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Sample records for waste decomposition due

  1. Decomposition Technology Development of Organic Component in a Decontamination Waste Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Oh, W. Z.; Won, H. J.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K

    2007-11-15

    Through the project of 'Decomposition Technology Development of Organic Component in a Decontamination Waste Solution', the followings were studied. 1. Investigation of decontamination characteristics of chemical decontamination process 2. Analysis of COD, ferrous ion concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration 3. Decomposition tests of hardly decomposable organic compounds 4. Improvement of organic acid decomposition process by ultrasonic wave and UV light 5. Optimization of decomposition process using a surrogate decontamination waste solution.

  2. Technology Innovation Of Organic Waste Decomposition In Providing Feedstuffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Prawirodigdo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous investigations in Indonesia indicated that an inactive ovary was a chronically reproduction problem in ruminants. There was a tendency that nutrition deficiency inhibited ovulation, oestrus occurrence, and conception in ruminants. Obviously, there is a correlation between sufficient nutrient consumption and reproduction performance of such animals. Thus, application of the production/reproduction technology innovation for improving ruminant’s productivity in the villages needs to be supported by the availability of sufficient feed. Whilst, there is a competition among ruminants in fulfilling feed requirement. On the other hand, there are large amounts of organic waste of food and plantation estate industries which are potential for non-traditional feedstuffs. The examples of such organic wastes are: 4,817,630 ton dry matter (DM of cacao pod, 314,042.51 ton DM of coffee pulp and hulls, and 29,700,000 ton DM of palm frond, leaves and trunks. Unfortunately, such materials contain anti-nutritive substance. Nevertheless, technology innovation for decomposing organic waste is available and its validity has been proven to be satisfactory and appropriate. Regarding the limitation of feedstuffs, introduction of technology innovation for organic waste decomposition to provide feed for improving livestock productivity is promising to be applied.

  3. Microbial control on decomposition of radionuclides-containing oily waste in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selivanovskaya, Svetlana; Galitskaya, Polina

    2014-05-01

    The oily wastes are formed annually during extraction, refinement, and transportation of the oil and may cause pollution of the environment. These wastes contain different concentrations of waste oil (40-60%), waste water (30-90%), and mineral particles (5-40%). Some oily wastes also contain naturally occurring radionuclides which were incorporated by water that was pumped up with the oil. For assessment of the hazard level of waste treated soil, not only measurements of contaminants content are needed, because bioavailability of oily components varies with hydrocarbon type, and soil properties. As far as namely microbial communities control the decomposition of organic contaminants, biological indicators have become increasingly important in hazard assessment and the efficiency of remediation process. In this study the decomposition of radionuclides-containing oily waste by soil microbial communities were estimated. Waste samples collected at the Tikchonovskii petroleum production yard (Tatarstan, Russia) were mixed with Haplic greyzem soil at ratio 1:4 and incubated for 120 days. During incubation period, the total hydrocarbon content of the soil mixed with the waste reduced from 156 ± 48 g kg-1 to 54 ± 8 g kg-1 of soil. The concentrations of 226Ra and 232Th were found to be 643 ± 127, 254 ± 56 Bq kg-1 and not changed significantly during incubation. Waste application led to a soil microbial biomass carbon decrease in comparison to control (1.9 times after 1 day and 1.3 times after 120 days of incubation). Microbial respiration increased in the first month of incubation (up to 120% and 160% of control after 1 and 30 days, correspondingly) and decreased to the end of incubation period (74% of control after 120 days). Structure of bacterial community in soil and soil/waste mixture was estimated after 120 days of incubation using SSCP method. The band number decreased in contaminated soil in comparison to untreated soil. Besides, several new dominant DNA

  4. Influence of vermicomposting on solid wastes decomposition kinetics in soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The effect of vermicomposting on kinetic behavior of the products is not well recognized. An incubation study was conducted to investigate C mineralization kinetics of cow manure, sugarcane filter cake and their vermicomposts. Two different soils were treated with the four solid wastes at a rate of 0.5 g solid waste C per kg soil with three replications. Soils were incubated for 56 d. The CO2-C respired was monitored periodically and a first-order kinetic model was used to calculate the kinetic parameters of C mineralization. Results indicated that the percentage of C mineralized during the incubation period ranged from 31.9% to 41.8% and 55.9% to 73.4% in the calcareous and acidic soils, respectively. The potentially mineralizable C (C0) of the treated soils was lower in the solid waste composts compared to their starting materials. Overall, it can be concluded that decomposable fraction of solid wastes has decreased due to vermicomposting.

  5. Characterization of Explosives Processing Waste Decomposition Due to Composting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-01

    even recalcitrant and toxic organic compounds. The rate at which such degradation occurs can be fast if (a) initial concentrations of the material are...chemical bonds between carbon and nitrogen. Such bonds should be particularly vulnerable to attack by consortia of soil microbiota : nitrogen is often the

  6. Characterization of explosives processing waste decomposition due to composting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griest, W.H.; Tyndall, R.L.; Stewart, A.J.; Ho, C.H.; Ironside, K.S.; Caton, J.E.; Caldwell, W.M.; Tan, E.

    1991-11-01

    Static pile and mechanically stirred composts generated at the Umatilla Army Depot Activity in a field composting optimization study were chemically and toxicologically characterized to provide data for the evaluation of composting efficiency to decontaminate and detoxify explosives-contaminated soil. Characterization included determination of explosives and 2,4,6,-trinitrotoluene metabolites in composts and their EPA Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure Leachates, leachate toxicity to Ceriodaphnia Dubia and mutagenicity of the leachates and organic solvent extracts of the composts to Ames bacterial strains TA-98 and TA-100. The main conclusion from this study is that composting can effectively reduce the concentrations of explosives and bacterial mutagenicity in explosives -- contaminated soil, and can reduce the aquatic toxicity of leachable compounds. Small levels of explosive and metabolites, bacterial mutagenicity, and leachable aquatic toxicity remain after composting. The ultimate fate of the biotransformed explosives, and the source(s) of residual toxicity and mutagenicity remain unknown.

  7. Characterization of Explosives Processing Waste Decomposition Due to Composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    taxa and carbon allocation patterns. The three species included lettuce (Lactuca sativa, cv Buttercrunch), radish ( Raphanus sativus , cv Cherry Belle...sativa, R. sativus allocates relatively more of its carbon to the root, and thus, has greater direct contact with the soil. Soybean was selected for

  8. [Intensification of Microbial Decomposition of Organic Fraction of Municipal Waste: Laboratory and Field Experiments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, A A; Kevbrina, M V; Kallistova, A Yu; Nekrasova, V K; Litti, Yu V; Nozhevnikova, A N

    2015-01-01

    Methods of intensifying the anaerobic microbial decomposition of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (MSW) on an MSW landfill and in anaerobic reactors were studied. It was discovered that it is preferable for the initiation and stabilization of the process of anaerobic digestion of organic waste in laboratory bioreactors at 20 and 50 degrees C to use a mixture of activated suspension of soil from the anaerobic zone of the landfill and digested sewage sludge. Stimulation of methanogenesis was shown in field conditions when digested sewage sludge was added directly into the upper layer of anaerobic zone of the landfill. The investigation of methane production during fermentation of concentrated food waste with a mixture of excessive activated sludge in the laboratory under thermophilic conditions (50 degrees C) has shown that the main problem at the first stage of the process was the acidification of the digested mixture due to the accumulation of volatile fatty acids. It was shown that for stable operation of the bioreactor under thermophilic conditions the amount of inoculum added during the start up should be no less than 30%-50%--based on volatile suspended solids. A sharp decrease in the digestion temperature from 50 to 20 degrees C did not cause methanogenesis termination, since the thermophilically fermented biomass contained both thermophilic and mesophilic methanogens.

  9. Thermal decomposition of organic wastes with radionuclides by using molten salt oxidation; Decomposicao termica de residuos organicos contendo radionuclideos por meio de oxidacao em sais fundidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lainetti, Paulo Ernesto O.; Abrao, Alcidio [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2002-07-01

    During the last decades, IPEN has performed different research developments to dominate the nuclear fuel cycle. The production processes, the development activities and the physical-chemical characterization methods have generated some effluents in the form of aqueous solutions containing radioactive elements that could be discarded after radioactive decay. Nevertheless, in spite of the possibility of waste discharging from a radiological point of view, as consequence of the low activity , some wastes containing organic solvents cannot be discarded in the sewerage system due to legislation restrictions. Some wastes, with high potential risk, such as pyridine or toluene, should be destroyed. However, their destruction in incinerators is not permitted since the presence of radioactive elements. An alternative process would be the oxidative decomposition in molten salts that is not considered incineration, because there is no flame. This work describes the developments conducted in IPEN, in bench scale, to perform tests of thermal decomposition of different hazardous wastes. (author)

  10. A probabilistic decomposition-synthesis method for the quantification of rare events due to internal instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Mohamad, Mustafa A; Sapsis, Themistoklis P

    2015-01-01

    We consider the problem of probabilistic quantification of dynamical systems that have heavy-tailed characteristics. These heavy-tailed features are associated with rare transient responses due to the occurrence of internal instabilities. Here we develop a computational method, a probabilistic decomposition-synthesis technique, that takes into account the nature of internal instabilities to inexpensively determine the non-Gaussian probability density function for any arbitrary quantity of interest. Our approach relies on the decomposition of the statistics into a `non-extreme core', typically Gaussian, and a heavy-tailed component. This decomposition is in full correspondence with a partition of the phase space into a `stable' region where we have no internal instabilities, and a region where non-linear instabilities lead to rare transitions with high probability. We quantify the statistics in the stable region using a Gaussian approximation approach, while the non-Gaussian distributions associated with the i...

  11. Groundwater Quality Deterioration due to Municipal Solid Waste Dumping Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameswari, Kaliyaperumal; Karunakaran, Krishnasamy

    2011-07-01

    Groundwater is the major source of drinking water in both urban and rural India. The demand for water has increased over the years and this has led to water scarcity. The scarcity situation, especially in urban areas, is aggravated by the problem of water pollution or contamination by solid waste dumping. In many urban centers in India, the quality of groundwater is getting severely affected because of the widespread pollution, due to the discharge of untreated waste water in water bodies and leachate from the unscientific disposal of solid wastes. It is necessary to realize the importance of groundwater and preserve its quality through careful monitoring and remediation. This study focuses on the magnitude of groundwater pollution due to improper solid waste dumping practices prevailing in the southern part of the Chennai Metropolitan Area. The Perungudi dumpsite, a solid waste dumping site in the periphery of Chennai city, India, has been chosen for this study. The chemical characteristic of solid waste and leachate has been studied, and the groundwater samples from various locations around the dumpsite were collected and analyzed. Samples were analyzed for pH, electrical conductivity, total dissolved solids, chlorides, sulfate, calcium, magnesium, total hardness, sodium, potassium, BOD, and COD. Heavy metals such as lead, iron, and zinc have been analyzed. The study reveals that most of the groundwater samples do not conform to drinking water quality standards. The study also indicates that groundwater remediation techniques and proper groundwater quality monitoring on a regular basis are of utmost importance in the study area. A few in-situ groundwater remediation technologies have been suggested to improve the present water quality.

  12. A probabilistic decomposition-synthesis method for the quantification of rare events due to internal instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Mustafa A.; Cousins, Will; Sapsis, Themistoklis P.

    2016-10-01

    We consider the problem of the probabilistic quantification of dynamical systems that have heavy-tailed characteristics. These heavy-tailed features are associated with rare transient responses due to the occurrence of internal instabilities. Systems with these properties can be found in a variety of areas including mechanics, fluids, and waves. Here we develop a computational method, a probabilistic decomposition-synthesis technique, that takes into account the nature of internal instabilities to inexpensively determine the non-Gaussian probability density function for any arbitrary quantity of interest. Our approach relies on the decomposition of the statistics into a 'non-extreme core', typically Gaussian, and a heavy-tailed component. This decomposition is in full correspondence with a partition of the phase space into a 'stable' region where we have no internal instabilities, and a region where non-linear instabilities lead to rare transitions with high probability. We quantify the statistics in the stable region using a Gaussian approximation approach, while the non-Gaussian distribution associated with the intermittently unstable regions of phase space is inexpensively computed through order-reduction methods that take into account the strongly nonlinear character of the dynamics. The probabilistic information in the two domains is analytically synthesized through a total probability argument. The proposed approach allows for the accurate quantification of non-Gaussian tails at more than 10 standard deviations, at a fraction of the cost associated with the direct Monte-Carlo simulations. We demonstrate the probabilistic decomposition-synthesis method for rare events for two dynamical systems exhibiting extreme events: a two-degree-of-freedom system of nonlinearly coupled oscillators, and in a nonlinear envelope equation characterizing the propagation of unidirectional water waves.

  13. Separating and Recycling Plastic, Glass, and Gallium from Waste Solar Cell Modules by Nitrogen Pyrolysis and Vacuum Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingen; Xu, Zhenming

    2016-09-06

    Many countries have gained benefits through the solar cells industry due to its high efficiency and nonpolluting power generation associated with solar energy. Accordingly, the market of solar cell modules is expanding rapidly in recent decade. However, how to environmentally friendly and effectively recycle waste solar cell modules is seldom concerned. Based on nitrogen pyrolysis and vacuum decomposition, this work can successfully recycle useful organic components, glass, and gallium from solar cell modules. The results were summarized as follows: (i) nitrogen pyrolysis process can effectively decompose plastic. Organic conversion rate approached 100% in the condition of 773 K, 30 min, and 0.5 L/min N2 flow rate. But, it should be noted that pyrolysis temperature should not exceed 773 K, and harmful products would be increased with the increasing of temperature, such as benzene and its derivatives by GC-MS measurement; (ii) separation principle, products analysis, and optimization of vacuum decomposition were discussed. Gallium can be well recycled under temperature of 1123 K, system pressure of 1 Pa and reaction time of 40 min. This technology is quite significant in accordance with the "Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle Principle" for solid waste, and provides an opportunity for sustainable development of photovoltaic industry.

  14. Thermal decomposition analysis of coal-waste sludge and coal-sunflower seed husk blends

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shu-yan; LI Xiao-qi; LIU Wen-tie; SONG Cheng-yi; WANG Chun-sheng; DONG Qun

    2010-01-01

    The thermal decomposition analysis of coal-pharmaceutical waste sludge,coal-sewage waste sludge blends and coal-sunflower seed husk blends are studied by TG dynamic runs at the heating rate of 20 ℃/min within the temperature range of 25 ℃-900℃.The effect of different kinetic models on the determination of kinetic parameters of thermal decompesition has been investigated.Results show that for coal-pharmaceutical sludge blend,coal-sewage sludge blend and coal-sunflower seed husk blend the optimal model functions are the three-dimensional diffusion reaction,2-dimensional and 3-diemensional nucleation and growth reactions,respectively.The Arrhenius kinetic parameters of the pre-exponential factor and activation energy of blends,as well waste sludge and sunflower seed husk only are proposed.

  15. Succession change of microorganisms on plant waste decomposition in simulation modelling field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Julia; Perminova, Evgenia; Khabibullina, Fluza; Kovaleva, Vera; Lapteva, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Plant waste decomposition processes are closely associated with living activity of soil microbiota in aboveground ecosystems. Functional activity of microorganisms and soil invertebrates determines plant material transformation rate whereby changes in plant material chemical composition during destruction - succession change of soil biota. The purpose of the work was revealing the mechanism of microorganisms succession change during plant waste decomposition in middle-taiga green-moss spruce forests and coniferous-deciduous secondary stands formed after earlier cut bilberry spruce forests. The study materials were undisturbed bilberry spruce forest (Sample Plot 1 - SP1) and coniferous-deciduous secondary stands which were formed after tree cutting activities of 2001-2002 (SP2) and 1969 and 1970 (SP3). Plant material decomposition intensity was determined in microcosms isolated into kapron bags with cell size of 1 mm. At SP1 and SP2, test material was living mosses and at SP3 - fallen birch and aspen leaves. Every test material was exposed for 2 years. Destruction rate was calculated as a weight loss for a particular time period. Composition of micromycetes which participated in plant material decomposition was assessed by the method of inoculation of soil extract to Getchinson's medium and acidified Czapek's medium (pH=4.5). Microbe number and biomass was analyzed by the method of luminescent microscopy. Chemical analysis of plant material was done in the certified Ecoanalytical Laboratory of the Institute of Biology Komi SC UrD RAS. Finally, plant material destruction intensity was similar for study plots and comprised 40-44 % weight loss for 2 years. The strongest differences in plant material decomposition rate between undisturbed spruce forests and secondary after-cut stands were observed at first stages of destruction process. In the first exposition year, mineralizing processes were most active in undisturbed spruce forest. Decomposition rate in cuts at that

  16. Catalytic Decomposition of Gaseous Byproducts from Heat Melt Waste Compaction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Several solid waste management systems currently under development result in the production of gas-phase organic contaminants which, due to the periodic and...

  17. Organic wastes decomposition technology, perspective for long-term autonomous missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viacheslav, Ilyin; Korshunov, Denis; Mardanov, Robert; Starkova, Lyubov; Deshevaya, Elena; Smirnov, Igor

    At present time there is no large problem in waste management in ISS space flight conditions, since spacecrafts "Progress" is used for it's removal from orbital station and the wastes burns in dense layers of Earth's atmosphere. However such method does not approach for far inter-planetary flights since interplanetary quarantine desires do not allow to deposit contaminated wastes outside the spacecraft. Essential part of wastes is formed by disposed means of personal hygiene and greenhouse wastes which are not safe from sanitary-epidemiological aspect. Above mentioned materials have one common feature: they can be subjected to biodegradation using different microbial compositions. Microbial decomposition of wastes as meets the main crite-ria of safety and power consumption. We investigated the effectiveness of method of disposed personal hygiene means biodegradation by anaerobic thermophiles with further purification of obtained decomposition products from chemical solvents with the help of mesophilic isolates in microaerophile conditions. Bacteria of Clostridium genera were selected for cellulolysis be-cause of their high specific endoglucanasic activity which less depends on substrate nature and relatively high growth rate on cellulose contaning substrates. As result some strains in case of optimal conditions (substrata pretreating, pH correction) decomposed means of personal hygiene with level of biodegradation up to 90With the purpose of purification, liqiud medi-ums originating from Closrtidium sp. exhibiting used like substrates for cellololitic fungi. It was shown that the cultures are able to change pH of media from slow-acid to neutral. Also the effectiveness of plant wastes biodegradation (vegetables homogenates) was studied using associations of mesophile aerobes trophically adapted to substrates. Rate of biodestruction of dry mass varied near 76To purify liquid products of biodegradation from chemicals cellulolytic fungal strains as well as bacterial

  18. Electrochemical decomposition of fluorinated wetting agents in plating industry waste water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fath, Andreas; Sacher, Frank; McCaskie, John E

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical decomposition of fluorinated surfactants (PFAS, perfluorinated alkyl substances) used in the plating industry was analyzed and the decomposition process parameters optimized at the laboratory scale and production scale of a 500-liter reactor using lead electrodes. The method and system was successfully demonstrated under production conditions to treat PFAS) with up to 99% efficiency in the concentration range of 1,000-20,000 μg/l (1 ppm-20 ppm). The treatment also reduced hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)) ions to trivalent chromium (Cr(3+)) ions in the wastewater. If the PFAS-containing wastewater is mixed with other wastewater streams, specifically from nickel plating drag out solution or when pH values >5, the treatment process is ineffective. For the short chain PFAS, (perfluorobutylsulfonate) the process was less efficient than C6-C8 PFAS. The process is automated and has safety procedures and controls to prevent hazards. The PFAS were decomposed to hydrogen fluoride (HF) under the strong acid electrochemical operating conditions. Analytical tests showed no evidence of organic waste products remaining from the process. Conventional alternative PFAS removal systems were tested on the waste streams and compared with each other and with the-E-destruct (electrochemical oxidation) process. For example, ion exchange resin (IX resin) treatment of wastewater to complex and remove PFAS was found to be seven times more efficient when compared to the conventional activated carbon absorption (C-treat) process. However, the E-destruct process is higher in capacity, exhibits longer service life and lower operating costs than either IX or C-treat methods for elimination of PFAS from these electroplating waste streams.

  19. The application of exogenous cellulase to improve soil fertility and plant growth due to acceleration of straw decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei; He, Ming

    2010-05-01

    The effects of exogenous cellulase application on straw decomposition, soil fertility, and plant growth were investigated with nylon bag and pot experiments. Cellulase application promoted straw decomposition, and the decomposition rates of rice and wheat straw increased by 6.3-26.0% and 6.8-28.0%, respectively, in the nylon bag experiments. In pot experiments soil-available N and P contents, soil cellulase activity, and growth of rice seedlings increased. Soil respiration rate and microbial population were unaffected. Seventy Ug(-1) was the optimal cellulase concentration for plant growth. The exogenous cellulase persisted in soil for more than 100days. Although the data show that exogenous cellulase application can enhance soil fertility and plant growth in the short-term due to the acceleration of straw decomposition and has the potential to be an environment-friendly approach to manage straw, cellulase application to soil seems currently not economical.

  20. Accelerating the degradation of green plant waste with chemical decomposition agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kejun, Sun; Juntao, Zhang; Ying, Chen; Zongwen, Liao; Lin, Ruan; Cong, Liu

    2011-10-01

    Degradation of green plant waste is often difficult, and excess maturity times are typically required. In this study, we used lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose assays; scanning electron microscopy; infrared spectrum analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis to investigate the effects of chemical decomposition agents on the lignocellulose content of green plant waste, its structure and major functional groups and the mechanism of accelerated degradation. Our results showed that adding chemical decomposition agents to Ficus microcarpa var. pusillifolia sawdust reduced the contents of lignin by 0.53%-11.48% and the contents of cellulose by 2.86%-7.71%, and increased the contents of hemicellulose by 2.92%-33.63% after 24 h. With increasing quantities of alkaline residue and sodium lignosulphonate, the lignin content decreased. Scanning electron microscopy showed that, after F. microcarpa var. pusillifolia sawdust was treated with chemical decomposition agents, lignocellulose tube wall thickness increased significantlyIncreases of 29.41%, 3.53% and 34.71% were observed after treatment with NaOH, alkaline residue and sodium lignosulphonate, respectively. Infrared spectroscopy showed that CO and aromatic skeleton stretching absorption peaks were weakened and the C-H vibrational absorption peak from out-of-plane in positions 2 and 6 (S units) (890-900 cm(-1)) was strengthened after F. microcarpa var. pusillifolia sawdust was treated with chemical decomposition agents, indicating a reduction in lignin content. Several absorption peaks [i.e., C-H deformations (asymmetry in methyl groups, -CH(3)- and -CH(2)-) (1450-1460 cm(-1)); Aliphatic C-H stretching in methyl and phenol OH (1370-1380 cm(-1)); CO stretching (cellulose and hemicellulose) (1040-1060 cm(-1))] that indicate the presence of a chemical bond between lignin and cellulose was reduced, indicating that the chemical bond between lignin and cellulose had been partially broken. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that Na

  1. Nitrogen amendment of green waste impacts microbial community, enzyme secretion and potential for lignocellulose decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Chaowei [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Harrold, Duff R. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Claypool, Joshua T. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Simmons, Blake A. [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Singer, Steven W. [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Simmons, Christopher W. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); VanderGheynst, Jean S. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States)

    2016-11-09

    Microorganisms involved in biomass deconstruction are an important resource for organic waste recycling and enzymes for lignocellulose bioconversion. The goals of this paper were to examine the impact of nitrogen amendment on microbial community restructuring, secretion of xylanases and endoglucanases, and potential for biomass deconstruction. Communities were cultivated aerobically at 55 °C on green waste (GW) amended with varying levels of NH4Cl. Bacterial and fungal communities were determined using 16S rRNA and ITS region gene sequencing and PICRUSt (Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States) was applied to predict relative abundance of genes involved in lignocellulose hydrolysis. Nitrogen amendment significantly increased secretion of xylanases and endoglucanases, and microbial activity; enzyme activities and cumulative respiration were greatest when nitrogen level in GW was between 4.13–4.56 wt% (g/g), but decreased with higher nitrogen levels. The microbial community shifted to one with increasing potential to decompose complex polymers as nitrogen increased with peak potential occurring between 3.79–4.45 wt% (g/g) nitrogen amendment. Finally, the results will aid in informing the management of nitrogen level to foster microbial communities capable of secreting enzymes that hydrolyze recalcitrant polymers in lignocellulose and yield rapid decomposition of green waste.

  2. Carbon decomposition by inoculating Phanerochaete chrysosporium during drum composting of agricultural waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, V Sudharsan; Ramu, Kamma; Kalamdhad, Ajay S

    2015-05-01

    The effect of Phanerochaete chrysosporium inoculation during drum composting of agricultural waste was performed at different composting stages. Three trials were carried out with (5:4:1) combination of vegetable waste, cattle manure, and sawdust along with 10 kg of dried leaves with a total mass of 100 kg in a 550 L rotary drum composter. Trial 1 was a control without inoculation of fungus, while trial 2 was inoculated during the initial day (0th day of composting), and trial 3 was inoculated after the thermophilic phase, i.e., on the 8th day of composting period. The inoculation of fungus increased the volatile solids reduction by 1.45-fold in trial 2 and 1.7-fold in trial 3 as compared to trial 1 without any fungal inoculation. Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen (TKN) was observed with 2.31, 2.62, and 2.59% in trials 1, 2, and 3, respectively, at the end of 20 days of composting period. Hence, it can be concluded that inoculation of white-rot fungus increased the decomposition rate of agricultural waste within shorter time in drum composting. However, inoculation after the thermophilic phase was found more effective than inoculation during initial days of composting for producing more stabilized and nutrient-rich compost.

  3. Food waste decomposition in leachbed reactor: role of neutralizing solutions on the leachate quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Xu, Su Yun; Gu, Xiang Yang; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2010-03-01

    The neutralization effects of 0.1M NaHCO(3), KPO(4)-buffer (pH 7.0) and sodium acetate (NaOAc) solutions (500 ml/kg food waste/day) on controlling the pH and leachate quality in an acidogenic reactor of food waste anaerobic digestion was investigated. pH of leachate from the reactor was low and ranged from 3.24 to 4.15. Although differences in chemical oxygen demand (COD) were observed, the cumulative COD yields were almost similar. Ammonia concentrations gradually decreased from 26 to 3mg/l after 15 days. Acetic acid was the major fraction and the total VFAs decreased gradually for a week and increased thereafter, with a sharp increase in NaOAc treatment. VFAs yield and acetate/propionate ratio were the highest in NaOAc treatment, followed by NaHCO(3) and KPO(4) treatments. Volatile solids reduction was the lowest in NaOAc treatment (47.5%) and highest in NaHCO(3) treatment (67.0%). With lower decomposition and higher yield of VFA and COD, NaOAc could be used as a neutralizing agent in acidogenic reactors to improve the efficiency of the acidogenesis process.

  4. Deer carcass decomposition and potential scavenger exposure to chronic wasting disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennelle, C.S.; Samuel, M.D.; Nolden, C.A.; Berkley, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy afflicting the Cervidae family in North America, causing neurodegeneration and ultimately death. Although there are no reports of natural cross-species transmission of CWD to noncervids, infected deer carcasses pose a potential risk of CWD exposure for other animals. We placed 40 disease-free white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) carcasses and 10 gut piles in the CWD-affected area of Wisconsin (USA) from September to April in 2003 through 2005. We used photos from remotely operated cameras to characterize scavenger visitation and relative activity. To evaluate factors driving the rate of carcass removal (decomposition), we used KaplanMeier survival analysis and a generalized linear mixed model. We recorded 14 species of scavenging mammals (6 visiting species) and 14 species of scavenging birds (8 visiting species). Prominent scavengers included American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos), raccoons (Procyon lotor), and Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana). We found no evidence that deer consumed conspecific remains, although they visited gut piles more often than carcasses relative to temporal availability in the environment. Domestic dogs, cats, and cows either scavenged or visited carcass sites, which could lead to human exposure to CWD. Deer carcasses persisted for 18 days to 101 days depending on the season and year, whereas gut piles lasted for 3 days. Habitat did not influence carcass decomposition, but mammalian and avian scavenger activity and higher temperatures were positively associated with faster removal. Infected deer carcasses or gut piles can serve as potential sources of CWD prions to a variety of scavengers. In areas where surveillance for CWD exposure is practical, management agencies should consider strategies for testing primary scavengers of deer carcass material.

  5. Factors affecting oxidative peat decomposition due to land use in tropical peat swamp forests in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Masayuki; Okimoto, Yosuke; Hirano, Takashi; Kusin, Kitso

    2017-12-31

    The increasing frequency of fire due to drainage of tropical peatland has become a major environmental problem in Southeast Asia. To clarify the effects of changes in land use on carbon dioxide emissions, we measured oxidative peat decomposition (PD) at different stages of disturbance at three sites in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia: an undrained peat swamp forest (UF), a heavily drained peat swamp forest (DF), and a drained and burned ex-forest (DB). PD exhibited seasonality, being less in the wet season and greater in the dry season. From February 2014 to December 2015, mean PD (±SE) were 1.90±0.19, 2.30±0.33, and 1.97±0.25μmolm(-2)s(-1) at UF, DF, and DB, respectively. The groundwater level (GWL) was a major controlling factor of PD at all sites. At UF and DF, PD and GWL showed significant quadratic relationships. At DB, PD and GWL showed significant positive and negative relationships during the dry and wet seasons, respectively. Using these relationships, we estimated annual PD from GWL data for 2014 and 2015 as 698 and 745gCm(-2)yr(-1) at UF (mean GWL: -0.23 and -0.39m), 775 and 825gCm(-2)yr(-1) at DF (-0.55 and -0.59m), and 646 and 748gCm(-2)yr(-1) at DB (-0.22 and -0.62m), respectively. The annual PD was significantly higher in DF than in UF or DB, in both years. Despite the very dry conditions, the annual PD values at these sites were much lower than those reported for tropical peat at plantations (e.g., oil palm, rubber, and acacia). The differences in the relationship between PD and GWL indicate that separate estimations are required for each type of land. Moreover, our results suggest that PD can be enhanced by drainage both in forests and at burned sites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Decomposition of organochlorine compounds in flue gas from municipal solid waste incinerators using natural and activated acid clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, In-Hee; Takahashi, Shigetoshi; Matsuo, Takayuki; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2014-09-01

    High-temperature particle control (HTPC) using a ceramic filter is a dust collection method without inefficient cooling and reheating of flue gas treatment; thus, its use is expected to improve the energy recovery efficiency of municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs). However there are concerns regarding de novo synthesis and a decrease in the adsorptive removal efficiency of dioxins (DXNs) at approximately 300 degrees C. In this study, the effect of natural and activated acid clays on the decomposition of monochlorobenzene (MCB), one of the organochlorine compounds in MSW flue gas, was investigated. From the results of MCB removal tests at 30-300 degrees C, the clays were classified as adsorption, decomposition, and low removal types. More than half of the clays (four kinds of natural acid clays and two kinds of activated acid clays) were of the decomposition type. In addition, the presence of Cl atoms detached from MCB was confirmed by washing the clay used in the MCB removal test at 300 degrees C. Activated acid clay was expected to have high dechlorination performance because of its proton-rich-composition, but only two clays were classed as decomposition type. Conversely, all the natural acid clays used in this work were of the decomposition type, which contained relatively higher di- and trivalent metal oxides such as Al2O3, Fe2O3, MgO, and CaO. These metal oxides might contribute to the catalytic dechlorination of MCB at 300 degrees C. Therefore, natural and activated acid clays can be used as alternatives for activated carbon at 300 degrees C to remove organochloride compounds such as DXNs. Their utilization is expected to mitigate the latent risks related to the adoption of HTPC, and also to contribute to the improvement of energy recovery efficiency of MSWI. Implications: The effect of natural and activated acid clays on MCB decomposition was investigated to evaluate their suitability as materials for the removal of organochlorine compounds, such as

  7. Characterization of Explosives Processing Waste Decomposition Due to Composting. Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    compounds. The rate at which such degradation occurs can be fast if (a) initial concentrations of the material are not great enough to inhibit the...nitrogen. Such bonds should be particularly vulnerable to attack by consortia of soil microbiota : nitrogen is often the limiting nutrient in northern

  8. Characterization of explosives processing waste decomposition due to composting. Phase 2, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griest, W.H.; Tyndall, R.L.; Stewart, A.J.; Ho, C.H.; Ironside, K.S.; Caton, J.E.; Caldwell, W.M.; Tan, E.

    1991-11-01

    Static pile and mechanically stirred composts generated at the Umatilla Army Depot Activity in a field composting optimization study were chemically and toxicologically characterized to provide data for the evaluation of composting efficiency to decontaminate and detoxify explosives-contaminated soil. Characterization included determination of explosives and 2,4,6,-trinitrotoluene metabolites in composts and their EPA Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure Leachates, leachate toxicity to Ceriodaphnia Dubia and mutagenicity of the leachates and organic solvent extracts of the composts to Ames bacterial strains TA-98 and TA-100. The main conclusion from this study is that composting can effectively reduce the concentrations of explosives and bacterial mutagenicity in explosives -- contaminated soil, and can reduce the aquatic toxicity of leachable compounds. Small levels of explosive and metabolites, bacterial mutagenicity, and leachable aquatic toxicity remain after composting. The ultimate fate of the biotransformed explosives, and the source(s) of residual toxicity and mutagenicity remain unknown.

  9. Characterization of explosives processing waste decomposition due to composting. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griest, W.H.; Stewart, A.J.; Ho, C.H.; Tyndall, R.L.; Vass, A.A.; Caton, J.E.; Caldwell, W.M.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this work was to provide data and methodology assisting the transfer and acceptance of composting technology for the remediation of explosives-contaminated soils and sediments. Issues and activities addressed included: (a) chemical and toxicological characterization of compost samples from new field composting experiments, and the environmental availability of composting efficiency by isolation of bacterial consortia and natural surfactants from highly efficient composts, and (c) improved assessment of compost product suitability for land application.

  10. Wasted tongue in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders due to hypoglossal nerve involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Shanthi

    2015-04-01

    We report two cases of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder with hypoglossal nerve involvement resulting in a wasted tongue associated with other brainstem symptoms of hypogeusia, hypersalivation, hiccough, increased sweating, hyperemesis and myelitis (in the second patient). This occurred due to involvement of the hypoglossal, tractus solitarius and dorsal vagal nuclei. Though the myelitis and other brainstem signs recovered the hypoglossal nerve involvement resulting in a unilateral wasted tongue did not. It is important to consider neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders in the differential diagnosis of a wasted tongue though its occurrence is rare.

  11. Decomposition of paper wastes in presence of ceramics and cement raw material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conesa, Juan A; Gálvez, Araceli; Fullana, Andrés

    2008-05-01

    Paper recycling is an environmental important activity that is carried out in all the countries, but during the recycling process a paper waste is produced. Generally these wastes are placed in landfill sites but it is possible to profit it as secondary fuel and raw material in manufacture furnaces. In this work the combustion of the waste papers with cement and ceramic raw material has been studied with the objective to analyse the interaction of these substances with the emitted pollutants like PAHs and PCDD/Fs. The results of the study show that the presence of inorganic material produces an increment in the lighter PAH emission but chlorinated compounds are not affected. The PCDD/F emission level found in the combustion of this waste is quite low compared with other wastes subjected to similar conditions.

  12. Effectivity of locally wood rot fungal isolates in decomposition of leaf and cocoa pod husk waste

    OpenAIRE

    Kuswinanti, Tutik; Rosmana, Ade; Dewi, Vien Sartika; Jamila; Baharuddin

    2014-01-01

    Cocoa pod husk is a major waste of cocoa plants that can be used either as an organic fertilizer or as animal feed. For 972.400 hectares of cocoa plantation, produce as much as 572.900 tons of cocoa beans, while the waste generated reached 1.8766 million tons/year. However, only 94.515 tons of cocoa waste has been utilized. Given the composition of twigs, leaves and cocoa pods that contain lots of lignin and cellulose, further research is needed to find microbes that effective ...

  13. Catalytic Decomposition of Gaseous Byproducts from Heat Melt Waste Compaction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Volume reduction is a critical element of Solid Waste Management for manned spacecraft and planetary habitations. To this end, a Heat Melt Compaction System is under...

  14. Catalytic decomposition of tar derived from wood waste pyrolysis using Indonesian low grade iron ore as catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wicakso, Doni Rahmat [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Lambung Mangkurat University, Jalan A. Yani KM. 36 Banjarbaru, 70714, South Kalimantan (Indonesia); Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Gadjah Mada University, Jalan Grafika No. 2 Bulaksumur, Yogyakarta, 55281 (Indonesia); Sutijan; Rochmadi [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Gadjah Mada University, Jalan Grafika No. 2 Bulaksumur, Yogyakarta, 55281 (Indonesia); Budiman, Arief, E-mail: abudiman@ugm.ac.id [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Gadjah Mada University, Jalan Grafika No. 2 Bulaksumur, Yogyakarta, 55281 (Indonesia); Center for Energy Studies, Gadjah Mada University, Sekip K1A, Yogyakarta, 55281 (Indonesia)

    2016-06-03

    Low grade iron ore can be used as an alternative catalyst for bio-tar decomposition. Compared to other catalysts, such as Ni, Rd, Ru, Pd and Pt, iron ore is cheaper. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of using low grade iron ore as catalyst for tar catalytic decomposition in fixed bed reactor. Tar used in this experiment was pyrolysis product of wood waste while the catalyst was Indonesian low grade iron ore. The variables studied were temperatures between 500 – 600 °C and catalyst weight between 0 – 40 gram. The first step, tar was evaporated at 450 °C to produce tar vapor. Then, tar vapor was flowed to fixed bed reactor filled low grade iron ore. Gas and tar vapor from reactor was cooled, then the liquid and uncondensable gas were analyzed by GC/MS. The catalyst, after experiment, was weighed to calculate total carbon deposited into catalyst pores. The results showed that the tar components that were heavy and light hydrocarbon were decomposed and cracked within the iron ore pores to from gases, light hydrocarbon (bio-oil) and carbon, thus decreasing content tar in bio-oil and increasing the total gas product. In conclusion, the more low grade iron ore used as catalyst, the tar content in the liquid decrease, the H{sup 2} productivity increased and calorimetric value of bio-oil increased.

  15. Catalytic decomposition of tar derived from wood waste pyrolysis using Indonesian low grade iron ore as catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicakso, Doni Rahmat; Sutijan, Rochmadi, Budiman, Arief

    2016-06-01

    Low grade iron ore can be used as an alternative catalyst for bio-tar decomposition. Compared to other catalysts, such as Ni, Rd, Ru, Pd and Pt, iron ore is cheaper. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of using low grade iron ore as catalyst for tar catalytic decomposition in fixed bed reactor. Tar used in this experiment was pyrolysis product of wood waste while the catalyst was Indonesian low grade iron ore. The variables studied were temperatures between 500 - 600 °C and catalyst weight between 0 - 40 gram. The first step, tar was evaporated at 450 °C to produce tar vapor. Then, tar vapor was flowed to fixed bed reactor filled low grade iron ore. Gas and tar vapor from reactor was cooled, then the liquid and uncondensable gas were analyzed by GC/MS. The catalyst, after experiment, was weighed to calculate total carbon deposited into catalyst pores. The results showed that the tar components that were heavy and light hydrocarbon were decomposed and cracked within the iron ore pores to from gases, light hydrocarbon (bio-oil) and carbon, thus decreasing content tar in bio-oil and increasing the total gas product. In conclusion, the more low grade iron ore used as catalyst, the tar content in the liquid decrease, the H2 productivity increased and calorimetric value of bio-oil increased.

  16. The thermal decomposition of waste computer wire%废电线热解过程产物分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭玉文; 王松涛; 刘景洋; 乔琦; 张建强; 王红梅

    2009-01-01

    The pyrolysis characteristics,thermal decomposition products from waste computer wire were simulant studied.Results show that waste computer wire has three acutely weight loss stages,of which the first is decomposing of the organic polymer,the second is decomposing of the Plasticizer,and decomposing of flame retardants persists throughout the experiment.A variety of organic compounds could probably be produced in the thermal decomposition,such as aromatic oil compounds comprised 6~16 caibon atom,little numerator organic compounds,chloridized organic compounds and HCI.The pyrolysis products have diversiform poisonous and toxic sudstances.Its pollution controlling is necessary.%模拟研究了废电脑电线热解特性和热处理产物.结果表明,废电脑电线热解过程出现3个剧烈失重阶段,第l剧烈失重阶段主要是聚合物分解,第2剧烈失重阶段主要是增塑剂分解,阻燃剂分解持续整个实验过程.废电脑电线热解产物既有6~16个c原子的油状有机物,也有烃类小分子有机化合物、有机氯化物和HCI.热解产物中有多种毒害物质,必须加以控制.

  17. Lost water and nitrogen resources due to EU consumer food waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanham, D.; Bouraoui, F.; Leip, A.; Grizzetti, B.; Bidoglio, G.

    2015-08-01

    The European Parliament recently called for urgent measures to halve food waste in the EU, where consumers are responsible for a major part of total waste along the food supply chain. Due to a lack of data on national food waste statistics, uncertainty in (consumer) waste quantities (and the resulting associated quantities of natural resources) is very high, but has never been previously assessed in studies for the EU. Here we quantify: (1) EU consumer food waste, and (2) associated natural resources required for its production, in term of water and nitrogen, as well as estimating the uncertainty of these values. Total EU consumer food waste averages 123 (min 55-max 190) kg/capita annually (kg/cap/yr), i.e. 16% (min 7-max 24%) of all food reaching consumers. Almost 80%, i.e. 97 (min 45-max 153) kg/cap/yr is avoidable food waste, which is edible food not consumed. We have calculated the water and nitrogen (N) resources associated with avoidable food waste. The associated blue water footprint (WF) (the consumption of surface and groundwater resources) averages 27 litre per capita per day (min 13-max 40 l/cap/d), which slightly exceeds the total blue consumptive EU municipal water use. The associated green WF (consumptive rainwater use) is 294 (min 127-max 449) l/cap/d, equivalent to the total green consumptive water use for crop production in Spain. The nitrogen (N) contained in avoidable food waste averages 0.68 (min 0.29-max 1.08) kg/cap/yr. The food production N footprint (any remaining N used in the food production process) averages 2.74 (min 1.02-max 4.65) kg/cap/yr, equivalent to the use of mineral fertiliser by the UK and Germany combined. Among all the food product groups wasted, meat accounts for the highest amounts of water and N resources, followed by wasted cereals. The results of this study provide essential insights and information on sustainable consumption and resource efficiency for both EU policies and EU consumers.

  18. Waste Package Outer Barrier Stress Due to Thermal Expansion with Various Barrier Gap Sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. M. Lewis

    2001-11-27

    The objective of this activity is to determine the tangential stresses of the outer shell, due to uneven thermal expansion of the inner and outer shells of the current waste package (WP) designs. Based on the results of the calculation ''Waste Package Barrier Stresses Due to Thermal Expansion'', CAL-EBS-ME-000008 (ref. 10), only tangential stresses are considered for this calculation. The tangential stresses are significantly larger than the radial stresses associated with thermal expansion, and at the WP outer surface the radial stresses are equal to zero. The scope of this activity is limited to determining the tangential stresses the waste package outer shell is subject to due to the interference fit, produced by having two different shell coefficients of thermal expansions. The inner shell has a greater coefficient of thermal expansion than the outer shell, producing a pressure between the two shells. This calculation is associated with Waste Package Project. The calculations are performed for the 21-PWR (pressurized water reactor), 44-BWR (boiling water reactor), 24-BWR, 12-PWR Long, 5 DHLW/DOE SNF - Short (defense high-level waste/Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel), 2-MCO/2-DHLW (multi-canister overpack), and Naval SNF Long WP designs. The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation is that of the potential design for the types of WPs considered in this calculation. This calculation is performed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for SR (Ref.7). The calculation is documented, reviewed, and approved in accordance with AP-3.12Q, Calculations (Ref.1).

  19. A LABORATORY STUDY TO INVESTIGATE GASEOUS EMISSIONS AND SOLIDS DECOMPOSITION DURING COMPOSTING OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a materials flow analysis performed for composting municipal solid waste (MSW) and specific biodegradable organic components of MSW. (NOTE: This work is part of an overall U.S. EPA project providing cost, energy, and materials flow information on diffe...

  20. Influence of leachate recirculation on aerobic and anaerobic decomposition of solid wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilgili, M. Sinan [Yildiz Technical University, Environmental Engineering Department, 34349 Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: mbilgili@yildiz.edu.tr; Demir, Ahmet [Yildiz Technical University, Environmental Engineering Department, 34349 Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: ahmetd@yildiz.edu.tr; Ozkaya, Bestamin [Yildiz Technical University, Environmental Engineering Department, 34349 Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: bozkaya@yildiz.edu.tr

    2007-05-08

    In this study, the effect of leachate recirculation on aerobic and anaerobic degradation of municipal solid wastes is determined by four laboratory-scale landfill reactors. The options studied and compared with the traditional anaerobic landfill are: leachate recirculation, landfill aeration, and aeration with leachate recirculation. Leachate quality is regularly monitored by the means of pH, alkalinity, total dissolved solids, conductivity, oxidation-reduction potential, chloride, chemical oxygen demand, ammonia, and total Kjeldahl nitrogen, in addition to generated leachate quantity. Aerobic leachate recirculated landfill appears to be the most effective option in the removal of organic matter and ammonia. The main difference between aerobic recirculated and non-recirculated landfill options is determined at leachate quantity. Recirculation is more effective on anaerobic degradation of solid waste than aerobic degradation. Further studies are going on to determine the optimum operational conditions for aeration and leachate recirculation rates, also with the operational costs of aeration and recirculation.

  1. Decomposition of CFC and Halon waste gases in normal-pressure plasma reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The normal-pressure decomposition of CF2Cl2 and CF2ClBr in air by non-equilibrium plasma was studied. The pressure of CF2Cl2 and CF2ClBr was 2.67x103Pa, added the dry air to 1.01 x 105 Pa, discharged by corona or DBD, 11.5% of CF2ClBr was decomposed by corona after 120s discharge, more than 85% of CF2Cl2 and 95% of CF2ClBr was decomposed by DBD after 10s discharge respectively. The main products were CF2O, Cl2 and Br2.

  2. Decomposition of olive mill waste compost, goat manure and Medicago sativa in Lebanese soils using the litterbag technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atallah, Therese

    2014-05-01

    Organic amendments, green manure and plant residues incorporation are the main sources of nutrients in organic farming, their decomposition rate is crucial for the accumulation and long-term storage of organic matter in soils. In this study the decomposition of compost from olive mill waste (N: 29.3 g kg-1; total dissolved nitrogen or TDN: 3.82 g kg-1), goat manure (N: 31.5 g kg-1; TDN: 0.94 g kg-1), the shoots (N: 33.6 g kg-1; TDN: 17.57 g kg-1) and roots (N: 22.12 g kg-1; TDN: 8.87 g kg-1) of Medicago sativa was followed in three Lebanese soils. The nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium released were followed over one year, starting in early winter (December-January). The mild sub-humid Mediterranean conditions allowed a rapid mass loss in alfalfa shoots 30 days after incorporation. Manure and compost were more persistent. Between 80 and 90% of TDN were released, after 30 days of in-situ incubation for compost, the release was over 90% for alfalfa shoots. The movement of P was slower, as the compost (6.99 g kg-1 of P) and manure (9.81 g kg-1 of P) lost 33% and 22%, respectively, during 30 days of incubation. After one year, 15 to 35% of P remained in the soils. The manure was the richest in potassium (19.66 g kg-1) followed by the alfalfa shoots (15.56 g kg-1), the compost (8.19 g kg-1) and the roots (5.96 g kg-1). The loss of potassium was important, as over 88% had disappeared over the year. All decomposition curves followed an exponential model. The calculated coefficients of decomposition for total nitrogen (lnfinal - lninitial/days) were significantly higher for alfalfa shoots (0.00547 day-1) and similar for the compost (0.00184 day-1) and the manure (0.00175 day-1). The ANOVA test showed a difference between two of the sites (Site A: 521 g kg-1 of clay and 42 g kg-1 of calcium carbonate; Site S: 260 g kg-1 of clay and 269 g kg-1 of CaCO3) and the third one (Site L: 315 g kg-1 of clay and 591 g kg-1 of CaCO3). The relationships between the soil calcium

  3. THE EFFECT OF F/M RATIO TO THE ANAEROBIC DECOMPOSITION OF BIOGAS PRODUCTION FROM FISH OFFAL WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Hadiyarto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogas is a gas produced from the anaerobic decomposition of organic compounds. In the production of biogas from anaerobic digestion, value of F/M ratio shows a ratio between the mass of food available in the waste substrate with a mass of microorganisms that act as decomposers. F/M ratio is too small causing microbes could not metabolize perfectly and vice versa on the value of the ratio F / M overload resulting metabolic imbalance. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of F/M ratio to optimal production of biogas from fish offal waste. The process of anaerobic digestion is conducted in the biodigester with four-liter volume and batch system operated at ambient temperature for 38 days. As a raw material, fish offal and microbial sludge obtained from the curing of fish and river mud discharges in the region of Bandarharjo, Semarang, Central Java. F/M ratio is set at 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 are derived from sewage sludge VSS weight ratio of fish offal with sludge containing microbes. The addition of micronutrients supplied with a concentration of 0.4 mg/liter. Yield maximum methane gas obtained was 164,7 l/kg CODMn when the ratio F/M was 0.2. Based on the results of the study, found that the ratio F/M affect the amount of biogas produced. Meanwhile, the retention time (HRT is only influenced by the ratio F/M.

  4. Keratinous waste decomposition and peptide production by keratinase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus AD-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegeckas, Audrius; Gudiukaitė, Renata; Debski, Janusz; Citavicius, Donaldas

    2015-04-01

    A keratinolytic proteinase was cloned from thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus AD-11 and was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). Recombinant keratinolytic proteinase (RecGEOker) with an estimated molecular weight of 57 kDa was purified and keratinase activity was measured. RecGEOker showed optimal activity at pH 9 and 60 °C. Recombinant keratinolytic proteinase showed the highest substrate specificity toward keratin from wool > collagen > sodium caseinate > gelatin > and BSA in descending order. RecGEOker is applicable for efficient keratin waste biodegradation and can replace conventional non-biological hydrolysis processes. High-value small peptides obtained from enzymatic biodegradation by RecGEOker are suitable for industrial application in white and/or green biotechnology for use as major additives in various products.

  5. Calculation of financial compensation due of municipalities hosting nuclear waste deposit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Renata A. da, E-mail: renata.amaral@ufrj.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Simoes, Francisco Fernando L.; Martins, Vivian B., E-mail: flamego@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (LIMA/IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. Impactos Ambientais

    2011-07-01

    The present work evaluates the math from monthly financial transfers to municipalities with technical viability for building of initial or intermediate repository for storing of radioactivity nuclear waste: gloves, sneakers, mask, resins and filters came from thermonuclear facilities. Several aspects have been considered as the geological factors of the site as presence of capable faults, groundwater vulnerability, infiltration of seawater. Also, it was take into account socioeconomic factors: population density, costs for construction, maintenance and operation of repository; size and activity of waste; among others. Hereafter, we have presented the key features of low and average activity repository and high activity repository even as initial, intermediate and final repository and the possible environment impact. The methodology for calculation of financial compensation of municipalities was established by CNEN will be applied for a specific assumed municipality. The analysis of financial compensation due to the specific nuclear waste deposit and the possible guidelines for the use of that compensation by the municipality will be analyzed. In addiction, it will be compared the model for compensation used for nuclear wastes with other plants receiving permanent wastes from cemeteries and sanitary landfills, where the land should not be allowed for the human activities the same as: crops, livestock and buildings. Also, comparison with royalties and indemnities were paid by facilities of energy production as hydroelectric dams as well as petroleum and gas exploration plants. The destination of financial compensation transfer to the municipality is in charge of the city administration. The compensation could be applied of investments in education and culture, health, sanitation works, improvement of public transport, environment, among others. It will be discussed the cost-benefit relation for the assumed municipality. (author)

  6. ACTUAL-WASTE TESTS OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING FOR RETRIEVAL OF SRS HLW SLUDGE TANK HEELS AND DECOMPOSITION OF OXALIC ACID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

    2012-01-12

    Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge.

  7. The effects of leachate recirculation with supplemental water addition on methane production and waste decomposition in a simulated tropical landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanphoti, N; Towprayoon, S; Chaiprasert, P; Nopharatana, A

    2006-10-01

    In order to increase methane production efficiency, leachate recirculation is applied in landfills to increase moisture content and circulate organic matter back into the landfill cell. In the case of tropical landfills, where high temperature and evaporation occurs, leachate recirculation may not be enough to maintain the moisture content, therefore supplemental water addition into the cell is an option that could help stabilize moisture levels as well as stimulate biological activity. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of leachate recirculation and supplemental water addition on municipal solid waste decomposition and methane production in three anaerobic digestion reactors. Anaerobic digestion with leachate recirculation and supplemental water addition showed the highest performance in terms of cumulative methane production and the stabilization period time required. It produced an accumulated methane production of 54.87 l/kg dry weight of MSW at an average rate of 0.58 l/kg dry weight/d and reached the stabilization phase on day 180. The leachate recirculation reactor provided 17.04 l/kg dry weight at a rate of 0.14l/kg dry weight/d and reached the stabilization phase on day 290. The control reactor provided 9.02 l/kg dry weight at a rate of 0.10 l/kg dry weight/d, and reached the stabilization phase on day 270. Increasing the organic loading rate (OLR) after the waste had reached the stabilization phase made it possible to increase the methane content of the gas, the methane production rate, and the COD removal. Comparison of the reactors' efficiencies at maximum OLR (5 kgCOD/m(3)/d) in terms of the methane production rate showed that the reactor using leachate recirculation with supplemental water addition still gave the highest performance (1.56 l/kg dry weight/d), whereas the leachate recirculation reactor and the control reactor provided 0.69 l/kg dry weight/d and 0.43 l/kg dry weight/d, respectively. However, when considering

  8. Far-reaching geometrical artefacts due to thermal decomposition of polymeric coatings around focused ion beam milled pigment particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykaczewski, K; Mieritz, D G; Liu, M; Ma, Y; Iezzi, E B; Sun, X; Wang, L P; Solanki, K N; Seo, D-K; Wang, R Y

    2016-06-01

    Focused ion beam and scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) instruments are extensively used to characterize nanoscale composition of composite materials, however, their application to analysis of organic corrosion barrier coatings has been limited. The primary concern that arises with use of FIB to mill organic materials is the possibility of severe thermal damage that occurs in close proximity to the ion beam impact. Recent research has shown that such localized artefacts can be mitigated for a number of polymers through cryogenic cooling of the sample as well as low current milling and intelligent ion beam control. Here we report unexpected nonlocalized artefacts that occur during FIB milling of composite organic coatings with pigment particles. Specifically, we show that FIB milling of pigmented polysiloxane coating can lead to formation of multiple microscopic voids within the substrate as far as 5 μm away from the ion beam impact. We use further experimentation and modelling to show that void formation occurs via ion beam heating of the pigment particles that leads to decomposition and vaporization of the surrounding polysiloxane. We also identify FIB milling conditions that mitigate this issue.

  9. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome due to hemorrhagic brain infarction: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Tomotaka; Uno, Hisakazu; Miyashita, Kotaro; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome is a condition featuring hyponatremia and dehydration caused by head injury, operation on the brain, subarachnoid hemorrhage, brain tumor and so on. However, there are a few reports of cerebral salt-wasting syndrome caused by cerebral infarction. We describe a patient with cerebral infarction who developed cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in the course of hemorrhagic transformation. Case presentation A 79-year-old Japanese woman with hypertension and ...

  10. Radiological impact assessment to the environment due to waste from disposal of porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsi, Tarek; Hegazy, Rehab; Badawy, Wael

    2017-06-01

    The present study aimed to assess the radiological parameters from gamma rays due to the uncontrolled disposal of porcelain waste to the environment. Qualitative and quantitative identification of radionuclides in the investigated samples was carried out by means of a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. The average activity concentrations of the local porcelain samples were measured as 208.28 Bq/kg for (226)Ra, 125.73 Bq/kg for (238)U, 84.94 Bq/kg for (232)Th and 1033.61 Bq/kg for (40)K, respectively. The imported samples had an average activity of 240.57 Bq/kg for (226)Ra, 135.56 Bq/kg for (238)U, 115.74 Bq/kg for (232)Th and 1312.49 Bq/kg for (40)K, respectively. Radiological parameters and the radium equivalent Raeq for the investigated samples were calculated. The external and internal hazard indices, representative level index (Iγ), alpha index (Iα), and the exemption level (Ix), were estimated to be higher than the recommended value (unity), while the average activity concentrations for the studied samples were higher than recommended levels. In conclusion, we are concerned that disposal of porcelain in the environment might be a significant hazard.

  11. Global burden of mortalities due to chronic exposure to ambient PM2.5 from open combustion of domestic waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodros, John K.; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Ford, Bonne; Cucinotta, Rachel; Gan, Ryan; Magzamen, Sheryl; Pierce, Jeffrey R.

    2016-12-01

    Uncontrolled combustion of domestic waste has been observed in many countries, creating concerns for air quality; however, the health implications have not yet been quantified. We incorporate the Wiedinmyer et al (2014 Environ. Sci. Technol. 48 9523-30) emissions inventory into the global chemical-transport model, GEOS-Chem, and provide a first estimate of premature adult mortalities from chronic exposure to ambient PM2.5 from uncontrolled combustion of domestic waste. Using the concentration-response functions (CRFs) of Burnett et al (2014 Environ. Health Perspect. 122 397-403), we estimate that waste-combustion emissions result in 270 000 (5th-95th: 213 000-328 000) premature adult mortalities per year. The confidence interval results only from uncertainty in the CRFs and assumes equal toxicity of waste-combustion PM2.5 to all other PM2.5 sources. We acknowledge that this result is likely sensitive to choice of chemical-transport model, CRFs, and emission inventories. Our central estimate equates to 9% of adult mortalities from exposure to ambient PM2.5 reported in the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010. Exposure to PM2.5 from waste combustion increases the risk of premature mortality by more than 0.5% for greater than 50% of the population. We consider sensitivity simulations to uncertainty in waste-combustion emission mass, the removal of waste-combustion emissions, and model resolution. A factor-of-2 uncertainty in waste-combustion PM2.5 leads to central estimates ranging from 138 000 to 518 000 mortalities per year for factors-of-2 reductions and increases, respectively. Complete removal of waste combustion would only avoid 191 000 (5th-95th: 151 000-224 000) mortalities per year (smaller than the total contributed premature mortalities due to nonlinear CRFs). Decreasing model resolution from 2° × 2.5° to 4° × 5° results in 16% fewer mortalities attributed to waste-combustion PM2.5, and over Asia, decreasing resolution from 0.5° × 0.666° to 2° × 2

  12. Co-composting of rose oil processing waste with caged layer manure and straw or sawdust: effects of carbon source and C/N ratio on decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onursal, Emrah; Ekinci, Kamil

    2015-04-01

    Rose oil is a specific essential oil that is produced mainly for the cosmetics industry in a few selected locations around the world. Rose oil production is a water distillation process from petals of Rosa damascena Mill. Since the oil content of the rose petals of this variety is between 0.3-0.4% (w/w), almost 4000 to 3000 kg of rose petals are needed to produce 1 kg of rose oil. Rose oil production is a seasonal activity and takes place during the relatively short period where the roses are blooming. As a result, large quantities of solid waste are produced over a limited time interval. This research aims: (i) to determine the possibilities of aerobic co-composting as a waste management option for rose oil processing waste with caged layer manure; (ii) to identify effects of different carbon sources - straw or sawdust on co-composting of rose oil processing waste and caged layer manure, which are both readily available in Isparta, where significant rose oil production also takes place; (iii) to determine the effects of different C/N ratios on co-composting by the means of organic matter decomposition and dry matter loss. Composting experiments were carried out by 12 identical laboratory-scale composting reactors (60 L) simultaneously. The results of the study showed that the best results were obtained with a mixture consisting of 50% rose oil processing waste, 64% caged layer manure and 15% straw wet weight in terms of organic matter loss (66%) and dry matter loss (38%).

  13. Predicting Mineral N Release during Decomposition of Organic Wastes in Soil by Use of the SOILN_NO Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trine A. Sogn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to predict the mineral N release associated with the use of organic waste as fertilizer in agricultural plant production, the adequacy of the SOILN_NO model has been evaluated. The original thought was that the model calibrated to data from simple incubation experiments could predict the mineral N release from organic waste products used as N fertilizer on agricultural land. First, the model was calibrated to mineral N data achieved in a laboratory experiment where different organic wastes were added to soil and incubated at 15°C for 8 weeks. Secondly, the calibrated model was tested by use of NO3 − leaching data from soil columns with barley growing in 4 different soil types, added organic waste and exposed to natural climatic conditions during three growing seasons. The SOILN_NO model reproduced relatively well the NO3 − leaching from some of the soils included in the outdoor experiment, but failed to reproduce others. Use of the calibrated model often induced underestimation of the observed NO3 − leaching. To achieve a satisfactory simulation of the NO3 − leaching, recalibration of the model had to be carried out. Thus, SOILN_NO calibrated to data from simple incubation experiments in the laboratory could not directly be used as a tool to predict the N-leaching following organic waste application in more natural agronomic plant production systems. The results emphasised the need for site- and system-specific data for model calibration before using a model for predictive purposes related to fertilizer N value of organic wastes applied to agricultural land.

  14. Leaching due to hygroscopic water uptake in cemented waste containing soluble salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, K.

    1992-01-01

    Considerable amounts of easily soluble salts such as sodium nitrate, sulphate, or carbonate are introduced into certain types of cemented waste. When such materials are stored in atmospheres with high relative humidity or disposed or by shallow land burial under unsaturated, but still humid...

  15. 空气气氛下医疗废物热分解特性%Decomposition characteristics of medical waste in air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟庆敏; 陈晓平; 张亮

    2011-01-01

    Thermal decomposition of certain medical waste and its mixture in the air was studied using the thermo-gravimetric(TG) analyzer coupled with the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The gravimetric characteristics of each species and mixture and the qualitative analysis of evolved volatile products were investigated. Compared with thermal decomposition in nitrogen (N2) , for perfusion tube, the peak number of differential thermogravimetric (DTG) curve increases and the first peak value increases obviously. For respirator, the initial decomposition temperature drops down about 150℃, and the peak appears earlier about 100℃. Evolved volatile products from respirator include CO2, H2O, CO, hydrocarbon, aldehyde and acid, and products from perfusion tube include CO2, alkyne, aldehyde, acid and hydrogen chloride (HC1). Decomposition temperature of HC1 in perfusion tube is between 304 ℃ and 409 ℃. The agravic characteristics of mixture reflect that of each species in the mixture. Also, mixture has no effect on decomposition of HC1. Finally , reaction kinetic parameters of perfusion tube and respirator in air are calculated which provides a theoretical basis and reliable sub-models for the controlled air oxidation of medical waste.%利用热重(TG)和傅里叶变换红外光谱(FTIR)联用技术对医疗废物中的塑料类(输液管)、化纤类(口罩)及其混合物进行空气气氛下热分解实验,研究单组分及混合物热分解的失重特性,并对热分解气体产物进行定性分析.结果表明:与N2气氛相比,塑料类(输液管)失重峰数量增多,且第一个失重峰峰值增大明显;化纤类(口罩)热分解起始温度提前约150℃,失重峰出现位置提前约100℃.化纤类(口罩)的热分解产物主要有CO2、H2O、CO、烷烃类、醛类和羧酸类等;塑料类(输液管)的热分解产物主要有CO2、炔类、醛类、酸类和HC1等,其中HC1的析出温度区间为304~409℃.混合物的热分

  16. Mineralocorticoid replacement during infancy for salt wasting congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa G. Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The protocols for glucocorticoid replacement in children with salt wasting 21-hydroxylase deficiency are well established; however, the current recommendation for mineralocorticoid replacement is general and suggests individualized dose adjustments. This study aims to retrospectively review the 9-∝-fludrocortisone dose regimen in salt wasting 21-hydroxylase deficient children who have been adequately treated during infancy. METHODS: Twenty-three salt wasting 21-hydroxylase deficient patients with good anthropometric and hormonal control were followed in our center since diagnosis. The assessments of cortisone acetate and 9-∝-fludrocortisone doses, anthropometric parameters, and biochemical and hormonal levels were rigorously evaluated in pre-determined intervals from diagnosis to two years of age. RESULTS: The 9-∝-fludrocortisone doses decreased over time during the first and second years of life; the median fludrocortisone doses were 200 µg at 0-6 months, 150 µg at 7-18 months and 125 µg at 19-24 months. The cortisone acetate dose per square meter was stable during follow-up (median = 16.8 mg/m²/day. The serum sodium, potassium and plasma rennin activity levels during treatment were normal, except in the first month of life, when periodic 9-∝-fludrocortisone dose adjustments were made. CONCLUSIONS: The mineralocorticoid needs of salt wasting 21-hydroxylase deficient patients are greater during early infancy and progressively decrease during the first two years of life, which confirms that a partial aldosterone resistance exists during this time. Our study proposes a safety regiment for mineralocorticoid replacement during this critical developmental period.

  17. Thermal decomposition and gasification of biomass pyrolysis gases using a hot bed of waste derived pyrolysis char.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rahbi, Amal S; Onwudili, Jude A; Williams, Paul T

    2016-03-01

    Chars produced from the pyrolysis of different waste materials have been investigated in terms of their use as a catalyst for the catalytic cracking of biomass pyrolysis gases during the two-stage pyrolysis-gasification of biomass. The chars were produced from the pyrolysis of waste tyres, refused derived fuel and biomass in the form of date stones. The results showed that the hydrocarbon tar yields decreased significantly with all the char materials used in comparison to the non-char catalytic experiments. For example, at a cracking temperature of 800°C, the total product hydrocarbon tar yield decreased by 70% with tyre char, 50% with RDF char and 9% with biomass date stones char compared to that without char. There was a consequent increase in total gas yield. Analysis of the tar composition showed that the content of phenolic compounds decreased and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons increased in the product tar at higher char temperatures.

  18. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome due to tuberculous meningitis; a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Syed; Majid, Zain; Mehdi, Mehwish; Mubarak, Muhammed

    2016-01-01

    A 58-year-old male presented with fever, nausea, and vomiting since 15 days along with irritability and confusion since 5 days. His laboratory reports showed low serum sodium, serum osmolality and uric acid. Computerized tomography (CT) scan of brain revealed age-related changes. While on lumbar puncture (LP) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination, CSF protein, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and total leukocyte count (predominant lymphocytes) were all increased. On his 14th day of admission, his serum sodium was 116 mEq/l and he had a high urine output. Fluid restriction was tried in order to rule out syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) but the patient did not respond to it. Keeping in view the above findings, a final diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis leading to cerebral salt wasting syndrome was made. The patient was started on 3% hypertonic saline, mineralocorticoids and anti-tuberculous therapy (ATT), to which he responded favorably and was later discharged.

  19. Delayed diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia with salt wasting due to type II 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Trine H; Mallet, Delphine; Dige-Petersen, Harriet

    2005-01-01

    Classical 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD) deficiency is a rare cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. We report two sisters presenting with delayed diagnoses of classical 3beta-HSD, despite salt wasting (SW) episodes in infancy. Sibling 1 was referred for premature pubarche, slight....... There is no previous report of the combination of SW and premature pubarche due to mutations in the type II 3beta-HSD gene. Because neonatal diagnosis could have prevented life-threatening crises in these girls, this report further supports the benefits for neonatal screening for congenital adrenal hyperplasia...

  20. Kinetics of thermal decomposition of typical waste materials%典型垃圾材料的热分解动力学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新跃; 彭庆法; 张浩; 谢超鸣

    2011-01-01

    对垃圾材料的热分解动力学研究目的在于研究垃圾材料的热解特性,文中对典型垃圾材料聚氯乙烯(PVC)和纸进行热分解动力学研究.用综合热分析仪分别测试PVC及纸在升温速率为10,15,20,30 K/min时的TG-DSC曲线,获取PVC和纸在最大质量损失速率时的温度Tmax及其他动力学参数.然后用Kissinger法和Flynn-Wall-Ozawa法处理实验数据并且计算得出PVC和纸在最大质量损失速率温度Tmax时的活化能和指前因子.计算结果为:采用Kissinger最大质量损失速率法求得PVC的活化能E=35.98 kJ/mol,指前因子A=8.7×105;纸的活化能E=55.15 kJ/mol,指前因子A=9.5×107.用Flynn-Wall-Ozawa法求得PVC的活化能E=38.029 kJ/mol;纸的活化能E= 40.426 kJ/mol.结果表明:垃圾的成分复杂,影响其热分解的因素较多,采用单一的动力学研究方法难以得到满意的实际应用结果.%The purpose of the experiment about thermal decomposition kinetics is to study the pyrolysis characteristics of waste materials. The thermal decomposition kinetics of typical waste materials of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and paper was studied by means of TG and DSC at different heating rates of 10, 15, 20, 30 K/min. Maximum temperature Tmax and other kinetic parameters of PVC and paper at maximum mass loss rate were obtained. Based on Kissinger's method, the activation energies and exponential factors of PVC and paper were calculated as E = 35.98 kJ/mol and A = 8.7 × 105, E =55.15 kJ/mol and A =9.5 × 107 respectively. And based on Flynn-Wall-Ozawa's method, the activation energies of PVC and paper were calculated as £ = 38.029 kj/mol and E =40.426 kj/mol respectively. The calculated results together with the complexity of the components of waste and other influence factors lead inescapably to the conclusion that it is difficult to get a good agreement with the actual application result by single dynamics research method.

  1. Investigation of the influence of inert and oxidizing atmospheres on the efficiency of decomposition of waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Anjan; Jha, Manis Kumar; Singh, Rajendra Prasad; Ranganathan, S.

    2016-08-01

    Thermo-gravimetry was used for studying the influence of the furnace atmosphere during the pyrolysis waste circuit boards (WPCBs). Pyrolysis in argon atmosphere resulted in a continuous decrease of mass of the sample. Rapid mass loss occurred at about 573 K. Heating the WPCBs in air and oxygen atmospheres resulted in an increase in the mass of the sample in the early stages until rapid mass loss occurred at about 573 K. When pyrolysis of larger sample mass (about 5 g each) was carried out in tubular furnace, about 20.43 % mass loss was observed during the pyrolysis of WPCBs in a flowing stream of argon at 548 K during a period of 4 min. On the other hand, a maximum of about 2.26 % mass loss was recorded when the WPCBs were heated at about 600 K for the same time interval in the still air. The mass transfer during the pyrolysis of WPCBs in flowing stream of inert gas was also modeled. It is found that controlling the flow rate of inert gas and the geometry of the equipment can enhance the rate of mass loss significantly.

  2. Investigation of the influence of inert and oxidizing atmospheres on the efficiency of decomposition of waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Anjan; Jha, Manis Kumar; Singh, Rajendra Prasad; Ranganathan, S.

    2017-04-01

    Thermo-gravimetry was used for studying the influence of the furnace atmosphere during the pyrolysis waste circuit boards (WPCBs). Pyrolysis in argon atmosphere resulted in a continuous decrease of mass of the sample. Rapid mass loss occurred at about 573 K. Heating the WPCBs in air and oxygen atmospheres resulted in an increase in the mass of the sample in the early stages until rapid mass loss occurred at about 573 K. When pyrolysis of larger sample mass (about 5 g each) was carried out in tubular furnace, about 20.43 % mass loss was observed during the pyrolysis of WPCBs in a flowing stream of argon at 548 K during a period of 4 min. On the other hand, a maximum of about 2.26 % mass loss was recorded when the WPCBs were heated at about 600 K for the same time interval in the still air. The mass transfer during the pyrolysis of WPCBs in flowing stream of inert gas was also modeled. It is found that controlling the flow rate of inert gas and the geometry of the equipment can enhance the rate of mass loss significantly.

  3. A DECOMPOSITION METHOD OF STRUCTURAL DECOMPOSITION ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jinghua

    2005-01-01

    Over the past two decades,structural decomposition analysis(SDA)has developed into a major analytical tool in the field of input-output(IO)techniques,but the method was found to suffer from one or more of the following problems.The decomposition forms,which are used to measure the contribution of a specific determinant,are not unique due to the existence of a multitude of equivalent forms,irrational due to the weights of different determinants not matching,inexact due to the existence of large interaction terms.In this paper,a decomposition method is derived to overcome these deficiencies,and we prove that the result of this approach is equal to the Shapley value in cooperative games,and so some properties of the method are obtained.Beyond that,the two approaches that have been used predominantly in the literature have been proved to be the approximate solutions of the method.

  4. Human health and pollution due to solid waste incinetators (SWI: a selection of two recent well conducted studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gennaro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Incinerators reduce the volume of visible waste, turning it into ashes and smoke which can cause local and global environmental pollution due to particulate matter (PM, dioxins, furans, hydrochloric acid, hydrocarbons, heavy metals, sulfur and nitrogen dioxides. In order to describe cancers and non-neoplastic diseases in populations exposed to incinerator pollution, the scientific literature available since 1987 has been selected on the basis of the best epidemiological evidences. In Italy, women who lived for at least 5 years in areas that were likely to be the most polluted by heavy metals, showed increased risk of death from all causes (relative risk, RR=1.17-1.54. In France, an incidence study found increases in all cancer risks both in males (RR=1.06 who resided in areas where dioxin pollution was estimated to be higher than it was in the referent areas (less dioxin polluted.

  5. Soil Chemical Properties and Soybean Yield Due to Application Biochar and Compost of Plant Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junita Barus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available he importance to return organic matter to the soil has been widely recognized, especially to agricultural lands that are low in organic matter and nutrients contents that will decrease the productivity of food crops. This study aimed to study the effect of biochar (rice husk and corn cob biochar and straw compost on soil chemical properties and yield of soybean (Glycine max (L. Merr. The experiments were done in the laboratory and the field experiment at February–July 2015. The first study was laboratory test using a randomized block design with three replicates. Soil samples were ground and sieved to obtain the less than 4 mm fraction for the incubation experiment. A five kg soil was mixtured with amandement treatments (A: control; B: Rice husk biochar 10 Mg ha-1 ; C: corn cob 10 Mg ha-1; D: straw compost 10 Mg ha-1; and E. Rice husk biochar 10 Mg ha-1 + straw compost 10 Mg ha-1 ; F. corn cob biochar 10 Mg ha-1 + straw compost 10 Mg ha-1 were filled into plastic pots. The treatments were incubated for 1 and 2 months. Soil samples measured were pH, Organic-C, Total-N, P2O5 (Bray-1, K2O (Morgan, Na, Ca, Mg, S, and CEC. The field experiment was conducted at Sukaraja Nuban Village, Batanghari Nuban sub district, East Lampung Regency. The treatments (similar too laboratory experiment were arranged in a randomized block design with four replicates. Plot size was 10 m × 20 m, and soybean as crop indicators. The parameters observed were plant heigh, number of branches , number of pods per plant , number of seeds per plant, grain weight, and stover. The results of laboratory experiment showed that application of biochar and compost improve soil fertility due to the increase in soil pH and nutrient availability for plant especially P2O5 and K2O available. The treatment of a rice husk biochar and compost mixture was better than single application to improve soil fertility and soybean yield. Apllication mixture husk biochar 10 Mg ha-1and straw compost

  6. Soil Chemical Properties and Soybean Yield Due to Application of Biochar and Compost of Plant Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junita Barus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance to return organic matter to the soil has been widely recognized, especially to agricultural lands that are low in organic matter and nutrients contents that will decrease the productivity of food crops. This study aimed to study the effect of biochar (rice husk and corn cob biochar and straw compost on soil chemical properties and yield of soybean (Glycine max (L. Merr. The experiments were done in the laboratory and the field experiment at February–July 2015. The first study was laboratory test using a randomized block designwith three replicates. Soil samples were ground and sieved to obtain the less than 4 mm fraction for the incubation experiment. A five kg soil was mixtured with amandement treatments (A: control; B: Rice husk biochar 10 Mg ha-1 ; C: corn cob 10 Mg ha-1; D: straw compost 10 Mg ha-1; and E. Rice husk biochar 10 Mg ha-1 + straw compost 10 Mg ha-1 ; F. corn cob biochar 10 Mg ha-1 + straw compost 10 Mg ha-1 were filled into plastic pots. The treatments were incubated for 1 and 2 months. Soil samples measured were pH, Organic-C, Total-N, P2O5 (Bray-1, K2O (Morgan, Na, Ca, Mg, S, and CEC. The field experiment was conducted at Sukaraja Nuban Village, Batanghari Nuban sub district, East Lampung Regency. The treatments (similar too laboratory experiment were arranged in a randomized block design with four replicates. Plot size was 10 m× 20 m, and soybean as crop indicators. The parameters observed were plant heigh, number of branches , number of pods per plant , number of seeds per plant, grain weight, and stover. The results of laboratory experiment showed that application of biochar and compost improve soil fertility due to the increase in soil pH and nutrient availability for plant especially P2O5 and K2O available. The treatment of a rice husk biochar and compost mixture was better than single application to improve soil fertility and soybean yield. Apllication mixture husk biochar 10 Mg ha-1and straw compost 10

  7. Ductility improvement due to martensite α' decomposition in porous Ti-6Al-4V parts produced by selective laser melting for orthopedic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallica-Leva, E; Caram, R; Jardini, A L; Fogagnolo, J B

    2016-02-01

    Ti-6Al-4V parts obtained by selective laser melting typically have an acicular α' martensitic microstructure whose ductility is low. Thus, post-heat treatments are useful for increasing ductility. In this work, the effects of sub-β-transus heat treatments on the mechanical properties of Ti-6Al-4V parts with porous structures are correlated with martensite α' phase decomposition. The precipitation of β phase and the gradual transformation of α' into α phase by the diffusion of excess vanadium from α' to β phase are proposed to be the main events of martensite α' phase decomposition in parts fabricated by selective laser melting. The heat treatment performed at 650°C for 1h produced no microstructural changes, but the samples treated for at the same temperature 2h showed a fine precipitation of β phase along the α' needle boundaries. The heat treatment performed at 800°C for 1 or 2h produced a fine α+β microstructure, in which β phase are present as particles fewer in number and larger in size, when compared with the ones present in the sample heat-treated at 650°C for 2h. Heat-treatment of the parts at 800°C for 2h proved to be the best condition, which improved the ductility of the samples while only slightly reducing their strength.

  8. Ozone decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batakliev Todor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers. Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates

  9. Quantification of parameters influencing methane generation due to biodegradation of municipal solid waste in landfills and laboratory experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Xunchang; Zekkos, Dimitrios; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2016-09-01

    The energy conversion potential of municipal solid waste (MSW) disposed of in landfills remains largely untapped because of the slow and variable rate of biogas generation, delayed and inefficient biogas collection, leakage of biogas, and landfill practices and infrastructure that are not geared toward energy recovery. A database consisting of methane (CH4) generation data, the major constituent of biogas, from 49 laboratory experiments and field monitoring data from 57 landfills was developed. Three CH4 generation parameters, i.e., waste decay rate (k), CH4 generation potential (L0), and time until maximum CH4 generation rate (tmax), were calculated for each dataset using U.S. EPA's Landfill Gas Emission Model (LandGEM). Factors influencing the derived parameters in laboratory experiments and landfills were investigated using multi-linear regression analysis. Total weight of waste (W) was correlated with biodegradation conditions through a ranked classification scheme. k increased with increasing percentage of readily biodegradable waste (Br0 (%)) and waste temperature, and reduced with increasing W, an indicator of less favorable biodegradation conditions. The values of k obtained in the laboratory were commonly significantly higher than those in landfills and those recommended by LandGEM. The mean value of L0 was 98 and 88L CH4/kg waste for laboratory and field studies, respectively, but was significantly affected by waste composition with ranges from 10 to 300L CH4/kg. tmax increased with increasing percentage of biodegradable waste (B0) and W. The values of tmax in landfills were higher than those in laboratory experiments or those based on LandGEM's recommended parameters. Enhancing biodegradation conditions in landfill cells has a greater impact on improving k and tmax than increasing B0. Optimizing the B0 and Br0 values of landfilled waste increases L0 and reduces tmax.

  10. Characterizations of mortar-degraded spinney waste composite nominated as solidifying agent for radwastes due to immersion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, H.M., E-mail: hosamsaleh70@yahoo.com [Radioisotope Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Dokki 12311, Giza (Egypt); Eskander, S.B. [Radioisotope Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Dokki 12311, Giza (Egypt)

    2012-11-15

    Immobilization process of radioactive wastes is a compromise between economic and reliability factors. It involves the use of inert and cheap matrices to fix the wastes in homogenous monolithic solid forms. The characteristics of the resulting waste form were studied in various disposal options before coming to the final conclusion concerning the solidification process. A proposed mortar composite is formed from a mixture of Portland cement and sand in the weight ratio of 0.33 which by slurry of degraded spinney waste fibers at the ratio of 0.7 relative to the Portland cement. The composite was prepared at the laboratory ambient conditions (25 {+-} 5 Degree-Sign C). The temperature changes accompanying the hydration process were followed up to 96 h. At the end of 28 days, curing period, the performance of the obtained composite was evaluated under immersion circumstances imitating a flooding scenario that could happen at a disposal site. Compressive strength, porosity and mass changes were investigated under complete static immersion conditions in three different leachants, namely acetic acid, groundwater and seawater for 48 weeks. X-ray and scanning electron microscopy were used to follow and evaluate the changes that may occur for the proposed composite under flooding conditions. Based on the experimental data reached, it could be concluded that the prepared mortar composite can be nominated as a matrix for solidification/stabilization of some radwaste categories, even under the aggressive attacks of various immersion media.

  11. Soil Contamination due to E-Waste Disposal and Recycling Activities: A Review with Special Focus on China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei-Hua; WU Ying-Xin; M. O. SIMONNOT

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a review of soil contamination resulting from e-waste recycling activities,with a special focus on China,where many data have been collected for a decade.Soils in the e-waste areas are often contaminated by heavy metals and organic compounds,mainly polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs),polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs),polychlorinated and polybrominated biphenyls (PCBs and PBBs),dechlorane plus (DP),hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs),polychlorinated and polybrominated dibenzop-dioxins (PCDDs and PBDDs),and polychlorinated and polybrominated dibenzofurans (PCDFs and PBDFs),while other compounds,not systematically monitored,can be found as well Pollutants are generally present in mixtures,so pollution situations are complex and diversified with a gradient of contamination from agricultural soils to hot spots at e-waste sites and mainly in open burning areas.It has been proved that pollutants were transferred to the food chain via rice in China,and that the population was threatened since high levels of various pollutants were detected in blood,placentas,hair,etc.,of residents of e-waste sites.Eventually,soil remediation techniques are reviewed.Although there are many available techniques devoted to heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants,the current techniques for the e-waste sites,where these contaminants coexist,are very sparse.Phytoremediation has been investigated and co-cropping appears as a promising approach for the slightly contaminated agricultural soils.In some cases,different remediation techniques should be combined or trained,while the influence of coexisting contaminants and the removal sequence of contaminants should be considered.In hot spots,physical and chemical techniques should be used to reduce high pollution levels to prevent further pollutant dissemination.This review highlights the urgent needs for 1) characterization of pollution status in all the countries where e-wastes are recycled,2) research on fate and

  12. Process for remediation of plastic waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pol, Vilas G [Westmont, IL; Thiyagarajan, Pappannan [Germantown, MD

    2012-04-10

    A single step process for degrading plastic waste by converting the plastic waste into carbonaceous products via thermal decomposition of the plastic waste by placing the plastic waste into a reactor, heating the plastic waste under an inert or air atmosphere until the temperature of 700.degree. C. is achieved, allowing the reactor to cool down, and recovering the resulting decomposition products therefrom. The decomposition products that this process yields are carbonaceous materials, and more specifically egg-shaped and spherical-shaped solid carbons. Additionally, in the presence of a transition metal compound, this thermal decomposition process produces multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

  13. Assessment of groundwater quality by unsaturated zone study due to migration of leachate from Abloradjei waste disposal site, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbi, Courage Davidson; Akiti, Tetteh Thomas; Osae, Shiloh; Dampare, Samuel Boakye; Abass, Gibrilla; Adomako, Dickson

    2015-06-01

    Leachate generated by open solid waste disposal sites contains substances likely to contaminate groundwater. The impact of potential contaminants migrating from leachate on groundwater can be quantified by monitoring their concentration and soil properties at specific points in the unsaturated zone. In this study, physical and chemical analyses were carried out on leachate, soil and water samples within the vicinity of the municipal solid waste disposal site at Abloradjei, a suburb of Accra, Ghana. The area has seen a massive increase in population and the residents depend on groundwater as the main source of water supply. Results obtained indicate alkaline pH for leachate and acidic conditions for unsaturated zone water. High EC values were recorded for leachate and unsaturated zone water. Major ions (Ca2+, Na+, Mg2+, K+, NO3 -, SO4 2-, Cl-, PO4 3- were analysed in leachate, unsaturated zone water, soil solution and groundwater while trace metals (Al, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb) were analysed in both soil and extracted soil solution. Concentrations of major ions were high in all samples indicating possible anthropogenic origin. Mean % gravel, % sand, % clay, bulk density, volumetric water content and porosity were 28.8, 63.93, 6.6, 1 g cm-3, 35 and 62.7 %, respectively. Distribution of trace elements showed Kd variation of Al > Cu > Fe > Pb > Zn in the order of sequential increasing solubility. It was observed that the quality of groundwater is not suitable for drinking.

  14. Assessment of groundwater quality by unsaturated zone study due to migration of leachate from Abloradjei waste disposal site, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbi, Courage Davidson; Akiti, Tetteh Thomas; Osae, Shiloh; Dampare, Samuel Boakye; Abass, Gibrilla; Adomako, Dickson

    2017-05-01

    Leachate generated by open solid waste disposal sites contains substances likely to contaminate groundwater. The impact of potential contaminants migrating from leachate on groundwater can be quantified by monitoring their concentration and soil properties at specific points in the unsaturated zone. In this study, physical and chemical analyses were carried out on leachate, soil and water samples within the vicinity of the municipal solid waste disposal site at Abloradjei, a suburb of Accra, Ghana. The area has seen a massive increase in population and the residents depend on groundwater as the main source of water supply. Results obtained indicate alkaline pH for leachate and acidic conditions for unsaturated zone water. High EC values were recorded for leachate and unsaturated zone water. Major ions (Ca2+, Na+, Mg2+, K+, NO3 -, SO4 2-, Cl-, PO4 3- were analysed in leachate, unsaturated zone water, soil solution and groundwater while trace metals (Al, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb) were analysed in both soil and extracted soil solution. Concentrations of major ions were high in all samples indicating possible anthropogenic origin. Mean % gravel, % sand, % clay, bulk density, volumetric water content and porosity were 28.8, 63.93, 6.6, 1 g cm-3, 35 and 62.7 %, respectively. Distribution of trace elements showed Kd variation of Al > Cu > Fe > Pb > Zn in the order of sequential increasing solubility. It was observed that the quality of groundwater is not suitable for drinking.

  15. Accumulation of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) at different depths clay and loamy sand textural soils due to tobacco waste application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülser, Coşkun; Yilmaz, Nazli Kutluk; Candemir, Feride

    2008-11-01

    The effects of tobacco waste (TW) application to the soil surface on the accumulation of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in clay and loamy sand textural soils at various depths were investigated in two different fields. The tobacco waste had been found to be infected with TMV. Eighteen months after TW application to the soil surface, soils were sampled at 20 cm intervals through to 80 cm depth. The DAS-ELISA method was performed to determine infection of soil with TMV. The viruses persisted in clay soil for a long period compared with loamy sand soil. There was no accumulation of TMV at any depth of loamy sand soil in Experimental Field 2. TMV adsorption to soil particles in 0-60 cm depth of clay soil was determined in all TW treatments in Experimental Field 1. The highest ELISA Absorbance (A405) values in all treatments were determined in the 20-40 cm soil depth that had the highest clay content. ELISA A405 values of TMV at different depths of clay soil gave significant correlations with clay content (r = 0.793**), EC values (r = 0.421**) and soil pH (r = -0.405**). Adsorption of TMV to net negatively charged clay particle surfaces increased with increasing EC values of soil solution. Decreasing soil pH and infiltration rate increased adsorption of TMV to clay particles. Higher infiltration rate and lower clay content in loamy sand soil caused leaching of TMV from the soil profile.

  16. Investigation of thermal decomposition behavior of hazelnut shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Can Celebi, Mustafa; Karatepe, Nilgun [Istanbul Technical University, Energy Institute (Turkey)], email: mcan.celebi@gmail.com, email: kmnilgun@itu.edu.tr

    2011-07-01

    The energy industry world-wide is faced with the double challenge of huge capacity power plant installations and the global warming threat. These two problems will become more acute in the future due to population growth and demands for better human well-being. A solution for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from power plants is needed. Agricultural bio-wastes include a mass of energy. The most important part of the energy conversion processes is the thermochemical conversion. The kinetic parameters of the fuels utilized depend on the carbonization process and could be used to inform the design of thermochemical conversion equipment. The purpose of this study is to examine the thermal decomposition behavior of hazelnut shells through dynamic thermogravimetry (TG) under N2 atmosphere. Various experiments were performed to investigate the impacts of heating rate and gas flow rate on the thermal decomposition.

  17. Composition decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyson, Mark

    2003-01-01

    This PhD is based on constructing and resolving a set of modular problems. Each problem exists as a separate entity. Each has its own characteristics, yet when combined with other, related problems, provides a dimension to a story. The relationships and order between problems has priority over....... Not only have design tools changed character, but also the processes associated with them. Today, the composition of problems and their decomposition into parcels of information, calls for a new paradigm. This paradigm builds on the networking of agents and specialisations, and the paths of communication...... that are necessary to make sense out of any design situation. The hypothesis of this project, is that Design organisation, communication and CAD-information processes must be jointly reengineered to create the dynamic structures needed for the forward projection of design knowledge into this expanding Design network....

  18. Hyponatremia following mild/moderate subarachnoid hemorrhage is due to SIAD and glucocorticoid deficiency and not cerebral salt wasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, M J; Behan, L A; O'Brien, M M C; Tormey, W; Ball, S G; Javadpour, M; Javadpur, M; Sherlock, M; Thompson, C J

    2014-01-01

    Hyponatremia is common after acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) but the etiology is unclear and there is a paucity of prospective data in the field. The cause of hyponatremia is variously attributed to the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (SIAD), acute glucocorticoid insufficiency, and the cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS). The objective was to prospectively determine the etiology of hyponatremia after SAH using sequential clinical examination and biochemical measurement of plasma cortisol, arginine vasopressin (AVP), and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). This was a prospective cohort study. The setting was the National Neurosurgery Centre in a tertiary referral centre in Dublin, Ireland. One hundred patients with acute nontraumatic aneurysmal SAH were recruited on presentation. Clinical examination and basic biochemical evaluation were performed daily. Plasma cortisol at 0900 hours, AVP, and BNP concentrations were measured on days 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 following SAH. Those with 0900 hours plasma cortisol<300 nmol/L were empirically treated with iv hydrocortisone. Plasma sodium concentration was recorded daily along with a variety of clinical and biochemical criteria. The cause of hyponatremia was determined clinically. Later measurement of plasma AVP and BNP concentrations enabled a firm biochemical diagnosis of the cause of hyponatremia to be made. Forty-nine of 100 developed hyponatremia<135 mmol/L, including 14/100<130 mmol/L. The cause of hyponatremia, and determined by both clinical examination and biochemical hormone measurement, was SIAD in 36/49 (71.4%), acute glucocorticoid insufficiency in 4/49 (8.2%), incorrect iv fluids in 5/49 (10.2%), and hypovolemia in 5/49 (10.2%). There were no cases of CSWS. The most common cause of hyponatremia after acute nontraumatic aneurysmal SAH is SIAD. Acute glucocorticoid insufficiency accounts for a small but significant number of cases. We found no cases of CSWS.

  19. Chemical and ecotoxicological analyses of sediments and elutriates of contaminated rivers due to e-waste recycling activities using a diverse battery of bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, F.; Leung, A.O.W.; Wu, S.C.; Yang, M.S. [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, and Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Wong, M.H., E-mail: mhwong@hkbu.edu.h [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, and Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2009-07-15

    A multi-trophic, multi-exposure phase assessment approach was applied to characterize the toxicity of sediments collected from two rivers in Guiyu, China, an e-waste recycling centre. Elutriate toxicity tests (bacterium Vibrio fischeri and microalga Selenastrum capricornutum) and whole sediment toxicity test (crustacean Heterocypris incongruens) showed that most sediments exhibited acute toxicity, due to elevated heavy metals and PAHs levels, and low pH caused by uncontrolled acid discharge. The survival rates of crustaceans were negatively (p < 0.05) correlated with total PAHs in sediments (411-1755 mg kg{sup -1}); EC50s of V. fischeri on the elutriates were significantly correlated with elutriate pH (p < 0.01). Significant (p < 0.05) correlations between the induction of hepatic metallothionein in tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) and metal concentrations (Cu, Zn, Pb) in sediments were also observed, when fish were fed with diets containing sediment. The results showed that uncontrolled e-waste recycling activities may bring adverse effects to local aquatic ecosystem. - Toxicity tests using different trophic organisms provided important information, supplementing chemical analyses.

  20. Potential Environment and Public Health Risk Due to Contamination of Heavy Metals from Industrial Waste Water in Lam Thao, Phu Tho, Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen C. Vinh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In Vietnam, rice cultivation plays an important role in national economic development and food security. However, rice production is facing many problems associated with rapid industrialization and urbanization in the country. Resultant emissions of solid and liquid wastes are often untreated and discharged directly to agricultural land. These practices have potential impacts on the environment and human health. Approach: The research was carried out within the frame of the collaborative research project “Towards the mitigation of environment and public health risks due to heavy metal contamination in irrigated rice-based systems of Vietnam” in 2006-2010. The study was implemented in the Lam Thao district, Phu Tho province with the aim to assess the effects of wastewater and other contamination sources on the environment and public health. Results: Surface water and soil in the field showed signs of significant contamination by wastewater from the industrial zones. Bio-indicators (DO, COD, BOD5 in the surface water were also strongly affected by waste. Paddy fields around the industrial zones had an elevated risk of heavy metal contamination (Cu, Zn, As, Cd and Pb, with concentrations exceeding Vietnamese Maximum Acceptable Concentrations (MACs for Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb. Soil contamination with heavy metals was resulting in elevated concentrations in rice grain. Where consumption of locally-produced food was high, exposure of individuals to heavy metals could present a public health risk. The partial Hazard Quotient (HQ; a ratio derived from comparing estimated exposure to heavy metals, i.e., Cd, (with toxicologically-derived„ safe’ daily doses for rice and vegetables (water spinach and the integrated Hazard Quotient of rice and vegetables (HQi was consistently greater in areas with soil contamination than in the reference area using Red River water for irrigation. The HQi for Cd was particularly high for children below the

  1. Smoke emissions due to burning of green waste in the Mediterranean area: Influence of fuel moisture content and fuel mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tihay-Felicelli, V.; Santoni, P. A.; Gerandi, G.; Barboni, T.

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate emission characteristics in relation to differences in fuel moisture content (FMC) and initial dry mass. For this purpose, branches and twigs with leaves of Cistus monspeliensis were burned in a Large Scale Heat Release apparatus coupled to a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer. A smoke analysis was conducted and the results highlighted the presence of CO2, H2O, CO, CH4, NO, NO2, NH3, SO2, and non-methane organic compounds (NMOC). CO2, NO, and NO2 species are mainly released during flaming combustion, whereas CO, CH4, NH3, and NMOC are emitted during both flaming and smoldering combustion. The emission of these compounds during flaming combustion is due to a rich fuel to air mixture, leading to incomplete combustion. The fuel moisture content and initial dry mass influence the flame residence time, the duration of smoldering combustion, the combustion efficiency, and the emission factors. By increasing the initial dry mass, the emission factors of NO, NO2, and CO2 decrease, whereas those of CO and CH4 increase. The increase of FMC induces an increase of the emission factors of CO, CH4, NH3, NMOC, and aerosols, and a decrease of those of CO2, NO, and NO2. Increasing fuel moisture content reduces fuel consumption, duration of smoldering, and peak heat release rate, but simultaneously increases the duration of propagation within the packed bed, and the flame residence time. Increasing the initial dry mass, causes all the previous combustion parameters to increase. These findings have implications for modeling biomass burning emissions and impacts.

  2. Decomposition kinetics of dimethyl methylphospate(chemical agent simulant) by supercritical water oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bambang VERIANSYAH; Jae-Duck KIM; Youn-Woo LEE

    2006-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) has been drawing much attention due to effectively destroy a large variety of high-risk wastes resulting from munitions demilitarization and complex industrial chemical. An important design consideration in the development of supercritical water oxidation is the information of decomposition rate. In this paper, the decomposition rate of dimethyl methylphosphonate(DMMP), which is similar to the nerve agent VX and GB(Sarin) in its structure, was investigated under SCWO conditions. The experiments were performed in an isothermal tubular reactor with a H2O2 as an oxidant. The reaction temperatures were ranged from 398 to 633 ℃ at a fixed pressure of 24 MPa. The conversion of DMMP was monitored by analyzing total organic carbon (TOC) on the liquid effluent samples. It is found that the oxidative decomposition of DMMP proceeded rapidly and a high TOC decomposition up to 99.99% was obtained within 11 s at 555℃. On the basis of data derived from experiments, a global kinetic equation for the decomposition of DMMP was developed. The model predictions agreed well with the experimental data.

  3. Stochastic modelling of landfill leachate and biogas production incorporating waste heterogeneity. Model formulation and uncertainty analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharof, A I; Butler, A P

    2004-01-01

    A mathematical model simulating the hydrological and biochemical processes occurring in landfilled waste is presented and demonstrated. The model combines biochemical and hydrological models into an integrated representation of the landfill environment. Waste decomposition is modelled using traditional biochemical waste decomposition pathways combined with a simplified methodology for representing the rate of decomposition. Water flow through the waste is represented using a statistical velocity model capable of representing the effects of waste heterogeneity on leachate flow through the waste. Given the limitations in data capture from landfill sites, significant emphasis is placed on improving parameter identification and reducing parameter requirements. A sensitivity analysis is performed, highlighting the model's response to changes in input variables. A model test run is also presented, demonstrating the model capabilities. A parameter perturbation model sensitivity analysis was also performed. This has been able to show that although the model is sensitive to certain key parameters, its overall intuitive response provides a good basis for making reasonable predictions of the future state of the landfill system. Finally, due to the high uncertainty associated with landfill data, a tool for handling input data uncertainty is incorporated in the model's structure. It is concluded that the model can be used as a reasonable tool for modelling landfill processes and that further work should be undertaken to assess the model's performance.

  4. Composting Organic Kitchen Waste with Worms for Sustainable Kitchen Waste Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehali J. Mehta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available India produces around 3000 million tons of organic waste annually. This huge volume of waste(s comes from agriculture, urban and industrial sources and also from domestic activities. Utilization of this waste material for productivity process is important for both economical and environmental reasons. In the present study an effort has been made to assess the efficacy of E. foetida (red tiger worm in utilizing the kitchen waste material, to analyse the waste decomposition process assessed with earthworm activity.

  5. Thermogravimetric Analysis of Char Waste from the Air Gasification of Empty Fruit Bunch Briquette.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyakuma Bemgba Bevan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The thermal decomposition behavior of char waste produced from the air gasification of Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB briquette was examined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. A comparison between the thermal decomposition behavior of char waste and EFB briquette is also presented. The results indicate that the char waste produced decreased from 22 % to 18 % with increasing temperature from 600 °C to 700 °C during gasification. This is due to the effect of high temperatures on the primary char decomposition reactions. It was observed that char degradation occurs in two steps; char degradation I & II with weight losses of 17 % and 32 % respectively. This showed that only ~ 50 % char was decomposed during thermal analysis, hence higher temperatures are required to ensure complete decomposition. The TGA curve for EFB briquette showed that complete thermal decomposition of EFB briquette occurs in four stages namely; drying, devolatization, reduction and char degradation. The most significant weight loss 2.51 mg or 49.31 % occurred during devolatization.

  6. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chia-lin W.

    1994-01-01

    According to its major aspects and broadly stated, the present invention is a process for treating alkaline waste materials, including high level radioactive wastes, for vitrification. The process involves adjusting the pH of the wastes with nitric acid, adding formic acid (or a process stream containing formic acid) to reduce mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2} to the Mn(II) ion, and mixing with class formers to produce a melter feed. The process minimizes production of hydrogen due to noble metal-catalyzed formic acid decomposition during, treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product. An important feature of the present invention is the use of different acidifying and reducing, agents to treat the wastes. The nitric acid acidifies the wastes to improve yield stress and supplies acid for various reactions; then the formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2}) to the Mn(II) ion. When the pH of the waste is lower, reduction of mercury compounds and MnO{sub 2}) is faster and less formic acid is needed, and the production of hydrogen caused by catalytically-active noble metals is decreased.

  7. Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA) is an unsupervised feature extraction technique similar to PCA that was developed to better distinguish spectral features in...

  8. Multiresolution signal decomposition schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Goutsias (John); H.J.A.M. Heijmans (Henk)

    1998-01-01

    textabstract[PNA-R9810] Interest in multiresolution techniques for signal processing and analysis is increasing steadily. An important instance of such a technique is the so-called pyramid decomposition scheme. This report proposes a general axiomatic pyramid decomposition scheme for signal analysis

  9. Multiresolution signal decomposition schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goutsias, J.; Heijmans, H.J.A.M.

    1998-01-01

    [PNA-R9810] Interest in multiresolution techniques for signal processing and analysis is increasing steadily. An important instance of such a technique is the so-called pyramid decomposition scheme. This report proposes a general axiomatic pyramid decomposition scheme for signal analysis and synthes

  10. Decompositions of manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Daverman, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    Decomposition theory studies decompositions, or partitions, of manifolds into simple pieces, usually cell-like sets. Since its inception in 1929, the subject has become an important tool in geometric topology. The main goal of the book is to help students interested in geometric topology to bridge the gap between entry-level graduate courses and research at the frontier as well as to demonstrate interrelations of decomposition theory with other parts of geometric topology. With numerous exercises and problems, many of them quite challenging, the book continues to be strongly recommended to eve

  11. Thermal decomposition of natural dolomite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Gunasekaran; G Anbalagan

    2007-08-01

    Thermal decomposition behaviour of dolomite sample has been studied by thermogravimetric (TG) measurements. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) curve of dolomite shows two peaks at 777.8°C and 834°C. The two endothermic peaks observed in dolomite are essentially due to decarbonation of dolomite and calcite, respectively. The TG data of the decomposition steps have also been analysed using various differential, difference-differential and integral methods, viz. Freeman–Carroll, Horowitz–Metzger, Coats–Redfern methods. Values of activation entropy, Arrhenius factor, and order of reaction have been approximated and compared. Measured activation energies vary between 97 and 147 kJ mol-1. The large fluctuation in activation energy is attributed to the presence of impurities such as SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, Cl- etc in the samples. FTIR and XRD analyses confirm the decomposition reaction. SEM observation of the heat-treated samples at 950°C shows cluster of grains, indicating the structural transformation.

  12. Life cycle assessment applied to two different municipal solid waste processes; Analisi del ciclo di vita di due diverse possibilita' di smaltimento di rifiuti solidi urbani

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corti, A. [Florence Univ., Florence (Italy). Dipt. di Energetica Sergio Stecco; Sirini, P. [Florence Univ., Florence (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Civile

    2001-12-01

    The application of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology as environmental balance tool is particularly suitable for the study of complex system such as municipal solid waste (MSW) collection, treatment and disposal systems. In this case a detailed analysis is carried out referring to an overall environmental balance based on two different waste treatments: land filling and incineration. The comparison carried out based on the LCA methodology and referring to specific process assumptions allowed to foreground that waste to energy treatments get a net overall balance lower than all the different land filling options, referring also to energy recovery from collected biogas. [Italian] La applicazione di metodologie di bilancio ambientale LCA (Life Cycle Assessment) si adatta particolarmente allo studio disistemi complessi quali quelli di raccolta, trattamento e smaltimento di rifiuti. In questo caso viene affrontata nel dettaglio la valutazione in termini di bilancio complessivo di diverse opzioni di trattamento basate su posa a discarica e trattamento termico. Il confronto effettuato mediante il percorso metodologico seguito, ha permesso di valutare, sulla base delle ipotesi di processi fatte, come il trattamento termico con recupero energetico abbia un bilancio netto ambientale inferiore rispetto a qualsiasi opzione di posa a discarica, anche dotata di recupero energetico dal biogas.

  13. Dominant modal decomposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombovari, Zoltan

    2017-03-01

    The paper deals with the automatic decomposition of experimental frequency response functions (FRF's) of mechanical structures. The decomposition of FRF's is based on the Green function representation of free vibratory systems. After the determination of the impulse dynamic subspace, the system matrix is formulated and the poles are calculated directly. By means of the corresponding eigenvectors, the contribution of each element of the impulse dynamic subspace is determined and the sufficient decomposition of the corresponding FRF is carried out. With the presented dominant modal decomposition (DMD) method, the mode shapes, the modal participation vectors and the modal scaling factors are identified using the decomposed FRF's. Analytical example is presented along with experimental case studies taken from machine tool industry.

  14. Litter Decomposition Rates, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set contains decomposition rates for litter of Salicornia pacifica, Distichlis spicata, and Deschampsia cespitosa buried at 7 tidal marsh sites in 2015....

  15. Spectral proper orthogonal decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Sieber, Moritz; Paschereit, Christian Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The identification of coherent structures from experimental or numerical data is an essential task when conducting research in fluid dynamics. This typically involves the construction of an empirical mode base that appropriately captures the dominant flow structures. The most prominent candidates are the energy-ranked proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and the frequency ranked Fourier decomposition and dynamic mode decomposition (DMD). However, these methods fail when the relevant coherent structures occur at low energies or at multiple frequencies, which is often the case. To overcome the deficit of these "rigid" approaches, we propose a new method termed Spectral Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (SPOD). It is based on classical POD and it can be applied to spatially and temporally resolved data. The new method involves an additional temporal constraint that enables a clear separation of phenomena that occur at multiple frequencies and energies. SPOD allows for a continuous shifting from the energetically ...

  16. Decomposition of Polynomials

    CERN Document Server

    Blankertz, Raoul

    2011-01-01

    This diploma thesis is concerned with functional decomposition $f = g \\circ h$ of polynomials. First an algorithm is described which computes decompositions in polynomial time. This algorithm was originally proposed by Zippel (1991). A bound for the number of minimal collisions is derived. Finally a proof of a conjecture in von zur Gathen, Giesbrecht & Ziegler (2010) is given, which states a classification for a special class of decomposable polynomials.

  17. Chemical recycle of plastics waste; Hai purasuchikku no kemikaru risaikuru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, A. [Sumitomo Chemical Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    Chemical recycling of the wasted plastics contains from regeneration to monomer as a constructing component in the case of single element polymer to conversion to fuel oil through thermal decomposition of the mixed wasted plastics and application to chemical raw material. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) decomposes to methylmethacrylate (MMA) monomer with high selection rate at max temperature of 400{+-}50degC. The Mitsubishi Rayon Co., Ltd. Signed a cooperative development contract on the recycling technique of PMMA The ICI., Ltd., Great Britain. Depolymerization technique of Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is already used actually on methanolysis with Coca-Cola Corp. (Hoechst-Celanese Corp.) and glycolysis with Pepsi-Cola Corp. (Goodyear Inc.). The chemical recycle due to thermal decomposition of the mixed wasted plastics is established as a technique of gasification of the mixed wasted plastics to generate methanol in Japan by the Mitsubishi Heavy Ind., Ltd., and is operated in a pilot plant of 2 ton/day. Here was summarized on these trends in and out of Japan. 29 refs., 5 figs., 4 tab.

  18. Aridity and decomposition processes in complex landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossola, Alessandro; Nyman, Petter

    2015-04-01

    Decomposition of organic matter is a key biogeochemical process contributing to nutrient cycles, carbon fluxes and soil development. The activity of decomposers depends on microclimate, with temperature and rainfall being major drivers. In complex terrain the fine-scale variation in microclimate (and hence water availability) as a result of slope orientation is caused by differences in incoming radiation and surface temperature. Aridity, measured as the long-term balance between net radiation and rainfall, is a metric that can be used to represent variations in water availability within the landscape. Since aridity metrics can be obtained at fine spatial scales, they could theoretically be used to investigate how decomposition processes vary across complex landscapes. In this study, four research sites were selected in tall open sclerophyll forest along a aridity gradient (Budyko dryness index ranging from 1.56 -2.22) where microclimate, litter moisture and soil moisture were monitored continuously for one year. Litter bags were packed to estimate decomposition rates (k) using leaves of a tree species not present in the study area (Eucalyptus globulus) in order to avoid home-field advantage effects. Litter mass loss was measured to assess the activity of macro-decomposers (6mm litter bag mesh size), meso-decomposers (1 mm mesh), microbes above-ground (0.2 mm mesh) and microbes below-ground (2 cm depth, 0.2 mm mesh). Four replicates for each set of bags were installed at each site and bags were collected at 1, 2, 4, 7 and 12 months since installation. We first tested whether differences in microclimate due to slope orientation have significant effects on decomposition processes. Then the dryness index was related to decomposition rates to evaluate if small-scale variation in decomposition can be predicted using readily available information on rainfall and radiation. Decomposition rates (k), calculated fitting single pool negative exponential models, generally

  19. Decomposing Nekrasov Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Morozov, A

    2015-01-01

    AGT relations imply that the four-point conformal block admits a decomposition into a sum over pairs of Young diagrams of essentially rational Nekrasov functions - this is immediately seen when conformal block is represented in the form of a matrix model. However, the q-deformation of the same block has a deeper decomposition - into a sum over a quadruple of Young diagrams of a product of four topological vertices. We analyze the interplay between these two decompositions, their properties and their generalization to multi-point conformal blocks. In the latter case we explain how Dotsenko-Fateev all-with-all (star) pair "interaction" is reduced to the quiver model nearest-neighbor (chain) one. We give new identities for q-Selberg averages of pairs of generalized Macdonald polynomials. We also translate the slicing invariance of refined topological strings into the language of conformal blocks and interpret it as abelianization of generalized Macdonald polynomials.

  20. Decomposing Nekrasov decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, A.; Zenkevich, Y.

    2016-02-01

    AGT relations imply that the four-point conformal block admits a decomposition into a sum over pairs of Young diagrams of essentially rational Nekrasov functions — this is immediately seen when conformal block is represented in the form of a matrix model. However, the q-deformation of the same block has a deeper decomposition — into a sum over a quadruple of Young diagrams of a product of four topological vertices. We analyze the interplay between these two decompositions, their properties and their generalization to multi-point conformal blocks. In the latter case we explain how Dotsenko-Fateev all-with-all (star) pair "interaction" is reduced to the quiver model nearest-neighbor (chain) one. We give new identities for q-Selberg averages of pairs of generalized Macdonald polynomials. We also translate the slicing invariance of refined topological strings into the language of conformal blocks and interpret it as abelianization of generalized Macdonald polynomials.

  1. Symmetric tensor decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Brachat, Jerome; Mourrain, Bernard; Tsigaridas, Elias

    2009-01-01

    We present an algorithm for decomposing a symmetric tensor, of dimension n and order d as a sum of rank-1 symmetric tensors, extending the algorithm of Sylvester devised in 1886 for binary forms. We recall the correspondence between the decomposition of a homogeneous polynomial in n variables of total degree d as a sum of powers of linear forms (Waring's problem), incidence properties on secant varieties of the Veronese Variety and the representation of linear forms as a linear combination of evaluations at distinct points. Then we reformulate Sylvester's approach from the dual point of view. Exploiting this duality, we propose necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of such a decomposition of a given rank, using the properties of Hankel (and quasi-Hankel) matrices, derived from multivariate polynomials and normal form computations. This leads to the resolution of polynomial equations of small degree in non-generic cases. We propose a new algorithm for symmetric tensor decomposition, based on th...

  2. Mueller matrix differential decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Quijano, Noé; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2011-05-15

    We present a Mueller matrix decomposition based on the differential formulation of the Mueller calculus. The differential Mueller matrix is obtained from the macroscopic matrix through an eigenanalysis. It is subsequently resolved into the complete set of 16 differential matrices that correspond to the basic types of optical behavior for depolarizing anisotropic media. The method is successfully applied to the polarimetric analysis of several samples. The differential parameters enable one to perform an exhaustive characterization of anisotropy and depolarization. This decomposition is particularly appropriate for studying media in which several polarization effects take place simultaneously. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  3. Decomposition of residue currents

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Mats; Wulcan, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    Given a submodule $J\\subset \\mathcal O_0^{\\oplus r}$ and a free resolution of $J$ one can define a certain vector valued residue current whose annihilator is $J$. We make a decomposition of the current with respect to Ass$(J)$ that correspond to a primary decomposition of $J$. As a tool we introduce a class of currents that includes usual residue and principal value currents; in particular these currents admit a certain type of restriction to analytic varieties and more generally to construct...

  4. CFD SIMULATION FOR DEMILITARIZATION OF RDX IN A ROTARY KILN BY THERMAL DECOMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SI H. LEE

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Demilitarization requires the recovery and disposal of obsolete ammunition and explosives. Since open burning/detonation of hazardous waste has caused serious environmental and safety problems, thermal decomposition has emerged as one of the most feasible methods. RDX is widely used as a military explosive due to its high melting temperature and detonation power. In this work, the feasible conditions under which explosives can be safely incinerated have been investigated via a rotary kiln simulation. To solve this problem, phase change along with the reactions of RDX has been incisively analyzed. A global reaction mechanism consisting of condensed phase and gas phase reactions are used in Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation. User Defined Functions in FLUENT is utilized in this study to inculcate the reactions and phase change into the simulation. The results divulge the effect of temperature and the varying amounts of gas produced in the rotary kiln during the thermal decomposition of RDX. The result leads to the prospect of demilitarizing waste explosives to avoid the possibility of detonation.

  5. Impact of leachate on groundwater pollution due to non-engineered municipal solid waste landfill sites of erode city, Tamil Nadu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar Nagarajan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Leachate and groundwater samples were collected from Vendipalayam, Semur and Vairapalayam landfill sites in Erode city, Tamil Nadu, India, to study the possible impact of leachate percolation on groundwater quality.Concentrations of various physicochemical parameters including heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, Fe and Znwere determined in leachate samples and are reported. The concentrations of Cl-, NO3 - , SO4 2-, NH4 + were found to be in considerable levels in the groundwater samples particularly near to the landfill sites, likely indicating thatgroundwater quality is being significantly affected by leachate percolation. Further they were proved to be the tracers for groundwater contamination near Semur and Vendipalayam dumpyards. The presence of contaminants in groundwater particularly near the landfill sites warns its quality and thus renders the associated aquifer unreliable for domestic water supply and other uses. Although some remedial measures are suggested to reduce furthergroundwater contamination via leachate percolation, the present study demands for the proper management of waste in Erode city.

  6. Impact of leachate on groundwater pollution due to non-engineered municipal solid waste landfill sites of erode city, Tamil Nadu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarajan Rajkumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Leachate and groundwater samples were collected from Vendipalayam, Semur and Vairapalayam landfill sites in Erode city, Tamil Nadu, India, to study the possible impact of leachate percolation on groundwater quality. Concentrations of various physicochemical parameters including heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, Fe and Zn were determined in leachate samples and are reported. The concentrations of Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, NH4+ were found to be in considerable levels in the groundwater samples particularly near to the landfill sites, likely indicating that groundwater quality is being significantly affected by leachate percolation. Further they were proved to be the tracers for groundwater contamination near Semur and Vendipalayam dumpyards. The presence of contaminants in groundwater particularly near the landfill sites warns its quality and thus renders the associated aquifer unreliable for domestic water supply and other uses. Although some remedial measures are suggested to reduce further groundwater contamination via leachate percolation, the present study demands for the proper management of waste in Erode city.

  7. Thermal Decomposition Behavior of Poly(3-nitratooxetane)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Brian; Cruz, Aliza; Stoltz, Chad

    2009-06-01

    Poly(3-nitratooxetane), or PNO, is a new high-energy density polymer that is expected to increase formulation energy output without sacrificing binder stability. It is anticipated that using PNO in propellant formulations will be advantageous compared to other energetic binders such as its structural isomer poly(glycidyl nitrate) (PGN). In an effort to understand the combustion behavior of this new energetic polymer, thermal decomposition of PNO has been investigated. Differential scanning calorimetry coupled with thermal gravimetric analysis shows that this material is thermally stable to at least 150^oC and that exothermic decomposition peaks near 203^oC. T- Jump/FTIR was used under various conditions to identify gas- phase thermal decomposition products, including H2O, CH2O, CO2, CO, N2O, NO, NO2, and HONO (cis and trans). Additional time- resolved T-Jump/FTIR experiments suggest immediate dissociation of NO2 as the obvious first step in PNO decomposition, while previous work on the PGN polymer system suggests that the entire CH2ONO2 side chain breaks from the PGN backbone before dissociation. It is likely that different decomposition pathways are followed for each binder system due to location of available C-O and N-O moieties on each polymer.

  8. Numerical analysis of thermal decomposition for RDX, TNT, and Composition B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Shin Hyuk; Nyande, Baggie W. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Hanbat National University, 125 Dongseo-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoun Soo; Park, Jung Su [Agency for Defence Development, 462 Jochiwon-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-150 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Woo Jin [Hanwha corporation, 117 Yeosusandan 3-ro, Yeosu-si, Jeollanam-do (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Min, E-mail: minoh@hanbat.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Hanbat National University, 125 Dongseo-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-05

    Highlights: • Reaction mechanism of thermal decomposition of military explosives is investigated. • Mathematical modeling of thermal decomposition are executed. • Commercial scale reactor is employed for demilitarization of waste explosives. • Dynamic response of thermal decomposition is examined in a reactor. - Abstract: Demilitarization of waste explosives on a commercial scale has become an important issue in many countries, and this has created a need for research in this area. TNT, RDX and Composition B have been used as military explosives, and they are very sensitive to thermal shock. For the safe waste treatment of these high-energy and highly sensitive explosives, the most plausible candidate suggested has been thermal decomposition in a rotary kiln. This research examines the safe treatment of waste TNT, RDX and Composition B in a rotary kiln type incinerator with regard to suitable operating conditions. Thermal decomposition in this study includes melting, 3 condensed phase reactions in the liquid phase and 263 gas phase reactions. Rigorous mathematical modeling and dynamic simulation for thermal decomposition were carried out for analysis of dynamic behavior in the reactor. The results showed time transient changes of the temperature, components and mass of the explosives and comparisons were made for the 3 explosives. It was concluded that waste explosives subject to heat supplied by hot air at 523.15 K were incinerated safely without any thermal detonation.

  9. Waste-to-energy: Dehalogenation of plastic-containing wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yafei; Zhao, Rong; Wang, Junfeng; Chen, Xingming; Ge, Xinlei; Chen, Mindong

    2016-03-01

    The dehalogenation measurements could be carried out with the decomposition of plastic wastes simultaneously or successively. This paper reviewed the progresses in dehalogenation followed by thermochemical conversion of plastic-containing wastes for clean energy production. The pre-treatment method of MCT or HTT can eliminate the halogen in plastic wastes. The additives such as alkali-based metal oxides (e.g., CaO, NaOH), iron powders and minerals (e.g., quartz) can work as reaction mediums and accelerators with the objective of enhancing the mechanochemical reaction. The dehalogenation of waste plastics could be achieved by co-grinding with sustainable additives such as bio-wastes (e.g., rice husk), recyclable minerals (e.g., red mud) via MCT for solid fuels production. Interestingly, the solid fuel properties (e.g., particle size) could be significantly improved by HTT in addition with lignocellulosic biomass. Furthermore, the halogenated compounds in downstream thermal process could be eliminated by using catalysts and adsorbents. Most dehalogenation of plastic wastes primarily focuses on the transformation of organic halogen into inorganic halogen in terms of halogen hydrides or salts. The integrated process of MCT or HTT with the catalytic thermal decomposition is a promising way for clean energy production. The low-cost additives (e.g., red mud) used in the pre-treatment by MCT or HTT lead to a considerable synergistic effects including catalytic effect contributing to the follow-up thermal decomposition.

  10. Tree decompositions with small cost

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodlaender, H.L.; Fomin, F.V.

    2002-01-01

    The f-cost of a tree decomposition ({Xi | i e I}, T = (I;F)) for a function f : N -> R+ is defined as EieI f(|Xi|). This measure associates with the running time or memory use of some algorithms that use the tree decomposition. In this paper we investigate the problem to find tree decompositions

  11. ADVANCED OXIDATION: OXALATE DECOMPOSITION TESTING WITH OZONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2012-02-29

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), oxalic acid is currently considered the preferred agent for chemically cleaning the large underground Liquid Radioactive Waste Tanks. It is applied only in the final stages of emptying a tank when generally less than 5,000 kg of waste solids remain, and slurrying based removal methods are no-longer effective. The use of oxalic acid is preferred because of its combined dissolution and chelating properties, as well as the fact that corrosion to the carbon steel tank walls can be controlled. Although oxalic acid is the preferred agent, there are significant potential downstream impacts. Impacts include: (1) Degraded evaporator operation; (2) Resultant oxalate precipitates taking away critically needed operating volume; and (3) Eventual creation of significant volumes of additional feed to salt processing. As an alternative to dealing with the downstream impacts, oxalate decomposition using variations of ozone based Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) were investigated. In general AOPs use ozone or peroxide and a catalyst to create hydroxyl radicals. Hydroxyl radicals have among the highest oxidation potentials, and are commonly used to decompose organics. Although oxalate is considered among the most difficult organic to decompose, the ability of hydroxyl radicals to decompose oxalate is considered to be well demonstrated. In addition, as AOPs are considered to be 'green' their use enables any net chemical additions to the waste to be minimized. In order to test the ability to decompose the oxalate and determine the decomposition rates, a test rig was designed, where 10 vol% ozone would be educted into a spent oxalic acid decomposition loop, with the loop maintained at 70 C and recirculated at 40L/min. Each of the spent oxalic acid streams would be created from three oxalic acid strikes of an F-area simulant (i.e., Purex = high Fe/Al concentration) and H-area simulant (i.e., H area modified Purex = high Al/Fe concentration

  12. High temperature phase decomposition in TixZryAlzN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Lind

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Through a combination of theoretical and experimental observations we study the high temperature decomposition behavior of c-(TixZryAlzN alloys. We show that for most concentrations the high formation energy of (ZrAlN causes a strong tendency for spinodal decomposition between ZrN and AlN while other decompositions tendencies are suppressed. In addition we observe that entropic effects due to configurational disorder favor a formation of a stable Zr-rich (TiZrN phase with increasing temperature. Our calculations also predict that at high temperatures a Zr rich (TiZrAlN disordered phase should become more resistant against the spinodal decomposition despite its high and positive formation energy due to the specific topology of the free energy surface at the relevant concentrations. Our experimental observations confirm this prediction by showing strong tendency towards decomposition in a Zr-poor sample while a Zr-rich alloy shows a greatly reduced decomposition rate, which is mostly attributable to binodal decomposition processes. This result highlights the importance of considering the second derivative of the free energy, in addition to its absolute value in predicting decomposition trends of thermodynamically unstable alloys.

  13. Influence of heat transfer on walls due to aerosol decomposition rate in the containment building of nuclear power plants during heavy incidents; Einfluss des Waermeuebergangs an Waenden auf die Aerosolabbaurate im Sicherheitsbehaelter von Kernkraftwerken bei schweren Stoerfaellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, T.

    2004-07-01

    Today, German nuclear power plants are leading in safety standards worldwide. Increasing potentials arise continuously along with improvements in technology. One of these potentials is the best-estimate simulation of fission product transport in case of a severe accident. A main part of the fission products is allocated on aerosols. Therefore, the aerosol behavior before containment leakage is important for the radioactive source term to the environment. Having a good knowledge about the main aerosol phenomena, it is possible to simulate them numerically. This enables to develop and test safety measures to limit damages before accidents occur. Within this study, the main aerosol phenomena have been ascertained and accordingly classified into formation, transport and reduction. On this basis, simulations of one- and multi-component aerosol experiments of the KAEVER series have been performed with the COCOSYS code. Due to an overprediction of the computed volume condensation rate, the results showed an overestimation of the reduction rate of insoluble aerosols. The reason was found to be the underestimation of the wall condensation rate. Based on an additional plain thermal hydraulic multi compartment experiment, these uncertainties in the wall heat transfer correlations were investigated in detail. The results show a strong dependency between the wall condensation rate and the convective heat transfer, resp. the characteristic length. In case of mainly forced convection, correct values for the characteristic length led to an underestimation of the calculated heat transfer coefficients. The analysis of the heat transfer models show an inconsistency in the coupling of free and forced convection. Therefore, an improved and consistent convection model has been developed and implemented. Both models have been tested on different experiments. Although the new model shows only minor improvements, it could be proven that the influence for forced convection is significant

  14. Decomposition of semigroup algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Boehm, Janko; Nitsche, Max Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Let A \\subseteq B be cancellative abelian semigroups, and let R be an integral domain. We show that the semigroup ring R[B] can be decomposed, as an R[A]-module, into a direct sum of R[A]-submodules of the quotient ring of R[A]. In the case of a finite extension of positive affine semigroup rings we obtain an algorithm computing the decomposition. When R[A] is a polynomial ring over a field we explain how to compute many ring-theoretic properties of R[B] in terms of this decomposition. In particular we obtain a fast algorithm to compute the Castelnuovo-Mumford regularity of homogeneous semigroup rings. As an application we confirm the Eisenbud-Goto conjecture in a range of new cases. Our algorithms are implemented in the Macaulay2 package MonomialAlgebras.

  15. Treatment for hydrazine-containing waste water solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yade, N.

    1986-01-01

    The treatment for waste solutions containing hydrazine is presented. The invention attempts oxidation and decomposition of hydrazine in waste water in a simple and effective processing. The method adds activated charcoal to waste solutions containing hydrazine while maintaining a pH value higher than 8, and adding iron salts if necessary. Then, the solution is aerated.

  16. Waste Generation in Denmark 1994-2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Louise Lykke; Bentzen, Jan Børsen

    In recent years the amount of waste generated by Danish firms has increased significantly. In the present analysis we use the decomposition analysis, which has been widely used in the energy economics literature to explain the mechanisms influencing energy consumption and CO2 emissions....... In this paper the methodology is transferred to the topic of waste generation and is used to analyse why the amount of business waste is increasing. The empirical application is related to data for the volumes of waste generated in the Danish economy for the main sectors as well as the manufacturing sector...... covering the time span 1994-2005 has been included. By means of the Log-Mean Divisia Index Method (LMDI) an algebraic decomposition of the data for the waste amounts generated is performed. This methodology separates the increases in waste amounts into effects related to economic activity, industrial...

  17. Fast approximate convex decomposition using relative concavity

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Mukulika

    2013-02-01

    Approximate convex decomposition (ACD) is a technique that partitions an input object into approximately convex components. Decomposition into approximately convex pieces is both more efficient to compute than exact convex decomposition and can also generate a more manageable number of components. It can be used as a basis of divide-and-conquer algorithms for applications such as collision detection, skeleton extraction and mesh generation. In this paper, we propose a new method called Fast Approximate Convex Decomposition (FACD) that improves the quality of the decomposition and reduces the cost of computing it for both 2D and 3D models. In particular, we propose a new strategy for evaluating potential cuts that aims to reduce the relative concavity, rather than absolute concavity. As shown in our results, this leads to more natural and smaller decompositions that include components for small but important features such as toes or fingers while not decomposing larger components, such as the torso, that may have concavities due to surface texture. Second, instead of decomposing a component into two pieces at each step, as in the original ACD, we propose a new strategy that uses a dynamic programming approach to select a set of n c non-crossing (independent) cuts that can be simultaneously applied to decompose the component into n c+1 components. This reduces the depth of recursion and, together with a more efficient method for computing the concavity measure, leads to significant gains in efficiency. We provide comparative results for 2D and 3D models illustrating the improvements obtained by FACD over ACD and we compare with the segmentation methods in the Princeton Shape Benchmark by Chen et al. (2009) [31]. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Adaptive Integrand Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Mastrolia, Pierpaolo; Primo, Amedeo; Bobadilla, William J Torres

    2016-01-01

    We present a simplified variant of the integrand reduction algorithm for multiloop scattering amplitudes in $d = 4 - 2\\epsilon$ dimensions, which exploits the decomposition of the integration momenta in parallel and orthogonal subspaces, $d=d_\\parallel+d_\\perp$, where $d_\\parallel$ is the dimension of the space spanned by the legs of the diagrams. We discuss the advantages of a lighter polynomial division algorithm and how the orthogonality relations for Gegenbauer polynomilas can be suitably used for carrying out the integration of the irreducible monomials, which eliminates spurious integrals. Applications to one- and two-loop integrals, for arbitrary kinematics, are discussed.

  19. Clustering via Kernel Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Anna Szynkowiak; Girolami, Mark A.; Larsen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Methods for spectral clustering have been proposed recently which rely on the eigenvalue decomposition of an affinity matrix. In this work it is proposed that the affinity matrix is created based on the elements of a non-parametric density estimator. This matrix is then decomposed to obtain...... posterior probabilities of class membership using an appropriate form of nonnegative matrix factorization. The troublesome selection of hyperparameters such as kernel width and number of clusters can be obtained using standard cross-validation methods as is demonstrated on a number of diverse data sets....

  20. Symmetric Tensor Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brachat, Jerome; Comon, Pierre; Mourrain, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    of polynomial equations of small degree in non-generic cases. We propose a new algorithm for symmetric tensor decomposition, based on this characterization and on linear algebra computations with Hankel matrices. The impact of this contribution is two-fold. First it permits an efficient computation...... of total degree d as a sum of powers of linear forms (Waring’s problem), incidence properties on secant varieties of the Veronese variety and the representation of linear forms as a linear combination of evaluations at distinct points. Then we reformulate Sylvester’s approach from the dual point of view...

  1. Mode decomposition evolution equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Guo-Wei; Yang, Siyang

    2012-03-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE) based methods have become some of the most powerful tools for exploring the fundamental problems in signal processing, image processing, computer vision, machine vision and artificial intelligence in the past two decades. The advantages of PDE based approaches are that they can be made fully automatic, robust for the analysis of images, videos and high dimensional data. A fundamental question is whether one can use PDEs to perform all the basic tasks in the image processing. If one can devise PDEs to perform full-scale mode decomposition for signals and images, the modes thus generated would be very useful for secondary processing to meet the needs in various types of signal and image processing. Despite of great progress in PDE based image analysis in the past two decades, the basic roles of PDEs in image/signal analysis are only limited to PDE based low-pass filters, and their applications to noise removal, edge detection, segmentation, etc. At present, it is not clear how to construct PDE based methods for full-scale mode decomposition. The above-mentioned limitation of most current PDE based image/signal processing methods is addressed in the proposed work, in which we introduce a family of mode decomposition evolution equations (MoDEEs) for a vast variety of applications. The MoDEEs are constructed as an extension of a PDE based high-pass filter (Europhys. Lett., 59(6): 814, 2002) by using arbitrarily high order PDE based low-pass filters introduced by Wei (IEEE Signal Process. Lett., 6(7): 165, 1999). The use of arbitrarily high order PDEs is essential to the frequency localization in the mode decomposition. Similar to the wavelet transform, the present MoDEEs have a controllable time-frequency localization and allow a perfect reconstruction of the original function. Therefore, the MoDEE operation is also called a PDE transform. However, modes generated from the present approach are in the spatial or time domain and can be

  2. Hydrogen peroxide catalytic decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide in a gaseous stream is converted to nitrogen dioxide using oxidizing species generated through the use of concentrated hydrogen peroxide fed as a monopropellant into a catalyzed thruster assembly. The hydrogen peroxide is preferably stored at stable concentration levels, i.e., approximately 50%-70% by volume, and may be increased in concentration in a continuous process preceding decomposition in the thruster assembly. The exhaust of the thruster assembly, rich in hydroxyl and/or hydroperoxy radicals, may be fed into a stream containing oxidizable components, such as nitric oxide, to facilitate their oxidation.

  3. Spectral Tensor-Train Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigoni, Daniele; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Marzouk, Youssef M.

    2016-01-01

    The accurate approximation of high-dimensional functions is an essential task in uncertainty quantification and many other fields. We propose a new function approximation scheme based on a spectral extension of the tensor-train (TT) decomposition. We first define a functional version of the TT.......e., the “cores”) comprising the functional TT decomposition. This result motivates an approximation scheme employing polynomial approximations of the cores. For functions with appropriate regularity, the resulting spectral tensor-train decomposition combines the favorable dimension-scaling of the TT...... decomposition with the spectral convergence rate of polynomial approximations, yielding efficient and accurate surrogates for high-dimensional functions. To construct these decompositions, we use the sampling algorithm \\tt TT-DMRG-cross to obtain the TT decomposition of tensors resulting from suitable...

  4. MACH: Fast Randomized Tensor Decompositions

    CERN Document Server

    Tsourakakis, Charalampos E

    2009-01-01

    Tensors naturally model many real world processes which generate multi-aspect data. Such processes appear in many different research disciplines, e.g, chemometrics, computer vision, psychometrics and neuroimaging analysis. Tensor decompositions such as the Tucker decomposition are used to analyze multi-aspect data and extract latent factors, which capture the multilinear data structure. Such decompositions are powerful mining tools, for extracting patterns from large data volumes. However, most frequently used algorithms for such decompositions involve the computationally expensive Singular Value Decomposition. In this paper we propose MACH, a new sampling algorithm to compute such decompositions. Our method is of significant practical value for tensor streams, such as environmental monitoring systems, IP traffic matrices over time, where large amounts of data are accumulated and the analysis is computationally intensive but also in "post-mortem" data analysis cases where the tensor does not fit in the availa...

  5. Waste Sites - Municipal Waste Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — A Municipal Waste Operation is a DEP primary facility type related to the Waste Management Municipal Waste Program. The sub-facility types related to Municipal Waste...

  6. About decomposition approach for solving the classification problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianova, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    This article describes the features of the application of an algorithm with using of decomposition methods for solving the binary classification problem of constructing a linear classifier based on Support Vector Machine method. Application of decomposition reduces the volume of calculations, in particular, due to the emerging possibilities to build parallel versions of the algorithm, which is a very important advantage for the solution of problems with big data. The analysis of the results of computational experiments conducted using the decomposition approach. The experiment use known data set for binary classification problem.

  7. Modeling N2O Reduction and Decomposition in a Circulating Fluidized bed Boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Åmand, Lars-Erik; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1996-01-01

    in the combustion chamber and the cyclone was calculated taking three mechanisms into account: Reduction by char, catalytic decomposition over bed material and thermal decomposition. The calculated destruction rate was in good agreement with the measured destruction of N2O injected at different levels in the boiler...... decomposition over bed material, and homogeneous thermal decomposition was negligible. However, at higher levels in the combustor the solids concentration is lower: at the top 60% of the N2O destruction was due to thermal decomposition and in the cyclone heterogeneous destruction of N2O was insignificant...

  8. The food waste hierarchy as a framework for the management of food surplus and food waste

    OpenAIRE

    Papargyropoulou, E; Lozano, R.; Steinberger, JK; Wright, N; Ujang, ZB

    2014-01-01

    The unprecedented scale of food waste in global food supply chains is attracting increasing attention due to its environmental, social and economic impacts. Drawing on interviews with food waste specialists, this study construes the boundaries between food surplus and food waste, avoidable and unavoidable food waste, and between waste prevention and waste management. This study suggests that the first step towards a more sustainable resolution of the food waste issue is to adopt a sustainable...

  9. Estudo da decomposição de plantas aquáticas em função das quantidades depositadas, da umidade e do tipo de disposição no solo Study on aquatic plant decomposition due to amount deposited, moisture and type of placement in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.D. Velini

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Um estudo foi realizado com a finalidade de avaliar a decomposição da biomassa de plantas aquáticas, incorporadas ou não ao solo, provenientes do controle mecânico, no reservatório da UHE Americana. O ensaio foi realizado em casa de vegetação, localizada no Núcleo de Pesquisas Avançadas em Matologia (NUPAM da FCA/Unesp-Botucatu. A avaliação foi conduzida em vasos contendo 14 kg de solo, simulando descartes de 50, 100, 150 e 200 t MF de plantas ha-1 e avaliando o processo de decomposição através da liberação de CO2, divididos em duas etapas: a primeira em solo seco e, a segunda, na seqüência, com o solo úmido. A quantificação do CO2 liberado foi realizada através de titulação de solução adicionada ao processo de incubação de 24 horas dos vasos. Os dados foram interpolados e analisados seguindo modelo de Mitscherlich, com algumas modificações. Na primeira etapa, foi observada uma rápida liberação de CO2 até o décimo dia, seguida de estabilização. O maior teor de CO2 liberado foi observado no tratamento com descarte de 200 t MF ha-1 incorporado ao solo. Os dados avaliados durante a segunda fase do ensaio representaram uma maior linearidade no processo de liberação de CO2, indicando um período mais longo do processo de degradação da biomassa descartada.A study was carried out to evaluate biomass decomposition of aquatic macrophytes incorporated or not into soil, due to mechanical control, at the Americana/SP UHE Reservoir. Analysis was performed in a greenhouse at the Weed Science Research Center (NUPAM, UNESP, Botucatu. Plastic vases containing 24 kg of soil were assessed by simulating discards of 50, 100, 150 and 200 t of fresh matter ha-1.The decomposition process was evaluated by CO2 release, divided into two stages: dry soil and wet soil. Quantification of released CO2 was performed through titration of solution added to vase incubation. Data were interpolated and analyzed by Mitscherlich model with

  10. Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Lindner, Robert R; Murray, Claire E; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian L; Heiles, Carl; Hennebelle, Patrick; Goss, W M; Dickey, John

    2014-01-01

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21cm absorption spectra from the 21cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the HI line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the up...

  11. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  12. Differentially Private Spatial Decompositions

    CERN Document Server

    Cormode, Graham; Shen, Entong; Srivastava, Divesh; Yu, Ting

    2011-01-01

    Differential privacy has recently emerged as the de facto standard for private data release. This makes it possible to provide strong theoretical guarantees on the privacy and utility of released data. While it is well-known how to release data based on counts and simple functions under this guarantee, it remains to provide general purpose techniques to release different kinds of data. In this paper, we focus on spatial data such as locations and more generally any data that can be indexed by a tree structure. Directly applying existing differential privacy methods to this type of data simply generates noise. Instead, we introduce a new class of "private spatial decompositions": these adapt standard spatial indexing methods such as quadtrees and kd-trees to provide a private description of the data distribution. Equipping such structures with differential privacy requires several steps to ensure that they provide meaningful privacy guarantees. Various primitives, such as choosing splitting points and describi...

  13. Bregmanized Domain Decomposition for Image Restoration

    KAUST Repository

    Langer, Andreas

    2012-05-22

    Computational problems of large-scale data are gaining attention recently due to better hardware and hence, higher dimensionality of images and data sets acquired in applications. In the last couple of years non-smooth minimization problems such as total variation minimization became increasingly important for the solution of these tasks. While being favorable due to the improved enhancement of images compared to smooth imaging approaches, non-smooth minimization problems typically scale badly with the dimension of the data. Hence, for large imaging problems solved by total variation minimization domain decomposition algorithms have been proposed, aiming to split one large problem into N > 1 smaller problems which can be solved on parallel CPUs. The N subproblems constitute constrained minimization problems, where the constraint enforces the support of the minimizer to be the respective subdomain. In this paper we discuss a fast computational algorithm to solve domain decomposition for total variation minimization. In particular, we accelerate the computation of the subproblems by nested Bregman iterations. We propose a Bregmanized Operator Splitting-Split Bregman (BOS-SB) algorithm, which enforces the restriction onto the respective subdomain by a Bregman iteration that is subsequently solved by a Split Bregman strategy. The computational performance of this new approach is discussed for its application to image inpainting and image deblurring. It turns out that the proposed new solution technique is up to three times faster than the iterative algorithm currently used in domain decomposition methods for total variation minimization. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012.

  14. Residential Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Fruergaard, Thilde; Matsufuji, Y.

    2011-01-01

    are discussed in this chapter. Characterizing residential waste is faced with the problem that many residences already divert some waste away from the official collection systems, for example performing home composting of vegetable waste and garden waste, having their bundled newspaper picked up by the scouts...... twice a year or bringing their used furniture to the flea markets organized by charity clubs. Thus, much of the data available on residential waste represents collected waste and not necessarily all generated waste. The latter can only be characterized by careful studies directly at the source......Residential waste comes from residential areas with multi-family and single-family housing and includes four types of waste: household waste, garden waste, bulky waste and household hazardous waste. Typical unit generation rates, material composition, chemical composition and determining factors...

  15. Residential Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Fruergaard, Thilde; Matsufuji, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Residential waste comes from residential areas with multi-family and single-family housing and includes four types of waste: household waste, garden waste, bulky waste and household hazardous waste. Typical unit generation rates, material composition, chemical composition and determining factors...... are discussed in this chapter. Characterizing residential waste is faced with the problem that many residences already divert some waste away from the official collection systems, for example performing home composting of vegetable waste and garden waste, having their bundled newspaper picked up by the scouts...... twice a year or bringing their used furniture to the flea markets organized by charity clubs. Thus, much of the data available on residential waste represents collected waste and not necessarily all generated waste. The latter can only be characterized by careful studies directly at the source...

  16. A Review of Study on Thermal Energy Transport System by Synthesis and Decomposition Reactions of Methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiusheng; Yabe, Akira; Kajiyama, Shiro; Fukuda, Katsuya

    The study on thermal energy transport system by synthesis and decomposition reactions of methanol was reviewed. To promote energy conservation and global environment protection, a two-step liquid-phase methanol synthesis process, which starts with carbonylation of methanol to methyl formate, then followed by the hydrogenolysis of the formate, was studied to recover wasted or unused discharged heat from industrial sources for the thermal energy demands of residential and commercial areas by chemical reactions. The research and development of the system were focused on the following three points. (1) Development of low-temperature decomposition and synthetic catalysts, (2) Development of liquid phase reactor (heat exchanger accompanying chemical reaction), (3) Simulation of the energy transport efficiency of entire system which contains heat recovery and supply sections. As the result of the development of catalyst, promising catalysts which agree with the development purposes for the methyl formate decomposition reaction and the synthetic reaction are being developed though some studies remain for the methanol decomposition and synthetic reactions. In the fundamental development of liquid phase reactor, the solubilities of CO and H2 gases in methanol and methyl formate were measured by the method of total pressure decrease due to absorption under pressures up to 1500kPa and temperatures up to 140°C. The diffusivity of CO gas in methanol was determined by measuring the diameter and solution time of single CO bubbles in methanol. The chemical reaction rate of methanol synthesis by hydrogenolysis of methyl formate was measured using a plate-type of Raney copper catalyst in a reactor with rectangular channel and in an autoclave reactor. The reaction characteristics were investigated by carrying out the experiments at various temperatures, flow rates and at various catalyst development conditions. We focused on the effect of Raney copper catalyst thickness on the liquid

  17. Hazardous Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you throw these substances away, they become hazardous waste. Some hazardous wastes come from products in our homes. Our garbage can include such hazardous wastes as old batteries, bug spray cans and paint ...

  18. Why is metallic Pt the best catalyst for methoxy decomposition?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruipeng Ren; Cuiyu Niu; Shaoyue Bu; Yuhua Zhou; Yongkang Lu; Guichang Wang

    2011-01-01

    The decomposition of methoxy on Cu(111),Ag(111),Au(111),Ni(111),Pt(111),Pd(111),and Rh(111)has been studied in detail by the density functional theory calculations.The calculated activation barriers were successfully correlated with the coupling matrix element V2ad and the d-band center(εd)for the group IB metals and group Ⅷ metals,respectively.By comparison of the activation energy barriers of the methoxy decomposition on different metals,it was found that Pt is the best catalyst for methoxy decomposition.The possible reason why the metallic Pt is the best catalyst has been analyzed from both the energetic data and the electronic structure information,that is,methoxy decomposition on Pt(111)has the largest exothermic behavior due to the closest p-band center of the CH3O among all metals after the adsorption.

  19. Decomposition methods for unsupervised learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten

    2008-01-01

    This thesis presents the application and development of decomposition methods for Unsupervised Learning. It covers topics from classical factor analysis based decomposition and its variants such as Independent Component Analysis, Non-negative Matrix Factorization and Sparse Coding to their genera......This thesis presents the application and development of decomposition methods for Unsupervised Learning. It covers topics from classical factor analysis based decomposition and its variants such as Independent Component Analysis, Non-negative Matrix Factorization and Sparse Coding...... methods and clustering problems is derived both in terms of classical point clustering but also in terms of community detection in complex networks. A guiding principle throughout this thesis is the principle of parsimony. Hence, the goal of Unsupervised Learning is here posed as striving for simplicity...... in the decompositions. Thus, it is demonstrated how a wide range of decomposition methods explicitly or implicitly strive to attain this goal. Applications of the derived decompositions are given ranging from multi-media analysis of image and sound data, analysis of biomedical data such as electroencephalography...

  20. Evaluation of Biodegradability of Waste Before and After Aerobic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchowska-Kisielewicz Monika

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An important advantage of use of an aerobic biostabilization of waste prior to its disposal is that it intensifies the decomposition of the organic fraction of waste into the form which is easily assimilable for methanogenic microorganisms involved in anaerobic decomposition of waste in the landfill. In this article it is presented the influence of aerobic pre-treatment of waste as well as leachate recirculation on susceptibility to biodegradation of waste in anaerobic laboratory reactors. The research has shown that in the reactor with aerobically treated waste stabilized with recilculation conversion of the organic carbon into the methane is about 45% higher than in the reactor with untreated waste stabilized without recirculation.

  1. Vacuum pyrolysis of waste print circuit board

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAN Ge; CHEN Lie-qiang; PENG Shao-hong; CAI Ming-zhao

    2005-01-01

    Waste print circuit board containing 11.38% Br was pyrolyzed in vacuum.Thermal stability of waste print circuit board was studied under vacuum condition by thermo-gravimetry(TG). Vacuum pyrolysis of WPCB was studied emphasizing on the kinetics of WPCB pyrolysis reactions. Based on the TG results, a kinetic model was proposed. Kinetic parameters were calculated for reaction with this model including all stages of decomposition. The average activation energy is 68 k J/mol with reaction order 3. These findings provide new insights into the WPCB thermal decomposition and useful data for rational design and operation of pyrolysis.

  2. Thermal decomposition of lutetium propionate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude

    2010-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of lutetium(III) propionate monohydrate (Lu(C2H5CO2)3·H2O) in argon was studied by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, IR-spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Dehydration takes place around 90 °C. It is followed by the decomposition of the anhydrous ...... of the oxycarbonate to the rare-earth oxide proceeds in a different way, which is here reminiscent of the thermal decomposition path of Lu(C3H5O2)·2CO(NH2)2·2H2O...

  3. Technology for safe treatment of radioisotope organic wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Jin; Park, Chong Mook; Choi, W. K.; Lee, K. W.; Moon, J. K.; Yang, H. Y.; Kim, B. T.; Park, S. C

    1999-12-01

    An examination of chemical and radiological characteristics of RI organic liquid waste, wet oxidation by Fenton reaction and decomposition liquid waste treatment process were studied. These items will be applied to develop the equipment of wet oxidation and decomposition liquid waste treatment mixed processes for the safe treatment of RI organic liquid waste which is consisted of organic solvents such as toluene, alcohol and acetone. Two types of toluene solutions were selected as a candidate decomposition material. As for the first type, the concentration of toluene was above 20 vol percent. As for the second type, the solubility of toluene was considered. The decomposition ration by Fenton reaction was above 95 percent for both of them. From the adsorption equilibrium tests, a -Na{sup +} substituted/acid treated activated carbon and Zeocarbon mixed adsorbent was selected for the fixed adsorption column. This mixed adsorbent will be used to obtain the basic design data of liquid waste purification equipment for the treatment of decomposition liquid waste arising from the wet oxidation process. Solidification and degree of strength tests were performed with the simulated sludge/spent adsorbent of MgO as an oxide type and KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}. From the test results, the design and fabrication of wet oxidation and liquid waste purification process equipment was made, and a performance test was carried out. (author)

  4. AUTONOMOUS GAUSSIAN DECOMPOSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Heiles, Carl [Radio Astronomy Lab, UC Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hennebelle, Patrick [Laboratoire AIM, Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU/SAp-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, F-91191 Gif-sur Yvette Cedex (France); Goss, W. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Dickey, John, E-mail: rlindner@astro.wisc.edu [University of Tasmania, School of Maths and Physics, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia)

    2015-04-15

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes.

  5. Gas hydrates forming and decomposition conditions analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Павленко

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of gas hydrates has been defined; their brief description has been given; factors that affect the formation and decomposition of the hydrates have been reported; their distribution, structure and thermodynamic conditions determining the gas hydrates formation disposition in gas pipelines have been considered. Advantages and disadvantages of the known methods for removing gas hydrate plugs in the pipeline have been analyzed, the necessity of their further studies has been proved. In addition to the negative impact on the process of gas extraction, the hydrates properties make it possible to outline the following possible fields of their industrial use: obtaining ultrahigh pressures in confined spaces at the hydrate decomposition; separating hydrocarbon mixtures by successive transfer of individual components through the hydrate given the mode; obtaining cold due to heat absorption at the hydrate decomposition; elimination of the open gas fountain by means of hydrate plugs in the bore hole of the gushing gasser; seawater desalination, based on the hydrate ability to only bind water molecules into the solid state; wastewater purification; gas storage in the hydrate state; dispersion of high temperature fog and clouds by means of hydrates; water-hydrates emulsion injection into the productive strata to raise the oil recovery factor; obtaining cold in the gas processing to cool the gas, etc.

  6. Researches of odour emitted by household waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eglė Marčiulaitienė

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with odour emitted by household waste, the chemical composition of household waste. The experiment was made with food waste (1000 g placed in 5 litter containers. Food waste was containing products of animal origin (meat, fish, dairy products and plant origin (vegetables, fruit waste. Time of the experiment was 14 days 19±3 °C at environment temperature. Odour concentration is determined by dynamic olfactometry method. Studies have shown that the strongest odour of all household waste used in this experiment was emitted by meat and fish waste (76 444 OUE/m3. Meat and fish waste emits the strongest odour as waste contains proteins, their decomposition releases into the environment a strong unpleasant odour, hydrogen sulphide and ammonia. Protein degradation releases into the environment are, characterized by a strong unpleasant smell of hydrogen sulphide and ammonia gas. During the anaerobic decomposition of organic matter a variety of other fragrant compounds: alcohols (e.g., ethanol and methanol, vinegar, formic acid, etc. is found.

  7. Waste decomposition and off-gas emissions of dry, single-stage anaerobic digestion processes followed by a composting stage: The example of the KOMPOGAS process; Abbauleistung und Abluftemissionen bei trockenen, einstufigen Vergaerungsverfahren mit nachgeschalteter Rotte am Beispiel des KOMPOGAS-Verfahrens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fricke, K. [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Leichtweiss-Institut fuer Wasserbau; Leisner, R. [KOGAS AG, Uzwil (Switzerland); Wallmann, R. [Ingenieurgemeinschaft Witzenhausen, Fricke und Turk GmbH, Witzenhausen (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    The working group IGW/LWI (Ingenieurgemeinschaft Witzenhausen Fricke and Turk GmbH and Leichtweiss Institute of TU Brunswick University) carried out scientific and technical investigations of anaerobic digestion and subsequent composting at the mechanical-biological waste treatment plant at Kufstein/Tyrol on behalf of KOGAS GmbH. The investigations started in May 2000; they were to provide information for analysis and optimisation of the process and products with a view to the minimisation of residues for dumping or incineration. The following subjects were investigated: Mass balance; decomposition rate; gas yields and gas quality; quality of residues for dumping (biological stability and calorific value); off-gas emissions; process control. Performance data of the plant will provide a basis for further planning and will be interpreted against the background of current legal boundary conditions. [German] Die Arbeitsgemeinschaft IGW/LWI (Ingenieurgemeinschaft Witzenhausen Fricke and Turk GmbH und Leichtweiss-Institut der TU Braunschweig) wurde im Mai 2000 von der KOGAS GmbH beauftragt, die wissenschaftlich-technische Begleitung eines Versuches zur Vergaerung und Nachrotte von Restmuell auf dem Gelaende der MBA Kufstein/Tirol durchzufuehren. Ziel der Untersuchung war die Ueberpruefung und Optimierung des Vergaerungs- und Nachrotteprozesses sowie der Materialaufbereitung und Konfektionierung im Hinblick auf die Minimierung von Stofffluessen in die energetische Verwertung bzw. thermische Behandlung. Im Rahmen des Vorhabens wurden folgende Thermokomplexe bearbeitet: - Massenbilanz, - Abbauleistung, - Gasertrag und Gasqualitaet, - Qualitaet der zu deponierenden Abfaelle (biologische Stabilitaet und Heizwert), - Abluftemissionen, - Prozesssteuerung. Leistungsdaten der Verfahren sollten als Planungsgrundlagen bereitgestellt und vor dem Hintergrund der aktuellen rechtlichen Rahmenbedingungen bewertet werden. (orig.)

  8. Some nonlinear space decomposition algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tai, Xue-Cheng; Espedal, M. [Univ. of Bergen (Norway)

    1996-12-31

    Convergence of a space decomposition method is proved for a general convex programming problem. The space decomposition refers to methods that decompose a space into sums of subspaces, which could be a domain decomposition or a multigrid method for partial differential equations. Two algorithms are proposed. Both can be used for linear as well as nonlinear elliptic problems and they reduce to the standard additive and multiplicative Schwarz methods for linear elliptic problems. Two {open_quotes}hybrid{close_quotes} algorithms are also presented. They converge faster than the additive one and have better parallelism than the multiplicative method. Numerical tests with a two level domain decomposition for linear, nonlinear and interface elliptic problems are presented for the proposed algorithms.

  9. Biogeochemistry of Decomposition and Detrital Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderman, J.; Amundson, R.

    2003-12-01

    represented by three pools: labile SOM, slow SOM, and passive SOM. Inputs include aboveground litterfall and belowground root turnover and exudates, which will be distributed among the pools based on the biochemical nature of the material. Outputs from each pool include mineralization to CO2 (dashed lines), humification (labile→slow→passive), and downward transport due to leaching and physical mixing. Communition by soil fauna will accelerate the decomposition process and reveal previously inaccessible materials. Soil mixing and other disturbances can also make physically protected passive SOM available to microbial attack (passive→slow). There exists an amazing body of literature on the subject of decomposition that draws from many disciplines - including ecology, soil science, microbiology, plant physiology, biochemistry, and zoology. In this chapter, we have attempted to draw information from all of these fields to present an integrated analysis of decomposition in a biogeochemical context. We begin by reviewing the composition of detrital resources and SOM (Section 8.07.2), the organisms responsible for decomposition ( Section 8.07.3), and some methods for quantifying decomposition rates ( Section 8.07.4). This is followed by a discussion of the mechanisms behind decomposition ( Section 8.07.5), humification ( Section 8.07.6), and the controls on these processes ( Section 8.07.7). We conclude the chapter with a brief discussion on how current biogeochemical models incorporate this information ( Section 8.07.8).

  10. Estimation of cost reduction and increase for the final disposal associated with the categorization of inert waste landfills in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Hirofumi; Tsuchida, Daisuke; Shimaoka, Takayuki

    2012-02-01

    This study estimates the overall cost savings that have been realized due to disposal of inert wastes in Japan because this material has been deposited in inert waste landfills (IWLs) that are designed exclusively for this purpose, instead of being co-dipsosed with organic wastes in more costly in sanitary landfills (SLs). The total realized cost savings were based on the disposed volume of inert waste and the actual disposal fees for IWLs and SLs for the period 1977-2006. The estimated reduction in expense is 4748 billion JPY for the period. On the other hand, if organic wastes had been deposited in IWLs along with inert wastes, costs would be incurred to clean up the sites because the surrounding environment may be polluted by the decomposition of the non-inert wastes and considerable efforts probably would be required to restore the polluted environment to its normal condition (this is because IWLs typically do not have a barrier system.) The potential cleanup cost was estimated to be 616 to 1226 billion JPY. These estimated costs were compared and it was found that the net reduction in expense was 3522 billion to 4122 billion JPY. Although the expense was reduced substantially, it was noted that a considerable cleanup cost would be generated. In particular, it was found that the increase in cleanup costs becomes most significant after the late 1990s.

  11. Decomposition of indwelling EMG signals

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Decomposition of indwelling electromyographic (EMG) signals is challenging in view of the complex and often unpredictable behaviors and interactions of the action potential trains of different motor units that constitute the indwelling EMG signal. These phenomena create a myriad of problem situations that a decomposition technique needs to address to attain completeness and accuracy levels required for various scientific and clinical applications. Starting with the maximum a posteriori probab...

  12. DC CONDUCTIVITY OF CERAMICS WITH CALCITE WASTE IN THE TEMPERATURE RANGE 20 - 1050C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Ondruska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependences of the electrical DC conductivity of calcite waste, kaolinite and illite based ceramics were measured in the temperature range of 20 - 1050oC. The ceramic mass that was used was a mixture of 60 wt. % kaolinitic-illitic clay, 20 - 40 wt. % of this clay was fired at 1000oC for 90 min and 0, 10 and 20 wt. % of calcite waste. During heating, several processes take place - the release of the physically bound water, the burning of organic impurities, the dehydroxylation of kaolinite and illite, the decomposition of calcite, and the creation of anorthite and mullite. All of these processes were checked by means of differential thermal analysis (DTA, derivative thermogravimetry (DTG and thermodilatometry (TDA. At low temperatures (20 - 200oC, due to the release and decomposition of physically bound water, H+ and OH- are dominant charge carriers. After completion of release of physically bound water, up to the start of dehydroxylation at the temperature of ~ 450oC, the DC conductivity is dominated by a transport of Na+, K+, and Ca2+ ions. During dehydroxylation, H+ and OH- ions, which are released from kaolinite and illite lattices, contribute to the DC conductivity. Decomposition of calcite runs between ~ 700oC and 900oC. The glassy phase has a dominant influence on the DC conductivity in the fired ceramics. Its high conductivity is determined by the high mobility of Na+, K+, and Ca2+ ions.

  13. TREE DECOMPOSITIONS OF MULTIGRAPHS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Minyong

    1999-01-01

    For a graph G, ifE(G) can be partitioned into several pairwise disjointsets as { E1, E2,……,El} such thatthe subgraph induced by Ei is a tree of orderki, (i=1,2, ……, l), then G is said to have a {k1,k2,……, kl}-tree-decomposition, denoted by {k1,k2,……, kl}∈G.For k≥1 and l≥0, a collection(G)(k,l) is the setof multigraphs such that G∈(G)(k,l) if and only if ε(G) = k(|G|-1)-l and ε(H)≤max{(k-1)(|H|-1), k(|H|-1)-l} for any subgraph H of G.We prove that (1) If k≥2, 0≤l≤3 and G∈(G)(k,l) of order n≥l+1, then {n,n,……, n-l}∈ G. (2) If k≥2 and G∈(G)(k,2) oforder n≥3, then {n,n,……, n,n-2}∈G and {n,n,……, n,n-1,n-1}∈G. (3) If k3 and G∈(G)(k,3) oforder n≥4, then {n,n,……, n,n-3}∈G ,{ n,n,……, n,n-1,n-2}∈ G and {n,n, ……, n,n-1,n-1,n-1}∈G.

  14. Decomposition of indwelling EMG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawab, S Hamid; Wotiz, Robert P; De Luca, Carlo J

    2008-08-01

    Decomposition of indwelling electromyographic (EMG) signals is challenging in view of the complex and often unpredictable behaviors and interactions of the action potential trains of different motor units that constitute the indwelling EMG signal. These phenomena create a myriad of problem situations that a decomposition technique needs to address to attain completeness and accuracy levels required for various scientific and clinical applications. Starting with the maximum a posteriori probability classifier adapted from the original precision decomposition system (PD I) of LeFever and De Luca (25, 26), an artificial intelligence approach has been used to develop a multiclassifier system (PD II) for addressing some of the experimentally identified problem situations. On a database of indwelling EMG signals reflecting such conditions, the fully automatic PD II system is found to achieve a decomposition accuracy of 86.0% despite the fact that its results include low-amplitude action potential trains that are not decomposable at all via systems such as PD I. Accuracy was established by comparing the decompositions of indwelling EMG signals obtained from two sensors. At the end of the automatic PD II decomposition procedure, the accuracy may be enhanced to nearly 100% via an interactive editor, a particularly significant fact for the previously indecomposable trains.

  15. DECOMPOSITION STUDY OF CALCIUM CARBONATE IN COCKLE SHELL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUSTAKIMAH MOHAMED

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Calcium oxide (CaO is recognized as an efficient carbon dioxide (CO2 adsorbent and separation of CO2 from gas stream using CaO based adsorbent is widely applied in gas purification process especially at high temperature reaction. CaO is normally been produced via thermal decomposition of calcium carbonate (CaCO3 sources such as limestone which is obtained through mining and quarrying limestone hill. Yet, this study able to exploit the vast availability of waste resources in Malaysia which is cockle shell, as the potential biomass resources for CaCO3 and CaO. In addition, effect of particle size towards decomposition process is put under study using four particle sizes which are 0.125-0.25 mm, 0.25-0.5 mm, 1-2 mm, and 2-4 mm. Decomposition reactivity is conducted using Thermal Gravimetric Analyzer (TGA at heating rate of 20°C/minutes in inert (Nitrogen atmosphere. Chemical property analysis using x-ray fluorescence (XRF, shows cockle shell is made up of 97% Calcium (Ca element and CaO is produced after decomposition is conducted, as been analyzed by x-ray diffusivity (XRD analyzer. Besides, smallest particle size exhibits the highest decomposition rate and the process was observed to follow first order kinetics. Activation energy, E, of the process was found to vary from 179.38 to 232.67 kJ/mol. From Arrhenius plot, E increased when the particle size is larger. To conclude, cockle shell is a promising source for CaO and based on four different particles sizes used, sample at 0.125-0.25 mm offers the highest decomposition rate.

  16. High speed multiplier design using Decomposition Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanathan Palaniappan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The multiplier forms the core of a Digital Signal Processor and is a major source of power dissipation. Often, the multiplier forms the limiting factor for the maximum speed of operation of a Digital Signal Processor. Due to continuing integrating intensity and the growing needs of portable devices, low-power, high-performance design is of prime importance. A new technique of implementing a multiplier circuit using Decomposition Logic is proposed here which improves speed with very little increase in power dissipation when compared to tree structured Dadda multipliers. Tanner EDA was used for simulation in the TSMC 180nm technology.

  17. Force decomposition in robot force control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Steve H.; Wen, John T.

    1991-01-01

    The unit inconsistency in force decomposition has motivated an investigation into the force control problem in multiple-arm manipulation. Based on physical considerations, it is argued that the force that should be controlled is the internal force at the specified frame in the payload. This force contains contributions due to both applied forces from the arms and the inertial force from the payload and the arms. A least-squares scheme free of unit inconsistency for finding this internal force is presented. The force control issue is analyzed, and an integral force feedback controller is proposed.

  18. Nonequilibrium adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations of methane clathrate hydrate decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, J. A.

    2010-04-01

    Nonequilibrium, constant energy, constant volume (NVE) molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the decomposition of methane clathrate hydrate in contact with water. Under adiabatic conditions, the rate of methane clathrate decomposition is affected by heat and mass transfer arising from the breakup of the clathrate hydrate framework and release of the methane gas at the solid-liquid interface and diffusion of methane through water. We observe that temperature gradients are established between the clathrate and solution phases as a result of the endothermic clathrate decomposition process and this factor must be considered when modeling the decomposition process. Additionally we observe that clathrate decomposition does not occur gradually with breakup of individual cages, but rather in a concerted fashion with rows of structure I cages parallel to the interface decomposing simultaneously. Due to the concerted breakup of layers of the hydrate, large amounts of methane gas are released near the surface which can form bubbles that will greatly affect the rate of mass transfer near the surface of the clathrate phase. The effects of these phenomena on the rate of methane hydrate decomposition are determined and implications on hydrate dissociation in natural methane hydrate reservoirs are discussed.

  19. Zero Waste; Energy Recovery From Non-recyclable Mixed Municipal Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Igor Laštůvka; Tomáš Vítěz; Jan Chovanec; Jan Mareček

    2016-01-01

    Zero Waste is a strategy offering waste management solutions for today’s businesses. The Zero Waste strategy has been created with the objective of stimulating sustainable utilisation of resources, production and consumption with the highest possible level of recycling of generated waste. Due to the fact that currently there is very little information and only few relevant data available as a base for the implementation of the Zero Waste strategy, waste management specialists approach and app...

  20. ZERO WASTE

    OpenAIRE

    Upadhyaya, Luv

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the thesis was to develop a clear vision on better waste management system. The thesis introduced the sustainable waste management along with innovation. The aim of the research was to find out the types of waste being introduced to environment, their consequence on human beings and surroundings, best policies, principles and practices to minimize the effect of the waste to lowest. The study was based on literature. The thesis includes the introduction of types of waste, clarifi...

  1. Real interest parity decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Luiz Ferreira

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the general causes of real interest rate differentials (rids for a sample of emerging markets for the period of January 1996 to August 2007. To this end, two methods are applied. The first consists of breaking the variance of rids down into relative purchasing power pariety and uncovered interest rate parity and shows that inflation differentials are the main source of rids variation; while the second method breaks down the rids and nominal interest rate differentials (nids into nominal and real shocks. Bivariate autoregressive models are estimated under particular identification conditions, having been adequately treated for the identified structural breaks. Impulse response functions and error variance decomposition result in real shocks as being the likely cause of rids.O objetivo deste artigo é investigar as causas gerais dos diferenciais da taxa de juros real (rids para um conjunto de países emergentes, para o período de janeiro de 1996 a agosto de 2007. Para tanto, duas metodologias são aplicadas. A primeira consiste em decompor a variância dos rids entre a paridade do poder de compra relativa e a paridade de juros a descoberto e mostra que os diferenciais de inflação são a fonte predominante da variabilidade dos rids; a segunda decompõe os rids e os diferenciais de juros nominais (nids em choques nominais e reais. Sob certas condições de identificação, modelos autorregressivos bivariados são estimados com tratamento adequado para as quebras estruturais identificadas e as funções de resposta ao impulso e a decomposição da variância dos erros de previsão são obtidas, resultando em evidências favoráveis a que os choques reais são a causa mais provável dos rids.

  2. Perspectives of metanization in the waste management; Perspectivas de la metanizacion en la gestion de residuos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, M. E. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Biological processes employed in residual water treatment, waste treatment and contaminated soils treatment are derived from process in nature. Aerobic and anaerobic cycles are typical examples. It is possible to speed up waste decomposition by checking environmental micro-organism conditions. With independence of waste type, biological process treatment consist in controlling the environment necessary for optimal micro-organism implicated increase. (Author)

  3. The abiotic litter decomposition in the drylands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H.; Throop, H.; Rahn, T. A.

    2009-12-01

    The decomposition of litter is an important ecosystem function that controls carbon and nutrient cycling, which is well understood from the relationship between temperature and moisture. However, the decomposition in the arid and semiarid environments (hereafter drylands) is relatively poorly predicted due to several abiotic factors such as the effect of ultraviolet radiation and physical mixing of fallen litter with soil. The relative magnitude of these abiotic factors to ecosystem scale litter decomposition is still in debate. Here, we examine the effect of two major abiotic factors in the drylands litter decomposition by conducting a controlled laboratory study using plant litter and soil collected from Sonoran and Chihuahuan desert areas. The first part of the experiment focused on the effect of soil-litter mixing. We established a complete block design of three levels of soil and litter mixing (no mixing, light soil-litter mixing, and complete soil-litter mixing) in combination with three levels of soil moisture (1%, 2%, and 6% volumetric water content) using 2g of two most dominant species litter, grass and mesquite, and 50g of air-dried soils in 500ml mason jar and incubated them under 25C. We measured CO2 fluxes from these soil-litter incubations and harvested the soil and litter at 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks and analyzed them of carbon and nitrogen content as well as the actual mass loss in the litter. The second part of the experiment focused on the effect of ultraviolet radiation. We established short-term litter incubation on a quartz chamber and used different temperature, moisture, and minerals to find the mechanism of photodegradation of litter. We measured CO2 fluxes from the litter incubation under ultraviolet radiation and also measured 13CO2 from these emissions. We were able to detect changes in the rate of carbon mineralization as a result of our treatments in the first week of soil-litter mixing experiment. The carbon mineralization rate was

  4. Piecewise-adaptive decomposition methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, J.I. [Room I-320-D, E.T.S. Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Malaga, Plaza El Ejido, s/n, 29013 Malaga (Spain)], E-mail: jirs@lcc.uma.es

    2009-05-30

    Piecewise-adaptive decomposition methods are developed for the solution of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. These methods are based on some theorems that show that Adomian's decomposition method is a homotopy perturbation technique and coincides with Taylor's series expansions for autonomous ordinary differential equations. Piecewise-decomposition methods provide series solutions in intervals which are subject to continuity conditions at the end points of each interval, and their adaption is based on the use of either a fixed number of approximants and a variable step size, a variable number of approximants and a fixed step size or a variable number of approximants and a variable step size. It is shown that the appearance of noise terms in the decomposition method is related to both the differential equation and the manner in which the homotopy parameter is introduced, especially for the Lane-Emden equation. It is also shown that, in order to avoid the use of numerical quadrature, there is a simple way of introducing the homotopy parameter in the two first-order ordinary differential equations that correspond to the second-order Thomas-Fermi equation. It is also shown that the piecewise homotopy perturbation methods presented here provide more accurate results than a modified Adomian decomposition technique which makes use of Pade approximants and the homotopy analysis method, for the Thomas-Fermi equation.

  5. Decomposition of SnH4 molecules on metal and metal-oxide surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ugur, D.; Storm, A.J.; Verberk, R.; Brouwer, J.C.; Sloof, W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic hydrogen cleaning is a promising method for EUV lithography systems, to recover from surface oxidation and to remove carbon and tin contaminants. Earlier studies showed, however, that tin may redeposit on nearby surfaces due to SnH4 decomposition. This phenomenon of SnH4 decomposition during

  6. Waste statistics 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    Reports to the ISAG (Information System for Waste and Recycling) for 2001 cover 402 Danish waste treatment plants owned by 295 enterprises. The total waste generation in 2001 amounted to 12,768,000 tonnes, which is 2% less than in 2000. Reductions are primarily due to the fact that sludge for mineralization is included with a dry matter content of 20% compared to 1,5% in previous statistics. This means that sludge amounts have been reduced by 808,886 tonnes. The overall rate of recycling amounted to 63%, which is 1% less than the overall recycling target of 64% for 2004. Since sludge has a high recycling rate, the reduction in sludge amounts of 808,886 tonnes has also caused the total recycling rate to fall. Waste amounts incinerated accounted for 25%, which is 1% more than the overall target of 24% for incineration in 2004. Waste going to landfill amounted to 10%, which is better than the overall landfill target for 2004 of a maximum of 12% for landfilling. Targets for treatment of waste from the different sectors, however, are still not complied with, since too little waste from households and the service sector is recycled, and too much waste from industry is led to landfill. (BA)

  7. The waste-to-energy framework for integrated multi-waste utilization: Waste cooking oil, waste lubricating oil, and waste plastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singhabhandhu, Ampaitepin; Tezuka, Tetsuo [Energy Economics Laboratory, Department of Socio-Environmental Energy Science, Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Yoshida-honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    Energy generation by wastes is considered one method of waste management that has the benefit of energy recovery. From the waste-to-energy point of view, waste cooking oil, waste lubricating oil, and waste plastics have been considered good candidates for feedstocks for energy conversion due to their high heating values. Compared to the independent management of these three wastes, the idea of co-processing them in integration is expected to gain more benefit. The economies of scale and the synergy of co-processing these wastes results in higher quality and higher yield of the end products. In this study, we use cost-benefit analysis to evaluate the integrated management scenario of collecting the three wastes and converting them to energy. We report the total heat of combustion of pyrolytic oil at the maximum and minimum conversion rates, and conduct a sensitivity analysis in which the parameters of an increase of the electricity cost for operating the process and increase of the feedstock transportation cost are tested. We evaluate the effects of economy of scale in the case of integrated waste management. We compare four cases of waste-to-energy conversion with the business as usual (BAU) scenario, and our results show that the integrated co-processing of waste cooking oil, waste lubricating oil, and waste plastics is the most profitable from the viewpoints of energy yield and economics. (author)

  8. Interactions among temperature, moisture, and oxygen concentrations in controlling decomposition rates in a boreal forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Carlos A.; Malghani, Saadatullah; Loescher, Henry W.

    2017-02-01

    Determining environmental controls on soil organic matter decomposition is of importance for developing models that predict the effects of environmental change on global soil carbon stocks. There is uncertainty about the environmental controls on decomposition rates at temperature and moisture extremes, particularly at high water content levels and high temperatures. It is uncertain whether observed declines in decomposition rates at high temperatures are due to declines in the heat capacity of extracellular enzymes as predicted by thermodynamic theory, or due to simultaneous declines in soil moisture. It is also uncertain whether oxygen limits decomposition rates at high water contents. Here we present the results of a full factorial experiment using organic soils from a boreal forest incubated at high temperatures (25 and 35 °C), a wide range of water-filled pore space (WFPS; 15, 30, 60, 90 %), and contrasting oxygen concentrations (1 and 20 %). We found support for the hypothesis that decomposition rates are high at high temperatures, provided that enough moisture and oxygen are available for decomposition. Furthermore, we found that decomposition rates are mostly limited by oxygen concentrations at high moisture levels; even at 90 % WFPS, decomposition proceeded at high rates in the presence of oxygen. Our results suggest an important degree of interaction among temperature, moisture, and oxygen in determining decomposition rates at the soil core scale.

  9. Distributed k-Core Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Montresor, Alberto; Miorandi, Daniele

    2011-01-01

    Among the novel metrics used to study the relative importance of nodes in complex networks, k-core decomposition has found a number of applications in areas as diverse as sociology, proteinomics, graph visualization, and distributed system analysis and design. This paper proposes new distributed algorithms for the computation of the k-core decomposition of a network, with the purpose of (i) enabling the run-time computation of k-cores in "live" distributed systems and (ii) allowing the decomposition, over a set of connected machines, of very large graphs, that cannot be hosted in a single machine. Lower bounds on the algorithms complexity are given, and an exhaustive experimental analysis on real-world graphs is provided.

  10. Thermal decomposition of ammonium hexachloroosmate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asanova, T I; Kantor, Innokenty; Asanov, I. P.

    2016-01-01

    Structural changes of (NH4)2[OsCl6] occurring during thermal decomposition in a reduction atmosphere have been studied in situ using combined energy-dispersive X-ray absorption spectroscopy (ED-XAFS) and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). According to PXRD, (NH4)2[OsCl6] transforms directly...... to metallic Os without the formation of any crystalline intermediates but through a plateau where no reactions occur. XANES and EXAFS data by means of Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR) analysis show that thermal decomposition occurs with the formation of an amorphous intermediate {OsCl4}x with a possible...... polymeric structure. Being revealed for the first time the intermediate was subjected to determine the local atomic structure around osmium. The thermal decomposition of hexachloroosmate is much more complex and occurs within a minimum two-step process, which has never been observed before....

  11. Quantitative and qualitative measures of decomposition: Is there a link?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eaton, Robert, J.; Sanchez, Felipe, G.

    2009-03-01

    Decomposition rates of loblolly pine coarse woody debris (CWD) were determined by mass loss and wood density changes for trees that differed in source of mortality (natural, girdle-poison, and felling). Specifically, three treatments were examined: (1) control (CON): natural mortality; (2) CD: 5-fold increase in CWD compared with the CON; and (3) CS: 12-fold increase in snags compared with the CON. The additional CWD in the CD treatment plots and the additional snags in the CS plots were achieved by felling (for the CD plots) or girdling followed by herbicide injection (for the CS plots) select trees in these plots. Consequently,mortality on the CD plots is due to natural causes and felling. Likewise, mortality on the CS plots is due to natural causes and girdle-poison. In each treatment plot, mortality due to natural causes was inventoried since 1997, whereas mortality due to girdle-poison and felling were inventoried since 2001. No significant difference was detected between the rates of decomposition for the CWD on these treatment plots, indicating that source of the tree mortality did not influence rates of decomposition once the tree fell. These experimental measures of decomposition were compared with two decay classification systems (three- and five-unit classifications) to determine linkages. Changes in wood density did not correlate to any decay classification, whereas mass loss had a weak correlation with decay class. However, the large degree of variation limits the utility of decay classification systems in estimating mass loss.

  12. Identification of Cellulose Breaking Bacteria in Landfill Samples for Organic Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, P. M.; Leung, F. C.

    2015-12-01

    According to the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department, the citizens of Hong Kong disposes 13,500 tonnes of waste to the landfill everyday. Out of the 13,500 tonnes, 3600 tonnes consist of organic waste. Furthermore, due to the limited supply of land for landfills in Hong Kong, it is estimated that landfills will be full by about 2020. Currently, organic wastes at landfills undergo anaerobic respiration, where methane gas, one of the most harmful green house gases, will be released. The management of such waste is a pressing issue, as possible solutions must be presented in this crucial period of time. The Independent Schools Foundation Academy introduced their very own method to manage the waste produced by the students. With an approximate of 1500 students on campus, the school produces 27 metric tonnes of food waste each academic year. The installation of the rocket food composter provides an alternate method of disposable of organic waste the school produces, for the aerobic environment allows for different by-products to be produced, namely compost that can be used for organic farming by the primary school students and subsequently carbon dioxide, a less harmful greenhouse gas. This research is an extension on the current work, as another natural factor is considered. It evaluates the microorganism community present in leachate samples collected from the North East New Territories Landfill, for the bacteria in the area exhibits special characteristics in the process of decomposition. Through the sequencing and analysis of the genome of the bacteria, the identification of the bacteria might lead to a break through on the current issue. Some bacteria demonstrate the ability to degrade lignin cellulose, or assist in the production of methane gas in aerobic respirations. These characteristics can hopefully be utilized in the future in waste managements across the globe.

  13. Rank-based decompositions of morphological templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussner, P; Ritter, G X

    2000-01-01

    Methods for matrix decomposition have found numerous applications in image processing, in particular for the problem of template decomposition. Since existing matrix decomposition techniques are mainly concerned with the linear domain, we consider it timely to investigate matrix decomposition techniques in the nonlinear domain with applications in image processing. The mathematical basis for these investigations is the new theory of rank within minimax algebra. Thus far, only minimax decompositions of rank 1 and rank 2 matrices into outer product expansions are known to the image processing community. We derive a heuristic algorithm for the decomposition of matrices having arbitrary rank.

  14. Waste management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark.......The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark....

  15. Waste management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark.......The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark....

  16. Microbial diversity of vermicompost bacteria that exhibit useful agricultural traits and waste management potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathma, Jayakumar; Sakthivel, Natarajan

    2012-01-01

    Vermicomposting is a non-thermophilic, boioxidative process that involves earthworms and associated microbes. This biological organic waste decomposition process yields the biofertilizer namely the vermicompost. Vermicompost is a finely divided, peat like material with high porosity, good aeration, drainage, water holding capacity, microbial activity, excellent nutrient status and buffering capacity thereby resulting the required physiochemical characters congenial for soil fertility and plant growth. Vermicompost enhances soil biodiversity by promoting the beneficial microbes which inturn enhances plant growth directly by production of plant growth-regulating hormones and enzymes and indirectly by controlling plant pathogens, nematodes and other pests, thereby enhancing plant health and minimizing the yield loss. Due to its innate biological, biochemical and physiochemical properties, vermicompost may be used to promote sustainable agriculture and also for the safe management of agricultural, industrial, domestic and hospital wastes which may otherwise pose serious threat to life and environment.

  17. Radioactive Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaylock, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of radioactive waste disposal, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the studies included are: (1) high-level and long-lived wastes, and (2) release and burial of low-level wastes. A list of 42 references is also presented. (HM)

  18. Decomposition of ground biomass of secondary forest and yield of annual crops in no tillage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déborah Verçoza da Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this work was to evaluate the dynamics of decomposition process of chopped secondary forest system, previously enriched with legumes Inga velutina Willd. and Stryphnodendron pulcherrimum (Willd. Hochr. and the contribution of this process to the nutrient input to the cultivation of corn and bean under no-tillage. The experimental design was a randomized block, split plot with four replications. The plots were two species (I. velutina and S. pulcherrimum and the subplots were seven times of evaluation (0, 7, 28, 63, 189, 252, 294 days after experiment installation. There was no difference (p ≥ 0.05 between the secondary forest systems enriched and no interaction with times for biomass waste, decomposition constant and half-life time. The waste of S. pulcherrimum trees had higher (p 0.05 yield in both areas, regardless of the waste origin.

  19. The ecology of carrion decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, or the remains of dead animals, is something that most people would like to avoid. It is visually unpleasant, emits foul odors, and may be the source of numerous pathogens. Decomposition of carrion, however, provides a unique opportunity for scientists to investigate how nutrients cycle t...

  20. Microbial interactions during carrion decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    This addresses the microbial ecology of carrion decomposition in the age of metagenomics. It describes what is known about the microbial communities on carrion, including a brief synopsis about the communities on other organic matter sources. It provides a description of studies using state-of-the...

  1. Wavefront reconstruction by modal decomposition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new method to determine the wavefront of a laser beam based on modal decomposition by computer-generated holograms. The hologram is encoded with a transmission function suitable for measuring the amplitudes and phases of the modes...

  2. Stepwise decomposition in controlpath synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, ten A.J.W.M.

    1990-01-01

    A method is presented for the synthesis of the microarchitecture of controlpaths. This method is called stepwise decomposition. It focuses primarily on controlpaths of instruction set processors, however it is also applicable for more general Finite State Machine synthesis. Many of the current contr

  3. Stepwise decomposition in controlpath synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Berg, A.J.W.M.; ten Berg, A.J.W.M.

    1990-01-01

    A method is presented for the synthesis of the microarchitecture of controlpaths. This method is called stepwise decomposition. It focuses primarily on controlpaths of instruction set processors, however it is also applicable for more general Finite State Machine synthesis. Many of the current contr

  4. Modular Decomposition of Boolean Functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Bioch (Cor)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractModular decomposition is a thoroughly investigated topic in many areas such as switching theory, reliability theory, game theory and graph theory. Most appli- cations can be formulated in the framework of Boolean functions. In this paper we give a uni_ed treatment of modular decompositio

  5. Modular Decomposition of Boolean Functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Bioch (Cor)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractModular decomposition is a thoroughly investigated topic in many areas such as switching theory, reliability theory, game theory and graph theory. Most appli- cations can be formulated in the framework of Boolean functions. In this paper we give a uni_ed treatment of modular

  6. Thermal Decomposition of Dicyclopentadienylarylvanadium Compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekel, C.P.; Jelsma, A.; Teuben, J.H.; Liefde Meijer, H.J. de

    1977-01-01

    The thermolysis of compounds of the type Cp2VR (R = aryl) in the solid state has been studied. A distinct increase in thermal stability is observed upon substitution of the ortho-position of the aryl group. Thermal decomposition occurs with formation of RH, Cp2V, a vanadocene homologue with the

  7. Multiple Descriptions Using Sparse Decompositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Østergaard, Jan; Dahl, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the design of multiple descriptions (MDs) using sparse decompositions. In a description erasure channel only a subset of the transmitted descriptions is received. The MD problem concerns the design of the descriptions such that they individually approximate the source...

  8. Theoretical study of coexistence of ordering and spinodal decomposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任晓兵; 王笑天; T.Tadaki; K.Shimizu

    1996-01-01

    According to the conventional theory of solid solutions (the nearest neighbor atomic interaction model),ordering and spinodal decomposition/clustering are mutually exclusive processes.However,it has been found that the coexistence of ordering and spinodal decomposition (COSD) occurs in a large number of alloys.This fact gave a strong challenge to the conventional theory.A statistical investigation revealed that the COSD was closely related to large atomic-siae factors.It was thus proposed that the COSD stemmed from the long-range elastic interactions due to atomic-si?E disparity.In order to verify this idea,the formulism of concentration waves was applied to calculating the elastic interactions.The results proved that long-range atomic elastic interactions promoted both ordering and spinodal decomposition.A possible application of the COSD reaction was proposed,i.e.using this reaction to fabricate high-performance "natural nano-alloys".

  9. Noise Covariance Properties in Dual-Tree Wavelet Decompositions

    CERN Document Server

    Chaux, Caroline; Duval, Laurent; 10.1109/TIT.2007.909104

    2011-01-01

    Dual-tree wavelet decompositions have recently gained much popularity, mainly due to their ability to provide an accurate directional analysis of images combined with a reduced redundancy. When the decomposition of a random process is performed -- which occurs in particular when an additive noise is corrupting the signal to be analyzed -- it is useful to characterize the statistical properties of the dual-tree wavelet coefficients of this process. As dual-tree decompositions constitute overcomplete frame expansions, correlation structures are introduced among the coefficients, even when a white noise is analyzed. In this paper, we show that it is possible to provide an accurate description of the covariance properties of the dual-tree coefficients of a wide-sense stationary process. The expressions of the (cross-)covariance sequences of the coefficients are derived in the one and two-dimensional cases. Asymptotic results are also provided, allowing to predict the behaviour of the second-order moments for larg...

  10. Naphthalene decomposition in a DC corona radical shower discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-jiang NI; Xu SHEN; Xiang GAO; Zu-liang WU; Hao LU; Zhong-shan LI; Zhong-yang LUO; Ke-fa CEN

    2011-01-01

    The naphthalene decomposition in a corona radical shower discharge (CRS) was investigated, with attention paid to the influences of voltage and initial naphthalene density. The OH emission spectra were investigated so as to know the naphthalene decomposing process. The by-products were analyzed and a decomposing theory in discharge was proposed. The results showed that higher voltage and relative humidity were effective on decomposition. The initial concentration affected the decomposing efficiency of naphthalene. When the mitial naphthalene density was 17 mg/m3, the decomposition rate was found to be 70% under 14 kV. The main by-products were carbon dioxide and water. However, a small amount of carbonic oxide, 1, 2-ethanediol and acetaldehyde were found due to the incomplete oxidization.

  11. Theoretical models for NO decomposition in Cu-exchanged zeolites

    CERN Document Server

    Tsekov, R

    2015-01-01

    A unified description of the catalytic effect of Cu-exchanged zeolites is proposed for the decomposition of NO. A general expression for the rate constant of NO decomposition is obtained by assuming that the rate-determining step consists of the transferring of a single atom associated with breaking of the N-O bond. The analysis is performed on the base of the generalized Langevin equation and takes into account both the potential interactions in the system and the memory effects due to the zeolite vibrations. Two different mechanisms corresponding to monomolecular and bimolecular NO decomposition are discussed. The catalytic effect in the monomolecular mechanism is related to both the Cu+ ions and zeolite O-vacancies, while in the case of the bimolecular mechanism the zeolite contributes through dissipation only. The comparison of the theoretically calculated rate constants with experimental results reveals additional information about the geometric and energetic characteristics of the active centers and con...

  12. Development of organic fertilizers from food market waste and urban gardening by composting in Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Samaniego, J.; Pérez-Murcia, M. D.; Bustamante, M. A.; Paredes, C.; Pérez-Espinosa, A.; Gavilanes-Terán, I.; López, M.; Marhuenda-Egea, F. C.; Brito, H.; Moral, R.

    2017-01-01

    Currently, the management of urban waste streams in developing countries is not optimized yet, and in many cases these wastes are disposed untreated in open dumps. This fact causes serious environmental and health problems due to the presence of contaminants and pathogens. Frequently, the use of specific low-cost strategies reduces the total amount of wastes. These strategies are mainly associated to the identification, separate collection and composting of specific organic waste streams, such as vegetable and fruit refuses from food markets and urban gardening activities. Concretely, in the Chimborazo Region (Ecuador), more than 80% of municipal solid waste is dumped into environment due to the lack of an efficient waste management strategy. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a demonstration project at field scale in this region to evaluate the feasibility of implanting the composting technology not only for the management of the organic waste fluxes from food market and gardening activities to be scaled-up in other developing regions, but also to obtain an end-product with a commercial value as organic fertilizer. Three co-composting mixtures were prepared using market wastes mixed with pruning of trees and ornamental palms as bulking agents. Two piles were created using different proportions of market waste and prunings of trees and ornamental palms: pile 1 (50:33:17) with a C/N ratio 25; pile 2: (60:30:10) with C/N ratio 24 and pile 3 (75:0:25) with C/N ratio 33), prepared with market waste and prunings of ornamental palm. Throughout the process, the temperature of the mixtures was monitored and organic matter evolution was determined using thermogravimetric and chemical techniques. Additionally, physico-chemical, chemical and agronomic parameters were determined to evaluate compost quality. The results obtained indicated that all the piles showed a suitable development of the composting process, with a significant organic matter decomposition

  13. Development of organic fertilizers from food market waste and urban gardening by composting in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Samaniego, J; Pérez-Murcia, M D; Bustamante, M A; Paredes, C; Pérez-Espinosa, A; Gavilanes-Terán, I; López, M; Marhuenda-Egea, F C; Brito, H; Moral, R

    2017-01-01

    Currently, the management of urban waste streams in developing countries is not optimized yet, and in many cases these wastes are disposed untreated in open dumps. This fact causes serious environmental and health problems due to the presence of contaminants and pathogens. Frequently, the use of specific low-cost strategies reduces the total amount of wastes. These strategies are mainly associated to the identification, separate collection and composting of specific organic waste streams, such as vegetable and fruit refuses from food markets and urban gardening activities. Concretely, in the Chimborazo Region (Ecuador), more than 80% of municipal solid waste is dumped into environment due to the lack of an efficient waste management strategy. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a demonstration project at field scale in this region to evaluate the feasibility of implanting the composting technology not only for the management of the organic waste fluxes from food market and gardening activities to be scaled-up in other developing regions, but also to obtain an end-product with a commercial value as organic fertilizer. Three co-composting mixtures were prepared using market wastes mixed with pruning of trees and ornamental palms as bulking agents. Two piles were created using different proportions of market waste and prunings of trees and ornamental palms: pile 1 (50:33:17) with a C/N ratio 25; pile 2: (60:30:10) with C/N ratio 24 and pile 3 (75:0:25) with C/N ratio 33), prepared with market waste and prunings of ornamental palm. Throughout the process, the temperature of the mixtures was monitored and organic matter evolution was determined using thermogravimetric and chemical techniques. Additionally, physico-chemical, chemical and agronomic parameters were determined to evaluate compost quality. The results obtained indicated that all the piles showed a suitable development of the composting process, with a significant organic matter decomposition

  14. High energy decomposition of halogenated hydrocarbons FY93 final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mincher, B.J.; Arbon, R.E.; Meikrantz, D.H.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this program is to demonstrate a viable process for the decomposition of hazardous organochlorine compounds to nonhazardous products. This process has applicability to the treatment of mixed wastes containing both chlorinated hydrocarbons and radioactive constituents. The organics may be decomposed leaving only the radioactive constituents in the waste. Further, the use of spent nuclear fuel as a gamma-ray source presents a potentially cost effective energy source and elegantly allows the fuel to be considered a resource rather than a liability. During FY93 more than 400 samples were irradiated with fission product gamma-rays. Many of these samples were individual PCB congeners dissolved in isopropanol. These samples were studied to gain an understanding of the mechanism and kinetics of, and to provide a mass balance for, the PCB radiolysis reaction. In addition to research findings this report also contains a summary of efforts expended on technology transfer, professional publications and conference presentations.

  15. Photocatalytic decomposition of cortisone acetate in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romão, Joana Sobral; Hamdy, Mohamed S; Mul, Guido; Baltrusaitis, Jonas

    2015-01-23

    The photocatalytic decomposition of cortisone 21-acetate (CA), a model compound for the commonly used steroid, cortisone, was studied. CA was photocatalytically decomposed in a slurry reactor with the initial rates between 0.11 and 0.46 mg L(-1)min(-1) at 10 mg L(-1) concentration, using the following heterogeneous photocatalysts in decreasing order of their catalytic activity: ZnO>Evonik TiO2 P25>Hombikat TiO2>WO3. Due to the lack of ZnO stability in aqueous solutions, TiO2 P25 was chosen for further experiments. The decomposition reaction was found to be pseudo-first order and the rate constant decreased as a function of increasing initial CA concentration. Changing the initial pH of the CA solution did not affect the reaction rate significantly. The decomposition reaction in the presence of the oxidizing sacrificial agent sodium persulfate showed an observed decomposition rate constant of 0.004 min(-1), lower than that obtained for TiO2 P25 (0.040 min(-1)). The highest photocatalytic degradation rate constant was obtained combining both TiO2 P25 and S2O8(2-) (0.071 min(-1)) showing a synergistic effect. No reactive intermediates were detected using LC-MS showing fast photocatalytic decomposition kinetics of CA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiation induced decomposition of a refractory cefathiamidine intermediate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiburi Bao; Lujun Chen; Jianlong Wang

    2014-01-01

    Diisopropylthiourea (DPT),an intermediate of a widely used cephalosporin,has been found to be one of the most refractory components in cephalosporin synthesis wastewater.This compound cannot be completely removed by conventional biological processes due to its antimicrobial property.Ionizing radiation has been applied in the decomposition of refractory pollutants in recent years and has proved effective.Therefore,the decomposition of DPT by γ-irradiation was studied.The compound was irradiated at the dose of 150-2000 Gy before a change of concentration and UV absorption of the solutions was detected.Furthermore,the decomposition kinetics and radiation yield (G-value) of DPT was investigated.The results of radiation experiments on DPT-containing aqueous showed that the DPT can be effectively degraded by γ-radiation.DPT concentration decreased with increasing absorbed doses.G-values of radiolytic decomposition for DPT (20 mg/L) were 1.04 and 0.47 for absorbed doses of 150 and 2000 Gy,respectively.The initial concentration and pH of the solutions affected the degradation.As the concentration of substrate increased,the decomposition was reduced.The decrease of removal rate and radiation efficacy under alkaline condition suggested that lower pH values benefit the γ-induced degradation.UV absorption from 190 to 250 nm decreased after radiation while that from 250 to 300 nm increased,indicating the formation of by-products.

  17. Development of the destruction technology for radioactive organic solid wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Zin; Park, H.S.; Lee, K.W. [and others

    1999-04-01

    The followings were studied through the project entitled 'Technology development for nuclear fuel cycle waste treatment'. 1. Organic waste decomposition technology development A. Destruction technology for organic wastes using Ag(2)-mediated electrochemical oxidation B. Recovery and regeneration technology for the spent chemicals used in the MEO process 2. Radioactive metal waste recycling technology A. Surface decontamination processes B. Decontamination waste treatment technology 3. Volume reduction technology nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) technology A. Estimation of the amount of radwastes and the optimum volume reduction methodology of domestic NFC B. Pretreatment of spent fuel cladding by electrochemical decontamination C. Hot cell process technology for the treatment of NFC wastes 4. Design and fabrication of the test equipment of volume reduction and reuse of alpha contaminated wastes 5. Evaluation on environmental compatibility of NFC A. Development of evaluation methodology on environmental friendliness of NFC B. Residual activity assessment of recycling wastes. (author). 321 refs., 54 tabs., 183 figs.

  18. Industrial Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    of the system industry has to inform at the planning stage and afterwards in yearly reports on their waste arising and how the waste is managed. If available such information is very helpful in obtaining information about that specific industry. However, in many countries there is very little information......Industrial waste is waste from industrial production and manufacturing. Industry covers many industrial sectors and within each sector large variations are found in terms of which raw materials are used, which production technology is used and which products are produced. Available data on unit...... generation rates and material composition as well as determining factors are discussed in this chapter. Characterizing industrial waste is faced with the problem that often only a part of the waste is handled in the municipal waste system, where information is easily accessible. In addition part...

  19. The inner structure of empirical mode decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yung-Hung; Young, Hsu-Wen Vincent; Lo, Men-Tzung

    2016-11-01

    The empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is a nonlinear method that is truly adaptive with good localization property in the time domain for analyzing non-stationary complex data. The EMD has been proven useful in a wide range of applications. However, due to the nonlinear and complex nature of the sifting process, the most essential step of the EMD, a firm mathematical foundation or a transparent physical description are still lacked for EMD. Here, we embark on constructing a mathematical theory of the sifting operator. We first show that the sifting operator can be expressed as the data plus the sum of the responses to the impulses (multiplied by the data value) at the extrema. Such an expression of the sifting operator is then used to investigate the adaptive nature and the localizing effect of the EMD. Alternatively, the sifting operator can also be represented by a sifting matrix, which depends nonlinearly on the extrema distribution. Based on the eigen-decomposition of the sifting matrix, the transfer function of the sifting process is analyzed. Finally we answer what an intrinsic mode function (IMF) is from the wave perspective by exploring the physical basis of the IMFs.

  20. Overlapping Community Detection based on Network Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhuanlian; Zhang, Xingyi; Sun, Dengdi; Luo, Bin

    2016-04-01

    Community detection in complex network has become a vital step to understand the structure and dynamics of networks in various fields. However, traditional node clustering and relatively new proposed link clustering methods have inherent drawbacks to discover overlapping communities. Node clustering is inadequate to capture the pervasive overlaps, while link clustering is often criticized due to the high computational cost and ambiguous definition of communities. So, overlapping community detection is still a formidable challenge. In this work, we propose a new overlapping community detection algorithm based on network decomposition, called NDOCD. Specifically, NDOCD iteratively splits the network by removing all links in derived link communities, which are identified by utilizing node clustering technique. The network decomposition contributes to reducing the computation time and noise link elimination conduces to improving the quality of obtained communities. Besides, we employ node clustering technique rather than link similarity measure to discover link communities, thus NDOCD avoids an ambiguous definition of community and becomes less time-consuming. We test our approach on both synthetic and real-world networks. Results demonstrate the superior performance of our approach both in computation time and accuracy compared to state-of-the-art algorithms.

  1. Experimental study of trimethyl aluminum decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi; Pan, Yang; Yang, Jiuzhong; Jiang, Zhiming; Fang, Haisheng

    2017-09-01

    Trimethyl aluminum (TMA) is an important precursor used for metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of most Al-containing structures, in particular of nitride structures. The reaction mechanism of TMA with ammonia is neither clear nor certain due to its complexity. Pyrolysis of trimethyl metal is the start of series of reactions, thus significantly affecting the growth. Experimental study of TMA pyrolysis, however, has not yet been conducted in detail. In this paper, a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer is adopted to measure the TMA decomposition from room temperature to 800 °C in a special pyrolysis furnace, activated by soft X-ray from the synchrotron radiation. The results show that generation of methyl, ethane and monomethyl aluminum (MMA) indicates the start of the pyrolysis process. In the low temperature range from 25 °C to 700 °C, the main product is dimethyl aluminum (DMA) from decomposition of TMA. For temperatures larger than 700 °C, the main products are MMA, DMA, methyl and ethane.

  2. Gauss decomposition for quantum groups and duality

    CERN Document Server

    Damaskinsky, E V; Lyakhovsky, V D; Sokolov, M A

    1995-01-01

    The Gauss decomposition of quantum groups and supergroups are considered. The main attention is paid to the R-matrix formulation of the Gauss decomposition and its properties as well as its relation to the contraction procedure. Duality aspects of the Gauss decomposition are also touched. For clarity of exposition a few simple examples are considered in some details.

  3. Functionality Decomposition by Compositional Correctness Preserving Transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinksma, Hendrik; Langerak, Romanus

    1995-01-01

    We present an algorithm for the decomposition of processes in a process algebraic framework. Decomposition, or the refinement of process substructure, is an important design principle in the top-down development of concurrent systems. In the approach that we follow the decomposition is based on a

  4. Nonlinear mode decomposition: A noise-robust, adaptive decomposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatsenko, Dmytro; McClintock, Peter V. E.; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2015-09-01

    The signals emanating from complex systems are usually composed of a mixture of different oscillations which, for a reliable analysis, should be separated from each other and from the inevitable background of noise. Here we introduce an adaptive decomposition tool—nonlinear mode decomposition (NMD)—which decomposes a given signal into a set of physically meaningful oscillations for any wave form, simultaneously removing the noise. NMD is based on the powerful combination of time-frequency analysis techniques—which, together with the adaptive choice of their parameters, make it extremely noise robust—and surrogate data tests used to identify interdependent oscillations and to distinguish deterministic from random activity. We illustrate the application of NMD to both simulated and real signals and demonstrate its qualitative and quantitative superiority over other approaches, such as (ensemble) empirical mode decomposition, Karhunen-Loève expansion, and independent component analysis. We point out that NMD is likely to be applicable and useful in many different areas of research, such as geophysics, finance, and the life sciences. The necessary matlab codes for running NMD are freely available for download.

  5. Nonlinear mode decomposition: a noise-robust, adaptive decomposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatsenko, Dmytro; McClintock, Peter V E; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2015-09-01

    The signals emanating from complex systems are usually composed of a mixture of different oscillations which, for a reliable analysis, should be separated from each other and from the inevitable background of noise. Here we introduce an adaptive decomposition tool-nonlinear mode decomposition (NMD)-which decomposes a given signal into a set of physically meaningful oscillations for any wave form, simultaneously removing the noise. NMD is based on the powerful combination of time-frequency analysis techniques-which, together with the adaptive choice of their parameters, make it extremely noise robust-and surrogate data tests used to identify interdependent oscillations and to distinguish deterministic from random activity. We illustrate the application of NMD to both simulated and real signals and demonstrate its qualitative and quantitative superiority over other approaches, such as (ensemble) empirical mode decomposition, Karhunen-Loève expansion, and independent component analysis. We point out that NMD is likely to be applicable and useful in many different areas of research, such as geophysics, finance, and the life sciences. The necessary matlab codes for running NMD are freely available for download.

  6. Influence of calcium carbonate on the decomposition of asbestos contained in end-of-life products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belardi, G. [Environmental Geology and GeoEngineering Institute (CNR), Area della ricerca RM1, via Salaria km 29,300, 00016 Monterotondo (Rome) (Italy); Piga, L., E-mail: luigi.piga@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Environment, Sapienza University of Rome, via Eudossiana 84, 00184 Rome (Italy)

    2013-12-10

    Highlights: • We characterized end-of-life asbestos-containing materials. • In the range 620–680 °C, calcite and quartz affect decomposition of asbestos. • Hypothesized decomposition reactions match with solid phases revealed by XRD analysis. • TGA of the content of chrysotile gives good results both in air and in nitrogen. - Abstract: Three bearing-asbestos wastes, friction material, vinyl-asbestos (linoleum) and cement-asbestos mainly containing chrysotile were characterized. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRDP), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with microanalysis observations and thermal analysis (TGA/DTA) were carried out on the materials as received and after heating at 1100 °C in order to observe their structural changes and thermal behaviours. A quantitative determination of chrysotile in the friction material was also carried out. To study the influence of CaCO{sub 3} on the decomposition of asbestos, the three techniques were also applied on the linoleum and cement-asbestos at room temperature and at 1100 °C after leaching of the materials with 1:3 HCl to remove the carbonates present in the wastes. The results show that the presence of CaCO{sub 3} prevents the asbestos to decompose according to the known decomposition reactions and leads to the formation of calcium-silicate compounds. When CaCO{sub 3} is removed by washing with HCl, decomposition of asbestos proceeds according to the expected reactions.

  7. Comparative waste forms study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wald, J.W.; Lokken, R.O.; Shade, J.W.; Rusin, J.M.

    1980-12-01

    A number of alternative process and waste form options exist for the immobilization of nuclear wastes. Although data exists on the characterization of these alternative waste forms, a straightforward comparison of product properties is difficult, due to the lack of standardized testing procedures. The characterization study described in this report involved the application of the same volatility, mechanical strength and leach tests to ten alternative waste forms, to assess product durability. Bulk property, phase analysis and microstructural examination of the simulated products, whose waste loading varied from 5% to 100% was also conducted. The specific waste forms investigated were as follows: Cold Pressed and Sintered PW-9 Calcine; Hot Pressed PW-9 Calcine; Hot Isostatic Pressed PW-9 Calcine; Cold Pressed and Sintered SPC-5B Supercalcine; Hot Isostatic pressed SPC-5B Supercalcine; Sintered PW-9 and 50% Glass Frit; Glass 76-68; Celsian Glass Ceramic; Type II Portland Cement and 10% PW-9 Calcine; and Type II Portland Cement and 10% SPC-5B Supercalcine. Bulk property data were used to calculate and compare the relative quantities of waste form volume produced at a spent fuel processing rate of 5 metric ton uranium/day. This quantity ranged from 3173 L/day (5280 Kg/day) for 10% SPC-5B supercalcine in cement to 83 L/day (294 Kg/day) for 100% calcine. Mechanical strength, volatility, and leach resistance tests provide data related to waste form durability. Glass, glass-ceramic and supercalcine ranked high in waste form durability where as the 100% PW-9 calcine ranked low. All other materials ranked between these two groupings.

  8. The anti NPP movement in change. New challenges due to the search for a final repository for high-level radioactive waste; Die Anti-AKW-Bewegung im Wandel. Neue Herausforderungen durch die Endlagersuche fuer hochradioaktive Abfaelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunnengraeber, Achim [Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Fachbereich Politik- und Sozialwissenschaften; Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Forschungszentrum fuer Umweltpolitik (FFU)

    2013-07-01

    The German Bundestag has decided on June 28th, 2013 the law on the site selection (StandAG) has been enacted as ''national consensus'' for ''social peace''. The compromise is considered to solve the polarized conflict with respect to the site for an final repository for high-level radioactive waste. New challenges result for the government and the civil society.

  9. VERMICOMPOSTING AS AN ALTERNATIVE WAY OF BIODEGRADABLE WASTE MANAGEMENT FOR SMALL MUNICIPALITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Sosnecka

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of vermicomposting as a method of bioconversion of organic wastes, inter alia sewage sludge, biodegradable fraction of municipal solid wastes and green wastes. Vermicomposting is a biological process in which earthworms are employed to cooperate with microorganisms in order to convert organic wastes into a valuable product. It is considered as a relatively low cost and environmentally-friendly method of waste treatment. Nevertheless, as each biotechnology, the process is limited to some physical, chemical and biological parameters. In this study, sewage sludge coming from medium-sized wastewater treatment plant was mixed with mown grass, sawdust and organic fraction of municipal wastes and vermicomposted for 5 weeks with Eisenia fetida and Eisenia andrei as main actors. The scope of the research was to 1 assess the influence of E. fetida and E.andrei composting earthworms on the physical and chemical properties of the product; 2 changes of concentration of selected heavy metals and their available forms in compost during the process, 3 the effects of substrates on earthworms survival and reproduction. Selected earthworm species had shown a high tolerance to the contaminants present in sewage sludge and a positive impact on the quality of the product was noted. Vermicomposting enhances decomposition of organic matter, leads to decrease in C/N ratio and pH, and changes the availability of some heavy metals and its total content in substratum. Experimental medium led earthworms to increase body weight due to the presence of large amount of organic matter, while the reproduction was importantly reduced. Vermicomposting can be considered as a method of treatment of solid wastes, mainly in the case of small municipalities.

  10. Microbiological biodiversity in poultry and paddy straw wastes in composting systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Devi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Immense quantity of waste is generated in association with poultry meat egg and crop production. The potential risks due to disposal of these wastes are magnified as a result of dense refinement of poultry production and the decreasing amount of land available for waste disposal. The study aims at studying the microbiological biodiversity of poultry waste and paddy straw based co-composting system. The predominant microflora of the poultry manure were bacteria, fungi, enteric bacteria and spore forming bacteria whose population was high at the initiation of composting but decreased significantly as the compost approached maturity. The initial load of inherent enteric groups of bacteria in poultry waste, that also includes some pathogenic ones, is considerably reduced and some new vital groups contributed to compost quality as the microbiological biodiversity sets in the system and becomes stable. Major fraction of nitrogen of poultry waste was subjected to ammonia volatilization and a fraction of it conserved by co-composting it in conjunction with wastes having low nitrogen contents. In the treatment T1 and T5, where poultry manure and paddy straws alone were composted, 60 and 30 percent of organic carbon, respectively, was lost over a period of six months. Whereas in treatments T2,T3 and T4, poultry manure and paddy straw were co-composted in the ratio of 3:1, 2:2 and 1:3, respectively, 51.4,45.0 and 37.0 percent of carbon, respectively, was lost during decomposition. The C: N ratio in all the treatments decreased significantly to 18.3 for T1, 24.7 for T2, 27.0 for T3, 34.9 for T4 and 38.5 for T5 at the end of composting period.

  11. Variance decomposition in stochastic simulators

    KAUST Repository

    Le Maître, O. P.

    2015-06-28

    This work aims at the development of a mathematical and computational approach that enables quantification of the inherent sources of stochasticity and of the corresponding sensitivities in stochastic simulations of chemical reaction networks. The approach is based on reformulating the system dynamics as being generated by independent standardized Poisson processes. This reformulation affords a straightforward identification of individual realizations for the stochastic dynamics of each reaction channel, and consequently a quantitative characterization of the inherent sources of stochasticity in the system. By relying on the Sobol-Hoeffding decomposition, the reformulation enables us to perform an orthogonal decomposition of the solution variance. Thus, by judiciously exploiting the inherent stochasticity of the system, one is able to quantify the variance-based sensitivities associated with individual reaction channels, as well as the importance of channel interactions. Implementation of the algorithms is illustrated in light of simulations of simplified systems, including the birth-death, Schlögl, and Michaelis-Menten models.

  12. Variance decomposition in stochastic simulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Maître, O P; Knio, O M; Moraes, A

    2015-06-28

    This work aims at the development of a mathematical and computational approach that enables quantification of the inherent sources of stochasticity and of the corresponding sensitivities in stochastic simulations of chemical reaction networks. The approach is based on reformulating the system dynamics as being generated by independent standardized Poisson processes. This reformulation affords a straightforward identification of individual realizations for the stochastic dynamics of each reaction channel, and consequently a quantitative characterization of the inherent sources of stochasticity in the system. By relying on the Sobol-Hoeffding decomposition, the reformulation enables us to perform an orthogonal decomposition of the solution variance. Thus, by judiciously exploiting the inherent stochasticity of the system, one is able to quantify the variance-based sensitivities associated with individual reaction channels, as well as the importance of channel interactions. Implementation of the algorithms is illustrated in light of simulations of simplified systems, including the birth-death, Schlögl, and Michaelis-Menten models.

  13. Variance decomposition in stochastic simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Maître, O. P.; Knio, O. M.; Moraes, A.

    2015-06-01

    This work aims at the development of a mathematical and computational approach that enables quantification of the inherent sources of stochasticity and of the corresponding sensitivities in stochastic simulations of chemical reaction networks. The approach is based on reformulating the system dynamics as being generated by independent standardized Poisson processes. This reformulation affords a straightforward identification of individual realizations for the stochastic dynamics of each reaction channel, and consequently a quantitative characterization of the inherent sources of stochasticity in the system. By relying on the Sobol-Hoeffding decomposition, the reformulation enables us to perform an orthogonal decomposition of the solution variance. Thus, by judiciously exploiting the inherent stochasticity of the system, one is able to quantify the variance-based sensitivities associated with individual reaction channels, as well as the importance of channel interactions. Implementation of the algorithms is illustrated in light of simulations of simplified systems, including the birth-death, Schlögl, and Michaelis-Menten models.

  14. Electrochemical decomposition of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    McGee, Gerard Anthony

    1993-01-01

    This work involves the characterisation of the electrochemical decomposition of chlorinated hydrocarbons. A variety of methods were employed involving the use of catalytic reagents to enhance the rate at which chlorinated organic compounds are reduced. The first reagent used was oxygen which was electrochemically reduced to superoxide in nonaqueous solvents. Superoxide is a reactive intermediate and decomposes chlorinated hydrocarbons. However it was found that since the rate of reaction betw...

  15. Decomposition of childhood malnutrition in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunil, Thankam S; Sagna, Marguerite

    2015-10-01

    Childhood malnutrition is a major problem in developing countries, and in Cambodia, it is estimated that approximately 42% of the children are stunted, which is considered to be very high. In the present study, we examined the effects of proximate and socio-economic determinants on childhood malnutrition in Cambodia. In addition, we examined the effects of the changes in these proximate determinants on childhood malnutrition between 2000 and 2005. Our analytical approach included descriptive, logistic regression and decomposition analyses. Separate analyses are estimated for 2000 and 2005 survey. The primary component of the difference in stunting is attributable to the rates component, indicating that the decrease of stunting is due mainly to the decrease in stunting rates between 2000 and 2005. While majority of the differences in childhood malnutrition between 2000 and 2005 can be attributed to differences in the distribution of malnutrition determinants between 2000 and 2005, differences in their effects also showed some significance. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A Lagrangian Dynamic Mode Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Sesterhenn, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    Temporal or spatial structures are readily extracted from complex data by modal decompositions like POD or DMD. Subspaces of that decompositions serve as reduced order models and define spatial structures in time or temporal structures in space. Convecting phenomena pose a major problem to those decompositions. A structure travelling with a certain group velocity will be perceived as a plethora of modes in time or space respectively. This manifests itself for example in poorly decaying Singular Values when using a POD. The poor decay is very counter-intuitive, since we expect a single structure to be represented by a few modes. The intuition proves to be correct and we show that in a properly chosen reference frame along the characteristic defined by the group velocity, a POD or DMD reduces moving structures to a few modes, as expected. Beyond serving as a reduced model, the re- sulting entity can be used to define a constant or minimally changing structure in turbulent flows. This can be interpreted as an em...

  17. The thermal decomposition of nitrocellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D. E. G.; Turcotte, R.; Acheson, B.; Kwok, Q. S. M.; Vachon, M. [Natural Resources Canada, CANMET Canadian Explosives Research Laboratory, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2003-03-01

    In the past, the thermal decomposition of nitrocellulose, the main high-energy component of explosives and solid rocket propellant compositions, was studied using DSC, thermogravimetry and accelerating rate calorimetry. This paper discusses new results obtained by accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC), heat flux calorimetry (HFC), simultaneous thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) coupled to FTIR and mass spectrometry (MS). Experiments with ARC showed that both the onset temperature and the activation energy for the thermal decomposition depend on sample mass. Evaluating the thermal decomposition of nitrocellulose using HFC at various pressures of argon between ambient and 27 MPa showed that the true onset temperature and the width of the corresponding exotherms are a strong function of the initial pressure. Also presented are the results of investigations conducted using TG-DTA-FTIR-MS in air and in helium. Corresponding to the sharp exotherm observed in helium, many gaseous product species were detected in a narrow band in FTIR and MS spectra. The main species observed by FTIR were carbon dioxide, formic acid, carbon monoxide and trace amounts of formaldehyde, nitrous oxide and water. In comparison, the products detected in air were found to occur in a much wider temperature range. Absorbances of carbon dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and water were observed to have been strongly enhanced in air, while organic species such as formic acid and formaldehyde were significantly depressed. 13 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  18. Industrial Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Industrial waste is waste from industrial production and manufacturing. Industry covers many industrial sectors and within each sector large variations are found in terms of which raw materials are used, which production technology is used and which products are produced. Available data on unit...... generation rates and material composition as well as determining factors are discussed in this chapter. Characterizing industrial waste is faced with the problem that often only a part of the waste is handled in the municipal waste system, where information is easily accessible. In addition part...... of the industrial waste may in periods, depending on market opportunities and prices, be traded as secondary rawmaterials. Production-specificwaste from primary production, for example steel slag, is not included in the current presentation. In some countries industries must be approved or licensed and as part...

  19. WASTE MANAGEMENT IN A SCHOOL RESTAURANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Peruchin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the amount of waste generated and its proper final destination is one of the greatest environmental issues. The higher education institutions are an important source of waste due to its diversity of teaching, researching and extension activities undertaken by academic world. The university restaurant supplies meals to the university community and ends up generating a kind of waste similar to the domestic waste, but in a bigger amount. The aim of this study was to investigate the gravimetric composition of the waste generated in the school restaurant of a higher-education institution in southern Brazil and provide a diagnostic of the current waste management. The data were obtained through a characterization process of the solid waste generated in one week; an interview with the responsible managers and direct observation of the local structure. It was found non-existence of a Management Plan for Solid Waste, as well as a lack of practices relative to its management. The waste segregation is impaired due the lack of specific and labeled bins, besides the overworked employees. Along the experimental period it were characterized 547,068 Kg of solid waste, in which more than 80% were organic waste. The paper concludes that the organic waste could be treated by composting. It is recommended the formulation and implementation of an integrated management plan for solid waste in order to provide adequate infrastructure for waste management in the school restaurant.

  20. Waste indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall, O.; Lassen, C.; Hansen, E. [Cowi A/S, Lyngby (Denmark)

    2003-07-01

    The Waste Indicator Project focuses on methods to evaluate the efficiency of waste management. The project proposes the use of three indicators for resource consumption, primary energy and landfill requirements, based on the life-cycle principles applied in the EDIP Project. Trial runs are made With the indicators on paper, glass packaging and aluminium, and two models are identified for mapping the Danish waste management, of which the least extensive focuses on real and potential savings. (au)

  1. Limits to acoustic sensing and modal decomposition using FBGs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Patrick; Davis, Claire; Rosalie, Cédric; Rajic, Nik

    2016-04-01

    Lamb-wave based structural health monitoring (SHM) approaches are typically constrained to operate below the first cut-off frequency to simplify the interpretation of the wave field in the time-domain. However from a diagnostic perspective, it is desirable to unlock the additional information encoded in the higher-order Lamb wave spectrum. Wave-mode decomposition is necessary for the extraction of useful information from multi-modal acoustic wave fields, which requires spatially dense sampling over the field. The instrument of choice for this task is the laser Doppler vibrometer, which is capable of producing detailed spectral decompositions. However vibrometry is not suited to in-situ measurement for SHM. Fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) are capable of sensing Lamb waves and detection of higher order modes using FBGs has been previously demonstrated. The ability to multiplex multiple short-length gratings along a single fibre to create an FBG array gives rise to an in-situ sensor with sufficiently dense spatial sampling of an acoustic wave field to perform useful wave-mode decomposition. This paper explores some of the fundamental limits to modal decomposition resolution and bandwidth that exist for such sensors. Potential sources of noise and distortion encountered due to limitations of the sensor fabrication and interrogation methods are also discussed. In addition, modal decomposition of Lamb waves with frequencies up to 1.25 MHz is demonstrated in a laboratory experiment using an array of sixteen ~1 mm long gratings bonded to an aluminium plate. At least four modes are distinguishable in the resulting spectral decomposition.

  2. Spinodal decomposition and precipitation in Cu–Cr nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheibani, S., E-mail: ssheibani@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Heshmati-Manesh, S.; Ataie, A. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Caballero, A.; Criado, J.M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla and Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, CSIC – Universidad de Sevilla (Spain)

    2014-02-25

    Highlights: • Precipitation mechanism of supersaturated Cu-Cr solid solutions was investigated. • Precipitation begins with spinodal decomposition and ends with nucleation and growth. • Kinetics of decomposition is faster in presence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-particles. -- Abstract: In this study, spinodal decomposition and precipitation mechanism of mechanically alloyed supersaturated Cu–3wt.%Cr and Cu–5wt.%Cr solid solutions was investigated under nonisothermal aging. Decomposition mechanism and kinetics were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Also, the microstructure was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Effect of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reinforcement on the aging kinetics was also evaluated. It was found that Cu–3wt.%Cr and Cu–5wt.%Cr solid solutions undergo spinodal decomposition at initial stages of ageing. However, decomposition mechanism was changed to nucleation and growth by the aging progress. The aging kinetics for the Cu–Cr/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composition appeared to be slightly faster than that for Cu–Cr, since the ageing activation energy is decreased in presence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-particles. This behavior is probably due to the higher dislocation density and other structural defects previously produced during ball milling. A detailed comparison of the DSC results with those obtained by TEM, showing good consistency, has been presented. The average size of Cr-rich precipitates was about 10 nm in the copper matrix.

  3. Numerical analysis of thermal decomposition for RDX, TNT, and Composition B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin Hyuk; Nyande, Baggie W; Kim, Hyoun Soo; Park, Jung Su; Lee, Woo Jin; Oh, Min

    2016-05-05

    Demilitarization of waste explosives on a commercial scale has become an important issue in many countries, and this has created a need for research in this area. TNT, RDX and Composition B have been used as military explosives, and they are very sensitive to thermal shock. For the safe waste treatment of these high-energy and highly sensitive explosives, the most plausible candidate suggested has been thermal decomposition in a rotary kiln. This research examines the safe treatment of waste TNT, RDX and Composition B in a rotary kiln type incinerator with regard to suitable operating conditions. Thermal decomposition in this study includes melting, 3 condensed phase reactions in the liquid phase and 263 gas phase reactions. Rigorous mathematical modeling and dynamic simulation for thermal decomposition were carried out for analysis of dynamic behavior in the reactor. The results showed time transient changes of the temperature, components and mass of the explosives and comparisons were made for the 3 explosives. It was concluded that waste explosives subject to heat supplied by hot air at 523.15K were incinerated safely without any thermal detonation.

  4. Leaf litter mixtures alter microbial community development: mechanisms for non-additive effects in litter decomposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha K Chapman

    Full Text Available To what extent microbial community composition can explain variability in ecosystem processes remains an open question in ecology. Microbial decomposer communities can change during litter decomposition due to biotic interactions and shifting substrate availability. Though relative abundance of decomposers may change due to mixing leaf litter, linking these shifts to the non-additive patterns often recorded in mixed species litter decomposition rates has been elusive, and links community composition to ecosystem function. We extracted phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs from single species and mixed species leaf litterbags after 10 and 27 months of decomposition in a mixed conifer forest. Total PLFA concentrations were 70% higher on litter mixtures than single litter types after 10 months, but were only 20% higher after 27 months. Similarly, fungal-to-bacterial ratios differed between mixed and single litter types after 10 months of decomposition, but equalized over time. Microbial community composition, as indicated by principal components analyses, differed due to both litter mixing and stage of litter decomposition. PLFA biomarkers a15∶0 and cy17∶0, which indicate gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria respectively, in particular drove these shifts. Total PLFA correlated significantly with single litter mass loss early in decomposition but not at later stages. We conclude that litter mixing alters microbial community development, which can contribute to synergisms in litter decomposition. These findings advance our understanding of how changing forest biodiversity can alter microbial communities and the ecosystem processes they mediate.

  5. Leaf Litter Mixtures Alter Microbial Community Development: Mechanisms for Non-Additive Effects in Litter Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Samantha K.; Newman, Gregory S.; Hart, Stephen C.; Schweitzer, Jennifer A.; Koch, George W.

    2013-01-01

    To what extent microbial community composition can explain variability in ecosystem processes remains an open question in ecology. Microbial decomposer communities can change during litter decomposition due to biotic interactions and shifting substrate availability. Though relative abundance of decomposers may change due to mixing leaf litter, linking these shifts to the non-additive patterns often recorded in mixed species litter decomposition rates has been elusive, and links community composition to ecosystem function. We extracted phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) from single species and mixed species leaf litterbags after 10 and 27 months of decomposition in a mixed conifer forest. Total PLFA concentrations were 70% higher on litter mixtures than single litter types after 10 months, but were only 20% higher after 27 months. Similarly, fungal-to-bacterial ratios differed between mixed and single litter types after 10 months of decomposition, but equalized over time. Microbial community composition, as indicated by principal components analyses, differed due to both litter mixing and stage of litter decomposition. PLFA biomarkers a15∶0 and cy17∶0, which indicate gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria respectively, in particular drove these shifts. Total PLFA correlated significantly with single litter mass loss early in decomposition but not at later stages. We conclude that litter mixing alters microbial community development, which can contribute to synergisms in litter decomposition. These findings advance our understanding of how changing forest biodiversity can alter microbial communities and the ecosystem processes they mediate. PMID:23658639

  6. E-waste hazard: The impending challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto Violet

    2008-01-01

    Electronic waste or e-waste is one of the rapidly growing problems of the world. E-waste comprises of a multitude of components, some containing toxic substances that can have an adverse impact on human health and the environment if not handled properly. In India, e-waste management assumes greater significance not only due to the generation of its own e-waste but also because of the dumping of e-waste from developed countries. This is coupled with India′s lack of appropriate infrastru...

  7. Unexpected high decomposition of legume residues in dry season soils from tropical coffee plantations and crop lands

    OpenAIRE

    Abera, Girma; Wolde-Meskel, Endalkachew; Bakken, Lars

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Crop residues are essential fertilizer source of low-input farming systems in Sub-Saharan Africa. However, crop residues provide nutrients only if they decompose in the soil. Decomposition is assumed to be very low during the dry season due to the scarcity of water, but there are few quantitative knowledge on decomposition under such conditions. Therefore, we studied the decomposition of legume residues, haricot bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and pigeon pea (Cajanus caj...

  8. METHODOLOGY & CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BARKER, S.A.

    2006-07-27

    Waste stored within tank farm double-shell tanks (DST) and single-shell tanks (SST) generates flammable gas (principally hydrogen) to varying degrees depending on the type, amount, geometry, and condition of the waste. The waste generates hydrogen through the radiolysis of water and organic compounds, thermolytic decomposition of organic compounds, and corrosion of a tank's carbon steel walls. Radiolysis and thermolytic decomposition also generates ammonia. Nonflammable gases, which act as dilutents (such as nitrous oxide), are also produced. Additional flammable gases (e.g., methane) are generated by chemical reactions between various degradation products of organic chemicals present in the tanks. Volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals in tanks also produce organic vapors. The generated gases in tank waste are either released continuously to the tank headspace or are retained in the waste matrix. Retained gas may be released in a spontaneous or induced gas release event (GRE) that can significantly increase the flammable gas concentration in the tank headspace as described in RPP-7771. The document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 5 is the annual update of the methodology and calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs.

  9. Repeated application of organic waste affects soil organic matter composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peltre, Clément; Gregorich, Edward G.; Bruun, Sander

    2017-01-01

    of different types of carbon compounds in soil. The objective of this study was to identify and characterise changes in soil organic matter (SOM) composition after repeated applications of organic waste. Soil from the CRUCIAL field experiment in Denmark was sampled after 12 years of annual application...... that there was accumulation in soil of different C compounds for the different types of applied organic waste, which appeared to be related to the degree to which microbial activity was stimulated and the type of microbial communities applied with the wastes or associated with the decomposition of applied wastes...

  10. Leaf litter decomposition in temperate deciduous forest stands with a decreasing fraction of beech (Fagus sylvatica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Mascha; Viedenz, Karin; Polle, Andrea; Thomas, Frank M

    2010-12-01

    We hypothesised that the decomposition rates of leaf litter will increase along a gradient of decreasing fraction of the European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and increasing tree species diversity in the generally beech-dominated Central European temperate deciduous forests due to an increase in litter quality. We studied the decomposition of leaf litter including its lignin fraction in monospecific (pure beech) stands and in stands with up to five tree genera (Acer spp., Carpinus betulus, Fagus sylvatica, Fraxinus excelsior, Tilia spp.) using a litterbag approach. Litter and lignin decomposition was more rapid in stand-representative litter from multispecific stands than in litter from pure beech stands. Except for beech litter, the decomposition rates of species-specific tree litter did not differ significantly among the stand types, but were most rapid in Fraxinus excelsior and slowest in beech in an interspecific comparison. Pairwise comparisons of the decomposition of beech litter with litter of the other tree species (except for Acer platanoides) revealed a "home field advantage" of up to 20% (more rapid litter decomposition in stands with a high fraction of its own species than in stands with a different tree species composition). Decomposition of stand-representative litter mixtures displayed additive characteristics, not significantly more rapid than predicted by the decomposition of litter from the individual tree species. Leaf litter decomposition rates were positively correlated with the initial N and Ca concentrations of the litter, and negatively with the initial C:N, C:P and lignin:N ratios. The results support our hypothesis that the overall decomposition rates are mainly influenced by the chemical composition of the individual litter species. Thus, the fraction of individual tree species in the species composition seems to be more important for the litter decomposition rates than tree species diversity itself.

  11. Food waste or wasted food

    OpenAIRE

    van Graas, Maaike Helene

    2014-01-01

    In the industrialized world large amounts of food are daily disposed of. A significant share of this waste could be avoided if different choices were made by individual households. Each day, every household makes decisions to maximize their happiness while balancing restricted amounts of time and money. Thinking of the food waste issue in terms of the consumer choice problem where households can control the amount of wasted food, we can model how households can make the best decisions. I...

  12. Wasted waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemczynowicz, J

    1996-11-01

    This article presents the increasing mismanagement of water as a result of increasing delivery of water volume, water pollution, and water wasting. One example of water mismanagement is irrigation, through which 67% of water is withdrawn from the hydrological cycle. In addition, reports from European communities reveal that pesticides from agriculture worsen the existing underground pollution. Furthermore, a 25% drop in land productivity was observed in Africa due to erosion, salinization, water logging, and desertification. Also, 23% of withdrawn water goes to industries, which are the major polluters. Since 1900 about 250,000 tons of cadmium have been produced worldwide, which eventually enter and harm the aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Moreover, high mercury levels were observed in Malaysia's Kelang River in the late 1980s, and river pollution in Thailand and Malaysia is recorded to be 30-100 times higher than accepted levels. Aside from that, the human race must also understand that there is a connection between water scarcity and water quality. When there is water pollution, it is expected that many people will suffer diarrheal diseases and intestinal parasite infections, which will further increase the mortality rate to 3.3 million per year. Realizing the severity of the problem, it is suggested that the human race must learn to recycle water like stormwater to prevent scarcity with drinking water.

  13. Radiation decomposition of alcohols and chloro phenols in micellar systems; Descomposicion por irradiacion de alcoholes y clorofenoles en sistemas micelares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno A, J

    1998-12-31

    The effect of surfactants on the radiation decomposition yield of alcohols and chloro phenols has been studied with gamma doses of 2, 3, and 5 KGy. These compounds were used as typical pollutants in waste water, and the effect of the water solubility, chemical structure, and the nature of the surfactant, anionic or cationic, was studied. The results show that anionic surfactant like sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), improve the radiation decomposition yield of ortho-chloro phenol, while cationic surfactant like cetyl trimethylammonium chloride (CTAC), improve the radiation decomposition yield of butyl alcohol. A similar behavior is expected for those alcohols with water solubility close to the studied ones. Surfactant concentrations below critical micellar concentration (CMC), inhibited radiation decomposition for both types of alcohols. However radiation decomposition yield increased when surfactant concentrations were bigger than the CMC. Aromatic alcohols decomposition was more marked than for linear alcohols decomposition. On a mixture of alcohols and chloro phenols in aqueous solution the radiation decomposition yield decreased with increasing surfactant concentration. Nevertheless, there were competitive reactions between the alcohols, surfactants dimers, hydroxyl radical and other reactive species formed on water radiolysis, producing a catalytic positive effect in the decomposition of alcohols. Chemical structure and the number of carbons were not important factors in the radiation decomposition. When an alcohol like ortho-chloro phenol contained an additional chlorine atom, the decomposition of this compound was almost constant. In conclusion the micellar effect depend on both, the nature of the surfactant (anionic or cationic) and the chemical structure of the alcohols. The results of this study are useful for wastewater treatment plants based on the oxidant effect of the hydroxyl radical, like in advanced oxidation processes, or in combined treatment such as

  14. Corrosion Testing of Monofrax K-3 Refractory in Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Alternate Reductant Feeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jantzen, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-04-06

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) uses a combination of reductants and oxidants while converting high level waste (HLW) to a borosilicate waste form. A reducing flowsheet is maintained to retain radionuclides in their reduced oxidation states which promotes their incorporation into borosilicate glass. For the last 20 years of processing, the DWPF has used formic acid as the main reductant and nitric acid as the main oxidant. During reaction in the Chemical Process Cell (CPC), formate and formic acid release measurably significant H2 gas which requires monitoring of certain vessel’s vapor spaces. A switch to a nitric acid-glycolic acid (NG) flowsheet from the nitric-formic (NF) flowsheet is desired as the NG flowsheet releases considerably less H2 gas upon decomposition. This would greatly simplify DWPF processing from a safety standpoint as close monitoring of the H2 gas concentration could become less critical. In terms of the waste glass melter vapor space flammability, the switch from the NF flowsheet to the NG flowsheet showed a reduction of H2 gas production from the vitrification process as well. Due to the positive impact of the switch to glycolic acid determined on the flammability issues, evaluation of the other impacts of glycolic acid on the facility must be examined.

  15. No evidence for leaf-trait dissimilarity effects on litter decomposition, fungal decomposers, and nutrient dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frainer, André; Moretti, Marcelo S; Xu, Wenjing; Gessner, Mark O

    2015-02-01

    Biodiversity and ecosystem-functioning theory suggest that litter mixtures composed of dissimilar leaf species can enhance decomposition due to species trait complementarity. Here we created a continuous gradient of litter chemistry trait variability within species mixtures to assess effects of litter dissimilarity on three related processes in a natural stream: litter decomposition, fungal biomass accrual in the litter, and nitrogen and phosphorus immobilization. Litter from a pool of eight leaf species was analyzed for chemistry traits affecting decomposition (lignin, nitrogen, and phosphorus) and assembled in all of the 28 possible two-species combinations. Litter dissimilarity was characterized in terms of a range of trait-diversity measures, using Euclidean and Gower distances and dendrogram-based indices. We found large differences in decomposition rates among leaf species, but no significant relationships between decomposition rate of individual leaf species and litter trait dissimilarity, irrespective of whether decomposition was mediated by microbes alone or by both microbes and litter-consuming invertebrates. Likewise, no effects of trait dissimilarity emerged on either fungal biomass accrual or changes during decomposition of nitrogen or phosphorus concentrations in individual leaf species. In line with recent meta-analyses, these results provide support for the contention that litter diversity effects on decomposition, at least in streams, are less pronounced than effects on terrestrial primary productivity.

  16. Decomposition of gas-phase diphenylether at 473 K by electron beam generated plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Ha [Institute for Environmental Management Technology, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba West, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Hakoda, Teruyuki [Department of Material Development, Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Kojima, Takuji [Department of Material Development, Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2003-03-07

    Decomposition of gas-phase diphenylether (DPE) in the order of several parts per million by volume (ppmv) was studied as a model compound of dioxin using a flow-type electron-beam reactor at an elevated temperature of 473 K. The ground state oxygen ({sup 3}P) atoms played an important role in the decomposition of DPE resulting in the formation of 1,4-hydroquinone (HQ) as a major ring retaining product. The high yield of hydroquinone indicated that the breakage of ether bond (C-O) is important in the initial step of DPE decomposition. Ring cleavage products were CO and CO{sub 2}, and NO{sub 2} was also produced from background N{sub 2}-O{sub 2}. The sum of the yields of HQ, CO{sub 2} and CO accounts for over 90% of the removed DPE. Hydroxyl radicals (OH) were less important in the dilute DPE decomposition at a high water content, and were mostly consumed by recombination reactions to form hydrogen peroxide. The smaller the initial DPE concentrations, the higher the decomposition efficiency and the lower the yields of primary products. NO scavenges oxygen atoms and decreases the DPE decomposition, while the addition of n-butane causes positive effect on the decomposition of DPE due to the several secondary radicals (HO{sub 2}, alkyl and alkoxy radicals) produced during the decomposition of n-butane.

  17. Mechanisms contributing to the thermal analysis of waste incineration bottom ash and quantification of different carbon species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Stefania; van Zomeren, André; Costa, Giulia; Dijkstra, Joris J; Comans, Rob N J; Lombardi, Francesco

    2013-02-01

    The focus of this study was to identify the main compounds affecting the weight changes of bottom ash (BA) in conventional loss on ignition (LOI) tests and to obtain a better understanding of the individual processes in heterogeneous (waste) materials such as BA. Evaluations were performed on BA samples from a refuse derived fuel incineration (RDF-I) plant and a hospital waste incineration (HW-I) plant using thermogravimetric analysis and subsequent mass spectrometry (TG-MS) analysis of the gaseous thermal decomposition products. Results of TG-MS analysis on RDF-I BA indicated that the LOI measured at 550°C was due to moisture evaporation and dehydration of Ca(OH)(2) and hydrocalumite. Results for the HW-I BA showed that LOI at 550°C was predominantly related to the elemental carbon (EC) content of the sample. Decomposition of CaCO(3) around 700°C was identified in both materials. In addition, we have identified reaction mechanisms that underestimate the EC and overestimate the CaCO(3) contents of the HW-I BA during TG-MS analyses. These types of artefacts are expected to occur also when conventional LOI methods are adopted, in particular for materials that contain CaO/Ca(OH)(2) in combination with EC and/or organic carbon, such as e.g. municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom and fly ashes. We suggest that the same mechanisms that we have found (i.e. in situ carbonation) can also occur during combustion of the waste in the incinerator (between 450 and 650°C) demonstrating that the presence of carbonate in bottom ash is not necessarily indicative for weathering. These results may also give direction to further optimization of waste incineration technologies with regard to stimulating in situ carbonation during incineration and subsequent potential improvement of the leaching behavior of bottom ash.

  18. Modelling volatility by variance decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amado, Cristina; Teräsvirta, Timo

    on the multiplicative decomposition of the variance is developed. It is heavily dependent on Lagrange multiplier type misspecification tests. Finite-sample properties of the strategy and tests are examined by simulation. An empirical application to daily stock returns and another one to daily exchange rate returns...... illustrate the functioning and properties of our modelling strategy in practice. The results show that the long memory type behaviour of the sample autocorrelation functions of the absolute returns can also be explained by deterministic changes in the unconditional variance....

  19. Azimuthal decomposition of optical modes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available of Optical Modes Angela Dudley1, Igor Litvin1, Filippus S. Roux1 and Andrew Forbes1,2,3 1 CSIR National Laser Centre, Pretoria, South Africa 2 School of Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa 3 Laser Research Institute, University... of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch, South Africa Presented at the 2012 South African Institute of Physics Conference University of Pretoria Pretoria, South Africa 12 July 2012 To decompose the azimuthal modes we need two steps: generation and decomposition...

  20. Stochiometry, Microbial community composition and decomposition, a modelling analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berninger, Frank; Zhou, Xuan; Aaltonen, Heidi; Köster, Kajar; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Pumpanen, Jukka

    2017-04-01

    Enzyme activity based litter decomposition models describe the decomposition of soil organic matter as a function of microbial biomass and its activity. In these models, decomposition depends largely on microbial and litter stoïchiometry. We, used the model of Schimel and Weintraub (Soil Biology & Biochemistry 35 (2003) 549-563 largely relying on the modification of Waring B et al. Ecology Letters, (2013) 16: 887-894) and we modified the model to include bacteria, fungi and mycorrizal fungi as decomposer groups assuming different stochiometries. The model was tested against previously published data from a fire chronosequence from northern Finland. The model reconstructed well the development of soil organic matter, microbial biomasses, enzyme actitivies with time after fire. In a theoretical model analysis we tried to understand how the exchange of carbon and nitrogen between mycorrhiza and the plant as different litter stoïchiometries interact. The results indicate that if a high percentage of fungal N uptake is transferred to the plant mycorrhizal biomass will decrease drastically and does decrease, due to low mycorrhizal biomasses, the N uptake of plants. If a lower proportion of the fungal N uptake is transferred to the plant the N uptake of the plants is reasonable stable while the proportion of mycorrhiza of the total fungal biomass varies. The model is also able to simulate priming of soil organic matter decomposition.

  1. The Split Decomposition of a k-Dissimilarity Map

    CERN Document Server

    Herrmann, Sven

    2010-01-01

    A k-dissimilarity map on a finite set X is a function D: \\binom X k -> R assigning a real value to each subset of X with cardinality k. Such functions arise naturally in the area of phylogenetics, where they are commonly used to reconstruct evolutionary trees or networks. In this paper, we show how regular subdivisions of the kth hypersimplex can be used to obtain a canonical decomposition of a k-dissimilarity map into the sum of simpler k-dissimilarity maps arising from bipartitions or splits of X. In the special case k=2, this decomposition is the well-known split decomposition of a distance due to Bandelt and Dress [Adv. Math. 92 (1992), 47-105]. Furthermore, we characterise those sets of splits that may occur in the resulting decompositions of k-dissimilarity maps. As a corollary, we also give a new proof of a theorem of Pachter and Speyer [Appl. Math. Lett. 17 (2004), 615-621] for recovering k-dissimilarity maps from trees.

  2. High Performance Polar Decomposition on Distributed Memory Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Sukkari, Dalal

    2016-08-08

    The polar decomposition of a dense matrix is an important operation in linear algebra. It can be directly calculated through the singular value decomposition (SVD) or iteratively using the QR dynamically-weighted Halley algorithm (QDWH). The former is difficult to parallelize due to the preponderant number of memory-bound operations during the bidiagonal reduction. We investigate the latter scenario, which performs more floating-point operations but exposes at the same time more parallelism, and therefore, runs closer to the theoretical peak performance of the system, thanks to more compute-bound matrix operations. Profiling results show the performance scalability of QDWH for calculating the polar decomposition using around 9200 MPI processes on well and ill-conditioned matrices of 100K×100K problem size. We study then the performance impact of the QDWH-based polar decomposition as a pre-processing step toward calculating the SVD itself. The new distributed-memory implementation of the QDWH-SVD solver achieves up to five-fold speedup against current state-of-the-art vendor SVD implementations. © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016.

  3. High Temperature Decomposition of Almandine and Pyrope in Reducing Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, C.; Filip, J.; Mashlan, M.

    2010-07-01

    Thermal decomposition of two garnets of near end-member composition—almandine (Fe2.85Mg0.15)(Al1.99)Si2.99O12 and pyrope (Mg2.22Fe0.47Ca0.33)(Cr0.11Fe0.06Al1.81)Si2.98O12—has been carried out in reducing atmosphere (forming gas: 10% of H2 in N2). High-temperature behavior of both samples was monitored using simultaneous thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. The decomposition of almandine and pyrope turned out to proceed at slightly different temperatures above 1000 °C. Therefore, two series of samples were prepared based on the results of thermal analysis: almandine heated up to 950 °C, 1070 °C and 1200 °C, and pyrope heated up to 1000 °C, 1100 °C, 1125 °C and 1200 °C. The identification of the decomposition products was performed by X-ray powder diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The common feature of the decomposition of both garnets is the presence of metallic iron and spinel phase, while the other products include fayalite, cristobalite, and cordierite for almandine; and enstatite and anorthite for pyrope. The formation of this last component was enabled due to Ca content in pyrope.

  4. Decomposition Dynamics of Typha angustifolia under Aerobic Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira,Caroline S.; Alcantara,Glaucia B.; Luciano M. Lião; Mesquita,Glenda M.; Freitas, Silvia S.; Petacci, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The study of the Typha species has gained attention in tropical areas due to their rapid growth, nutrient release, and contribution to detritus in lakes. Analysis of the degradation of Typha angustifolia has shown that the first stage of decomposition is marked primarily by the release of soluble compounds, indicating that microorganisms have a minor influence at this stage. In subsequent stages, microorganisms act by degrading and consuming phenolic compounds and phosphorus. The remaining co...

  5. Explaining Dutch emissions of CO2; a decomposition analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Alex Hoen; Machiel Mulder

    2003-01-01

    Decomposition of CO2 data of the Netherlands shows that much progress has been made with reduction of CO2 emissions by changing to less CO2 intensive technologies. Moreover, demand shifted to products that are produced with less CO2 emission. Further, shifts in the inputs needed in the production process also managed to decrease the CO2 emissions. These effects, however, were more than compensated by increased CO2 emission due to economic growth. Especially growth in exports led to substantia...

  6. Non-isothermal decomposition kinetics of magnesite

    OpenAIRE

    Maitra, S; Mukherjee, S.; Saha, N; Pramanik, J

    2007-01-01

    Kinetics of thermal decomposition of Indian magnesite was studied by thermo-gravimetric analysis under non-isothermal condition. Coats and Redfern Integral approximation method was used to determine the kinetic parameters. Using the kinetic parameters different kinetic functions were analyzed with the experimental data to ascertain the decomposition mechanism of magnesium carbonate and it was observed that the decomposition reaction followed a contracting sphere kinetic mechanism.

  7. Highly Scalable Matching Pursuit Signal Decomposition Algorithm

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this research, we propose a variant of the classical Matching Pursuit Decomposition (MPD) algorithm with significantly improved scalability and computational...

  8. On Schubert decompositions of quiver Grassmannians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorscheid, Oliver

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we introduce Schubert decompositions for quiver Grassmannians and investigate certain classes of quiver Grassmannians with a Schubert decomposition into affine spaces. The main theorem puts the cells of a Schubert decomposition into relation to the cells of a certain simpler quiver Grassmannian. This allows us to extend known examples of Schubert decompositions into affine spaces to a larger class of quiver Grassmannians. This includes exceptional representations of the Kronecker quiver as well as representations of forests with block matrices of the form (0100). Finally, we draw conclusions on the Euler characteristics and the cohomology of quiver Grassmannians.

  9. Direct observation of nanowire growth and decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rackauskas, Simas; Shandakov, Sergey D; Jiang, Hua

    2017-01-01

    knowledge, so far this has been only postulated, but never observed at the atomic level. By means of in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy we monitored and examined the atomic layer transformation at the conditions of the crystal growth and its decomposition using CuO nanowires selected...... as a model object. The atomic layer growth/decomposition was studied by varying an O2 partial pressure. Three distinct regimes of the atomic layer evolution were experimentally observed: growth, transition and decomposition. The transition regime, at which atomic layer growth/decomposition switch takes place...

  10. Decomposition methods in turbulence research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uruba Václav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays we have the dynamical velocity vector field of turbulent flow at our disposal coming thanks advances of either mathematical simulation (DNS or of experiment (time-resolved PIV. Unfortunately there is no standard method for analysis of such data describing complicated extended dynamical systems, which is characterized by excessive number of degrees of freedom. An overview of candidate methods convenient to spatiotemporal analysis for such systems is to be presented. Special attention will be paid to energetic methods including Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD in regular and snapshot variants as well as the Bi-Orthogonal Decomposition (BOD for joint space-time analysis. Then, stability analysis using Principal Oscillation Patterns (POPs will be introduced. Finally, the Independent Component Analysis (ICA method will be proposed for detection of coherent structures in turbulent flow-field defined by time-dependent velocity vector field. Principle and some practical aspects of the methods are to be shown. Special attention is to be paid to physical interpretation of outputs of the methods listed above.

  11. Thermal decomposition of mercuric sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leckey, J.H.; Nulf, L.E.

    1994-10-28

    The rate of thermal decomposition of mercuric sulfide (HgS) has been measured at temperatures from 265 to 345 C. These data have been analyzed using a first-order chemical reaction model for the time dependence of the reaction and the Arrhenius equation for the temperature dependence of the rate constant. Using this information, the activation energy for the reaction was found to be 55 kcal/mol. Significant reaction vessel surface effects obscured the functional form of the time dependence of the initial portion of the reaction. The data and the resulting time-temperature reaction-rate model were used to predict the decomposition rate of HgS as a function of time and temperature in thermal treatment systems. Data from large-scale thermal treatment studies already completed were interpreted in terms of the results of this study. While the data from the large-scale thermal treatment studies were consistent with the data from this report, mass transport effects may have contributed to the residual amount of mercury which remained in the soil after most of the large-scale runs.

  12. Decomposition of Diethylstilboestrol in Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregers-Hansen, Birte

    1964-01-01

    The rate of decomposition of DES-monoethyl-1-C14 in soil was followed by measurement of C14O2 released. From 1.6 to 16% of the added C14 was recovered as C14O2 during 3 months. After six months as much as 12 to 28 per cent was released as C14O2.Determination of C14 in the soil samples after the e...... not inhibit the CO2 production from the soil.Experiments with γ-sterilized soil indicated that enzymes present in the soil are able to attack DES.......The rate of decomposition of DES-monoethyl-1-C14 in soil was followed by measurement of C14O2 released. From 1.6 to 16% of the added C14 was recovered as C14O2 during 3 months. After six months as much as 12 to 28 per cent was released as C14O2.Determination of C14 in the soil samples after...

  13. An attempt to perform water balance in a Brazilian municipal solid waste landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    São Mateus, Maria do Socorro Costa; Machado, Sandro Lemos; Barbosa, Maria Cláudia

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents an attempt to model the water balance in the metropolitan center landfill (MCL) in Salvador, Brazil. Aspects such as the municipal solid waste (MSW) initial water content, mass loss due to decomposition, MSW liquid expelling due to compression and those related to weather conditions, such as the amount of rainfall and evaporation are considered. Superficial flow and infiltration were modeled considering the waste and the hydraulic characteristics (permeability and soil-water retention curves) of the cover layer and simplified uni-dimensional empirical models. In order to validate the modeling procedure, data from one cell at the landfill were used. Monthly waste entry, volume of collected leachate and leachate level inside the cell were monitored. Water balance equations and the compressibility of the MSW were used to calculate the amount of leachate stored in the cell and the corresponding leachate level. Measured and calculated values of the leachate level inside the cell were similar and the model was able to capture the main trends of the water balance behavior during the cell operational period.

  14. Decreases in Soil Moisture and Organic Matter Quality Suppress Microbial Decomposition Following a Boreal Forest Fire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, Sandra R.; Berhe, Asmeret A.; Treseder, Kathleen K.

    2015-08-01

    Climate warming is projected to increase the frequency and severity of wildfires in boreal forests, and increased wildfire activity may alter the large soil carbon (C) stocks in boreal forests. Changes in boreal soil C stocks that result from increased wildfire activity will be regulated in part by the response of microbial decomposition to fire, but post-fire changes in microbial decomposition are poorly understood. Here, we investigate the response of microbial decomposition to a boreal forest fire in interior Alaska and test the mechanisms that control post-fire changes in microbial decomposition. We used a reciprocal transplant between a recently burned boreal forest stand and a late successional boreal forest stand to test how post-fire changes in abiotic conditions, soil organic matter (SOM) composition, and soil microbial communities influence microbial decomposition. We found that SOM decomposing at the burned site lost 30.9% less mass over two years than SOM decomposing at the unburned site, indicating that post-fire changes in abiotic conditions suppress microbial decomposition. Our results suggest that moisture availability is one abiotic factor that constrains microbial decomposition in recently burned forests. In addition, we observed that burned SOM decomposed more slowly than unburned SOM, but the exact nature of SOM changes in the recently burned stand are unclear. Finally, we found no evidence that post-fire changes in soil microbial community composition significantly affect decomposition. Taken together, our study has demonstrated that boreal forest fires can suppress microbial decomposition due to post-fire changes in abiotic factors and the composition of SOM. Models that predict the consequences of increased wildfires for C storage in boreal forests may increase their predictive power by incorporating the observed negative response of microbial decomposition to boreal wildfires.

  15. Theoretical study of the decomposition pathways and products of C5- perfluorinated ketone (C5 PFK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuwei; Wang, Xiaohua; Li, Xi; Yang, Aijun; Han, Guohui; Lu, Yanhui; Wu, Yi; Rong, Mingzhe

    2016-08-01

    Due to the high global warming potential (GWP) and increasing environmental concerns, efforts on searching the alternative gases to SF6, which is predominantly used as insulating and interrupting medium in high-voltage equipment, have become a hot topic in recent decades. Overcoming the drawbacks of the existing candidate gases, C5- perfluorinated ketone (C5 PFK) was reported as a promising gas with remarkable insulation capacity and the low GWP of approximately 1. Experimental measurements of the dielectric strength of this novel gas and its mixtures have been carried out, but the chemical decomposition pathways and products of C5 PFK during breakdown are still unknown, which are the essential factors in evaluating the electric strength of this gas in high-voltage equipment. Therefore, this paper is devoted to exploring all the possible decomposition pathways and species of C5 PFK by density functional theory (DFT). The structural optimizations, vibrational frequency calculations and energy calculations of the species involved in a considered pathway were carried out with DFT-(U)B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) method. Detailed potential energy surface was then investigated thoroughly by the same method. Lastly, six decomposition pathways of C5 PFK decomposition involving fission reactions and the reactions with a transition states were obtained. Important intermediate products were also determined. Among all the pathways studied, the favorable decomposition reactions of C5 PFK were found, involving C-C bond ruptures producing Ia and Ib in pathway I, followed by subsequent C-C bond ruptures and internal F atom transfers in the decomposition of Ia and Ib presented in pathways II + III and IV + V, respectively. Possible routes were pointed out in pathway III and lead to the decomposition of IIa, which is the main intermediate product found in pathway II of Ia decomposition. We also investigated the decomposition of Ib, which can undergo unimolecular reactions to give the formation

  16. Theoretical study of the decomposition pathways and products of C5- perfluorinated ketone (C5 PFK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwei Fu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to the high global warming potential (GWP and increasing environmental concerns, efforts on searching the alternative gases to SF6, which is predominantly used as insulating and interrupting medium in high-voltage equipment, have become a hot topic in recent decades. Overcoming the drawbacks of the existing candidate gases, C5- perfluorinated ketone (C5 PFK was reported as a promising gas with remarkable insulation capacity and the low GWP of approximately 1. Experimental measurements of the dielectric strength of this novel gas and its mixtures have been carried out, but the chemical decomposition pathways and products of C5 PFK during breakdown are still unknown, which are the essential factors in evaluating the electric strength of this gas in high-voltage equipment. Therefore, this paper is devoted to exploring all the possible decomposition pathways and species of C5 PFK by density functional theory (DFT. The structural optimizations, vibrational frequency calculations and energy calculations of the species involved in a considered pathway were carried out with DFT-(UB3LYP/6-311G(d,p method. Detailed potential energy surface was then investigated thoroughly by the same method. Lastly, six decomposition pathways of C5 PFK decomposition involving fission reactions and the reactions with a transition states were obtained. Important intermediate products were also determined. Among all the pathways studied, the favorable decomposition reactions of C5 PFK were found, involving C-C bond ruptures producing Ia and Ib in pathway I, followed by subsequent C-C bond ruptures and internal F atom transfers in the decomposition of Ia and Ib presented in pathways II + III and IV + V, respectively. Possible routes were pointed out in pathway III and lead to the decomposition of IIa, which is the main intermediate product found in pathway II of Ia decomposition. We also investigated the decomposition of Ib, which can undergo unimolecular reactions to

  17. Fused Empirical Mode Decomposition and MUSIC Algorithms for Detecting Multiple Combined Faults in Induction Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Camarena-Martinez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Detection of failures in induction motors is one of the most important concerns in industry. An unexpected fault in the induction motors can cause a loss of financial resources and waste of time that most companies cannot afford. The contribution of this paper is a fusion of the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD and Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC methodologies for detection of multiple combined faults which provides an accurate and effective strategy for the motor condition diagnosis.

  18. Vibrational Order, Structural Properties, and Optical Gap of ZnO Nanostructures Sintered through Thermal Decomposition

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The sintering of different ZnO nanostructures by the thermal decomposition of zinc acetate is reported. Morphological changes from nanorods to nanoparticles are exhibited with the increase of the decomposition temperature from 300 to 500°C. The material showed a loss in the crystalline order with the increase in the temperature, which is correlated to the loss of oxygen due to the low heating rate used. Nanoparticles have a greater vibrational freedom than nanorods which is demonstrated in th...

  19. A meta-analysis of the effects of nutrient enrichment on litter decomposition in streams

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Verónica; Castagneyrol, Bastien; Koricheva, Julia; Gulis, Vladislav; Chauvet, Eric; Manuel A. S Graça

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The trophic state of many streams is likely to deteriorate in the future due to the continuing increase in human-induced nutrient availability. Therefore, it is of fundamental importance to understand how nutrient enrichment affects plant litter decomposition, a key ecosystem-level process in forest streams. Here, we present a meta-analysis of 99 studies published between 1970 and 2012 that reported the effects of nutrient enrichment on litter decomposition in running ...

  20. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING ENABLING ORGANIC HIGH LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, M

    2008-05-09

    Waste streams planned for generation by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and existing radioactive High Level Waste (HLW) streams containing organic compounds such as the Tank 48H waste stream at Savannah River Site have completed simulant and radioactive testing, respectfully, by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). GNEP waste streams will include up to 53 wt% organic compounds and nitrates up to 56 wt%. Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. provided by organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce NOX in the off-gas to N2 to meet Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during the waste form stabilization process regardless of the GNEP processes utilized and exists in some of the high level radioactive waste tanks at Savannah River Site and Hanford Tank Farms, e.g. organics in the feed or organics used for nitrate destruction. Waste streams containing high organic concentrations cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by pretreatment. The alternative waste stabilization pretreatment process of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operates at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). The FBSR process has been demonstrated on GNEP simulated waste and radioactive waste containing high organics from Tank 48H to convert organics to CAA compliant gases, create no secondary liquid waste streams and create a stable mineral waste form.

  1. The food waste hierarchy as a framework for the management of food surplus and food waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papargyropoulou, Effie; Lozano, Rodrigo|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/36412380X; K. Steinberger, Julia; Wright, Nigel; Ujang, Zaini Bin

    2014-01-01

    The unprecedented scale of food waste in global food supply chains is attracting increasing attention due to its environmental, social and economic impacts. Drawing on interviews with food waste specialists, this study construes the boundaries between food surplus and food waste, avoidable and

  2. The food waste hierarchy as a framework for the management of food surplus and food waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papargyropoulou, Effie; Lozano, Rodrigo; K. Steinberger, Julia; Wright, Nigel; Ujang, Zaini Bin

    2014-01-01

    The unprecedented scale of food waste in global food supply chains is attracting increasing attention due to its environmental, social and economic impacts. Drawing on interviews with food waste specialists, this study construes the boundaries between food surplus and food waste, avoidable and unavo

  3. Fate of mercury in tree litter during decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Pokharel

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We performed a controlled laboratory litter incubation study to assess changes in dry mass, carbon (C mass and concentration, mercury (Hg mass and concentration, and stoichiometric relations between elements during decomposition. Twenty-five surface litter samples each, collected from four forest stands, were placed in incubation jars open to the atmosphere, and were harvested sequentially at 0, 3, 6, 12, and 18 months. Using a mass balance approach, we observed significant mass losses of Hg during decomposition (5 to 23 % of initial mass after 18 months, which we attribute to gaseous losses of Hg to the atmosphere through a gas-permeable filter covering incubation jars. Percentage mass losses of Hg generally were less than observed dry mass and C mass losses (48 to 63 % Hg loss per unit dry mass loss, although one litter type showed similar losses. A field control study using the same litter types exposed at the original collection locations for one year showed that field litter samples were enriched in Hg concentrations by 8 to 64 % compared to samples incubated for the same time period in the laboratory, indicating strong additional sorption of Hg in the field likely from atmospheric deposition. Solubility of Hg, assessed by exposure of litter to water upon harvest, was very low (<0.22 ng Hg g−1 dry mass and decreased with increasing stage of decomposition for all litter types. Our results indicate potentially large gaseous emissions, or re-emissions, of Hg originally associated with plant litter upon decomposition. Results also suggest that Hg accumulation in litter and surface layers in the field is driven mainly by additional sorption of Hg, with minor contributions from "internal" accumulation due to preferential loss of C over Hg. Litter types showed highly species-specific differences in Hg levels during decomposition suggesting that emissions, retention, and sorption of Hg are dependent on litter type.

  4. Fate of mercury in tree litter during decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Pokharel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We performed a controlled laboratory litter incubation study to assess changes in dry mass, carbon (C mass and concentration, mercury (Hg mass and concentration, and stoichiometric relations between elements during decomposition. Twenty-five surface litter samples each, collected from four forest stands, were placed in incubation jars open to the atmosphere, and were harvested sequentially at 0, 3, 6, 12, and 18 months. Using a mass balance approach, we observed significant mass losses of Hg during decomposition (5 to 23% of initial mass after 18 months, which we attribute to gaseous losses of Hg to the atmosphere through a gas-permeable filter covering incubation jars. Percentage mass losses of Hg generally were less than observed dry mass and C mass losses (48% to 63% Hg loss per unit dry mass loss, although one species showed similar losses. A field control study using the same litter types exposed at the original collection locations for one year showed that field litter samples were enriched in Hg concentrations by 8 to 64% compared to samples incubated for the same time period in the laboratory, indicating strong additional sorption of Hg in the field. Solubility of Hg, assessed by exposure of Hg to water upon harvest, was very low (< 0.22 ng Hg g−1 dry mass and decreased with increasing stage of decomposition for all litter types. Our results indicate large gaseous emissions, or re-emissions, of Hg originally associated with plant litter upon decomposition. Results also suggest that Hg accumulation in litter and surface layers in the field is driven mainly by sorption of Hg – such as from atmospheric deposition – with minor contributions from "internal" accumulation due to preferential loss of C over Hg. Litter types showed highly species-specific differences in Hg levels during decomposition – suggesting that emissions, retention, and sorption of Hg are dependent on litter type.

  5. Interacting effects of insects and flooding on wood decomposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Ulyshen

    Full Text Available Saproxylic arthropods are thought to play an important role in wood decomposition but very few efforts have been made to quantify their contributions to the process and the factors controlling their activities are not well understood. In the current study, mesh exclusion bags were used to quantify how arthropods affect loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L. decomposition rates in both seasonally flooded and unflooded forests over a 31-month period in the southeastern United States. Wood specific gravity (based on initial wood volume was significantly lower in bolts placed in unflooded forests and for those unprotected from insects. Approximately 20.5% and 13.7% of specific gravity loss after 31 months was attributable to insect activity in flooded and unflooded forests, respectively. Importantly, minimal between-treatment differences in water content and the results from a novel test carried out separately suggest the mesh bags had no significant impact on wood mass loss beyond the exclusion of insects. Subterranean termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae: Reticulitermes spp. were 5-6 times more active below-ground in unflooded forests compared to flooded forests based on wooden monitoring stakes. They were also slightly more active above-ground in unflooded forests but these differences were not statistically significant. Similarly, seasonal flooding had no detectable effect on above-ground beetle (Coleoptera richness or abundance. Although seasonal flooding strongly reduced Reticulitermes activity below-ground, it can be concluded from an insignificant interaction between forest type and exclusion treatment that reduced above-ground decomposition rates in seasonally flooded forests were due largely to suppressed microbial activity at those locations. The findings from this study indicate that southeastern U.S. arthropod communities accelerate above-ground wood decomposition significantly and to a similar extent in both flooded and unflooded forests

  6. LCA of Solid Waste Management Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakas, Ioannis; Laurent, Alexis; Clavreul, Julie

    2017-01-01

    The chapter explores the application of LCA to solid waste management systems through the review of published studies on the subject. The environmental implications of choices involved in the modelling setup of waste management systems are increasingly in the spotlight, due to public health...... concerns and new legislation addressing the impacts from managing our waste. The application of LCA to solid waste management systems, sometimes called “waste LCA”, is distinctive in that system boundaries are rigorously defined to exclude all life cycle stages except from the end-of-life. Moreover......, specific methodological challenges arise when investigating waste systems, such as the allocation of impacts and the consideration of long-term emissions. The complexity of waste LCAs is mainly derived from the variability of the object under study (waste) which is made of different materials that may...

  7. LCA Modeling of Waste Management Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Simion, F.; Tonini, Davide

    2011-01-01

    and shows that recycling is superior to incineration with energy recovery, which again is better than landfilling. Cleary (2010) reviewed 20 waste management scenarios assessed in 11 studies published in the period 2002–2008 and concluded that, due to lack of transparency regarding boundary conditions...... and exchange with the energy systems, a comparison of results was hampered on a system level. In addition, differences in waste composition may affect the LCA results. This chapter provides results of LCA modeling of 40 waste management scenarios handling the same municipal waste (MSW) and using different...... management systems. The study focuses on Europe in terms of waste composition and exchange with the energy system. The waste management systems modeled are described with respect to waste composition, waste management technologies, mass flows and energy exchange in the systems. Results are first presented...

  8. Food waste and food processing waste for biohydrogen production: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasin, Nazlina Haiza Mohd; Mumtaz, Tabassum; Hassan, Mohd Ali; Abd Rahman, Nor'Aini

    2013-11-30

    Food waste and food processing wastes which are abundant in nature and rich in carbon content can be attractive renewable substrates for sustainable biohydrogen production due to wide economic prospects in industries. Many studies utilizing common food wastes such as dining hall or restaurant waste and wastes generated from food processing industries have shown good percentages of hydrogen in gas composition, production yield and rate. The carbon composition in food waste also plays a crucial role in determining high biohydrogen yield. Physicochemical factors such as pre-treatment to seed culture, pH, temperature (mesophilic/thermophilic) and etc. are also important to ensure the dominance of hydrogen-producing bacteria in dark fermentation. This review demonstrates the potential of food waste and food processing waste for biohydrogen production and provides a brief overview of several physicochemical factors that affect biohydrogen production in dark fermentation. The economic viability of biohydrogen production from food waste is also discussed.

  9. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production from waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhu, D H; Lee, W H; Kim, J Y; Choi, E

    2003-01-01

    PHA (polyhydroxyalkanoate) production was attempted with SBRs from food waste. Seed microbes were collected from a sewage treatment plant with a biological nutrient removal process, and acclimated with synthetic substrate prior to the application of the fermented food waste. Laboratory SBRs were used to produce PHA with limited oxygen and nutrients. The maximum content of 51% PHA was obtained with an anaerobic/aerobic cycle with P limitation, and the yield was estimated to be about 0.05 gPHA(produced)/gCOD(applied) or 25 kg PHA/dry ton of food waste, assuming more than 40% of the PHA contents were recoverable. PHB/PHA ratios were 0.74 to 0.77 due to the higher acetate concentrations. Economical analysis seemed to suggest the PHA produced from the food waste could be an alternative material to produce the biodegradable plastic to be used for the collection bags for solid waste.

  10. Tree decompositions and social graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Adcock, Aaron B; Mahoney, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has established that large informatics graphs such as social and information networks have non-trivial tree-like structure when viewed at moderate size scales. Here, we present results from the first detailed empirical evaluation of the use of tree decomposition (TD) heuristics for structure identification and extraction in social graphs. Although TDs have historically been used in structural graph theory and scientific computing, we show that---even with existing TD heuristics developed for those very different areas---TD methods can identify interesting structure in a wide range of realistic informatics graphs. Among other things, we show that TD methods can identify structures that correlate strongly with the core-periphery structure of realistic networks, even when using simple greedy heuristics; we show that the peripheral bags of these TDs correlate well with low-conductance communities (when they exist) found using local spectral computations; and we show that several types of large-scale "...

  11. Nonnegative Decomposition of Multivariate Information

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Paul L

    2010-01-01

    Of the various attempts to generalize information theory to multiple variables, the most widely utilized, interaction information, suffers from the problem that it is sometimes negative. Here we reconsider from first principles the general structure of the information that a set of sources provides about a given variable. We begin with a new definition of redundancy as the minimum information that any source provides about each possible outcome of the variable, averaged over all possible outcomes. We then show how this measure of redundancy induces a lattice over sets of sources that clarifies the general structure of multivariate information. Finally, we use this redundancy lattice to propose a definition of partial information atoms that exhaustively decompose the Shannon information in a multivariate system in terms of the redundancy between synergies of subsets of the sources. Unlike interaction information, the atoms of our partial information decomposition are never negative and always support a clear i...

  12. Regular Decompositions for H(div) Spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolev, Tzanio [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center for Applied Scientific Computing; Vassilevski, Panayot [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center for Applied Scientific Computing

    2012-01-01

    We study regular decompositions for H(div) spaces. In particular, we show that such regular decompositions are closely related to a previously studied “inf-sup” condition for parameter-dependent Stokes problems, for which we provide an alternative, more direct, proof.

  13. Complete azimuthal decomposition of optical fields

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available By using digital holograms, we present a simple technique for performing a complete azimuthal decomposition of an arbitrary laser mode. The match-filter, used to perform the azimuthal decomposition, is bounded by an annular ring, allowing us...

  14. Some Aspects of Thermochemical Decomposition of Peat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. Losiuk

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers peculiar features of thermochemical decomposition of peat as a result of quick pyrolysis. Evaluation of energy and economic expediency of the preliminary peat decomposition process for obtaining liquid and gaseous products has been made in the paper. The paper reveals prospects pertaining to application of the given technology while generating electric power and heat.

  15. Some Aspects of Thermochemical Decomposition of Peat

    OpenAIRE

    Y. A. Losiuk; S. V. Gibric; S. V. Korchinenko

    2008-01-01

    The paper considers peculiar features of thermochemical decomposition of peat as a result of quick pyrolysis. Evaluation of energy and economic expediency of the preliminary peat decomposition process for obtaining liquid and gaseous products has been made in the paper. The paper reveals prospects pertaining to application of the given technology while generating electric power and heat.

  16. Climate history shapes contemporary leaf litter decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael S. Strickland; Ashley D. Keiser; Mark A. Bradford

    2015-01-01

    Litter decomposition is mediated by multiple variables, of which climate is expected to be a dominant factor at global scales. However, like other organisms, traits of decomposers and their communities are shaped not just by the contemporary climate but also their climate history. Whether or not this affects decomposition rates is underexplored. Here we source...

  17. Decompositions of Revised Monotone Signed Fuzzy Measures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张强; 刘克

    2003-01-01

    The concept of fuzzy measure was introduced by Sugeno in 1974. A notion of signed fuzzy measure is introduced in this paper, and its elementary properties are briefly discussed. An analogue of Hahn decomposition theorem is established under the null-null-additive condition. A version of the Jordan decomposition theorem is proved under the null-additive condition.

  18. Helmholtz Hodge decomposition of scalar optical fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Monika; Senthilkumaran, P

    2012-11-01

    It is shown that the vector field decomposition method, namely, the Helmholtz Hodge decomposition, can also be applied to analyze scalar optical fields that are ubiquitously present in interference and diffraction optics. A phase gradient field that depicts the propagation and Poynting vector directions can hence be separated into solenoidal and irrotational components.

  19. Determination of 63Ni and 55Fe in nuclear waste samples using radiochemical separation and liquid scintillation counting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaolin; Frøsig Østergaard, L.; Nielsen, S.P.

    2005-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of Ni-63 and Fe-55 in nuclear waste samples such as graphite, heavy concrete, aluminium and lead was developed. Different decomposition methods (i.e. ashing, acid digestion and alkali fusion) were investigated for the decomposition of the samples...

  20. A global HMX decomposition model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, M.L.

    1996-12-01

    HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) decomposes by competing reaction pathways to form various condensed and gas-phase intermediate and final products. Gas formation is related to the development of nonuniform porosity and high specific surface areas prior to ignition in cookoff events. Such thermal damage enhances shock sensitivity and favors self-supported accelerated burning. The extent of HMX decomposition in highly confined cookoff experiments remains a major unsolved experimental and modeling problem. The present work is directed at determination of global HMX kinetics useful for predicting the elapsed time to thermal runaway (ignition) and the extent of decomposition at ignition. Kinetic rate constants for a six step engineering based global mechanism were obtained using gas formation rates measured by Behrens at Sandia National Laboratories with his Simultaneous Modulated Beam Mass Spectrometer (STMBMS) experimental apparatus. The six step global mechanism includes competition between light gas (H[sub 2]Awe, HCN, CO, H[sub 2]CO, NO, N[sub 2]Awe) and heavy gas (C[sub 2]H[sub 6]N[sub 2]Awe and C[sub 4]H[sub 10]N0[sub 2]) formation with zero order sublimation of HMX and the mononitroso analog of HMX (mn-HMX), C[sub 4]H[sub 8]N[sub 8]Awe[sub 7]. The global mechanism was applied to the highly confined, One Dimensional Time to eXplosion (ODTX) experiment and hot cell experiments by suppressing the sublimation of HMX and mn-HMX. An additional gas-phase reaction was also included to account for the gas-phase reaction of N[sub 2]Awe with H[sub 2]CO. Predictions compare adequately to the STMBMS data, ODTX data, and hot cell data. Deficiencies in the model and future directions are discussed.

  1. The influence of preliminary aerobic treatment on the efficacy of waste stabilisation under leachate recirculation conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Suchowska-Kisielewicz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the changes in the chemical composition of leachate and the concentrations and quantity of methane production in each individual decomposition phases, determined for untreated and after aerobic treatment of waste stabilised in anaerobic reactors with and without leachate recirculation. The research results demonstrate that leachate recirculation intensifies the decomposition of both aerobically treated and untreated waste. The methane production in the reactor with untreated, stabilised waste with recirculation was 28% higher; and in the reactor with aerobically treated waste, the methane production was 24% higher than in the reactors without recirculation. An important finding of the study is that aerobic treatment of waste prior to landfilling effectively reduces the quantity of pollutant emissions in leachate and biogas from waste and increases the availability for methane micro-organisms of organic substrates from difficult-to-decompose organic substances.

  2. Waste to energy – key element for sustainable waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Paul H., E-mail: paul.h.brunner@tuwien.ac.at; Rechberger, Helmut

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • First paper on the importance of incineration from a urban metabolism point of view. • Proves that incineration is necessary for sustainable waste management. • Historical and technical overview of 100 years development of MSW incineration. - Abstract: Human activities inevitably result in wastes. The higher the material turnover, and the more complex and divers the materials produced, the more challenging it is for waste management to reach the goals of “protection of men and environment” and “resource conservation”. Waste incineration, introduced originally for volume reduction and hygienic reasons, went through a long and intense development. Together with prevention and recycling measures, waste to energy (WTE) facilities contribute significantly to reaching the goals of waste management. Sophisticated air pollution control (APC) devices ensure that emissions are environmentally safe. Incinerators are crucial and unique for the complete destruction of hazardous organic materials, to reduce risks due to pathogenic microorganisms and viruses, and for concentrating valuable as well as toxic metals in certain fractions. Bottom ash and APC residues have become new sources of secondary metals, hence incineration has become a materials recycling facility, too. WTE plants are supporting decisions about waste and environmental management: They can routinely and cost effectively supply information about chemical waste composition as well as about the ratio of biogenic to fossil carbon in MSW and off-gas.

  3. Directed Graphs, Decompositions, and Spatial Linkages

    CERN Document Server

    Shai, Offer; Whiteley, Walter

    2010-01-01

    The decomposition of a system of constraints into small basic components is an important tool of design and analysis. Specifically, the decomposition of a linkage into minimal components is a central tool of analysis and synthesis of linkages. In this paper we prove that every pinned 3-isostatic (minimally rigid) graph (grounded linkage) has a unique decomposition into minimal strongly connected components (in the sense of directed graphs) which we call 3-Assur graphs. This analysis extends the Assur decompositions of plane linkages previously studied in the mathematical and the mechanical engineering literature. These 3-Assur graphs are the central building blocks for all kinematic linkages in 3-space. They share a number of key combinatorial and geometric properties with the 2-Assur graphs, including an associated lower block-triangular decomposition of the pinned rigidity matrix which provides a format for extending the motion induced by inserting one driver in a bottom Assur linkage to the joints of the e...

  4. Multilinear operators for higher-order decompositions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2006-04-01

    We propose two new multilinear operators for expressing the matrix compositions that are needed in the Tucker and PARAFAC (CANDECOMP) decompositions. The first operator, which we call the Tucker operator, is shorthand for performing an n-mode matrix multiplication for every mode of a given tensor and can be employed to concisely express the Tucker decomposition. The second operator, which we call the Kruskal operator, is shorthand for the sum of the outer-products of the columns of N matrices and allows a divorce from a matricized representation and a very concise expression of the PARAFAC decomposition. We explore the properties of the Tucker and Kruskal operators independently of the related decompositions. Additionally, we provide a review of the matrix and tensor operations that are frequently used in the context of tensor decompositions.

  5. Litter Production, Decomposition, and Nutrient Release in Subalpine Forest Communities of the Northwest Himalaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod K. Bisht

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Production, decomposition, and release of nutrients from leaf and nonleaf litter were investigated in four subalpine forests of North-West Himalaya, India. Total annual litter fall in four communities varied from 2950.00 to 4040.00 kg ha−1 and was found significant (CD0.05 = 118.2. Decomposition of leaf litter varied from 1.82–3.5% during autumn-winter to 36.14–45.51 during summer rainy season in all stands and percent of mass loss was significantly varied in stands (CD6.00. Similarly, decomposition in nonleaf litter was varied from 0.3–1.1% during autumn-winter to 19.59–30.05% during summer rainy season and was significantly varied irrespective of seasons. However, percent decomposition of leaf litter and the values of decay constant (k were at par in all stands. Total standing state of nutrients in fresh litter as well as release of total nitrogen (N, phosphorus (P, and potassium (K in due course of decomposition (12 months was also varying significantly. The rate of nonleaf litter decomposition was significantly positively correlated with air temperature (r=0.63–0.74 in all communities. The significant correlation (r=0.85 was observed only in Rhododendron-Sorbus forest community (PRS. Study indicates that the air temperature is a major determinant for nonleaf litter decomposition in this region.

  6. Public concerns and behaviours towards solid waste management in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, Alessandra; Di Giuseppe, Gabriella; Marinelli, Paolo; Angelillo, Italo F

    2010-12-01

    A self-administered questionnaire investigated knowledge, perceptions of the risks to health associated with solid waste management, and practices about waste management in a random sample of 1181 adults in Italy. Perceived risk of developing cancer due to solid waste burning was significantly higher in females, younger, with an educational level lower than university and who believed that improper waste management is linked to cancer. Respondents who had visited a physician at least once in the last year for fear of contracting a disease due to the non-correct waste management had an educational level lower than university, have modified dietary habits for fear of contracting disease due to improper waste management, believe that improper waste management is linked to allergies, perceive a higher risk of contracting infectious disease due to improper waste management and have participated in education/information activities on waste management. Those who more frequently perform with regularity differentiate household waste collection had a university educational level, perceived a higher risk of developing cancer due to solid waste burning, had received information about waste collection and did not need information about waste management. Educational programmes are needed to modify public concern about adverse health effects of domestic waste.

  7. Factors controlling bark decomposition and its role in wood decomposition in five tropical tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossa, Gbadamassi G. O.; Paudel, Ekananda; Cao, Kunfang; Schaefer, Douglas; Harrison, Rhett D.

    2016-01-01

    Organic matter decomposition represents a vital ecosystem process by which nutrients are made available for plant uptake and is a major flux in the global carbon cycle. Previous studies have investigated decomposition of different plant parts, but few considered bark decomposition or its role in decomposition of wood. However, bark can comprise a large fraction of tree biomass. We used a common litter-bed approach to investigate factors affecting bark decomposition and its role in wood decomposition for five tree species in a secondary seasonal tropical rain forest in SW China. For bark, we implemented a litter bag experiment over 12 mo, using different mesh sizes to investigate effects of litter meso- and macro-fauna. For wood, we compared the decomposition of branches with and without bark over 24 mo. Bark in coarse mesh bags decomposed 1.11–1.76 times faster than bark in fine mesh bags. For wood decomposition, responses to bark removal were species dependent. Three species with slow wood decomposition rates showed significant negative effects of bark-removal, but there was no significant effect in the other two species. Future research should also separately examine bark and wood decomposition, and consider bark-removal experiments to better understand roles of bark in wood decomposition. PMID:27698461

  8. Improved beamforming performance using pulsed plane wave decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2000-01-01

    A tool for calculating the beamformer setup associated with a specified pulsed acoustic field is presented. The method is named Pulsed Plane Wave Decomposition (PPWD) and is based on the decomposition of a pulsed acoustic field into a set of PPWs at a given depth. Each PPW can be propagated...... to the location of the elements of an array transducer by a time delay. The contribution of each propagated PPW is summed to form one time function for each array element (the BMF matrix). This approach gives the beamformer setup needed to obtain a close approximation to the desired bounded pulsed acoustic field...... without involving any optimization scheme. The approximation arises due to the limited size of the acoustic aperture and the spatial sampling property of the array transducer. Thus, the acoustical field can be designed according to the imaging needs. The method is demonstrated by examples in the 2D space...

  9. Insights from a refined decomposition of cloud feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelinka, Mark D.; Zhou, Chen; Klein, Stephen A.

    2016-09-01

    Decomposing cloud feedback into components due to changes in several gross cloud properties provides valuable insights into its physical causes. Here we present a refined decomposition that separately considers changes in free tropospheric and low cloud properties, better connecting feedbacks to individual governing processes and avoiding ambiguities present in a commonly used decomposition. It reveals that three net cloud feedback components are robustly nonzero: positive feedbacks from increasing free tropospheric cloud altitude and decreasing low cloud cover and a negative feedback from increasing low cloud optical depth. Low cloud amount feedback is the dominant contributor to spread in net cloud feedback but its anticorrelation with other components damps overall spread. The ensemble mean free tropospheric cloud altitude feedback is roughly 60% as large as the standard cloud altitude feedback because it avoids aliasing in low cloud reductions. Implications for the "null hypothesis" climate sensitivity from well-understood and robustly simulated feedbacks are discussed.

  10. Early Decomposition of Retained Heavy Silicone Oil Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touka Banaee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report a case of early decomposition of retained heavy silicone oil droplets. Case Report: The single highly myopic eye of a 16-year-old boy with history of scleral buckling and buckle revision developed redetachment due to inferior retinal dialysis. The patient underwent pars plana vitrectomy and injection of heavy silicone oil. Early emulsification of the silicone oil was observed following surgery, which was removed 4 weeks later in another operation. Retained heavy silicone droplets lost their heavier- than-water specific gravity within 2 months together with extensive iris depigmentation, and release of pigment granules into the anterior chamber and vitreous cavity. Conclusion: This case report demonstrates that heavy silicone oil droplets can undergo in vivo chemical decomposition with possible toxic effects on ocular tissues.

  11. Electrochemistry and Radioactive Wastes: A Scientific Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Abed Elaziz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Radioactive wastes are arising from nuclear applications such as nuclear medicine and nuclear power plants. Radioactive wastes should be managed in a safe manner to protect human beings and the environment now and in the future. The management strategy depends on collection, segregation, treatment, immobilization, and disposal. The treatment process is a very important step in which the hazardous materials were converted to a more concentrated, less volume and less movable materials. Electrochemistry is the branch of chemistry in which the passage of electric current was producing a chemical change. Electrochemical treatment of radioactive wastes is widely used all over the world. It has a number of advantages and hence benefits. Electrochemistry can lead to remote, automatic control and increasing safety. The present work is focusing on the role of electrochemistry in the treatment of radioactive wastes worldwide. It contains the fundamentals of electrochemistry, the brief story of radioactive wastes, and the modern trends in the electrochemical treatment of radioactive wastes. An overview of electrochemical decomposition of organic wastes, electrochemical reduction of nitrates, electro- precipitation, electro- ion exchange, and electrochemical remediation of soil are outlined. The main operating factors, the mechanism of decontamination, energy consumption and examples of field trials are considered.

  12. Installation and Setup of Whole School Food Waste Composting Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, A.; Forder, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Hong Kong, one of the busiest trading harbors in the world, is also a city of 8 million of people. The biggest problem that the government faces is the lack of solid waste landfill space. Hong Kong produces around 13,500 tons of waste per day. There are three landfills in Hong Kong in operation. These three landfills will soon be exhausted in around 2020, and the solid waste in Hong Kong is still increasing. Out of the 13,500 tons of solid waste, 9,000 tons are organic solid waste or food waste. Food waste, especially domestic waste, is recyclable. The Independent Schools Foundation Academy has a project to collect domestic food waste (from the school cafeteria) for decomposition. Our school produces around 15 tons of food waste per year. The project includes a sub-project in the Primary school, which uses the organic soil produced by an aerobic food waste machine, the Rocket A900, to plant vegetables in school. This not only helps our school to process the waste, but also helps the Primary students to study agriculture and have greater opportunities for experimental learning. For this project, two types of machines will be used for food waste processing. Firstly, the Dehydra made by Tiny Planet reduces the volume and the mass of the food waste, by dehydrating the food waste and separating the ground food waste and the excessive water inside machine for further decomposition. Secondly, the A900 Rocket, also made by Tidy Planet; this is used to process the dehydrated ground food waste for around 14 days thereby producing usable organic soil. It grinds the food waste into tiny pieces so that it is easier to decompose. It also separates the wood chips inside the ground food waste. This machine runs an aerobic process, which includes O2 and will produce CO2 during the process and is less harmful to the environment. On the other hand, if it is an anaerobic process occurs during the operation, it will produce a greenhouse gas- CH4 -and smells bad.

  13. Laser decontamination and decomposition of PCB-containing paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthofer, A.; Kögler, P.; Friedrich, C.; Lippmann, W.; Hurtado, A.

    2017-01-01

    Decontamination of concrete surfaces contaminated with paint containing polychlorinated biphenyls is an elaborate and complex task that must be performed within the scope of nuclear power plant dismantling as well as conventional pollutant cleanup in buildings. The state of the art is mechanical decontamination, which generates dust as well as secondary waste and is both dangerous and physically demanding. Moreover, the ablated PCB-containing paint has to be treated in a separate process step. Laser technology offers a multitude of possibilities for contactless surface treatment with no restoring forces and a high potential for automation. An advanced experimental setup was developed for performing standard laser decontamination investigations on PCB-painted concrete surfaces. As tested with epoxy paints, a high-power diode laser with a laser power of 10 kW in continuous wave (CW) mode was implemented and resulted in decontamination of the concrete surfaces as well as significant PCB decomposition. The experimental results showed PCB removal of 96.8% from the concrete surface and PCB decomposition of 88.8% in the laser decontamination process. Significant PCDD/F formation was thereby avoided. A surface ablation rate of approx. 7.2 m2/h was realized.

  14. A Research on the Using Possibilitiy of the Tobacco Wastes of Cigarette Factory as Fertilizer

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZGÜVEN, Menşure; KAYA, Zülküf; YILMAZ, Mehmet Asil; KIRICI, Saliha; TANSI, Sezen

    2014-01-01

    In this study, possibilities of using the tobacco wastes as fertilizers, after processing in cigarette industry have been investigated. Wheat and rape seed and sesame and corn were selected as test plants for winter and summer time period, respectively. For this purpose, tobacco wastes in the different rates (0, 750, 1500, 2250 and 3000 kg/da) were applied into soil at 15 cm. depth two months ago before seeding so it provides partly decomposition of the tobacco wastes. Also another plot whic...

  15. Carbon pools and flows during lab-scale degradation of old landfilled waste under different oxygen and water regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandstätter, Christian, E-mail: bran.chri@gmail.com; Laner, David, E-mail: david.laner@tuwien.ac.at; Fellner, Johann, E-mail: johann.fellner@tuwien.ac.at

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • 40 year old waste from an old MSW landfill was incubated in LSR experiments. • Carbon balances for anaerobic and aerobic waste degradation were established. • The transformation of carbon pools during waste degradation was investigated. • Waste aeration resulted in the formation of a new, stable organic carbon pool. • Water addition did not have a significant effect on aerobic waste degradation. - Abstract: Landfill aeration has been proven to accelerate the degradation of organic matter in landfills in comparison to anaerobic decomposition. The present study aims to evaluate pools of organic matter decomposing under aerobic and anaerobic conditions using landfill simulation reactors (LSR) filled with 40 year old waste from a former MSW landfill. The LSR were operated for 27 months, whereby the waste in one pair was kept under anaerobic conditions and the four other LSRs were aerated. Two of the aerated LSR were run with leachate recirculation and water addition and two without. The organic carbon in the solid waste was characterized at the beginning and at the end of the experiments and major carbon flows (e.g. TOC in leachate, gaseous CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}) were monitored during operation. After the termination of the experiments, the waste from the anaerobic LSRs exhibited a long-term gas production potential of more than 20 NL kg{sup −1} dry waste, which corresponded to the mineralization of around 12% of the initial TOC (67 g kg{sup −1} dry waste). Compared to that, aeration led to threefold decrease in TOC (32–36% of the initial TOC were mineralized), without apparent differences in carbon discharge between the aerobic set ups with and without water addition. Based on the investigation of the carbon pools it could be demonstrated that a bit more than 10% of the initially present organic carbon was transformed into more recalcitrant forms, presumably due to the formation of humic substances

  16. Zero Waste; Energy Recovery From Non-recyclable Mixed Municipal Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Laštůvka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Zero Waste is a strategy offering waste management solutions for today’s businesses. The Zero Waste strategy has been created with the objective of stimulating sustainable utilisation of resources, production and consumption with the highest possible level of recycling of generated waste. Due to the fact that currently there is very little information and only few relevant data available as a base for the implementation of the Zero Waste strategy, waste management specialists approach and apply such a strategy in different manners. On the other hand, there are areas of waste management where such a strategy has already been applied on a long-term basis in spite of non-existing relevant legislative tools. Indicators determined in the Zero Waste strategy may be achieved only if the individual countries clearly define legislative environment and adopt a national Zero Waste strategy with achievable objectives unambiguously determined. The area of waste separation, or handling of fractions of waste non-utilisable as secondary materials after separation, is one of the areas directly connected to the Zero Waste strategy. The objective of this paper is the evaluation of the usage of fractions of waste non-utilisable as secondary materials for energy recovery, providing thus valuable knowledge and information for the implementation of the Zero Waste strategy.

  17. Comparison of the Decomposition VOC Profile during Winter and Summer in a Moist, Mid-Latitude (Cfb) Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Shari L.; Perrault, Katelynn A.; Stefanuto, Pierre-Hugues; Nizio, Katie D.; Focant, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with decomposition is an emerging field in forensic taphonomy due to their importance in locating human remains using biological detectors such as insects and canines. A consistent decomposition VOC profile has not yet been elucidated due to the intrinsic impact of the environment on the decomposition process in different climatic zones. The study of decomposition VOCs has typically occurred during the warmer months to enable chemical profiling of all decomposition stages. The present study investigated the decomposition VOC profile in air during both warmer and cooler months in a moist, mid-latitude (Cfb) climate as decomposition occurs year-round in this environment. Pig carcasses (Sus scrofa domesticus L.) were placed on a soil surface to decompose naturally and their VOC profile was monitored during the winter and summer months. Corresponding control sites were also monitored to determine the natural VOC profile of the surrounding soil and vegetation. VOC samples were collected onto sorbent tubes and analyzed using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography – time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS). The summer months were characterized by higher temperatures and solar radiation, greater rainfall accumulation, and comparable humidity when compared to the winter months. The rate of decomposition was faster and the number and abundance of VOCs was proportionally higher in summer. However, a similar trend was observed in winter and summer demonstrating a rapid increase in VOC abundance during active decay with a second increase in abundance occurring later in the decomposition process. Sulfur-containing compounds, alcohols and ketones represented the most abundant classes of compounds in both seasons, although almost all 10 compound classes identified contributed to discriminating the stages of decomposition throughout both seasons. The advantages of GC×GC-TOFMS were demonstrated for

  18. Super-Brownian motion: Lp-convergence of martingales through the pathwise spine decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Murillo-Salas, A E Kyprianou A

    2011-01-01

    Evans (1992) described the semi-group of a superprocess with quadratic branching mechanism under a martingale change of measure in terms of the semi-group of an immortal particle and the semigroup of the superprocess prior to the change of measure. This result, commonly referred to as the spine decomposition, alludes to a pathwise decomposition in which independent copies of the original process `immigrate' along the path of the immortal particle. For branching particle diffusions the analogue of this decomposition has already been demonstrated in the pathwise sense, see for example Hardy and Harris (2009). The purpose of this short note is to exemplify a new {\\it pathwise} spine decomposition for supercritical super-Brownian motion with general branching mechanism (cf. Kyprianou et al. (2010)) by studying $L^p$ convergence of naturally underlying additive martingales in the spirit of analogous arguments for branching particle diffusions due to Hardys and Harris (2009). Amongst other ingredients, the Dynkin-K...

  19. Landfills - Municipal Waste Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — A Municipal Waste Operation is a DEP primary facility type related to the Waste Management Municipal Waste Program. The sub-facility types related to Municipal Waste...

  20. Composting of Disposal Organic Wastes: Resource Recovery for Agricultural Sustainability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad H. Golabi; Peggy Denney; Clancy Iyekar

    2006-01-01

    One of the major problems of agricultural soils in the tropical regions of the Pacific is the low organic matter content. Because of the hot and humid environment, the soil organic matter (SOM) is minimal due to rapid decomposition.Composted organic material is being applied on agricultural fields as an amendment to provide nutrients and enhance the organic matter content for improving the physical and chemical properties of the cultivated soils. In addition land application of composted material as a fertilizer source effectively disposes of wastes that otherwise are buried in landfills. In our soil program at the University of Guam, we are evaluating the use of organic material as an alternative to synthetic fertilizers. Its goal is to develop management strategies and use available resources for improving crop production while conserving resources and preserving environmental quality. Our case study project is designed to improve soil fertility status by using composted organic wastes and assessing how the nitrogen and other essential nutrients contribute to long-term soil fertility and crop productivity without application of synthetic fertilizers. In our pilot project, compost is produced from wood chips,grinded typhoon debris mixed with animal manure, fish feed, shredded paper and other organic wastes. Mature compost is then applied on the field at the rates of 0, 5, 10 and 20 t/ha as a soil amendment on the eroded cobbly soils of southern Guam.Corn is planted and monitored for growth performance and yield. The effect of land application of composted material on the SOM content and overall soil quality indices are being evaluated in this pilot study.

  1. Single-step scalable conversion of waste natural oils to carbon nanowhiskers and their interaction with mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Abheek [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Department of Chemical Sciences (India); Dutta, Priyanka [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Department of Biological Sciences (India); Sadhu, Anustup [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Department of Chemical Sciences (India); Maiti, Sankar [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Department of Biological Sciences (India); Bhattacharyya, Sayan, E-mail: sayanb@iiserkol.ac.in [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Department of Chemical Sciences (India)

    2013-07-15

    Waste cooking oil has daily deliberate hazardous effects on human health due to consumption of re-cooked oil and on the environment from disposal of the waste oil. These hazards can be controlled if there are ways to economically convert the waste oils into industrially relevant materials. Large-scale controlled catalytic conversion of the waste natural oils to carbon nanowhiskers (CNWs; diameter: 98-191 nm, length: {<=}2 {mu}m) was achieved by a one-pot, environmentally friendly process. The no-cost CNWs consist of carbon spirals with spacing between two adjacent layers at 3.1 {+-} 0.2 nm and arranged perpendicular to the whisker axis. The reactions were performed inside a sealed container at 500-850 Degree-Sign C and autogenic pressure for 4-10 h. It was demonstrated that the gaseous pressure from the decomposition of the fatty acids was crucial for formation of the semi-graphitic filamentous structures. The dilute acid-washed catalyst free CNWs were found to be negligibly toxic to the mammalian cells and can be localized inside the cell nucleus. The cellular internalization studies of the fluorescent CNWs demonstrated their viability as potential delivery vehicles into the mammalian cells.

  2. Designing Advanced Ceramic Waste Forms for Electrochemical Processing Salt Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, W. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Snyder, C. T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Frank, Steven [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Riley, Brian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report describes the scientific basis underlying the approach being followed to design and develop “advanced” glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form (ACWF) materials that can (1) accommodate higher salt waste loadings than the waste form developed in the 1990s for EBR-II waste salt and (2) provide greater flexibility for immobilizing extreme waste salt compositions. This is accomplished by using a binder glass having a much higher Na2O content than glass compositions used previously to provide enough Na+ to react with all of the Cl– in the waste salt and generate the maximum amount of sodalite. The phase compositions and degradation behaviors of prototype ACWF products that were made using five new binder glass formulations and with 11-14 mass% representative LiCl/KCl-based salt waste were evaluated and compared with results of similar tests run with CWF products made using the original binder glass with 8 mass% of the same salt to demonstrate the approach and select a composition for further studies. About twice the amount of sodalite was generated in all ACWF materials and the microstructures and degradation behaviors confirmed our understanding of the reactions occurring during waste form production and the efficacy of the approach. However, the porosities of the resulting ACWF materials were higher than is desired. These results indicate the capacity of these ACWF waste forms to accommodate LiCl/KCl-based salt wastes becomes limited by porosity due to the low glass-to-sodalite volume ratio. Three of the new binder glass compositions were acceptable and there is no benefit to further increasing the Na content as initially planned. Instead, further studies are needed to develop and evaluate alternative production methods to decrease the porosity, such as by increasing the amount of binder glass in the formulation or by processing waste forms in a hot isostatic press. Increasing the amount of binder glass to eliminate porosity will decrease the waste

  3. Designing Advanced Ceramic Waste Forms for Electrochemical Processing Salt Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, W. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Snyder, C. T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Frank, Steven [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Riley, Brian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report describes the scientific basis underlying the approach being followed to design and develop “advanced” glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form (ACWF) materials that can (1) accommodate higher salt waste loadings than the waste form developed in the 1990s for EBR-II waste salt and (2) provide greater flexibility for immobilizing extreme waste salt compositions. This is accomplished by using a binder glass having a much higher Na2O content than glass compositions used previously to provide enough Na+ to react with all of the Cl– in the waste salt and generate the maximum amount of sodalite. The phase compositions and degradation behaviors of prototype ACWF products that were made using five new binder glass formulations and with 11-14 mass% representative LiCl/KCl-based salt waste were evaluated and compared with results of similar tests run with CWF products made using the original binder glass with 8 mass% of the same salt to demonstrate the approach and select a composition for further studies. About twice the amount of sodalite was generated in all ACWF materials and the microstructures and degradation behaviors confirmed our understanding of the reactions occurring during waste form production and the efficacy of the approach. However, the porosities of the resulting ACWF materials were higher than is desired. These results indicate the capacity of these ACWF waste forms to accommodate LiCl/KCl-based salt wastes becomes limited by porosity due to the low glass-to-sodalite volume ratio. Three of the new binder glass compositions were acceptable and there is no benefit to further increasing the Na content as initially planned. Instead, further studies are needed to develop and evaluate alternative production methods to decrease the porosity, such as by increasing the amount of binder glass in the formulation or by processing waste forms in a hot isostatic press. Increasing the amount of binder glass to eliminate porosity will decrease

  4. A direct product decomposition of QMV algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xian; SHANG Yun; LU RuQian

    2012-01-01

    We study the direct product decomposition of quantum many-valued algebras (QMV algebras)which generalizes the decomposition theorem of ortholattices (orthomodular lattices).In detail,for an idempotent element of a given QMV algebra,if it commutes with every element of the QMV algebra,it can induce a direct product decomposition of the QMV algebra.At the same time,we introduce the commutant C(S) of a set S in a QMV algebra,and prove that when S consists of idempotent elements,C(S) is a subalgebra of the QMV algebra.This also generalizes the cases of orthomodular lattices.

  5. On a Decomposition Model for Optical Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhau, Jochen; Belhachmi, Zakaria; Scherzer, Otmar

    In this paper we present a variational method for determining cartoon and texture components of the optical flow of a noisy image sequence. The method is realized by reformulating the optical flow problem first as a variational denoising problem for multi-channel data and then by applying decomposition methods. Thanks to the general formulation, several norms can be used for the decomposition. We study a decomposition for the optical flow into bounded variation and oscillating component in greater detail. Numerical examples demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed approach.

  6. Solid state exchange reactions and thermal decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albarran, G.; Archundia, C.; Maddock, A.G.

    1982-01-01

    A further study of exchange of the cobalt atoms in solid Co(H/sub 2/O)/sub 6/(Co EDTA)/sub 2/ x 4H/sub 2/O has been made. The exchange is more easily measured when the compound has been ..gamma.. irradiated before heating. Without irradiation the exchange is complicated by substantial concurrent thermal decomposition. Vacuum dehydration to the tetrahydrate can be effected at 366 K without appreciable exchange. A relation between exchange, annealing of radiolytic decomposition and thermal decomposition in such compounds is suggested.

  7. Domain decomposition algorithms and computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tony F.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the new domain decomposition algorithms are applied to two model problems in computational fluid dynamics: the two-dimensional convection-diffusion problem and the incompressible driven cavity flow problem. First, a brief introduction to the various approaches of domain decomposition is given, and a survey of domain decomposition preconditioners for the operator on the interface separating the subdomains is then presented. For the convection-diffusion problem, the effect of the convection term and its discretization on the performance of some of the preconditioners is discussed. For the driven cavity problem, the effectiveness of a class of boundary probe preconditioners is examined.

  8. Photocatalytic decomposition of cortisone acetate in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romão, Joana Sobral; Hamdy, Mohamed S.; Mul, Guido, E-mail: g.mul@utwente.nl; Baltrusaitis, Jonas, E-mail: j.baltrusaitis@utwente.nl

    2015-01-23

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Most efficient photocatalysts for cortisone 21-acetate (CA) degradation were ZnO and TiO{sub 2} (P25). • The decomposition rate increased at low CA concentrations. • No pH dependence was observed allowing CA photocatalytic degradation at native pH. • Synergistic CA degradation effects between TiO{sub 2} and S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} were found. • LC–MS confirmed a decrease in CA concentration, but no intermediate products were detected. - Abstract: The photocatalytic decomposition of cortisone 21-acetate (CA), a model compound for the commonly used steroid, cortisone, was studied. CA was photocatalytically decomposed in a slurry reactor with the initial rates between 0.11 and 0.46 mg L{sup −1} min{sup −1} at 10 mg L{sup −1} concentration, using the following heterogeneous photocatalysts in decreasing order of their catalytic activity: ZnO > Evonik TiO{sub 2} P25 > Hombikat TiO{sub 2} > WO{sub 3}. Due to the lack of ZnO stability in aqueous solutions, TiO{sub 2} P25 was chosen for further experiments. The decomposition reaction was found to be pseudo-first order and the rate constant decreased as a function of increasing initial CA concentration. Changing the initial pH of the CA solution did not affect the reaction rate significantly. The decomposition reaction in the presence of the oxidizing sacrificial agent sodium persulfate showed an observed decomposition rate constant of 0.004 min{sup −1}, lower than that obtained for TiO{sub 2} P25 (0.040 min{sup −1}). The highest photocatalytic degradation rate constant was obtained combining both TiO{sub 2} P25 and S{sub 2}O{sub 8}{sup 2−} (0.071 min{sup −1}) showing a synergistic effect. No reactive intermediates were detected using LC–MS showing fast photocatalytic decomposition kinetics of CA.

  9. Unimolecular thermal decomposition of dimethoxybenzenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robichaud, David J.; Scheer, Adam M.; Mukarakate, Calvin; Ormond, Thomas K.; Buckingham, Grant T.; Ellison, G. Barney; Nimlos, Mark R.

    2014-06-01

    The unimolecular thermal decomposition mechanisms of o-, m-, and p-dimethoxybenzene (CH3O-C6H4-OCH3) have been studied using a high temperature, microtubular (μtubular) SiC reactor with a residence time of 100 μs. Product detection was carried out using single photon ionization (SPI, 10.487 eV) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry and matrix infrared absorption spectroscopy from 400 K to 1600 K. The initial pyrolytic step for each isomer is methoxy bond homolysis to eliminate methyl radical. Subsequent thermolysis is unique for each isomer. In the case of o-CH3O-C6H4-OCH3, intramolecular H-transfer dominates leading to the formation of o-hydroxybenzaldehyde (o-HO-C6H4-CHO) and phenol (C6H5OH). Para-CH3O-C6H4-OCH3 immediately breaks the second methoxy bond to form p-benzoquinone, which decomposes further to cyclopentadienone (C5H4=O). Finally, the m-CH3O-C6H4-OCH3 isomer will predominantly follow a ring-reduction/CO-elimination mechanism to form C5H4=O. Electronic structure calculations and transition state theory are used to confirm mechanisms and comment on kinetics. Implications for lignin pyrolysis are discussed.

  10. Geometric decompositions of collective motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischiati, Matteo; Krishnaprasad, P. S.

    2017-04-01

    Collective motion in nature is a captivating phenomenon. Revealing the underlying mechanisms, which are of biological and theoretical interest, will require empirical data, modelling and analysis techniques. Here, we contribute a geometric viewpoint, yielding a novel method of analysing movement. Snapshots of collective motion are portrayed as tangent vectors on configuration space, with length determined by the total kinetic energy. Using the geometry of fibre bundles and connections, this portrait is split into orthogonal components each tangential to a lower dimensional manifold derived from configuration space. The resulting decomposition, when interleaved with classical shape space construction, is categorized into a family of kinematic modes-including rigid translations, rigid rotations, inertia tensor transformations, expansions and compressions. Snapshots of empirical data from natural collectives can be allocated to these modes and weighted by fractions of total kinetic energy. Such quantitative measures can provide insight into the variation of the driving goals of a collective, as illustrated by applying these methods to a publicly available dataset of pigeon flocking. The geometric framework may also be profitably employed in the control of artificial systems of interacting agents such as robots.

  11. Thermal Decomposition Kinetics of HMX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, A K; Weese, R K

    2004-11-18

    Nucleation-growth kinetic expressions are derived for thermal decomposition of HMX from a variety of thermal analysis data types, including mass loss for isothermal and constant rate heating in an open pan and heat flow for isothermal and constant rate heating in open and closed pans. Conditions are identified in which thermal runaway is small to nonexistent, which typically means temperatures less than 255 C and heating rates less than 1 C/min. Activation energies are typically in the 140 to 165 kJ/mol range for open pan experiments and about 150 to 165 kJ/mol for sealed pan experiments. Our activation energies tend to be slightly lower than those derived from data supplied by the University of Utah, which we consider the best previous thermal analysis work. The reaction clearly displays more than one process, and most likely three processes, which are most clearly evident in open pan experiments. The reaction is accelerated in closed pan experiments, and one global reaction appears to fit the data well. Comparison of our rate measurements with additional literature sources for open and closed low temperature pyrolysis from Sandia gives a likely activation energy of 165 kJ/mol at 10% conversion.

  12. Thermal Decomposition Kinetics of HMX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, A K; Weese, R K

    2004-05-05

    Nucleation-growth kinetic expressions are derived for thermal decomposition of HMX from a variety of types of data, including mass loss for isothermal and constant rate heating in an open pan, and heat flow for isothermal and constant rate heating in open and closed pans. Conditions are identified in which thermal runaway is small to nonexistent, which typically means temperatures less than 255 C and heating rates less than 1 C/min. Activation energies are typically in the 140 to 150 kJ/mol regime for open pan experiments and about 160 kJ/mol for sealed pan experiments. Our activation energies are about 10% lower than those derived from data supplied by the University of Utah, which we consider the best previous work. The reaction clearly displays more than one process, and most likely three processes, which are most clearly evident in open pan experiments. The reaction is accelerated for closed pan experiments, and one global reaction appears to fit the data well.

  13. Thermal Decomposition Kinetics of HMX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, A K; Weese, R K

    2005-03-17

    Nucleation-growth kinetic expressions are derived for thermal decomposition of HMX from a variety of types of data, including mass loss for isothermal and constant rate heating in an open pan, and heat flow for isothermal and constant rate heating in open and closed pans. Conditions are identified in which thermal runaway is small to nonexistent, which typically means temperatures less than 255 C and heating rates less than 1 C/min. Activation energies are typically in the 140 to 165 kJ/mol regime for open pan experiments and about 150-165 kJ/mol for sealed-pan experiments. The reaction clearly displays more than one process, and most likely three processes, which are most clearly evident in open pan experiments. The reaction is accelerated for closed pan experiments, and one global reaction fits the data fairly well. Our A-E values lie in the middle of the values given in a compensation-law plot by Brill et al. (1994). Comparison with additional open and closed low temperature pyrolysis experiments support an activation energy of 165 kJ/mol at 10% conversion.

  14. E-waste hazard: The impending challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto Violet

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Electronic waste or e-waste is one of the rapidly growing problems of the world. E-waste comprises of a multitude of components, some containing toxic substances that can have an adverse impact on human health and the environment if not handled properly. In India, e-waste management assumes greater significance not only due to the generation of its own e-waste but also because of the dumping of e-waste from developed countries. This is coupled with India′s lack of appropriate infrastructure and procedures for its disposal and recycling. This review article provides a concise overview of India′s current e-waste scenario, namely magnitude of the problem, environmental and health hazards, current disposal and recycling operations, existing legal framework, organizations working on this issue and recommendations for action.

  15. E-waste hazard: The impending challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Violet N

    2008-08-01

    Electronic waste or e-waste is one of the rapidly growing problems of the world. E-waste comprises of a multitude of components, some containing toxic substances that can have an adverse impact on human health and the environment if not handled properly. In India, e-waste management assumes greater significance not only due to the generation of its own e-waste but also because of the dumping of e-waste from developed countries. This is coupled with India's lack of appropriate infrastructure and procedures for its disposal and recycling. This review article provides a concise overview of India's current e-waste scenario, namely magnitude of the problem, environmental and health hazards, current disposal and recycling operations, existing legal framework, organizations working on this issue and recommendations for action.

  16. Potential migration of buoyant LNAPL from intermediate level waste (ILW) emplaced in a geological disposal facility (GDF) for U.K. radioactive waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbow, Steven J; Rivett, Michael O; Chittenden, Neil; Herbert, Alan W; Watson, Sarah; Williams, Steve J; Norris, Simon

    2014-10-15

    A safety case for the disposal of Intermediate Level (radioactive) Waste (ILW) in a deep geological disposal facility (GDF) requires consideration of the potential for waste-derived light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) to migrate under positive buoyancy from disposed waste packages. Were entrainment of waste-derived radionuclides in LNAPL to occur, such migration could result in a shorter overall travel time to environmental or human receptors than radionuclide migration solely associated with the movement of groundwater. This paper provides a contribution to the assessment of this issue through multiphase-flow numerical modelling underpinned by a review of the UK's ILW inventory and literature to define the nature of the associated ILW LNAPL source term. Examination has been at the waste package-local GDF environment scale to determine whether proposed disposal of ILW would lead to significant likelihood of LNAPL migration, both from waste packages and from a GDF vault into the local host rock. Our review and numerical modelling support the proposition that the release of a discrete free phase LNAPL from ILW would not present a significant challenge to the safety case even with conservative approximations. 'As-disposed' LNAPL emplaced with the waste is not expected to pose a significant issue. 'Secondary LNAPL' generated in situ within the disposed ILW, arising from the decomposition of plastics, in particular PVC (polyvinyl chloride), could form the predominant LNAPL source term. Released high molecular weight phthalate plasticizers are judged to be the primary LNAPL potentially generated. These are expected to have low buoyancy-based mobility due to their very low density contrast with water and high viscosity. Due to the inherent uncertainties, significant conservatisms were adopted within the numerical modelling approach, including: the simulation of a deliberately high organic material--PVC content wastestream (2D03) within an annular grouted waste package

  17. Potential migration of buoyant LNAPL from Intermediate Level Waste (ILW) emplaced in a geological disposal facility (GDF) for UK radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbow, Steven J.; Rivett, Michael O.; Chittenden, Neil; Herbert, Alan W.; Watson, Sarah; Williams, Steve J.; Norris, Simon

    2014-10-01

    A safety case for the disposal of Intermediate Level (radioactive) Waste (ILW) in a deep geological disposal facility (GDF) requires consideration of the potential for waste-derived light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) to migrate under positive buoyancy from disposed waste packages. Were entrainment of waste-derived radionuclides in LNAPL to occur, such migration could result in a shorter overall travel time to environmental or human receptors than radionuclide migration solely associated with the movement of groundwater. This paper provides a contribution to the assessment of this issue through multiphase-flow numerical modelling underpinned by a review of the UK's ILW inventory and literature to define the nature of the associated ILW LNAPL source term. Examination has been at the waste package-local GDF environment scale to determine whether proposed disposal of ILW would lead to significant likelihood of LNAPL migration, both from waste packages and from a GDF vault into the local host rock. Our review and numerical modelling support the proposition that the release of a discrete free phase LNAPL from ILW would not present a significant challenge to the safety case even with conservative approximations. 'As-disposed' LNAPL emplaced with the waste is not expected to pose a significant issue. 'Secondary LNAPL' generated in situ within the disposed ILW, arising from the decomposition of plastics, in particular PVC (polyvinyl chloride), could form the predominant LNAPL source term. Released high molecular weight phthalate plasticizers are judged to be the primary LNAPL potentially generated. These are expected to have low buoyancy-based mobility due to their very low density contrast with water and high viscosity. Due to the inherent uncertainties, significant conservatisms were adopted within the numerical modelling approach, including: the simulation of a deliberately high organic material - PVC content wastestream (2D03) within an annular grouted waste package

  18. Satellite Image Time Series Decomposition Based on EEMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-long Kong

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Satellite Image Time Series (SITS have recently been of great interest due to the emerging remote sensing capabilities for Earth observation. Trend and seasonal components are two crucial elements of SITS. In this paper, a novel framework of SITS decomposition based on Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD is proposed. EEMD is achieved by sifting an ensemble of adaptive orthogonal components called Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs. EEMD is noise-assisted and overcomes the drawback of mode mixing in conventional Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD. Inspired by these advantages, the aim of this work is to employ EEMD to decompose SITS into IMFs and to choose relevant IMFs for the separation of seasonal and trend components. In a series of simulations, IMFs extracted by EEMD achieved a clear representation with physical meaning. The experimental results of 16-day compositions of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, and Global Environment Monitoring Index (GEMI time series with disturbance illustrated the effectiveness and stability of the proposed approach to monitoring tasks, such as applications for the detection of abrupt changes.

  19. Ab initio modeling of decomposition in iron based alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbatov, O. I.; Gornostyrev, Yu. N.; Korzhavyi, P. A.; Ruban, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    This paper reviews recent progress in the field of ab initio based simulations of structure and properties of Fe-based alloys. We focus on thermodynamics of these alloys, their decomposition kinetics, and microstructure formation taking into account disorder of magnetic moments with temperature. We review modern theoretical tools which allow a consistent description of the electronic structure and energetics of random alloys with local magnetic moments that become totally or partially disordered when temperature increases. This approach gives a basis for an accurate finite-temperature description of alloys by calculating all the relevant contributions to the Gibbs energy from first-principles, including a configurational part as well as terms due to electronic, vibrational, and magnetic excitations. Applications of these theoretical approaches to the calculations of thermodynamics parameters at elevated temperatures (solution energies and effective interatomic interactions) are discussed including atomistic modeling of decomposition/clustering in Fe-based alloys. It provides a solid basis for understanding experimental data and for developing new steels for modern applications. The precipitation in Fe-Cu based alloys, the decomposition in Fe-Cr, and the short-range order formation in iron alloys with s-p elements are considered as examples.

  20. Waste to energy--key element for sustainable waste management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Paul H; Rechberger, Helmut

    2015-03-01

    Human activities inevitably result in wastes. The higher the material turnover, and the more complex and divers the materials produced, the more challenging it is for waste management to reach the goals of "protection of men and environment" and "resource conservation". Waste incineration, introduced originally for volume reduction and hygienic reasons, went through a long and intense development. Together with prevention and recycling measures, waste to energy (WTE) facilities contribute significantly to reaching the goals of waste management. Sophisticated air pollution control (APC) devices ensure that emissions are environmentally safe. Incinerators are crucial and unique for the complete destruction of hazardous organic materials, to reduce risks due to pathogenic microorganisms and viruses, and for concentrating valuable as well as toxic metals in certain fractions. Bottom ash and APC residues have become new sources of secondary metals, hence incineration has become a materials recycling facility, too. WTE plants are supporting decisions about waste and environmental management: They can routinely and cost effectively supply information about chemical waste composition as well as about the ratio of biogenic to fossil carbon in MSW and off-gas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Contribution of individual waste fractions to the environmental impacts from landfilling of municipal solid waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfredi, Simone; Tonini, Davide; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2010-01-01

    PE/tonne). These savings are mostly determined by the waste fractions characterized by a high content of biogenic carbon (paper, organics, other combustible waste). These savings are due to emissions from energy generation avoided by landfill gas utilization, and by the storage of biogenic carbon in the landfill due......A number of LCA-based studies have reported on the environmental performance of landfilling of mixed waste, but little is known about the relative contributions of individual waste fractions to the overall impact potentials estimated for the mixed waste. In this paper, an empirical model has been...... used to estimate the emissions to the environment from landfilling of individual waste fractions. By means of the LCA-model EASEWASTE, the emissions estimated have been used to quantify how much of the overall impact potential for each impact category is to be attributed to the individual waste...

  2. Solid waste utilization: pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boegly, W.J. Jr.; Mixon, W.R.; Dean, C.; Lizdas, D.J.

    1977-08-01

    As a part of the Integrated Community Energy System (ICES) Program, a number of technology evaluations are being prepared on various current and emerging sources of energy. This evaluation considers the use of pyrolysis as a method of producing energy from municipal solid waste. The energy can be in the form of a gas, oil, chars, or steam. Pyrolysis, the decomposition of organic matter in the absence of oxygen (or in an oxygen-deficient atmosphere), has been used to convert organic matter to other products or fuels. This process is also described as ''destructive distillation''. Four processes are described in detail: the ''Landgard'' System (Monsanto Environ-Chem Systems, Inc.); the Occidental Research Corporation Process (formerly the Garrett Research and Development Company; The ''Purox'' System (Union Carbide Corporation); and the ''Refu-Cycler'' (Hamilton Standard Corporation). ''Purox'' and ''Refu-Cycler'' produce a low-Btu gas; the Occidental process produces an oil, and the ''Landgard'' process produces steam using on-site auxiliary boilers to burn the fuel gases produced by the pyrolysis unit. Also included is a listing of other pyrolysis processes currently under development for which detailed information was not available. The evaluation provides information on the various process flowsheets, energy and material balances, product characteristics, and economics. Pyrolysis of municipal solid waste as an energy source can be considered a potential for the future; however little operational or economic information is available at this time.

  3. Human waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, Md Nurul; Kroeze, Carolien; Strokal, Maryna

    2017-01-01

    Many people practice open defecation in south Asia. As a result, lot of human waste containing nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) enter rivers. Rivers transport these nutrients to coastal waters, resulting in marine pollution. This source of nutrient pollution is, however, ignored in

  4. Waste disposal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    We should like to remind you that you can have all commonplace, conventional waste (combustible, inert, wood, etc.) disposed of by the TS-FM Group. Requests for the removal of such waste should be made by contacting FM Support on tel. 77777 or by e-mail (Fm.Support@cern.ch). For requests to be acted upon, the following information must be communicated to FM Support: budget code to be debited for the provision and removal of the skip / container. type of skip required (1m3, 4 m3, 7 m3, 15 m3, 20 m3, 30 m3). nature of the waste to be disposed of (bulky objects, cardboard boxes, etc.). building concerned. details of requestor (name, phone number, department, group, etc.). We should also like to inform you that the TS-FM Group can arrange for waste to be removed from work-sites for firms under contract to CERN, provided that the prior authorisation of the CERN Staff Member in charge of the contract is obtained and the relevant disposal/handling charges are paid. You are reminded that the selective sorting o...

  5. Waste disposal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    We should like to remind you that you can have all commonplace, conventional waste (combustible, inert, wood, etc.) disposed of by the TS-FM Group. Requests for the removal of such waste should be made by contacting FM Support on tel. 77777 or by e-mail (Fm.Support@cern.ch). For requests to be acted upon, the following information must be communicated to FM Support: budget code to be debited for the provision and removal of the skip / container; type of skip required (1m3, 4 m3, 7 m3, 15 m3, 20 m3, 30 m3); nature of the waste to be disposed of (bulky objects, cardboard boxes, etc.); building concerned; details of requestor (name, phone number, department, group, etc.). We should also like to inform you that the TS-FM Group can arrange for waste to be removed from work-sites for firms under contract to CERN, provided that the prior authorisation of the CERN Staff Member in charge of the contract is obtained and the relevant disposal/handling charges are paid. You are reminded that the selective sorting...

  6. The decomposition of estuarine macrophytes under different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-04-29

    Apr 29, 2013 ... versity and recreational value (Hanisak, 1993; Pedersen and. Borum, 1996 ... in providing organic matter to detrital food chains, or alter- natively ..... Moreover, when assessing the SRP released during decomposition for each.

  7. Directional Filters for Cartoon + Texture Image Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Buades

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We present in this article a detailed analysis and implementation of the cartoon+texture decomposition algorithm proposed in [A. Buades, J.L. Lisani, 'Directional filters for color cartoon + texture image and video decomposition', Journal of Mathematical Imaging and Vision, 2015]. This method follows the approach proposed by [A. Buades, T. Le, J-M. Morel, L. Vese, 'Cartoon+Texture Image Decomposition', IPOL 2011], based on low/high-pass filtering, but replaces the isotropic filters by a bank of low-pass directional filters. The cartoon image is obtained by filtering in the direction that leads to the largest local total variation rate reduction. This permits to improve the performance of the decomposition near image discontinuities, where an halo effect was produced by the previous method.

  8. Thomas Decomposition of Algebraic and Differential Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bächler, Thomas; Lange-Hegermann, Markus; Robertz, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we consider disjoint decomposition of algebraic and non-linear partial differential systems of equations and inequations into so-called simple subsystems. We exploit Thomas decomposition ideas and develop them into a new algorithm. For algebraic systems simplicity means triangularity, squarefreeness and non-vanishing initials. For differential systems the algorithm provides not only algebraic simplicity but also involutivity. The algorithm has been implemented in Maple.

  9. Partial differential equations possessing Frobenius integrable decompositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Wen-Xiu [Department of Mathematics, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620-5700 (United States)]. E-mail: mawx@cas.usf.edu; Wu, Hongyou [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115-2888 (United States)]. E-mail: wu@math.niu.edu; He, Jingsong [Department of Mathematics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)]. E-mail: jshe@ustc.edu.cn

    2007-04-16

    Frobenius integrable decompositions are introduced for partial differential equations. A procedure is provided for determining a class of partial differential equations of polynomial type, which possess specified Frobenius integrable decompositions. Two concrete examples with logarithmic derivative Baecklund transformations are given, and the presented partial differential equations are transformed into Frobenius integrable ordinary differential equations with cubic nonlinearity. The resulting solutions are illustrated to describe the solution phenomena shared with the KdV and potential KdV equations.

  10. Decomposition of forging dies for machining planning

    CERN Document Server

    Tapie, Laurent; Anselmetti, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    This paper will provide a method to decompose forging dies for machining planning in the case of high speed machining finishing operations. This method lies on a machining feature approach model presented in the following paper. The two main decomposition phases, called Basic Machining Features Extraction and Process Planning Generation, are presented. These two decomposition phases integrates machining resources models and expert machining knowledge to provide an outstanding process planning.

  11. Decomposition of forging dies for machining planning

    OpenAIRE

    Tapie, Laurent; Mawussi, Kwamiwi; Anselmetti, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    International audience; This paper will provide a method to decompose forging dies for machining planning in the case of high speed machining finishing operations. This method lies on a machining feature approach model presented in the following paper. The two main decomposition phases, called Basic Machining Features Extraction and Process Planning Generation, are presented. These two decomposition phases integrates machining resources models and expert machining knowledge to provide an outs...

  12. Domain Decomposition Based High Performance Parallel Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Raju, Mandhapati P

    2009-01-01

    The study deals with the parallelization of finite element based Navier-Stokes codes using domain decomposition and state-ofart sparse direct solvers. There has been significant improvement in the performance of sparse direct solvers. Parallel sparse direct solvers are not found to exhibit good scalability. Hence, the parallelization of sparse direct solvers is done using domain decomposition techniques. A highly efficient sparse direct solver PARDISO is used in this study. The scalability of both Newton and modified Newton algorithms are tested.

  13. Lagrange relaxation and Dantzig-Wolfe decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    1989-01-01

    The paper concerns a large-scale linear programming problem having a block-diagonal structure with coupling constraints. It is shown that there are deep connections between the Lagrange relaxation techniques and the Dantzig-Wolfe decomposition methods......The paper concerns a large-scale linear programming problem having a block-diagonal structure with coupling constraints. It is shown that there are deep connections between the Lagrange relaxation techniques and the Dantzig-Wolfe decomposition methods...

  14. Hardware Implementation of Singular Value Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Swanirbhar; Shaw, Anil Kumar; Sarkar, Subir Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Singular value decomposition (SVD) is a useful decomposition technique which has important role in various engineering fields such as image compression, watermarking, signal processing, and numerous others. SVD does not involve convolution operation, which make it more suitable for hardware implementation, unlike the most popular transforms. This paper reviews the various methods of hardware implementation for SVD computation. This paper also studies the time complexity and hardware complexity in various methods of SVD computation.

  15. Lagrange relaxation and Dantzig-Wolfe decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    1989-01-01

    The paper concerns a large-scale linear programming problem having a block-diagonal structure with coupling constraints. It is shown that there are deep connections between the Lagrange relaxation techniques and the Dantzig-Wolfe decomposition methods......The paper concerns a large-scale linear programming problem having a block-diagonal structure with coupling constraints. It is shown that there are deep connections between the Lagrange relaxation techniques and the Dantzig-Wolfe decomposition methods...

  16. Facilitating the improved management of waste in South Africa through a national waste information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Developing a waste information system (WIS) for a country is more than just about collecting routine data on waste; it is about facilitating the improved management of waste by providing timely, reliable information to the relevant role-players. It is a means of supporting the waste governance challenges facing South Africa - challenges ranging from strategic waste management issues at national government to basic operational challenges at local government. The paper addresses two hypotheses. The first is that the identified needs of government can provide a platform from which to design a national WIS framework for a developing country such as South Africa, and the second is that the needs for waste information reflect greater, currently unfulfilled challenges in the sustainable management of waste. Through a participatory needs analysis process, it is shown that waste information is needed by the three spheres of government, to support amongst others, informed planning and decision-making, compliance monitoring and enforcement, community participation through public access to information, human, infrastructure and financial resource management and policy development. These needs for waste information correspond closely with key waste management challenges currently facing the country. A shift in governments approach to waste, in line with national and international policy, is evident from identified current and future waste information needs. However, the need for information on landfilling remains entrenched within government, possibly due to the poor compliance of landfill sites in South Africa and the problems around the illegal disposal of both general and hazardous waste.

  17. Critical analysis of nitramine decomposition data: Activation energies and frequency factors for HMX and RDX decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of a literature review on thermal decomposition of HMX and RDX is presented. The decomposition apparently fits first order kinetics. Recommended values for Arrhenius parameters for HMX and RDX decomposition in the gaseous and liquid phases and for decomposition of RDX in solution in TNT are given. The apparent importance of autocatalysis is pointed out, as are some possible complications that may be encountered in interpreting extending or extrapolating kinetic data for these compounds from measurements carried out below their melting points to the higher temperatures and pressure characteristic of combustion.

  18. Unimolecular thermal decomposition of dimethoxybenzenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robichaud, David J., E-mail: david.robichaud@nrel.gov; Mukarakate, Calvin; Nimlos, Mark R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Scheer, Adam M.; Ormond, Thomas K.; Buckingham, Grant T. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado-Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); Ellison, G. Barney [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado-Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States)

    2014-06-21

    The unimolecular thermal decomposition mechanisms of o-, m-, and p-dimethoxybenzene (CH{sub 3}O-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OCH{sub 3}) have been studied using a high temperature, microtubular (μtubular) SiC reactor with a residence time of 100 μs. Product detection was carried out using single photon ionization (SPI, 10.487 eV) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry and matrix infrared absorption spectroscopy from 400 K to 1600 K. The initial pyrolytic step for each isomer is methoxy bond homolysis to eliminate methyl radical. Subsequent thermolysis is unique for each isomer. In the case of o-CH{sub 3}O-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OCH{sub 3}, intramolecular H-transfer dominates leading to the formation of o-hydroxybenzaldehyde (o-HO-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-CHO) and phenol (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH). Para-CH{sub 3}O-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OCH{sub 3} immediately breaks the second methoxy bond to form p-benzoquinone, which decomposes further to cyclopentadienone (C{sub 5}H{sub 4}=O). Finally, the m-CH{sub 3}O-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-OCH{sub 3} isomer will predominantly follow a ring-reduction/CO-elimination mechanism to form C{sub 5}H{sub 4}=O. Electronic structure calculations and transition state theory are used to confirm mechanisms and comment on kinetics. Implications for lignin pyrolysis are discussed.

  19. Stock flow diagram analysis on solid waste management in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkipli, Faridah; Nopiah, Zulkifli Mohd; Basri, Noor Ezlin Ahmad; Kie, Cheng Jack

    2016-10-01

    The effectiveness on solid waste management is a major importance to societies. Numerous generation of solid waste from our daily activities has risked for our communities. These due to rapid population grow and advance in economic development. Moreover, the complexity of solid waste management is inherently involved large scale, diverse and element of uncertainties that must assist stakeholders with deviating objectives. In this paper, we proposed a system dynamics simulation by developing a stock flow diagram to illustrate the solid waste generation process and waste recycle process. The analysis highlights the impact on increasing the number of population toward the amount of solid waste generated and the amount of recycled waste. The results show an increment in the number of population as well as the amount of recycled waste will decrease the amount of waste generated. It is positively represent the achievement of government aim to minimize the amount of waste to be disposed by year 2020.

  20. Microbiological decomposition of bagasse after radiation pasteurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hitoshi; Ishigaki, Isao

    1987-11-01

    Microbiological decomposition of bagasse was studied for upgrading to animal feeds after radiation pasteurization. Solid-state culture media of bagasse were prepared with addition of some amount of inorganic salts for nitrogen source, and after irradiation, fungi were infected for cultivation. In this study, many kind of cellulosic fungi such as Pleurotus ostreatus, P. flavellatus, Verticillium sp., Coprinus cinereus, Lentinus edodes, Aspergillus niger, Trichoderma koningi, T. viride were used for comparison of decomposition of crude fibers. In alkali nontreated bagasse, P. ostreatus, P. flavellatus, C. cinereus and Verticillium sp. could decompose crude fibers from 25 to 34 % after one month of cultivation, whereas other fungi such as A. niger, T. koningi, T. viride, L. edodes decomposed below 10 %. On the contrary, alkali treatment enhanced the decomposition of crude fiber by A. niger, T. koningi and T. viride to be 29 to 47 % as well as Pleurotus species or C. cinereus. Other species of mushrooms such as L. edodes had a little ability of decomposition even after alkali treatment. Radiation treatment with 10 kGy could not enhance the decomposition of bagasse compared with steam treatment, whereas higher doses of radiation treatment enhanced a little of decomposition of crude fibers by microorganisms.

  1. Carbon pools and flows during lab-scale degradation of old landfilled waste under different oxygen and water regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstätter, Christian; Laner, David; Fellner, Johann

    2015-06-01

    Landfill aeration has been proven to accelerate the degradation of organic matter in landfills in comparison to anaerobic decomposition. The present study aims to evaluate pools of organic matter decomposing under aerobic and anaerobic conditions using landfill simulation reactors (LSR) filled with 40 year old waste from a former MSW landfill. The LSR were operated for 27 months, whereby the waste in one pair was kept under anaerobic conditions and the four other LSRs were aerated. Two of the aerated LSR were run with leachate recirculation and water addition and two without. The organic carbon in the solid waste was characterized at the beginning and at the end of the experiments and major carbon flows (e.g. TOC in leachate, gaseous CO2 and CH4) were monitored during operation. After the termination of the experiments, the waste from the anaerobic LSRs exhibited a long-term gas production potential of more than 20 NL kg(-1) dry waste, which corresponded to the mineralization of around 12% of the initial TOC (67 g kg(-1) dry waste). Compared to that, aeration led to threefold decrease in TOC (32-36% of the initial TOC were mineralized), without apparent differences in carbon discharge between the aerobic set ups with and without water addition. Based on the investigation of the carbon pools it could be demonstrated that a bit more than 10% of the initially present organic carbon was transformed into more recalcitrant forms, presumably due to the formation of humic substances. The source of anaerobic degradation could be identified mainly as cellulose which played a minor role during aerobic degradation in the experiment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A review of plutonium oxalate decomposition reactions and effects of decomposition temperature on the surface area of the plutonium dioxide product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, R. M.; Sims, H. E.; Taylor, R. J.

    2015-10-01

    Plutonium (IV) and (III) ions in nitric acid solution readily form insoluble precipitates with oxalic acid. The plutonium oxalates are then easily thermally decomposed to form plutonium dioxide powder. This simple process forms the basis of current industrial conversion or 'finishing' processes that are used in commercial scale reprocessing plants. It is also widely used in analytical or laboratory scale operations and for waste residues treatment. However, the mechanisms of the thermal decompositions in both air and inert atmospheres have been the subject of various studies over several decades. The nature of intermediate phases is of fundamental interest whilst understanding the evolution of gases at different temperatures is relevant to process control. The thermal decomposition is also used to control a number of powder properties of the PuO2 product that are important to either long term storage or mixed oxide fuel manufacturing. These properties are the surface area, residual carbon impurities and adsorbed volatile species whereas the morphology and particle size distribution are functions of the precipitation process. Available data and experience regarding the thermal and radiation-induced decompositions of plutonium oxalate to oxide are reviewed. The mechanisms of the thermal decompositions are considered with a particular focus on the likely redox chemistry involved. Also, whilst it is well known that the surface area is dependent on calcination temperature, there is a wide variation in the published data and so new correlations have been derived. Better understanding of plutonium (III) and (IV) oxalate decompositions will assist the development of more proliferation resistant actinide co-conversion processes that are needed for advanced reprocessing in future closed nuclear fuel cycles.

  3. Direct valorisation of waste cocoa butter triglycerides via catalytic epoxidation, ring‐opening and polymerisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Dorota D; Strobel, Vinzent; Heer, Parminder Kaur KS; Sellars, Andrew B; Hoong, Seng‐Soi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND Development of circular economy requires significant advances in the technologies for valorisation of waste, as waste becomes new feedstock. Food waste is a particularly important feedstock, containing large variation of complex chemical functionality. Although most food waste sources are complex mixtures, waste from food processing, no longer suitable for the human food chain, may also represent relatively clean materials. One such material requiring valorisation is cocoa butter. RESULTS Epoxidation of a triglyceride from a food waste source, processing waste cocoa butter, into the corresponding triglyceride epoxide was carried out using a modified Ishii‐Venturello catalyst in batch and continuous flow reactors. The batch reactor achieved higher yields due to the significant decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in the laminar flow tubular reactor. Integral and differential models describing the reaction and the phase transfer kinetics were developed for the epoxidation of cocoa butter and the model parameters were estimated. Ring‐opening of the epoxidised cocoa butter was undertaken to provide polyols of varying molecular weight (Mw = 2000–84 000 Da), hydroxyl value (27–60 mg KOH g−1) and acid value (1–173 mg KOH g−1), using either aqueous ortho‐phosphoric acid (H3PO4 ) or boron trifluoride diethyl etherate (BF3 ·OEt2)‐mediated oligomerisation in bulk, using hexane or tetrahydrofuran (THF) as solvents. The thermal and tensile properties of the polyurethanes obtained from the reaction of these polyols with 4,4′‐methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) are described. CONCLUSION The paper presents a complete valorisation scheme for a food manufacturing industry waste stream, starting from the initial chemical transformation, developing a process model for the design of a scaled‐up process, and leading to synthesis of the final product, in this case a polymer. This work describes aspects of optimisation of the conversion route

  4. Direct valorisation of waste cocoa butter triglycerides via catalytic epoxidation, ring-opening and polymerisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Dorota D; Strobel, Vinzent; Heer, Parminder Kaur Ks; Sellars, Andrew B; Hoong, Seng-Soi; Clark, Andrew J; Lapkin, Alexei A

    2017-09-01

    Development of circular economy requires significant advances in the technologies for valorisation of waste, as waste becomes new feedstock. Food waste is a particularly important feedstock, containing large variation of complex chemical functionality. Although most food waste sources are complex mixtures, waste from food processing, no longer suitable for the human food chain, may also represent relatively clean materials. One such material requiring valorisation is cocoa butter. Epoxidation of a triglyceride from a food waste source, processing waste cocoa butter, into the corresponding triglyceride epoxide was carried out using a modified Ishii-Venturello catalyst in batch and continuous flow reactors. The batch reactor achieved higher yields due to the significant decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in the laminar flow tubular reactor. Integral and differential models describing the reaction and the phase transfer kinetics were developed for the epoxidation of cocoa butter and the model parameters were estimated. Ring-opening of the epoxidised cocoa butter was undertaken to provide polyols of varying molecular weight (Mw = 2000-84 000 Da), hydroxyl value (27-60 mg KOH g(-1)) and acid value (1-173 mg KOH g(-1)), using either aqueous ortho-phosphoric acid (H 3 PO 4) or boron trifluoride diethyl etherate (BF 3·OEt2)-mediated oligomerisation in bulk, using hexane or tetrahydrofuran (THF) as solvents. The thermal and tensile properties of the polyurethanes obtained from the reaction of these polyols with 4,4'-methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) are described. The paper presents a complete valorisation scheme for a food manufacturing industry waste stream, starting from the initial chemical transformation, developing a process model for the design of a scaled-up process, and leading to synthesis of the final product, in this case a polymer. This work describes aspects of optimisation of the conversion route, focusing on clean synthesis and also demonstrates the

  5. Energy recovery from solid waste. Volume 1: Summary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    A systems analysis of energy recovery from solid waste which demonstrates the feasibility of several processes for converting solid waste to an energy form is presented. The social, legal, environmental, and political factors are considered and recommendations made in regard to legislation and policy. A technical and economic evaluation of available and developing energy-recovery processes is given with emphasis on thermal decomposition and biodegradation. A pyrolysis process is suggested. The use of prepared solid waste as a fuel supplemental to coal is considered to be the most economic process for recovery of energy from solid waste. Markets are discussed with suggestions for improving market conditions and for developing market stability. A decision procedure is given to aid a community in deciding on its options in dealing with solid waste.

  6. 加权极分解%Weighted Polar Decomposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨虎; 李寒宇

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,a new matrix decomposition called the weighted polar decomposition is considered.Two uniqueness theorems of weighted polar decomposition are presented,and the best approximation property of weighted unitary polar factor and perturbation bounds for weighted polar decomposition are also studied.

  7. Decomposition Orders, another generalisation of the fundamental theorem of arithmetic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttik, B.; Oostrom, V. van

    We discuss unique decomposition in partial commutative monoids. Inspired by a result from process theory, we propose the notion of decomposition order for partial commutative monoids, and prove that a partial commutative monoid has unique decomposition iff it can be endowed with a decomposition

  8. CHALLENGES OF MUNICIPAL WASTE MANAGEMENT IN HUNGARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZOLTÁN OROSZ

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims, tasks and priorities of medium term development plans of national waste management were defined in the National Waste Management Plan, which was made for the period of 2003–2008 in Hungary. Supporting of the European Union is indispensable for carrying out of plan. The most important areas are related to the developing projects of municipal solid waste treatment (increasingthe capacity of landfills, accomplishment of the infrastructure of selective waste collection, building of new composting plants. The national environmental policy does not focus sufficiently on the prevention of waste production. Due to the high expenses of investment and operation the energetic recovery and the incineration of municipal solid waste do not compete with the deposition. We inclined to think that the waste management of Hungary will be deposition-orientated until 2015. The main problems to the next years will be the lack of reprocessing industry of plastic and glass packaging waste. The high number of to-be-recultivated landfills and the attainability of necessary financial sources are also serious problems. There are many questions. What is the future in national waste management? How can we reduce the quantity of dumped waste? What are challenges of national waste management on the short and long term?

  9. China's Changing Energy Intensity Trend: A Decomposition Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Chunbo Ma; Stern, David I.

    2006-01-01

    China experienced a dramatic decline in energy intensity from the onset of economic reform in the late 1970s until 2000, but since then rate of decline slowed and energy intensity actually increased in 2003. Most previous studies found that most of the decline was due to technological change, but disagreed on the role of structural change. To the best of our knowledge, no decomposition study has investigated the role of inter-fuel substitution in the decline in energy intensity or the causes ...

  10. IN SITU INFRARED STUDY OF CATALYTIC DECOMPOSITION OF NITRIC OXIDE (NO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    1999-12-31

    The growing concerns for the environment and increasingly stringent standards for NO emission have presented a major challenge to control NO emissions from electric utility plants and automobiles. Catalytic decomposition of NO is the most attractive approach for the control of NO emission for its simplicity. Successful development of an effective catalyst for NO decomposition will greatly decrease the equipment and operation cost of NO control. Due to lack of understanding of the mechanism of NO decomposition, efforts on the search of an effective catalyst have been unsuccessful. Scientific development of an effective catalyst requires fundamental understanding of the nature of active site, the rate-limiting step, and an approach to prolong the life of the catalyst. The authors have investigated the feasibility of two novel approaches for improving catalyst activity and resistance to sintering. The first approach is the use of silanation to stabilize metal crystallites and supports for Cu-ZSM-5 and promoted Pt catalysts; the second is utilization of oxygen spillover and desorption to enhance NO decomposition activity. The silanation approach failed to stabilize Cu-ZSM-5 activity under hydrothermal condition. Silanation blocked the oxygen migration and inhibited oxygen desorption. Oxygen spillover was found to be an effective approach for promoting NO decomposition activity on Pt-based catalysts. Detailed mechanistic study revealed the oxygen inhibition in NO decomposition and reduction as the most critical issue in developing an effective catalytic approach for controlling NO emission.

  11. Aggregates from mineral wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baic Ireneusz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem concerning the growing demand for natural aggregates and the need to limit costs, including transportation from remote deposits, cause the increase in growth of interest in aggregates from mineral wastes as well as in technologies of their production and recovery. The paper presents the issue related to the group of aggregates other than natural. A common name is proposed for such material: “alternative aggregates”. The name seems to be fully justified due to adequacy of this term because of this raw materials origin and role, in comparison to the meaning of natural aggregates based on gravel and sand as well as crushed stones. The paper presents characteristics of the market and basic application of aggregates produced from mineral wastes, generated in the mining, power and metallurgical industries as well as material from demolished objects.

  12. Biological and climatic controls on leaf litter decomposition across European forests and grasslands revealed by reciprocal litter transplantation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo-Estrada, M.; Pihlatie, M.; Korhonen, J. F. J.; Levula, J.; Frumau, A. K. F.; Ibrom, A.; Lembrechts, J. J.; Morillas, L.; Horváth, L.; Jones, S. K.; Niinemets, Ü.

    2015-11-01

    Projection of carbon and nitrogen cycles to future climates is associated with large uncertainties, in particular due to uncertainties how changes in climate alter soil turnover, including litter decomposition. In addition, future conditions are expected to result in changes in vegetation composition, and accordingly in litter type and quality, but it is unclear how such changes could potentially alter litter decomposition. Litter transplantation experiments were carried out across 6 European sites (4 forest and 2 grasslands) spanning a large geographical and climatic gradient (5.6-11.4 °C in annual temperature 511-878 mm in precipitation) to gain insight into biological (litter origin and type, soil type) and climatic controls on litter decomposition. The decomposition k rates were overall higher in warmer and wetter sites than in colder and drier sites, and positively correlated to the litter total specific leaf area. Also, litter N content increased as less litter mass remained and decay went further. Surprisingly, this study demonstrates that climatic controls on litter decomposition are quantitatively more important than species, litter origin and soil type. Cumulative climatic variables, precipitation and air temperature (ignoring days with air temperatures below 0 °C), were appropriate to predict the litter remaining mass during decomposition (Mr). And Mr and cumulative air temperature were found to be the best predictors for litter carbon and nitrogen remaining during decomposition. We concluded with an equation for predicting the decomposition k rate by using mean annual air temperature and litter total specific leaf area.

  13. Catalytic non-thermal plasma reactor for the decomposition of a mixture of volatile organic compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Rama Raju; E Linga Reddy; J Karuppiah; P Manoj Kumar Reddy; Ch Subrahmanyam

    2013-05-01

    The decomposition of mixture of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been studied in a catalytic non-thermal plasma dielectric barrier discharge reactor. The VOCs mixture consisting n-hexane, cyclo-hexane and -xylene was chosen for the present study. The decomposition characteristics of mixture of VOCs by the DBD reactor with inner electrode modified with metal oxides of Mn and Co was studied. The results indicated that the order of the removal efficiency of VOCs followed as -xylene > cyclo-hexane > -hexane. Among the catalytic study, MnOx/SMF (manganese oxide on sintered metal fibres electrode) shows better performance, probably due to the formation of active oxygen species by in situ decomposition of ozone on the catalyst surface. Water vapour further enhanced the performance due to the in situ formation of OH radicals.

  14. Anatase-brookite mixed phase nano TiO2 catalyzed homolytic decomposition of ammonium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargeese, Anuj A; Muralidharan, Krishnamurthi

    2011-09-15

    Compared to the conventional ammonium perchlorate based solid rocket propellants, burning of ammonium nitrate (AN) based propellants produce environmentally innocuous combustion gases. Application of AN as propellant oxidizer is restricted due to low reactivity and low energetics besides its near room temperature polymorphic phase transition. In the present study, anatase-brookite mixed phase TiO(2) nanoparticles (~ 10 nm) are synthesized and used as catalyst to enhance the reactivity of the environmental friendly propellant oxidizer ammonium nitrate. The activation energy required for the decomposition reactions, computed by differential and non-linear integral isoconversional methods are used to establish the catalytic activity. Presumably, the removal of NH(3) and H(2)O, known inhibitors of ammonium nitrate decomposition reaction, due to the surface reactions on active surface of TiO(2) changes the decomposition pathway and thereby the reactivity.

  15. METHODOLOGY & CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TU, T.A.

    2007-01-04

    Waste stored within tank farm double-shell tanks (DST) and single-shell tanks (SST) generates flammable gas (principally hydrogen) to varying degrees depending on the type, amount, geometry, and condition of the waste. The waste generates hydrogen through the radiolysis of water and organic compounds, thermolytic decomposition of organic compounds, and corrosion of a tank's carbon steel walls. Radiolysis and thermolytic decomposition also generates ammonia. Nonflammable gases, which act as dilutents (such as nitrous oxide), are also produced. Additional flammable gases (e.g., methane) are generated by chemical reactions between various degradation products of organic chemicals present in the tanks. Volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals in tanks also produce organic vapors. The generated gases in tank waste are either released continuously to the tank headspace or are retained in the waste matrix. Retained gas may be released in a spontaneous or induced gas release event (GRE) that can significantly increase the flammable gas concentration in the tank headspace as described in RPP-7771, Flammable Gas Safety Isme Resolution. Appendices A through I provide supporting information. The document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste and characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 6 is the annual update of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs.

  16. Priming of soil organic matter decomposition in cryoturbated Arctic soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, A.; Wild, B.; Schnecker, J.; Rusalimova, O.

    2012-12-01

    The Arctic is subjected to particularly high rates of warming, with profound consequences for the carbon cycle: on the one hand plant productivity and C storage in plant biomass have been shown to increase strongly in many parts of the Arctic, on the other hand, increasing rates of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition have been reported. One of the possibilities that could reconcile these observations is, that increased plant growth may lead to increased root exudation rates, which are known to stimulate microbial turnover of organic matter under certain circumstances, in a process termed "priming" of SOM. Two mechanisms have been brought forward that may be responsible for priming: first, easily assimilable material exuded by plant roots may help microbes to overcome their energy limitation and second, this input of labile carbon could lead to a nitrogen limitation of the microbial community and lead to nitrogen mining, i.e. decomposition of N-rich SOM. We here report on an incubation study with arctic soil investigating potential priming of SOM decomposition in organic topsoil horizons, cryoturbated organic matter and subsoil mineral horizons of tundra soil from the Taymyr peninsula in Siberia. We used arctic soils, that are characterized by cryoturbation (mixing of soil layers due to freezing and thawing), for this study. Turbated cryosols store more than 580 Gt C globally, a significant proportion of which is stored in the cryoturbated organic matter. We hypothesized that an increased availability of labile compounds would increase SOM decomposition rates, and that this effect would be strongest in horizons with a low natural availability of labile C, i.e. in the mineral subsoil. We amended soils with 13C labelled glucose, cellulose, amino acids or proteins, and measured the mineralization of SOM C as well as microbial community composition and potential activities of extracellular enzymes. Our results demonstrate that topsoil organic, cryoturbated and

  17. Thermal decomposition and kinetics of plastic bonded explosives based on mixture of HMX and TATB with polymer matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Singh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This work describes thermal decomposition behaviour of plastic bonded explosives (PBXs based on mixture of l,3,5,7-tetranitro- 1,3,5,7-tetrazocane (HMX and 2,4,6- triamino-1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TATB with Viton A as polymer binder. Thermal decomposition of PBXs was undertaken by applying simultaneous thermal analysis (STA and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC to investigate influence of the HMX amount on thermal behavior and its kinetics. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA indicated that the thermal decomposition of PBXs based on mixture of HMX and TATB was occurred in a three-steps. The first step was mainly due to decomposition of HMX. The second step was ascribed due to decomposition of TATB, while the third step was occurred due to decomposition of the polymer matrices. The thermal decomposition % was increased with increasing HMX amount. The kinetics related to thermal decomposition were investigated under non-isothermal for a single heating rate measurement. The variation in the activation energy of PBXs based on mixture of HMX and TATB was observed with varying the HMX amount. The kinetics from the results of TGA data at various heating rates under non-isothermal conditions were also calculated by Flynn–Wall–Ozawa (FWO and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS methods. The activation energies calculated by employing FWO method were very close to those obtained by KAS method. The mean activation energy calculated by FWO and KAS methods was also a good agreement with the activation energy obtained from single heating rate measurement in the first step decomposition.

  18. Local Fractional Adomian Decomposition and Function Decomposition Methods for Laplace Equation within Local Fractional Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Ping Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We perform a comparison between the local fractional Adomian decomposition and local fractional function decomposition methods applied to the Laplace equation. The operators are taken in the local sense. The results illustrate the significant features of the two methods which are both very effective and straightforward for solving the differential equations with local fractional derivative.

  19. Laboratory Testing of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Surrogate Waste Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, S.; Bronowski, D.; Pfeifle, T.; Herrick, C. G.

    2011-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a U.S. Department of Energy geological repository for the permanent disposal of defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. The waste is emplaced in rooms excavated in the bedded Salado salt formation at a depth of 655 m below the ground surface. After emplacement of the waste, the repository will be sealed and decommissioned. WIPP Performance Assessment modeling of the underground material response requires a full and accurate understanding of coupled mechanical, hydrological, and geochemical processes and how they evolve with time. This study was part of a broader test program focused on room closure, specifically the compaction behavior of waste and the constitutive relations to model this behavior. The goal of this study was to develop an improved waste constitutive model. The model parameters are developed based on a well designed set of test data. The constitutive model will then be used to realistically model evolution of the underground and to better understand the impacts on repository performance. The present study results are focused on laboratory testing of surrogate waste materials. The surrogate wastes correspond to a conservative estimate of the degraded containers and TRU waste materials after the 10,000 year regulatory period. Testing consists of hydrostatic, uniaxial, and triaxial tests performed on surrogate waste recipes that were previously developed by Hansen et al. (1997). These recipes can be divided into materials that simulate 50% and 100% degraded waste by weight. The percent degradation indicates the anticipated amount of iron corrosion, as well as the decomposition of cellulosics, plastics, and rubbers. Axial, lateral, and volumetric strain and axial and lateral stress measurements were made. Two unique testing techniques were developed during the course of the experimental program. The first involves the use of dilatometry to measure sample volumetric strain under a hydrostatic condition. Bulk

  20. Peat decomposition records in three pristine ombrotrophic bogs in southern Patagonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Broder

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ombrotrophic bogs in southern Patagonia have been examined with regard to paleoclimatic and geochemical research questions but knowledge about organic matter decomposition in these bogs is limited. Therefore, we examined peat humification with depth by Fourier Transformed Infrared (FTIR measurements of solid peat, C/N ratio, and δ13C and δ15N isotope measurements in three bog sites. Peat decomposition generally increased with depth but distinct small scale variation occurred, reflecting fluctuations in factors controlling decomposition. C/N ratios varied mostly between 40 and 120 and were significantly correlated (R2 > 0.55, p < 0.01 with FTIR-derived humification indices. The degree of decomposition was lowest at a site presently dominated by Sphagnum mosses. The peat was most strongly decomposed at the driest site, where currently peat-forming vegetation produced less refractory organic material, possibly due to fertilizing effects of high sea spray deposition. Decomposition of peat was also advanced near ash layers, suggesting a stimulation of decomposition by ash deposition. Values of δ13C were 26.5 ± 2‰ in the peat and partly related to decomposition indices, while δ15N in the peat varied around zero and did not consistently relate to any decomposition index. Concentrations of DOM partly related to C/N ratios, partly to FTIR derived indices. They were not conclusively linked to the decomposition degree of the peat. DOM was enriched in 13C and in 15N relative to the solid phase probably due to multiple microbial modifications and recycling of N in these N-poor environments. In summary, the depth profiles of C/N ratios, δ13C values, and FTIR spectra seemed to reflect changes in environmental conditions affecting decomposition, such as bog wetness, but were dominated by site specific factors, and are further influenced by ash

  1. Rethinking the waste hierarchy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, C.; Vigsoe, D. (eds.)

    2005-03-01

    There is an increasing need to couple environmental and economic considerations within waste management. Consumers and companies alike generate ever more waste. The waste-policy challenges of the future lie in decoupling growth in waste generation from growth in consumption, and in setting priorities for the waste management. This report discusses the criteria for deciding priorities for waste management methods, and questions the current principles of EU waste policies. The basis for the discussion is the so-called waste hierarchy which has dominated the waste policy in the EU since the mid-1970s. The waste hierarchy ranks possible methods of waste management. According to the waste hierarchy, the very best solution is to reduce the amount of waste. After that, reuse is preferred to recycling which, in turn, is preferred to incineration. Disposal at a landfill is the least favourable solution. (BA)

  2. Other Special Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Line Kai-Sørensen; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    separately from MSW. Some of these other special wastes are briefly described in this chapter with respect to their definition, quantity and composition, and management options. The special wastes mentioned here are batteries, tires, polyvinylchloride (PVC) and food waste.......In addition to the main types of special waste related to municipal solid waste (MSW) mentioned in the previous chapters (health care risk waste, WEEE, impregnated wood, hazardous waste) a range of other fractions of waste have in some countries been defined as special waste that must be handled...

  3. Other Special Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Line Kai-Sørensen; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    In addition to the main types of special waste related to municipal solid waste (MSW) mentioned in the previous chapters (health care risk waste, WEEE, impregnated wood, hazardous waste) a range of other fractions of waste have in some countries been defined as special waste that must be handled...... separately from MSW. Some of these other special wastes are briefly described in this chapter with respect to their definition, quantity and composition, and management options. The special wastes mentioned here are batteries, tires, polyvinylchloride (PVC) and food waste....

  4. Microbial Decomposition of Extracellular DNA in Clay Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, E. M.; McHugh, T. A.; Schwartz, E.; Preteska, L.; Hayer, M.; Hungate, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Genomic analysis of soil communities can only be useful in predicting ecosystem processes if the genetic data gathered is representative of the microbial community. Consequently, extracellular DNA (eDNA) represents a pool of unexpressed genetic information that may skew genomic analyses. To date, our understanding of the representation of eDNA in metagenomic data and its decomposition in soil is very limited. To address this deficit, we performed a laboratory experiment wherein soils were amended with eDNA and/or clay minerals in a full factorial design. Specifically, the decomposition of 13C labeled E. coli DNA was monitored over a 30-day period in control, Kaolinite-amended, and Montmorillonite-amended soils. The amount of added eDNA carbon (C) remaining in the soil declined exponentially over time, with the majority of decomposition occurring in the first two weeks. Kaolinite significantly decreased eDNA decomposition rates and retained a higher fraction of eDNA-C (~70% remaining) than unamended and Montmorillonite-soils (~40% remaining) after 30 days. Phylogenetic (16S rRNA) sequencing of DNA extracted over the course of the incubation period enabled detection of the added eDNA. The relative abundance of added E. coli DNA decreased ~10-100 fold over 30 days. These results indicate that while a significant fraction of eDNA-C remained in the soil, this carbon was likely no longer in the form of intact strands of DNA amenable to sequencing. In addition, the eDNA affected the composition of the bacterial community. Specifically, the relative abundance of Planctomycetes and TM7 were elevated in soils that received eDNA regardless of clay addition, suggesting these phyla may be particularly effective at degrading eDNA and using it for growth. In conclusion these results indicate that the representation of eDNA in metagenomic sequence data declines rapidly, likely due to fragmentation. However, a fraction of eDNA material was resistant to decomposition, suggesting a

  5. Discussion on the methodology for determining food waste in household waste composition studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebersorger, S; Schneider, F

    2011-01-01

    Food waste has become an increasingly discussed topic in recent years. However, there is little authoritative data on food waste quantities and composition and systematic and comparable data are missing. Household waste composition analyses, which are often carried out routinely at regular or irregular intervals, provide an opportunity for obtaining data about food waste at both local and regional levels. The results of prior waste composition studies are not really comparable due to the different classifications, definitions and methods used; in addition, these are mostly insufficiently described and not reproducible by a third party. The aim of this paper is to discuss a methodology for determining the proportion of food waste in household waste composition studies, by analysing specific problems and possible solutions. For that purpose, findings from the literature are analysed and the approach and results of a composition analysis of residual waste of a stratified sample (urban, rural area) are presented. The study suggests that in order to avoid a significant loss of information, waste should not be sieved before sorting and packed food waste should be classified into the relevant food waste category together with its packaging. The case study showed that the overall influence of the proportion of food packaging included in the food waste category, which amounted to only 8%, did not significantly influence the results and can therefore be disregarded. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

  7. Cadmium complexation by solid waste leachates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu Ze Lun; Christensen, Thomas H.

    1989-01-01

    A previously reported method for determination of Cd species in solid waste leachates has been applied to ten leachate samples representing five different types of solid waste: refuse compost, flyash from coal combustion, sewage sludge, refuse incineration residues and landfilled municipal waste......, slowly labile complexes and stable complexes. Leachates originating from the same type of solid waste showed different fractions of Cd, in particular with respect to free divalent Cd and stable Cd complexes. Only coal flyash showed almost identical fractions of Cd in the two leachates. The latter is due...

  8. Supercritical Water Process for the Chemical Recycling of Waste Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Motonobu

    2010-11-01

    The development of chemical recycling of waste plastics by decomposition reactions in sub- and supercritical water is reviewed. Decomposition reactions proceed rapidly and selectively using supercritical fluids compared to conventional processes. Condensation polymerization plastics such as PET, nylon, and polyurethane, are relatively easily depolymerized to their monomers in supercritical water. The monomer components are recovered in high yield. Addition polymerization plastics such as phenol resin, epoxy resin, and polyethylene, are also decomposed to monomer components with or without catalysts. Recycling process of fiber reinforced plastics has been studied. Pilot scale or commercial scale plants have been developed and are operating with sub- and supercritical fluids.

  9. A comprehensive approach to the decomposition of biowaste; Biojaetteiden maedaetyksen kokonaisprosessiratkaisuja

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kymaelaeinen, M. [Haeme , Haemeenlinna (Finland)

    2005-07-01

    Treating biowaste in anaerobic digestion (AD) plant is a complete process which involves pre-treatment and disposal of the end product in addition to the process of anaerobic decomposition itself. Pre-treatment can affect the process of decomposition (in terms of stability, controllability and speed of decay), the smooth running of the process (mechanical stress, blockages) and the quality of the end product. In this project, an impact grinding as a pre-treatment option was found to have beneficial effects on treatability of the studied wastes (OFMSW and sewage sludge, SS). In addition, the impact ground OFMSW resulted in more stable digestion process than the crushed OFMSW. In case of SS, the impact grinding resulted in effective disintegration of sludge flocks which in turn may help foaming problems during the following digestion. A separate hygienization pre-treatment (70 deg C, 1 h) of waste did not affect the biogas production of the studied wastes during the following digestion. On the other hand, hygienic quality of the digestate was found to depend on digestion conditions itself (temperature and retention time). Biodegradation of a biopolymer (pieces of a 'bioplastic bag' used for the collection of OFMSW at households) was, in turn, found to be very poor under the studied anaerobic conditions. In addition, in this work a large experimental pre-study for the AD plant, started in 2003 at Laihia, was done to confirm the smooth start-up and running of the co-digestion process. (orig.)

  10. Global responses for recycling waste CRTs in e-waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Narendra; Li, Jinhui; Zeng, Xianlai

    2016-11-01

    The management of used cathode ray tube (CRT) devices is a major problem worldwide due to rapid uptake of the technology and early obsolescence of CRT devices, which is considered an environment hazard if disposed improperly. Previously, their production has grown in step with computer and television demand but later on with rapid technological innovation; TVs and computer screens has been replaced by new products such as Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs) and Plasma Display Panel (PDPs). This change creates a large volume of waste stream of obsolete CRTs waste in developed countries and developing countries will be becoming major CRTs waste producers in the upcoming years. We studied that there is also high level of trans-boundary movement of these devices as second-hand electronic equipment into developing countries in an attempt to bridge the 'digital divide'. Moreover, the current global production of e-waste is estimated to be '41million tonnes per year' where a major part of the e-waste stream consists of CRT devices. This review article provides a concise overview of world's current CRTs waste scenario, namely magnitude of the demand and processing, current disposal and recycling operations.

  11. Prospects of effective microorganisms technology in wastes treatment in Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emad A Shalaby

    2011-01-01

    Sludge dewatering and treatment may cost as much as the wastewater treatment. Usually large proportion of the pollutants in wastewater is organic. They are attacked by saprophytic microorganisms, i.e. organisms that feed upon dead organic matter. Activity of organisms causes decomposition of organic matter and destroys them, where the bacteria convert the organic matter or other constituents in the wastewater to new cells, water, gases and other products. Demolition activities, including renovation/remodeling works and complete or selective removal/demolishing of existing structures either by man-made processes or by natural disasters, create an extensive amount of wastes. These demolition wastes are characterized as heterogeneous mixtures of building materials that are usually contaminated with chemicals and dirt. In developing countries, it is estimated that demolition wastes comprise 20% to 30% of the total annual solid wastes. In Egypt, the daily quantity of construction and demolition (C&D) waste has been estimated as 10 000 tones. That is equivalent to one third of the total daily municipal solid wastes generated per day in Egypt. The zabbaliin have since expanded their activities and now take the waste they collect back to their garbage villages where it is sorted into recyclable components: paper, plastics, rags, glass, metal and food. The food waste is fed to pigs and the other items are sold to recycling centers. This paper summarizes the wastewater and solid wastes management in Egypt now and future.

  12. Classification of the Z-Pinch Waste Stream as Low-Level Waste for Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singledecker, Steven John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-10

    The purpose of this document is to describe the waste stream from Z-Pinch Residual Waste Project that due to worker safety concerns and operational efficiency is a candidate for blending Transuranic and low level waste together and can be safely packaged as low-level waste consistent with DOE Order 435.1 requirements and NRC guidance 10 CFR 61.42. This waste stream consists of the Pu-ICE post-shot containment systems, including plutonium targets, generated from the Z Machine experiments requested by LANL and conducted by SNL/NM. In the past, this TRU waste was shipped back to LANL after Sandia sends the TRU data package to LANL to certify the characterization (by CCP), transport and disposition at WIPP (CBFO) per LANL MOU-0066. The Low Level Waste is managed, characterized, shipped and disposed of at NNSS by SNL/NM per Sandia MOU # 11-S-560.

  13. IGNEOUS INTRUSION IMPACTS ON WASTE PACKAGES AND WASTE FORMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Bernot

    2004-04-19

    -chemical environment and seepage water alteration by reaction with intruded basalt. The scope of this model only includes impacts to the components stated above, and does not include impacts to other engineered barrier system (EBS) components such as the waste package pallet. The results of this model report will be used in TSPA for several parameters including (1) temperature of magma (used for the temperature of the waste form after an intrusion) (2) temperature increase in Zone 2 due to intrusion to evaluate impact to Zone 2 waste packages; (3) effects of exsolved gases reaching Zone 2 to evaluate impact to Zone 2 waste packages; and (4) pH and ionic strength of water reacted with basalt to be used in conjunction with ''Dissolved Concentration Limits of Radioactive Elements'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS: 163152]) to determine solubility of spent fuel within the basalt. Ionic strength will also be used in conjunction with ''Waste Form and In-Drift Colloids-Associated Radionuclide Concentrations: Abstraction and Summary'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS: 166845]) for stability of colloids.

  14. A Study on The Management of Municipal Residential Solid Waste in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Mingzhong; Shao Tianyi; Li Huayou

    2004-01-01

    As the main organic pollutant in municipal living waste, kitchen waste causes secondary pollution in the course of its being gathered and transported to the landfill by mixing with other refuse and by decomposition. This makes pollution prevention more difficult and raises the cost of landfill engineering. However, the amount of solid waste to be treated can be decreased and such pollution burden lessened by disposing of the solid waste in local municipal areas. The program in Beijing also shows that this works well with our situation in China and can accelerate marketization and public participation.

  15. Pyrolysis and gasification of typical components in wastes with macro-TGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Aihong; Chen, Shen; Long, Yanqiu; Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Yanguo; Li, Qinghai

    2015-12-01

    The pyrolysis and gasification of typical components of solid waste, cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, pectin, starch, polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) were performed and compared in a macro thermogravimetric analyzer (macro-TGA). Three model biomasses, poplar stem, orange peel and Chinese cabbage, were applied to pyrolysis and gasification simulation by their components based on TG curves. Compared to those from TGA, peaks temperature of the differential thermogravimetric (DTG) curves of each samples pyrolysis on macro-TGA delayed 30-55°C due to heat transferring effect. CO2 promoted the thermal decomposition of hemicellulose, lignin, starch, pectin and model biomasses significantly by Boudouard reaction, and enhanced slightly the decomposition of PET. The activation energy (AE) of biomass components pyrolysis on macro-TGA was 167-197 kJ/mol, while that of plastic samples was 185-235 kJ/mol. The activation energy of 351-377 kJ/mol was corresponding to the Boudouard reaction in CO2 gasification. All overlap ratios in pseudo-components simulation were higher than 0.98 to indicate that pseudo-components model could be applied to both pyrolysis and CO2 gasification, and the mass fractions of components derived from pyrolysis and gasification were slightly different but not brought in obvious difference in simulating curves when they were applied across.

  16. Federal facilities compliance act waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, J; Gates-Anderson, D; Hollister, R; Painter, S

    1999-07-06

    Site Treatment Plans (STPs) developed through the Federal Facilities Compliance Act pose many technical and administrative challenges. Legacy wastes managed under these plans require Land Disposal Restriction (LDR) compliance through treatment and ultimate disposal. Although capacity has been defined for most of the Department of Energy wastes, many waste streams require further characterization and many need additional treatment and handling beyond LDR criteria to be able to dispose of the waste. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Hazardous Waste Management Division has developed a comprehensive Legacy Waste Program. The program directs work to manage low level and mixed wastes to ensure compliance with nuclear facility rules and its STP. This paper provides a survey of work conducted on these wastes at LLNL. They include commercial waste treatment and disposal, diverse forms of characterization, inventory maintenance and reporting, on-site treatment, and treatability studies. These activities are conducted in an integrated fashion to meet schedules defined in the STP. The processes managing wastes are dynamic due to required integration of administrative, regulatory, and technical concerns spanning the gamut to insure safe proper disposal.

  17. Tetrahydrofuran hydrate decomposition characteristics in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yongchen; Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Shenglong; Zhao, Jiafei; Yang, Mingjun

    2016-12-01

    Many tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate properties are similar to those of gas hydrates. In the present work THF hydrate dissociation in four types of porous media is studied. THF solution was cooled to 275.15 K with formation of the hydrate under ambient pressure, and then it dissociated under ambient conditions. THF hydrate dissociation experiments in each porous medium were conducted three times. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to obtain images. Decomposition time, THF hydrate saturation and MRI mean intensity (MI) were measured and analyzed. The experimental results showed that the hydrate decomposition time in BZ-4 and BZ-3 was similar and longer than that in BZ-02. In each dissociation process, the hydrate decomposition time of the second and third cycles was shorter than that of the first cycle in BZ-4, BZ-3, and BZ-02. The relationship between THF hydrate saturation and time is almost linear.

  18. Isothermal Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide Dihydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new method of growing pure solid hydrogen peroxide in an ultra high vacuum environment and apply it to determine thermal stability of the dihydrate compound that forms when water and hydrogen peroxide are mixed at low temperatures. Using infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis, we quantified the isothermal decomposition of the metastable dihydrate at 151.6 K. This decomposition occurs by fractional distillation through the preferential sublimation of water, which leads to the formation of pure hydrogen peroxide. The results imply that in an astronomical environment where condensed mixtures of H2O2 and H2O are shielded from radiolytic decomposition and warmed to temperatures where sublimation is significant, highly concentrated or even pure hydrogen peroxide may form.

  19. Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ELLEFSON, M.D.

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

  20. Airborne microorganisms from waste containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlicka, Sabrina S; Stravitz, David M; Lyman, Charles E

    2012-01-01

    In physician's offices and biomedical labs, biological waste is handled every day. This waste is disposed of in waste containers designed for holding red autoclave bags. The containers used in these environments are closed hands-free containers, often with a step pedal. While these containers protect the user from surface-borne microorganisms, the containers may allow airborne microorganisms to escape via the open/close mechanism because of the air current produced upon open/close cycles. In this study, the air current was shown to be sufficient to allow airborne escape of microorganisms held in the container, including Aspergillus niger. However, bacterial cultures, such as Escherichia coli and Lactococcus lactis did not escape. This may be due to the choice of bacterial cultures and the absence of solid waste, such as dust or other particulate matter in the waste containers, that such strains of bacteria could travel on during aerosolization. We compared these results to those obtained using a re-designed receptacle, which mimimizes air currents, and detected no escaping microorganisms. This study highlights one potential source of airborne contamination in labs, hospitals, and other environments that dispose of biological waste.

  1. Nitrosation Reaction Without Nitrogen Oxide Waste Gas Emission and Its Engineering Practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chunguang; FENG Yaqing; NIU Weiwei; CHEN Xuexi

    2013-01-01

    The gas-liquid phase equilibrium is used in controlling the nitrosation reaction process.Decomposition of nitrous acid and oxidation side reaction are suppressed in a closed reaction system.The system pressure is used as the criterion of the end of reaction,avoiding excessive feeding and reducing the decomposition of nitrous acid.The head space of the reactor is used as the gas buffer,stabilizing the feeding fluctuations and inhibiting the side reaction,decomposition of nitrous acid.Nitrogen oxide concentration is controlled at the minimum level.Thus the zero release of nitrogen oxide waste gas can be achieved without using any absorption process.

  2. Minimally-sized balanced decomposition schemes for multi-class classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smirnov, E.N.; Moed, M.; Nalbantov, G.I.; Sprinkhuizen-Kuyper, I.G.

    2011-01-01

    Error-Correcting Output Coding (ECOC) is a well-known class of decomposition schemes for multi-class classification. It allows representing any multiclass classification problem as a set of binary classification problems. Due to code redundancy ECOC schemes can significantly improve generalization p

  3. Single-experiment observability decomposition of discrete-time analytic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kawano, Yu; Kotta, Ülle

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the single-experiment observability decomposition of discrete-time analytic systems. Unlike the continuous-time case, there exist systems which cannot be decomposed into observable and unobservable subsystems due to the fact that the observable space is not integrable. In this p

  4. Different mechanisms of goose influence both accelerate and retard the decomposition process in an Arctic wetland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loonen, Maarten; Fivez, Lise; Meire, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims Due to human induced changes in their wintering grounds, goose numbers increased dramatically over the past 50 years. To understand the consequences of these changes, studies on key ecosystem processes, like decomposition, on the breeding grounds in the generally severely

  5. Waste remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halas, Nancy J.; Nordlander, Peter; Neumann, Oara

    2017-01-17

    A system including a steam generation system and a chamber. The steam generation system includes a complex and the steam generation system is configured to receive water, concentrate electromagnetic (EM) radiation received from an EM radiation source, apply the EM radiation to the complex, where the complex absorbs the EM radiation to generate heat, and transform, using the heat generated by the complex, the water to steam. The chamber is configured to receive the steam and an object, wherein the object is of medical waste, medical equipment, fabric, and fecal matter.

  6. Hazardous Waste Generators

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The HazWaste database contains generator (companies and/or individuals) site and mailing address information, waste generation, the amount of waste generated etc. of...

  7. Household hazardous waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjelsted, Lotte; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2007-01-01

    'Paint waste', a part of the 'household hazardous waste', amounting to approximately 5 tonnes was collected from recycling stations in two Danish cities. Sorting and analyses of the waste showed paint waste comprised approximately 65% of the mass, paint-like waste (cleaners, fillers, etc.......) comprised 15-25% and foreign items comprised 10-20%. Water-based paint was the dominant part of the paint waste. The chemical composition of the paint waste and the paint-like waste was characterized by an analysis of 27 substances in seven waste fractions. The content of critical substances was tow...... and the paint waste was less contaminated with heavy metals than was the ordinary household waste. This may suggest that households no longer need to source-segregate their paint if the household waste is incinerated, since the presence of a small quantity of solvent-based paint will not be harmful when...

  8. Informative document waste plastics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelhout D; Sein AA; Duvoort GL

    1989-01-01

    This "Informative document waste plastics" forms part of a series of "informative documents waste materials". These documents are conducted by RIVM on the indstruction of the Directorate General for the Environment, Waste Materials Directorate, in behalf of the program of

  9. Deployed Force Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-11-01

    Granath J., Baky A., Thhyselius L., (2004). Municipal Solid Waste Management from a Systems Perspective. Journal of Cleaner Production , forthcoming...Municipal Solid Waste Management from a Systems Perspective. Journal of Cleaner Production , forthcoming article In this paper different waste

  10. NO Decomposition on Rh Supported CNTs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The decomposition of NO has been studied in a steady flow reactor on fresh carbon nanotubes (CNTs), purified CNTs, Rh/p-CNTs and Rh/g-Al2O3 between 573 K and 973 K. NO decomposition at 573 K was initially complete over a reduced surface. The amount of NO absorption increased at temperature below 773 K. 100% NO conversion and more than 100% N2 activity was achieved at 973 K for 150 min on p-CNTs and f-CNTs.

  11. Subspace decomposition-based correlation matrix multiplication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Hao; Guo Wei; Yu Jingdong

    2008-01-01

    The correlation matrix, which is widely used in eigenvalue decomposition (EVD) or singular value decomposition (SVD), usually can be denoted by R = E[yiy'i]. A novel method for constructing the correlation matrix R is proposed. The proposed algorithm can improve the resolving power of the signal eigenvalues and overcomes the shortcomings of the traditional subspace methods, which cannot be applied to low SNR. Then the proposed method is applied to the direct sequence spread spectrum (DSSS) signal's signature sequence estimation.The performance of the proposed algorithm is analyzed, and some illustrative simulation results are presented.

  12. Convergence Analysis of a Domain Decomposition Paradigm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bank, R E; Vassilevski, P S

    2006-06-12

    We describe a domain decomposition algorithm for use in several variants of the parallel adaptive meshing paradigm of Bank and Holst. This algorithm has low communication, makes extensive use of existing sequential solvers, and exploits in several important ways data generated as part of the adaptive meshing paradigm. We show that for an idealized version of the algorithm, the rate of convergence is independent of both the global problem size N and the number of subdomains p used in the domain decomposition partition. Numerical examples illustrate the effectiveness of the procedure.

  13. Two Notes on Discrimination and Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helena Skyt

    1998-01-01

    1. It turns out that the Oaxaca-Blinder wage decomposition is inadequate when it comes to calculation of separate contributions for indicator variables. The contributions are not robust against a change of reference group. I extend the Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition to handle this problem. 2. The p....... The paper suggests how to use the logit model to decompose the gender difference in the probability of an occurrence. The technique is illustrated by an analysis of discrimination in child labor in rural Zambia....

  14. Two Notes on Discrimination and Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helena Skyt

    1998-01-01

    1. It turns out that the Oaxaca-Blinder wage decomposition is inadequate when it comes to calculation of separate contributions for indicator variables. The contributions are not robust against a change of reference group. I extend the Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition to handle this problem. 2. The p....... The paper suggests how to use the logit model to decompose the gender difference in the probability of an occurrence. The technique is illustrated by an analysis of discrimination in child labor in rural Zambia....

  15. Decomposition of aquatic plants in lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godshalk, G.L.

    1977-01-01

    This study was carried out to systematically determine the effects of temperature and oxygen concentration, two environmental parameters crucial to lake metabolism in general, on decomposition of five species of aquatic vascular plants of three growth forms in a Michigan lake. Samples of dried plant material were decomposed in flasks in the laboratory under three different oxygen regimes, aerobic-to-anaerobic, strict anaerobic, and aerated, each at 10/sup 0/C and 25/sup 0/C. In addition, in situ decomposition of the same species was monitored using the litter bag technique under four conditions.

  16. Eigenvalue Decomposition-Based Modified Newton Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-jun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available When the Hessian matrix is not positive, the Newton direction may not be the descending direction. A new method named eigenvalue decomposition-based modified Newton algorithm is presented, which first takes the eigenvalue decomposition of the Hessian matrix, then replaces the negative eigenvalues with their absolute values, and finally reconstructs the Hessian matrix and modifies the searching direction. The new searching direction is always the descending direction. The convergence of the algorithm is proven and the conclusion on convergence rate is presented qualitatively. Finally, a numerical experiment is given for comparing the convergence domains of the modified algorithm and the classical algorithm.

  17. Heegaard structure respects complicated JSJ decompositions

    CERN Document Server

    Bachman, David; Sedgwick, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Let $M$ be a 3-manifold with torus boundary components $T_1$ and $T_2$. Let $\\phi \\colon T_1 \\to T_2$ be a homeomorphism, $M_\\phi$ the manifold obtained from $M$ by gluing $T_1$ to $T_2$ via the map $\\phi$, and $T$ the image of $T_1$ in $M_\\phi$. We show that if $\\phi$ is "sufficiently complicated" then any incompressible or strongly irreducible surface in $M_\\phi$ can be isotoped to be disjoint from $T$. It follows that every Heegaard splitting of a 3-manifold admitting a "sufficiently complicated" JSJ decomposition is an amalgamation of Heegaard splittings of the components of the JSJ decomposition.

  18. Spinodal decomposition in fine grained materials

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanarayan, H.; Abinandanan, TA

    2003-01-01

    We have used a phase field model to study spinodal decomposition in polycrystalline materials in which the grain size is of the same order of magnitude as the characteristic decomposition wavelength (lambda(SD))In the spirit of phase field models, each grain (i) in our model has an order parameter (eta(i)) associated with it; eta(i) has a value of unity inside the ith grain, decreasessmoothly through the grain boundary region to zero outside the grain. For a symmetric alloy of composition, c ...

  19. High temperature decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  20. Multiresolution signal decomposition transforms, subbands, and wavelets

    CERN Document Server

    Akansu, Ali N; Haddad, Paul R

    2001-01-01

    The uniqueness of this book is that it covers such important aspects of modern signal processing as block transforms from subband filter banks and wavelet transforms from a common unifying standpoint, thus demonstrating the commonality among these decomposition techniques. In addition, it covers such ""hot"" areas as signal compression and coding, including particular decomposition techniques and tables listing coefficients of subband and wavelet filters and other important properties.The field of this book (Electrical Engineering/Computer Science) is currently booming, which is, of course

  1. Graphlet decomposition of a weighted network

    CERN Document Server

    Soufiani, Hossein Azari

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the graphlet decomposition of a weighted network, which encodes a notion of social information based on social structure. We develop a scalable inference algorithm, which combines EM with Bron-Kerbosch in a novel fashion, for estimating the parameters of the model underlying graphlets using one network sample. We explore some theoretical properties of the graphlet decomposition, including computational complexity, redundancy and expected accuracy. We demonstrate graphlets on synthetic and real data. We analyze messaging patterns on Facebook and criminal associations in the 19th century.

  2. Waste Characterization Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Naranjo, Felicia Danielle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-02

    This report discusses ways to classify waste as outlined by LANL. Waste Generators must make a waste determination and characterize regulated waste by appropriate analytical testing or use of acceptable knowledge (AK). Use of AK for characterization requires several source documents. Waste characterization documentation must be accurate, sufficient, and current (i.e., updated); relevant and traceable to the waste stream’s generation, characterization, and management; and not merely a list of information sources.

  3. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    This fourth Annual Report presents and analyzes 1995 DOE complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention activities at 40 reporting sites in 25 States, and trends DOE waste generation from 1991 through 1995. DOE has established a 50% reduction goal (relative to the 1993 baseline) for routine operations radioactive and hazardous waste generation, due by December 31, 1999. Routine operations waste generation decreased 37% from 1994 to 1995, and 43% overall from 1993--1995.

  4. An effective approach for the management of waste coffee grounds

    OpenAIRE

    Fletcher, IA

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the disposal of organic wastes from domestic, commercial, agricultural and industrial sources have caused concerns due to the environmental and economic problems associated with waste. The waste produced particularly in urban areas represents a huge cost for cities and a burden to the environment but, at the same time, represents an opportunity to take stock of valuable resources, which can be exploited. By boosting solutions to reduce waste and promoting its use as a resource...

  5. Extraction of Valuable Substances from E-Waste

    OpenAIRE

    P.I. Okwu; I.N. Onyeje

    2016-01-01

    Globally, e-waste is the fastest growing waste stream due to rapid growth in technology, planned obsolesces in electronics industry and increased desire for new electronic products. E- waste has the ugly and good sides because it contains substances that can be classified as hazardous and non-hazardous. This paper focuses on the good side-extraction of valuable substances by means of recycling. Millions of dollars of gold, silver and other precious metals are hidden away e-waste landfills ...

  6. Quantitative Analysis of the Sources of Construction Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Fadiya, Olusanjo O.; Georgakis, Panos; Chinyio, Ezekiel

    2014-01-01

    The construction industry is traditionally environmentally unfriendly. The environmental impacts of construction waste include soil contamination, water contamination, and deterioration of landscape. Also, construction waste has a negative economic impact by contributing additional cost to construction due to the need to replace wasted materials. However, in order to mitigate waste, construction managers have to explore management options, which include reduction, recycling, and disposal of w...

  7. Sub-critical water as a green solvent for production of valuable materials from agricultural waste biomass: A review of recent work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shitu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural waste biomass generated from agricultural production and food processing industry are abundant, such as durian  peel, mango peel, corn straw, rice bran, corn shell, potato peel and many more. Due to low commercial value, these wastes are disposed in landfill, which if not managed properly may cause environmental problems. Currently, environmental laws and regulations pertaining to the pollution from agricultural waste streams by regulatory agencies are stringent and hence the application of toxic solvents during processing has become public concern. Recent development in valuable materials extraction from the decomposition of agricultural waste by sub-critical water treatment from the published literature was review. Physico-chemical characteristic (reaction temperature, reaction time and solid to liquid ratio of the sub-critical water affecting its yield were also reviewed. The utilization of biomass residue from agriculture, forest wood production and from food and feed processing industry may be an important alternative renewable energy supply. The paper also presents future research on sub-critical water.

  8. Development of a Novel Food Waste Collection Kiosk and Waste-to-Energy Business Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Franchetti

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. generates more than 37 million metric tons of food waste each year, and over 95% of it is disposed of at U.S. landfills. This paper describes the development of a novel food waste collection kiosk and business model called “Greenbox” that will collect and store food waste from households and restaurants with incentives for user participation to spur food waste-to-energy production in a local community. Greenbox offers a low-cost collection point to divert food waste from landfills, reduce greenhouse gases from decomposition, and aid in generating cleaner energy. A functional prototype was successfully developed by a team of engineering students and a business model was created as part of a senior design capstone course. Each Greenbox unit has the potential to reduce 275 metric tons of food waste per year, remove 1320 kg of greenhouse gases, and create 470,000 liters of methane gas while providing a payback period of 4.2 years and a rate of return of 14.9%.

  9. Food Waste to Energy: An Overview of Sustainable Approaches for Food Waste Management and Nutrient Recycling

    OpenAIRE

    Kunwar Paritosh; Kushwaha, Sandeep K.; Monika Yadav; Nidhi Pareek; Aakash Chawade; Vivekanand Vivekanand

    2017-01-01

    Food wastage and its accumulation are becoming a critical problem around the globe due to continuous increase of the world population. The exponential growth in food waste is imposing serious threats to our society like environmental pollution, health risk, and scarcity of dumping land. There is an urgent need to take appropriate measures to reduce food waste burden by adopting standard management practices. Currently, various kinds of approaches are investigated in waste food processing and ...

  10. Evolution of enzymatic activities and carbon fractions throughout composting of plant waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, M M; Suárez-Estrella, F; Vargas-García, M C; López, M J; López-González, J A; Moreno, J

    2014-01-15

    Many alternatives for the proper disposal of horticultural plant wastes have been studied, and composting is one of the most attractive due to its insignificant environmental impact and low cost. The quality of compost for agronomical use is related to the degree of organic matter maturation and stabilization. Traditional parameters as well as temperature, ratio C/N, cationic exchange capacity, extractable carbon, or evolution of humificated substances have been successfully used to assess compost maturity and stability. However, microorganisms frequently isolated during composting release a wide range of hydrolytic enzymes, whose activity could apparently give interesting information on the rate of decomposition of organic matter and, therefore, on the product stability. The aim of this work was to study the evolution of some important enzymatic activities during composting of agricultural wastes and their comparison with other chemical parameters commonly employed as quality and maturity indexes, to establish a relationship between the degradation intensity of specific organic carbon fractions throughout the process. In this work, the chemical and biochemical parameters of plant wastes were studied along a composting process of 189 days to evaluate their importance as tools for compost characterization. Results showed an intense enzymatic activity during the first 2-3 weeks of composting (bio-oxidative phase), because of the availability of easily decomposable organic compounds. From a biological point of view, a less intense phase was observed between second and third month of composting (mesophilic or cooling phase). Finally, chemical humification parameters were more closely associated with the period between 119 and 189 days (maturation phase). Significant correlations between the enzymatic activities as well as between enzyme activities and other more traditional parameters were also highlighted, indicating that both kind of indexes can be a reliable tool to

  11. An investigation on thermal decomposition of DNTF-CMDB propellants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Wei; Wang, Jiangning; Ren, Xiaoning; Zhang, Laying; Zhou, Yanshui [Xi' an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Xi' an 710065 (China)

    2007-12-15

    The thermal decomposition of DNTF-CMDB propellants was investigated by pressure differential scanning calorimetry (PDSC) and thermogravimetry (TG). The results show that there is only one decomposition peak on DSC curves, because the decomposition peak of DNTF cannot be separated from that of the NC/NG binder. The decomposition of DNTF can be obviously accelerated by the decomposition products of the NC/NG binder. The kinetic parameters of thermal decompositions for four DNTF-CMDB propellants at 6 MPa were obtained by the Kissinger method. It is found that the reaction rate decreases with increasing content of DNTF. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  12. Waste Transfer Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    tion and transport is usually the most costly part of any waste management system; and when waste is transported over a considerable distance or for a long time, transferring the waste from the collection vehicles to more efficient transportation may be economically beneficial. This involves...... a transfer station where the transfer takes place. These stations may also be accessible by private people, offering flexibility to the waste system, including facilities for bulky waste, household hazardous waste and recyclables. Waste transfer may also take place on the collection route from small...... describes the main features of waste transfer stations, including some considerations about the economical aspects on when transfer is advisable....

  13. BIOGAS PRODUCTION FROM TOFU LIQUID WASTE ON TREATED AGRICULTURAL WASTES

    OpenAIRE

    Budy Rahmat; Tedi Hartoyo; Yaya Sunarya

    2014-01-01

    The Tofu Liquid Waste (TLW) as a pollution might be processed into biogas which was environmentally friendly and had potential to replace burning wood or oil. However, the waste could not directly be employed as the biogas substrate due to the high nitrogen content which was not suitable to the methanogen microorganism on the biogas digester and did not produce biogas. It was therefore necessary to adapt the carbon-nitrogen ratio in TLW with the addition of other organic materials that had a ...

  14. Improvement of visible light photocatalytic acetaldehyde decomposition of bismuth vanadate/silica nanocomposites by cocatalyst loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Naoya; Takebe, Naohiro; Tsubota, Toshiki; Ohno, Teruhisa

    2012-04-15

    Photocatalytic activity of bismuth vanadate (BiVO(4)) for acetaldehyde decomposition under visible light irradiation was improved by inclusion of a nanocomposition of silica as an adsorbent material and loading of platinum (Pt) or trivalent iron ion (Fe(3+)) as reduction cocatalysts. Addition of silica enhanced photocatalytic activity due to improvement of adsorption ability, but total decomposition of acetaldehyde was not observed within 24h of visible light irradiation. For further improvement of photocatalytic activity, BiVO(4) with an optimized amount of silica composition were modified with Pt or Fe(3+). Photodeposition of Pt greatly increased photocatalytic activity, and acetaldehyde was totally decomposed within 24h of visible light irradiation.

  15. Generalized requirements and decompositions for the design of test parts for micro additive manufacturing research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Mary Kathryn; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    2015-01-01

    level decompositions for the design of test parts and the design of experiments to characterize micro additive manufacturing processes. While the test parts and the experiments described are still work in progress, the generic requirements derived from them can serve as a starting point for the design......The design of experimental test parts to characterize micro additive manufacturing (AM) processes is challenging due to the influence of the manufacturing and metrology processes. This work builds on the lessons learned from a case study in the literature to derive generalized requirements and high...... of other micro additive manufacturing related studies and their decompositions can help structure future work....

  16. Analysis on 3RWB model (Reduce, reuse, recycle, and waste bank) in comprehensive waste management toward community-based zero waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affandy, Nur Azizah; Isnaini, Enik; Laksono, Arif Budi

    2017-06-01

    Waste management becomes a serious issue in Indonesia. Significantly, waste production in Lamongan Regency is increasing in linear with the growth of population and current people activities, creating a gap between waste production and waste management. It is a critical problem that should be solved immediately. As a reaction to the issue, the Government of Lamongan Regency has enacted a new policy regarding waste management through a program named Lamongan Green and Clean (LGC). From the collected data, it showed that the "wet waste" or "organic waste" was approximately 63% of total domestic waste. With such condition, it can be predicted that the trashes will decompose quite quickly. From the observation, it was discovered that the generated waste was approximately 0.25 kg/person/day. Meanwhile, the number of population in Tumenggungan Village, Lamongan (data obtained from Monograph in Lamongan district, 2012) was 4651 people. Thus, it can be estimated the total waste in Lamongan was approximately 0.25 kg/person/day x 4651 characters = 930 kg/day. Within 3RWB Model, several stages have to be conducted. In the planning stage, the promotion of self-awareness among the communities in selecting and managing waste due to their interest in a potential benefit, is done. It indicated that community's awareness of waste management waste grew significantly. Meanwhile in socialization stage, each village staff, environmental expert, and policymaker should bear significant role in disseminating the awareness among the people. In the implementation phase, waste management with 3RWB model is promoted by applying it among of the community, starting from selection, waste management, until recycled products sale through the waste bank. In evaluation stage, the village managers, environmental expert, and waste managers are expected to regularly supervise and evaluate the whole activity of the waste management.

  17. Canonical polyadic decomposition of third-order tensors: reduction to generalized eigenvalue decomposition

    OpenAIRE

    Domanov, Ignat; De Lathauwer, Lieven

    2013-01-01

    Canonical Polyadic Decomposition (CPD) of a third-order tensor is decomposition in a minimal number of rank-$1$ tensors. We call an algorithm algebraic if it is guaranteed to find the decomposition when it is exact and if it only relies on standard linear algebra (essentially sets of linear equations and matrix factorizations). The known algebraic algorithms for the computation of the CPD are limited to cases where at least one of the factor matrices has full column rank. In the paper we pres...

  18. Pollutant emissions during pyrolysis and combustion of waste printed circuit boards, before and after metal removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortuño, Nuria; Conesa, Juan A., E-mail: ja.conesa@ua.es; Moltó, Julia; Font, Rafael

    2014-11-15

    The constant increase in the production of electronic devices implies the need for an appropriate management of a growing number of waste electrical and electronic equipment. Thermal treatments represent an interesting alternative to recycle this kind of waste, but particular attention has to be paid to the potential emissions of toxic by-products. In this study, the emissions from thermal degradation of printed circuit boards (with and without metals) have been studied using a laboratory scale reactor, under oxidizing and inert atmosphere at 600 and 850 °C. Apart from carbon oxides, HBr was the main decomposition product, followed by high amounts of methane, ethylene, propylene, phenol and benzene. The maximum formation of PAHs was found in pyrolysis at 850 °C, naphthalene being the most abundant. High levels of 2-, 4-, 2,4-, 2,6- and 2,4,6-bromophenols were found, especially at 600 °C. Emissions of PCDD/Fs and dioxin-like PCBs were quite low and much lower than that of PBDD/Fs, due to the higher bromine content of the samples. Combustion at 600 °C was the run with the highest PBDD/F formation: the total content of eleven 2,3,7,8-substituted congeners (tetra- through heptaBDD/Fs) was 7240 and 3250 ng WHO{sub 2005}-TEQ/kg sample, corresponding to the sample with and without metals, respectively. - Highlights: • Thermal decomposition of printed circuit boards (with and without metals) is studied. • Important differences were found at the different experimental conditions. • Emission of brominated pollutants is much higher than that of chlorinated. • Metal enhances emission of halogenated compounds. • An increase in the temperature produces the destruction of pollutants.

  19. Simulation of N2O Abatement in Waste Gases by Its Decomposition over a K-Promoted Co-Mn-Al Mixed Oxide Catalyst%钾促进的Co-Mn-Al混合氧化物催化剂上模拟废气中N2O的分解减排

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lucie OBALOV(A); Kv(e)tu(s)e JIR(A)TOV(A); Kate(r)ina KAR(A)SKOV(A); Franti(s)ek KOVANDA

    2011-01-01

    Intrinsic data of N2O catalytic decomposition over a K-promoted Co-Mn-Al mixed oxide prepared by the thermal treatment of a layered double hydroxide was used for the design of a pilot reactor for the abatement of N2O emissions from the off-gases in HNO3 production. A pseudo-homogeneous one-dimensional model of an ideal plug flow reactor under an isothermal regime (450 ℃) was used for reactor design. A catalyst particle diameter of 3 mm is a compromise size because increasing the size of the catalyst particle leads to a decrease in the reaction rate because of an internal diffusion limitation, and particles with a smaller diameter cause a large pressure drop. A catalyst bed of 11.5 m3 was estimated for the target N2O conversion of 90% upon the treatment of 30000 m3/h of exhaust gas (0.1 mol% N2O, 0.005 mol% NO, 0.9 mol% H2O, 5 mol% O2) at 450 ℃ and 130 kPa.

  20. Soil C and N availability determine the priming effect: microbial N mining and stoichiometric decomposition theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruirui; Senbayram, Mehmet; Blagodatsky, Sergey; Dittert, Klaus; Lin, Xiangui; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    The increasing input of anthropogenically derived nitrogen (N) to ecosystems raises a crucial question: how does available N modify the decomposer community and thus affects the mineralization of soil organic matter (SOM). Moreover, N input modifies the priming effect (PE), that is, the effect of fresh organics on the microbial decomposition of SOM. We studied the interactive effects of C and N on SOM mineralization (by natural 13C labelling adding C4-sucrose or C4-maize straw to C3-soil) in relation to microbial growth kinetics and to the activities of five hydrolytic enzymes. This encompasses the groups of parameters governing two mechanisms of priming effects - microbial N mining and stoichiometric decomposition theories. In sole C treatments, positive PE was accompanied by a decrease in specific microbial growth rates, confirming a greater contribution of K-strategists to the decomposition of native SOM. Sucrose addition with N significantly accelerated mineralization of native SOM, whereas mineral N added with plant residues accelerated decomposition of plant residues. This supports the microbial mining theory in terms of N limitation. Sucrose addition with N was accompanied by accelerated microbial growth, increased activities of β-glucosidase and cellobiohydrolase, and decreased activities of xylanase and leucine amino peptidase. This indicated an increased contribution of r-strategists to the PE and to decomposition of cellulose but the decreased hemicellulolytic and proteolytic activities. Thus, the acceleration of the C cycle was primed by exogenous organic C and was controlled by N. This confirms the stoichiometric decomposition theory. Both K- and r-strategists were beneficial for priming effects, with an increasing contribution of K-selected species under N limitation. Thus, the priming phenomenon described in 'microbial N mining' theory can be ascribed to K-strategists. In contrast, 'stoichiometric decomposition' theory, that is, accelerated OM

  1. Eutrophication triggers contrasting multilevel feedbacks on litter accumulation and decomposition in fens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emsens, W-J; Aggenbach, C J S; Grootjans, A P; Nfor, E E; Schoelynck, J; Struyf, E; van Diggelen, R

    2016-10-01

    Eutrophication is a major threat for the persistence of nutrient-poor fens, as multilevel feedbacks on decomposition rates could trigger carbon loss and increase nutrient cycling. Here, we experimentally investigate the effects of macronutrient (NPK) enrichment on litter quality of six species of sedge (Carex sp.), which we relate to litter decomposition rates in a nutrient-poor and nutrient-rich environment. Our research focused on four levels: we examined how eutrophication alters (1) fresh litter production ("productivity shift"), (2) litter stoichiometry within the same species ("intraspecific shift"), (3) overall litter stoichiometry of the vegetation under the prediction that low-competitive species are outcompeted by fast-growing competitors ("interspecific shift"), and (4) litter decomposition rates due to an altered external environment (e.g., shifts in microbial activity; "exogenous shift"). Eutrophication triggered a strong increase in fresh litter production. Moreover, individuals of the same species produced litter with lower C:N and C:P ratios, higher K contents, and lower lignin, Ca and Mg contents (intraspecific shift), which increased litter decomposability. In addition, species typical for eutrophic conditions produced more easily degradable litter than did species typical for nutrient-poor conditions (interspecific shift). However, the effects of nutrient loading of the external environment (exogenous shift) were contradictory. Here, interactions between litter type and ambient nutrient level indicate that the (exogenous) effects of eutrophication on litter decomposition rates are strongly dependent of litter quality. Moreover, parameters of litter quality only correlated with decomposition rates for litter incubated in nutrient-poor environments, but not in eutrophic environments. This suggests that rates of litter decomposition can be uncoupled from litter stoichiometry under eutrophic conditions. In conclusion, our results show that

  2. Placement-aware decomposition of a digital standard cells library for double patterning lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassal, Amr G.; Sharaf, Heba; Hammouda, Sherif

    2012-11-01

    To continue scaling the circuit features down, Double Patterning (DP) technology is needed in 22nm technologies and lower. DP requires decomposing the layout features into two masks for pitch relaxation, such that the spacing between any two features on each mask is greater than the minimum allowed mask spacing. The relaxed pitches of each mask are then processed on two separate exposure steps. In many cases, post-layout decomposition fails to decompose the layout into two masks due to the presence of conflicts. Post-layout decomposition of a standard cells block can result in native conflicts inside the cells (internal conflict), or native conflicts on the boundary between two cells (boundary conflict). Resolving native conflicts requires a redesign and/or multiple iterations for the placement and routing phases to get a clean decomposition. Therefore, DP compliance must be considered in earlier phases, before getting the final placed cell block. The main focus of this paper is generating a library of decomposed standard cells to be used in a DP-aware placer. This library should contain all possible decompositions for each standard cell, i.e., these decompositions consider all possible combinations of boundary conditions. However, the large number of combinations of boundary conditions for each standard cell will significantly increase the processing time and effort required to obtain all possible decompositions. Therefore, an efficient methodology is required to reduce this large number of combinations. In this paper, three different reduction methodologies are proposed to reduce the number of different combinations processed to get the decomposed library. Experimental results show a significant reduction in the number of combinations and decompositions needed for the library processing. To generate and verify the proposed flow and methodologies, a prototype for a placement-aware DP-ready cell-library is developed with an optimized number of cell views.

  3. In situ infrared study of catalytic decomposition of NO. Second semiannual report, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, S.S.; Tan, Cher-Dip

    1997-04-01

    The growing concerns for the environment and increasingly stringent standards for NO emission have presented a major challenge to control NO emissions from electric utility plants and automobiles. Catalytic decomposition of NO is the most attractive approach for the control of NO emission for its simplicity. Successful development of an effective catalyst for NO decomposition will greatly decrease the equipment and operation cost of NO control. Due to lack of understanding of the mechanism of NO decomposition, efforts on the search of an effective catalyst have been unsuccessful. Scientific development of an effective catalyst requires fundamental understanding of the nature of active site, the rate-limiting step, and an approach to prolong the life of the catalyst. Research is proposed to study the reactivity of adsorbates for the direct NO decomposition and to investigate the feasibility of two novel approaches for improving catalyst activity and resistance to sintering. The first approach is the use of silanation to stabilize metal crystallites and supports for Cu-ZSM-5 and promoted Pt catalysts; the second is utilization of oxygen spillover and desorption to enhance NO decomposition activity. An innovative infrared reactor system will be used to observe and determine the dynamic behavior and the reactivity of adsorbates during NO decomposition, oxygen spillover, and silanation. A series of experiment including X-ray diffraction, temperature programmed desorption, temperature programmed reaction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy will be used to characterize the catalysts. The information obtained from this study will provide a scientific basis for developing an effective catalyst for the NO decomposition under practical flue gas conditions.

  4. Co-Combustion of Animal Waste in a Commercial Waste-to-Energy BFB Boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Moradian

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Co-combustion of animal waste, in waste-to-energy boilers, is considered a method to produce both heat and power and to dispose of possibly infected animal wastes. This research conducted full-scale combustion tests to identify the impact of changed fuel composition on a fluidized-bed boiler. The impact was characterized by analyzing the deposit formation rate, deposit composition, ash composition, and emissions. Two combustion tests, denoted the reference case and animal waste case, were performed based on different fuel mixes. In the reference case, a normal solid waste fuel mix was combusted in the boiler, containing sorted industry and household waste. In the animal waste case, 20 wt% animal waste was added to the reference fuel mix. The collected samples, comprising sampling probe deposits, fuel mixes, bed ash, return sand, boiler ash, cyclone ash and filter ash, were analyzed using chemical fractionation, SEM-EDX and XRD. The results indicate decreased deposit formation due to animal waste co-combustion. SEM-EDX and chemical fractionation identified higher concentrations of P, Ca, S, and Cl in the bed materials in the animal waste case. Moreover, the risk of bed agglomeration was lower in the animal waste case and also a decreased rate of NOx and SO2 emissions were observed.

  5. Frequent Questions About Universal Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frequent questions such as Who is affected by the universal waste regulations? What is “mercury-containing equipment”? How are waste batteries managed under universal waste? How are waste pesticides managed under universal waste?

  6. Gas emission from anaerobic decomposition of plant resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Bianchessi da Cunha-Santino

    Full Text Available Abstract: Aim The aim of this study was to quantify the emission rates of gases resulting from the anaerobic decomposition of different plant resources under conditions usually found in sediments of tropical aquatic systems and drained organic soils. Methods Incubations were prepared with green leaves, bark, twigs, plant litter, sugarcane stalks and leaves, soybean leaves, grasses, forest leaves and an aquatic macrophyte (Typha domingensis. Over 10 months, the daily volume of gas evolved from decay was measured and a kinetic model was used to describe the anaerobic mineralization. Results Using the mathematical model, it can be observed that the composition of the plant resources is heterogeneous. The temporal variation of the gas rates indicated that the mineralization of the labile fractions of detritus varied, on a carbon basis, from 16.2 (bark to 100% (samples composed of leaves, grasses and sugar cane stalks. High gas emissions were observed during the mineralization of grasses, sugar cane stalks, leaves and plant litter, while low volumes of gases were measured during the mineralization of bark, twigs, forest leaves and T. domingensis, which are the most fibrous and recalcitrant resources (carbon content: 83.8, 78.2, 64.8 and 53.4%, respectively. The mineralization of labile carbon presented half-life values, which varied from 41 (twigs to 295 days (grasses. Conclusions Considering the high amount of remaining recalcitrant fraction, the anaerobic decomposition of these plant resources showed a strong trend towards accumulating organic matter in flooded soils. Despite the higher temperatures found in the tropical environment, these environments represent a sink of particulate detritus due to its slow decomposition.

  7. Content Based Image Retrieval Using Singular Value Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Harshini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A computer application which automatically identifies or verifies a person from a digital image or a video frame from a video source, one of the ways to do this is by com-paring selected facial features from the image and a facial database. Content based image retrieval (CBIR, a technique for retrieving images on the basis of automatically derived features. This paper focuses on a low-dimensional feature based indexing technique for achieving efficient and effective retrieval performance. An appearance based face recognition method called singular value decomposition (SVD is proposed in this paper and is different from principal component analysis (PCA, which effectively considers only Euclidean structure of face space for analysis which lead to poor classification performance in case of great facial variations such as expression, lighting, occlusion and so on, due to the fact the image gray value matrices on which they manipulate are very sensitive to these facial variations. We consider the fact that every image matrix can always have the well known singular value decomposition (SVD and can be regarded as a composition of a set of base images generated by SVD and we further point out that base images are sensitive to the composition of face image. Finally our experimental results show that SVD has the advantage of providing a better representation and achieves lower error rates in face recognition but it has the disadvantage that it drags the performance evaluation. So, in order to overcome that, we conducted experiments by introducing a controlling parameter ‘α’, which ranges from 0 to 1, and we achieved better results for α=0.4 when compared with the other values of ‘α’. Key words: Singular value decomposition (SVD, Euclidean distance, original gray value matrix (OGVM.

  8. Priming-induced Changes in Permafrost Soil Organic Matter Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, E.; Schuur, E.; Bracho, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    Warming of tundra ecosystems due to climate change is predicted to thaw permafrost and increase plant biomass and litter input to soil. Additional input of easily decomposable carbon can alter microbial activity by providing a much needed energy source, thereby accelerating soil organic matter decomposition. This phenomenon, known as the priming effect, can increase CO2 flux from soil to the atmosphere. However, the extent to which this mechanism can decrease soil carbon stocks in the Arctic is unknown. This project assessed priming effects on permafrost soil collected from a moist acidic tundra site in Healy, Alaska. We hypothesized that priming would increase microbial activity by providing microbes with a fresh source of carbon, thereby increasing decomposition of old and slowly decomposing carbon. Soil from surface and deep layers were amended with multiple pulses of uniformly 13C labeled glucose and cellulose, and samples were incubated at 15° C to quantify whether labile substrate addition increased carbon mineralization. We quantified the proportion of old carbon mineralization by measuring 14CO2. Data shows that substrate addition resulted in higher respiration rates in amended soils; however, priming was only observed in deep layers, where 30% more soil-derived carbon was respired compared to control samples. This suggests that microbes in deep layers are limited in energy, and the addition of labile carbon increases native soil organic matter decomposition, especially in soil with greater fractions of slowly decomposing carbon. Priming in permafrost could exacerbate the effects of climate change by increasing mineralization rates of carbon accumulated over the long-term in deep layers. Therefore, quantifying priming effect in permafrost soils is imperative to understanding the dynamics of carbon turnover in a warmer world.

  9. Advanced waste form and Melter development for treatment of troublesome high-level wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, James [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Kim, Dong -Sang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Maio, Vincent [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-01

    A number of waste components in US defense high level radioactive wastes (HLW) have proven challenging for current Joule heated ceramic melter (JHCM) operations and have limited the ability to increase waste loadings beyond already realized levels. Many of these “troublesome" waste species cause crystallization in the glass melt that can negatively impact product quality or have a deleterious effect on melter processing. Recent efforts at US Department of Energy laboratories have focused on understanding crystallization behavior within HLW glass melts and investigating approaches to mitigate the impacts of crystallization so that increases in waste loading can be realized. Advanced glass formulations have been developed to highlight the unique benefits of next-generation melter technologies such as the Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Crystal-tolerant HLW glasses have been investigated to allow sparingly soluble components such as chromium to crystallize in the melter but pass out of the melter before accumulating.The Hanford site AZ-101 tank waste composition represents a waste group that is waste loading limited primarily due to high concentrations of Fe2O3 (also with high Al2O3 concentrations). Systematic glass formulation development utilizing slightly higher process temperatures and higher tolerance to spinel crystals demonstrated that an increase in waste loading of more than 20% could be achieved for this waste composition, and by extension higher loadings for wastes in the same group. An extended duration CCIM melter test was conducted on an AZ-101 waste simulant using the CCIM platform at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The melter was continually operated for approximately 80 hours demonstrating that the AZ-101 high waste loading glass composition could be readily processed using the CCIM technology. The resulting glass was close to the targeted composition and exhibited excellent durability in both

  10. CHALLENGES WITH RETRIEVING TRANSURANIC WASTE FROM THE HANFORD BURIAL GROUNDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SWAN, R.J.; LAKES, M.E.

    2007-08-06

    The U.S. DOE's Hanford Reservation produced plutonium and other nuclear materials for the nation's defense starting in World War II. The defense mission generated wastes that were either retrievably stored (i.e. retrievably stored waste) and/or disposed of in burial grounds. Challenges have emerged from retrieving suspect TRU waste including adequacy of records, radiological concerns, container integrity, industrial hygiene and safety issues, the lack of processing/treatment facilities, and the integration of regulatory requirements. All retrievably stored waste is managed as mixed waste and assumed to be TRU waste, unless documented otherwise. Mixed waste is defined as radioactive waste that contains hazardous constituents. The Atomic Energy Act governs waste with radionuclides, and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) governs waste with hazardous constituents. Waste may also be governed by the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and a portion may be managed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). In 1970, TRU waste was required to be placed in 20-year retrievable storage and segregated from other Waste. Prior to that date, segregation did not occur. Because of the changing definition of TRU over the years, and the limitations of early assay equipment, all retrievably stored waste in the burial grounds is managed as suspect TRU. Experience has shown that some of this waste will be characterized as low-level (non-TRU) waste after assay. The majority of the retrieved waste is not amenable to sampling due to waste type and/or radiological issues. Key to waste retrieval and disposition are characterization, historical investigation and research, knowledge of past handling and packaging, as well as a broad understanding and application of the regulations.

  11. Introduction to Waste Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Solid waste management is as old as human civilization, although only considered an engineering discipline for about one century. The change from the previous focus on public cleansing of the cities to modern waste management was primarily driven by industrialization, which introduced new materials...... and chemicals, dramatically changing the types and composition of waste, and by urbanization making waste management in urban areas a complicated and costly logistic operation. This book focuses on waste that commonly appears in the municipal waste management system. This chapter gives an introduction to modern...... waste management, including issues as waste definition, problems associated with waste, waste management criteria and approaches to waste management. Later chapters introduce aspects of engineering (Chapter 1.2), economics (Chapter 1.3) and regulation (Chapter 1.4)....

  12. Modeling decomposition of rigid polyurethane foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    Rigid polyurethane foams are used as encapsulants to isolate and support thermally sensitive components within weapon systems. When exposed to abnormal thermal environments, such as fire, the polyurethane foam decomposes to form products having a wide distribution of molecular weights and can dominate the overall thermal response of the system. Decomposing foams have either been ignored by assuming the foam is not present, or have been empirically modeled by changing physical properties, such as thermal conductivity or emissivity, based on a prescribed decomposition temperature. The hypothesis addressed in the current work is that improved predictions of polyurethane foam degradation can be realized by using a more fundamental decomposition model based on chemical structure and vapor-liquid equilibrium, rather than merely fitting the data by changing physical properties at a prescribed decomposition temperature. The polyurethane decomposition model is founded on bond breaking of the primary polymer and formation of a secondary polymer which subsequently decomposes at high temperature. The bond breaking scheme is resolved using percolation theory to describe evolving polymer fragments. The polymer fragments vaporize according to individual vapor pressures. Kinetic parameters for the model were obtained from Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) from a single nonisothermal experiment with a heating rate of 20 C/min. Model predictions compare reasonably well with a separate nonisothermal TGA weight loss experiment with a heating rate of 200 C/min.

  13. Influence of Family Structure on Variance Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Stefan McKinnon; Sarup, Pernille Merete; Sørensen, Peter

    Partitioning genetic variance by sets of randomly sampled genes for complex traits in D. melanogaster and B. taurus, has revealed that population structure can affect variance decomposition. In fruit flies, we found that a high likelihood ratio is correlated with a high proportion of explained ge...

  14. Strongly Cyclic and Strongly Irreducible Decomposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    纪友清; 韩黎明

    2001-01-01

    Let W be an injective unilateral weighted shift, and let W(n) be the orthogonal direct sum of n copies of W. In this paper, we prove that, if the commutant of W is strictly cyclic, then W(n) has a unique (SI) decomposition with respect to similarity for every natural number n.

  15. Distributed Prognostics based on Structural Model Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Matthew J.; Bregon, Anibal; Roychoudhury, I.

    2014-01-01

    Within systems health management, prognostics focuses on predicting the remaining useful life of a system. In the model-based prognostics paradigm, physics-based models are constructed that describe the operation of a system and how it fails. Such approaches consist of an estimation phase, in which the health state of the system is first identified, and a prediction phase, in which the health state is projected forward in time to determine the end of life. Centralized solutions to these problems are often computationally expensive, do not scale well as the size of the system grows, and introduce a single point of failure. In this paper, we propose a novel distributed model-based prognostics scheme that formally describes how to decompose both the estimation and prediction problems into independent local subproblems whose solutions may be easily composed into a global solution. The decomposition of the prognostics problem is achieved through structural decomposition of the underlying models. The decomposition algorithm creates from the global system model a set of local submodels suitable for prognostics. Independent local estimation and prediction problems are formed based on these local submodels, resulting in a scalable distributed prognostics approach that allows the local subproblems to be solved in parallel, thus offering increases in computational efficiency. Using a centrifugal pump as a case study, we perform a number of simulation-based experiments to demonstrate the distributed approach, compare the performance with a centralized approach, and establish its scalability. Index Terms-model-based prognostics, distributed prognostics, structural model decomposition ABBREVIATIONS

  16. Spinodal decomposition in fine grained materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H Ramanarayan; T A Abinandanan

    2003-01-01

    We have used a phase field model to study spinodal decomposition in polycrystalline materials in which the grain size is of the same order of magnitude as the characteristic decomposition wavelength ($\\lambda_{SD}$). In the spirit of phase field models, each grain () in our model has an order parameter ($\\eta_i$) associated with it; $\\eta_i$ has a value of unity inside the th grain, decreases smoothly through the grain boundary region to zero outside the grain. For a symmetric alloy of composition, = 0.5, our results show that microstructural evolution depends largely on the difference in the grain boundary energies, $\\gamma_{gb}$, of A-rich () and B-rich () phases. If $\\gamma^{\\alpha}_{gb}$ is lower, we find that the decomposition process is initiated with an layer being formed at the grain boundary. If the grain size is sufficiently small (about the same as $\\lambda_{SD}$), the interior of the grain is filled with the phase. If the grain size is large (say, about 10 $\\lambda_{SD}$ or greater), the early stage microstructure exhibits an A-rich grain boundary layer followed by a B-rich layer; the grain interior exhibits a spinodally decomposed microstructure, evolving slowly. Further, grain growth is suppressed completely during the decomposition process.

  17. TP89 - SIRZ Decomposition Spectral Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seetho, Isacc M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Azevedo, Steve [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, Jerel [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, William D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martz, Jr., Harry E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-08

    The primary objective of this test plan is to provide X-ray CT measurements of known materials for the purposes of generating and testing MicroCT and EDS spectral estimates. These estimates are to be used in subsequent Ze/RhoE decomposition analyses of acquired data.

  18. The Thermal Decomposition of Calcium Carbonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The thermogravimetry(TG) and derivative thermogravimetry(DTG) curves of the thermal decomposition reaction of calcium carbonate have been measured at five different heating rates. The kinetic parameters and the reaction mechanism of the reaction were evaluated from analysis of the TG and DTG curves by using the Ozawa method, the combined integral and differential methods and the reduced equations derived by us.

  19. Urea Decomposition Method to Synthesize Hydrotalcites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Piao Ping YANG; Jian Feng YU; Tong Hao WU; Guo Zong LIU; Tae Sun CHANG; Dong Koo LEE; Deug Hee CHO

    2004-01-01

    The urea decomposition property at high temperature has been used to control the pH value in the synthesis of layer compounds. The hydrotalcites of Mg-Al and Ni-Al with high crystallinity were synthesized by using this property.

  20. Thermal decomposition of barium valerate in argon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres, P.; Norby, Poul; Grivel, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of barium valerate (Ba(C4H9CO2)(2)/Ba-pentanoate) was studied in argon by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, IR-spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and hot-stage optical microscopy. Melting takes place in two different steps, at 200 degrees C and 280...

  1. Methodologies in forensic and decomposition microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culturable microorganisms represent only 0.1-1% of the total microbial diversity of the biosphere. This has severely restricted the ability of scientists to study the microbial biodiversity associated with the decomposition of ephemeral resources in the past. Innovations in technology are bringing...

  2. Influence of Family Structure on Variance Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Stefan McKinnon; Sarup, Pernille Merete; Sørensen, Peter

    Partitioning genetic variance by sets of randomly sampled genes for complex traits in D. melanogaster and B. taurus, has revealed that population structure can affect variance decomposition. In fruit flies, we found that a high likelihood ratio is correlated with a high proportion of explained ge...

  3. Nonlinear Doob-Meyer Decomposition with Jumps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Quan LIN

    2003-01-01

    Concepts of g-supersolution, g-martingale, g-supermartingale are introduced, which arerelated to BSDE with Brownian motion and Poisson point process. A strict comparison theorem,monotonic limit theorem related to this type of BSDE are also discussed. As an application of theseresults, a nonlinear Doob-Meyer decomposition theorem is obtained.

  4. Nash-Williams’ cycle-decomposition theorem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We give an elementary proof of the theorem of Nash-Williams that a graph has an edge-decomposition into cycles if and only if it does not contain an odd cut. We also prove that every bridgeless graph has a collection of cycles covering each edge at least once and at most 7 times. The two results...

  5. THREE WAY DECOMPOSITION FOR THE BOLTZMANN EQUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ilgis Ibragimov; Sergej Rjasanow

    2009-01-01

    The initial value problem for the spatially homogeneous Boltzmann equation is considered. A deterministic numerical scheme for this problem is developed by the use of the three way decomposition of the unknown function as well as of the collision integral. On this way, almost linear complexity of the algorithm is achieved. Some numerical examples are presented.

  6. Linear, Constant-rounds Bit-decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reistad, Tord; Toft, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    When performing secure multiparty computation, tasks may often be simple or difficult depending on the representation chosen. Hence, being able to switch representation efficiently may allow more efficient protocols. We present a new protocol for bit-decomposition: converting a ring element x ∈ ℤ M...

  7. Weakly tight functions and their decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Khare

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the study of a weakly tight function and its relation to tight functions. We obtain a Jordan-decomposition-type theorem for a locally bounded weakly tight real-valued function defined on a sublattice of IX, followed by the notion of a total variation.

  8. Thermal decomposition of some chemotherapic substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes Nedja Suely

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermogravimetry, derivative thermogravimetry (TG, DTG, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and X ray diffraction powder patterns have been used to study trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, ampicillim, tetracycline hydrochloride and rifampim. The results revealed the extent of their thermal stability and also allowed interpretations concerning their thermal decompositions in air atmosphere.

  9. Organic matter decomposition in simulated aquaculture ponds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres Beristain, B.

    2005-01-01

    Different kinds of organic and inorganic compounds (e.g. formulated food, manures, fertilizers) are added to aquaculture ponds to increase fish production. However, a large part of these inputs are not utilized by the fish and are decomposed inside the pond. The microbiological decomposition of the

  10. The Algorithmic Complexity of Modular Decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Bioch (Cor)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractModular decomposition is a thoroughly investigated topic in many areas such as switching theory, reliability theory, game theory and graph theory. We propose an O(mn)-algorithm for the recognition of a modular set of a monotone Boolean function f with m prime implicants and n variables.

  11. Distributed Model Predictive Control via Dual Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biegel, Benjamin; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle

    2014-01-01

    This chapter presents dual decomposition as a means to coordinate a number of subsystems coupled by state and input constraints. Each subsystem is equipped with a local model predictive controller while a centralized entity manages the subsystems via prices associated with the coupling constraints...

  12. MADCam: The multispectral active decomposition camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilger, Klaus Baggesen; Stegmann, Mikkel Bille

    2001-01-01

    A real-time spectral decomposition of streaming three-band image data is obtained by applying linear transformations. The Principal Components (PC), the Maximum Autocorrelation Factors (MAF), and the Maximum Noise Fraction (MNF) transforms are applied. In the presented case study the PC transform...

  13. Decomposition of variance for spatial Cox processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalilian, Abdollah; Guan, Yongtao; Waagepetersen, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    Spatial Cox point processes is a natural framework for quantifying the various sources of variation governing the spatial distribution of rain forest trees. We introduce a general criterion for variance decomposition for spatial Cox processes and apply it to specific Cox process models...

  14. A Martingale Decomposition of Discrete Markov Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Reinhard

    We consider a multivariate time series whose increments are given from a homogeneous Markov chain. We show that the martingale component of this process can be extracted by a filtering method and establish the corresponding martingale decomposition in closed-form. This representation is useful...

  15. Decomposition of variance for spatial Cox processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalilian, Abdollah; Guan, Yongtao; Waagepetersen, Rasmus

    Spatial Cox point processes is a natural framework for quantifying the various sources of variation governing the spatial distribution of rain forest trees. We introducea general criterion for variance decomposition for spatial Cox processes and apply it to specific Cox process models with additive...

  16. Modal decomposition without a priori scale information

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The modal decomposition of an arbitrary optical field may be done without regard to the spatial scale of the chosen basis functions, but this generally leads to a large number of modes in the expansion. While this may be considered as mathematically...

  17. Decomposition of variance for spatial Cox processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalilian, Abdollah; Guan, Yongtao; Waagepetersen, Rasmus

    Spatial Cox point processes is a natural framework for quantifying the various sources of variation governing the spatial distribution of rain forest trees. We introduce a general criterion for variance decomposition for spatial Cox processes and apply it to specific Cox process models...

  18. SELF SINTERING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVay, T.N.; Johnson, J.R.; Struxness, E.G.; Morgan, K.Z.

    1959-12-29

    A method is described for disposal of radioactive liquid waste materials. The wastes are mixed with clays and fluxes to form a ceramic slip and disposed in a thermally insulated container in a layer. The temperature of the layer rises due to conversion of the energy of radioactivity to heat boillng off the liquid to fomn a dry mass. The dry mass is then covered with thermal insulation, and the mass is self-sintered into a leach-resistant ceramic cake by further conversion of the energy of radioactivity to heat.

  19. Feature Extraction by Wavelet Decomposition of Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Singh

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new approach to surface acoustic wave (SAW chemical sensor array design and data processing for recognition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs based on transient responses. The array is constructed of variable thickness single polymer-coated SAW oscillator sensors. The thickness of polymer coatings are selected such that during the sensing period, different sensors are loaded with varied levels of diffusive inflow of vapour species due to different stages of termination of equilibration process. Using a single polymer for coating the individual sensors with different thickness introduces vapour-specific kinetics variability in transient responses. The transient shapes are analysed by wavelet decomposition based on Daubechies mother wavelets. The set of discrete wavelet transform (DWT approximation coefficients across the array transients is taken to represent the vapour sample in two alternate ways. In one, the sets generated by all the transients are combined into a single set to give a single representation to the vapour. In the other, the set of approximation coefficients at each data point generated by all transients is taken to represent the vapour. The latter results in as many alternate representations as there are approximation coefficients. The alternate representations of a vapour sample are treated as different instances or realisations for further processing. The wavelet analysis is then followed by the principal component analysis (PCA to create new feature space. A comparative analysis of the feature spaces created by both the methods leads to the conclusion that both methods yield complimentary information: the one reveals intrinsic data variables, and the other enhances class separability. The present approach is validated by generating synthetic transient response data based on a prototype polyisobutylene (PIB coated 3-element SAW sensor array exposed to 7 VOC vapours: chloroform, chlorobenzene o

  20. Gas generation from transuranic waste degradation: data summary and interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molecke, M.A.

    1979-12-01

    A comprehensive review of all applicable gas generation data resulting from the degradation of existing and potential forms of transuranic-contaminated wastes is presented. Extensive experimental studies have been performed under both realistic environmental conditions expected in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and overtest conditions. Degradation mechanisms investigated were radiolysis, thermal decomposition and dewatering, bacterial action, and chemical corrosion. Waste matrices studied include cellulosics, plastics, rubbers, organic composite, concrete-TRU ash, asphalt, process sludges, and mild steel. Measured gas generation rates are presented in terms of gas moles/year/drum of waste and in G(gas) values for radiolysis. The effects of multiple variables on gas generation are also described. 7 figures, 15 tables.

  1. The pressure-amorphized state in zirconium tungstate: a precursor to decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, Akhilesh K [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Sastry, V S [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Sahu, P Ch [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Mary, T A [Department of Materials Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2004-02-25

    In contrast to widely accepted view that pressure-induced amorphization arises due to kinetic hindrance of equilibrium phase transitions, here we provide evidence that the metastable pressure-amorphized state in zirconium tungstate is a precursor to decomposition of the compound into a mixture of simple oxides. This is from the volume collapse {delta}V across amorphization, which is obtained for the first time by measuring linear dimensions of irreversibly amorphized samples during their recovery to the original cubic phase upon isochronal annealing up to 1000 K. The anomalously large {delta}V of 25.7 {+-} 1.2% being the same as that expected for the decomposition indicates that this amorphous state is probably a precursor to kinetically hindered decomposition. A P-T diagram of the compound is also proposed.

  2. Central-force decomposition of spline-based modified embedded atom method potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winczewski, S.; Dziedzic, J.; Rybicki, J.

    2016-10-01

    Central-force decompositions are fundamental to the calculation of stress fields in atomic systems by means of Hardy stress. We derive expressions for a central-force decomposition of the spline-based modified embedded atom method (s-MEAM) potential. The expressions are subsequently simplified to a form that can be readily used in molecular-dynamics simulations, enabling the calculation of the spatial distribution of stress in systems treated with this novel class of empirical potentials. We briefly discuss the properties of the obtained decomposition and highlight further computational techniques that can be expected to benefit from the results of this work. To demonstrate the practicability of the derived expressions, we apply them to calculate stress fields due to an edge dislocation in bcc Mo, comparing their predictions to those of linear elasticity theory.

  3. Combating Curse of Dimensionality in Resilient Monitoring Systems: Conditions for Lossless Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerkov, Semyon M; Ravichandran, Maruthi T

    2017-05-01

    Resilient monitoring systems (RMSs) are sensor networks that degrade gracefully under cyber-attacks on their sensors. The recently developed RMSs, while being effective in the attacked sensors identification and isolation, exhibited a drawback in their operation-an exponentially increasing assessment time as a function of the number of sensors in the network. To combat this curse of dimensionality, a decomposition approach has been proposed, which led to a dramatic reduction of the assessment time, irrespective of the sensor network dimensionality. However, information losses and, thus, reductions in the level of resiliency due to the decomposition, have not been investigated. This paper is intended to carry out such an investigation. Specifically, it derives conditions for lossless decomposition in terms of the Renyi-2 entropy. The development is based on the analysis of matrices, which characterize coupling of process variables and on a monotonicity property of the Dempster-Shafer combination rule on a class of functions, which arise within the RMS operation.

  4. Marine environmental protection: An application of the nanometer photo catalyst method on decomposition of benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mu-Chien; Kao, Jui-Chung

    2016-04-15

    Bioremediation is currently extensively employed in the elimination of coastal oil pollution, but it is not very effective as the process takes several months to degrade oil. Among the components of oil, benzene degradation is difficult due to its stable characteristics. This paper describes an experimental study on the decomposition of benzene by titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanometer photocatalysis. The photocatalyst is illuminated with 360-nm ultraviolet light for generation of peroxide ions. This results in complete decomposition of benzene, thus yielding CO2 and H2O. In this study, a nonwoven fabric is coated with the photocatalyst and benzene. Using the Double-Shot Py-GC system on the residual component, complete decomposition of the benzene was verified by 4h of exposure to ultraviolet light. The method proposed in this study can be directly applied to elimination of marine oil pollution. Further studies will be conducted on coastal oil pollution in situ.

  5. The Effect of Topography on Target Decomposition of Polarimetric SAR Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Eun Park

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Polarimetric target decomposition enables the interpretation of radar images more easily, mostly based on physical assumptions, i.e., fitting physically-based scattering models to the polarimetric SAR observations. However, the model-fitting result cannot be always successful. Particularly, the performance of model-fitting in sloping forests is still an open question. In this study, the effect of ground topography on the model-fitting-based polarimetric decomposition techniques is investigated. The estimation accuracy of each scattering component in the decomposition results are evaluated based on the simulated target matrix by using the incoherent vegetation scattering model that accounts for the tilted scattering surface beneath the forest canopy. Experimental results show that the surface and the double-bounce scattering components can be significantly misestimated due to the topographic slope, even when the volume scattering power is successfully estimated.

  6. Structural Analysis of Multi-component Amyloid Systems by Chemometric SAXS Data Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trillo, Isabel Fatima Herranz; Jensen, Minna Grønning; van Maarschalkerweerd, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Formation of amyloids is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative pathologies. Structural investigation of these complex transformation processes poses significant experimental challenges due to the co-existence of multiple species. The additive nature of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data...... allows for probing the evolution of these mixtures of oligomeric states, but the decomposition of SAXS data into species-specific spectra and relative concentrations is burdened by ambiguity. We present an objective SAXS data decomposition method by adapting the multivariate curve resolution alternating...... least squares (MCR-ALS) chemometric method. The approach enables rigorous and robust decomposition of synchrotron SAXS data by simultaneously introducing these data in different representations that emphasize molecular changes at different time and structural resolution ranges. The approach has allowed...

  7. Assessing the management of healthcare waste in Hawassa city, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel Deneke Haylamicheal; Mohamed Aqiel Dalvie; Biruck Desalegn Yirsaw; Hanibale Atsbeha Zegeye

    2011-08-01

    Inadequate management of healthcare waste is a serious concern in many developing countries due to the risks posed to human health and the environment. This study aimed to evaluate healthcare waste management in Hawassa city, Ethiopia. The study was conducted in nine healthcare facilities (HCFs) including hospitals (four), health centres (two) and higher clinics (three) in two phases, first to assess the waste management aspect and second to determine daily waste generation rate. The result showed that the median quantity of waste generated at the facilities was 3.46 kg bed(-1) day(-1) (range: 1.48-8.19 kg bed(-1) day(-1)). The quantity of waste per day generated at a HCF increased as occupancy increased (p waste generated at government HCFs was more than at private HCFs (p waste (20-63.1%) generated at the different HCFs was much higher than the WHO recommendation (10-25%). There was no waste segregation in most HCFs and only one used a complete color coding system. Solid waste and wastewater were stored, transported, treated and disposed inappropriately at all HCFs. Needle-stick injuries were prevalent in 25-100% of waste handlers employed at these HCFs. Additionally, low levels of training and awareness of waste legislation was prevalent amongst staff. The study showed that management of healthcare waste at HCFs to be poor. Waste management practices need to be improved through improved legislation and enforcement, and training of staff in the healthcare facilities in Hawassa.

  8. Waste Management in Industrial Construction: Investigating Contributions from Industrial Ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa A. R. U. Freitas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The need for effective construction waste management is growing in importance, due to the increasing generation of construction waste and to its adverse impacts on the environment. However, despite the numerous studies on construction waste management, recovery of construction waste through Industrial Symbiosis and the adoption of other inter-firm practices, comprised within Industrial Ecology field of study, have not been fully explored. The present research aims to investigate Industrial Ecology contributions to waste management in industrial construction. The waste management strategies adopted in two industrial construction projects in Brazil are analyzed. The main waste streams generated are identified, recycling and landfilling diversion rates are presented and waste recovery through Industrial Symbiosis is discussed. A SWOT analysis was carried out. Results demonstrate that 9% of the waste produced in one of the projects was recovered through Industrial Symbiosis, while in the other project, waste recovery through Industrial Symbiosis achieved the rate of 30%. These data reveal Industrial Symbiosis’ potential to reduce landfilling of industrial construction wastes, contributing to waste recovery in construction. In addition, results show that industrial construction projects can benefit from the following synergies common in Industrial Ecology place-based approaches: centralized waste management service, shared waste management infrastructure and administrative simplification.

  9. Differences in water depth determine leaf-litter decomposition in streams: implications on impact assessment reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leaf-litter decomposition is a widespread functional indicator to assess the stream ecosystem status. However, the spatial location of leaf-bags could distort the impact assessment since intrinsic features of a given site have an important role in the spatial distribution of macroinvertebrates, which could affect decomposition rate. A source of variability that can be easily controlled is the water depth at which bags are incubated in stream bed. Therefore, we tested if water depth within a same mesohabitat (riffles can determine decomposition rates. Due to the seasonal variability of macroinvertebrate assemblages in temperate regions, the study was performed in autumn-winter and spring to test the consistency of the findings. In three streams from North of Spain 15 mesh bags with alder leaves were placed in riffles covering a gradient of depths. Depth had a positive effect on decomposition rates and biomass of associated total invertebrates and shredders in autumn-winter, fauna variables helping to explain the differences in rates. In spring, depth affected negatively rates, the observed variability being weakly explained by invertebrates, which did not show differences along depth. Despite the opposite trend between seasons, water depth influences the decomposition rates, which may reduce or increase differences among systems if the water depth distribution is greatly biased. Our study highlights the importance of covering a similar range of water depths in the different systems being compared.

  10. A simple method for decomposition of peracetic acid in a microalgal cultivation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Min-Gyu; Lee, Hansol; Nam, Kibok; Rexroth, Sascha; Rögner, Matthias; Kwon, Jong-Hee; Yang, Ji-Won

    2015-03-01

    A cost-efficient process devoid of several washing steps was developed, which is related to direct cultivation following the decomposition of the sterilizer. Peracetic acid (PAA) is known to be an efficient antimicrobial agent due to its high oxidizing potential. Sterilization by 2 mM PAA demands at least 1 h incubation time for an effective disinfection. Direct degradation of PAA was demonstrated by utilizing components in conventional algal medium. Consequently, ferric ion and pH buffer (HEPES) showed a synergetic effect for the decomposition of PAA within 6 h. On the contrary, NaNO3, one of the main components in algal media, inhibits the decomposition of PAA. The improved growth of Chlorella vulgaris and Synechocystis PCC6803 was observed in the prepared BG11 by decomposition of PAA. This process involving sterilization and decomposition of PAA should help cost-efficient management of photobioreactors in a large scale for the production of value-added products and biofuels from microalgal biomass.

  11. Thermal Decomposition Behavior and Kinetics of Composites from Coal and Polyethylene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Fu-sheng; QU Jian-lin; YANG Zhi-yuan; ZHOU An-ning

    2007-01-01

    A thermogravimetric analysis (TG) was conducted to study the thermal decomposition behavior and kinetics of composites from coal and high density polyethylene (HDPE), linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) or low density polyethylene (LDPE). The results show that coal facilitates melting of the polyethylene before temperatures reach 700 K in nitrogen due to the exothermic effect of coal. Above 700 K, adding coal into the polyethylene will result in smaller maximum rates of mass loss and higher initial mass loss temperatures of the composites. Hence, some chemical interactions, occurring between liquid compounds released in the pyrolysis of the coal and polymer, depend on several factors, such as coal rank and the molecular structure of polymers. Synergetic effects in coal and polymers were also found. Both chemical interactions and synergetic effects control the entire thermal decomposition behavior of composites. The larger the amount of coal in the composites, the greater the decomposition temperature spans and the higher the maximum decomposition temperature, the smaller the devolatilization rates. The effect of coal on the thermal stability of composites lies in the hydrogen acceptor effect of the coals. Thermal decomposition of the coals, the polymers and related composites can be modelled via first order parallel reactions between 563 K and 763 K.

  12. D\\'ecomposition effective de Jordan-Chevalley et ses retomb\\'ees en enseignement

    CERN Document Server

    Couty, Danielle; Zarouf, Rachid

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to point the effectiveness of the Jordan-Chevalley decomposition, i.e. the decomposition of a square matrix $U$ with coefficients in a field $k$ containing the eigenvalues of $U$ as a sum $U=D+N,$ where $D$ is a diagonalizable matrix and $N$ a nilpotent matrix which commutes with $D.$ The most general version of this decomposition shows that every separable element $u$ of a $k$-algebra $A$ can be written in a unique way as a sum $u=d+n,$ where $d \\in A$ is absolutely semi-simple and where $n\\in A$ is nilpotent and commutes with $d.$ In fact an algorithm, due to C. Chevalley, allows to compute this decomposition: this algorithm is an adaptation to this context of the Newton method, which gives here the exact value of the absolutely semi-simple part $d$ of $u$ after a finite number of iterations. We illustrate the effectiveness of this method by computing the decomposition of a $15 \\times 15$ matrix having eigenvalues of multiplicity 3 which are not computable exactly. We also discu...

  13. Forest decompositions of graphs with cyclomatic number 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Farrell

    1983-01-01

    derived. From these polynomials, results about forest decompositions are deduced. Explicit formulae are given for the number of decompositions of the basic graphs into forest with specified finite cardinalities.

  14. Construction of generalized atomic decompositions in Banach spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available G-atomic decompositions for Banach spaces with respect to a model space of sequences have been introduced and studied as a generalization of atomic decompositions. Examples and counter example have been provided to show its existence. It has been proved that an associated Banach space for G-atomic decomposition always has a complemented subspace. The notion of a representation system is introduced and exhibits its relation with G-atomic decomposition. Also It has been observed that G-atomic decompositions are exactly compressions of Schauder decompositions for a larger Banach space. We give a characterization for finite G-atomic decomposition in terms of finite-dimensional expansion of identity. Keywords: complemented coefficient spaces, finite-dimensional expansion of identity, G-atomic decomposition, representation system.

  15. TRIANGLE-SHAPED DC CORONA DISCHARGE DEVICE FOR MOLECULAR DECOMPOSITION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses the evaluation of electrostatic DC corona discharge devices for the application of molecular decomposition. A point-to-plane geometry corona device with a rectangular cross section demonstrated low decomposition efficiencies in earlier experimental work. The n...

  16. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 3, Part 1, Waste Management Facility report, dangerous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation, and amount of waste.

  17. Wasted energy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Steg

    1999-01-01

    Original title: Verspilde energie? Many environmental problems are increasing primarily due to rising production and consumption, in other words due to the behaviour of consumers. Accordingly, there is a growing realisation that environmental problems must be partly resolved through a change

  18. Biofilm responses to marine fish farm wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz-Lazaro, Carlos, E-mail: carsanz@um.es [Departamento de Ecologia e Hidrologia, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad de Murcia, 30100 Murcia (Spain); Navarrete-Mier, Francisco; Marin, Arnaldo [Departamento de Ecologia e Hidrologia, Facultad de Biologia, Universidad de Murcia, 30100 Murcia (Spain)

    2011-03-15

    The changes in the biofilm community due to organic matter enrichment, eutrophication and metal contamination derived from fish farming were studied. The biofilm biomass, polysaccharide content, trophic niche and element accumulation were quantified along an environmental gradient of fish farm wastes in two seasons. Biofilm structure and trophic diversity was influenced by seasonality as well as by the fish farm waste load. Fish farming enhanced the accumulation of organic carbon, nutrients, selenium and metals by the biofilm community. The accumulation pattern of these elements was similar regardless of the structure and trophic niche of the community. This suggests that the biofilm communities can be considered a reliable tool for assessing dissolved aquaculture wastes. Due to the ubiquity of biofilms and its wide range of consumers, its role as a sink of dissolved wastes may have important implications for the transfer of aquaculture wastes to higher trophic levels in coastal systems. - Research highlights: > Biofilms can act as a trophic pathway of fish farm dissolved wastes. > Biofilms are reliable tools for monitoring fish farm dissolved wastes. > The influence of the fish farm dissolved wastes can be detected 120-350 m from farm. - Under the influence of fish farming biofilm accumulates organic carbon, nutrients, selenium and metals, regardless of the structure and trophic niche of the community.

  19. A Decomposition Software Package for the Decomposition of Long-Term Multi-Channel Electromyographic Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Luca, �A procedure for decomposing the myoelectric signal into its constituent action potentials,� IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng., vol. BME-29, pp. 149...Abstract- The analysis of intramuscular EMG signals is based on the decomposition of the signals into basic units. Existing decomposition...software only supports short registration periods or single-channel recordings of signals of constant muscle effort. In this paper, we present the

  20. Mini-review of the geotechnical parameters of municipal solid waste: Mechanical and biological pre-treated versus raw untreated waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Igor

    2016-09-01

    The most viable option for biostabilisation of old sanitary landfills, filled with raw municipal solid waste, is the so-called bioreactor landfill. Even today, bioreactor landfills are viable options in many economically developing countries. However, in order to reduce the biodegradable component of landfilled waste, mechanical and biological treatment has become a widely accepted waste treatment technology, especially in more prosperous countries. Given that mechanical and biological treatment alters the geotechnical properties of raw waste material, the design of sanitary landfills which accepts mechanically and biologically treated waste, should be carried out with a distinct set of geotechnical parameters. However, under the assumption that 'waste is waste', some design engineers might be tempted to use geotechnical parameters of untreated raw municipal solid waste and mechanical and biological pre-treated municipal solid waste interchangeably. Therefore, to provide guidelines for use and to provide an aggregated source of this information, this mini-review provides comparisons of geotechnical parameters of mechanical and biological pre-treated waste and raw untreated waste at various decomposition stages. This comparison reveals reasonable correlations between the hydraulic conductivity values of untreated and mechanical and biological pre-treated municipal solid waste. It is recognised that particle size might have a significant influence on the hydraulic conductivity of both municipal solid waste types. However, the compression ratios and shear strengths of untreated and pre-treated municipal solid waste do not show such strong correlations. Furthermore, another emerging topic that requires appropriate attention is the recovery of resources that are embedded in old landfills. Therefore, the presented results provide a valuable tool for engineers designing landfills for mechanical and biological pre-treated waste or bioreactor landfills for untreated raw

  1. Theoretical study of the decomposition pathways and products of C5- perfluorinated ketone (C5 PFK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yuwei; Wang, Xiaohua, E-mail: xhw@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: mzrong@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Li, Xi; Yang, Aijun; Wu, Yi; Rong, Mingzhe, E-mail: xhw@mail.xjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: mzrong@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No. 28 XianNing West Road, Xi’an, Shaanxi Province 710049 (China); Han, Guohui; Lu, Yanhui [Pinggao Group Co. Ltd., Pingdingshan, Henan Province 467001 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Due to the high global warming potential (GWP) and increasing environmental concerns, efforts on searching the alternative gases to SF{sub 6}, which is predominantly used as insulating and interrupting medium in high-voltage equipment, have become a hot topic in recent decades. Overcoming the drawbacks of the existing candidate gases, C5- perfluorinated ketone (C5 PFK) was reported as a promising gas with remarkable insulation capacity and the low GWP of approximately 1. Experimental measurements of the dielectric strength of this novel gas and its mixtures have been carried out, but the chemical decomposition pathways and products of C5 PFK during breakdown are still unknown, which are the essential factors in evaluating the electric strength of this gas in high-voltage equipment. Therefore, this paper is devoted to exploring all the possible decomposition pathways and species of C5 PFK by density functional theory (DFT). The structural optimizations, vibrational frequency calculations and energy calculations of the species involved in a considered pathway were carried out with DFT-(U)B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) method. Detailed potential energy surface was then investigated thoroughly by the same method. Lastly, six decomposition pathways of C5 PFK decomposition involving fission reactions and the reactions with a transition states were obtained. Important intermediate products were also determined. Among all the pathways studied, the favorable decomposition reactions of C5 PFK were found, involving C-C bond ruptures producing Ia and Ib in pathway I, followed by subsequent C-C bond ruptures and internal F atom transfers in the decomposition of Ia and Ib presented in pathways II + III and IV + V, respectively. Possible routes were pointed out in pathway III and lead to the decomposition of IIa, which is the main intermediate product found in pathway II of Ia decomposition. We also investigated the decomposition of Ib, which can undergo unimolecular reactions to give the

  2. Synthesis of alpha-Fe nanoparticles by solventless thermal decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyun Gil; Kim, Young Hwan; Kim, Chang Woo; Lee, Don Keun; Moon, Sung Doo; Kwon, Hae Woong; Kang, Young Soo

    2006-11-01

    A new preparation for highly crystalline and monodisperse Fe3O4 nanoparticle is reported. This synthesis requires the use of rather complicated procedures including delicate control of surfactants ratios and inert reaction conditions due to the toxic and unstable nature of the precursors none the less because thermal decomposition methods were tried to synthesize monodispersed inorganic nanocrystallites until very recently. The synthesis of Fe3O4 nanocrystallites by using Fe(+2)-oleate2 complex was studied. The Fe(+2)-oleate2 complex was prepared from the reaction of iron chloride and sodium oleate in water. The thermal decomposition of the complex at the reduced pressure (0.3 torr) and about 300 degrees was done without any solvent. We demonstrated that a new solventless synthesis of size- and shape-monodisperse Fe3O4 nanoparticles depends on the amount of Na-oleate. And it is possible to remove the oleate ligand using reduction process. We confirmed that the nanoparticles changed from Fe3O4 to alpha-Fe phase obtained higher magnetic properties and crystallites by a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and x-ray powder diffraction (XRD). Removal of the organic surfactant and other volatile components surrounding Fe3O4 nanoparticles was detected by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR).

  3. Hydrofluoride decomposition of natural materials including zirconium-containing minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laptash, N.; Maslennikova, I.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, interest in ammonium hydrogen difluoride (NH4HF2) as a versatile fluorinating agent for the decomposition of natural materials resumed. It is considered to be a new and more efficient than hydrofluoric acid (HF) reagent in analytical chemistry. Thermodynamically possible fluorination reactions with NH4HF2 are exothermic and proceed even at room temperature with the entropy reserve. The fluorination products are of high symmetry phases (tetragonal or cubic) with partial substitution of fluoride ion for oxide (or hydroxide). The fluorination of refractory silicate zircon (ZrSiO4) is kinetically hindered, and its complete decomposition requires the use of a Teflon autoclave at 200oC. The fluorination products are cubic (NH4)3Zr(OH)xF7-x (x ≤ 0.3) and tetragonal double salt (NH4)3SiF7, which can be separated due to incongruent sublimation of (NH4)2SiF6. The mechanism of the latter process is proposed.

  4. Lead sequestration and species redistribution during soil organic matter decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroth, A.W.; Bostick, B.C.; Kaste, J.M.; Friedland, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    The turnover of soil organic matter (SOM) maintains a dynamic chemical environment in the forest floor that can impact metal speciation on relatively short timescales. Here we measure the speciation of Pb in controlled and natural organic (O) soil horizons to quantify changes in metal partitioning during SOM decomposition in different forest litters. We provide a link between the sequestration of pollutant Pb in O-horizons, estimated by forest floor Pb inventories, and speciation using synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. When Pb was introduced to fresh forest Oi samples, it adsorbed primarily to SOM surfaces, but as decomposition progressed over two years in controlled experiments, up to 60% of the Pb was redistributed to pedogenic birnessite and ferrihydrite surfaces. In addition, a significant fraction of pollutant Pb in natural soil profiles was associated with similar mineral phases (???20-35%) and SOM (???65-80%). Conifer forests have at least 2-fold higher Pb burdens in the forest floor relative to deciduous forests due to more efficient atmospheric scavenging and slower organic matter turnover. We demonstrate that pedogenic minerals play an important role in surface soil Pb sequestration, particularly in deciduous forests, and should be considered in any assessment of pollutant Pb mobility. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  5. Bacterial community succession in pine-wood decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eKielak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Though bacteria and fungi are common inhabitants of decaying wood, little is known about the relationship between bacterial and fungal community dynamics during natural wood decay. Based on previous studies involving inoculated wood blocks, strong fungal selection on bacteria abundance and community composition was expected to occur during natural wood decay. Here we focused on bacterial and fungal community compositions in pine wood samples collected from dead trees in different stages of decomposition. We showed that bacterial communities undergo less drastic changes than fungal communities during wood decay. Furthermore, we found that bacterial community assembly was a stochastic process at initial stage of wood decay and became more deterministic in later stages, likely due to environmental factors. Moreover, composition of bacterial communities did not respond to the changes in the major fungal species present in the wood but rather to the stage of decay reflected by the wood density. We concluded that the shifts in the bacterial communities were a result of the changes in wood properties during decomposition and largely independent of the composition of the wood-decaying fungal communities.

  6. Hydroxyl radicals from secondary organic aerosol decomposition in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Haijie; Arangio, Andrea M.; Lakey, Pascale S. J.; Berkemeier, Thomas; Liu, Fobang; Kampf, Christopher. J.; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-04-01

    We found that ambient and laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosols (SOA) form substantial amounts of OH radicals upon interaction with liquid water, which can be explained by the decomposition of organic hydroperoxides. The molar OH yield from SOA formed by ozonolysis of terpenes (α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene) is ~ 0.1% upon extraction with pure water, and which increases to ~ 1.5% in the presence of iron ions due to Fenton-like reactions. Our findings imply that the chemical reactivity and aging of SOA particles is strongly enhanced upon interaction with water and iron. In cloud droplets under dark conditions, SOA decomposition can compete with the classical hydrogen peroxide Fenton reaction as the source of OH radicals. Also in the human respiratory tract, the inhalation and deposition of SOA particles may lead to a substantial release of OH radicals, which may contribute to oxidative stress and play an important role in the adverse health effects of atmospheric aerosols.

  7. Tensor decomposition and nonlocal means based spectral CT reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanbo; Yu, Hengyong

    2016-10-01

    As one of the state-of-the-art detectors, photon counting detector is used in spectral CT to classify the received photons into several energy channels and generate multichannel projection simultaneously. However, the projection always contains severe noise due to the low counts in each energy channel. How to reconstruct high-quality images from photon counting detector based spectral CT is a challenging problem. It is widely accepted that there exists self-similarity over the spatial domain in a CT image. Moreover, because a multichannel CT image is obtained from the same object at different energy, images among channels are highly correlated. Motivated by these two characteristics of the spectral CT, we employ tensor decomposition and nonlocal means methods for spectral CT iterative reconstruction. Our method includes three basic steps. First, each channel image is updated by using the OS-SART. Second, small 3D volumetric patches (tensor) are extracted from the multichannel image, and higher-order singular value decomposition (HOSVD) is performed on each tensor, which can help to enhance the spatial sparsity and spectral correlation. Third, in order to employ the self-similarity in CT images, similar patches are grouped to reduce noise using the nonlocal means method. These three steps are repeated alternatively till the stopping criteria are met. The effectiveness of the developed algorithm is validated on both numerically simulated and realistic preclinical datasets. Our results show that the proposed method achieves promising performance in terms of noise reduction and fine structures preservation.

  8. Organic Fertilizer Production From Cattle Waste Vermicomposting Assisted By Lumbricus Rubellus

    OpenAIRE

    Siswo Sumardiono; R.P. Djoko Murwono; Amin Nugroho

    2011-01-01

    Composting is decomposition of compound in organic waste by specific treatment using microorganism aerobically. Natural composting for producing organic fertilizer from manure and market waste utilize long time processing and less equal to the market demand. Vermicomposting is a technique to produce high quality compos fertilizer from biodegradable garbage and mixture of red worm (Lumbricus Rubellus). In conventional compos production took 8 weeks of processing time, in vermicomposting only t...

  9. Construction and Demolition Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Andersen, L.

    2011-01-01

    Construction and demolition waste (C&D waste) is the waste generated during the building, repair, remodeling or removal of constructions. The constructions can be roads, residential housing and nonresidential buildings. C&D waste has traditionally been considered without any environmental problems...

  10. Exploring Patterns of Soil Organic Matter Decomposition with Students through the Global Decomposition Project (GDP) and the Interactive Model of Leaf Decomposition (IMOLD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, S. M.; Wood, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    As decomposition rates are affected by climate change, understanding crucial soil interactions that affect plant growth and decomposition becomes a vital part of contributing to the students' knowledge base. The Global Decomposition Project (GDP) is designed to introduce and educate students about soil organic matter and decomposition through a standardized protocol for collecting, reporting, and sharing data. The Interactive Model of Leaf Decomposition (IMOLD) utilizes animations and modeling to learn about the carbon cycle, leaf anatomy, and the role of microbes in decomposition. Paired together, IMOLD teaches the background information and allows simulation of numerous scenarios, and the GDP is a data collection protocol that allows students to gather usable measurements of decomposition in the field. Our presentation will detail how the GDP protocol works, how to obtain or make the materials needed, and how results will be shared. We will also highlight learning objectives from the three animations of IMOLD, and demonstrate how students can experiment with different climates and litter types using the interactive model to explore a variety of decomposition scenarios. The GDP demonstrates how scientific methods can be extended to educate broader audiences, and data collected by students can provide new insight into global patterns of soil decomposition. Using IMOLD, students will gain a better understanding of carbon cycling in the context of litter decomposition, as well as learn to pose questions they can answer with an authentic computer model. Using the GDP protocols and IMOLD provide a pathway for scientists and educators to interact and reach meaningful education and research goals.

  11. Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ELLEFSON, M.D.

    2000-01-06

    The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source special nuclear and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this document. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. This document has been revised to meet the interim status waste analysis plan requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173 303-300(5). When the final status permit is issued, permit conditions will be incorporated and this document will be revised accordingly.

  12. In situ XAS of the solvothermal decomposition of dithiocarbamate complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Islam, H.-U.; Roffey, A.; Hollingsworth, N.; Catlow, R.; Wolthers, M.; de Leeuw, N.H.; Bras, W.; Sankar, G.; Hogarth, G.

    2012-01-01

    An in situ XAS study of the solvothermal decomposition of iron and nickel dithiocarbamate complexes was performed in order to gain understanding of the decomposition mechanisms. This work has given insight into the steps involved in the decomposition, showing variation in reaction pathways between t

  13. Decompositions and Biplots in Three-Way Correspondence Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, Andre; Kroonenberg, Pieter M.

    1996-01-01

    Correspondence analysis for three-way contingency tables is presented using three-way generalizations of the singular value decomposition. It is shown that, in combination with the additive decomposition of interactions in three-way tables proposed by H. O. Lancaster, a detailed analysis of decomposition of dependence is possible. (SLD)

  14. Climate fails to predict wood decomposition at regional scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Bradford; Robert J. Warren; Petr Baldrian; Thomas W. Crowther; Daniel S. Maynard; Emily E. Oldfield; William R. Wieder; Stephen A. Wood; Joshua R. King

    2014-01-01

    Decomposition of organic matter strongly influences ecosystem carbon storage1. In Earth-system models, climate is a predominant control on the decomposition rates of organic matter2, 3, 4, 5. This assumption is based on the mean response of decomposition to climate, yet there is a growing appreciation in other areas of global change science that projections based on...

  15. Decomposition orders : another generalisation of the fundamental theorem of arithmetic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.P. Luttik (Bas); V. van Oostrom (Vincent)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractWe discuss unique decomposition in partial commutative monoids. Inspired by a result from process theory, we propose the notion of decomposition order for partial commutative monoids, and prove that a partial commutative monoid has unique decomposition iff it can be endowed with a

  16. Investigation on the characteristics of liquid wastes depending on their generation sources and study on optimum treatment method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Guk; Kim, Dong Chan; Shin, Dae Hyun; Son, Seung Geun; Roh, Nam Sun; Woo, Je Kyung [Korea Inst. of Energy Research, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-01

    The major research contents conducted this year are as follows: (1) environmental regulation with respect to the treatment of the liquid waste in the U.S.A., (2) the present status of the generation and treatment of liquid wastes for large producers(>1,000 ton/year), (3) analysis for heating value element, heavy metal content, halogenated species on collected samples, (4) investigation on estimation method of energy recovery rate from liquid waste, (5) design of a lab. scale reactor which could be capable of conducting thermal decomposition test with small quantity of sample. In this study, present status of liquid waste generation and treatment is investigated, and thermal decomposition characteristics are studied using a lab. scale thermal reactor. The purpose of this research is to divide liquid waste into groups and to present best treatment method for their each group. (author). 24 refs., 21 figs., 23 tabs.

  17. Introduction to Waste Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Solid waste management is as old as human civilization, although only considered an engineering discipline for about one century. The change from the previous focus on public cleansing of the cities to modern waste management was primarily driven by industrialization, which introduced new materials...... waste management, including issues as waste definition, problems associated with waste, waste management criteria and approaches to waste management. Later chapters introduce aspects of engineering (Chapter 1.2), economics (Chapter 1.3) and regulation (Chapter 1.4)....

  18. Understanding radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

  19. Pollutant emissions during pyrolysis and combustion of waste printed circuit boards, before and after metal removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortuño, Nuria; Conesa, Juan A; Moltó, Julia; Font, Rafael

    2014-11-15

    The constant increase in the production of electronic devices implies the need for an appropriate management of a growing number of waste electrical and electronic equipment. Thermal treatments represent an interesting alternative to recycle this kind of waste, but particular attention has to be paid to the potential emissions of toxic by-products. In this study, the emissions from thermal degradation of printed circuit boards (with and without metals) have been studied using a laboratory scale reactor, under oxidizing and inert atmosphere at 600 and 850 °C. Apart from carbon oxides, HBr was the main decomposition product, followed by high amounts of methane, ethylene, propylene, phenol and benzene. The maximum formation of PAHs was found in pyrolysis at 850 °C, naphthalene being the most abundant. High levels of 2-, 4-, 2,4-, 2,6- and 2,4,6-bromophenols were found, especially at 600 °C. Emissions of PCDD/Fs and dioxin-like PCBs were quite low and much lower than that of PBDD/Fs, due to the higher bromine content of the samples. Combustion at 600 °C was the run with the highest PBDD/F formation: the total content of eleven 2,3,7,8-substituted congeners (tetra- through heptaBDD/Fs) was 7240 and 3250 ng WHO2005-TEQ/kg sample, corresponding to the sample with and without metals, respectively.

  20. Reuse of hydroponic waste solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ramasamy Rajesh; Cho, Jae Young

    2014-01-01

    Attaining sustainable agriculture is a key goal in many parts of the world. The increased environmental awareness and the ongoing attempts to execute agricultural practices that are economically feasible and environmentally safe promote the use of hydroponic cultivation. Hydroponics is a technology for growing plants in nutrient solutions with or without the use of artificial medium to provide mechanical support. Major problems for hydroponic cultivation are higher operational cost and the causing of pollution due to discharge of waste nutrient solution. The nutrient effluent released into the environment can have negative impacts on the surrounding ecosystems as well as the potential to contaminate the groundwater utilized by humans for drinking purposes. The reuse of non-recycled, nutrient-rich hydroponic waste solution for growing plants in greenhouses is the possible way to control environmental pollution. Many researchers have successfully grown several plant species in hydroponic waste solution with high yield. Hence, this review addresses the problems associated with the release of hydroponic waste solution into the environment and possible reuse of hydroponic waste solution as an alternative resource for agriculture development and to control environmental pollution.