnes apres emploi comme dechets radioactifs. Mais, devant l'augmentation sans cesse croissante des quantites employees, les responsables du SPRAR ont envisage leur decontamination et leur recyclage apres controles. Les installations de recuperation mises au point, de conception artisanale et fonctionnant de maniere episodique au depart, se sont progressivement ameliorees au fur et a mesure de l'experience acquise; elles revetent aujourd'hui le caractere d'une exploitation industrielle equipee de machines automatiques. En 1967, ces nouvelles installations ont permis de recuperer 247000 paires de gants, ce qui represente pres de 70 pour cent des quantites traitees. (auteur)

  5. Effect of Organic Solvents in Preparation of Silica-Based Chemical Gel Decontaminates for Decontamination of Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Suk Bon; Jung, Chong Hun; Kim, Chang Ki; Choi, Byung Seon; Lee, Kune Woo; Moon, Jei Kwon

    2011-01-01

    Decontamination of nuclear facilities is necessary to reduce the radiation field during normal operations and decommissioning of complex equipment such as stainless steel components, other iron-based steel and alloys, metal surfaces, structural materials and so on. Chemical decontamination technology in particular is a highly effective method to remove the radioactive contamination through a chemical dissolution or a redox reaction. However, this method has the serious drawback due to the generation of large amounts of the radioactive liquid wastes. Recently, a few literatures have been reported for the preparation of the chemical gel decontaminants to reduce the amount of the radioactive liquid wastes and to enhance the decontamination efficiency through increasing the contact time between the gels and the radioactive contaminants. In the preparation of the chemical gels, the control of the viscosity highly depends on the amount of a coviscosifier used among the components of the chemical gels consisted of a viscosifier, a coviscosifier, and a chemical decontaminant. In this works, a new effective method for the preparation of the chemical gel was investigated by introducing the organic solvents. The mixture solution of the coviscosifier and organic solvent was more effective in the control of the viscosity compared with that of the coviscosifier only in gels. Furthermore, the decontamination efficiency of the chemical gels measured by using the multi-channel analyzer (MCA) showed the high decontamination factor for Co-60 and Cs-137 contaminated on the surface of the stainless steel 304

  6. Facility decontamination technology workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    Purpose of the meeting was to provide a record of experience at nuclear facilities, other than TMI-2, of events and incidents which have required decontamination and dose reduction activities, and to furnish GPU and others involved in the TMI-2 cleanup with the results of that decontamination and dose reduction technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 of the 25 papers; the remaining paper had been previously abstracted

  7. Special zone territory decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samojlenko, Yu.N.; Golubev, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    Special zone is the Chernobyl' NPP operating site (OS). OS decontamination is described including reactor ruins from the accident moment. The process was begun from reactor bombardment with absorbing and filtering materials (sand, clay, lead, boron compounds). Then were produced soil shovelling, territory filling by dry concrete and laying concrete layer with thickness up to 300 mm. NPP room and equipment decontamination is described. 3 figs.; 3 tabs

  8. Facility decontamination technology workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-10-01

    Purpose of the meeting was to provide a record of experience at nuclear facilities, other than TMI-2, of events and incidents which have required decontamination and dose reduction activities, and to furnish GPU and others involved in the TMI-2 cleanup with the results of that decontamination and dose reduction technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 of the 25 papers; the remaining paper had been previously abstracted. (DLC)

  9. Coolant system decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anstine, L.D.; James, D.B.; Melaika, E.A.; Peterson, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    An improved method for decontaminating the coolant system of water cooled nuclear power reactors and for regenerating the decontamination solution is described. A small amount of one or more weak-acid organic complexing agents is added to the reactor coolant, and the pH is adjusted to form a decontamination solution which is circulated throughout the coolant system to dissolve metal oxides from the interior surfaces and complex the resulting metal ions and radionuclide ions. The coolant containing the complexed metal ions and radionuclide ions is passed through a strong-base anion exchange resin bed which has been presaturated with a solution containing the complexing agents in the same ratio and having the same pH as the decontamination solution. As the decontamination solution passes through the resin bed, metal-complexed anions are exchanged for the metal-ion-free anions on the bed, while metal-ion-free anions in the solution pass through the bed, thus removing the metal ions and regenerating the decontamination solution. (author)

  10. Technology for treatment of decontamination products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavkhuta, G.A.; Rozdzyalovskaya, L.F.

    1994-01-01

    The research concerning the methods of management and processing of products generated as the result of post Chernobyl decontamination activities is being carried out by the Institute of Radioecological Problems of Belarus Academy of Science (IRP) in the framework of the Belarus National Programme. The main goal of this work is choice and development of an appropriate system for treatment of the decontamination radwastes, based on currently available information and experimental studies. This paper presents the technological schemes being studied for treating the post-Chernobyl liquid and solid wastes and will also briefly discuss the approach being used to settle a problem on collecting/management of low-level radioactive ash wastes, generated from the use of contaminated fuel

  11. Adsorption of krypton from helium by low temperature charcoal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.H.; Simmons, C.R.; Taylor, G.R.

    1975-01-01

    Adsorption of krypton from helium by charcoal at temperatures from -100 0 C to -140 0 C was experimentally investigated to verify adsorption system design methods and to determine effects of regeneration for the Gas Purification System of the Liquid-Metal Fast Breeder Reactor. Helium with two krypton concentrations, traced by krypton-85 at 0.0044 μCi/cm 3 , was passed through a 1/2-inch diameter, three-inch long trap packed with coconut charcoal. Breakthrough curves were measured by continuously recording the activity of the effluent gas using a sampler with a krypton-85 detection limit of about 5 x 10 -7 μCi/cm 3 . Experimental breakthrough curves with continuous feed for both concentrations and for superficial gas velocities of 5 to 28 cm/sec were closely fitted when the pore diffusion term was omitted from the Anzelius linear equilibrium adsorption model indicating that the adsorption process for this system was controlled by gas phase mass transport kinetics. Adsorption capacities determined in these experiments at -140 0 C agreed closely with published data. A discontinuity, however, was observed in the krypton adsorption coefficient between -100 and -120 0 C. This discontinuity may be caused by capillary condensation of krypton in the charcoal pores. Breakthrough times for pulse experiments at 400 ppM (vol.) krypton concentration were several times greater than breakthrough for continuous feed experiments at equivalent conditions. The differences in breakthrough times indicate that the adsorption isotherms are non-linear in this concentration range. Regeneration experiments showed that purging with helium at room temperature for 16 hours was inadequate, since lower breakthrough times were obtained after this treatment. Regeneration under vacuum at 100 0 C or 200 0 C for 16 hours resulted in satisfactory regeneration (i.e., no reduction in breakthrough times occurred in subsequent runs). (U.S.)

  12. Partitioning of krypton-85 in liquid scintillation cocktail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohorst, F.A.; Sherlock, M.A.

    1994-12-01

    Krypton is one of the noble gases. As such, it forms compounds only with exceptionally strong oxidizing agents. The concentration of krypton in air is 1.139 parts per million by volume. In general, its behavior is best described as that of an ideal gas. Krypton-85 is the longest lived of the common radioactive noble gases with a half life of 10.72 years. Gamma radiation at 513.990 keV has an intensity of only 0.434%. Most decay is β - emission with a maximum energy of 687.0 keV and an average energy of 251.4 keV. The analytical chemistry of krypton-85 is driven by these factors. High concentrations may be gamma counted directly. Low levels are typically determined by more sensitive techniques such as liquid scintillation counting (LSC) where detection limits on the order of 1 picocurie (pCi) are routinely achieved. For a 5 standard cubic centimeter (scc) sample, this represents a concentration of 0.2 pCi/scc, well below the DOE Air Immersion Derived Concentration Guideline (G) of 3 pCi/scc. As a gas, krypton in a sealed LSC vial distributes itself between the liquid phase and the gas phase. Some past work has used gamma counting at levels many orders of magnitude greater than those now achievable by LSC to study the distribution of krypton. This effect is of interest in the analytical chemistry of krypton-85 because geometrical considerations influence how much of the material in the gas phase decays generating particles which then impact the liquid phase where they may be counted

  13. Krypton for computed tomography lung ventilation imaging: preliminary animal data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahnken, Andreas H; Jost, Gregor; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility and safety of krypton ventilation imaging with intraindividual comparison to xenon ventilation computed tomography (CT). In a first step, attenuation of different concentrations of xenon and krypton was analyzed in a phantom setting. Thereafter, 7 male New Zealand white rabbits (4.4-6.0 kg) were included in an animal study. After orotracheal intubation, an unenhanced CT scan was obtained in end-inspiratory breath-hold. Thereafter, xenon- (30%) and krypton-enhanced (70%) ventilation CT was performed in random order. After a 2-minute wash-in of gas A, CT imaging was performed. After a 45-minute wash-out period and another 2-minute wash-in of gas B, another CT scan was performed using the same scan protocol. Heart rate and oxygen saturation were measured. Unenhanced and krypton or xenon data were registered and subtracted using a nonrigid image registration tool. Enhancement was quantified and statistically analyzed. One animal had to be excluded from data analysis owing to problems during intubation. The CT scans in the remaining 6 animals were completed without complications. There were no relevant differences in oxygen saturation or heart rate between the scans. Xenon resulted in a mean increase of enhancement of 35.3 ± 5.5 HU, whereas krypton achieved a mean increase of 21.9 ± 1.8 HU in enhancement (P = 0.0055). The use of krypton for lung ventilation imaging appears to be feasible and safe. Despite the use of a markedly higher concentration of krypton, enhancement is significantly worse when compared with xenon CT ventilation imaging, but sufficiently high for CT ventilation imaging studies.

  14. Lessons Learned from Decontamination Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, JH

    2000-11-16

    This interim report describes a DOE project currently underway to establish what is known about decontamination of buildings and people and the procedures and protocols used to determine when and how people or buildings are considered ''clean'' following decontamination. To fulfill this objective, the study systematically examined reported decontamination experiences to determine what procedures and protocols are currently employed for decontamination, the timeframe involved to initiate and complete the decontamination process, how the contaminants were identified, the problems encountered during the decontamination process, how response efforts of agencies were coordinated, and the perceived social psychological effects on people who were decontaminated or who participated in the decontamination process. Findings and recommendations from the study are intended to aid decision-making and to improve the basis for determining appropriate decontamination protocols for recovery planners and policy makers for responding to chemical and biological events.

  15. Separation of the fission product noble gases krypton and xenon from dissolver off-gas in reprocessing HTGR-fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohnenstingl, J.; Djoa, S.H.; Laser, M.; Mastera, S.; Merz, E.; Morschl, P.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes a process developed for the retainment and separation of volatile ( 3 H, 129+131 I) and gaseous ( 85 Kr, Xe) fission products from the off-gas produced during dissolution of HTGR-fuel. To prevent unnecessary dilution of liberated noble gases by surrounding atmosphere, a helium purge-gas cycle is applied to enable a coarse fractionating of krypton and xenon by cold-trapping at about 80 0 K after precleaning the gas stream. The process consists of the following steps: deposition of droplets and solid aerosols; chemisorption of iodine on silver impregnated silica gel; catalytic removal of nitrogen oxides and oxygen; drying of the process gas stream; final filtering of abraded solids; deposition of xenon in solid form at 80 0 K and low subpressure; deposition of krypton in solid form at 80 0 K after compression to about 6 bar; decontamination of 85 Kr-containing xenon by batch distillation for eventual industrial utilization; and removal of nitrogen and argon enrichment during continuous operation in the purge-gas stream by inleaking air with charcoal. A continuously operating dissolver vessel, closed to the surrounding atmosphere, yields a very high content of noble gases, i.e., 0.35 vol % krypton and 2.0 vol % xenon. The presented off-gas treatment unit is operated in cold runs with 1 / 3 of the full capacity and can treat about 1 m 3 STP/h helium, corresponding to a quantity of about 10,000 MW/sub e/ HTGR-fuel reprocessing plant

  16. Advanced robotics for decontamination and dismantlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, W.R.; Haley, D.C.

    1994-01-01

    The decontamination and dismantlement (D ampersand D) robotics technology application area of the US Department of Energy's Robotics Technology Development Program is explained and described. D ampersand D robotic systems show real promise for the reduction of human exposure to hazards, for improvement of productivity, and for the reduction of secondary waste generation. Current research and development pertaining to automated floor characterization, robotic equipment removal, and special inspection is summarized. Future research directions for these and emerging activities is given

  17. Decontamination of CAGR gas circulator components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, L.N.; Hooper, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the development and full-scale trial of two methods for removal of radioactive contamination on the surfaces of CAGR gas circulator components. The two methods described are a particle impact cleaning (PIC) decontamination technique and an electrochemical technique, 'electro-swabbing', which is based on the principle of decontamination by electro-polishing. In developing these techniques it was necessary to take account of the physical and chemical nature of the surface deposits on the gas circulator components; these were shown to consist of magnetite-type oxide and carbonaceous material. In order to follow the progress of the decontamination it was also necessary to develop a surface sampling technique which was effective and precise under these conditions; an electrochemical technique, employing similar principles to the electro-swabbing process, was developed for this purpose. The full-scale trial of the PIC decontamination technique was carried out on an inlet guide vane (IGV) assembly, this having been identified as the component from the gas circulator which contributes most to the radiation dose accumulated during routine circulator maintenance. The technique was shown to be practically viable and some 99% of the radioactive contamination was readily removed from the treated surfaces with only negligible surface damage being caused. The full-scale trial of the electro-swabbing decontamination technique was carried out on a gas circulator impeller. High decontamination factors were again achieved with ≥ 99% of the radioactive contamination being removed from the treated surfaces. The technique has practical limitations in terms of handling and treatment of waste-arisings. However, the use of specially-designed swabbing electrodes may allow the treatment of constricted geometries inaccessible to techniques such as PIC. The technique is also highly suitable for the treatment of soft-finish materials and of components fabricated from a

  18. Decontamination measures for Fukushima prefecture. Fukushima prefecture measures for promoting decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Kouzou

    2013-01-01

    For Fukushima prefecture having suffered from significant damage associated with the Great East Japan Earthquake and the nuclear power plant accident, the decontamination work is the most urgent issue. The paper reports the present situation of the remediation acts of Fukushima Government done since the accident, particular emphasis on the removal of radioactive substances due to cesium 137 in the residential area. Government supports to promote the decontamination work and its operators, and encourages employers and employees in their efforts, to set up temporary storages of the produced radioactive wastes, to cultivate and improve technical supports for decontamination work and strengthen understanding and support of the local resident, thus providing the training course for the site supervisors, the person engaged in the work and management. (S. Ohno)

  19. Decontamination and size reduction of plutonium contaminated process exhaust ductwork and glove boxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaFrate, P.; Elliott, J.; Valasquez, M.

    1996-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Decommissioning Program has decontaminated and demolished two filter plenum buildings at Technical Area 21 (TA-21). During the project a former hot cell was retrofitted to perform decontamination and size reduction of highly Pu contaminated process exhaust (1,100 ft) and gloveboxes. Pu-238/239 concentrations were as high a 1 Ci per linear foot and averaged approximately 1 mCi/ft. The Project decontamination objective was to reduce the plutonium contamination on surfaces below transuranic levels. If possible, metal surfaces were decontaminated further to meet Science and Ecology Group (SEG) waste classification guidelines to enable the metal to be recycled at their facility in oak Ridge, Tennessee. Project surface contamination acceptance criteria for low-level radioactive waste (LLRW), transuranic waste, and SEG waste acceptance criteria will be presented. Ninety percent of all radioactive waste for the project was characterized as LLRW. Twenty percent of this material was shipped to SEG. Process exhaust and glove boxes were brought to the project decontamination area, an old hot cell in Building 4 North. This paper focuses on process exhaust and glovebox decontamination methodology, size reduction techniques, waste characterization, airborne contamination monitoring, engineering controls, worker protection, lessons learned, and waste minimization. Decontamination objectives are discussed in detail

  20. Shape Coexistence In Light Krypton Isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, E.; Goergen, A.; Bouchez, E.; Chatillon, A.; Korten, W.; Le Coz, Y.; Theisen, Ch.; Huerstel, A.; Lucas, R.; Wilson, J.N.; Andreoiu, C.; Butler, P.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Iwanicki, J.; Jenkins, D.; Jones, G.; Becker, F.; Gerl, J.; Blank, B.; Hannachi, F.

    2005-01-01

    Shape coexistence in the light krypton isotopes was studied in a series of experiments at GANIL using various experimental techniques. A new low-lying 0+ state, a so-called shape isomer, was found in delayed conversion-electron spectroscopy after fragmentation reactions. The systematics of such low-lying 0+ states suggests that the ground states of the isotopes 78Kr and 76Kr have prolate deformation, while states with prolate and oblate shape are practically degenerate and strongly mixed in 74Kr, and that the oblate configuration becomes the ground state in 72Kr. This scenario was tested in experiments performing low-energy Coulomb excitation of radioactive 76Kr and 74Kr beams from the SPIRAL facility. Both transitional and diagonal electromagnetic matrix elements were extracted from the observed γ-ray yields. The results find the prolate shape for the ground-state bands in 76Kr and 74Kr and an oblate deformation for the excited 2 2 + state in 74Kr, confirming the proposed scenario of shape coexistence