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Sample records for waste combustor mwc

  1. Inside story on the legal challenge to EPA`s municipal waste combustor rule: The mouse that roared, Round 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, L.S. [Wood Quinn & Crapo, L.C., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1997-12-01

    An article in the Deseret News, one of two general circulation newspapers in Salt Lake City, Utah, dated December 13, 1996, reported that {open_quotes}David{close_quotes} took on {open_quotes}Goliath{close_quotes} and won. The article referred to the Davis County Solid Waste Management and Energy Recovery Special Service District`s (the {open_quotes}District{close_quotes}) victory on its challenge to the EPA`s municipal waste combustor rules. On December 6, 1996, the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit ruled that the EPA violated the plain language of Section 129 of the Clean Air Act, when it wrote size categories for municipal waste combustors ({open_quotes}MWCs{close_quotes}) based on aggregate plant capacity, rather than unit capacity. The District argued that Congress divided the universe of MWC units into two categories: those with unit capacities above 250 tons per day, and those with unit capacities equal to or less than 250 tons per day. The EPA, however, had set the dividing line at 248 tons per day aggregate plant capacity in its municipal waste combustor rule. The Court said this was wrong. The Deseret News report certainly echoed the feelings of the District. Those of you familiar with the EPA, the process of judicial review of administrative rule making, and the Biblical story of David and Goliath, however, will quickly see that this is not the best metaphor to describe what happened. When David slew Goliath, that was the end of Goliath. He didn`t get back up. Of course, that will not happen to the EPA in the Davis County case. Like an 800-pound gorilla, it will always get back up after being challenged by a mouse. This paper tells the story of the challenge to the MWC rule from the District`s perspective. The District has not been popular with either the EPA or many industry players. But, the District was faced with a real problem that, given the District`s location and the local economy, forced its hand in this case.

  2. 40 CFR 60.53a - Standard for municipal waste combustor organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for municipal waste combustor organics. 60.53a Section 60.53a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... September 20, 1994 § 60.53a Standard for municipal waste combustor organics. (a) (b) On and after the...

  3. Thermal treatment of wastes in an advanced cyclonic combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, H.A.; Khinkis, M.J.; Kunc, W.

    1991-01-01

    IGT is developing an advanced waste combustion concept, based on cyclonic combustion principles, for application to a wide range of industrial wastes. In IGT's cyclonic combustor, a mixture of fuel and combustion air is fed tangentially at a relatively high velocity into a cylindrical chamber. The waste is injected either tangentially with the fuel or separately in a tangential, radial, or axial configuration. This approach provides high combustion intensity with internal recirculation of combustion products, which results in extremely stable and complete combustion, even at relatively low temperatures. IGT has performed three successful test programs involving cyclonic waste combustion for industrial clients. In one program, industrial wastewaters containing 40% to 50% organics and inorganics with heating values of 1600 to 3270 Btu/lb were combusted to 99.9% completion at only 2000{degrees}F. The low combustion temperature minimized the supplemental fuel required. In another program, simulated low-Btu industrial off-gases (55 to 65 BTu/SCF) were successfully combusted with stable combustion at 1900{degrees}F using air and waste preheat. Supplemental fuel was unnecessary because of the mixing that occurs in the cyclonic combustor. The conversion of fuel-bonded nitrogen to NO{sub x} was as low as 5%, and CO levels were in the range of 25 to 30 ppm. In the third program, CCl{sub 4} (as a test surrogate for PCBs) was efficiently destroyed by firing natural gas or hexane. With 100% CCl{sub 4} and natural gas firing, the DRE at 2200{degrees}F and a 0.25-second residence time ranged from 99.9999% to 99.9999%. These successful tests have led to the design and construction of a modular test facility at IGT's Energy Development Center. 13 figs., 17 tabs.

  4. 77 FR 32022 - Direct Final Negative Declaration and Withdrawal of Large Municipal Waste Combustors State Plan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-31

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 62 Direct Final Negative Declaration and Withdrawal of Large Municipal Waste... from ``Large Municipal Waste Combustors'' (LMWC). DATES: This direct final rule will be effective July... Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is taking direct final action to approve Illinois...

  5. 40 CFR 62.14105 - Requirements for municipal waste combustor operator training and certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 07007. You may inspect a copy at the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards Air Docket, EPA... Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards Air Docket, EPA, Mutual Building, Room 540, 411 West Chapel... subpart; (2) A description of basic combustion theory applicable to a municipal waste combustor unit; (3...

  6. 40 CFR 60.56a - Standards for municipal waste combustor operating practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... cause such facility to exceed the carbon monoxide standards shown in table 1. Table 1—MWC Operating..., at a minimum, address the following elements of MWC unit operation: (1) Summary of the applicable... periodic upset or off-specification conditions; (8) Procedures for minimizing particulate matter...

  7. 40 CFR 60.53b - Standards for municipal waste combustor operating practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Modular excess air 50 4 Refuse-derived fuel stoker 150 24 Bubbling fluidized bed combustor 100 4 Circulating fluidized bed combustor 100 4 Pulverized coal/refuse-derived fuel mixed fuel-fired combustor 150...

  8. Minimizing NOx Emission from a Waste Derived Fuel Gasifier Gas Combustor using CFD Combined with Detailed Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brink, A.; Hupa, M. [Process Chemistry Centre, Aabo Akademi University, FI-20500 Aabo (Finland); Kurkela, E.; Suomalainen, M. [VTT Processes, P.O. Box 1601, FI-02044 VTT (Finland)

    2005-09-15

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) coupled with a detailed description of the gas phase chemistry is used to find a firing mode that minimizes emissions of nitrogen oxide. The studied combustor is fired with product gas from a waste derived fuel gasifier. First, three experiments were carried out with varying air supply and air ratio in order to gain insights into the nitrogen chemistry inside the burner. Then, CFD modelling is carried out using a mechanism considering 21 species and 54 reactions. Based on the obtained insight additional CFD calculations are performed to find a firing mode with lower NOx emission. In the optimal firing mode enough air was introduced in the upper part of the burner to obtain conditions favourable for NOx reduction through reactions between NH3 and NO. The rest of the air was supplied in the lower part of the burner using low jet velocities. If too little air was introduced in the upper part of the burner, NO was formed at the lower air level. If too much air was supplied, NO was formed in the upper part of the burner. The CFD calculations also indicate that the generally low NOx yield in this device is closely connected to the low temperature associated with combustion of low calorific gases.

  9. Improving environmental sustainability of concrete products: Investigation on MWC thermal and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becchio, Cristina; Corgnati, Stefano Paolo; Kindinis, Andrea [Department of Energetics (DENER), Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Pagliolico, Simonetta [Department of Materials Science and Engineering Chemistry (DISMIC), Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2009-11-15

    This research focuses on the possibility of constituting a more sustainable lightweight concrete, Mineralized Wood Concrete (MWC), substituting natural aggregates with wastes from woodworking activities. Exploiting this type of aggregates, a triple purpose has been achieved: preservation of natural raw materials, reuse of wastes and energy saving. Furthermore, the use of wood aggregates is a way to try to develop a sustainable concrete characterized by high thermal inertia, high thermal resistance and low weight. In this paper, effects of the addition of wood aggregates on mechanical and thermal properties of concrete are studied. Mechanical performances have been investigated with compressive strength tests, while a one-dimensional heat flow model has been used to predict the thermal conductivity of MWC. The use of MWC can be associated with the idea of a different typology of relatively heavy building envelope: this union could competitively answer to the demand of well-insulated building envelope and concurrently characterized by high thermal mass. From this union, a series of other values can be derived: low weight, environmentally friendly, easily industrialized and easy on-site casting. Consequently, applications of wood concrete in building constructions may be an interesting solution in order to improve sustainability and building energy efficiency. (author)

  10. Statistical mechanics of Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzen, Sarah; Garcia, Hernan G; Phillips, Rob

    2013-05-13

    The 50th anniversary of the classic Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) model provides an opportunity to survey the broader conceptual and quantitative implications of this quintessential biophysical model. With the use of statistical mechanics, the mathematical implementation of the MWC concept links problems that seem otherwise to have no ostensible biological connection including ligand-receptor binding, ligand-gated ion channels, chemotaxis, chromatin structure and gene regulation. Hence, a thorough mathematical analysis of the MWC model can illuminate the performance limits of a number of unrelated biological systems in one stroke. The goal of our review is twofold. First, we describe in detail the general physical principles that are used to derive the activity of MWC molecules as a function of their regulatory ligands. Second, we illustrate the power of ideas from information theory and dynamical systems for quantifying how well the output of MWC molecules tracks their sensory input, giving a sense of the "design" constraints faced by these receptors.

  11. Clocked combustor can array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won-Wook; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Srinivasan, Shiva Kumar

    2017-01-17

    The present application provides a clocked combustor can array for coherence reduction in a gas turbine engine. The clocked combustor can array may include a number of combustor cans positioned in a circumferential array. A first set of the combustor cans may have a first orientation and a second set of the combustor cans may have a second orientation.

  12. Clocked combustor can array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Wook; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Srinivasan, Shiva Kumar

    2017-01-17

    The present application provides a clocked combustor can array for coherence reduction in a gas turbine engine. The clocked combustor can array may include a number of combustor cans positioned in a circumferential array. A first set of the combustor cans may have a first orientation and a second set of the combustor cans may have a second orientation.

  13. Mercury emissions from municipal solid waste combustors. An assessment of the current situation in the United States and forecast of future emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1993-05-01

    This report examines emissions of mercury (Hg) from municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion in the United States (US). It is projected that total annual nationwide MSW combustor emissions of mercury could decrease from about 97 tonnes (1989 baseline uncontrolled emissions) to less than about 4 tonnes in the year 2000. This represents approximately a 95 percent reduction in the amount of mercury emitted from combusted MSW compared to the 1989 mercury emissions baseline. The likelihood that routinely achievable mercury emissions removal efficiencies of about 80 percent or more can be assured; it is estimated that MSW combustors in the US could prove to be a comparatively minor source of mercury emissions after about 1995. This forecast assumes that diligent measures to control mercury emissions, such as via use of supplemental control technologies (e.g., carbon adsorption), are generally employed at that time. However, no present consensus was found that such emissions control measures can be implemented industry-wide in the US within this time frame. Although the availability of technology is apparently not a limiting factor, practical implementation of necessary control technology may be limited by administrative constraints and other considerations (e.g., planning, budgeting, regulatory compliance requirements, etc.). These projections assume that: (a) about 80 percent mercury emissions reduction control efficiency is achieved with air pollution control equipment likely to be employed by that time; (b) most cylinder-shaped mercury-zinc (CSMZ) batteries used in hospital applications can be prevented from being disposed into the MSW stream or are replaced with alternative batteries that do not contain mercury; and (c) either the amount of mercury used in fluorescent lamps is decreased to an industry-wide average of about 27 milligrams of mercury per lamp or extensive diversion from the MSW stream of fluorescent lamps that contain mercury is accomplished.

  14. CYANIDE PHOTOCHEMISTRY AND NITROGEN FRACTIONATION IN THE MWC 480 DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzmán, V. V.; Öberg, K. I.; Loomis, R.; Qi, C., E-mail: vguzman@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-11-20

    HCN is a commonly observed molecule in Solar System bodies and in interstellar environments. Its abundance with respect to CN is a proposed tracer of UV exposure. HCN is also frequently used to probe the thermal history of objects, by measuring its degree of nitrogen fractionation. To address the utility of HCN as a probe of disks, we present Atacama Large (sub-) Millimeter Array observations of CN, HCN, H{sup 13}CN, and HC{sup 15}N toward the protoplanetary disk around Herbig Ae star MWC 480, and of CN and HCN toward the disk around T Tauri star DM Tau. Emission from all molecules is clearly detected and spatially resolved, including the first detection of HC{sup 15}N in a disk. Toward MWC 480, CN emission extends radially more than 1″ exterior to the observed cut-off of HCN emission. Quantitative modeling further reveals very different radial abundance profiles for CN and HCN, with best-fit outer cut-off radii of >300 AU and 110 ± 10 AU, respectively. This result is in agreement with model predictions of efficient HCN photodissociation into CN in the outer-part of the disk where the vertical gas and dust column densities are low. No such difference in CN and HCN emission profiles are observed toward DM Tau, suggestive of different photochemical structures in Herbig Ae and T Tauri disks. We use the HCN isotopologue data toward the MWC 480 disk to provide the first measurement of the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratio in a disk. We find a low disk averaged {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N ratio of 200 ± 100, comparable to what is observed in cloud cores and comets, demonstrating interstellar inheritance and/or efficient nitrogen fractionation in this disk.

  15. Variable volume combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostebee, Heath Michael; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-01-17

    The present application provides a variable volume combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The variable volume combustor may include a liner, a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles positioned within the liner, and a linear actuator so as to maneuver the micro-mixer fuel nozzles axially along the liner.

  16. Gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burd, Steven W. (Inventor); Cheung, Albert K. (Inventor); Dempsey, Dae K. (Inventor); Hoke, James B. (Inventor); Kramer, Stephen K. (Inventor); Ols, John T. (Inventor); Smith, Reid Dyer Curtis (Inventor); Sowa, William A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gas turbine engine has a combustor module including an annular combustor having a liner assembly that defines an annular combustion chamber having a length, L. The liner assembly includes a radially inner liner, a radially outer liner that circumscribes the inner liner, and a bulkhead, having a height, H1, which extends between the respective forward ends of the inner liner and the outer liner. The combustor has an exit height, H3, at the respective aft ends of the inner liner and the outer liner interior. The annular combustor has a ratio H1/H3 having a value less than or equal to 1.7. The annular combustor may also have a ration L/H3 having a value less than or equal to 6.0.

  17. Confirmation of the Luminous Blue Variable Status of MWC 930

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Miroshnichenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present spectroscopic and photometric observations of the emission-line star MWC 930 (V446 Sct during its long-term optical brightening in 2006–2013. Based on our earlier data we suggested that the object has features found in Luminous Blue Variables (LBV, such as a high luminosity (~3 105 L⊙, a low wind terminal velocity (~140 km s−1, and a tendency to show strong brightness variations (~1 mag over 20 years. For the last ~7 years it has been exhibiting a continuous optical and near-IR brightening along with a change of the emission-line spectrum appearance and cooling of the star’s photosphere. We present the object’s V-band light curve, analyze the spectral variations, and compare the observed properties with those of other recognized Galactic LBVs, such as AG Car and HR Car. Overall we conclude the MWC 930 is a bona fide Galactic LBV that is currently in the middle of an S Dor cycle.

  18. The Jet from MWC 137 Points at a Supergiant B[e] Star in a Binary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehner, A.; de Wit, W. J.; Groh, J. H.; Oudmaijer, R. D.; Baade, D.; Rivinius, Th.; Selman, F.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Martayan, C.

    2017-02-01

    The Galactic B[e] star MWC 137 is a prime example of an object with an uncertain evolutionary classification. Previous work has suggested that is either a pre- or a post-main sequence object. Integral field spectrograph observations with the Very Large Telescope Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (VLT MUSE) of the host cluster SH 2-266 are used to provide a reliable evolutionary classification. The MUSE data also allowed the discovery of a large collimated outflow, geometrically centered on MWC 137. A color-magnitude diagram analysis of the cluster promotes strongly a post-main sequence stage for MWC 137, while the existence of a jet implies the presence of an accretion disk. A SWIFT X-ray source, which may be associated with MWC 137, hints at the possibility of a neutron star companion.

  19. Numerical Simulations of the pulsed Jet of MWC 560

    CERN Document Server

    Stute, M; Schmid, H M; Stute, Matthias; Camenzind, Max; Schmid, Hans Martin

    2002-01-01

    MWC 560 (= V694 Mon) is the only known Symbiotic Star system in which the jet axis is practically parallel to the line of sight. Therefore this system is predestinated to study the dynamical evolution and the propagation of stellar jets. Spectroscopic monitoring done by Schmid et al. (2001) showed that the outflow is seen as absorption features in the continuum of the accretion disk and the accreting white dwarf, the emission line spectrum of the accretion disk and the spectrum of the red giant. We present the first numerical simulations of the jet of this particular object using the NIRVANA code (Ziegler & Yorke 1997) in order to reproduce the velocity structures seen in the observational data. This code solves the equations of hydrodynamics and was modified to calculate radiative losses due to non-equilibrium cooling by line-emission (Thiele 2000).

  20. Modeling the Asymmetric Wind of Massive LBV Binary MWC 314

    CERN Document Server

    Lobel, A; Dozinel, K Torres; Gorlova, N; Martayan, C; Raskin, G; Van Winckel, H; Prins, S; Pessemier, W; Waelkens, C; Frémat, Y; Hensberge, H; Dummortier, L; Jorissen, A; Van Eck, S; Lehmann, H

    2011-01-01

    Spectroscopic monitoring with Mercator-HERMES over the past two years reveals that MWC 314 is a massive binary system composed of an early B-type primary LBV star and a less-luminous supergiant companion. We determine an orbital period Porb of 60.85 d from optical S II and Ne I absorption lines observed in this single-lined spectroscopic binary. We find an orbital eccentricity of e=0.26, and a large amplitude of the radial velocity curve of 80.6 km/s. The ASAS V light-curve during our spectroscopic monitoring reveals two brightness minima (\\Delta V~0.1 mag.) over the orbital period due to partial eclipses at an orbital inclination angle of ~70 degrees. We find a clear correlation between the orbital phases and the detailed shapes of optical and near-IR P Cygni-type line profiles of He I, Si II, and double- or triple-peaked stationary cores of prominent Fe II emission lines. A preliminary 3-D radiative transfer model computed with Wind3D shows that the periodic P Cygni line profile variability results from an ...

  1. Compact dust concentration in the MWC 758 protoplanetary disk

    CERN Document Server

    Marino, S; Perez, S; Lyra, W; Roman, P E; Avenhaus, H; Wright, C M; Maddison, S T

    2015-01-01

    The formation of planetesimals requires that primordial dust grains grow from micron- to km-sized bodies. Dust traps caused by gas pressure maxima have been proposed as regions where grains can concentrate and grow fast enough to form planetesimals, before radially migrating onto the star. We report new VLA Ka & Ku observations of the protoplanetary disk around the Herbig Ae/Be star MWC 758. The Ka image shows a compact emission region in the outer disk indicating a strong concentration of big dust grains. Tracing smaller grains, archival ALMA data in band 7 continuum shows extended disk emission with an intensity maximum to the north-west of the central star, which matches the VLA clump position. This segregation of grains sizes is expected in the context of dust trapping, where big grains are trapped more easily than smaller grains in gas pressure maxima. We develop a non-axisymmetric parametric model inspired by a steady state vortex solution which reproduces the observations, including the spectral en...

  2. COMPACT DUST CONCENTRATION IN THE MWC 758 PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marino, S.; Casassus, S.; Perez, S.; Avenhaus, H. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Lyra, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University Northridge, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States); Roman, P. E. [Millenium Nucleus “Protoplanetary Disks in ALMA Early Science,” Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Wright, C. M. [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, UNSW@ADFA, Canberra ACT 2600 (Australia); Maddison, S. T., E-mail: smarino@das.uchile.cl [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)

    2015-11-01

    The formation of planetesimals requires that primordial dust grains grow from micron- to kilometer-sized bodies. Dust traps caused by gas pressure maxima have been proposed as regions where grains can concentrate and grow fast enough to form planetesimals, before radially migrating onto the star. We report new VLA Ka and Ku observations of the protoplanetary disk around the Herbig Ae/Be star MWC 758. The Ka image shows a compact emission region in the outer disk, indicating a strong concentration of big dust grains. Tracing smaller grains, archival ALMA data in band 7 continuum shows extended disk emission with an intensity maximum to the northwest of the central star, which matches the VLA clump position. The compactness of the Ka emission is expected in the context of dust trapping, as big grains are trapped more easily than smaller grains in gas pressure maxima. We develop a nonaxisymmetric parametric model inspired by a steady-state vortex solution with parameters adequately selected to reproduce the observations, including the spectral energy distribution. Finally, we compare the radio continuum with SPHERE scattered light data. The ALMA continuum spatially coincides with a spiral-like feature seen in scattered light, while the VLA clump is offset from the scattered light maximum. Moreover, the ALMA map shows a decrement that matches a region devoid of scattered polarized emission. Continuum observations at a different wavelength are necessary to conclude whether the VLA-ALMA difference is an opacity or a real dust segregation.

  3. Hα Emission vs. Continuum Variability of MWC349A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Kamber R.; Strelnitski, V.; Walker, G.

    2011-01-01

    We report on a three-year CCD monitoring of MWC349A at the Maria Mitchell Observatory with narrowband and broadband filters. The use of three narrowband filters centered on Hα and adjacent continuum allowed us to separate, for the first time, the variability of this object’s Hα emission from that of the continuum. We detected a general anticorrelation of Hα emission with its nearby continuum and, tentatively, periodic variations of the Hα flux with a period of 223±7 days and a peak-to-peak amplitude of ≈6%. This period is close to the supposed period of 238±8 days for the variations of the peak ratio of the double-peak spectrum of the masing H30α line (Fuchs et al. 2010). More observations, both in the optical and radio domains, are needed to verify these new phenomena. We briefly discuss possible causes of the periodicity and the anticorrelation between the Hα emission and continuum. This project was supported by NSF/REU grant AST-0851892 and the Nantucket Maria Mitchell Association.

  4. Discrete absorption components in the massive LBV Binary MWC 314

    CERN Document Server

    Lobel, A; Corcoran, M; Groh, J H; Frémat, Y

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the physical properties of large-scale wind structures around massive hot stars with radiatively-driven winds. We observe Discrete Absorption Components (DACs) in optical He I P Cygni lines of the LBV binary MWC 314 (Porb=60.8 d). The DACs are observed during orbital phases when the primary is in front of the secondary star. They appear at wind velocities between -100 km/s and -600 km/s in the P Cyg profiles of He I lam5875, lam6678, and lam4471, signaling high-temperature expanding wind regions of enhanced density and variable outflow velocity. The DACs can result from wave propagation linked to the orbital motion near the low-velocity wind base. The He I lines indicate DAC formation close to the primary's surface in high-temperature wind regions in front of its orbit, or in dynamical wind regions confined between the binary stars. We observed the DACs with Mercator-HERMES on 5 Sep 2009, 5 May 2012, and 6 May 2014 when the primary is in front of the secondary star. XMM-Newton observations of 6...

  5. Combustor liner construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, H. M.; Wagner, W. B.; Strock, W. J. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A combustor liner is fabricated from a plurality of individual segments each containing counter/parallel Finwall material and are arranged circumferentially and axially to define the combustion zone. Each segment is supported by a hook and ring construction to an opened lattice frame with sufficient tolerance between the hook and ring to permit thermal expansion with a minimum of induced stresses.

  6. Catalytic combustor for hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercea, J.; Grecu, E.; Fodor, T.; Kreibik, S.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of catalytic combustors for hydrogen using platinum-supported catalysts is described. Catalytic plates of different sizes were constructed using fibrous and ceramic supports. The temperature distribution as well as the reaction efficiency as a function of the fuel input rate was determined, and a comparison between the performances of different plates is discussed.

  7. OBSERVATIONS OF THE B[E] STAR MWC 349 WITH MID-INFRARED INTERFEROMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Quirrenbach

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available MWC349A es probablemente una estrella masiva joven rodeada por un disco y un fuerte viento ionizado desde la super cie del disco. Las caracter sticas m s espectaculares del disco de MWC349A son l neas m ser y l ser de recombinaci n del hidr geno en longitudes de onda milim trica, sub-milim trica y de IR-medio. Hemos conducido observaciones de MWC349A con el instrumento MIDI del VLTI a 10 um. Las visibilidades en el continuo muestran la rma caracter stica esperada en un disco de polvo. Adem s, las rmas de por lo menos una docena de l neas de emisi n han sido identi cadas en los datos interferom tricos.

  8. High-Contrast NIR Polarization Imaging of MWC480

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElwain, M. W.; Kusakabe, N.; Hashimoto, J.; Kudo, T.; Kandori, R.; Miyama, S.; Morino, J.-I.; Suto, H.; Suzuki, R.; Tamura, M.; Grady, C. A.; Sitko, M. L.; Werren, C.; Day, A. N.; Beerman, C.; Iye, M.; Lynch, D. K.; Russell, R. W.; Brafford, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the key predictions of modeling from the IR excess of Herbig Ae stars is that for protoplanetary disks, where significant grain growth and settling has occurred, the dust disk has flattened to the point that it can be partially or largely shadowed by the innermost material at or near the dust sublimation radius. When the self-shadowing has already started, the outer disk is expected to be detected in scattered light only in the exceptional cases that the scale height of the dust disk at the sublimation radius is smaller than usual. High-contrast imaging combined with the IR spectral energy distribution allow us to measure the degree of flattening of the disk, as well as to determine the properties of the outer disk. We present polarimetric differential imaging in H band obtained with Subaru/HiCIAO of one such system, MWC 480. The HiCIAO data were obtained at a historic minimum of the NIR excess. The disk is detected in scattered light from 0".2-1"0 (27.4-137 AU). Together with the marginal detection of the disk from 1998 February 24 by HST / NICMOS, our data constrain the opening half angle for the disk to lie between 1.3 <= Theta <=2.2 deg. When compared with similar measures in CO for the gas disk from the literature, the dust disk subtends only approx 30% of the gas disk scale height (H/R approx 0. 03). Such a dust disk is a factor of 5-7 flatter than transitional disks, which have structural signatures that giant planets have formed.

  9. Field evaluation of natural gas and dry sorbent injection for MWC emissions control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohadlo, S; Abbasi, H; Cygan, D [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), in cooperation with the Olmsted Waste-to-Energy Facility (OWEF) and with subcontracted engineering services from the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER), has completed the detailed engineering and preparation of construction specifications for an Emissions Reduction Testing System (ERTS). The ERTS has been designed for retrofit to one of two 100-ton/day municipal waste combustors at the OWEF, located in Rochester, Minnesota. The purpose of the retrofit is to conduct a field evaluation of a combined natural gas and sorbent injection process (IGT`s METHANE de-TOX{sup SM}, IGT Patent No. 5,105,747) for reducing the emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), hydrochloric acid (HCI), oxides of sulfur (SO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), total hydrocarbons (THC), and chlorinated hydrocarbons (dioxin/furans). In addition, the design includes modifications for the control of heavy metals (HM). Development of the process should allow the waste-to-energy industry to meet the Federal New Source Performance Standards for these pollutants at significantly lower costs when compared to existing technology of Thermal deNO{sub x} combined with spray dryer scrubber/fabric filters. Additionally, the process should reduce boiler corrosion and increase both the thermal and power production efficiency of the facility.

  10. MAGIC observations of MWC 656, the only known Be/BH system

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    Context: MWC 656 has recently been established as the first observationally detected high-mass X-ray binary system containing a Be star and a black hole (BH). The system has been associated with a gamma-ray flaring event detected by the AGILE satellite in July 2010. Aims: Our aim is to evaluate if the MWC 656 gamma-ray emission extends to very high energy (VHE > 100 GeV) gamma rays. Methods. We have observed MWC 656 with the MAGIC telescopes for $\\sim$23 hours during two observation periods: between May and June 2012 and June 2013. During the last period, observations were performed contemporaneously with X-ray (XMM-Newton) and optical (STELLA) instruments. Results: We have not detected the MWC 656 binary system at TeV energies with the MAGIC Telescopes in either of the two campaigns carried out. Upper limits (ULs) to the integral flux above 300 GeV have been set, as well as differential ULs at a level of $\\sim$5\\% of the Crab Nebula flux. The results obtained from the MAGIC observations do not support persis...

  11. VLT/MUSE discovers a jet from the evolved B[e] star MWC 137

    CERN Document Server

    Mehner, A; Groh, J H; Oudmaijer, R D; Baade, D; Rivinius, T; Selman, F; Boffin, H M J; Martayan, C

    2016-01-01

    Not all stars exhibiting the optical spectral characteristics of B[e] stars share the same evolutionary stage. The Galactic B[e] star MWC 137 is a prime example of an object with uncertain classification, with previous work suggesting pre- and post-main sequence classification. Our goal is to settle this debate and provide reliable evolutionary classification. Integral field spectrograph observations with VLT MUSE of the cluster SH 2-266 are used to analyze the nature of MWC 137. A collimated outflow is discovered that is geometrically centered on MWC 137. The central position of MWC 137 in the cluster SH 2-266 within the larger nebula suggests strongly that it is a member of this cluster and that it is both at the origin of the nebula and the newly discovered jet. Comparison of the color-magnitude diagram of the brightest cluster stars with stellar evolutionary models results in a distance of about 5.2$\\pm$1.4 kpc. We estimate that the cluster is at least 3 Myr old. The jet extends over 66" (1.7 pc) projecte...

  12. Detection of X-rays from the jet-driving Symbiotic Star MWC 560

    CERN Document Server

    Stute, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    We report the detection of X-ray emission from the jet-driving symbiotic star MWC 560. We observed MWC 560 with XMM-Newton for 36 ks. We fitted the spectra from the EPIC pn, MOS1 and MOS2 instruments with XSPEC and examined the light curves with the package XRONOS. The spectrum can be fitted with a highly absorbed hard X-ray component from an optically-thin hot plasma, a Gaussian emission line with an energy of 6.1 keV and a less absorbed soft thermal component. The best fit is obtained with a model in which the hot component is produced by optically thin thermal emission from an isobaric cooling flow with a maximum temperature of 61 keV, which might be created inside an optically-thin boundary layer on the surface of the accreting with dwarf. The derived parameters of the hard component detected in MWC 560 are in good agreement with similar objects as CH Cyg, SS7317, RT Cru and T CrB, which all form a new sub-class of symbiotic stars emitting hard X-rays. Our previous numerical simulations of the jet in MWC ...

  13. Disk wind and magnetospheric accretion in emission from the Herbig Ae star MWC 480

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambovtseva, L. V.; Grinin, V. P.; Potravnov, I. S.; Mkrtichian, D. E.

    2016-09-01

    The young Herbig Ae star MWC 480 (HD 31648) is one of the comprehensively spectroscopically studied stars in the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared spectral ranges. Using non-LTE modeling of its hydrogen spectrum, we have calculated the contribution to the hydrogen emission from such important regions of the circumstellar environment as the disk wind and the magnetosphere. We have used our own observations of the stellar spectrum performed with the 2.4-m telescope at the Thai National Observatory to quantitatively check our theoretical calculations. In addition, all of the visible and infrared spectra available in the literature have been used for a qualitative comparison. The modeling results have revealed a significant role of the magneto-centrifugal disk wind in the formation of atomic hydrogen emission. The cause of the emission line variability in the spectrum ofMWC 480 is discussed.

  14. Disks around CQ Tau and MWC 758: dense PDR or gas dispersal?

    CERN Document Server

    Chapillon, Edwige; Dutrey, Anne; Piétu, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    The overall properties of disks surrounding intermediate PMS stars (HAe) are not yet well constrained by current observations. The disk inclination, which significantly affect SED modeling, is often unknown. We attempted to resolve the disks around CQ Tau and MWC 758, to provide accurate constraints on the disk parameters, in particular the temperature and surface density distribution. We report arcsecond resolution observations of dust and CO line emissions with the IRAM array. The disk properties are derived using a standard disk model. We use the Meudon PDR code to study the chemistry. The two disks share some common properties. The mean CO abundance is low despite disk temperatures above the CO condensation temperature. Furthermore, the CO surface density and dust opacity have different radial dependence. The CQ Tau disk appears warmer, and perhaps less dense than that of MWC 758. Modeling the chemistry, we find that photodissociation of CO is a viable mechanism to explain the low abundance. The photosphe...

  15. Coal desulfurization in a rotary kiln combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobb, J.T. Jr.

    1992-09-11

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the combustion of coal and coal wastes in a rotary kiln reactor with limestone addition for sulfur control. The rationale for the project was the perception that rotary systems could bring several advantages to combustion of these fuels, and may thus offer an alternative to fluid-bed boilers. Towards this end, an existing wood pyrolysis kiln (the Humphrey Charcoal kiln) was to be suitably refurbished and retrofitted with a specially designed version of a patented air distributor provided by Universal Energy, Inc. (UEI). As the project progressed beyond the initial stages, a number of issues were raised regarding the feasibility and the possible advantages of burning coals in a rotary kiln combustor and, in particular, the suitability of the Humphrey Charcoal kiln as a combustor. Instead, an opportunity arose to conduct combustion tests in the PEDCO Rotary Cascading-Bed Boiler (RCBB) commercial demonstration unit at the North American Rayon CO. (NARCO) in Elizabethton, TN. The tests focused on anthracite culm and had two objectives: (a) determine the feasibility of burning anthracite culms in a rotary kiln boiler and (b) obtain input for any further work involving the Humphrey Charcoal kiln combustor. A number of tests were conducted at the PEDCO unit. The last one was conducted on anthracite culm procured directly from the feed bin of a commercial circulating fluid-bed boiler. The results were disappointing; it was difficult to maintain sustained combustion even when large quantities of supplemental fuel were used. Combustion efficiency was poor, around 60 percent. The results suggest that the rotary kiln boiler, as designed, is ill-suited with respect to low-grade, hard to burn solid fuels, such as anthracite culm. Indeed, data from combustion of bituminous coal in the PEDCO unit suggest that with respect to coal in general, the rotary kiln boiler appears inferior to the circulating fluid bed boiler.

  16. Evidence of the evolved nature of the B[e] star MWC 137

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muratore, M. F.; Arias, M. L.; Cidale, L. [Departamento de Espectroscopía Estelar, Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, and Instituto de Astrofísica de La Plata, CCT La Plata, CONICET-UNLP, Paseo del Bosque S/N, B1900FWA, La Plata (Argentina); Kraus, M.; Oksala, M. E. [Astronomický ústav, Akademie věd České Republiky, Fričova 298, 251 65 Ondřejov (Czech Republic); Fernandes, M. Borges [Observatório Nacional, Rua General José Cristino 77, 20921-400 São Cristovão, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Liermann, A., E-mail: fmuratore@carina.fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary phase of B[e] stars is difficult to establish due to the uncertainties in their fundamental parameters. For instance, possible classifications for the Galactic B[e] star MWC 137 include pre-main-sequence and post-main-sequence phases, with a large range in luminosity. Our goal is to clarify the evolutionary stage of this peculiar object, and to study the CO molecular component of its circumstellar medium. To this purpose, we modeled the CO molecular bands using high-resolution K-band spectra. We find that MWC 137 is surrounded by a detached cool (T=1900±100 K) and dense (N=(3±1)×10{sup 21} cm{sup −2}) ring of CO gas orbiting the star with a rotational velocity, projected to the line of sight, of 84 ± 2 km s{sup −1}. We also find that the molecular gas is enriched in the isotope {sup 13}C, excluding the classification of the star as a Herbig Be. The observed isotopic abundance ratio ({sup 12}C/{sup 13}C = 25 ± 2) derived from our modeling is compatible with a proto-planetary nebula, main-sequence, or supergiant evolutionary phase. However, based on some observable characteristics of MWC 137, we propose that the supergiant scenario seems to be the most plausible. Hence, we suggest that MWC 137 could be in an extremely short-lived phase, evolving from a B[e] supergiant to a blue supergiant with a bipolar ring nebula.

  17. Photometric activity of the Herbig Be star MWC 297 over 25 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsunova, O. Yu.; Mel'nikov, S. Yu.; Grinin, V. P.; Katysheva, N. A.; Shugarov, S. Yu.

    2013-02-01

    The photometric behavior of the hot, young Herbig Be starMWC 297 on various time scales is studied using published data, as well as new observations. The series of photometric observations covers about 25 years. Over this time, the star showed low-amplitude (Δ V ≈ 0.3 m ) irregular variabilitymodulated by large-scale cyclic variabilitywith an amplitude close to 0.2 m and a period (or quasi-period) of 5.4±0.1 yr. A detailed seasonal analysis of the data shows that the light curve of MWC 297 displays two types of photometric features: low-amplitude Algol-like fading with an amplitude close to 0.2 m and low-amplitude flares resembling the flares of UV Ceti stars, but being more powerful and having longer durations. The variations of the stellar brightness are accompanied by variations of the B- V and V - R colors: when the brightness decreases, B- V decreases, while V - R increases (the star reddens). The reddening law is close to the standard interstellar reddening law. Although the character of the brightness variability ofMWC 297 resembles the photometric activity of UX Ori type stars, which is due to variations of their circumstellar extinction, its scale is very far from the scales observed for UX Ori stars. It is difficult to reconcile the level of photometric activity with the idea that MWC 297 is observed through its own gas-dust disk viewed almost edge-on, as has been suggested in several studies.

  18. Improved Constraints on the Disk around MWC 349A from the 23 m LBTI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallum, S.; Eisner, J. A.; Hinz, P. M.; Sheehan, P. D.; Skemer, A. J.; Tuthill, P. G.; Young, J. S.

    2017-07-01

    We present new spatially resolved observations of MWC 349A from the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI), a 23 m baseline interferometer made up of two, co-mounted 8 m telescopes. MWC 349A is a B[e] star with an unknown evolutionary state. Proposed scenarios range from a young stellar object, to a B[e] supergiant, to a tight binary system. Radio continuum and recombination line observations of this source revealed a sub-arcsecond bipolar outflow surrounding an ∼100 mas circumstellar disk. Follow-up infrared studies detected the disk, and suggested that it may have skew and an inner clearing. Our new infrared interferometric observations, which have more than twice the resolution of previously published data sets, support the presence of both skew and a compact infrared excess. They rule out inner clearings with radii greater than ∼14 mas. We show the improvements in disk parameter constraints provided by LBTI, and discuss the inferred disk parameters in the context of the posited evolutionary states for MWC 349A.

  19. Modelling the asymmetric wind of the luminous blue variable binary MWC 314

    CERN Document Server

    Lobel, A; Martayan, C; Frémat, Y; Dozinel, K Torres; Raskin, G; Van Winckel, H; Prins, S; Pessemier, W; Waelkens, C; Hensberge, H; Dummortier, L; Jorissen, A; Van Eck, S; Lehmann, H

    2013-01-01

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of MWC 314, a luminous blue variable (LBV) candidate with an extended bipolar nebula. The detailed spectroscopic variability is investigated to determine if MWC 314 is a massive binary system with a supersonically accelerating wind or a low-mass B[e] star. We compare the spectrum and spectral energy distribution to other LBVs (such as P Cyg) and find very similar physical wind properties, indicating strong kinship. We combined long-term high-resolution optical spectroscopic monitoring and V-band photometric observations to determine the orbital elements and stellar parameters and to investigate the spectral variability with the orbital phases. We developed an advanced model of the large-scale wind-velocity and wind-density structure with 3-D radiative transfer calculations that fit the orbitally modulated P Cyg profile of He I lam5876, showing outflow velocities above 1000 km/s. We find that MWC 314 is a massive semi-detached binary system of ~1.22 AU, observed at an inclin...

  20. Micro-mixer/combustor

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad Ahmad

    2014-09-18

    A micro-mixer/combustor to mix fuel and oxidant streams into combustible mixtures where flames resulting from combustion of the mixture can be sustained inside its combustion chamber is provided. The present design is particularly suitable for diffusion flames. In various aspects the present design mixes the fuel and oxidant streams prior to entering a combustion chamber. The combustion chamber is designed to prevent excess pressure to build up within the combustion chamber, which build up can cause instabilities in the flame. A restriction in the inlet to the combustion chamber from the mixing chamber forces the incoming streams to converge while introducing minor pressure drop. In one or more aspects, heat from combustion products exhausted from the combustion chamber may be used to provide heat to at least one of fuel passing through the fuel inlet channel, oxidant passing through the oxidant inlet channel, the mixing chamber, or the combustion chamber. In one or more aspects, an ignition strip may be positioned in the combustion chamber to sustain a flame without preheating.

  1. Methanol tailgas combustor control method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart-Predmore, David J.; Pettit, William H.

    2002-01-01

    A method for controlling the power and temperature and fuel source of a combustor in a fuel cell apparatus to supply heat to a fuel processor where the combustor has dual fuel inlet streams including a first fuel stream, and a second fuel stream of anode effluent from the fuel cell and reformate from the fuel processor. In all operating modes, an enthalpy balance is determined by regulating the amount of the first and/or second fuel streams and the quantity of the first air flow stream to support fuel processor power requirements.

  2. Evidence of the Evolved Nature of the B[e] Star MWC 137

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratore, M. F.; Kraus, M.; Oksala, M. E.; Arias, M. L.; Cidale, L.; Borges Fernandes, M.; Liermann, A.

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary phase of B[e] stars is difficult to establish due to the uncertainties in their fundamental parameters. For instance, possible classifications for the Galactic B[e] star MWC 137 include pre-main-sequence and post-main-sequence phases, with a large range in luminosity. Our goal is to clarify the evolutionary stage of this peculiar object, and to study the CO molecular component of its circumstellar medium. To this purpose, we modeled the CO molecular bands using high-resolution K-band spectra. We find that MWC 137 is surrounded by a detached cool (T=1900+/- 100 K) and dense (N=(3+/- 1)× {{10}21} {{cm}-2}) ring of CO gas orbiting the star with a rotational velocity, projected to the line of sight, of 84 ± 2 km s-1. We also find that the molecular gas is enriched in the isotope 13C, excluding the classification of the star as a Herbig Be. The observed isotopic abundance ratio (12C/13C = 25 ± 2) derived from our modeling is compatible with a proto-planetary nebula, main-sequence, or supergiant evolutionary phase. However, based on some observable characteristics of MWC 137, we propose that the supergiant scenario seems to be the most plausible. Hence, we suggest that MWC 137 could be in an extremely short-lived phase, evolving from a B[e] supergiant to a blue supergiant with a bipolar ring nebula. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina), under program IDs GN-2011B-Q-24 and GN-2013B-Q-11.

  3. Clumpy molecular structures revolving the B[e] supergiant MWC 137

    CERN Document Server

    Kraus, M; Liimets, T; Cappa, C E; Duronea, N; Gunawan, D S; Oksala, M E; Santander-Garcia, M; Arias, M L; Nickeler, D H; Maravelias, G; Fernandes, M Borges; Cure, M

    2016-01-01

    The peculiar emission-line star MWC 137 with its extended optical nebula was recently classified as B[e] supergiant. To study the spatial distribution of its circumstellar molecular gas on small and large scales, we obtained near-infrared and radio observations using SINFONI and APEX, respectively. We find that the hot CO gas is arranged in moving clumpy ring and shell structures close to the star, while a cold CO envelope is encircling the borders of the optical nebula from the south to the west.

  4. Assessment of Combustor Working Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leiyong Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the remaining life of gas turbine critical components, it is vital to accurately define the aerothermodynamic working environments and service histories. As a part of a major multidisciplinary collaboration program, a benchmark modeling on a practical gas turbine combustor is successfully carried out, and the two-phase, steady, turbulent, compressible, reacting flow fields at both cruise and takeoff are obtained. The results show the complicated flow features inside the combustor. The airflow over each flow element of the combustor can or liner is not evenly distributed, and considerable variations, ±25%, around the average values, are observed. It is more important to note that the temperatures at the combustor can and cooling wiggle strips vary significantly, which can significantly affect fatigue life of engine critical components. The present study suggests that to develop an adequate aerothermodynamics tool, it is necessary to carry out a further systematic study, including validation of numerical results, simulations at typical engine operating conditions, and development of simple correlations between engine operating conditions and component working environments. As an ultimate goal, the cost and time of gas turbine engine fleet management must be significantly reduced.

  5. Periods in a 87 Years Light Curve of the Symbiotic Star MWC 560

    CERN Document Server

    Leibowitz, Elia M

    2015-01-01

    We have constructed a visual light curve of the symbiotic star MWC covering the last 87 years of its history. The data were assembled from the literature and from the AAVSO data bank. Most of the periodic components of the system brightness variation can be accounted for by the operation of 3 basic clocks of the periods P1=19000 d, P2=1943 d and P3=722 d. These periods can plausibly, and consistently with the observations, be attributed to 3 physical mechanisms in the system. They are, respectively, the working of a solar-like magnetic dynamo cycle in the outer layers of the giant star of the system, the binary orbit cycle and the sidereal rotation cycle of the giant star. MWC 560 is the 7th symbiotic star with historical light curves that reveal similar basic characteristics of the systems. The light curves of all these stars are well interpreted on the basis of current understanding of the physical processes that are the major sources of the optical luminosity of these symbiotic systems.

  6. Radio Emission from the Be/Black Hole Binary MWC 656

    CERN Document Server

    Dzib, S A; Jaron, F

    2015-01-01

    Context. MWC 656 is the recently discovered first binary system case composed of a Be-type star and an accreting black hole. Its low X-ray luminosity indicates that the system is in a quiescent X-ray state. Aims. The aim of our investigation is to establish if the MWC 656 system has detectable radio emission and if the radio characteristics are consistent with those of quiescent black hole systems. Methods.We used three archived VLA data sets, one hour each, at 3 GHz and seven new VLA observations, two hours each, at 10 GHz to produce very high sensitivity images, down to $\\sim$1$\\,\\mu$Jy. Results.We detected the source twice in the new observations: in the first VLA run, at periastron passage, with a flux density of 14.2$\\,\\pm\\,$2.9 $\\mu$Jy and by combining all together the other six VLA runs, with a flux density of $3.7 \\pm 1.4$ $\\mu$Jy. The resulting combined map of the archived observations has the sensitivity of $1 \\sigma = 6.6\\, \\mu Jy$ but no radio emission is there detected. Conclusions. The radio and...

  7. THREE FUNDAMENTAL PERIODS IN AN 87 YEAR LIGHT CURVE OF THE SYMBIOTIC STAR MWC 560

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leibowitz, Elia M.; Formiggini, Liliana, E-mail: elia@astro.tau.ac.il [The Wise Observatory and the School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2015-08-15

    We construct a visual light curve of the symbiotic star MWC covering the last 87 years of its history. The data were assembled from the literature and from the AAVSO data bank. Most of the periodic components of the system brightness variation can be accounted for by the operation of three basic clocks of the periods P1 = 19,000 days, P2 = 1943 days, and P3 = 722 days. These periods can plausibly, and consistently with the observations, be attributed to three physical mechanisms in the system: the working of a solar-like magnetic dynamo cycle in the outer layers of the giant star of the system, the binary orbit cycle, and the sidereal rotation cycle of the giant star. MWC 560 is the seventh symbiotic star with historical light curves that reveal similar basic characteristics of the systems. The light curves of all these stars are well interpreted on the basis of the current understanding of the physical processes that are the major sources of the optical luminosity of these symbiotic systems.

  8. Spectroscopy, MOST Photometry, and Interferometry of MWC 314: Is it an LBV or an interacting binary?

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, Noel D; Maltais-Tariant, Raphaël; Pablo, Herbert; Gies, Douglas R; Saio, Hideyuki; St-Louis, Nicole; Schaefer, Gail; Miroshnichenko, Anatoly S; Farrington, Chris; Aldoretta, Emily J; Artigau, Étienne; Boyajian, Tabetha S; Gordon, Kathryn; Jones, Jeremy; Matson, Rachel; McAlister, Harold A; O'Brien, David; Raghavan, Deepak; Ramiaramanantsoa, Tahina; Ridgway, Stephen T; Scott, Nic; Sturmann, Judit; Sturmann, Laszlo; Brummelaar, Theo ten; Thomas, Joshua D; Turner, Nils; Vargas, Norm; Zharikov, Sergey; Matthews, Jaymie; Cameron, Chris; Guenther, David; Kuschnig, Rainer; Rowe, Jason; Rucinski, Slavek; Sasselov, Dimitar; Weiss, Werner

    2015-01-01

    MWC 314 is a bright candidate luminous blue variable that resides in a fairly close binary system, with an orbital period of 60.753$\\pm$0.003 d. We observed MWC 314 with a combination of optical spectroscopy, broad-band ground- and space-based photometry, as well as with long baseline, near-infrared interferometry. We have revised the single-lined spectroscopic orbit and explored the photometric variability. The orbital light curve displays two minima each orbit that can be partially explained in terms of the tidal distortion of the primary that occurs around the time of periastron. The emission lines in the system are often double-peaked and stationary in their kinematics, indicative of a circumbinary disc. We find that the stellar wind or circumbinary disc is partially resolved in the K\\prime-band with the longest baselines of the CHARA Array. From this analysis, we provide a simple, qualitative model in an attempt to explain the observations. From the assumption of Roche Lobe overflow and tidal synchronisa...

  9. On the formation and evolution of the first Be star in a black hole binary MWC 656

    CERN Document Server

    Grudzinska, M; Casares, J; de Mink, S E; Ziolkowski, J; Negueruela, I; Ribo, M; Ribas, I; Paredes, J M; Herrero, A; Benacquista, M

    2015-01-01

    We find that the formation of MWC 656 (the first Be binary containing a black hole) involves a common envelope phase and a supernova explosion. This result supports the idea that a rapidly rotating Be star can emerge out of a common envelope phase, which is very intriguing because this evolutionary stage is thought to be too fast to lead to significant accretion and spin up of the B star. We predict $\\sim 10-100$ of Be BH binaries to currently reside in the Galactic disk, but there is only a small chance to observe a system with parameters resembling MWC 656. If MWC 656 is representative of intrinsic Galactic Be BH binary population, it may indicate that standard evolutionary theory needs to be revised. This would pose another evolutionary problem in understanding BH binaries, with BH X-ray Novae formation issue being the prime example. The future evolution of MWC 656 with a $\\sim 5$ M$_{\\odot}$ black hole and with a $\\sim 13$ M$_{\\odot}$ main sequence companion on a $\\sim 60$ day orbit may lead to the format...

  10. A Simplified Multiband Sampling and Detection Method Based on MWC Structure for Mm Wave Communications in 5G Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The millimeter wave (mm wave communications have been proposed to be an important part of the 5G mobile communication networks, and it will bring more difficulties to signal processing, especially signal sampling, and also cause more pressures on hardware devices. In this paper, we present a simplified sampling and detection method based on MWC structure by using the idea of blind source separation for mm wave communications, which can avoid the challenges of signal sampling brought by high frequencies and wide bandwidth for mm wave systems. This proposed method takes full advantage of the beneficial spectrum aliasing to achieve signal sampling at sub-Nyquist rate. Compared with the traditional MWC system, it provides the exact quantity of sampling channels which is far lower than that of MWC. In the reconstruction stage, the proposed method simplifies the computational complexity by exploiting simple linear operations instead of CS recovery algorithms and provides more stable performance of signal recovery. Moreover, MWC structure has the ability to apply to different bands used in mm wave communications by mixed processing, which is similar to spread spectrum technology.

  11. Numerical Modelling of Scramjet Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Deepu

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Numerical modelling of turbulent-reacting flow field of supersonic combustion ramjet(scramjet combustors are presented. The developed numerical procedure is based on the implicittreatment of chemical source terms by preconditioning and solved along with unstedy turbulentNavier-Stokes equations explicitly. Reaction is modelled using an eight-step hydrogen-airchemistry. Code is validated against a standard wall jet experimental data and is successfullyused to model the turbulent-reacting flow field resulting due to the combustion of hydrogeninjected from diamond-shaped strut and also in the wake region of wedge-shaped strut placedin the heated supersonic airstream. The analysis could demonstrate the effect of interaction ofoblique shock wave with a supersonic stream of hydrogen  in its (fuel-air mixing and reactionfor strut-based scramjet combustors.

  12. Assessment of Combustor Working Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Leiyong Jiang; Andrew Corber

    2012-01-01

    In order to assess the remaining life of gas turbine critical components, it is vital to accurately define the aerothermodynamic working environments and service histories. As a part of a major multidisciplinary collaboration program, a benchmark modeling on a practical gas turbine combustor is successfully carried out, and the two-phase, steady, turbulent, compressible, reacting flow fields at both cruise and takeoff are obtained. The results show the complicated flow features inside the com...

  13. Alternate-Fueled Combustor-Sector Performance: Part A: Combustor Performance Part B: Combustor Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shouse, D. T.; Neuroth, C.; Henricks, R. C.; Lynch, A.; Frayne, C.; Stutrud, J. S.; Corporan, E.; Hankins, T.

    2010-01-01

    Alternate aviation fuels for military or commercial use are required to satisfy MIL-DTL-83133F(2008) or ASTM D 7566 (2010) standards, respectively, and are classified as drop-in fuel replacements. To satisfy legacy issues, blends to 50% alternate fuel with petroleum fuels are certified individually on the basis of feedstock. Adherence to alternate fuels and fuel blends requires smart fueling systems or advanced fuel-flexible systems, including combustors and engines without significant sacrifice in performance or emissions requirements. This paper provides preliminary performance (Part A) and emissions and particulates (Part B) combustor sector data for synthetic-parafinic-kerosene- (SPK-) type fuel and blends with JP-8+100 relative to JP-8+100 as baseline fueling.

  14. A disk asymmetry in motion around the B[e] star MWC158

    CERN Document Server

    Kluska, J; Soulez, F; Berger, J -P; Bouquin, J -B Le; Malbet, F; Lazareff, B; Thiébaut, E

    2016-01-01

    MWC158 is a star with the B[e] phenomenon that shows strong spectrophotometric variability (in lines and in UV and visible continuum) attributed to phases of shell ejection. The evolutionary stage of this star was never clearly determined. Previous interferometric, spectropolarimetric and spectro-interferometric studies suggest a disk morphology for its environment. We investigate the origin of the variability within the inner astronomical unit of the central star using near-infrared interferometric observations with PIONIER at the VLTI over a two-year period. We performed an image reconstruction of the circumstellar environment using the SPARCO method. We discovered that the morphology of the circumstellar environment could vary on timescales of weeks or days. We carried out a parametric fit of the data with a model consisting of a star, a disk and a bright spot that represents a brighter emission in the disk. We detect strong morphological changes in the first astronomical unit around the star, that happen ...

  15. SPIRAL ARMS IN THE ASYMMETRICALLY ILLUMINATED DISK OF MWC 758 AND CONSTRAINTS ON GIANT PLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, C. A. [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer, Suite 100, Oakland CA 96002 (United States); Muto, T. [Division of Liberal Arts, Kogakuin University, 1-24-2, Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 163-8677 (Japan); Hashimoto, J.; Kwon, J. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Fukagawa, M.; Sai, S. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Currie, T. [ExoPlanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, NASA' s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Biller, B.; Thalmann, C. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sitko, M. L. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut St., Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Russell, R. [The Aerospace Corporation, Los Angeles, CA 90009 (United States); Wisniewski, J. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Dong, R. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States); Hornbeck, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Schneider, G. [Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Hines, D. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Martin, A. Moro [Departamento de Astrofisica, CAB (INTA-CSIC), Instituto Nacional de Tcnica Aeroespacial, Torrejn de Ardoz, E-28850 Madrid (Spain); Feldt, M.; Henning, Th.; Pott, J.-U., E-mail: carol.a.grady@nasa.gov [Max Planck Institute fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2013-01-01

    We present the first near-IR scattered light detection of the transitional disk associated with the Herbig Ae star MWC 758 using data obtained as part of the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru, and 1.1 {mu}m Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS data. While submillimeter studies suggested there is a dust-depleted cavity with r = 0.''35, we find scattered light as close as 0.''1 (20-28 AU) from the star, with no visible cavity at H, K', or K{sub s} . We find two small-scaled spiral structures that asymmetrically shadow the outer disk. We model one of the spirals using spiral density wave theory, and derive a disk aspect ratio of h {approx} 0.18, indicating a dynamically warm disk. If the spiral pattern is excited by a perturber, we estimate its mass to be 5{sup +3} {sub -4} M{sub J} , in the range where planet filtration models predict accretion continuing onto the star. Using a combination of non-redundant aperture masking data at L' and angular differential imaging with Locally Optimized Combination of Images at K' and K{sub s} , we exclude stellar or massive brown dwarf companions within 300 mas of the Herbig Ae star, and all but planetary mass companions exterior to 0.''5. We reach 5{sigma} contrasts limiting companions to planetary masses, 3-4 M{sub J} at 1.''0 and 2 M{sub J} at 1.''55, using the COND models. Collectively, these data strengthen the case for MWC 758 already being a young planetary system.

  16. Spiral Arms in the Asymmetrically Illuminated Disk of MWC 758 and Constraints on Giant Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, C. A.; Muto, T.; Hashimoto, J.; Fukagawa, M.; Currie, T.; Biller, B.; Thalmann, C.; Sitko, M. L.; Russell, R.; Wisniewski, J.; Dong, R.; Kwon, J.; Sai, S.; Hornbeck, J.; Schneider, G.; Hines, D.; Moro Martin, A.; Feldt, M.; Henning, Th.; Pott, J.-U.; Bonnefoy, M.; Bouwman, J.; Lacour, S.; McElwain, M.; Serabyn, G.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first near-IR scattered light detection of the transitional disk associated with the Herbig Ae star MWC 758 using data obtained as part of the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru, and 1.1 micrometer Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS data. While submillimeter studies suggested there is a dust-depleted cavity with r = 0".35, we find scattered light as close as 0".1 (20-28 AU) from the star, with no visible cavity at H, K', or Ks . We find two small-scaled spiral structures that asymmetrically shadow the outer disk. We model one of the spirals using spiral density wave theory, and derive a disk aspect ratio of h approximately 0.18, indicating a dynamically warm disk. If the spiral pattern is excited by a perturber, we estimate its mass to be 5(exp +3)(sub -4) M(sub J), in the range where planet filtration models predict accretion continuing onto the star. Using a combination of non-redundant aperture masking data at L' and angular differential imaging with Locally Optimized Combination of Images at K' and Ks , we exclude stellar or massive brown dwarf companions within 300 mas of the Herbig Ae star, and all but planetary mass companions exterior to 0".5. We reach 5 sigma contrasts limiting companions to planetary masses, 3-4 M(sub J) at 1".0 and 2 M(sub J) at 1".55, using the COND models. Collectively, these data strengthen the case for MWC 758 already being a young planetary system.

  17. Disk Wind in the Radiation of Two Herbig Ae/Be Stars: MWC 480 and IL Cep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinin, V.; Tambovtseva, L.; Potravnov, I.; Mkrtichian, D.

    2017-02-01

    Using non-LTE modeling for different components of the curcumstellar environment in Herbig AeBe stars, we reproduced hydrogen emission lines, such as Hα and Hβ, and determined geometrical and physical parameters of the line emitting regions. Two Herbig stars (MWC 480 and IL Cep) have been considered. The modeling shows that the disk wind or X-wind are the main contributors to the radiation of the lines of the Balmer series compared to the magnetospheric accreting region.

  18. The First Simultaneous X-Ray/Radio Detection of the First Be/BH System MWC 656

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribó, M.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Paredes, J. M.; Marcote, B.; Iwasawa, K.; Moldón, J.; Casares, J.; Migliari, S.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.

    2017-02-01

    MWC 656 is the first known Be/black hole (BH) binary system. Be/BH binaries are important in the context of binary system evolution and sources of detectable gravitational waves because they are possible precursors of coalescing neutron star/BH binaries. X-ray observations conducted in 2013 revealed that MWC 656 is a quiescent high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB), opening the possibility to explore X-ray/radio correlations and the accretion/ejection coupling down to low luminosities for BH HMXBs. Here we report on a deep joint Chandra/VLA observation of MWC 656 (and contemporaneous optical data) conducted in 2015 July that has allowed us to unambiguously identify the X-ray counterpart of the source. The X-ray spectrum can be fitted with a power law with Γ ∼ 2, providing a flux of ≃4 × 10‑15 erg cm‑2 s‑1 in the 0.5–8 keV energy range and a luminosity of LX ≃ 3 × 1030 erg s‑1 at a 2.6 kpc distance. For a 5 M⊙ BH this translates into ≃5 × 10‑9 LEdd. These results imply that MWC 656 is about 7 times fainter in X-rays than it was two years before and reaches the faintest X-ray luminosities ever detected in stellar-mass BHs. The radio data provide a detection with a peak flux density of 3.5 ± 1.1 μJy beam‑1. The obtained X-ray/radio luminosities for this quiescent BH HMXB are fully compatible with those of the X-ray/radio correlations derived from quiescent BH low-mass X-ray binaries. These results show that the accretion/ejection coupling in stellar-mass BHs is independent of the nature of the donor star.

  19. Chaos in an imperfectly premixed model combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabiraj, Lipika, E-mail: lipika.kabiraj@tu-berlin.de; Saurabh, Aditya; Paschereit, Christian O. [Hermann Föttinger Institut, Technische Universität Berlin (Germany); Karimi, Nader [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom); Sailor, Anna [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison 53706 (United States); Mastorakos, Epaminondas; Dowling, Ann P. [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-15

    This article reports nonlinear bifurcations observed in a laboratory scale, turbulent combustor operating under imperfectly premixed mode with global equivalence ratio as the control parameter. The results indicate that the dynamics of thermoacoustic instability correspond to quasi-periodic bifurcation to low-dimensional, deterministic chaos, a route that is common to a variety of dissipative nonlinear systems. The results support the recent identification of bifurcation scenarios in a laminar premixed flame combustor (Kabiraj et al., Chaos: Interdiscip. J. Nonlinear Sci. 22, 023129 (2012)) and extend the observation to a practically relevant combustor configuration.

  20. Alternate-Fueled Combustor-Sector Performance. Parts A and B; (A) Combustor Performance; (B) Combustor Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shouse, D. T.; Hendricks, R. C.; Lynch, A.; Frayne, C. W.; Stutrud, J. S.; Corporan, E.; Hankins, T.

    2012-01-01

    Alternate aviation fuels for military or commercial use are required to satisfy MIL-DTL-83133F(2008) or ASTM D 7566 (2010) standards, respectively, and are classified as "drop-in" fuel replacements. To satisfy legacy issues, blends to 50% alternate fuel with petroleum fuels are certified individually on the basis of processing and assumed to be feedstock agnostic. Adherence to alternate fuels and fuel blends requires "smart fueling systems" or advanced fuel-flexible systems, including combustors and engines, without significant sacrifice in performance or emissions requirements. This paper provides preliminary performance (Part A) and emissions and particulates (Part B) combustor sector data. The data are for nominal inlet conditions at 225 psia and 800 F (1.551 MPa and 700 K), for synthetic-paraffinic-kerosene- (SPK-) type (Fisher-Tropsch (FT)) fuel and blends with JP-8+100 relative to JP-8+100 as baseline fueling. Assessments are made of the change in combustor efficiency, wall temperatures, emissions, and luminosity with SPK of 0%, 50%, and 100% fueling composition at 3% combustor pressure drop. The performance results (Part A) indicate no quantifiable differences in combustor efficiency, a general trend to lower liner and higher core flow temperatures with increased FT fuel blends. In general, emissions data (Part B) show little differences, but with percent increase in FT-SPK-type fueling, particulate emissions and wall temperatures are less than with baseline JP-8. High-speed photography illustrates both luminosity and combustor dynamic flame characteristics.

  1. APPLICATION OF PULSE COMBUSTION TO INCINERATION OF LIQUID HAZARDOUS WASTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a study to determine the effect of acoustic pulsations on the steady-state operation of a pulse combustor burning liquid hazardous waste. A horizontal tunnel furnace was retrofitted with a liquid injection pulse combustor that burned No. 2 fuel oil. Th...

  2. Turbulent Recirculating Flows in Isothermal Combustor Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, D.; Rhode, D.

    1985-01-01

    Computer program developed that provides mathematical solution to design and construction of combustion chambers for jet engines. Improved results in areas of combustor flow fields accomplished by this computerprogram solution, cheaper and quicker than experiments involving real systems for models.

  3. TRW Advanced Slagging Coal Combustor Utility Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The TRW Advanced Slagging Coal Combustor Demonstration Project consists of retrofitting Orange and Rockland (O R) Utility Corporation's Lovett Plant Unit No. 3 with four (4) slagging combustors which will allow the gas/ou desip unit to fire 2.5 sulfur coal. The slogging combustor process will provide NO[sub x] and SO[sub x] emissions that meet NSPS and New York State Envirommental Standards. TRW-CBU scope of work includes the engineering, design and supply of the slogging combustors, coal and limestone feed systems and a control system for these components. During this report period, the design activities for all systems progressed to permit the release of specifications and requests for proposals. Award of contracts for long-delivery items and major equipment are being placed to meet the revised program schedule.

  4. Spiral Arms in the Asymmetrically Illuminated Disk of MWC 758 and Constraints on Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Grady, C A; Hashimoto, J; Fukagawa, M; Currie, T; Biller, B; Thalmann, C; Sitko, M L; Russell, R; Wisniewski, J; Dong, R; Kwon, J; Sai, S; Hornbeck, J; Schneider, G; Hines, D; Moro-Martin, A; Feldt, M; Henning, Th; Pott, J -U; Bonnefoy, M; Bouwman, J; Lacour, S; Mueller, A; Juhasz, A; Crida, A; Chauvin, G; Andrews, S; Wilner, D; Kraus, A; Dahm, S; Robitaille, T; Jang-Condell, H; Abe, L; Akiyama, E; Brandner, W; Brandt, T; Carson, J; Egner, S; Follette, K B; Goto, M; Guyon, O; Hayano, Y; Hayashi, M; Hayashi, S; Hodapp, K; Ishii, M; Iye, M; Janson, M; Kandori, R; Knapp, G; Kudo, T; Kusakabe, N; Kuzuhara, M; Mayama, S; McElwain, M; Matsuo, T; Miyama, S; Morino, J -I; Nishimura, T; Pyo, T -S; Serabyn, G; Suto, H; Suzuki, R; Takami, M; Takato, N; Terada, H; Tomono, D; Turner, E; Watanabe, M; Yamada, T; Takami, H; Usuda, T; Tamura, M

    2012-01-01

    We present the first near-IR scattered light detection of the transitional disk associated with the Herbig Ae star MWC 758 using data obtained as part of the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru, and 1.1 micron HST/NICMOS data. While sub-millimeter studies suggested there is a dust-depleted cavity with r=0.35, we find scattered light as close as 0.1 (20-28 AU) from the star, with no visible cavity at H, K', or Ks. We find two small-scaled spiral structures which asymmetrically shadow the outer disk. We model one of the spirals using spiral density wave theory, and derive a disk aspect ratio of h ~ 0.18, indicating a dynamically warm disk. If the spiral pattern is excited by a perturber, we estimate its mass to be 5+3,-4 Mj, in the range where planet filtration models predict accretion continuing onto the star. Using a combination of non-redundant aperture masking data at L' and angular differential imaging with Locally Optimized Combination of Images at K' and Ks, we exclude stellar or ma...

  5. Calculations of magnetohydrodynamic swirl combustor flowfields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A.K.; Beer, J.H.; Khan, H.; Lilley, D.G.

    1982-09-01

    The objectives of the paper were to theoretically calculate and experimentally verify the fluid mechanics in the second stage of a model MHD swirl combustor with special emphasis on avoidance of the boundary-layer separation as the flow turns in to the MHD disk generator; to find the most suitable seed injection point at the entrance to the second stage which will yield uniform seed concentration at the combustor exit prior to entry into the disk generator. The model combustor is a multiannular swirl burner that is placed at the exit of the first-stage swirl combustor, which in turn can be used to vary the turbulent shear that arises between the individual swirling concentric annuli. This design permits ultrahigh swirl in the second stage with swirl vanes (if any) to be placed outside the very high temperature regions of the combustor in the clean preheated air. The gas burns completely in the second-stage combustor and turns 90 deg into the disk generator along a trumpet-shaped exit module. In this synoptic results are presented of the fluid mechanics in the trumpet-shaped second-stage exit module, with water as the working fluid.

  6. Pilot plant testing of IGT`s two-stage fluidized-bed/cyclonic agglomerating combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehmat, A.; Mensinger, M.C. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Richardson, T.L. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is conducting a multi-year experimental program to develop and test, through pilot-scale operation, IGT`s two-stage fluidized-bed/cyclonic agglomerating combustor (AGGCOM). The AGGCOM process is based on combining the fluidized-bed agglomeration and gasification technology with the cyclonic combustion technology, both of which have been developed at IGT over many years. AGGCOM is a unique and extremely flexible combustor that can operate over a wide range of conditions in the fluidized-bed first stage from low temperature (desorption) to high temperature (agglomeration), including gasification of high-energy-content wastes. The ACCCOM combustor can easily and efficiently destroy solid, liquid, and gaseous organic wastes, while isolating solid inorganic contaminants within an essentially non-leachable glassy matrix, suitable for disposal in ordinary landfills. Fines elutriated from the first stage are captured by a high-efficiency cyclone and returned to the fluidized bed for ultimate incorporation into the agglomerates. Intense mixing in the second-stage cyclonic combustor ensures high destruction and removal efficiencies (DRE) for organic compounds that may be present in the feed material. This paper presents an overview of the experimental development of the AGGCOM process and progress made to date in designing, constructing, and operating the 6-ton/day AGGCOM pilot plant. Results of the bench-scale tests conducted to determine the operating conditions necessary to agglomerate a soil were presented at the 1991 Incineration Conference. On-site construction of the AGGCOM pilot plant was initiated in August 1992 and completed at the end of March 1993, with shakedown testing following immediately thereafter. The initial tests in the AGGCOM pilot plant will focus on the integrated operation of both stages of the combustor and will be conducted with ``clean`` topsoil.

  7. Low emissions combustor test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, D.J.; Hadley, M.S.; Norton, T.S.

    1993-12-01

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is in the process of constructing a low emissions combustor test and research (LECTR) facility designed to support the development of low emissions gas turbine combustion systems fired on natural gas and coal derived gaseous fuels containing fuel bound nitrogen. The LECTR facility is a major test station located within METC`s new combustion facility. The heart of this test station is a 60 centimeter (24 inch) diameter, refractory lined pressure vessel made up of a series of flanged modules. The facility design offers the flexibility to test a variety of low emissions combustion concepts at pressures up to 3 MPa (30 atm). Upon completion of fabrication and shake-down testing in January of 1994, the facility will be available for use by industrial and university partners through Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) or through other cooperative arrangements. This paper is intended to describe the LECTR facility and associated operating parameter ranges and to inform interested parties of the facility availability.

  8. HIGH-CONTRAST NEAR-INFRARED POLARIZATION IMAGING OF MWC480

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusakabe, N.; Hashimoto, J.; Kudo, T. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Grady, C. A. [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer St., Suite 100, Oakland, CA 96402 (United States); Sitko, M. L.; Werren, C.; Day, A. N.; Beerman, L. C. [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Fukagawa, M. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1, Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Muto, T. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Wisniewski, J. P. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580 Seattle, Washington, DC (United States); Min, M. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' Science Park 904 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mayama, S. [Center for the Promotion of Integrated Sciences, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Shonan International Village Hayama-cho, Miura-gun, Kanagawa (Japan); Lynch, D. K.; Russell, R. W. [The Aerospace Corporation, Los Angeles, CA 90009 (United States); Brafford, S. M. [Brafford and Phillips, Batavia, OH 45103 (United States); Kuzuhara, M. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Brandt, T. D. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States); Abe, L. [Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR7293, Universite Le de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d' fAzur, 06300 Nice (France); Brandner, W., E-mail: nb.kusakabe@nao.ac.jp [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, 69117 Heidelberg, Koenigstuhl 17 (Germany); and others

    2012-07-10

    One of the key predictions of modeling from the IR excess of Herbig Ae stars is that for protoplanetary disks, where significant grain growth and settling has occurred, the dust disk has flattened to the point that it can be partially or largely shadowed by the innermost material at or near the dust sublimation radius. When the self-shadowing has already started, the outer disk is expected to be detected in scattered light only in the exceptional cases when the scale height of the dust disk at the sublimation radius is smaller than usual. High-contrast imaging combined with the IR spectral energy distribution allow us to measure the degree of flattening of the disk, as well as to determine the properties of the outer disk. We present polarimetric differential imaging in the H band obtained with Subaru/HiCIAO of one such system, MWC 480. The HiCIAO data were obtained at a historic minimum of the NIR excess. The disk is detected in scattered light from 0.''2 to 1.''0 (27.4-137 AU). Together with the marginal detection of the disk from 1998 February 24 by Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS, our data constrain the opening half-angle for the disk to lie between 1.{sup 0}3 {<=}{theta} {<=} 2.{sup 0}2. When compared with similar measures in CO for the gas disk from the literature, the dust disk subtends only {approx}30% of the gas disk scale height (H/R {approx} 0.03). Such a dust disk is a factor of 5-7 flatter than transitional disks, which have structural signatures that giant planets have formed.

  9. Angular Momentum in Disk Wind Revealed in the Young Star MWC 349A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qizhou; Claus, Brian; Watson, Linda; Moran, James

    2017-03-01

    Disk winds are thought to play a critical role in star birth. As winds extract excess angular momentum from accretion disks, matter in the disk can be transported inward to the star to fuel mass growth. However, observational evidence of wind carrying angular momentum has been very limited. We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of the young star MWC 349A in the H26α and H30α recombination lines. The high signal-to-noise ratios made possible by the maser emission process allow us to constrain the relative astrometry of the maser spots to milli-arcsecond precision. Previous observations of the H30α line with the SMA and the Plateau de Bure interferometer (PdBI) showed that masers are distributed in the disk and wind. Our new high-resolution observations of the H26α line reveal differences in spatial distribution from that of the H30α line. H26α line masers in the disk are excited in a thin annulus with a radius of about 25 au, while the H30α line masers are formed in a slightly larger annulus with a radius of 30 au. This is consistent with expectations for maser excitation in the presence of an electron density variation of approximately R ‑4. In addition, the H30α and H26α line masers arise from different parts in the wind. This difference is also expected from maser theory. The wind component of both masers exhibits line-of-sight velocities that closely follow a Keplerian law. This result provides strong evidence that the disk wind extracts significant angular momentum, thereby facilitating mass accretion in the young star.

  10. Short-Term Spectral Variability in the Binary FS CMa-Type Object MWC 728

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharikov, S. V.; Miroshnichenko, A. S.

    2017-02-01

    We report the results of a long-term spectroscopic monitoring of the FS CM-type object MWC 728. We found that it is a binary system with a B5 ve (T1,eff = 14000±1000 K) primary and a G8 III (T2,eff ˜ 5000 K) secondary. Absorption lines of the cool star show regular variations with a semi-amplitude of ˜20 km s-1 and a period of 27.5 days. The system mass function is 2.3×10-2 M⊙, and its orbital plane is ˜ 13-15° tilted from the plane of the sky. The hot star has a projected rotational velocity of ˜110 km s-1 which implies a nearly breakup rotation at the equator. We detected strong variations of the Balmer and He I emission-line profiles on timescales from days to years. This points out to a variable stellar wind of the hot star in addition to the presence of a circum-primary gaseous disk. The strength of the absorption-line spectrum along with the optical and near-IR continuum suggest that the hot star contributes ˜60% of the V-band flux, the disk contributes ˜30%, and the cool star ˜10%.The binary system parameters, along with the interstellar extinction, suggest a distance of ˜1 kpc, that the cool star radius (˜8 R⊙) is smaller than its Roche lobe, and that the companions' mass ratio is q ˜0.5. Overall, the observed spectral variability and the presence of a strong IR-excess are in agreement with a model of a close binary system that has undergone a non-conservative mass-transfer.

  11. Dish stirling solar receiver combustor test program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankston, C. P.; Back, L. H.

    1981-01-01

    The operational and energy transfer characteristics of the Dish Stirling Solar Receiver (DSSR) combustor/heat exchanger system was evaluated. The DSSR is designed to operate with fossil fuel augmentation utilizing a swirl combustor and cross flow heat exchanger consisting of a single row of 4 closely spaced tubes that are curved into a conical shape. The performance of the combustor/heat exchanger system without a Stirling engine was studied over a range of operating conditions and output levels using water as the working fluid. Results show that the combustor may be started under cold conditions, controlled safety, and operated at a constant air/fuel ratio (10 percent excess air) over the required range of firing rates. Furthermore, nondimensional heat transfer coefficients based on total heat transfer are plotted versus Reynolds number and compared with literature data taken for single rows of closely spaced tubes perpendicular to cross flow. The data show enhanced heat transfer for the present geometry and test conditions. Analysis of the results shows that the present system meets specified thermal requirements, thus verifying the feasibility of the DSSR combustor design for final prototype fabrication.

  12. Alternate-Fueled Combustor-Sector Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Anna E.; Saxena, Nikita T.; Shouse, Dale T.; Neuroth, Craig; Hendricks, Robert C.; Lynch, Amy; Frayne, Charles W.; Stutrud, Jeffrey S.; Corporan, Edwin; Hankins, Terry

    2013-01-01

    In order to realize alternative fueling for military and commercial use, the industry has set forth guidelines that must be met by each fuel. These aviation fueling requirements are outlined in MIL-DTL-83133F(2008) or ASTM D 7566 Annex (2011) standards, and are classified as "drop-in" fuel replacements. This report provides combustor performance data for synthetic-paraffinic-kerosene- (SPK-) type (Fischer-Tropsch (FT)) fuel and blends with JP-8+100, relative to JP-8+100 as baseline fueling. Data were taken at various nominal inlet conditions: 75 psia (0.52 MPa) at 500 degF (533 K), 125 psia (0.86 MPa) at 625 degF (603 K), 175 psia (1.21 MPa) at 725 degF (658 K), and 225 psia (1.55 MPa) at 790 degF (694 K). Combustor performance analysis assessments were made for the change in flame temperatures, combustor efficiency, wall temperatures, and exhaust plane temperatures at 3, 4, and 5 percent combustor pressure drop (DP) for fuel:air ratios (F/A) ranging from 0.010 to 0.025. Significant general trends show lower liner temperatures and higher flame and combustor outlet temperatures with increases in FT fueling relative to JP-8+100 fueling. The latter affects both turbine efficiency and blade and vane lives.

  13. Multi-Ducted Inlet Combustor Research and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    of a reactor or combustor as defined in equation (1) is the combustor volume divided by the fluid flow rate through the combustor. Therefore, for a...Development Laboratories, Inc., Costa Mesa, California, March, 1983. 3. 0. Levenspiel , Chemical Reaction Engineering, John Wiley and Sons, 1962. 59 •rac v £98 kg3-ඃ-,162-;8b

  14. Dilution jet experiments in compact combustor configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, I.; Zizelman, J.

    1984-01-01

    This project concerns the effects of cooling jets on the velocity and temperature fields in a compact reverse flow combustor. The work is motivated by the need to limit the temperatures of post combustion gases in jet engines to values within the endurance capabilities of turbine blades. The application requires not only that the temperature be kept sufficiently low but also that a suitably tailored temperature profile be provided at the combustor exit, with higher temperatures generally permissible at the blade tip than at the blade root because of higher centrifugal loads at the root. Flows in reverse flow combustor accelerate both longitudinally because of area changes and transversely because of flow turning. The current project started with flow visualization experiments in water, using aqueous solutions of zinc bromide to model the relatively higher density of cooling jets.

  15. Micro-combustor for gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Scott M.

    2010-11-30

    An improved gas turbine combustor (20) including a basket (26) and a multiplicity of micro openings (29) arrayed across an inlet wall (27) for passage of a fuel/air mixture for ignition within the combustor. The openings preferably have a diameter on the order of the quenching diameter; i.e. the port diameter for which the flame is self-extinguishing, which is a function of the fuel mixture, temperature and pressure. The basket may have a curved rectangular shape that approximates the shape of the curved rectangular shape of the intake manifolds of the turbine.

  16. Variable volume combustor with aerodynamic support struts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostebee, Heath Michael; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Stewart, Jason Thurman; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-03-07

    The present application provides a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles and a fuel injection system for providing a flow of fuel to the micro-mixer fuel nozzles. The fuel injection system may include a number of support struts supporting the fuel nozzles and providing the flow of fuel therethrough. The support struts may include an aerodynamic contoured shape so as to distribute evenly a flow of air to the micro-mixer fuel nozzles.

  17. Disk and wind interaction in the young stellar object MWC 297 spatially resolved with VLTI/AMBER

    CERN Document Server

    Malbet, F; De Wit, W J; Kraus, S; Meilland, A; Millour, F; Tatulli, E; Berger, J P; Chesneau, O; Hofmann, Karl Heinrich; Isella, A; Natta, A; Petrov, R; Preibisch, T; Stee, P; Testi, L; Weigelt, G; Antonelli, P; Beckmann, U; Bresson, Y; Chelli, A; Duvert, G; Gluck, L; Kern, P; Lagarde, S; Le Coarer, E; Lisi, F; Perraut, K; Robbe-Dubois, S; Roussel, A; Zins, G; Accardo, M; Acke, B; Agabi, K; Arezki, B; Aristidi, E; Baffa, C; Behrend, J; Blöcker, T; Bonhomme, S; Busoni, S; Cassaing, F; Clausse, J M; Colin, J; Connot, C; Delboulbé, A; Driebe, T; Dugué, M; Feautrier, P; Ferruzzi, D; Forveille, T; Fossat, E; Foy, R; Fraix-Burnet, D; Gallardo, A; Gennari, S; Glentzlin, A; Giani, E; Gil, C; Heiden, M; Heininger, M; Kamm, D; Le Contel, D; Le Contel, J M; López, B; Magnard, Y; Marconi, A; Mars, G; Martinot-Lagarde, G; Mathias, P; Monin, J L; Mouillet, D; Mourard, D; Mege, P; Nussbaum, E; Ohnaka, K; Pacheco, J; Pacini, F; Perrier, C; Puget, P; Rabbia, Y; Rebattu, S; Reynaud, F; Richichi, A; Sacchettini, M; Salinari, P; Schertl, D; Solscheid, W; Stefanini, P; Tallon, M; Tallon-Bosc, I; Tasso, D; Valtier, J C; Vannier, M; Ventura, N; Kiekebusch, M; Rantakyro, F; Schöller, M

    2005-01-01

    The young stellar object MWC 297 has been observed with the VLT interferometer equipped with the AMBER instrument. MWC 297 has been spatially resolved in the continuum with a visibility of 0.50 as well as in the Br gamma emission line where the visibility decrease to a lower value of 0.33. This change in the visibility with the wavelength can be interpreted by the presence of an optically thick disk responsible for the visibility in the continuum and of a stellar wind traced by Br gamma and whose apparent size is 40% larger. We validate this interpretation by building a model of the stellar environment that combines a geometrically thin, optically thick accretion disk model consisting of gas and dust, and a latitude-dependent stellar wind outflowing above the disk surface. The continuum emission and visibilities obtained from this model are fully consistent with the interferometric AMBER data. They agree also with existing optical, near-infrared spectra and other broad-band near-infrared interferometric visib...

  18. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: Evidence for radiative heating in Serpens MWC 297 and its influence on local star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Rumble, D; Gutermuth, R A; Kirk, H; Buckle, J; Beaulieu, S F; Berry, D S; Broekhoven-Fiene, H; Currie, M J; Fich, M; Jenness, T; Johnstone, D; Mottram, J C; Nutter, D; Pattle, K; Pineda, J E; Quinn, C; Salji, C; Tisi, S; Walker-Smith, S; Di Francesco, J; Hogerheijde, M R; Ward-Thompson, D; Allen, L E; Cieza, L A; Dunham, M M; Harvey, P M; Stapelfeldt, K R; Bastien, P; Butner, H; Chen, M; Chrysostomou, A; Coude, S; Davis, C J; Drabek-Maunder, E; Duarte-Cabral, A; Fiege, J; Friberg, P; Friesen, R; Fuller, G A; Graves, S; Greaves, J; Gregson, J; Holland, W; Joncas, G; Kirk, J M; Knee, L B G; Mairs, S; Marsh, K; Matthews, B C; Moriarty-Schieven, G; Rawlings, J; Richer, J; Robertson, D; Rosolowsky, E; Sadavoy, S; Thomas, H; Tothill, N; Viti, S; White, G J; Wilson, C D; Wouterloot, J; Yates, J; Zhu, M

    2014-01-01

    We present SCUBA-2 450\\mu m and 850\\mu m observations of the Serpens MWC 297 region, part of the JCMT Gould Belt Survey of nearby star-forming regions. Simulations suggest that radiative feedback influences the star-formation process and we investigate observational evidence for this by constructing temperature maps. Maps are derived from the ratio of SCUBA-2 fluxes and a two component model of the JCMT beam for a fixed dust opacity spectral index of beta = 1.8. Within 40 of the B1.5Ve Herbig star MWC 297, the submillimetre fluxes are contaminated by free-free emission with a spectral index of 1.03\\pm0.02, consistent with an ultra-compact HII region and polar winds/jets. Contamination accounts for 73\\pm5 per cent and 82\\pm4 per cent of peak flux at 450\\mu m and 850\\mu m respectively. The residual thermal disk of the star is almost undetectable at these wavelengths. Young Stellar Objects are confirmed where SCUBA-2 850\\mu m clumps identified by the fellwalker algorithm coincide with Spitzer Gould Belt Survey d...

  19. The gamma-ray source AGL J2241+4454 as the possible counterpart of MWC 656

    CERN Document Server

    Munar-Adrover, P; Piano, G; Tavani, M; Nguyen, L H; Lucarelli, F; Verrecchia, F; Pittori, C

    2016-01-01

    The AGILE satellite discovered the transient source AGL J2241+4454 in 2010 which triggered the study of the associated field allowing for the discovery of the first Be/black hole binary system: MWC 656. This binary was suggested to be the counterpart of AGL J2241+4454, but this is still not a firm association. In this work we explore the archival AGILE and Fermi/LAT data in order to find more transient events originating in the field of AGL J2241+4454 and address the possibility to link them to the accretion/ejection processes of MWC 656. We found a total of 9 other transient events with AGILE compatible with the position of AGL J2241+4454, besides the one from 2010. We folded this events with the period of the binary system and we did not find significant results that allow us to associate the gamma-ray activity to any particular orbital phase. By stacking the 10 transient events we obtained a spectrum that extends between 100 MeV and 1 GeV, and we fitted it with a power law with photon index {\\Gamma} = 2.3 ...

  20. The 2016 outburst of the unique symbiotic star MWC 560 (= V694 Mon), its long-term BVRI evolution and a marked 331 days periodicity

    CERN Document Server

    Munari, U; Castellani, F; Baldinelli, L; Righetti, G L; Graziani, M; Cherini, G; Maitan, A; Moretti, S; Tomaselli, S; Frigo, A

    2016-01-01

    After 26 years from the major event of 1990, in early 2016 the puzzling symbiotic binary MWC 560 has gone into a new and even brighter outburst. We present our tight BVRI photometric monitoring of MWC 560 (451 independent runs distributed over 357 different nights), covering the 2005-2016 interval, and the current outburst in particoular. A stricking feature of the 2016 outburst has been the suppression of the short term chaotic variability during the rise toward maximum brightness, and its dominance afterward with an amplitude in excess of 0.5 mag. Similar to the 1990 event when the object remained around maximum brightness for ~6 months, at the time Solar conjunction prevented further observations of the current outburst, MWC 560 was still around maximum, three months past reaching it. We place our observations into a long term contex by combining with literature data to provide a complete 1928-2016 lightcurve. Some strong periodicities are found to modulate the optical photometry of MWC 560. A period of 18...

  1. Combustion of biomass-derived, low caloric value, fuel gas in a gasturbine combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andries, J.; Hoppesteyn, P.D.J.; Hein, K.R.G. [Technische Univ. Delf (Netherlands)

    1998-09-01

    The use of biomass and biomass/coal mixtures to produce electricity and heat reduces the net emissions of CO{sub 2}, contributes to the restructuring of the agricultural sector, helps to reduce the waste problem and saves finite fossil fuel reserves. Pressurised fluidised bed gasification followed by an adequate gas cleaning system, a gas turbine and a steam turbine, is a potential attractive way to convert biomass and biomass/coal mixtures. To develop and validate mathematical models, which can be used to design and operate Biomass-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (BIGCC) systems, a Process Development Unit (PPDU) with a maximum thermal capacity of 1.5 MW{sub th}, located at the Laboratory for Thermal Power Engineering of the Delft University of Technology in The Netherlands is being used. The combustor forms an integral part of this facility. Recirculated flue gas is used to cool the wall of the combustor. (orig.)

  2. Co-combustion of agricultural residues with coal in a fluidized bed combustor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, W A W A K; Alias, A B; Savory, R M; Cliffe, K R

    2009-02-01

    Power generation from biomass is an attractive technology that utilizes agricultural residual waste. In order to explain the behavior of biomass-fired fluidized bed incinerator, biomass sources from agricultural residues (rice husk and palm kernel) were co-fired with coal in a 0.15m diameter and 2.3m high fluidized bed combustor. The combustion efficiency and carbon monoxide emissions were studied and compared with those for pure coal combustion. Co-combustion of a mixture of biomass with coal in a fluidized bed combustor designed for coal combustion increased combustion efficiency up to 20% depending upon excess air levels. Observed carbon monoxide levels fluctuated between 200 and 900 ppm with the addition of coal. It is evident from this research that efficient co-firing of biomass with coal can be achieved with minimal modifications to existing coal-fired boilers.

  3. Syngas combustor for fluidized bed applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brushwood, J.

    1999-07-01

    The Siemens Westinghouse Multi-Annular Swirl Burner (MASB) is a rich-quench-lean gas turbine combustor for use primarily on synthetic fuel gases made by gasifying solid fuels (coal or biomass). These fuels contain high amounts of fuel bound nitrogen, primarily as ammonia, which are converted to molecular nitrogen rather than to nitrogen oxides in the rich zone of this combustor. The combustor can operate in many modes. In second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) applications, the fuel gas is burned in a hot, depleted oxygen air stream generated in a fluid bed coal combustor. In 1-1/2 generation PFBC applications, natural gas is burned in this vitiated air stream. In an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) application, the synthetic fuel gas is burned in turbine compressor air. In this paper, the MASB technology is described. Recent results of tests at the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) for these various operation modes on a full scale basket are summarized. The start-up and simple cycle operating experience on propane at the Wilsonville Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) are also described. In addition, the design issues related to the integration of the MASB in the City of Lakeland PCFB Clean Coal Demonstration Project is summarized.

  4. Thermal Imaging Control of Furnaces and Combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David M. Rue; Serguei Zelepouga; Ishwar K. Puri

    2003-02-28

    The object if this project is to demonstrate and bring to commercial readiness a near-infrared thermal imaging control system for high temperature furnaces and combustors. The thermal imaging control system, including hardware, signal processing, and control software, is designed to be rugged, self-calibrating, easy to install, and relatively transparent to the furnace operator.

  5. Computation of Three-Dimensional Combustor Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivatsa, S.

    1985-01-01

    Existing steady-state 3-D computer program for calculating gasturbine flow fields modified to include computation of soot and nitrogen oxide emission. In addition, radiation calculation corrected for soot particles. These advanced tools offer potential of reducing design and development time required for gas-turbine combustors.

  6. Core/Combustor Noise - Research Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2017-01-01

    Contributions from the combustor to the overall propulsion noise of civilian transport aircraft are starting to become important due to turbofan design trends and advances in mitigation of other noise sources. Future propulsion systems for ultra-efficient commercial air vehicles are projected to be of increasingly higher bypass ratio from larger fans combined with much smaller cores, with ultra-clean burning fuel-flexible combustors. Unless effective noise-reduction strategies are developed, combustor noise is likely to become a prominent contributor to overall airport community noise in the future. This presentation gives a brief overview of the NASA outlook on pertinent issues and far-term research needs as well as current and planned research in the core/combustor-noise area. The research described herein is aligned with the NASA Ultra-Efficient Commercial Transport strategic thrust and is supported by the NASA Advanced Air Vehicle Program, Advanced Air Transport Technology Project, under the Aircraft Noise Reduction Subproject. The overarching goal of the Advanced Air Transport Technology (AATT) Project is to explore and develop technologies and concepts to revolutionize the energy efficiency and environmental compatibility of fixed wing transport aircrafts. These technological solutions are critical in reducing the impact of aviation on the environment even as this industry and the corresponding global transportation system continue to grow.

  7. The demonstration of an advanced cyclone coal combustor, with internal sulfur, nitrogen, and ash control for the conversion of a 23 MMBTU/hour oil fired boiler to pulverized coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zauderer, B.; Fleming, E.S.

    1991-08-30

    This work contains to the final report of the demonstration of an advanced cyclone coal combustor. Titles include: Chronological Description of the Clean Coal Project Tests,'' Statistical Analysis of Operating Data for the Coal Tech Combustor,'' Photographic History of the Project,'' Results of Slag Analysis by PA DER Module 1 Procedure,'' Properties of the Coals Limestone Used in the Test Effort,'' Results of the Solid Waste Sampling Performed on the Coal Tech Combustor by an Independent Contractor During the February 1990 Tests.'' (VC)

  8. Waste combustion as a source of ambient air polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrzykowska-Ceradini, Barbara; Gullett, Brian K.; Tabor, Dennis; Touati, Abderrahmane

    2011-08-01

    The first comprehensive set of U.S. data on polybrominated diphenylether (PBDE) concentrations from municipal waste combustion (MWC), with more than 40 PBDE congeners reported, was compared to ambient air levels of PBDEs in the U.S. The PBDE profiles in the raw MWC flue gas reflected the historical production and usage pattern of PBDE-based flame retardants in North America, which favored Penta- and Deca- BDE formulations. The pattern of selected, routinely measured in the environment, PBDEs (TeBDE-47, PeBDE-99, PeBDE-100, HxBDE-153 and DcBDE-209) was similar in the MWC emissions and profiles most commonly reported for the U.S. atmosphere. The mean Σ PBDE concentrations in the clean flue gases collected from the stack were 0.13 and 1.7 ng dscm -1 during the steady state and transients of MWC, respectively (which was 98.6% reduction compare to the levels in the raw flue gases). The major PBDE congeners in the MWC flue gases were those typically found in PBDE technical mixes (TeBDE-47, PeBDE-99, PeBDE-100, HxBDE-153, HpBDE-183, OcBDE-197, NoBDE-206, NoBDE-207, NoBDE-208, DcBDE-209). The profile of the PBDEs in the raw flue gas was dominated by heavier congeners, especially DcBDE-209, while the profile of the stack flue gases profile was dominated by the lighter congeners (TeBDE-47, PeBDE-99, PeBDE-100 accounted for around 80% of total stack emissions). Some of the MWC flue gas samples exhibited enrichment of lower brominated congeners that are minor or not present in the technical mixtures, suggesting that debromination occurs during combustion. Congeners substituted in non- and mono- ortho positions (TeBDE-77, PeBDE-126, HxBDE-156 and -169) were detected mostly during the transients of MWC.

  9. The Gamma-Ray Source AGL J2241+4454 as the Possible Counterpart of MWC 656

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munar-Adrover, Pere; Sabatini, S.; Piano, Giovanni; Tavani, Marco; Nguyen, L. H.; Lucarelli, F.; Verrecchia, F.; Pittori, C.

    2016-10-01

    AGILE discovered the transient source AGL J2241+4454 in 2010, which triggered the study of the associated field allowing for the discovery of the first Be/black hole binary system: MWC 656. This binary was suggested to be the counterpart of AGL J2241+4454, but this association is still not robust. In this work we explore the archival AGILE and Fermi/Large Area Telescope (LAT) data to find more transient events compatible with AGL J2241+4454 and address the possibility to link them to the accretion/ejection processes of MWC 656. We found a total of nine other transient events with AGILE compatible with the position of AGL J2241+4454, besides the 2010 one. We folded these events with the period of the binary system and we could not associate the gamma-ray activity with any particular orbital phase. By stacking the 10 transient events we obtained a spectrum that extends between 100 MeV and 1 GeV, and we fitted it with a power law with a photon index {{Γ }}=2.3+/- 0.2. We searched the Fermi/LAT data in order to complement the gamma-ray information provided by AGILE but no significant results arose. To investigate this apparent contradiction between these telescopes, we studied the exposure of the field of AGL J2241+4454 in both instruments, and found significant differences. In particular, AGILE exposed, for a longer time and at a lower off-axis angular distance, the field of AGL J2241+4454. This fact, together with the energy-dependent sensitivity of both instruments, and the soft spectrum found in the stacking analysis, might explain why AGILE observed the transient events not seen by Fermi/LAT.

  10. Assumed PDF modeling in rocket combustor simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempke, M.; Gerlinger, P.; Aigner, M.

    2013-03-01

    In order to account for the interaction between turbulence and chemistry, a multivariate assumed PDF (Probability Density Function) approach is used to simulate a model rocket combustor with finite-rate chemistry. The reported test case is the PennState preburner combustor with a single shear coaxial injector. Experimental data for the wall heat flux is available for this configuration. Unsteady RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes) simulation results with and without the assumed PDF approach are analyzed and compared with the experimental data. Both calculations show a good agreement with the experimental wall heat flux data. Significant changes due to the utilization of the assumed PDF approach can be observed in the radicals, e. g., the OH mass fraction distribution, while the effect on the wall heat flux is insignificant.

  11. Operational Characteristics of an Ultra Compact Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Combustion simulator generated temperature profiles and b) commercial engine combustor temperature profiles [30]. Samuelson [31] describes why...better suited to handle the elevated heat flux. Thus, the desired temperature profile is skewed towards the OD. Samuelson [31] further defines both...backward facing step (Figure 2.30b) delivered the most desirable exit profile per Samuelson [31] and was utilized by 53 Zelina [10]. The downward angled

  12. Near-zero emissions combustor system for syngas and biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongho, Kim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rosocha, Louis [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    A multi-institutional plasma combustion team was awarded a research project from the DOE/NNSA GIPP (Global Initiative for Prolifereation Prevention) office. The Institute of High Current Electronics (Tomsk, Russia); Leonardo Technologies, Inc. (an American-based industrial partner), in conjunction with the Los Alamos National Laboratory are participating in the project to develop novel plasma assisted combustion technologies. The purpose of this project is to develop prototypes of marketable systems for more stable and cleaner combustion of syngas/biofuels and to demonstrate that this technology can be used for a variety of combustion applications - with a major focus on contemporary gas turbines. In this paper, an overview of the project, along with descriptions of the plasma-based combustors and associated power supplies will be presented. Worldwide, it is recognized that a variety of combustion fuels will be required to meet the needs for supplying gas-turbine engines (electricity generation, propulsion), internal combustion engines (propulsion, transportation), and burners (heat and electricity generation) in the 21st Century. Biofuels and biofuel blends have already been applied to these needs, but experience difficulties in modifications to combustion processes and combustor design and the need for flame stabilization techniques to address current and future environmental and energy-efficiency challenges. In addition, municipal solid waste (MSW) has shown promise as a feedstock for heat and/or electricity-generating plants. However, current combustion techniques that use such fuels have problems with achieving environmentally-acceptable air/exhaust emissions and can also benefit from increased combustion efficiency. This project involves a novel technology (a form of plasma-assisted combustion) that can address the above issues. Plasma-assisted combustion (PAC) is a growing field that is receiving worldwide attention at present. The project is focused on

  13. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laster, W. R.; Anoshkina, E.

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1- Implementation Plan, Phase 2- Validation Testing and Phase 3 – Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  14. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1 - Implementation Plan, Phase 2 - Validation Testing and Phase 3 - Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  15. Apparatus and method for cooling a combustor cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Baifang; Washam, Roy Marshall; Wu, Chunyang

    2014-04-29

    A combustor includes an end cap having a perforated downstream plate and a combustion chamber downstream of the downstream plate. A plenum is in fluid communication with the downstream plate and supplies a cooling medium to the combustion chamber through the perforations in the downstream plate. A method for cooling a combustor includes flowing a cooling medium into a combustor end cap and impinging the cooling medium on a downstream plate in the combustor end cap. The method further includes flowing the cooling medium into a combustion chamber through perforations in the downstream plate.

  16. 75 FR 48743 - Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... tons of CO 2 equivalents MVC molar volume conversion factor MWC municipal waste combustor NESHAP... North American Industry Classification System NGLs natural gas liquids O 2 oxygen O&M operation and.... Finally, the last (third) section discusses the various statutory and executive order requirements...

  17. Utilization of ash from municipal solid waste combustion. Final report, Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, C.M.; Hartman, R.M.; Kort, D.; Rapues, N.

    1994-09-01

    This ash study investigates several aspects of Municipal Waste Combustion (MWC) ash utilization to develop an alternative to the present disposal practice of landfilling in a lined monofill. Ash was investigated as a daily or final cover for municipal waste in the landfill to prevent erosion and as a road construction aggregate. Samples of eight mixtures of ash and other materials, and one sample of soil were analyzed for chemical constituents. Biological tests on these mixters were conducted, along with erosion tests and sieve analyses. A chemical analysis of each sieve size was conducted. Geotechnical properties of the most promising materials were made. Findings to this point include: all ash samples take have passed the EPA TCLP testing; chemical analysis of bottom and combined ash samples indicate less than expected variability; selected ash mixtures exhibited very low coefficients of hydraulic conductivity; all but one of the ash mixtures exhibited greater erosion resistance than the currently used landfill cover material; MWC combined analysis indicates this is a viable alternative for landfill cover; MWC ash size reactions and chemical analysis show bottom and combined ash to be a viable alternative for road construction.

  18. Compliance with the new emissions guidelines for existing municipal waste combustion facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, J.P.; Wofford, J. [Burns and McDonnell Engineering, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The EPA proposed air emission guidelines for existing Municipal Waste Combustion (MWC) facilities on December 20, 1989. The regulation, 40 CFR Subpart Ca, was eventually issued on February 11, 1991, but Section 129 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 required the EPA to review and revise the regulations. On October 31, 1995, Subpart Ca was withdrawn and replaced by a more stringent regulation, 40 CFR Subpart Cb. The new guidelines apply to all existing MWC facilities for which construction began before September 20, 1994 and have a capacity to combust over 35 megagrams per day. Most facilities will be required to be in compliance with the new regulations four years from the date Subpart Cb was issued, or by December 19, 1999. Subpart Cb requires significant capital expenditures and increases in operating costs. The major modifications EPA based the guidelines on are summarized. Pollutants of concern include sulfur dioxide, hydrochloric acid, dioxin/furans, metals, particulates, nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide.

  19. The 2016 outburst of the unique symbiotic star MWC 560 (= V694 Mon), its long-term BVRI evolution and a marked 331 days periodicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munari, U.; Dallaporta, S.; Castellani, F.; Baldinelli, L.; Righetti, G. L.; Graziani, M.; Cherini, G.; Maitan, A.; Moretti, S.; Tomaselli, S.; Frigo, A.

    2016-11-01

    After 26 years from the major event of 1990, in early 2016 the puzzling symbiotic binary MWC 560 has gone into a new and even brighter outburst. We present our tight BVRCIC photometric monitoring of MWC 560 (451 independent runs distributed over 357 different nights), covering the 2005-2016 interval, and the current outburst in particoular. A stricking feature of the 2016 outburst has been the suppression of the short term chaotic variability during the rise toward maximum brightness, and its dominance afterward with an amplitude in excess of 0.5 mag. Similar to the 1990 event when the object remained around maximum brightness for ∼6 months, at the time Solar conjunction prevented further observations of the current outburst, MWC 560 was still around maximum, three months past reaching it. We place our observations into a long term contex by combining with literature data to provide a complete 1928-2016 lightcurve. Some strong periodicities are found to modulate the optical photometry of MWC 560. A period of 1860 days regulate the occourence of bright phases at BVRC bands (with exactly 5.0 cycles separating the 1990 and 2016 outbursts), while the peak brightness attained during bright phases seems to vary with a ∼9570 days cycle. A clean 331 day periodicity modulate the IC lightcurve, where the emission from the M giant dominates, with a lightcurve strongly reminiscent of an ellipsoidal distortion plus irradiation from the hot companion. Pros and cons of 1860 and 331 days as the system orbital period are reviewed, waiting for a spectroscopic radial velocity orbit of the M giant to settle the question (provided the orbit is not oriented face-on).

  20. Detection of an inner gaseous component in a Herbig Be star accretion disk: Near- and mid-infrared spectro-interferometry and radiative transfer modeling of MWC 147

    CERN Document Server

    Kraus, Stefan; Ohnaka, Keiichi

    2007-01-01

    We study the geometry and the physical conditions in the inner (AU-scale) circumstellar region around the young Herbig Be star MWC 147 using long-baseline spectro-interferometry in the near-infrared (NIR K-band, VLTI/AMBER observations and PTI archive data) as well as the mid-infrared (MIR N-band, VLTI/MIDIobservations). The emission from MWC 147 is clearly resolved and has a characteristic physical size of approx. 1.3 AU and 9 AU at 2.2 micron and 11 micron respectively (Gaussian diameter). The spectrally dispersed AMBER and MIDI interferograms both show a strong increase in the characteristic size towards longer wavelengths, much steeper than predicted by analytic disk models assuming power-law radial temperature distributions. We model the interferometric data and the spectral energy distribution of MWC 147 with 2-D, frequency-dependent radiation transfer simulations. This analysis shows that models of spherical envelopes or passive irradiated Keplerian disks (with vertical or curved puffed-up inner rim) c...

  1. Variable volume combustor with nested fuel manifold system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin; Keener, Christopher Paul; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ostebee, Heath Michael

    2016-09-13

    The present application provides a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles, a fuel manifold system in communication with the micro-mixer fuel nozzles to deliver a flow of fuel thereto, and a linear actuator to maneuver the micro-mixer fuel nozzles and the fuel manifold system.

  2. Variable volume combustor with pre-nozzle fuel injection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keener, Christopher Paul; Johnson, Thomas Edward; McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin; Ostebee, Heath Michael

    2016-09-06

    The present application provides a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of fuel nozzles, a pre-nozzle fuel injection system supporting the fuel nozzles, and a linear actuator to maneuver the fuel nozzles and the pre-nozzle fuel injection system.

  3. Gas turbine combustor insensitive to compressor outlet distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humenik, F.; Norgren, C. T.

    1970-01-01

    Short-length annular combustor for turbojet engines eliminates change of exit temperature profile. Individual scoops of full annular height control air distribution so that shifts in the radial velocity profile of air entering the combustor will not affect combustion process or alter exit temperature profile.

  4. Combustor nozzle for a fuel-flexible combustion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Joel Meier [Niskayuna, NY; Mosbacher, David Matthew [Cohoes, NY; Janssen, Jonathan Sebastian [Troy, NY; Iyer, Venkatraman Ananthakrishnan [Mason, OH

    2011-03-22

    A combustor nozzle is provided. The combustor nozzle includes a first fuel system configured to introduce a syngas fuel into a combustion chamber to enable lean premixed combustion within the combustion chamber and a second fuel system configured to introduce the syngas fuel, or a hydrocarbon fuel, or diluents, or combinations thereof into the combustion chamber to enable diffusion combustion within the combustion chamber.

  5. System and method for reducing combustion dynamics in a combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Srinivasan, Shiva; York, William David

    2016-11-29

    A system for reducing combustion dynamics in a combustor includes an end cap that extends radially across the combustor and includes an upstream surface axially separated from a downstream surface. A combustion chamber is downstream of the end cap, and tubes extend from the upstream surface through the downstream surface. Each tube provides fluid communication through the end cap to the combustion chamber. The system further includes means for reducing combustion dynamics in the combustor. A method for reducing combustion dynamics in a combustor includes flowing a working fluid through tubes that extend axially through an end cap that extends radially across the combustor and obstructing at least a portion of the working fluid flowing through a first set of the tubes.

  6. Numerical investigation of recirculation in the UTSI MHD combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, R.J.; Lee, J.J.; Giel, T.V. Jr.

    1983-09-01

    Numerical studies were carried out to investigate the gross structure of flow in cylindrical combustors. The combustor configurations studied are variations of a working design used at the University of Tennessee Space Institute to burn pulverized coal at temperatures in excess of 3000K for generation of a plasma feeding a magnetohydrodynamic channel. The numerical studies were conducted for an isothermal fluid; the main objective of the calculations was to study the effect of the oxidant injection pattern on the gross structure of recirculating flows within the combustor. The calculations illustrate the basic features of the flow in combustors of this type and suggest implications for the injection of coal and oxidizer in this type of combustor.

  7. System and method for reducing combustion dynamics in a combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Srinivasan, Shiva; York, William David

    2016-11-29

    A system for reducing combustion dynamics in a combustor includes an end cap that extends radially across the combustor and includes an upstream surface axially separated from a downstream surface. A combustion chamber is downstream of the end cap, and tubes extend from the upstream surface through the downstream surface. Each tube provides fluid communication through the end cap to the combustion chamber. The system further includes means for reducing combustion dynamics in the combustor. A method for reducing combustion dynamics in a combustor includes flowing a working fluid through tubes that extend axially through an end cap that extends radially across the combustor and obstructing at least a portion of the working fluid flowing through a first set of the tubes.

  8. Pulse Combustor Design, A DOE Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2003-07-31

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) program is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This document serves as a DOE post-project assessment (PPA) of a project selected in CCT Round IV, the Pulse Combustor Design Qualification Test, as described in a Report to Congress (U.S. Department of Energy 1992). Pulse combustion is a method intended to increase the heat-transfer rate in a fired heater. The desire to demonstrate the use of pulse combustion as a source of heat for the gasification of coal, thus avoiding the need for an oxygen plant, prompted ThermoChem, Inc. (TCI), to submit a proposal for this project. In October 1992, TCI entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to conduct this project. In 1998, the project was restructured and scaled down, and in September 1998, a new cooperative agreement was signed. The site of the revised project was TCI's facilities in Baltimore, Maryland. The original purpose of this CCT project was to demonstrate a unit that would employ ten identical 253-resonance tube combustors in a coal gasification unit. The objective of the scaled-down project was to test a single 253-resonance-tube combustor in a fluidized sand bed, with gasification being studied in a process development unit (PDU). DOE provided 50 percent of the total project funding of $8.6 million. The design for the demonstration unit was completed in February 1999, and construction was completed in November 2000. Operations were conducted in March 2001.

  9. Combustor nozzles in gas turbine engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Keener, Christopher Paul; Stewart, Jason Thurman; Ostebee, Heath Michael

    2017-09-12

    A micro-mixer nozzle for use in a combustor of a combustion turbine engine, the micro-mixer nozzle including: a fuel plenum defined by a shroud wall connecting a periphery of a forward tube sheet to a periphery of an aft tubesheet; a plurality of mixing tubes extending across the fuel plenum for mixing a supply of compressed air and fuel, each of the mixing tubes forming a passageway between an inlet formed through the forward tubesheet and an outlet formed through the aft tubesheet; and a wall mixing tube formed in the shroud wall.

  10. Fuel Flexible, Low Emission Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuel Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eteman, Shahrokh

    2013-06-30

    Limited fuel resources, increasing energy demand and stringent emission regulations are drivers to evaluate process off-gases or process waste streams as fuels for power generation. Often these process waste streams have low energy content and/or highly reactive components. Operability of low energy content fuels in gas turbines leads to issues such as unstable and incomplete combustion. On the other hand, fuels containing higher-order hydrocarbons lead to flashback and auto-ignition issues. Due to above reasons, these fuels cannot be used directly without modifications or efficiency penalties in gas turbine engines. To enable the use of these wide variety of fuels in gas turbine engines a rich catalytic lean burn (RCL®) combustion system was developed and tested in a subscale high pressure (10 atm.) rig. The RCL® injector provided stability and extended turndown to low Btu fuels due to catalytic pre-reaction. Previous work has shown promise with fuels such as blast furnace gas (BFG) with LHV of 85 Btu/ft3 successfully combusted. This program extends on this work by further modifying the combustor to achieve greater catalytic stability enhancement. Fuels containing low energy content such as weak natural gas with a Lower Heating Value (LHV) of 6.5 MJ/m3 (180 Btu/ft3 to natural gas fuels containing higher hydrocarbon (e.g ethane) with LHV of 37.6 MJ/m3 (1010 Btu/ft3) were demonstrated with improved combustion stability; an extended turndown (defined as the difference between catalytic and non-catalytic lean blow out) of greater than 250oF was achieved with CO and NOx emissions lower than 5 ppm corrected to 15% O2. In addition, for highly reactive fuels the catalytic region preferentially pre-reacted the higher order hydrocarbons with no events of flashback or auto-ignition allowing a stable and safe operation with low NOx and CO emissions.

  11. 40 CFR 63.1220 - What are the replacement standards for hazardous waste burning cement kilns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... hazardous waste burning cement kilns? 63.1220 Section 63.1220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Waste Combustors Replacement Emissions Standards and Operating Limits for Incinerators, Cement Kilns... burning cement kilns? (a) Emission and hazardous waste feed limits for existing sources. You must...

  12. 78 FR 72581 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerator Negative Declaration for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 62 Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerator Negative... negative declarations from Michigan and Wisconsin regarding Hospital/Medical/ Infectious Waste Incinerator...) requirements to existing solid waste combustors, including HMIWIs, and provide that EPA should include, as...

  13. Energy recovery from heavy ASR by co-incineration in a fluidized bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermeulen, Isabel; Caneghem, Jo van; Block, Chantal; Vandecasteele, Carlo [University of Leuven, Department of Chemical Engineering, Leuven (Belgium); Brecht, Andres van; Wauters, Guido [Indaver NV, Mechelen (Belgium)

    2012-10-15

    Automotive shredder residue (ASR) is a heterogeneous waste stream with varying particle size and elemental composition. Owing to its complexity and hazardous characteristics, landfilling of ASR is still a common practice. Nevertheless, incineration with energy recovery of certain ASR fractions (Waste-to-Energy, WtE) emerges as an interesting alternative. In a full scale experiment, a waste mix of 25 % heavy ASR, 25 % refuse derived fuel (RDF), and 50 % waste water treatment (WWT) sludge was incinerated in the SLECO fluidized bed combustor (FBC) at the Indaver site in Antwerp, Belgium. Input and output streams were sampled and analyzed to make an inventory of the most important pollutants and toxics. The inventory was further used to determine the environmental impact. Results are compared to those of two other scenarios: incineration of the usual waste feed (70 % RDF and 30 % WWT sludge) and co-incineration of 39 % ASR with 61 % WWT sludge. It can be concluded that co-incineration of heavy ASR in an existing FBC is a valid and clean technology to increase current reuse and recovery rates. In the considered FBC, 27 % of the energetic value of ASR can be recovered, while all emissions remain well below regulatory limits and only 12.6 % of the heavy ASR needs to be landfilled. The proportion of ASR in the input waste mix is however limited by the heavy metal concentration in the ASR and the generated ashes. (orig.)

  14. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    This appendix provides information on fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) technology as it has been applied to municipal waste combustion (MWC). A review of the literature was conducted to determine: (1) to what extent FBC technology has been applied to MWC, in terms of number and size of units was well as technology configuration; (2) the operating history of facilities employing FBC technology; and (3) the cost of these facilities as compared to conventional MSW installations. Where available in the literature, data on operating and performance characteristics are presented. Tabular comparisons of facility operating/cost data and emissions data have been complied and are presented. The literature review shows that FBC technology shows considerable promise in terms of providing improvements over conventional technology in areas such as NOx and acid gas control, and ash leachability. In addition, the most likely configuration to be applied to the first large scale FBC dedicated to municipal solid waste (MSW) will employ circulating bed (CFB) technology. Projected capital costs for the Robbins, Illinois 1600 ton per day CFB-based waste-to-energy facility are competitive with conventional systems, in the range of $125,000 per ton per day of MSW receiving capacity.

  15. Hydrodynamics in atmospheric fluidized bed coal combustors. Fluodinamica en combustores atmosfericos de carbon en lecho fluidizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adanez, J.; Abanades, J.C.; Fernandez, I. (Instituto de Carboquimica, Zaragoza (Spain))

    1990-01-01

    The different flow regimes present in an atmospheric fluidized bed coal combustor have been analyzed depending on working conditions (u, {rho}{sub s}, h{sub bed}). The minimum fluidizing velocity u{sub mf} is a basic parameter for these analyses. Also, there is a great discrepancy between the equations proposed by different workers, for calculating u{sub mf} in the usual conditions of operation in combustors of this kind. By this, the experimental u{sub mf} of limestone and partially sulphated lime has been determined at ambient temperature and 850{degree}C. In plots u vs d{sub p}, maps of flow have been constructed recognizing the different regions and flow regimes. Also, the effect of {rho} {sub s} and bed height over these maps of flow has been analyzed. 16 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Process for Operating a Dual-Mode Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trefny, Charles J. (Inventor); Dippold, Vance F. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A new dual-mode ramjet combustor used for operation over a wide flight Mach number range is described. Subsonic combustion mode is usable to lower flight Mach numbers than current dual-mode scramjets. High speed mode is characterized by supersonic combustion in a free-jet that traverses the subsonic combustion chamber to a variable nozzle throat. Although a variable combustor exit aperture is required, the need for fuel staging to accommodate the combustion process is eliminated. Local heating from shock-boundary-layer interactions on combustor walls is also eliminated.

  17. Non-linear dynamics in pulse combustor: A review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sirshendu Mondal; Achintya Kukhopadhyay; Swarnendu Sen

    2015-03-01

    The state of the art of non-linear dynamics applied to pulse combustor theoretically and experimentally is reviewed. Pulse combustors are a class of air-breathing engines in which pulsations in combustion are utilized to improve the performance. As no analytical solution can be obtained for most of the nonlinear systems, the whole set of solutions can be investigated with the help of dynamical system theory. Many studies have been carried out on pulse combustors whose dynamics include limit cycle behaviour, Hopf bifurcation and period-doubling bifurcation. The dynamic signature has also been used for early prediction of extinction.

  18. Induction time effects in pulse combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, J B; Marcus, D L; Pember, R B

    1999-04-09

    Combustion systems that take advantage of a periodic combustion process have many advantages over conventional systems. Their rate of heat transfer is greatly enhanced and their pollutant emissions are lower. They draw in their own supply of fuel and air and they are self-venting. They have few moving parts. The most common type of pulse combustor is based on a Helmholtz resonator - a burning cycle drives a resonant pressure wave, which in turn enhances the rate of combustion, resulting in a self-sustaining, large-scale oscillation. Although the basic physical mechanisms controlling such a process were explained by Rayleigh over a century ago, a full understanding of the operation of a pulse combustor still does not exist. The dominant processes in such a system--combustion, turbulent fluid dynamics, acoustics--are highly coupled and interact nonlinearly, which has reduced the design process to a costly and inefficient trial-and-error procedure. Several recent numerical and experimental studies, however, have been focused towards a better understanding of the basic underlying physics. Barr et al. [l] have elucidated the relative roles of the time scales governing the energy release, the turbulent mixing, and the acoustics. Keller et al. [5] have demonstrated the importance of the phase relation between the resonant pressure field in the tailpipe and the periodic energy release. Marcus et al. [6] have developed the capability for a fully three-dimensional simulation of the reacting flow in a pulse combustor. This paper is an application of that methodology to a detailed investigation of the frequency response of the model to changes in the chemical kinetics. The methodology consists of a fully conservative second-order Godunov algorithm for the inviscid, reacting gas dynamics equations coupled to an adaptive mesh refinement procedure[2]. The axisymmetric and three-dimensional simulations allow us to explore in detail the interaction between the transient fluid

  19. Oxy-combustor operable with supercritical fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, Klaus; McClung, Aaron M.; Owston, Rebecca A.

    2017-04-04

    An oxy-combustor is provided which comprises a combustion vessel including at least one solid fuel slurry inlet port, at least one oxygen inlet port and at least one supercritical fluid inlet port, wherein the combustion vessel is operable at an operating pressure of at least 1,100 psi; an interior of the combustion vessel comprises a combustion chamber and a supercritical fluid infusion chamber surrounding at least a part of the combustion chamber, the supercritical fluid infusion chamber and the combustion chamber are separated by a porous liner surrounding the combustion chamber, and the supercritical infusion chamber is located between the porous liner and an outer casing of the combustion vessel.

  20. Application of numerical analysis to jet engine combustor design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    To, H. (Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-04-01

    The design and development process of jet engine combustors in Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. was presented which is featured by iterated numerical analyses in earlier stages of design. The analytical methods used, models applied and features were given together with verification results of numerical analyses of a velocity profile in a dump diffuser, flow and temperature distribution in a combustion liner, and liner skin temperature distribution. As examples in design and development of an airblast fuel injector type high temperature combustor, analytical results of the followings were given: flows through a diffuser, flows through a combustion liner, flows through liner cooling slots and liner skin temperature distribution. In addition, results of three-dimensional flow analysis were given in terms of optimization of design parameters for a jet-swirl combustor and calculation of a centrifugal force for a jet-swirl combustor liner as examples. 6 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Variable volume combustor with an air bypass system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Ostebee, Heath Michael; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-02-07

    The present application provides a combustor for use with flow of fuel and a flow of air in a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles positioned within a liner and an air bypass system position about the liner. The air bypass system variably allows a bypass portion of the flow of air to bypass the micro-mixer fuel nozzles.

  2. Aerotrace. Measurement of particulates from an engine combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, C.D. [DRA, Farnborough (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    The effect of gas turbine operating conditions, inlet temperature, pressure and overall air fuel ratio, on particulate number density has been measured. Particulate number density was found to be proportional to combustor inlet pressure and decrease with increasing combustor inlet temperature. The relationship with air fuel ratio is more complex. The mechanism of particulate loss down sample lines has been elucidated and equations are presented to predict particulate losses for stainless steel and PTFE sample lines. (author) 3 refs.

  3. Transient heat transfer properties in a pulse detonation combustor

    OpenAIRE

    Fontenot, Dion G.

    2011-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The heat transfer along the axis of a pulse detonation combustor has been characterized for various frequencies and fill fractions at 2.5 atmospheres of pressure for chamber refresh conditions. In a pulse detonation combustor, a supersonic detonation wave is the method for transforming chemical energy into mechanical energy and the wave propagates much faster than the subsonic flames in devices such as rockets and ramjets. The flow...

  4. Coal desulfurization in a rotary kiln combustor. Final report, March 15, 1990--July 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobb, J.T. Jr.

    1992-09-11

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the combustion of coal and coal wastes in a rotary kiln reactor with limestone addition for sulfur control. The rationale for the project was the perception that rotary systems could bring several advantages to combustion of these fuels, and may thus offer an alternative to fluid-bed boilers. Towards this end, an existing wood pyrolysis kiln (the Humphrey Charcoal kiln) was to be suitably refurbished and retrofitted with a specially designed version of a patented air distributor provided by Universal Energy, Inc. (UEI). As the project progressed beyond the initial stages, a number of issues were raised regarding the feasibility and the possible advantages of burning coals in a rotary kiln combustor and, in particular, the suitability of the Humphrey Charcoal kiln as a combustor. Instead, an opportunity arose to conduct combustion tests in the PEDCO Rotary Cascading-Bed Boiler (RCBB) commercial demonstration unit at the North American Rayon CO. (NARCO) in Elizabethton, TN. The tests focused on anthracite culm and had two objectives: (a) determine the feasibility of burning anthracite culms in a rotary kiln boiler and (b) obtain input for any further work involving the Humphrey Charcoal kiln combustor. A number of tests were conducted at the PEDCO unit. The last one was conducted on anthracite culm procured directly from the feed bin of a commercial circulating fluid-bed boiler. The results were disappointing; it was difficult to maintain sustained combustion even when large quantities of supplemental fuel were used. Combustion efficiency was poor, around 60 percent. The results suggest that the rotary kiln boiler, as designed, is ill-suited with respect to low-grade, hard to burn solid fuels, such as anthracite culm. Indeed, data from combustion of bituminous coal in the PEDCO unit suggest that with respect to coal in general, the rotary kiln boiler appears inferior to the circulating fluid bed boiler.

  5. Variability of Disk Emission in Pre-main Sequence and Related Stars. V. Changes in the Innermost Disk Structure of the Herbig AE Star HD 31648 = MWC 480

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Rachel; Long, Zachary; Sitko, Michael L.; Grady, C. A.; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko

    2017-01-01

    We present five epochs of near IR observations of the protoplanetary disk around HD 31648 (MWC 480). A mass accretion rate of approximately 1.1×10-7 Msun/year was derived from Brγ and Paβ lines. The spectral energy distribution (SED) reveals a variability of about 30% between 1.5 and 10 microns. We present the theoretical modeling analysis of the disk in HD 31648 using Monte-Carlo Radiation Transfer Code (MRTC). We find that varying the height of the inner rim successfully produces a shift in the NIR flux.

  6. Thermionic combustor application to combined gas and steam turbine power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskolczy, G.; Wang, C. C.; Lieb, D. P.; Margulies, A. E.; Fusegni, L. J.; Lovell, B. J.

    A design for the insertion of thermionic converters into the wall of a conventional combustor to produce electricity in a topping cycle is described, and a study for applications in gas and steam generators of 70 and 30 MW is evaluated for engineering and economic feasibility. Waste heat from the thermionic elements is used to preheat the combustor air; the heat absorbed by the elements plus further quenching of the exhaust gases with ammonia is projected to reduce NO(x) emissions to acceptable levels. Schematics, flow diagrams, and components of a computer model for cost projections are provided. It was found that temperatures around the emitters must be maintained above 1,600 K, with maximum efficiency and allowable temperature at 1,800 K, while collectors generate maximally at 950 K, with a corresponding work function of 1.5 eV. Cost sensitive studies indicate an installed price of $475/kW for the topping cycle, with improvements in thermionic converter characteristics bringing the cost to $375/kW at a busbar figure of 500 mills/kWh.

  7. Cardio-respiratory and subjective strains sustained by paraplegic subjects, when travelling on a cross slope in a manual wheelchair (MWC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierret, Benoît; Desbrosses, Kévin; Paysant, Jean; Meyer, Jean-Pierre

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify cardiac, energetic and subjective strains during manual wheelchair (MWC) travel on cross slopes (Cs). 25 paraplegics achieved eight 300 m propulsion tests combining 4 Cs (0, 2, 8 and 12%) and 2 velocities (Vi = 0.97 m s(-1), Vc "comfortable"). Heart rate and oxygen uptake were recorded continuously. Subjective rating (RPE) was made on completion of each test. Vc exceeds Vi for all Cs. Cardiac and energetic strains at Vc also exceed those at Vi (p < 0.01). Mean cardiac cost (in bpm) at Vc is 34 (SD = 13) bpm for a 0/2% Cs and 55 (18) bpm for a 12% Cs. Mean energetic cost (in J m(-1) kg(-1)) is 1.20 (0.38) and 2.76 (0.97) for respectively 0/2% and 12% Cs at Vi and, at Vc 1.50 (0.43) and 3.37 (1.43) for 0/2% and 12% Cs respectively. Subjective rating was considered as moderate for a 12% Cs. MWC users with high level injuries travel faster as those with low level injuries. Strain increase is linear for Cs from 0% to 12%. The results suggest that 2% Cs is generally acceptable, while 8% would be a critical threshold.

  8. Combustion modeling in a model combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.Y.Jiang; I.Campbell; K.Su

    2007-01-01

    The flow-field of a propane-air diffusion flame combustor with interior and exterior conjugate heat transfers was numerically studied.Results obtained from four combustion models,combined with the re-normalization group (RNG) k-ε turbulence model,discrete ordinates radiation model and enhanced wall treatment are presented and discussed.The results are compared with a comprehensive database obtained from a series of experimental measurements.The flow patterns and the recirculation zone length in the combustion chamber are accurately predicted,and the mean axial velocities are in fairly good agreement with the experimental data,particularly at downstream sections for all four combustion models.The mean temperature profiles are captured fairly well by the eddy dissipation (EDS),probability density function (PDF),and laminar flamelet combustion models.However,the EDS-finite-rate combustion model fails to provide an acceptable temperature field.In general,the flamelet model illustrates little superiority over the PDF model,and to some extent the PDF model shows better performance than the EDS model.

  9. Analysis of Regen Cooling in Rocket Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Brent (Technical Monitor); Merkle, C. L.; Li, D.; Sankaran, V.

    2004-01-01

    The use of detailed CFD modeling for the description of cooling in rocket chambers is discussed. The overall analysis includes a complete three-dimensional analysis of the flow in the regenerative cooling passages, conjugate heat transfer in the combustor walls, and the effects of film cooling on the inside chamber. The results in the present paper omit the effects of film cooling and include only regen cooling and the companion conjugate heat transfer. The hot combustion gases are replaced by a constant temperature wall boundary condition. Load balancing for parallel cluster computations is ensured by using single-block unstructured grids for both fluids and solids, and by using a 'multiple physical zones' to account for differences in the number of equations. Validation of the method is achieved by comparing simple two-dimensional solutions with analytical results. Representative results for cooling passages are presents showing the effects of heat conduction in the copper walls with tube aspect ratios of 1.5:l.

  10. CO-COMBUSTION OF REFUSE DERIVED FUEL WITH COAL IN A FLUIDISED BED COMBUSTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. WAN AB KARIM GHANI

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Power generation from biomass is an attractive technology which utilizes municipal solid waste-based refused derived fuel. In order to explain the behavior of biomass-fired fluidized bed incinerator, biomass sources from refuse derived fuel was co-fired with coal in a 0.15 m diameter and 2.3 m high fluidized bed combustor. The combustion efficiency and carbon monoxide emissions were studied and compared with those from pure coal combustion. This study proved that the blending effect had increased the carbon combustion efficiency up to 12% as compared to single MSW-based RDF. Carbon monoxide levels fluctuated between 200-1600 ppm were observed when coal is added. It is evident from this research that efficient co-firing of biomass with coal can be achieved with minimum modification of existing coal-fired boilers.

  11. Computer simulation of an advanced combustor for clean coal technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation is a clean coal technology because of its higher thermal efficiency and lower pollutant emission. Argonne National Laboratory used a comprehensive integral combustion computer code to aid the development of a TRW's second stage combustor for MHD power generation. The integral combustion code is a computer code for two-phase, two-dimensional, steady state, turbulent, and reacting flows, based on mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws for multiple gas species and solid particles of variable sizes. In the MHD second stage combustor, opposed jets of oxidizer are injected into a confined cross-stream coal gas flow laden with seed particles. The performance of the downstream MHD power generation channel depends mainly on the degree and the uniformity of gas ionization, which, in turn, depends on the uniformity of temperature and seed vapor distributions leaving the combustor. The simulation provides in-depth information of flow, combustion, and heat transfer patterns in the combustor, which is used to predict ranges of combustor operating conditions for optimum performance of the MHD system.

  12. Computer simulation of an advanced combustor for clean coal technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.

    1992-09-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation is a clean coal technology because of its higher thermal efficiency and lower pollutant emission. Argonne National Laboratory used a comprehensive integral combustion computer code to aid the development of a TRW`s second stage combustor for MHD power generation. The integral combustion code is a computer code for two-phase, two-dimensional, steady state, turbulent, and reacting flows, based on mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws for multiple gas species and solid particles of variable sizes. In the MHD second stage combustor, opposed jets of oxidizer are injected into a confined cross-stream coal gas flow laden with seed particles. The performance of the downstream MHD power generation channel depends mainly on the degree and the uniformity of gas ionization, which, in turn, depends on the uniformity of temperature and seed vapor distributions leaving the combustor. The simulation provides in-depth information of flow, combustion, and heat transfer patterns in the combustor, which is used to predict ranges of combustor operating conditions for optimum performance of the MHD system.

  13. Computational Simulation of Acoustic Modes in Rocket Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Brent (Technical Monitor); Merkle, C. L.; Sankaran, V.; Ellis, M.

    2004-01-01

    A combination of computational fluid dynamic analysis and analytical solutions is being used to characterize the dominant modes in liquid rocket engines in conjunction with laboratory experiments. The analytical solutions are based on simplified geometries and flow conditions and are used for careful validation of the numerical formulation. The validated computational model is then extended to realistic geometries and flow conditions to test the effects of various parameters on chamber modes, to guide and interpret companion laboratory experiments in simplified combustors, and to scale the measurements to engine operating conditions. In turn, the experiments are used to validate and improve the model. The present paper gives an overview of the numerical and analytical techniques along with comparisons illustrating the accuracy of the computations as a function of grid resolution. A representative parametric study of the effect of combustor mean flow Mach number and combustor aspect ratio on the chamber modes is then presented for both transverse and longitudinal modes. The results show that higher mean flow Mach numbers drive the modes to lower frequencies. Estimates of transverse wave mechanics in a high aspect ratio combustor are then contrasted with longitudinal modes in a long and narrow combustor to provide understanding of potential experimental simulations.

  14. Analysis of combustion efficiency in CFB coal combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afsin Gungor [Nigde University, Nigde (Turkey). Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture

    2008-06-15

    Fluidized bed technology is well known for its high combustion efficiency and is widely used in coal combustion. In this study, the combustor efficiency has been defined and investigated for CFB coal combustor based on the losses using a dynamic 2D model. The model is shown to agree well with the published data. The effect of operating parameters such as excess air ratio, bed operational velocity, coal particle diameter and combustor load and the effect of design variables such as bed height and bed diameter on the mean bed temperature, the overall CO emission and the combustion efficiency are analyzed for the small-scale of CFBC in the presently developed model. As a result of this analysis, it is observed that the combustion efficiency decreases with increasing excess air value. The combustion efficiency increases with the bed operational velocity. Increasing coal particle size results in higher combustion efficiency values. The coal feed rate has negative effect on the combustion efficiency. The combustor efficiency considerably increases with increasing combustor height and diameter if other parameters are kept unchanged. 46 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Experimental Study of Ethylene Combustion in a Scramjet Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Yin-li; SONG Wen-yan; LE Jia-ling

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the ignition characteristics of gaseous ethylene hydrocarbon fuel is investigated in the supersonic clean airstreams experimental facility with a resistance heater. The generic cavity flame holder is used to create recirculation and promote the fuel/air mixing at the lower wall of the combustor. Three different injection concepts are considered in this research: (1) ethylene injection upstream of the cavity; (2) ethylene and hydrogen injection upstream of the cavity simultaneously; (3) ethylene injection preceded by pilot hydrogen injection. The pilot injection showed to be a supportive tool for holding the flame of the main normal ethylene fuel injection. Therefore, using pilot hydrogen injection and cavity configuration necessitates optimizing the combustor length to ensure the complete combustion and the full liberation of the chemical energy stored in the fuel before exiting the combustor. The present study proved the possibility of igniting the ethylene and maintaining its flame in the supersonic airstreams.

  16. CFD Evaluation of a 3rd Generation LDI Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmani, Kumud; Mongia, Hukam; Lee, Phil

    2017-01-01

    An effort was undertaken to perform CFD analysis of fluid flow in Lean-Direct Injection (LDI) combustors with axial swirl-venturi elements for next-generation LDI-3 combustor design. The National Combustion Code (NCC) was used to perform non-reacting and two-phase reacting flow computations for a nineteen-element injector array arranged in a three-module, 7-5-7 element configuration. All computations were performed with a consistent approach of mesh-optimization, spray-modeling, ignition and kinetics-modeling with the NCC. Computational predictions of the aerodynamics of the injector were used to arrive at an optimal injector design that meets effective area and fuel-air mixing criteria. LDI-3 emissions (EINOx, EICO and UHC) were compared with the previous generation LDI-2 combustor experimental data at representative engine cycle conditions.

  17. Co-combustion of waste from olive oil production with coal in a fluidised bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliffe, K R; Patumsawad, S

    2001-01-01

    Waste from olive oil production was co-fired with coal in a fluidised bed combustor to study the feasibility of using this waste as an energy source. The combustion efficiency and CO emission were investigated and compared to those of burning 100% of coal. Olive oil waste with up to 20% mass concentration can be co-fired with coal in a fluidised bed combustor designed for coal combustion with a maximum drop of efficiency of 5%. A 10% olive oil waste concentration gave a lower CO emission than 100% coal firing due to improved combustion in the freeboard region. A 20% olive oil waste mixture gave a higher CO emission than both 100% coal firing and 10% olive oil waste mixture, but the combustion efficiency was higher than the 10% olive oil waste mixture due to lower elutriation from the bed.

  18. Combustion characteristics of spent catalyst and paper sludge in an internally circulating fluidized-bed combustor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Seon Ah; Jung, Dae Sung; Kim, Sang Done; Guy, Christophe

    2005-09-01

    Combustion of spent vacuum residue hydrodesulfurization catalyst and incineration of paper sludge were carried out in thermo-gravimetric analyzer and an internally circulating fluidized-bed (ICFB) reactor. From the thermo-gravimetric analyzer-differential thermo-gravimetric curves, the pre-exponential factors and activation energies are determined at the divided temperature regions, and the thermo-gravimetric analysis patterns can be predicted by the kinetic equations. The effects of bed temperature, gas velocity in the draft tube and annulus, solid circulation rate, and waste feed rate on combustion efficiency of the wastes have been determined in an ICFB from the experiments and the model studies. The ICFB combustor exhibits uniform temperature distribution along the bed height with high combustion efficiency (>90%). The combustion efficiency increases with increasing reaction temperature, gas velocity in the annulus region, and solid circulation rate and decreases with increasing waste feed rate and gas velocity in the draft tube. The simulated data from the kinetic equation and the hydrodynamic models predict the experimental data reasonably well.

  19. Numerical Simulations of Static Tested Ramjet Dump Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Afroz; Chakraborty, Debasis

    2016-06-01

    The flow field of a Liquid Fuel Ram Jet engine side dump combustor with kerosene fuel is numerically simulated using commercial CFD code CFX-11. Reynolds Averaged 3-D Navier-Stokes equations are solved alongwith SST turbulence model. Single step infinitely fast reaction is assumed for kerosene combustion. The combustion efficiency is evaluated in terms of the unburnt kerosene vapour leaving the combustor. The comparison of measured pressures with computed values show that the computation underpredicts (~5 %) pressures for non reacting cases but overpredicts (9-7 %) for reacting cases.

  20. Variable volume combustor with aerodynamic fuel flanges for nozzle mounting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin; Keener, Christopher Paul; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ostebee, Heath Michael

    2016-09-20

    The present application provides a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles and a fuel injection system for providing a flow of fuel to the micro-mixer fuel nozzles. The fuel injection system may include a number of support struts supporting the fuel nozzles and for providing the flow of fuel therethrough. The fuel injection system also may include a number of aerodynamic fuel flanges connecting the micro-mixer fuel nozzles and the support struts.

  1. Nonluminous Spray Combustion in a Jet-Mixing-Type Combustor

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    A new combustion system called a jet-mixing-type combustor was designed to obtain a nonluminous blue flame of a kerosene spray. A spray was injected by a conventional-type swirl atomizer into the combustor, and combustion air was introduced through a baffle plate with 16 inlet holes. The principle of this combustion method was revealed as a prompt mixing of the air and spray, which was achieved by high-speed air jets. The combustion characteristics such as combustion stability, temperature di...

  2. Variable volume combustor with center hub fuel staging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostebee, Heath Michael; McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin; Stewart, Jason Thurman; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2016-08-23

    The present application and the resultant patent provide a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles and a fuel injection system for providing a flow of fuel to the micro-mixer fuel nozzles. The fuel injection system may include a center hub for providing the flow of fuel therethrough. The center hub may include a first supply circuit for a first micro-mixer fuel nozzle and a second supply circuit for a second micro-mixer fuel nozzle.

  3. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 5, Appendix C, Fluidized-bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-10-01

    This appendix provides information on fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) technology as it has been applied to municipal waste combustion (MWC). A review of the literature was conducted to determine: (1) to what extent FBC technology has been applied to MWC, in terms of number and size of units was well as technology configuration; (2) the operating history of facilities employing FBC technology; and (3) the cost of these facilities as compared to conventional MSW installations. Where available in the literature, data on operating and performance characteristics are presented. Tabular comparisons of facility operating/cost data and emissions data have been complied and are presented. The literature review shows that FBC technology shows considerable promise in terms of providing improvements over conventional technology in areas such as NOx and acid gas control, and ash leachability. In addition, the most likely configuration to be applied to the first large scale FBC dedicated to municipal solid waste (MSW) will employ circulating bed (CFB) technology. Projected capital costs for the Robbins, Illinois 1600 ton per day CFB-based waste-to-energy facility are competitive with conventional systems, in the range of $125,000 per ton per day of MSW receiving capacity.

  4. Turbine combustor with fuel nozzles having inner and outer fuel circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Kim, Kwanwoo

    2013-12-24

    A combustor cap assembly for a turbine engine includes a combustor cap and a plurality of fuel nozzles mounted on the combustor cap. One or more of the fuel nozzles would include two separate fuel circuits which are individually controllable. The combustor cap assembly would be controlled so that individual fuel circuits of the fuel nozzles are operated or deliberately shut off to provide for physical separation between the flow of fuel delivered by adjacent fuel nozzles and/or so that adjacent fuel nozzles operate at different pressure differentials. Operating a combustor cap assembly in this fashion helps to reduce or eliminate the generation of undesirable and potentially harmful noise.

  5. The Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas fluidized bed combustor; El combustor de lecho fluidizado del Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milan Foressi, Julio [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1991-12-31

    After synthesizing the most important aspects of the combustion technology in fluidized bed, the experimental combustor developed at the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) is described, as well as the test results of the experiences carried out with coal from Rio Escondido, Coahuila. [Espanol] Tras sintetizar los aspectos mas importantes de la tecnologia de combustion en lecho fluidizado, se describe el combustor experimental desarrollado en el Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), asi como los resultados de las experiencias realizadas con carbon proveniente de Rio Escondido, Coahuila.

  6. Idealized gas turbine combustor for performance research and validation of large eddy simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Timothy C; Schefer, Robert W; Oefelein, Joseph C; Shaddix, Christopher R

    2007-03-01

    This paper details the design of a premixed, swirl-stabilized combustor that was designed and built for the express purpose of obtaining validation-quality data for the development of large eddy simulations (LES) of gas turbine combustors. The combustor features nonambiguous boundary conditions, a geometrically simple design that retains the essential fluid dynamics and thermochemical processes that occur in actual gas turbine combustors, and unrestrictive access for laser and optical diagnostic measurements. After discussing the design detail, a preliminary investigation of the performance and operating envelope of the combustor is presented. With the combustor operating on premixed methane/air, both the equivalence ratio and the inlet velocity were systematically varied and the flame structure was recorded via digital photography. Interesting lean flame blowout and resonance characteristics were observed. In addition, the combustor exhibited a large region of stable, acoustically clean combustion that is suitable for preliminary validation of LES models.

  7. Hydrodynamical Simulations of the Jet in the Symbiotic Star MWC 560. 3; Application to X-ray Jets in Symbiotic Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stute, Matthias; Sahai, Raghvendra

    2007-01-01

    In Papers I and II in this series, we presented hydrodynamical simulations of jet models with parameters representative of the symbiotic system MWC 560. These were simulations of a pulsed, initially underdense jet in a high-density ambient medium. Since the pulsed emission of the jet creates internal shocks and since the jet velocity is very high, the jet bow shock and the internal shocks are heated to high temperatures and should therefore emit X-ray radiation. In this paper, we investigate in detail the X-ray properties of the jets in our models. We have focused our study on the total X-ray luminosity and its temporal variability, the resulting spectra, and the spatial distribution of the emission. Temperature and density maps from our hydrodynamical simulations with radiative cooling presented in the second paper are used, together with emissivities calculated with the atomic database ATOMDB. The jets in our models show extended and variable X-ray emission, which can be characterized as a sum of hot and warm components with temperatures that are consistent with observations of CH Cyg and R Aqr. The X-ray spectra of our model jets show emission-line features that correspond to observed features in the spectra of CH Cyg. The innermost parts of our pulsed jets show iron line emission in the 6.4-6.7 keV range, which may explain such emission from the central source in R Aqr. We conclude that MWC 560 should be detectable with Chandra or XMM-Newton, and such X-ray observations will prove crucial for understanding jets in symbiotic stars.

  8. Co-combustion of automotive shredder residue (ASR) and sewage sludge with a mixture of industrial and household waste in an 20MW fluidized bed combustor; Samfoerbraenning av bilfluff, roetslam och avfall i en 20 MW fluidbaeddpanna - Studier av braenslesammansaettningens paaverkan paa belaeggningsbildning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskilsson, David; Johansson, Andreas; Johansson, Linda; Wikstroem-Blomqvist, Evalena

    2007-07-01

    In order to prevent a further increased use of resources and to decrease the environmental impact from landfills, organic wastes are today diverted towards material and energy recovery. This creates a waste market with an increasing number of waste fractions that needs to be treated properly. As an example, in Sweden it has recently been prohibited to landfill source separated combustible waste (2002) and organic waste (2005). Wastes as automotive shredder residue (ASR) and sewage sludge can no longer be landfilled and needs to be either material or energy recovered, which challenge the waste treatment sector. This work investigates the effects of ASR and sewage sludge co-combustion in a 20 MW Energy-from-Waste plant (bubbling fluidised bed). The long term objective of the work is to increase the fuel flexibility, the boiler availability and the power production. This report focus on boiler operation and combustion performance in terms of agglomeration, deposit rates and emissions. In addition to the tests with ASR and sewage sludge, repeated measurements were performed during normal load as a reference. The results show that the co-combusted fractions of ASR and sewage sludge, which on mass basis constituted 6 % and 15 % respectively, did not increase the risk for agglomeration or deposits on heat-exchanging surfaces. Instead, compared to the two reference cases, the deposit rates decreased when sewage sludge was added. Only minor variation in the emissions was seen between the different cases. The levels of I-TEQs were far below the legislated values in all cases

  9. Novel designs of fluidized bed combustors for low pollutant emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, W.; Bleek, C.M. van den [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Dam-Johansen, K. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-12-31

    It is known that NH{sub 3}, released during the devolatilization of fuel, is an important precursor for NO formation in fluidized bed combustors. On the other hand, NH{sub 3} may be used as a reducing agent in the thermal DeNO{sub x} process to reduce NO{sub x} emission levels. In this paper, a new concept of fluidized bed combustors is proposed based on the idea of in situ reduction of NO{sub x} by self-produced NH{sub 3} from fuel without lowering the sulfur capture level. This design is intended to separate the NH{sub 3} release process under reducing conditions from the char combustion process under oxidizing conditions; this self-released NH{sub 3}, together with some combustibles, is mixed with gaseous combustion products in the upper part of the combustor for a further reduction of the NO{sub x} formed during combustion. Furthermore, the combustion of the combustibles may cause the temperature to rise in this upper zone and thereby reduce the emission of N{sub 2}O. The applications of this design to bubbling and circulating fluidized bed combustors are described and the mechanisms of the main reactions involved discussed.

  10. MHD coal combustor technology. Final report, phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    The design, performance, and testing of a 20-MW coal combustor for scaleup to 50 MW for use in an MHD generator are described. The design incorporates the following key features: (1) a two-stage combustor with an intermediate slag separator to remove slag at a low temperture, thus minimizing enthalpy losses required for heating and vaporizing the slag; (2) a first-stage pentad (four air streams impinging on one coal stream) injector design with demonstrated efficient mixing, promoting high carbon burnout; (3) a two-section first-stage combustion chamber; the first stage using a thin slag-protected refractory layer and the second section using a thick refractory layer, both to minimize heat losses; (4) a refractory lining in the slag separator to minimize heat losses; (5) a second-stage combustor, which provided both de-swirl of the combustion products exiting from the slag separator and simple mixing of the vitiated secondary air and seed; (6) a dense-phase coal feed system to minimize cold carrier gas entering the first-stage combustors; (7) a dry seed injection system using pulverized K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ with a 1% amorphous, fumed silicon dioxide additive to enhance flowability, resulting in rapid vaporization and ionization and ensuring maximum performance; and (8) a performance evaluation module (PEM) of rugged design based on an existing, successfully-fired unit. (WHK)

  11. Catalytic combustor for integrated gasification combined cycle power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachovchin, Dennis M.; Lippert, Thomas E.

    2008-12-16

    A gasification power plant 10 includes a compressor 32 producing a compressed air flow 36, an air separation unit 22 producing a nitrogen flow 44, a gasifier 14 producing a primary fuel flow 28 and a secondary fuel source 60 providing a secondary fuel flow 62 The plant also includes a catalytic combustor 12 combining the nitrogen flow and a combustor portion 38 of the compressed air flow to form a diluted air flow 39 and combining at least one of the primary fuel flow and secondary fuel flow and a mixer portion 78 of the diluted air flow to produce a combustible mixture 80. A catalytic element 64 of the combustor 12 separately receives the combustible mixture and a backside cooling portion 84 of the diluted air flow and allows the mixture and the heated flow to produce a hot combustion gas 46 provided to a turbine 48. When fueled with the secondary fuel flow, nitrogen is not combined with the combustor portion.

  12. One dimensional numerical simulation of small scale CFB combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gungor, Afsin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Nigde University, 51100 Nigde (Turkey)

    2009-03-15

    In this study, a one-dimensional model which includes volatilization, attrition and combustion of char particles for a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustor has been developed. In the modeling, the CFB combustor is analyzed in two regions: bottom zone considering as a bubbling fluidized bed in turbulent fluidization regime and upper zone core-annulus solids flow structure is established. In the bottom zone, a single-phase back-flow cell model is used to represent the solid mixing. Solids exchange, between the bubble phase and emulsion phase is a function of the bubble diameter and varies along the axis of the combustor. In the upper zone, particles move upward in the core and downward in the annulus. Thickness of the annulus varies according to the combustor height. Using the developed simulation program, the effects of operational parameters which are the particle diameter, superficial velocity and air-to-fuel ratio on net solids flux, oxygen and carbon dioxide mole ratios along the bed height and carbon content and bed temperature on the top of the riser are investigated. Simulation results are compared with test results obtained from the 50 kW Gazi University Heat Power Laboratory pilot scale unit and good agreement is observed. (author)

  13. Low emissions combustor development for an industrial gas turbine to utilize LCV fuel gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsall, G.J.; Smith, M.A. (British Coal Corp., Glos (United Kingdom). Coal Research Establishment); Cannon, M.F. (European Gas Turbines Ltd., Lincoln (United Kingdom). Aero and Technology Products)

    1994-07-01

    Advanced coal-based power generation systems such as the British Coal Topping Cycle offer the potential for high-efficiency electricity generation with minimum environmental impact. An important component of the Topping cycle program is the gas turbine, for which development of a combustion system to burn low calorific value coal derived fuel gas, at a turbine inlet temperature of 1,260 C (2,300 F), with minimum pollutant emissions, is a key R and D issue. A phased combustor development program is underway burning low calorific value fuel gas (3.6--4.1 MJ/m[sup 3]) with low emissions, particularly NO[sub x] derived from fuel-bound nitrogen. The first phase of the combustor development program has now been completed using a generic tubo-annular, prototype combustor design. Tests were carried out at combustor loading and Mach numbers considerably greater than the initial design values. Combustor performance at these conditions was encouraging. The second phase of the program is currently in progress. This will assess, initially, an improved variant of the prototype combustor operating at conditions selected to represent a particular medium sized industrial gas turbine. This combustor will also be capable of operating using natural gas as an auxiliary fuel, to suite the start-up procedure for the Topping Cycle. The paper presents the Phase 1 test program results for the prototype combustor. Design of the modified combustor for Phase 2 of the development program is discussed, together with preliminary combustor performance results.

  14. Innovative Adaptive Control Method Demonstrated for Active Suppression of Instabilities in Engine Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George

    2005-01-01

    This year, an improved adaptive-feedback control method was demonstrated that suppresses thermoacoustic instabilities in a liquid-fueled combustor of a type used in aircraft engines. Extensive research has been done to develop lean-burning (low fuel-to-air ratio) combustors that can reduce emissions throughout the mission cycle to reduce the environmental impact of aerospace propulsion systems. However, these lean-burning combustors are susceptible to thermoacoustic instabilities (high-frequency pressure waves), which can fatigue combustor components and even downstream turbine blades. This can significantly decrease the safe operating life of the combustor and turbine. Thus, suppressing the thermoacoustic combustor instabilities is an enabling technology for meeting the low-emission goals of the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Project.

  15. An Adaptive Instability Suppression Controls Method for Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopasakis, George; DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2008-01-01

    An adaptive controls method for instability suppression in gas turbine engine combustors has been developed and successfully tested with a realistic aircraft engine combustor rig. This testing was part of a program that demonstrated, for the first time, successful active combustor instability control in an aircraft gas turbine engine-like environment. The controls method is called Adaptive Sliding Phasor Averaged Control. Testing of the control method has been conducted in an experimental rig with different configurations designed to simulate combustors with instabilities of about 530 and 315 Hz. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of this method in suppressing combustor instabilities. In addition, a dramatic improvement in suppression of the instability was achieved by focusing control on the second harmonic of the instability. This is believed to be due to a phenomena discovered and reported earlier, the so called Intra-Harmonic Coupling. These results may have implications for future research in combustor instability control.

  16. Computational investigation on combustion instabilities in a rocket combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lei; Shen, Chibing

    2016-10-01

    High frequency combustion instability is viewed as the most challenging task in the development of Liquid Rocket Engines. In this article, results of attempts to capture the self-excited high frequency combustion instability in a rocket combustor are shown. The presence of combustion instability was demonstrated using point measurements, along with Fast Fourier Transform analysis and instantaneous flowfield contours. A baseline case demonstrates a similar wall heat flux profile as the associated experimental case. The acoustic oscillation modes and corresponding frequencies predicted by current simulations are almost the same as the results obtained from classic acoustic analysis. Pressure wave moving back and forth across the combustor was also observed. Then this baseline case was compared against different fuel-oxidizer velocity ratios. It predicts a general trend: the smaller velocity ratio produces larger oscillation amplitudes than the larger one. A possible explanation for the trend was given using the computational results.

  17. Flame quenching process in cavity based on model scramjet combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Pan; Jing Lei; Jian-Han Liang; Wei-Dong Liu; Zhen-Guo Wang

    2012-01-01

    The flame quenching process in combustors was observed by high speed camera and Schlieren system,at the inflow conditions of Ma =2.64,To =1 483 K,P0 =1.65 MPa,T =724 K and P =76.3 kPa.Changing process of the flame and shock structure in the combustor was clearly observed.The results revealed that the precombustion shock disappeared accompanied with the process in which the flame was blown out and withdrawed from the mainflow into the cavity and vanished after a short while.The rime of quenching process was extended by the cavity flame holder,and the ability of flame holding was enhanced by arranging more cavities in the downstream as well.The flame was blown from the upstream to the downstream,so the flame in the downstream of the cavity was quenched out later than that in the upstream.

  18. Features of Ignition and Stable Combustion in Supersonic Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfeld, M.; Starov, A.; Timofeev, K.

    2009-01-01

    Present paper describes the results of experimental investigations of the supersonic combustor with entrance Mach numbers from 2 to 4 at static pressure from 0.8 to 2.5 bars, total temperature from 2000K to 3000K. Hydrogen and kerosene were used as fuel. The conditions, under which the self-ignition and intensive combustion of the fuel realized were found. Position of ignition area in the channel was determined and features of flame propagation in the channel presented. A possibility to ensure an efficient combustion of hydrogen and kerosene at a high supersonic flow velocity at the combustor entrance without special throttling and/or pseudo-shock introduction was shown. Analysis of applicability of existing methods of criterion descriptions of conditions of self-ignition and extinction of combustion is executed for generalization of experimental results on the basis of results obtained.

  19. Analytical fuel property effects, small combustors, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of nonstandard aviation fuels on a typical small gas turbine combustor was analyzed. The T700/CT7 engine family was chosen as being representative of the class of aircraft power plants desired. Fuel properties, as specified by NASA, are characterized by low hydrogen content and high aromatics levels. Higher than normal smoke output and flame radiation intensity for the current T700 combustor which serves as a baseline were anticipated. It is, therefore, predicted that out of specification smoke visibility and higher than normal shell temperatures will exist when using NASA ERBS fuels with a consequence of severe reduction in cyclic life. Three new designs are proposed to compensate for the deficiencies expected with the existing design. They have emerged as the best of the eight originally proposed redesigns or combinations thereof. After the five choices that were originally made by NASA on the basis of competing performance factors, General Electric narrowed the field to the three proposed.

  20. N+2 Advanced Low NOx Combustor Technology Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbon, John; Aicholtz, John; Hsieh, Shih-Yang; Viars, Philip; Birmaher, Shai; Brown, Dan; Patel, Nayan; Carper, Doug; Cooper, Clay; Fitzgerald, Russell

    2017-01-01

    In accordance with NASAs technology goals for future subsonic vehicles, this contract identified and developed new combustor concepts toward meeting N+2 generation (2020) LTO (landing and take-off) NOx emissions reduction goal of 75 from the standard adopted at Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection 6 (CAEP6). Based on flame tube emissions, operability, and autoignition testing, one concept was down selected for sector testing at NASA. The N+2 combustor sector successfully demonstrated 75 reduction for LTO NOx (vs. CAEP6) and cruise NOx (vs. 2005 B777-200 reference) while maintaining 99.9 cruise efficiency and no increase in CO and HC emissions.The program also developed enabling technologies for the combustion system including ceramic matrix composites (CMC) liner materials, active combustion control concepts, and laser ignition for improved altitude relight.

  1. Systems and methods for preventing flashback in a combustor assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2016-04-05

    Embodiments of the present application include a combustor assembly. The combustor assembly may include a combustion chamber, a first plenum, a second plenum, and one or more elongate air/fuel premixing injection tubes. Each of the elongate air/fuel premixing injection tubes may include a first length at least partially disposed within the first plenum and configured to receive a first fluid from the first plenum. Moreover, each of the elongate air/fuel premixing injection tubes may include a second length disposed downstream of the first length and at least partially disposed within the second plenum. The second length may be formed of a porous wall configured to allow a second fluid from the second plenum to enter the second length and create a boundary layer about the porous wall.

  2. Effects of Immersed Surfaces on the Combustor Efficiency of Small-Scale Fluidized Beds

    OpenAIRE

    Nurdil Eskin; Afsin Gungor

    2005-01-01

    In this study, effects of the different types of heat exchanger surfaces on the second law efficiency of a small-scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustor are analyzed and the results are compared with the bubbling fluidized bed coal combustor effectiveness values. Using a previously developed simulation program, combustor efficiency and entropy generation values are obtained at different operation velocities at different height and volume ratios of the immersed surfaces, both for circu...

  3. Design and Performance of an Improved Trapped Vortex Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Yi; HE Xiaomin; JIANG Bo; WU Zejun; DING Guoyu

    2012-01-01

    A trapped vortex combustor (TVC) has been a very promising novel concept for it offers improvements in lean blow out,altitude relight,operating range,as well as a potential to decrease NOx emissions compared to conventional combustors.The present paper discusses the improved designs of the new combustor over the prior ones of our research group,including that:a) the overall dimensions,both axial and radial,are reduced to those of an actual aero-engine combustor; b) the air flow distribution is optimized,and especially 15% of the air is fed into the liner as cooling air; c) a straight-wall diffuser with divergence angle 9° is added.A series of experiments (cavity-fueled only,under atmospheric pressure) has been conducted to investigate the performance of the improved TVC.Experimental results show that at the inlet temperature of 523 K,the inlet pressure of 0.1 MPa,stable operation of the TVC test rig is observed for the Mach number 0.15-0.34,indicating good flame stability; the combustion efficiency obtained in this paper falls into the range of 60%-96%; as the total excess air ratio increases,the combustion efficiency decreases,while the increase of the inlet temperature is beneficial to high combustion efficiency; besides,the optimal Mach numbers for high combustion efficiency under different inlet conditions are confirmed.The outlet temperature profiles feature a bottom in the mid-height of the exit.This paper demonstrates the feasibility for the TVC to be applied to a realistic aero-engine preliminarily and provides reference for TVC design.

  4. System for tuning a combustor of a gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Michael John

    2016-12-27

    A system for tuning a combustor of a gas turbine includes a flow sleeve having an annular main body. The main body includes an upstream end, a downstream end, an inner surface and an outer surface. A cooling channel extends along the inner surface of the main body. The cooling channel extends at least partially between the downstream end and the upstream end of the main body.

  5. Flame dynamics of a meso-scale heat recirculating combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayan, V.; Gupta, A.K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    The dynamics of premixed propane-air flame in a meso-scale ceramic combustor has been examined here. The flame characteristics in the combustor were examined by measuring the acoustic emissions and preheat temperatures together with high-speed cinematography. For the small-scale combustor, the volume to surface area ratio is small and hence the walls have significant effect on the global flame structure, flame location and flame dynamics. In addition to the flame-wall thermal coupling there is a coupling between flame and acoustics in the case of confined flames. Flame-wall thermal interactions lead to low frequency flame fluctuations ({proportional_to}100 Hz) depending upon the thermal response of the wall. However, the flame-acoustic interactions can result in a wide range of flame fluctuations ranging from few hundred Hz to few kHz. Wall temperature distribution is one of the factors that control the amount of reactant preheating which in turn effects the location of flame stabilization. Acoustic emission signals and high-speed flame imaging confirmed that for the present case flame-acoustic interactions have more significant effect on flame dynamics. Based on the acoustic emissions, five different flame regimes have been identified; whistling/harmonic mode, rich instability mode, lean instability mode, silent mode and pulsating flame mode. (author)

  6. Combustor cap having non-round outlets for mixing tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michael John; Boardman, Gregory Allen; McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin; Arguinzoni, Carlo Antonio

    2016-12-27

    A system includes a a combustor cap configured to be coupled to a plurality of mixing tubes of a multi-tube fuel nozzle, wherein each mixing tube of the plurality of mixing tubes is configured to mix air and fuel to form an air-fuel mixture. The combustor cap includes multiple nozzles integrated within the combustor cap. Each nozzle of the multiple nozzles is coupled to a respective mixing tube of the multiple mixing tubes. In addition, each nozzle of the multiple nozzles includes a first end and a second end. The first end is coupled to the respective mixing tube of the multiple mixing tubes. The second end defines a non-round outlet for the air-fuel mixture. Each nozzle of the multiple nozzles includes an inner surface having first and second portions, the first portion radially diverges along an axial direction from the first end to the second end, and the second portion radially converges along the axial direction from the first end to the second end.

  7. Experimental study of entrainment phenomenon in a trapped vortex combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Rongchun; Fan Weijun

    2013-01-01

    Trapped vortex combustor (TVC) is an advanced low-pollution gas turbine combustor,with the adoption of staged combustion technique.To achieve low-pollutant emission and better combustion performance,the proportion of the air flow in each combustion zone should be precisely determined in the design of the combustor.Due to the presence of entrainment phenomenon,the total air flow in the cavity zone is difficult to estimate.To overcome the measurement difficulty,this study adopts the indirect measurement approach in the experimental research of entrainment phenomenon in the cavity.In accordance with the measurement principle,a TVC model fueled by methane is designed.Under two experimental conditions,i.e.with and without direct air intake in the cavity,the influence of the mainstream air flow velocity,the air intake velocity in the cavity,the height of inlet channel,the structure of holder and the structural proportion of the cavity on entrainment in the cavity is studied,respectively,through experiment at atmospheric temperature and pressure.The results suggest that the air flow velocity of mainstream,the air intake velocity of the cavity and the structure of the holder exert significant influence on the air entrainment,while the influence of structural proportion of the cavity is comparatively insignificant.The square root of momentum ratio of cavity air to mainstream air could be used to analyze the correlation of the entrainment data.

  8. Evaluation of a staged fuel combustor for turboprop engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdouw, A. J.

    1976-01-01

    Proposed EPA emission regulations require emission reduction by 1979 for various gas turbine engine classes. Extensive combustion technology advancements are required to meet the proposed regulations. The T56 turboprop engine requires CO, UHC, and smoke reduction. A staged fuel combustor design was tested on a combustion rig to evaluate emission reduction potential in turboprop engines from fuel zoning. The can-type combustor has separately fueled-pilot and main combustion zones in series. The main zone fueling system was arranged for potential incorporation into the T56 with minor or no modifications to the basic engine. Three combustor variable geometry systems were incorporated to evaluate various airflow distributions. Emission results with fixed geometry operation met all proposed EPA regulations over the EPA LTO cycle. CO reduction was 82 percent, UHC reduction was 96 percent, and smoke reduction was 84 percent. NOx increased 14 percent over the LTO cycle. At high power, NOx reduction was 40 to 55 percent. This NOx reduction has potential application to stationary gas turbine powerplants which have different EPA regulations.

  9. Combustor concepts for aircraft gas turbine low-power emissions reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mularz, E. J.; Gleason, C. C.; Dodds, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Three combustor concepts have been designed and tested to demonstrate significant reductions in aircraft engine idle pollutant emissions. Each concept used a different approach for pollutant reductions: the Hot Wall Combustor employs a thermal barrier coating and impingement cooled liners, the Recuperative Cooling Combustor preheats the air before entering the combustion chamber, and the Catalytic Converter Combustor is composed of a conventional primary zone followed by a catalytic bed for pollutant cleanup. The designs are discussed in detail and test results are presented for a range of aircraft engine idle conditions. The results indicate that ultra-low levels of unburned hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide emissions can be achieved with this technology.

  10. Large eddy simulation of soot evolution in an aircraft combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Michael E.; Pitsch, Heinz

    2013-11-01

    An integrated kinetics-based Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approach for soot evolution in turbulent reacting flows is applied to the simulation of a Pratt & Whitney aircraft gas turbine combustor, and the results are analyzed to provide insights into the complex interactions of the hydrodynamics, mixing, chemistry, and soot. The integrated approach includes detailed models for soot, combustion, and the unresolved interactions between soot, chemistry, and turbulence. The soot model is based on the Hybrid Method of Moments and detailed descriptions of soot aggregates and the various physical and chemical processes governing their evolution. The detailed kinetics of jet fuel oxidation and soot precursor formation is described with the Radiation Flamelet/Progress Variable model, which has been modified to account for the removal of soot precursors from the gas-phase. The unclosed filtered quantities in the soot and combustion models, such as source terms, are closed with a novel presumed subfilter PDF approach that accounts for the high subfilter spatial intermittency of soot. For the combustor simulation, the integrated approach is combined with a Lagrangian parcel method for the liquid spray and state-of-the-art unstructured LES technology for complex geometries. Two overall fuel-to-air ratios are simulated to evaluate the ability of the model to make not only absolute predictions but also quantitative predictions of trends. The Pratt & Whitney combustor is a Rich-Quench-Lean combustor in which combustion first occurs in a fuel-rich primary zone characterized by a large recirculation zone. Dilution air is then added downstream of the recirculation zone, and combustion continues in a fuel-lean secondary zone. The simulations show that large quantities of soot are formed in the fuel-rich recirculation zone, and, furthermore, the overall fuel-to-air ratio dictates both the dominant soot growth process and the location of maximum soot volume fraction. At the higher fuel

  11. Hydrodynamical simulations of the jet in the symbiotic star MWC 560 III. Application to X-ray jets in symbiotic stars

    CERN Document Server

    Stute, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    In papers I and II in this series, we presented hydrodynamical simulations of jet models with parameters representative of the symbiotic system MWC 560. These were simulations of a pulsed, initially underdense jet in a high density ambient medium. Since the pulsed emission of the jet creates internal shocks and since the jet velocity is very high, the jet bow shock and the internal shocks are heated to high temperatures and should therefore emit X-ray radiation. In this paper, we investigate in detail the X-ray properties of the jets in our models. We have focused our study on the total X-ray luminosity and its temporal variability, the resulting spectra and the spatial distribution of the emission. Temperature and density maps from our hydrodynamical simulations with radiative cooling presented in the second paper are used together with emissivities calculated with the atomic database ATOMDB. The jets in our models show extended and variable X-ray emission which can be characterized as a sum of hot and warm ...

  12. CID: Chemistry in disks VI.sulfur-bearing molecules in the protoplanetary disks surrounding LkCa15, MWC480, DM Tau, and GO Tau

    CERN Document Server

    Dutrey, Anne; Boehler, Yann; Guilloteau, Stéphane; Hersant, Franck; Semenov, Dmitry; Chapillon, Edwige; Henning, Thomas; Piétu, Vincent; Launhardt, Ralf; Gueth, Frederic; Schreyer, Katharina

    2011-01-01

    We study the content in S-bearing molecules of protoplanetary disks around low-mass stars. We used the new IRAM 30-m receiver EMIR to perform simultaneous observations of the $1_{10}-1_{01}$ line of H$_2$S at 168.8 GHz and $2_{23}-1_{12}$ line of SO at 99.3 GHz. We compared the observational results with predictions coming from the astrochemical code NAUTILUS, which has been adapted to protoplanetary disks. The data were analyzed together with existing CS J=3-2 observations. We fail to detect the SO and H$_2$S lines, although CS is detected in LkCa15, DM\\,Tau, and GO\\,Tau but not in MWC\\,480. However, our new upper limits are significantly better than previous ones and allow us to put some interesting constraints on the sulfur chemistry. Our best modeling of disks is obtained for a C/O ratio of 1.2, starting from initial cloud conditions of H density of $2\\times 10^5$ cm$^{-3}$ and age of $10^6$ yr. The results agree with the CS data and are compatible with the SO upper limits, but fail to reproduce the H$_2$...

  13. Grimethorpe experimental pressurized fluidized-bed combustor: in future energy concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadbent, D.B.

    1979-01-01

    The experimental pressurized fluidized bed combustor project at Grimethorpe, UK, is described. The design of the combustor, which is a pressure vessel containing a furnace, which contains the fluidized bed is discussed. Details of the process, the steam water circuit, the fuel system and method of feeding coal, ash removal during the process, the water treatment plant and plant control are given.

  14. The preliminary design of an annular combustor for a mini gas turbine

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyers, Bronwyn C

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study involves the redesign of the combustor liner for a 200N mini gas turbine engine using first principles and the design methods of the NREC series as shown in Figure 1. The combustor design was performed using five different operating...

  15. Gas Turbine Combustor Liner Life Assessment Using a Combined Fluid/Structural Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tinga, Tiedo; Kampen, van J.F.; Jager, de B.; Kok, J.B.W.

    2007-01-01

    A life assessment was performed on a fighter jet engine annular combustor liner, using a combined fluid/structural approach. Computational fluid dynamics analyses were performed to obtain the thermal loading of the combustor liner and finite element analyses were done to calculate the temperature an

  16. Large eddy simulation of a high aspect ratio combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirtas, Mehmet

    The present research investigates the details of mixture preparation and combustion in a two-stroke, small-scale research engine with a numerical methodology based on large eddy simulation (LES) technique. A major motivation to study such small-scale engines is their potential use in applications requiring portable power sources with high power density. The investigated research engine has a rectangular planform with a thickness very close to quenching limits of typical hydrocarbon fuels. As such, the combustor has a high aspect ratio (defined as the ratio of surface area to volume) that makes it different than the conventional engines which typically have small aspect ratios to avoid intense heat losses from the combustor in the bulk flame propagation period. In most other aspects, this engine involves all the main characteristics of traditional reciprocating engines. A previous experimental work has identified some major design problems and demonstrated the feasibility of cyclic combustion in the high aspect ratio combustor. Because of the difficulty of carrying out experimental studies in such small devices, resolving all flow structures and completely characterizing the flame propagation have been an enormously challenging task. The numerical methodology developed in this work attempts to complement these previous studies by providing a complete evolution of flow variables. Results of the present study demonstrated strengths of the proposed methodology in revealing physical processes occuring in a typical operation of the high aspect ratio combustor. For example, in the scavenging phase, the dominant flow structure is a tumble vortex that forms due to the high velocity reactant jet (premixed) interacting with the walls of the combustor. Since the scavenging phase is a long process (about three quarters of the whole cycle), the impact of the vortex is substantial on mixture preparation for the next combustion phase. LES gives the complete evolution of this flow

  17. Development and testing of pulsed and rotating detonation combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. George, Andrew C.

    Detonation is a self-sustaining, supersonic, shock-driven, exothermic reaction. Detonation combustion can theoretically provide significant improvements in thermodynamic efficiency over constant pressure combustion when incorporated into existing cycles. To harness this potential performance benefit, countless studies have worked to develop detonation combustors and integrate these devices into existing systems. This dissertation consists of a series of investigations on two types of detonation combustors: the pulse detonation combustor (PDC) and the rotating detonation combustor (RDC). In the first two investigations, an array of air-breathing PDCs is integrated with an axial power turbine. The system is initially operated with steady and pulsed cold air flow to determine the effect of pulsed flow on turbine performance. Various averaging approaches are employed to calculate turbine efficiency, but only flow-weighted (e.g., mass or work averaging) definitions have physical significance. Pulsed flow turbine efficiency is comparable to steady flow efficiency at high corrected flow rates and low rotor speeds. At these conditions, the pulse duty cycle expands and the variation of the rotor incidence angle is constrained to a favorable range. The system is operated with pulsed detonating flow to determine the effect of frequency, fill fraction, and rotor speed on turbine performance. For some conditions, output power exceeds the maximum attainable value from steady constant pressure combustion due to a significant increase in available power from the detonation products. However, the turbine component efficiency estimated from classical thermodynamic analysis is four times lower than the steady design point efficiency. Analysis of blade angles shows a significant penalty due to the detonation, fill, and purge processes simultaneously imposed on the rotor. The latter six investigations focus on fundamental research of the RDC concept. A specially-tailored RDC data

  18. Parametric Study of Pulse-Combustor-Driven Ejectors at High-Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yungster, Shaye; Paxson, Daniel E.; Perkins, Hugh D.

    2015-01-01

    Pulse-combustor configurations developed in recent studies have demonstrated performance levels at high-pressure operating conditions comparable to those observed at atmospheric conditions. However, problems related to the way fuel was being distributed within the pulse combustor were still limiting performance. In the first part of this study, new configurations are investigated computationally aimed at improving the fuel distribution and performance of the pulse-combustor. Subsequent sections investigate the performance of various pulse-combustor driven ejector configurations operating at highpressure conditions, focusing on the effects of fuel equivalence ratio and ejector throat area. The goal is to design pulse-combustor-ejector configurations that maximize pressure gain while achieving a thermal environment acceptable to a turbine, and at the same time maintain acceptable levels of NOx emissions and flow non-uniformities. The computations presented here have demonstrated pressure gains of up to 2.8%.

  19. A conceptual design of shock-eliminating clover combustor for large scale scramjet engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming-bo; Zhao, Yu-xin; Zhao, Guo-yan; Liu, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    A new concept of shock-eliminating clover combustor is proposed for large scale scramjet engine to fulfill the requirements of fuel penetration, total pressure recovery and cooling. To generate the circular-to-clover transition shape of the combustor, the streamline tracing technique is used based on an axisymmetric expansion parent flowfield calculated using the method of characteristics. The combustor is examined using inviscid and viscous numerical simulations and a pure circular shape is calculated for comparison. The results showed that the combustor avoids the shock wave generation and produces low total pressure losses in a wide range of flight condition with various Mach number. The flameholding device for this combustor is briefly discussed.

  20. Diffusion Combustion in a Tube-Nested Combustor

    OpenAIRE

    Tetsuji, Seko; Ryosuke, Matsumoto; Yoshitomo, Shintani; Isao, Ishihara; Mamoru, Ozawa

    2004-01-01

    An advanced-type compact water-tube boiler has been designed on the basis of the new concept of cooling flame by water-tube bank in the furnace, and is referred to as "tube-nested combustor". It realized drastic reduction in boiler size as well as in the NO_x emission. In this present study, aiming at further improvement of boiler efficiency and reduction of NO_x emission, the combustion characteristics in the furnace were investigated by using the test boiler of 0.5t/h steam output. Experime...

  1. Modeling of Sulfur Retention in Circulating Fluidized Bed Coal Combustors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔锐; 吕俊复; 刘青; 吴学安; 岳光溪

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive model for predicting the sulfur retention performance in circulating fluidized bedcombustors was developed which involves the different residence times, the wide particle size distribution andthe different forms of sulfur in the coal. In addition, the reductive decomposition of CaSO4 is highlighted. Thesimulation results from the model show that the sulfur contents, the bed temperature, the sorbent particle sizedistribution and the sorbent activity or the maximum conversion rate can significantly influence the sulfuretention performance in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustors.``

  2. Device for improved air and fuel distribution to a combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laster, Walter R.; Schilp, Reinhard

    2016-05-31

    A flow conditioning device (30, 50, 70, 100, 150) for a can annular gas turbine engine, including a plurality of flow elements (32, 34, 52, 54, 72, 74, 102) disposed in a compressed air flow path (42, 60, 80, 114, 122) leading to a combustor (12), configured such that relative adjustment of at least one flow directing element (32, 52, 72, 110) with respect to an adjacent flow directing element (34, 54, 74, 112, 120) during operation of the gas turbine engine is effective to adjust a level of choking of the compressed air flow path (42, 60, 80, 114, 122).

  3. Dynamic analysis of a flameless combustion model combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Flameless combustion is a new technology with the following advantages:1)Ultra-low emissions of both NOX and CO;2)fuel flexibility,from liquid fuels,natural gas to hydrogen-rich syngas;3)lower possibility of flashback and thermoacoustic oscillations.In this paper,we focus on the dynamic characteristics of a flameless model combustor.Experimental results show that flameless combustion can lower emissions while maintaining combustion stability.However,combining a pilot flame with flameless combustion may excite thermoacoustic instability.

  4. Refractory experience in circulating fluidized bed combustors, Task 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, R.Q.

    1989-11-01

    This report describes the results of an investigation into the status of the design and selection of refractory materials for coal-fueled circulating fluidized-bed combustors. The survey concentrated on operating units in the United States manufactured by six different boiler vendors: Babcock and Wilcox, Combustion Engineering, Foster Wheeler, Keeler Dorr-Oliver, Pyropower, and Riley Stoker. Information was obtained from the boiler vendors, refractory suppliers and installers, and the owners/operators of over forty units. This work is in support of DOE's Clean Coal Technology program, which includes circulating fluidized-bed technology as one of the selected concepts being evaluated.

  5. Sensitivity of PCDD/F formation to hazardous waste. Firing rate and combustion quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gullet, B.; Touati, A.

    2002-07-01

    Industrial boilers that cofire hazardous waste will be receiving attention from the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as part of an effort to consider revising PCDD/F emission standards for hazardous waste combustors. Recent combustor work has shown that combustion deposits became a sink and source for polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and di benzofurans (PCDDs/Fs) and their precursors, respectively, and that byproduct emissions have species-specific response times that result in varying pollutant concentrations long after fuel/waste or combustion conditions change. It is important to understand the PCDD/F emissions from hazardous-waste cofiring boilers as well as the impact of operating changes on emissions, such that accurate causality can be determined as well as appropriate conditions under which sampling can characterize emissions. (Author) 9 refs.

  6. Active Combustion Control for Aircraft Gas-Turbine Engines-Experimental Results for an Advanced, Low-Emissions Combustor Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaat, John C.; Kopasakis, George; Saus, Joseph R.; Chang, Clarence T.; Wey, Changlie

    2012-01-01

    Lean combustion concepts for aircraft engine combustors are prone to combustion instabilities. Mitigation of instabilities is an enabling technology for these low-emissions combustors. NASA Glenn Research Center s prior activity has demonstrated active control to suppress a high-frequency combustion instability in a combustor rig designed to emulate an actual aircraft engine instability experience with a conventional, rich-front-end combustor. The current effort is developing further understanding of the problem specifically as applied to future lean-burning, very low-emissions combustors. A prototype advanced, low-emissions aircraft engine combustor with a combustion instability has been identified and previous work has characterized the dynamic behavior of that combustor prototype. The combustor exhibits thermoacoustic instabilities that are related to increasing fuel flow and that potentially prevent full-power operation. A simplified, non-linear oscillator model and a more physics-based sectored 1-D dynamic model have been developed to capture the combustor prototype s instability behavior. Utilizing these models, the NASA Adaptive Sliding Phasor Average Control (ASPAC) instability control method has been updated for the low-emissions combustor prototype. Active combustion instability suppression using the ASPAC control method has been demonstrated experimentally with this combustor prototype in a NASA combustion test cell operating at engine pressures, temperatures, and flows. A high-frequency fuel valve was utilized to perturb the combustor fuel flow. Successful instability suppression was shown using a dynamic pressure sensor in the combustor for controller feedback. Instability control was also shown with a pressure feedback sensor in the lower temperature region upstream of the combustor. It was also demonstrated that the controller can prevent the instability from occurring while combustor operation was transitioning from a stable, low-power condition to

  7. Detecting deterministic nature of pressure measurements from a turbulent combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tony, J.; Gopalakrishnan, E. A.; Sreelekha, E.; Sujith, R. I.

    2015-12-01

    Identifying nonlinear structures in a time series, acquired from real-world systems, is essential to characterize the dynamics of the system under study. A single time series alone might be available in most experimental situations. In addition to this, conventional techniques such as power spectral analysis might not be sufficient to characterize a time series if it is acquired from a complex system such as a thermoacoustic system. In this study, we analyze the unsteady pressure signal acquired from a turbulent combustor with bluff-body and swirler as flame holding devices. The fractal features in the unsteady pressure signal are identified using the singularity spectrum. Further, we employ surrogate methods, with translational error and permutation entropy as discriminating statistics, to test for determinism visible in the observed time series. In addition to this, permutation spectrum test could prove to be a robust technique to characterize the dynamical nature of the pressure time series acquired from experiments. Further, measures such as correlation dimension and correlation entropy are adopted to qualitatively detect noise contamination in the pressure measurements acquired during the state of combustion noise. These ensemble of measures is necessary to identify the features of a time series acquired from a system as complex as a turbulent combustor. Using these measures, we show that the pressure fluctuations during combustion noise has the features of a high-dimensional chaotic data contaminated with white and colored noise.

  8. Single Cavity Trapped Vortex Combustor Dynamics – Part-1: Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Singhal

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a water-cooled, modular, atmospheric pressure Trapped Vortex Combustor (TVC test rig is designed and fabricated for reacting and non-reacting flow experiments. The unique features of this rig consist of a continuously variable length-to-depth ratio (L/D of the cavity and optical access through quartz plates provided on three sides for visualization. Flame stabilization in the single cavity TVC was successfully achieved with methane as fuel and the range of flow conditions for stable operation were identified. From these, a few cases were selected for detailed experimentation. Reacting flow experiments for the selected cases indicated that reducing L/D ratio and increasing cavity-air velocity favour stable combustion. The pressure drop across the single cavity TVC is observed to be lower as compared to conventional combustors. Temperatures are measured at the exit using thermocouples and corrected for radiative losses. Species concentrations are measured at the exit using an exhaust gas analyzer. The combustion efficiency is observed to be around 97-99 % and the pattern factor is observed to be in the range of 0.08 to 0.13. High-speed imaging made possible by the optical access indicates that the overall combustion is fairly steady, and there is no vortex shedding downstream.

  9. Scaling of heat transfer in gas-gas injector combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiao-Wei; Cai Guo-Biao; Gao Yu-Shan

    2011-01-01

    The scaling of heat transfer in gas-gas injector combuetor is investigated theoretically, numerically and experimentally based on the previous study on the scaling of gas-gas combustion flowfield. The similarity condition of the gas-gas injector combustor heat transfer is obtained by conducting a formulation analysis of the boundary layer Navier-Stokes equations and a dimensional analysis of the corresponding heat transfer phenomenon. Then, a practicable engineering scaling criterion of the gas-gas injector combustor heat transfer is put forward. The criterion implies that when the similarity conditions of inner flowfield are satisfied, the size and the pressure of gas-gas combustion chamber can be changed, while the heat transfer can still be qualitatively similar to the distribution trend and quantitatively correlates well with the size and pressure as q ∝ pc0.8dt-0.2. Based on the criterion, single-element injector chambers with different geometric sizes and at different chamber pressures ranging from 1 MPa to 20 MPa are numerically simulated. A single-element injector chamber is designed and hot-fire tested at seven chamber pressures from 0.92 MPa to 6.1 MPa.The inner wall heat flux are obtained and analysed. The numerical and experimental results both verified the scaling criterion in gas-gas injector combustion chambers under different chamber pressures and geometries.

  10. Three Dimensional CFD Analysis of the GTX Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, C. J., Jr.; Bond, R. B.; Edwards, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    The annular combustor geometry of a combined-cycle engine has been analyzed with three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics. Both subsonic combustion and supersonic combustion flowfields have been simulated. The subsonic combustion analysis was executed in conjunction with a direct-connect test rig. Two cold-flow and one hot-flow results are presented. The simulations compare favorably with the test data for the two cold flow calculations; the hot-flow data was not yet available. The hot-flow simulation indicates that the conventional ejector-ramjet cycle would not provide adequate mixing at the conditions tested. The supersonic combustion ramjet flowfield was simulated with frozen chemistry model. A five-parameter test matrix was specified, according to statistical design-of-experiments theory. Twenty-seven separate simulations were used to assemble surrogate models for combustor mixing efficiency and total pressure recovery. ScramJet injector design parameters (injector angle, location, and fuel split) as well as mission variables (total fuel massflow and freestream Mach number) were included in the analysis. A promising injector design has been identified that provides good mixing characteristics with low total pressure losses. The surrogate models can be used to develop performance maps of different injector designs. Several complex three-way variable interactions appear within the dataset that are not adequately resolved with the current statistical analysis.

  11. CFD predictions of LBO limits for aero-engine combustors using fuel iterative approximation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Bin; Huang Yong; Wang Fang; Xie Fa

    2013-01-01

    Lean blow-out (LBO) is critical to operational performance of combustion systems in propulsion and power generation.Current predictive tools for LBO limits are based on decadesold empirical correlations that have limited applicability for modern combustor designs.According to the Lefebvre's model for LBO and classical perfect stirred reactor (PSR) concept,a load parameter (LP) is proposed for LBO analysis of aero-engine combustors in this paper.The parameters contained in load parameter are all estimated from the non-reacting flow field of a combustor that is obtained by numerical simulation.Additionally,based on the load parameter,a method of fuel iterative approximation (FIA) is proposed to predict the LBO limit of the combustor.Compared with experimental data for 19 combustors,it is found that load parameter can represent the actual combustion load of the combustor near LBO and have good relativity with LBO fuel/air ratio (FAR).The LBO FAR obtained by FIA shows good agreement with experimental data,the maximum prediction uncertainty of FIA is about ± 17.5%.Because only the non-reacting flow is simulated,the time cost of the LBO limit prediction using FIA is relatively low (about 6 h for one combustor with computer equipment of CPU 2.66 GHz × 4 and 4 GB memory),showing that FIA is reliable and efficient to be used for practical applications.

  12. Combustion Dynamics in Multi-Nozzle Combustors Operating on High-Hydrogen Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santavicca, Dom; Lieuwen, Tim

    2013-09-30

    Actual gas turbine combustors for power generation applications employ multi-nozzle combustor configurations. Researchers at Penn State and Georgia Tech have extended previous work on the flame response in single-nozzle combustors to the more realistic case of multi-nozzle combustors. Research at Georgia Tech has shown that asymmetry of both the flow field and the acoustic forcing can have a significant effect on flame response and that such behavior is important in multi-flame configurations. As a result, the structure of the flame and its response to forcing is three-dimensional. Research at Penn State has led to the development of a three-dimensional chemiluminescence flame imaging technique that can be used to characterize the unforced (steady) and forced (unsteady) flame structure of multi-nozzle combustors. Important aspects of the flame response in multi-nozzle combustors which are being studied include flame-flame and flame-wall interactions. Research at Penn State using the recently developed three-dimensional flame imaging technique has shown that spatial variations in local flame confinement must be accounted for to accurately predict global flame response in a multi-nozzle can combustor.

  13. Experimental Study on Effects of Fuel Injection on Scramjet Combustor Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Xianyu; Li Xiaoshan; Ding Meng; Liu Weidong; Wang Zhenguo

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of fuel injection distribution on the scramjet combustor performance, there are conducted three sets of test on a hydrocarbon fueled direct-connect scramjet test facility. The results of Test A; whose fuel injection is carried out with injectors located on the top-wall and the bottom-wall, show that the fuel injection with an appropriate close-front and centralized distribution would be of much help to optimize combustor performances. The results of Test B, whose fuel injection is performed at the optimal injection locations found in Test A, with a given equivalence ratio and different injection proportions for each injector, show that this injection mode is of little benefit to improve combustor performances. The results of Test C with a circumferential fuel injection distribution displaies the possibility of ameliorating combustor performance. By analyzing the effects of injection location parameters on combustor performances on the base of the data of Test C, it is clear that the injector location has strong coupled influences on combustor performances. In addition, an inner-force synthesis specific impulse is used to reduce the errors caused by the disturbance of fuel supply and working state of air heater while assessing combustor performances.

  14. Development of a new method for improving load turndown in fluidized bed combustors: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R.C.

    1988-12-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate a new concept in fluidized bed design that improves load turndown capability. This improvement is accomplished by independently controlling heat transfer and combustion in the combustor. The design consists of two fluidized beds, one central and one annular. The central bed serves as the combustion bed. The annular bed is fluidized separately from the combustion bed and its level of fluidization determine the overall heat transfer rate from the combustion bed to the surrounding water jacket. Early theoretical considerations suggested a load turndown exceeding ten was possible for this design. This research consisted of three major phases: development of a computational model to predict heat transfer in the two-bed combustor, heat transfer measurements in hot-and-cold flow models of the combustor, and combustion tests in an optimally designed combustor. The computation model was useful in selecting the design of the combustor. Annular bed width and particle sizes were chosen with the aid of the model. The heat transfer tests were performed to determine if the existing correlations for fluidized bed heat transfer coefficients were sufficiently accurate for high aspect ratio fluidized beds (such as the annular bed in the combustor). Combustion tests were performed in an optimally designed combustor. Three fuel forms were used: double screened, crushed coal, coal-water-limestone mixtures (CWLM), and coal-limestone briquettes. 18 refs., 30 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. NONEQUILIBRIUM SULFUR CAPTURE & RETENTION IN AN AIR COOLED SLAGGING COAL COMBUSTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bert Zauderer

    2003-04-21

    Calcium oxide injected in a slagging combustor reacts with the sulfur from coal combustion to form sulfur-bearing particles. The reacted particles impact and melt in the liquid slag layer on the combustor wall by the centrifugal force of the swirling combustion gases. Due to the low solubility of sulfur in slag, it must be rapidly drained from the combustor to limit sulfur gas re-evolution. Prior analyses and laboratory scale data indicated that for Coal Tech's 20 MMBtu/hour, air-cooled, slagging coal combustor slag mass flow rates in excess of 400 lb/hr should limit sulfur re-evolution. The objective of this 42-month project was to validate this sulfur-in-slag model in a group of combustor tests. A total of 36 days of testing on the combustor were completed during the period of performance of this project. This was more that double the 16 test days that were required in the original work statement. The extra tests were made possible by cost saving innovations that were made in the operation of the combustor test facility and in additional investment of Coal Tech resources in the test effort. The original project plan called for two groups of tests. The first group of tests involved the injection of calcium sulfate particles in the form of gypsum or plaster of Paris with the coal into the 20 MMBtu/hour-combustor. The second group of tests consisted of the entire two-step process, in which lime or limestone is co-injected with coal and reacts with the sulfur gas released during combustion to form calcium sulfate particles that impact and dissolve in the slag layer. Since this sulfur capture process has been validated in numerous prior tests in this combustor, the primary effort in the present project was on achieving the high slag flow rates needed to retain the sulfur in the slag.

  16. Ignition and Flame Stabilization of a Strut-Jet RBCC Combustor with Small Rocket Exhaust

    OpenAIRE

    Jichao Hu; Juntao Chang; Wen Bao

    2014-01-01

    A Rocket Based Combined Cycle combustor model is tested at a ground direct connected rig to investigate the flame holding characteristics with a small rocket exhaust using liquid kerosene. The total temperature and the Mach number of the vitiated air flow, at exit of the nozzle are 1505 K and 2.6, respectively. The rocket base is embedded in a fuel injecting strut and mounted in the center of the combustor. The wall of the combustor is flush, without any reward step or cavity, so the strut-je...

  17. Design and preliminary results of a fuel flexible industrial gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, A. S.; Troth, D. L.; Yacobucci, H. G.

    1981-01-01

    The design characteristics are presented of a fuel tolerant variable geometry staged air combustor using regenerative/convective cooling. The rich/quench/lean variable geometry combustor is designed to achieve low NO(x) emission from fuels containing fuel bound nitrogen. The physical size of the combustor was calculated for a can-annular combustion system with associated operating conditions for the Allison 570-K engine. Preliminary test results indicate that the concept has the potential to meet emission requirements at maximum continuous power operation. However, airflow sealing and improved fuel/air mixing are necessary to meet Department of Energy program goals.

  18. Design and preliminary results of a fuel flexible industrial gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, A. S.; Troth, D. L.; Yacobucci, H. G.

    1981-01-01

    The design characteristics are presented of a fuel tolerant variable geometry staged air combustor using regenerative/convective cooling. The rich/quench/lean variable geometry combustor is designed to achieve low NO(x) emission from fuels containing fuel bound nitrogen. The physical size of the combustor was calculated for a can-annular combustion system with associated operating conditions for the Allison 570-K engine. Preliminary test results indicate that the concept has the potential to meet emission requirements at maximum continuous power operation. However, airflow sealing and improved fuel/air mixing are necessary to meet Department of Energy program goals.

  19. Fast Ignition and Stable Combustion of Coarse Coal Particles in a Nonslagging Cyclone Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BiaoZhou; X.L.Wang; 等

    1995-01-01

    A combustion set-up of an innovative nonalagging cyclone combustor called “Spouting-Cyclone Combustor(SCC)”,,with two-stage combustion,organized in orthogonal vortex flows,was established and the experimental studies on the fast ignition and stable combustion of coarse coal particles in this combustor were carried out.The flame temperature versus ignition time and the practical fast ignition the temperature fields in SCC were obtained.These results whow that it is possible to obtain highly efficient and clean combustion of unground coal particles by using this technology.

  20. Waste Sites - Municipal Waste Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — A Municipal Waste Operation is a DEP primary facility type related to the Waste Management Municipal Waste Program. The sub-facility types related to Municipal Waste...

  1. Flame dynamics in a micro-channeled combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Taaha; Markides, Christos N.; Balachandran, Ramanarayanan

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) has generated a significant interest in combustion-based power generation technologies, as a replacement of traditional electrochemical batteries which are plagued by low energy densities, short operational lives and low power-to-size and power-to-weight ratios. Moreover, the versatility of integrated combustion-based systems provides added scope for combined heat and power generation. This paper describes a study into the dynamics of premixed flames in a micro-channeled combustor. The details of the design and the geometry of the combustor are presented in the work by Kariuki and Balachandran [1]. This work showed that there were different modes of operation (periodic, a-periodic and stable), and that in the periodic mode the flame accelerated towards the injection manifold after entering the channels. The current study investigates these flames further. We will show that the flame enters the channel and propagates towards the injection manifold as a planar flame for a short distance, after which the flame shape and propagation is found to be chaotic in the middle section of the channel. Finally, the flame quenches when it reaches the injector slots. The glow plug position in the exhaust side ignites another flame, and the process repeats. It is found that an increase in air flow rate results in a considerable increase in the length (and associated time) over which the planar flame travels once it has entered a micro-channel, and a significant decrease in the time between its conversion into a chaotic flame and its extinction. It is well known from the literature that inside small channels the flame propagation is strongly influenced by the flow conditions and thermal management. An increase of the combustor block temperature at high flow rates has little effect on the flame lengths and times, whereas at low flow rates the time over which the planar flame front can be observed decreases and the time of

  2. 40 CFR 63.1221 - What are the replacement standards for hazardous waste burning lightweight aggregate kilns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Hazardous Waste Combustors Replacement Emissions Standards and Operating Limits for Incinerators, Cement.... You must not discharge or cause combustion gases to be emitted into the atmosphere or feed hazardous... corrected to 7 percent oxygen; or (ii) Rapid quench of the combustion gas temperature at the exit of...

  3. Gas turbine combustor exit piece with hinged connections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charron, Richard C.; Pankey, William W.

    2016-04-26

    An exit piece (66) with an inlet throat (67) that conducts a combustion gas flow (36A) in a path (82) from a combustor (63) to an annular chamber (68) that feeds the first blade section (37) of a gas turbine (26). The exit piece further includes an outlet portion (69) that forms a circumferential segment of the annular chamber. The outlet portion interconnects with adjacent outlet portions by hinges (78A, 78B, 80A, 80B). Each hinge may have a hinge axis (82A, 82B) parallel to a centerline (21) of the turbine. Respective gas flows (36A) are configured by an assembly (60) of the exit pieces to converge on the feed chamber (68) into a uniform helical flow that drives the first blade section with minimal circumferential variations in force.

  4. Development of a pressure gain combustor for improved cycle efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemmen, R.S.; Richards, G.A.; Janus, M.C.

    1994-09-01

    This paper presents results from an experimental research program attempting to improve the thermodynamic efficiencies of gas-turbine combustors. An elementary thermodynamic analysis shows that the thermodynamic cycle efficiencies of gas turbines can be significantly improved by using unsteady combustion that achieves quasi-constant-volume combustion. The ability to produce the so-called pressure gain via this process has already been demonstrated by others for pressures less than 3 atmospheres. This paper presents experimental results for pressures up to 11 atmospheres, compares certain process parameters to a numerical simulation, and briefly examines the problem of scale-up. Results of pollutant measurements over the 2--11 atmospheric range of operation are also included.

  5. Flame Interactions and Thermoacoustics in Multiple-Nozzle Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Brian

    The first major chapter of original research (Chapter 3) examines thermoacoustic oscillations in a low-emission staged multiple-nozzle lean direct injection (MLDI) combustor. This experimental program investigated a relatively practical combustor sector that was designed and built as part of a commercial development program. The research questions are both practical, such as under what conditions the combustor can be safely operated, and fundamental, including what is most significant to driving the combustion oscillations in this system. A comprehensive survey of operating conditions finds that the low-emission (and low-stability) intermediate and outer stages are necessary to drive significant thermoacoustics. Phase-averaged and time-resolved OH* imaging show that dramatic periodic strengthening and weakening of the reaction zone downstream of the low-emission combustion stages. An acoustic modal analysis shows the pressure wave shapes and identifies the dominant thermoacoustic behavior as the first longitudinal mode for this combustor geometry. Finally, a discussion of the likely significant coupling mechanisms is given. Periodic reaction zone behavior in the low-emission fuel stages is the primary contributor to unsteady heat release. Differences between the fuel stages in the air swirler design, the fuel number of the injectors, the lean blowout point, and the nominal operating conditions all likely contribute to the limit cycle behavior of the low-emission stages. Chapter 4 investigates the effects of interaction between two adjacent swirl-stabilized nozzles using experimental and numerical tools. These studies are more fundamental; while the nozzle hardware is the same as the lean direct injection nozzles used in the MLDI combustion concept, the findings are generally applicable to other swirl-stabilized combustion systems as well. Much of the work utilizes a new experiment where the distance between nozzles was varied to change the level of interaction

  6. A Simplified Model for Detonation Based Pressure-Gain Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    A time-dependent model is presented which simulates the essential physics of a detonative or otherwise constant volume, pressure-gain combustor for gas turbine applications. The model utilizes simple, global thermodynamic relations to determine an assumed instantaneous and uniform post-combustion state in one of many envisioned tubes comprising the device. A simple, second order, non-upwinding computational fluid dynamic algorithm is then used to compute the (continuous) flowfield properties during the blowdown and refill stages of the periodic cycle which each tube undergoes. The exhausted flow is averaged to provide mixed total pressure and enthalpy which may be used as a cycle performance metric for benefits analysis. The simplicity of the model allows for nearly instantaneous results when implemented on a personal computer. The results compare favorably with higher resolution numerical codes which are more difficult to configure, and more time consuming to operate.

  7. Turbulent transport measurements in a model of GT-combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikishev, L. M.; Gobyzov, O. A.; Sharaborin, D. K.; Lobasov, A. S.; Dulin, V. M.; Markovich, D. M.; Tsatiashvili, V. V.

    2016-10-01

    To reduce NOx formation modern industrial power gas-turbines utilizes lean premixed combustion of natural gas. The uniform distribution of local fuel/air ratio in the combustion chamber plays one of the key roles in the field of lean combustion to prevent thermo-acoustic pulsations. Present paper reports on simultaneous Particle Image Velocimetry and acetone Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence measurements in a cold model of GT-combustor to investigate mixing processes which are relevant to the organization of lean premixed combustion. Velocity and passive admixture pulsations correlations were measured to verify gradient closer model, which is often used in Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation of turbulent mixing.

  8. Combustion of hydrogen in an experimental trapped vortex combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui; Chen, Qin; Shao, Weiwei; Zhang, Yongliang; Wang, Yue; Xiao, Yunhan

    2009-09-01

    Combustion performances of pure hydrogen in an experimental trapped vortex combustor have been tested under different operating conditions. Pressure fluctuations, NOx emissions, OH distributions, and LBO (Lean Blow Out) were measured in the tests. Results indicate that the TVC test rig has successfully realized a double vortex construction in the cavity zone in a wide range of flow conditions. Hydrogen combustion in the test rig has achieved an excellent LBO performance and relatively low NOx emissions. Through comparison of dynamic pressure data, OH fluctuation images, and NOx emissions, the optimal operating condition has been found out to be Φp =0.4, fuel split =0.4, and primary air/fuel premixed.

  9. Single particle behaviour in circulating fluidized bed combustors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erik Weinell, Claus

    1994-01-01

    of fuel particles in a boiler. A cold pilot scale model of a circulating fluidized bed combustor was used. Here sand was recirculated by means of air. Pressure measurements along the riser determined suspension density. A radioactive tracking facility to determined the dynamic picture of the particle....... The tracer particles moved between the zones with a mean frequency of ca. 1 Hz. The upwards particle velocity in the upper dilute transport zone decreased with particle size and density, resulting in a decreased number of particle observations for the larger particles with the riser height. The particles...... kept their axial course within relatively short ranges but this pattern was wiped out at larger distances. The mean particle residence time in the zone above and below the secondary air inlet was almost independent of particle characteristics, but was proportional to the magnitude of the internal...

  10. Parametric Design of Injectors for LDI-3 Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmani, Kumud; Mongia, Hukam; Lee, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Application of a partially calibrated National Combustion Code (NCC) for providing guidance in the design of the 3rd generation of the Lean-Direct Injection (LDI) multi-element combustion configuration (LDI-3) is summarized. NCC was used to perform non-reacting and two-phase reacting flow computations on several LDI-3 injector configurations in a single-element and a five-element injector array. All computations were performed with a consistent approach for mesh-generation, turbulence, spray simulations, ignition and chemical kinetics-modeling. Both qualitative and quantitative assessment of the computed flowfield characteristics of the several design options led to selection of an optimal injector LDI- 3 design that met all the requirements including effective area, aerodynamics and fuel-air mixing criteria. Computed LDI-3 emissions (namely, NOx, CO and UHC) will be compared with the prior generation LDI- 2 combustor experimental data at relevant engine cycle conditions.

  11. Enabling Advanced Modeling and Simulations for Fuel-Flexible Combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinz Pitsch

    2010-05-31

    The overall goal of the present project is to enable advanced modeling and simulations for the design and optimization of fuel-flexible turbine combustors. For this purpose we use a high-fidelity, extensively-tested large-eddy simulation (LES) code and state-of-the-art models for premixed/partially-premixed turbulent combustion developed in the PI's group. In the frame of the present project, these techniques are applied, assessed, and improved for hydrogen enriched premixed and partially premixed gas-turbine combustion. Our innovative approaches include a completely consistent description of flame propagation, a coupled progress variable/level set method to resolve the detailed flame structure, and incorporation of thermal-diffusion (non-unity Lewis number) effects. In addition, we have developed a general flamelet-type transformation holding in the limits of both non-premixed and premixed burning. As a result, a model for partially premixed combustion has been derived. The coupled progress variable/level method and the general flamelet tranformation were validated by LES of a lean-premixed low-swirl burner that has been studied experimentally at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The model is extended to include the non-unity Lewis number effects, which play a critical role in fuel-flexible combustor with high hydrogen content fuel. More specifically, a two-scalar model for lean hydrogen and hydrogen-enriched combustion is developed and validated against experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Results are presented to emphasize the importance of non-unity Lewis number effects in the lean-premixed low-swirl burner of interest in this project. The proposed model gives improved results, which shows that the inclusion of the non-unity Lewis number effects is essential for accurate prediction of the lean-premixed low-swirl flame.

  12. Enabling Advanced Modeling and Simulations for Fuel-Flexible Combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitsch, Heinz

    2010-05-31

    The overall goal of the present project is to enable advanced modeling and simulations for the design and optimization of fuel-flexible turbine combustors. For this purpose we use a high fidelity, extensively-tested large-eddy simulation (LES) code and state-of-the-art models for premixed/partially-premixed turbulent combustion developed in the PI's group. In the frame of the present project, these techniques are applied, assessed, and improved for hydrogen enriched premixed and partially premixed gas-turbine combustion. Our innovative approaches include a completely consistent description of flame propagation; a coupled progress variable/level set method to resolve the detailed flame structure, and incorporation of thermal-diffusion (non-unity Lewis number) effects. In addition, we have developed a general flamelet-type transformation holding in the limits of both non-premixed and premixed burning. As a result, a model for partially premixed combustion has been derived. The coupled progress variable/level method and the general flamelet transformation were validated by LES of a lean-premixed low-swirl burner that has been studied experimentally at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The model is extended to include the non-unity Lewis number effects, which play a critical role in fuel-flexible combustor with high hydrogen content fuel. More specifically, a two-scalar model for lean hydrogen and hydrogen-enriched combustion is developed and validated against experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Results are presented to emphasize the importance of non-unity Lewis number effects in the lean-premixed low-swirl burner of interest in this project. The proposed model gives improved results, which shows that the inclusion of the non-unity Lewis number effects is essential for accurate prediction of the lean-premixed low-swirl flame.

  13. Robust High Fidelity Large Eddy Simulation Tool for Gas Turbine Combustors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective is to develop and demonstrate the use of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) for computations of gas turbine combustor flow and transport processes, using the...

  14. A variable-geometry combustor used to study primary and secondary zone stoichiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briehl, D.; Schultz, D. F.; Ehlers, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    A combustion program is underway to evaluate fuel quality effects on gas turbine combustors. A rich-lean variable geometry combustor design was chosen to evaluate fuel quality effects over a wide range of primary and secondary zone equivalence ratios at simulated engine operating conditions. The first task of this effort, was to evaluate the performance of the variable geometry combustor. The combustor incorporates three stations of variable geometry to control primary and secondary zone equivalence ratio and overall pressure loss. Geometry changes could be made while a test was in progress through the use of remote control actuators. The primary zone liner was water cooled to eliminate the concern of liner durability. Emissions and performance data were obtained at simulated engine conditions of 80 percent and full power. Inlet air temperature varied from 611 to 665K, inlet total pressure varied from 1.02 to 1.24 MPa, reference velocity was a constant 1400 K.

  15. Design of Combustor for Long-range Ram-jet Engine and Performance of Rectangular Analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayle, Warren D; Koch, Richard G

    1954-01-01

    The report describes the design of a piloted combustor intended for a ram-jet engine of long flight range. The unit comprises a large annular basket of V-type cross-section, the inner surface of which is slotted and bent into small V-gutters. At the trailing edge of the basket, eight V-gutters are used to propagate the flame into the main stream. A rectangular analog of this combustor was tested at air-flow conditions corresponding to those that might be obtained during cruise. At these conditions, combustion efficiencies of as much as 90 percent were calculated for the combustor at the design equivalence ratio of 0.52. The performance of the unit was relatively insensitive to mounting and flow variables; the greatest effect on efficiency was that of the manner and location of the fuel injection. A full-scale version of this combustor has been designed for a 48-inch-diameter engine.

  16. Thermoacoustic analysis of the dynamic pressure inside a model combustor during limit cycle oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alemela, Panduranga Reddy; Roman Casado, Juan; Tarband Veeraraghavan, Santos Kumar; Kok, Jim

    2013-01-01

    In this work comprehensive experimental and numerical studies incorporating the most relevant physical mechanisms causing limit cycle pressure and combustion rate oscillations (LCO) in a laboratory scale combustor will be discussed. The strong interaction between the aerodynamics-combustion-acoustic

  17. A chemical reactor network for oxides of nitrogen emission prediction in gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Nguyen Thanh

    2014-06-01

    This study presents the use of a new chemical reactor network (CRN) model and non-uniform injectors to predict the NOx emission pollutant in gas turbine combustor. The CRN uses information from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) combustion analysis with two injectors of CH4-air mixture. The injectors of CH4-air mixture have different lean equivalence ratio, and they control fuel flow to stabilize combustion and adjust combustor's equivalence ratio. Non-uniform injector is applied to improve the burning process of the turbine combustor. The results of the new CRN for NOx prediction in the gas turbine combustor show very good agreement with the experimental data from Korea Electric Power Research Institute.

  18. TRW Advanced Slagging Coal Combustor Utility Demonstration. Fourth Quarterly progress report, August 1989--October 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    The TRW Advanced Slagging Coal Combustor Demonstration Project consists of retrofitting Orange and Rockland (O&R) Utility Corporation`s Lovett Plant Unit No. 3 with four (4) slagging combustors which will allow the gas/ou desip unit to fire 2.5 sulfur coal. The slogging combustor process will provide NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions that meet NSPS and New York State Envirommental Standards. TRW-CBU scope of work includes the engineering, design and supply of the slogging combustors, coal and limestone feed systems and a control system for these components. During this report period, the design activities for all systems progressed to permit the release of specifications and requests for proposals. Award of contracts for long-delivery items and major equipment are being placed to meet the revised program schedule.

  19. Coupled generator and combustor performance calculations for potential early commercial MHD power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, T. C.; Hnat, J. G.; Marston, C. H.

    1979-01-01

    A parametric study of the performance of the MHD generator and combustor components of potential early commercial open-cycle MHD/steam power plants is presented. Consideration is given to the effects of air heater system concept, MHD combustor type, coal type, thermal input power, oxygen enrichment of the combustion, subsonic and supersonic generator flow and magnetic field strength on coupled generator and combustor performance. The best performance is found to be attained with a 3000 F, indirectly fired air heater, no oxygen enrichment, Illinois no. 6 coal, a two-stage cyclone combustor with 85% slag rejection, a subsonic generator, and a magnetic field configuration yielding a constant transverse electric field of 4 kV/m. Results indicate that optimum net MHD generator power is generally compressor-power-limited rather than electric-stress-limited, with optimum net power a relatively weak function of operating pressure.

  20. Heat transport and parametric simulation of a porous ceramic combustor in a gas turbine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei David

    2002-09-01

    This study is to generate basic knowledge of heat transport inside a porous ceramic combustor in a gas turbine combustion environment. This work predicts the peak temperature inside the porous ceramic combustor, which directly affects the combustor life cycle and flame stability characteristics within the ceramic media. The results will help to generate an operating window for the stable operation of the porous ceramic combustor under the operating conditions of a gas turbine. A theoretical model is developed to study the operational characteristics of the combustor. The model used here accounts for both radiative and convective thermal transport between the solid and gas phases. The solid is assumed to absorb, emit, and scatter radiative energy. A one-step global reaction mechanism is used to model the released energy due to combustion. The effects of the properties of the porous material on gas and solid phase temperature distribution, radiative flux distribution, and flame location (as indicated by local temperature) were investigated. The results confirm that radiative heat transfer is a key mechanism in the stable operation of the combustor. For proper functioning of the combustor, the temperature of the porous material (the solid temperature) must be lowered in order to maintain material and structural integrity. Yet, the gas phase temperature has to be high enough so that a stable combustion process can be maintained. A lower value for the porous material temperature of the combustor can be obtained by enhancing the radiative output from the combustor to the downstream sections. This can be achieved by choosing optimized values of porosity and other properties of the porous ceramic matrix. Higher solid phase thermal conductivity enhances the radiative output from the combustor and helps to reduce the porous material's temperature. It is also desirable that the porous layer has an optimized optical thickness so that the radiative output of the combustor is

  1. CFD Study of NOx Emissions in a Model Commercial Aircraft Engine Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Man; FU Zhenbo; LIN Yuzhen; LI Jibao

    2012-01-01

    Air worthiness requirements of the aircraft engine emission bring new challenges to the combustor research and design.With the motivation to design high performance and clean combustor,computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is utilized as the powerful design approach.In this paper,Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations of reactive two-phase flow in an experimental low emission combustor is performed.The numerical approach uses an implicit compressible gas solver together with a Lagrangian liquid-phase tracking method and the extended coherent flamelet model for turbulence-combustion interaction.The NOx formation is modeled by the concept of post-processing,which resolves the NOx transport equation with the assumption of frozen temperature distribution.Both turbulence-combustion interaction model and NOx formation model are firstly evaluated by the comparison of experimental data published in open literature of a lean direct injection (LDI) combustor.The test rig studied in this paper is called low emission stirred swirl (LESS) combustor,which is a two-stage model combustor,fueled with liquid kerosene (RP-3) and designed by Beihang University (BUAA).The main stage of LESS combustor employs the principle of lean prevaporized and premixed (LPP) concept to reduce pollutant,and the pilot stage depends on a diffusion flame for flame stabilization.Detailed numerical results including species distribution,turbulence performance and burning performance are qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated.Numerical prediction of NOx emission shows a good agreement with test data at both idle condition and full power condition of LESS combustor.Preliminary results of the flame structure are shown in this paper.The flame stabilization mechanism and NOx reduction effort are also discussed with in-depth analysis.

  2. Combustor having mixing tube bundle with baffle arrangement for directing fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Michael John; McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin

    2016-08-23

    A combustor includes a tube bundle that extends radially across at least a portion of the combustor. The tube bundle includes an upstream surface axially separated from a downstream surface, and a plurality of tubes extend from the upstream surface through the downstream surface to provide fluid communication through the tube bundle. A barrier extends radially inside the tube bundle between the upstream and downstream surfaces, and a baffle extends axially inside the tube bundle between the upstream surface and the barrier.

  3. Laser-Induced Fluorescence and Performance Analysis of the Ultra-Compact Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    fuel consumption TVC Trapped Vortex Combustion UCC Ultra Compact Combustor UHC Unburned hydrocarbons UV Ultra-violet VI Virtual Instrument 2-D...unburned hydrocarbons ( UHC ), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), and soot particles (Turns, 2006:3). In conventional combustors, a high...power (fuel-rich) condition tends to produce more NOx and soot, while low power (fuel-lean) produces more UHC and CO (Quaale, 2003:27). While the UCC

  4. Investigation of operational parameters for an industrial CFB combustor of coal, biomass and sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The combustion of coal and/or biomass (sludge, wood waste, RDF, etc.) in a circulating fluidized bed has been a commercial topper for over 20 years, and references to principles and applications are numerous and widespread although few data are presented concerning the operation of large scale CFB-units. The authors studied the CFB-combustion at UPM-Kymmene (Ayr), a major paper mill relying for its steam production upon the combustion of coal (80-85%), wood bark (5-10%) and wastewater treatment sludge (5-10%). The maximum capacity of the CFB is 58 MWth.A complete diagnostic of the operation was made, and additional tests were performed to assess the operating mode. The plant schematics,relevant dimensions and process data are given. To assess the operation of the UPM-CFB, it is important to review essential design parameters and principles of CFB combustors, which will be discussed in detail to include required data, heat balance and flowrates, operating versus transport velocity, kinetics and conversion (including the possible effect of the Bouduard reaction if carbon is present).Since the residence time in the riser and the cyclone efficiency determine the burnout of circulating fuel-particles, the UPM-CFB was subjected to a stimulus response technique using nickel oxide as tracer. Results illustrate the efficiency of the cyclone separation and the number of recycle loops for particles of a given size. Results will also be used to assess the cyclone operation and efficiency and to comment upon expected and measured carbon conversion.

  5. Study of Biodiesel Emissions and Carbon Mitigation in Gas Turbine Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Alalim Altaher

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The energy security and reduction of carbon emissions have accelerated the R&D of the alternative fuels in the transport, heating and power generation sectors in last decade. The heating and power generation sectors are two of the major contributors to carbon dioxide emissions, which are due to the combustion of petroleum fuels. A gas turbine combustor test rig was used to study the combustion and emission characteristics of waste cooking oil methyl ester (WME biodiesel. A 140mm diameter atmospheric pressure premixed combustion test rig was used at 600K inlet air temperature and Mach number 0.017. The tests were conducted using pure WME and blend with kerosene. The central fuel injection was used for liquid fuels and wall injection was used for NG (Natural Gas. The exhaust samples for smoke and gaseous emissions (NOx, UHC, CO and CO₂ have been analysed on dry basis and corrected to 15% O₂ over range of different fuel rate. The results showed that the biodiesel had lower CO, UHC emissions and higher NOx emissions than the kerosene. The blend B20 had lowest NOx emissions comparing with pure biodiesel (B100 and B50. The optimum conditions for WME with lowest emissions were identified. The carbon dioxide emissions per 100 megawatts of heat generated for each fuel were calculated. The relative carbon emissions and mitigations by biodiesel were compared. The results can be used to estimate pollutant emissions and carbon reductions by biodiesel in power generation industry and other sectors where gas turbine engines are used.

  6. Non-reacting Flow Analysis from Combustor Inlet to Outlet using Computational Fluid Dynamics Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ananda Reddy

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes non-reacting flow analysis of a gas turbine combustion system. The method is based on the solution of Navier-Strokes equations using generalised non-orthogonal coordinate system. The turbulence effects are modelled through the renormalisation group k-E model. The method has been applied to a practical gas turbine combustor. The combustionsystem includes swirler vane passages, fuel nozzles, rotor bleed, customer bleed, air-blast atomiser, swirl cone, and all holes in primary , dilution , dome, flare, and cooling ring. Thetotal geometry has been created using the pre-processors GAMBIT and CATIA, and the meshing has been done using GAMBIT, and the analysis carried out in a FLUENT solver. The interaction between the diffuser and the combustor external flows plays a key role in controlling the pressure loss, air flow distribution around the combustor liner, durability, and stability. The aero gas turbine combustor designs are generally guided by experimental methods and past experience; however, experimental methods are inherently slow, costly, especially at hightemperature engine-operating conditions. These drawbacks and the growing need to understand the complex flow-field phenomenon involved, have led to the development of a numericalmodel for predicting flow in the gas turbine combustor. These models are used to optimise the design of the combustor and its subcomponents, and reduce cost, time, and the number ofexperiments.

  7. Residential Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Fruergaard, Thilde; Matsufuji, Y.

    2011-01-01

    are discussed in this chapter. Characterizing residential waste is faced with the problem that many residences already divert some waste away from the official collection systems, for example performing home composting of vegetable waste and garden waste, having their bundled newspaper picked up by the scouts...... twice a year or bringing their used furniture to the flea markets organized by charity clubs. Thus, much of the data available on residential waste represents collected waste and not necessarily all generated waste. The latter can only be characterized by careful studies directly at the source......Residential waste comes from residential areas with multi-family and single-family housing and includes four types of waste: household waste, garden waste, bulky waste and household hazardous waste. Typical unit generation rates, material composition, chemical composition and determining factors...

  8. Residential Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Fruergaard, Thilde; Matsufuji, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Residential waste comes from residential areas with multi-family and single-family housing and includes four types of waste: household waste, garden waste, bulky waste and household hazardous waste. Typical unit generation rates, material composition, chemical composition and determining factors...... are discussed in this chapter. Characterizing residential waste is faced with the problem that many residences already divert some waste away from the official collection systems, for example performing home composting of vegetable waste and garden waste, having their bundled newspaper picked up by the scouts...... twice a year or bringing their used furniture to the flea markets organized by charity clubs. Thus, much of the data available on residential waste represents collected waste and not necessarily all generated waste. The latter can only be characterized by careful studies directly at the source...

  9. The Use of an Ultra-Compact Combustor as an Inter-Turbine Burner for Improved Engine Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Alstom , formally known as ABB Power Generation, developed a line of SCgas turbines for the power generation industry [12]. The Alstom GT24 and GT26...consist of a primary combustor a turbine and a reheat combustor, with the aim of achieving high efficiency while delivering low emissions. Alstom has been...utilizing the SC concepts since the 1940’s using diffusion type combustors. In 1995 Alstom developed their modern line SC gas turbines shown in Figure

  10. Hazardous Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you throw these substances away, they become hazardous waste. Some hazardous wastes come from products in our homes. Our garbage can include such hazardous wastes as old batteries, bug spray cans and paint ...

  11. Industrial Gas Turbine Engine Catalytic Pilot Combustor-Prototype Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etemad, Shahrokh [Precision Combustion, Inc., North Haven, CT (United States); Baird, Benjamin [Precision Combustion, Inc., North Haven, CT (United States); Alavandi, Sandeep [Precision Combustion, Inc., North Haven, CT (United States); Pfefferle, William [Precision Combustion, Inc., North Haven, CT (United States)

    2010-04-01

    PCI has developed and demonstrated its Rich Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL®) technology for industrial and utility gas turbines to meet DOE's goals of low single digit emissions. The technology offers stable combustion with extended turndown allowing ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment and further increasing overall efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses). The objective of the work was to develop and demonstrate emission benefits of the catalytic technology to meet strict emissions regulations. Two different applications of the RCL® concept were demonstrated: RCL® catalytic pilot and Full RCL®. The RCL® catalytic pilot was designed to replace the existing pilot (a typical source of high NOx production) in the existing Dry Low NOx (DLN) injector, providing benefit of catalytic combustion while minimizing engine modification. This report discusses the development and single injector and engine testing of a set of T70 injectors equipped with RCL® pilots for natural gas applications. The overall (catalytic pilot plus main injector) program NOx target of less than 5 ppm (corrected to 15% oxygen) was achieved in the T70 engine for the complete set of conditions with engine CO emissions less than 10 ppm. Combustor acoustics were low (at or below 0.1 psi RMS) during testing. The RCL® catalytic pilot supported engine startup and shutdown process without major modification of existing engine controls. During high pressure testing, the catalytic pilot showed no incidence of flashback or autoignition while operating over a wide range of flame temperatures. In applications where lower NOx production is required (i.e. less than 3 ppm), in parallel, a Full RCL® combustor was developed that replaces the existing DLN injector providing potential for maximum emissions reduction. This concept was tested at industrial gas turbine conditions in a Solar Turbines, Incorporated high-pressure (17 atm.) combustion rig and in a modified Solar

  12. Characterization and Simulation of Thermoacoustic Instability in a Low Emissions Combustor Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaat, John C.; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2008-01-01

    Extensive research is being done toward the development of ultra-low-emissions combustors for aircraft gas turbine engines. However, these combustors have an increased susceptibility to thermoacoustic instabilities. This type of instability was recently observed in an advanced, low emissions combustor prototype installed in a NASA Glenn Research Center test stand. The instability produces pressure oscillations that grow with increasing fuel/air ratio, preventing full power operation. The instability behavior makes the combustor a potentially useful test bed for research into active control methods for combustion instability suppression. The instability behavior was characterized by operating the combustor at various pressures, temperatures, and fuel and air flows representative of operation within an aircraft gas turbine engine. Trends in instability behavior vs. operating condition have been identified and documented. A simulation developed at NASA Glenn captures the observed instability behavior. The physics-based simulation includes the relevant physical features of the combustor and test rig, employs a Sectored 1-D approach, includes simplified reaction equations, and provides time-accurate results. A computationally efficient method is used for area transitions, which decreases run times and allows the simulation to be used for parametric studies, including control method investigations. Simulation results show that the simulation exhibits a self-starting, self-sustained combustion instability and also replicates the experimentally observed instability trends vs. operating condition. Future plans are to use the simulation to investigate active control strategies to suppress combustion instabilities and then to experimentally demonstrate active instability suppression with the low emissions combustor prototype, enabling full power, stable operation.

  13. Characterization and Simulation of the Thermoacoustic Instability Behavior of an Advanced, Low Emissions Combustor Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaat, John C.; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2008-01-01

    Extensive research is being done toward the development of ultra-low-emissions combustors for aircraft gas turbine engines. However, these combustors have an increased susceptibility to thermoacoustic instabilities. This type of instability was recently observed in an advanced, low emissions combustor prototype installed in a NASA Glenn Research Center test stand. The instability produces pressure oscillations that grow with increasing fuel/air ratio, preventing full power operation. The instability behavior makes the combustor a potentially useful test bed for research into active control methods for combustion instability suppression. The instability behavior was characterized by operating the combustor at various pressures, temperatures, and fuel and air flows representative of operation within an aircraft gas turbine engine. Trends in instability behavior versus operating condition have been identified and documented, and possible explanations for the trends provided. A simulation developed at NASA Glenn captures the observed instability behavior. The physics-based simulation includes the relevant physical features of the combustor and test rig, employs a Sectored 1-D approach, includes simplified reaction equations, and provides time-accurate results. A computationally efficient method is used for area transitions, which decreases run times and allows the simulation to be used for parametric studies, including control method investigations. Simulation results show that the simulation exhibits a self-starting, self-sustained combustion instability and also replicates the experimentally observed instability trends versus operating condition. Future plans are to use the simulation to investigate active control strategies to suppress combustion instabilities and then to experimentally demonstrate active instability suppression with the low emissions combustor prototype, enabling full power, stable operation.

  14. Hydrodynamics of a fluidized bed co-combustor for tobacco waste and coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Yu, Bangting; Chang, Jian; Wu, Guiying; Wang, Tengda; Wen, Dongsheng

    2012-09-01

    The fluidization characteristics of binary mixtures containing tobacco stem (TS) and cation exchange resin (a substitute for coal) were studied in a rectangular bed with the cross-section area of 0.3 × 0.025 m(2). The presence of herbaceous biomass particles and their unique properties such as low density and high aspect ratio resulted in different fluidization behaviors. Three fluidization velocities, i.e. initial, minimum and full fluidization velocities, were observed as the TS mass fraction increased from 7% to 20%, and four hydrodynamic stages were experienced, including the static, segregation, transition and mixing stages, with increasing operational gas velocities. The results suggest that the operational gas velocity should be in the range of 2.0-5.0 times of the minimum fluidization velocity of the binary mixtures, and less than 7% TS mass fraction should be used in an existing bubbling fluidized bed. Higher TS fraction inclusion requires the introduction of central jet gas to improve the mixing effect.

  15. Combustion oscillation study in a kerosene fueled rocket-based combined-cycle engine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhi-Wei; He, Guo-Qiang; Qin, Fei; Xue, Rui; Wei, Xiang-Geng; Shi, Lei

    2016-12-01

    This study reports the combustion oscillation features in a three-dimensional (3D) rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) engine combustor under flight Mach number (Mflight) 3.0 conditions both experimentally and numerically. Experiment is performed on a direct-connect ground test facility, which measures the wall pressure along the flow-path. High-speed imaging of the flame luminosity and schlieren is carried out at exit of the primary rocket. Compressible reactive large eddy simulation (LES) with reduced chemical kinetics of a surrogate model for kerosene is performed to further understand the combustion oscillation mechanisms in the combustor. LES results are validated with experimental data by the time-averaged and root mean square (RMS) pressure values, and show acceptable agreement. Effects of the primary rocket jet on pressure oscillation in the combustor are analyzed. Relation of the high speed rocket jet oscillation, which is thought to among the most probable sources of combustion oscillation, with the RBCC combustor is recognized. Results reveal that the unsteady over-expanded rocket jet has significant impacts on the combustion oscillation feature of the RBCC combustor, which is different from a thermo-acoustics type oscillation. The rocket jet/air inflow physical interactions under different rocket jet expansion degrees are experimentally studied.

  16. The Mechanisms of Flame Stabilization and Low NOx Emission in an Eccentric Jet Pulverized Coal Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SunWenchao; SunYezhu; 等

    1992-01-01

    The mechanisms of flame stabilization and low NOx emission features of an accentric jet pulverzed coal combustor were studied through numerical modelling and experimental investigation.The results show that the formation of the unique flowfield structure is closely related to the interaction among combustor configuration.the primary jet and the control Jet.and that certain rules should be follwed in orber to obtain the optimum condition for flame stabilization.The distributions of temperature and concentration of NO,O2,CO and CO2 inside the combustor were experimentally measured.The effects of strustural and operational parameters on combustion and NO formation were studied.It was found that reduction of primary air,suitable use of control jet and reasonable uptilt angle of the primary jet all contributed to the reduction of NOx at the combustor exit.A new hypothesis,that reasonable separation of oxygen and fuel within the fuel-rich zone is beneficial to further reduction of NOx emission,is given,The study showed that good compatibility existed between the capability of flame stabilization and low NOX emission for this type of combustor.

  17. Effects of Cavity Configurations on Flameholding and Performances of Kerosene Fueled Scramjet Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Deyong; Song, Wenyan; Wang, Yuhang; Wang, Yanhua

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the effects of cavity flameholder configurations on flameholding and performances of kerosene fueled scramjet combustor were studied experimentally and numerically. For experiments, a directly connected ground facility was used and clean high enthalpy air, with a total temperature of 800 K and a total pressure of 800 Kpa, was provided by an electricity resistance heater. To investigate the effects of cavity configurations on flameholding capacity and reacting-flow characteristics, three different flameholders, one single cavity flameholder and two tandem cavity flameholders, were used in experiments. For the two combustors with tandem cavity flameholders, the location and configurations of its up-stream cavity were same with the single cavity flameholder, and the length-to-depth ratios for down-stream cavities were 9 and 11 respectively. The experimental results showed that stabilize kerosene combustion were achieved for combustor with tandem cavity flameholders mounted, and none for that with single cavity flameholder. The none-reacting and reacting flows of combustor models with tandem cavity flameholders were compared and studied with numerical and experimental results. The results showed that higher combustion efficiencies and pressure recovery ratios were achieved for the combustor with down-stream cavity length-to-depth ratio of 9.

  18. Emission Characteristics of A P and W Axially Staged Sector Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhuohui J.; Wey, Changlie; Chang, Clarence T.; Lee, Chi Ming; Surgenor, Angela D.; Kopp-Vaughan, Kristin; Cheung, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Emission characteristics of a three-cup P and W Axially Controlled Stoichiometry (ACS) sector combustor are reported in this article. Multiple injection points and fuel staging strategies are used in this combustor design. Pilot-stage injectors are located on the front dome plate of the combustor, and main-stage injectors are positioned on the top and bottom of the combustor liners downstream. Low power configuration uses only pilot-stage injectors. Main-stage injectors are added to high power configuration to help distribute fuel more evenly and achieve overall lean burn yielding very low NOx emissions. Combustion efficiencies at four ICAO LTO conditions were all above 99%. Three EINOx emissions correlation equations were developed based on the experimental data to describe the NOx emission trends of this combustor concept. For the 7% and 30% engine power conditions, NOx emissions are obtained with the low power configuration, and the EINOx values are 6.16 and 6.81. The high power configuration was used to assess 85% and 100% engine power NOx emissions, with measured EINOx values of 4.58 and 7.45, respectively. The overall landing-takeoff cycle NOx emissions are about 12% relative to ICAO CAEP/6 level.

  19. Forced and self-excited oscillations in a natural gas fired lean premixed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Daesik; Park, Sung Wook

    2010-11-15

    An experimental study of the flame response in a premixed gas turbine combustor has been conducted at room temperature and under atmospheric pressure inlet conditions using natural gas. The fuel is premixed with the air upstream of a choked inlet to avoid equivalence ratio fluctuations. Therefore the observed flame response is only the result of the imposed velocity fluctuations, which are produced using a variable-speed siren. Also, a variable length combustor is designed for investigating characteristics of self-excited instabilities. Measurements are made of the velocity fluctuation in the mixing section using hot wire anemometry and of the heat release fluctuation in the combustor using chemiluminescence emission. The results are analyzed to determine the phase and gain of the flame transfer function. The results show that the gain of flame transfer function is closely associated both with inlet flow forcing conditions such as frequency and amplitude of modulation as well as the operating conditions such as equivalence ratio. In order to predict the operating conditions where the combustor goes stable or unstable at given combustor and nozzle designs, time-lag analysis was tried using convection time delay measured from the phase information of the transfer function. The model prediction was in very good agreement with the self-excited instability measurement. However, spatial heat release distribution became more significant in long flames than in short flames and also had an important influence on the system damping procedure. (author)

  20. Combustion Dynamic Characteristics Identification in a 9-point LDI Combustor Under Choked Outlet Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhuohui J.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2017-01-01

    Combustion dynamics data were collected at the NASA Glenn Research Center's CE-5 flame tube test facility under combustor outlet choked conditions. Two 9-point Swirl-Venturi Lean Direct Injection (SV-LDI) configurations were tested in a rectangular cuboid combustor geometry. Combustion dynamic data were measured at different engine operational conditions up to inlet air pressure and temperature of 24.13 bar and 828 K, respectively. In this study, the effects of acoustic cavity resonance, precessing vortex core (PVC), and non-uniform thermal expansion on the dynamic noise spectrum are identified by comparing the dynamic data that collected at various combustor inlet conditions along with combustor geometric calculations. The results show that the acoustic cavity resonance noises were seen in the counter-rotating pilot configuration but not in the co-rotating pilot configuration. Dynamic pressure noise band at around 0.9 kHz was only detected at the P'41 location (9.8 cm after fuel injector face) but not at the P'42 location (29 cm after the fuel injector face); the amplitude of this noise band depended on the thermal expansion ratio (T4/T3). The noise band at around 1.8 kHz was found to depend on the inlet air pressure or the air density inside the combustor. The PVC frequency was not observed in these two configurations.

  1. Investigation of swirling flow mixing for application in an MHD pulverized coal combustor using isothermal modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Power, W. H.

    1980-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate combustor reactant mixing with swirling oxidizer flow. The combustor configuration that was considered was designed to simulate a 4 lbm/sec mas flow pulverized coal combustor being tested in The University of Tennessee Space Institute MHD Facility. A one-fourth dimensionally scaled combustor model was developed for isothermal flow testing. A comparison was made of cold flow tests using 3 swirler designs with a base case oxidizer injector design of perforated plated which demonstrated acceptable performance in the 4 lbm/sec MHD combustor. The three swirlers that were evaluated were designed to allow a wide range of swirl intensity to be investigated. The design criterion of the swirler was the swirl number which has been related to swirler geometry. The results of the study showed that the swirlers that were tested fell short of the mixing characteristics displayed with the perforated plate base case oxidizer injector. Test data obtained with the cold flow model established that the actual swirl numbers of two of the swirlers were much lower than the design swirl numbers. Recirculation zones were defined for all configurations that were tested, and a comparison of velocity profiles was made for the configurations.

  2. ZERO WASTE

    OpenAIRE

    Upadhyaya, Luv

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the thesis was to develop a clear vision on better waste management system. The thesis introduced the sustainable waste management along with innovation. The aim of the research was to find out the types of waste being introduced to environment, their consequence on human beings and surroundings, best policies, principles and practices to minimize the effect of the waste to lowest. The study was based on literature. The thesis includes the introduction of types of waste, clarifi...

  3. Computational simulation of multi-strut central lobed injection of hydrogen in a scramjet combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam Choubey

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-strut injection is an approach to increase the overall performance of Scramjet while reducing the risk of thermal choking in a supersonic combustor. Hence computational simulation of Scramjet combustor at Mach 2.5 through multiple central lobed struts (three struts have been presented and discussed in the present research article. The geometry and model used here is slight modification of the DLR (German Aerospace Center scramjet model. Present results show that the presence of three struts injector improves the performance of scramjet combustor as compared to single strut injector. The combustion efficiency is also found to be highest in case of three strut fuel injection system. In order to validate the results, the numerical data for single strut injection is compared with experimental result which is taken from the literature.

  4. Numerical study of effect of compressor swirling flow on combustor design in a MTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yong; Wang, Chengdong; Liu, Cunxi; Liu, Fuqiang; Hu, Chunyan; Xu, Gang; Zhu, Junqiang

    2017-08-01

    An effect of the swirling flow on the combustion performance is studied by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in a micro-gas turbine with a centrifugal compressor, dump diffuser and forward-flow combustor. The distributions of air mass and the Temperature Pattern Factor (as: Overall Temperature Distribution Factor -OTDF) in outlet are investigated with two different swirling angles of compressed air as 0° and 15° in three combustors. The results show that the influences of swirling flow on the air distribution and OTDF cannot be neglected. Compared with no-swirling flow, the air through outer liner is more, and the air through the inner liner is less, and the pressure loss is bigger under the swirling condition in the same combustor. The Temperature Pattern Factor changes under the different swirling conditions.

  5. Computational investigation of film cooling from cylindrical and row trenched cooling holes near the combustor endwall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Kianpour

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to investigate the effects of cylindrical and row trenched cooling holes with alignment angles of 0° and 90° at blowing ratio of 3.18 on the film cooling performance adjacent to the endwall surface of a combustor simulator. In this research a three-dimensional representation of Pratt and Whitney gas turbine engine was simulated and analyzed with a commercial finite volume package FLUENT 6.2. The analysis has been carried out with Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes turbulence model (RANS on internal cooling passages. This combustor simulator was combined with the interaction of two rows of dilution jets, which were staggered in the streamwise direction and aligned in the spanwise direction. Film cooling was placed along the combustor liner walls. In comparison with the baseline case of cooling holes, the application of a row trenched hole near the endwall surface doubled the performance of film cooling effectiveness.

  6. Wide range operation of advanced low NOx aircraft gas turbine combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, P. B.; Fiorito, R. J.; Butze, H. F.

    1978-01-01

    The paper summarizes the results of an experimental test rig program designed to define and demonstrates techniques which would allow the jet-induced circulation and vortex air blast combustors to operate stably with acceptable emissions at simulated engine idle without compromise to the low NOx emissions under the high-altitude supersonic cruise condition. The discussion focuses on the test results of the key combustor modifications for both the simulated engine idle and cruise conditions. Several range-augmentation techniques are demonstrated that allow the lean-reaction premixed aircraft gas turbine combustor to operate with low NOx emissons at engine cruise and acceptable CO and UHC levels at engine idle. These techniques involve several combinations, including variable geometry and fuel switching designs.

  7. Combustion analysis for flame stability predictions at ground level and altitude in aviation gas turbine engines with low emissions combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turek, Tomas

    Low emissions combustors operating with low fuel/air ratios may have challenges with flame stability. As combustion is made leaner in the primary zone, the flame can lose its stability, resulting in operability problems such as relight, flameout or cold starting. This thesis analyzes combustion processes for the prediction of flame stability in low emissions combustors. A detailed review of the literature on flame stability was conducted and main approaches in flame stability modelling were indicated. Three flame stability models were proposed (Characteristic Time, Loading Parameter, and Combustion Efficiency models) and developed into a unique Preliminary Multi-Disciplinary Design Optimization (PMDO) tool. Results were validated with a database of experimental combustor test data and showed that flame stability can be predicted for an arbitrary shape of combustors running at any operational conditions including ground and altitude situations with various jet fuels and nozzles. In conclusion, flame stability can be predicted for newly designed low emission combustors.

  8. Aviary heating: control of air temperature heated by a set biomass gasifier-combustor in a co-current flow, using a frequency inverter; Aquecimento de aviarios: controle da temperatura do ar aquecido por um conjunto gaseificador-combustor de biomassa de fluxo concorrente, utilizando um inversor de frequencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, William Rosario dos [Universidade Presidente Antonio Carlos (UNIPAC), Ponte Nova, MG (Brazil); Silva, Jadir Nogueira; Oliveira Filho, Delly; Martins, Marcio Aredes; Oliveira, Jofran Luiz de [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil)], Emails: jadir@ufv.br, delly@ufv.br, aredes@ufv.br, jofran.oliveira@ufv.br

    2009-07-01

    One of the problems with using the gasifier for heating purposes in poultry facilities is the waste of energy during the day, once the equipment does not have control of the thermal and power generated. During this period, the difference in temperature between the air and the standard for the birds inside the building is lower than when compared with the nocturnal period. During the day, the temperature inside the poultry house is controlled by curtains, which occurs without diminishing the biomass burning. Another way to control the temperature is the shutdown of the system, which requires the constant attention of the operator. In this way, there is a potential for energy savings if the thermal power could be controlled according to the demand, which can be represented by the temperature gradient. The purpose of this study was to control the temperature of exhaustion air from a set combustor-gasifier (down draft), based on the model developed by Martin et al. (2006), through the control of speed of the fan engine and also controlling the flow contributions of primary and secondary air in the combustor. The experiment was carried out in the Energy and Pre-processing of Agricultural Products areas, at the Department of Agricultural Engineering - Federal University of Vicosa. (author)

  9. Combustion Control and Diagnostics Sensor Testing in a Thermal Barrier Coated Combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chorpening, B.T.; Dukes, M.G.; Robey, E.H.; Thornton, J.D.

    2007-05-01

    The combustion control and diagnostics sensor (CCADS) continues to be developed as an in-situ combustion sensor, with immediate application to natural gas fired turbines. In-situ combustion monitoring is also expected to benefit advanced power plants of the future, fueled by coal-derived syngas, liquified natural gas (LNG), hydrogen, or hydrogen blend fuels. The in-situ monitoring that CCADS provides can enable the optimal operation of advanced, fuel-flexible turbines for minimal pollutant emissions and maximum efficiency over the full operating range of an advanced turbine. Previous work has demonstrated CCADS as a useful sensor for in-situ monitoring of natural gas combustion, including detection of important combustion events such as flashback and lean blowoff, in experimental combustors without thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Since typical TBC materials are electrical insulators at room temperature, and CCADS operation requires conduction of electrical current to the walls of the combustor, a TBC on the combustion liner was identified as a potential barrier to CCADS operation in commercial application. This paper reports on CCADS experiments in a turbulent lean premixed combustor with a yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coating on the combustor wall. The tests were conducted at 0.1 MPa (1 atm), with a 15V excitation voltage on the CCADS electrodes. The results confirm that for a typical thermal barrier coating, CCADS operates properly, and the total measured average resistance is close to that of an uncoated combustor. This result is consistent with previous materials studies that found the electrical resistance of typical TBC materials considerably decreases at combustor operating temperatures.

  10. System for reducing combustion dynamics and NO.sub.x in a combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Hughes, Michael John; York, William David

    2016-05-31

    A combustor includes an end cap that extends radially across at least a portion of the combustor. The end cap includes an upstream surface axially separated from a downstream surface. A plurality of tubes extend from the upstream surface through the downstream surface of the end cap to provide fluid communication through the end cap. Each tube in a first set of the plurality of tubes has an inlet proximate to the upstream surface and an outlet downstream from the downstream surface. Each outlet has a first portion that extends a different axial distance from the inlet than a second portion.

  11. Techno-economic assessment of a hybrid solar receiver and combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jin Han; Nathan, Graham; Dally, Bassam; Chinnici, Alfonso

    2016-05-01

    A techno-economic analysis is performed to compare two different configurations of hybrid solar thermal systems with fossil fuel backup to provide continuous electricity output. The assessment compares a Hybrid Solar Receiver Combustor (HSRC), in which the functions of a solar cavity receiver and a combustor are integrated into a single device with a reference conventional solar thermal system using a regular solar cavity receiver with a backup boiler, termed the Solar Gas Hybrid (SGH). The benefits of the integration is assessed by varying the size of the storage capacity and heliostat field while maintaining the same overall thermal input to the power block.

  12. Capacity control of power stations by O 2/H 2 rocket combustor technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternfeld, Ing. H. J.

    1995-10-01

    The concept of a hydrogen/oxygen spinning reserve system is described. The novel component of this concept is a socalled hydrogen/oxygen steam generator derived from modern H 2/O 2 rocket combustor technology. With the HYDROSS-project the DLR and German power plant industries as well as electric utilities have converted the rocket combustor technology to a power plant component. The status of the project as well as technical problems encountered with the conversion are described. Finally, future options for utilizing H 2/O 2 steam generator technology for stand-by and peak-load power plants are discussed.

  13. Evaluation of Water Injection Effect on NO(x) Formation for a Staged Gas Turbine Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, L.; Yang, S. L.; Kundu, K. P.

    1996-01-01

    NO(x) emission control by water injection on a staged turbine combustor (STC) was modeled using the KIVA-2 code with modification. Water is injected into the rich-burn combustion zone of the combustor by a single nozzle. Parametric study for different water injection patterns was performed. Results show NO(x) emission will decrease after water being injected. Water nozzle location also has significant effect for NO formation and fuel ignition. The chemical kinetic model is also sensitive to the excess water. Through this study, a better understanding of the physics and chemical kinetics is obtained, this will enhance the STC design process.

  14. Numerical Study of an Annular Gas Turbine Combustor with Dump Diffuser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.X.Zhao; Y.B.Lai

    1999-01-01

    A general numerical method is presented for calculating steady three-dimensional and two-phase turbulent reactive flows with a nonstaggered body-fitted coordinate system in an annular gas turbine combustor with the dump diffuser.The modified two-equation model and the EDC turbulent combustion model are used for the gas phase.The liquid phase equations are solved in a Lagrangian frame of reference by PSIC algorithm.The effect of different velocity profiles at the entry of the prediffuser on combustor flow characteristics is calculated.

  15. Dynamic properties of combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine combustor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoda, Hiroshi; Nikimoto, Hiroyuki; Miyano, Takaya; Tachibana, Shigeru

    2011-03-01

    We experimentally investigate the dynamic behavior of the combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine combustor from the viewpoint of nonlinear dynamics. A nonlinear time series analysis in combination with a surrogate data method clearly reveals that as the equivalence ratio increases, the dynamic behavior of the combustion instability undergoes a significant transition from stochastic fluctuation to periodic oscillation through low-dimensional chaotic oscillation. We also show that a nonlinear forecasting method is useful for predicting the short-term dynamic behavior of the combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine combustor, which has not been addressed in the fields of combustion science and physics.

  16. Woodworking machine converts waste into energy; Houtbewerker zet restafval om in energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Gool, J. (ed.)

    2004-02-01

    Wood wastes from a woodworking business in Schijndel, Netherlands, are used to provide 3,000 households with green electricity. Since 1997 the bio-combustor produces 1 MW{sub e} and 5 MW{sub th}. [Dutch] De houtresten die vrijkomen bij het houtverwerkingsbedrijf Houtindustrie Schijndel kunnen worden gebruikt om 3000 huishoudens van groene stroom te voorzien. Sinds 1997 levert de bioverbrandingsinstallatie 1 MW{sub e} en 5 MW{sub th}.

  17. Waste management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark.......The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark....

  18. Waste management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark.......The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark....

  19. Radioactive Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaylock, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of radioactive waste disposal, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the studies included are: (1) high-level and long-lived wastes, and (2) release and burial of low-level wastes. A list of 42 references is also presented. (HM)

  20. Evaluation of Durable Metallic Supports for Catalytic Combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, BA

    2003-10-08

    In 2000, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Catalytica Energy Systems Incorporated (CESI) to determine the properties of current metallic catalyst supports and examine new candidate alloys for this application. A team was established at ORNL to examine oxidation-limited lifetime of these thin-walled metallic components using standard lifetime models and to measure the mechanical properties of the foils (40-200:m in thickness) which can differ substantially from bulk properties. Oxidation experiments were conducted on foil specimens at 700-1100 C in laboratory air and in air with 10 vol.% water vapor to better simulate the combustor environment. At the higher test temperatures, time to oxidation-induced (i.e. breakaway oxidation) failure was determined in 1h cycles in order to verify predictions from a standard reservoir-type oxidation lifetime model. Selected specimens were run for >10,000h in 100 or 500h cycles at lower test temperatures in order to determine the oxidation kinetics for the model. The creep properties of selected foils were measured for 4,000-8,000h at operation-relevant stresses and temperatures. None of the new candidate alloys significantly out-performed currently used alloys in laboratory testing, particularly in oxidation lifetime testing. Therefore, engine testing was not performed on any of the new candidate alloys. Both the oxidation- and creep-resistance of FeCrAl alloys was greater than expected and the results of the CRADA allowed CESI to extend life or increase operating temperatures for these lower cost substrate alloys in the next generation of catalyst modules. Three work areas were defined for the CRADA. The first area was investigating the oxidation behavior of current and candidate alloy foils. The goal was to obtain data such as the oxidation rate as a function of temperature and environment, the time to breakaway oxidation at high test

  1. Trend of research and development of combustors for jet engines. Koku engine yo nenshoki no kenkyu kaihatsu doko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    To, H. (Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-03-10

    To the aeroengine, a requirement for an improvement of the fuel consumption ratio from a viewpoint of the energy saving and for a reduction of the harmful exhaust materials from a viewpoint of environmental protection is being increasingly elevated. In order to improve a fuel consumption ratio of engine, making it a higher temperature and pressure is attempted for raising a engine cycle efficiency, and moreover there is a trend to elevate an inlet pressure and temperature of the combustor as for a combustor, and consequently an outlet temperature of the combustor becomes higher. Therefore to the combustor, a durability elongation of the liner and fuel injection valve, as well as a correspondence to a range expansion of a fuel-air ratio of the combustor are demanded. As the harmful exhaust materials, there are unburned hydrocarbon (UHC), carbon monoxides (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and smoke. A reduction of NOx is most strongly requested at present. In addition to these requests on the combustor, making a study and development of the combustor more efficient is being demanded. For this purpose a numerical analysis is utilized by adapting the various purposes. As the recent utilization methods, the prediction examples of exhaust gas quantity are frequent. 14 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  2. A three-dimensional algebraic grid generation scheme for gas turbine combustors with inclined slots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S. L.; Cline, M. C.; Chen, R.; Chang, Y. L.

    1993-01-01

    A 3D algebraic grid generation scheme is presented for generating the grid points inside gas turbine combustors with inclined slots. The scheme is based on the 2D transfinite interpolation method. Since the scheme is a 2D approach, it is very efficient and can easily be extended to gas turbine combustors with either dilution hole or slot configurations. To demonstrate the feasibility and the usefulness of the technique, a numerical study of the quick-quench/lean-combustion (QQ/LC) zones of a staged turbine combustor is given. Preliminary results illustrate some of the major features of the flow and temperature fields in the QQ/LC zones. Formation of co- and counter-rotating bulk flow and shape temperature fields can be observed clearly, and the resulting patterns are consistent with experimental observations typical of the confined slanted jet-in-cross flow. Numerical solutions show the method to be an efficient and reliable tool for generating computational grids for analyzing gas turbine combustors with slanted slots.

  3. Wall heat flux influence on the thermodynamic optimisation of irreversibilities of a circulating fluidised bed combustor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Baloyi, J

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the study the comparison of irreversibilities was done when the wall condition of the combustor was changed from adiabatic to negative heat flux, for incoming air temperature of 400 K. The reactant mixture of solid pitch pine wood fuel and air...

  4. Studies of pressure oscillations in a research dump combustor. [low frequency vibration effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadow, K. C.; Crump, J. E.; Derr, R. L.; Heaser, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    A coaxial research dump combustor was used to investigate the acoustic modes structure and its effect on the inlet shock system. Acoustic wave structure was determined including the amplitude, frequency, and phase as a function of position. Inlet shock position, shock displacement, shock displacement frequency, and phase relative to acoustic wave structure were also defined. All results were compared to with one dimensional modeling.

  5. Improved Robust Adaptive Control of a Fluidized Bed Combustor for Sewage Sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENGHong-Xia; JIAYing-Min

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a robust model reference adaptive control scheme to deal with uncertain time delay in the dynamical model of a fluidized bed combustor for sewage sludge. The theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the proposed scheme can guarantee not only stability and robustness, but also the adaptive decoupling performance of the system.

  6. Measurement and Modeling of the Acoustic Response in a High Pressure Combustor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapucu, M.; Kapucu, Mehmet; Alemela, P.R.; Kok, Jacobus B.W.; Pozarlik, Artur Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a one dimensional acoustic network model is presented which can be used as a design tool to predict the limit cycle pressure oscillations in a gas turbine combustor. Analytically represented models are combined with measured flame transfer functions and well defined boundary condition

  7. Experimental and numerical studies of a lean-burn internally-staged combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Zhenbo; Lin Yuzhen; Li Lin; Zhang Chi

    2014-01-01

    A lean-burn internally-staged combustor for low emissions that can be used in civil avi-ation gas turbines is introduced in this paper. The main stage is designed and optimized in terms of fuel evaporation ratio, fuel/air pre-mixture uniformity, and particle residence time using commer-cial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. A single-module rectangular combustor is adopted in performance tests including lean ignition, lean blowout, combustion efficiency, emis-sions, and combustion oscillation using aviation kerosene. Furthermore, nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission is also predicted using CFD simulation to compare with test results. Under normal inlet temperature, this combustor can be ignited easily with normal and negative inlet pressures. The lean blowout fuel/air ratio (LBO FAR) at the idle condition is 0.0049. The fuel split proportions between the pilot and main stages are determined through balancing emissions, combustion efficiency, and combustion oscillation. Within the landing and take-off (LTO) cycle, this combustor enables 42%NOx reduction of the standard set by the 6th Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection (CAEP/6) with high combustion efficiency. The maximum board-band pressure oscillations of inlet air and fuel are below 1%of total pressure during steady-state operations at the LTO cycle specific conditions.

  8. Experimental and numerical studies of a lean-burn internally-staged combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Zhenbo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A lean-burn internally-staged combustor for low emissions that can be used in civil aviation gas turbines is introduced in this paper. The main stage is designed and optimized in terms of fuel evaporation ratio, fuel/air pre-mixture uniformity, and particle residence time using commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD software. A single-module rectangular combustor is adopted in performance tests including lean ignition, lean blowout, combustion efficiency, emissions, and combustion oscillation using aviation kerosene. Furthermore, nitrogen oxides (NOx emission is also predicted using CFD simulation to compare with test results. Under normal inlet temperature, this combustor can be ignited easily with normal and negative inlet pressures. The lean blowout fuel/air ratio (LBO FAR at the idle condition is 0.0049. The fuel split proportions between the pilot and main stages are determined through balancing emissions, combustion efficiency, and combustion oscillation. Within the landing and take-off (LTO cycle, this combustor enables 42% NOx reduction of the standard set by the 6th Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection (CAEP/6 with high combustion efficiency. The maximum board-band pressure oscillations of inlet air and fuel are below 1% of total pressure during steady-state operations at the LTO cycle specific conditions.

  9. Bed agglomeration in fluidized combustor fueled by wood and rice straw blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thy, P.; Jenkins, B.M.; Williams, R.B.; Lesher, C.E.; Bakker, R.R.

    2010-01-01

    Petrographic techniques have been used to examine bed materials from fluidized bed combustion experiments that utilized wood and rice straw fuel blends. The experiments were conducted using a laboratory-scale combustor with mullite sand beds, firing temperatures of 840 to 1030 °C, and run durations

  10. Bed agglomeration in fluidized combustor fueled by wood and rice straw blends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thy, Peter; Jenkins, Brian; Williams, R.B.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Petrographic techniques have been used to examine bed materials from fluidized bed combustion experiments that utilized wood and rice straw fuel blends. The experiments were conducted using a laboratory-scale combustor with mullite sand beds, firing temperatures of 840 to 1030 °C, and run...

  11. Three-dimensional particle image velocimetry in a generic can-type gas turbine combustor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyers, BC

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available taken by the bulk flow from all inlets to the exit plane. Velocity vectors show the swirling action and the three-dimensional nature of the flow inside a combustor. This data can be used effectively as a test case for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD...

  12. Investigation of Combustion Control in a Dump Combustor Using the Feedback Free Fluidic Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Eric J.; Casiano, Matthew J.; Anderson, William E.; Heister, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    A feedback free fluidic oscillator was designed and integrated into a single element rocket combustor with the goal of suppressing longitudinal combustion instabilities. The fluidic oscillator uses internal fluid dynamics to create an unsteady outlet jet at a specific frequency. An array of nine fluidic oscillators was tested to mimic modulated secondary oxidizer injection into the combustor dump plane. The combustor has a coaxial injector that uses gaseous methane and decomposed hydrogen peroxide with an overall O/F ratio of 11.7. A sonic choke plate on an actuator arm allows for continuous adjustment of the oxidizer post acoustics enabling the study of a variety of instability magnitudes. The fluidic oscillator unsteady outlet jet performance is compared against equivalent steady jet injection and a baseline design with no secondary oxidizer injection. At the most unstable operating conditions, the unsteady outlet jet saw a 67% reduction in the instability pressure oscillation magnitude when compared to the steady jet and baseline data. Additionally, computational fluid dynamics analysis of the combustor gives insight into the flow field interaction of the fluidic oscillators. The results indicate that open loop high frequency propellant modulation for combustion control can be achieved through fluidic devices that require no moving parts or electrical power to operate.

  13. Resonant Pulse Combustors: A Reliable Route to Practical Pressure Gain Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Dan

    2017-01-01

    A particular type of pressure gain combustion (PGC) device is described, which is under investigation at GRC. The Resonant Pulse Combustor (RPC) has been largely overlooked due to its theoretically low performance. However, its practical performance is quite competitive with other PGC systems, and its physical simplicity is unmatched.

  14. Bed agglomeration in fluidized combustor fueled by wood and rice straw blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thy, P.; Jenkins, B.M.; Williams, R.B.; Lesher, C.E.; Bakker, R.R.

    2010-01-01

    Petrographic techniques have been used to examine bed materials from fluidized bed combustion experiments that utilized wood and rice straw fuel blends. The experiments were conducted using a laboratory-scale combustor with mullite sand beds, firing temperatures of 840 to 1030 °C, and run durations

  15. Volatile properties of jet engine combustor particles during the partemis campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyeki, S.; Gysel, M.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Petzold, A. [Deutsche Luft- und Raumfahrt, Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany); Wilson, C.W.

    2002-03-01

    The influence of fuel sulphur content (FSC) on exhaust particle properties from a jet engine combustor test rig was investigated during the EC PartEmis project. Volatile properties were measured using a Volatility Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (V-TDMA). Measurements indicated that particles with diameter d <30 nm were more volatile than larger particles. (author)

  16. Effect of dilution holes on the performance of a triple swirler combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Guoyu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A triple swirler combustor is considered to be a promising solution for future high temperature rise combustors. The present paper aims to study dilution holes including primary dilution holes and secondary dilution holes on the performance of a triple swirler combustor. Experimental investigations are conducted at different inlet airflow velocities (40–70 m/s and combustor overall fuel–air ratio with fixed inlet airflow temperature (473 K and atmospheric pressure. The experimental results show that the ignition is very difficult with specific performance of high ignition fuel–air ratio when the primary dilution holes are located 0.6H (where H is the liner dome heightdownstream the dome, while the other four cases have almost the same ignition performance. The position of primary dilution holes has an effect on lean blowout stability and has a large influence on combustion efficiency. The combustion efficiency is the highest when the primary dilution holes are placed 0.9H downstream the dome among the five different locations. For the secondary dilution holes, the pattern factor of Design A is better than that of Design B.

  17. Overview of experimental measurements in a generic can-type gas turbine combustor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyers, BC

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to CFD Shortfalls, experimental data on gas turbine combustors is required to obtain insight into the combustion and flow mechanisms as well as for simulation and model validation and evaluation. The temperature and velocity fields of a generic...

  18. Effect of dilution holes on the performance of a triple swirler combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding Guoyu; He Xiaomin; Zhao Ziqiang; An Bokun; Song Yaoyu; Zhu Yixiao

    2014-01-01

    A triple swirler combustor is considered to be a promising solution for future high temperature rise combustors. The present paper aims to study dilution holes including primary dilu-tion holes and secondary dilution holes on the performance of a triple swirler combustor. Experi-mental investigations are conducted at different inlet airflow velocities (40–70 m/s) and combustor overall fuel–air ratio with fixed inlet airflow temperature (473 K) and atmospheric pressure. The experimental results show that the ignition is very difficult with specific performance of high ignition fuel–air ratio when the primary dilution holes are located 0.6H (where H is the liner dome height)downstream the dome, while the other four cases have almost the same ignition performance. The position of primary dilution holes has an effect on lean blowout stability and has a large influence on combustion efficiency. The combustion efficiency is the highest when the primary dilution holes are placed 0.9H downstream the dome among the five different locations. For the secondary dilution holes, the pattern factor of Design A is better than that of Design B.

  19. Three-component particle image velocimetry in a generic can-type gas turbine combustor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyers, Bronwyn C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available -1 Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part A: Journal of Power and Energy November 2012/ Vol. 226(7) Three-componentParticle Image Velocimetry in a Generic Can-type Gas Turbine Combustor B C Meyers 1, 2* , G C Snedden 1 , J P...

  20. Effect of Spray Cone Angle on Flame Stability in an Annular Gas Turbine Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, R. K.; Kumar, S. Kishore; Chandel, Sunil

    2016-04-01

    Effect of fuel spray cone angle in an aerogas turbine combustor has been studied using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and full-scale combustor testing. For CFD analysis, a 22.5° sector of an annular combustor is modeled and the governing equations are solved using the eddy dissipation combustion model in ANSYS CFX computational package. The analysis has been carried out at 125 kPa and 303 K inlet conditions for spray cone angles from 60° to 140°. The lean blowout limits are established by studying the behavior of combustion zone during transient engine operation from an initial steady-state condition. The computational study has been followed by testing the practical full-scale annular combustor in an aerothermal test facility. The experimental result is in a good agreement with the computational predictions. The lean blowout fuel-air ratio increases as the spray cone angle is decreased at constant operating pressure and temperature. At higher spray cone angle, the flame and high-temperature zone moves upstream close to atomizer face and a uniform flame is sustained over a wide region causing better flame stability.

  1. Performance of a Model Rich Burn-quick Mix-lean Burn Combustor at Elevated Temperature and Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christopher O.; Sowa, William A.; Samuelsen, G. S.

    2002-01-01

    As interest in pollutant emission from stationary and aero-engine gas turbines increases, combustor engineers must consider various configurations. One configuration of increasing interest is the staged, rich burn - quick mix - lean burn (RQL) combustor. This report summarizes an investigation conducted in a recently developed high pressure gas turbine combustor facility. The model RQL combustor was plenum fed and modular in design. The fuel used for this study is Jet-A which was injected from a simplex atomizer. Emission (CO2, CO, O2, UHC, NOx) measurements were obtained using a stationary exit plane water-cooled probe and a traversing water-cooled probe which sampled from the rich zone exit and the lean zone entrance. The RQL combustor was operated at inlet temperatures ranging from 367 to 700 K, pressures ranging from 200 to 1000 kPa, and combustor reference velocities ranging from 10 to 20 m/s. Variations were also made in the rich zone and lean zone equivalence ratios. Several significant trends were observed. NOx production increased with reaction temperature, lean zone equivalence ratio and residence time and decreased with increased rich zone equivalence ratio. NOx production in the model RQL combustor increased to the 0.4 power with increased pressure. This correlation, compared to those obtained for non-staged combustors (0.5 to 0.7), suggests a reduced dependence on NOx on pressure for staged combustors. Emissions profiles suggest that rich zone mixing is not uniform and that the rich zone contributes on the order of 16 percent to the total NOx produced.

  2. Analytical and experimental evaluations of the effect of broad property fuels on combustors for commercial aircraft gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were conducted in three contract activities funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Lewis Research Center, to assess the impacts of broad property fuels on the design, performance, durability, emissions and operational characteristics of current and advanced combustors for commercial aircraft gas turbine engines. The effect of fuel thermal stability on engine and airframe fuel system was evaluated. Trade-offs between fuel properties, exhaust emissions and combustor life were also investigated. Results indicate major impacts of broad property fuels on allowable metal temperatures in fuel manifolds and injector support, combustor cyclic durability and somewhat lesser impacts on starting characteristics, lightoff, emissions and smoke.

  3. Experimental results showing the internal three-component velocity field and outlet temperature contours for a model gas turbine combustor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyers, BC

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available ,2]. These inconsistencies are especially great when combustion is simulated when there are already flow inconsistencies after modeling the flow in cold flow simulations. To enable the improvement of CFD modeling and techniques, a CFD test case has been created to aid.... [7], attempts have to be made to ensure that as many of the factors that influence the combustor flow should be included in the tests. The combustor in which these experiments were performed is a full, non-premixed, cylindrical, can-type combustor...

  4. NACA research on combustors for aircraft gas turbines I : effects of operating variables on steady-state performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Walter T; Childs, J Howard

    1950-01-01

    Some of the systematic research conducted by the NACA on aircraft gas-turbine combustors is reviewed. Trends depicting the effect of inlet-air pressure, temperature, and velocity and fuel-air ratio on performance characteristics, such as combustion efficiency, maximum temperature rise attainable, pressure loss, and combustor-outlet temperature distribution are described for a variety of turbojet combustors of the liquid-fuel type. These trends are further discussed as effects significant to the turbojet engine, such as altitude operational limits, specific fuel consumption, thrust, acceleration, and turbine life.

  5. Industrial Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    of the system industry has to inform at the planning stage and afterwards in yearly reports on their waste arising and how the waste is managed. If available such information is very helpful in obtaining information about that specific industry. However, in many countries there is very little information......Industrial waste is waste from industrial production and manufacturing. Industry covers many industrial sectors and within each sector large variations are found in terms of which raw materials are used, which production technology is used and which products are produced. Available data on unit...... generation rates and material composition as well as determining factors are discussed in this chapter. Characterizing industrial waste is faced with the problem that often only a part of the waste is handled in the municipal waste system, where information is easily accessible. In addition part...

  6. Development of an Air Assisted Fuel Atomizer (Liquid Siphon Type for a Continuous Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pipatpong Watanawanyoo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was the study of a fuel injection system in continuous combustor. Air atomizing nozzle is developed to good efficiency injection and used low air pressure (68.95-275.79kPa to assist the atomizing nozzle. Refined palm oil and automotive diesel oil were the fuels for the experiment for the system of atomization. The atomizer was designed in a manner that air could flow through the small nozzle. Consequently, the low-pressure airflow could induce fuel by siphoning and break oil into small fine droplets that were delivered through the outlet. The aim of design and develop a continuous combustor is emphasized on simplicity for construction, inexpensive, good stability and reduce import fuel for continuous combustor. Material for combustor chamber is stainless steel in order to avoid oxidation at high combustion temperature. The results showed practical combustion performance using refined palm oil as fuel with ultra-low CO and HC emissions less than 206 ppm and 7 ppm. Another main advantage is a clean combustion, as no sulfur content in the fuel. As a result, the combustor performance testing was evaluated with refined palm oil and LPG. By regulating atomizing air pressure between 68.9995- 275.79 kPa (10-40psi, Siphon height 0.45 m and regulating LPG pressure of 6.8 kPa (1 psi, result showed that 0.0001167-0.00019936 kg/s of fuel consumption, hot gas produced from combustion was in the range of 308-4980C depending on oxidizing air mass flow regulated between 0.0695-0.1067kg/s. The LPG mass flow was regulated 0.000489 kg/s in order to sustain the combustion stability.

  7. Low NO/sub x/ Heavy Fuel Combustor Concept Program. Phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutrone, M B

    1981-10-01

    Six combustor concepts were designed, fabricated, and underwent a series of combustion tests with the objective of evaluating and developing a combustor capable of meeting US New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), dry, for high-nitrogen liquid fuels. Three rich/lean and three lean/lean two-stage combustors were tested with ERBS distillate, petroleum residual, and SRC-II coal derived liquid (CDL) fuels with fuel-bound nitrogen contents of 0.0054, 0.23, and 0.87 weight percent, respectively. A lean/lean concept was demonstrated with ultralow NO/sub x/ emissions, dry, of 5 gm NO/sub x/kg fuel on ERBS, and NO/sub x/ emissions meeting the NSPS NO/sub x/ standard on residual fuel. This combustor concept met operational goals for pressure drop, smoke, exhaust pattern factor, and combustion efficiency. A rich/lean concept was identified and developed which demonstrated NO/sub x/ emissions approaching the NSPS standards, dry, for all liquid fuels including the 0.87 weight percent nitrogen SRC-II coal-derived liquid. Exhaust pattern factor and pressure drop met or approached goals. Smoke emissions were higher than the program goal. However, a significant improvement was made with only a minor modification of the fuel injector/air swirler system, and further development should result in meeting smoke goals for all fuels. Liner metal temperatures were higher than allowable for commercial application. Conceptual designs for further development of these two rich/lean and lean/lean concepts have been completed which address smoke and metal temperature concerns, and are available for the next phase of this NASA-sponsored, DOE-funded program. Tests of a rich/lean concept, and a catalytic combustor concept using low- and intermediate-Btu simulated coal-derived gases will be completed during the ongoing Phase IA extension of this program.

  8. Evaluation of Kerosene Fuelled Scramjet Combustor using a Combination of Cooled and Uncooled Struts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chandrasekhar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The scramjet combustor a vital component of scramjet engine has been designed by employing fuel injection struts. Several experimental studies have been carried out to evaluate the propulsive performance and structural integrity of the in-stream fuel injection struts in the connect-pipe test facility. As the mission objective of hypersonic demonstrator is to flight test the scramjet engine for 20 s duration, in-stream fuel injection struts which are designed as heat sink devices encounter hostile flow field conditions especially in terms of high thermal and high convective loads in the scramjet combustor. To circumvent these adverse conditions, materials like Niobium C-103 and W-Ni-Fe alloys have been used for the construction of struts and a number of tests have been carried out to evaluate the survivability of the in-stream fuel injection struts in the scramjet combustor. The results thus obtained show that the erosion of leading edges of the Stage-II fuel injection struts in the initial phase and subsequently puncturing of the fuel injection manifold after 10-12 s of the test are noticed, while the other stages of the struts are found to be intact. This deteriorating leading edges of Stage-II struts with respect to time, affect the overall propulsive performance of the combustor. To mitigate this situation, Stage-II struts have been designed as cooled structure and other Stages of struts are designed as un-cooled structure. Material of construction of struts used is Nimonic C-263 alloy. This paper highlights the results of the static test of the scramjet combustor, which has been carried out at a combustor entry Mach number of 2.0, total temperature of 2000 K, with an overall kerosene fuel equivalence ratio of 1.0 and for the supersonic combustion duration of 20 s. Low back pressure has been created at the exit of the scramjet combustor using ejector system to avoid flow separation.Visual inspection of the fuel injection struts after the test

  9. Investigations on the Influence of the In-Stream Pylon and Strut on the Performance of a Scramjet Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Ouyang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the in-stream pylon and strut on the performance of scramjet combustor was experimentally and numerically investigated. The experiments were conducted with a direct-connect supersonic model combustor equipped with multiple cavities. The entrance parameter of combustor corresponds to scramjet flight Mach number 4.0 with a total temperature of 947 K. The research results show that, compared with the scramjet combustor without pylon and strut, the wall pressure and the thrust of the scramjet increase due to the improvement of mixing and combustion effect due to the pylon and strut. The total pressure loss caused by the strut is considerable whereas pylon influence is slight.

  10. Industrial Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Industrial waste is waste from industrial production and manufacturing. Industry covers many industrial sectors and within each sector large variations are found in terms of which raw materials are used, which production technology is used and which products are produced. Available data on unit...... generation rates and material composition as well as determining factors are discussed in this chapter. Characterizing industrial waste is faced with the problem that often only a part of the waste is handled in the municipal waste system, where information is easily accessible. In addition part...... of the industrial waste may in periods, depending on market opportunities and prices, be traded as secondary rawmaterials. Production-specificwaste from primary production, for example steel slag, is not included in the current presentation. In some countries industries must be approved or licensed and as part...

  11. Waste indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall, O.; Lassen, C.; Hansen, E. [Cowi A/S, Lyngby (Denmark)

    2003-07-01

    The Waste Indicator Project focuses on methods to evaluate the efficiency of waste management. The project proposes the use of three indicators for resource consumption, primary energy and landfill requirements, based on the life-cycle principles applied in the EDIP Project. Trial runs are made With the indicators on paper, glass packaging and aluminium, and two models are identified for mapping the Danish waste management, of which the least extensive focuses on real and potential savings. (au)

  12. Coupling between hydrodynamics, acoustics, and heat release in a self-excited unstable combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvazinski, Matthew E.; Huang, Cheng; Sankaran, Venkateswaran; Feldman, Thomas W.; Anderson, William E.; Merkle, Charles L.; Talley, Douglas G.

    2015-04-01

    The unsteady gas dynamic field in a closed combustor is determined by the nonlinear interactions between chamber acoustics, hydrodynamics, and turbulent combustion that can energize these modes. These interactions are studied in detail using hybrid RANS/large eddy simulations (RANS = Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes) of a non-premixed, high-pressure laboratory combustor that produces self-excited longitudinal instabilities. The main variable in the study is the relative acoustic length between the combustion chamber and the tube that injects oxidizer into the combustor. Assuming a half-wave (closed-closed) combustion chamber, the tube lengths approximately correspond to quarter-, 3/8-, and half-wave resonators that serve to vary the phasing between the acoustic modes in the tube and the combustion chamber. The simulation correctly predicts the relatively stable behavior measured with the shortest tube and the very unstable behavior measured with the intermediate tube. Unstable behavior is also predicted for the longest tube, a case for which bifurcated stability behavior was measured in the experiment. In the first (stable) configuration, fuel flows into the combustor uninterrupted, and heat release is spatially continuous with a flame that remains attached to the back step. In the second (unstable) configuration, a cyclic process is apparent comprising a disruption in the fuel flow, subsequent detachment of the flame from the back step, and accumulation of fuel in the recirculation zone that ignites upon arrival of a compression wave reflected from the downstream boundary of the combustion chamber. The third case (mixed stable/unstable) shares features with both of the other cases. The major difference between the two cases predicted to be unstable is that, in the intermediate length tube, a pressure wave reflection inside the tube pushes unburnt fuel behind the back step radially outward, leading to a post-coupled reignition mechanism, while in the case of the

  13. Large eddy simulation of combustion characteristics in a kerosene fueled rocket-based combined-cycle engine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhi-wei; He, Guo-qiang; Qin, Fei; Cao, Dong-gang; Wei, Xiang-geng; Shi, Lei

    2016-10-01

    This study reports combustion characteristics of a rocket-based combined-cycle engine combustor operating at ramjet mode numerically. Compressible large eddy simulation with liquid kerosene sprayed and vaporized is used to study the intrinsic unsteadiness of combustion in such a propulsion system. Results for the pressure oscillation amplitude and frequency in the combustor as well as the wall pressure distribution along the flow-path, are validated using experimental data, and they show acceptable agreement. Coupled with reduced chemical kinetics of kerosene, results are compared with the simultaneously obtained Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes results, and show significant differences. A flow field analysis is also carried out for further study of the turbulent flame structures. Mixture fraction is used to determine the most probable flame location in the combustor at stoichiometric condition. Spatial distributions of the Takeno flame index, scalar dissipation rate, and heat release rate reveal that different combustion modes, such as premixed and non-premixed modes, coexisted at different sections of the combustor. The RBCC combustor is divided into different regions characterized by their non-uniform features. Flame stabilization mechanism, i.e., flame propagation or fuel auto-ignition, and their relative importance, is also determined at different regions in the combustor.

  14. An Experimental Study on Axial Temperature Distribution of Combustion of Dewatered Poultry Sludge in Fluidized bed combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas A.H.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory scale bubbling fluidized bed combustor was designed and fabricated to study the combustion of dewatered poultry sludge at different operational parameters. This paper present a study on the influence of equivalent ratio, secondary to primary air ratio and the fuel feed rate on the temperature distribution along the combustor. The equivalent ratio has been changed between 0.8 to 1.4% under poultry sludge feed rate of 10 kg/h and from 0.8 to 1 under poultry sludge feed rate of 15 kg/h. The secondary to primary air ratio was varied from 0.1 to 0.5 at 0.65 m injection height and 1.25 equivalent ratio. The results showed that these factors had a significant influence on the combustion characteristics of poultry sludge. The temperature distribution along the combustor was found to be strongly dependent on the fuel feed rate and the equivalent ratio and it increased when these two factors increased. However, the secondary air ratio increased the temperature in the lower region of the combustor while no significant effect was observed at the upper region of the combustor. The results suggested that the poultry sludge can be used as a fuel with high thermal combustor efficiency.

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF CATALYTIC COMBUSTOR TURBULENCE AND ITS INFLUENCE ON VANE AND ENDWALL HEAT TRANSFER AND ENDWALL FILM COOLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrest E. Ames

    2002-10-01

    Endwall heat transfer distributions taken in a large-scale low speed linear cascade facility are documented for mock catalytic and dry low NOx (DLN) combustion systems. Inlet turbulence levels range from about 1.0 percent for the mock Catalytic combustor condition to 14 percent for the mock dry low NOx combustor system. Stanton number contours are presented at both turbulence conditions for Reynolds numbers based on true chord length and exit conditions ranging from 500,000 to 2,000,000. Catalytic combustor endwall heat transfer shows the influence of the complex three-dimensional flow field, while the effects of individual vortex systems are less evident for the mock dry low NOx cases. Turbulence scales have been documented for both cases. Inlet boundary layers are relatively thin for the mock catalytic combustor case while inlet flow approximates a channel flow with high turbulence for the mock DLN combustor case. Inlet boundary layer parameters are presented across the inlet passage for the three Reynolds numbers and both the mock catalytic and DLN combustor inlet cases. Both midspan and 95 percent span pressure contours are included. This research provides a well-documented database taken across a range of Reynolds numbers and turbulence conditions for assessment of endwall heat transfer predictive capabilities.

  16. Food waste or wasted food

    OpenAIRE

    van Graas, Maaike Helene

    2014-01-01

    In the industrialized world large amounts of food are daily disposed of. A significant share of this waste could be avoided if different choices were made by individual households. Each day, every household makes decisions to maximize their happiness while balancing restricted amounts of time and money. Thinking of the food waste issue in terms of the consumer choice problem where households can control the amount of wasted food, we can model how households can make the best decisions. I...

  17. Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability Induced Mixing Enhancement in the Scramjet Combustor with a Central Strut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingchun Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and numerical study of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI induced mixing enhancement has been conducted in a liquid-fueled scramjet engine with a central strut. To generate the RMI in the scramjet engine, transverse high temperature jets are employed downstream the strut injector. Compared to the transverse ordinary temperature jet, the jet penetration into the supersonic airstream of high temperature jet increases by 60%. The numerical results indicate that the RMI phenomenon markedly enhances the mixing efficiency (up to 43%, which is necessary to initiate the chemical reactions. Ground experiments were carried out in the combustor, which verify the numerical method from the perspective of wall pressures of the combustor. In particular, the experiment results indicate that the RMI can benefit flame-holding due to the mixing enhancement.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Combustion and Rotor-Stator Interaction in a Turbine Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragos D. Isvoranu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the development of a numerical algorithm for the computation of flow and combustion in a turbine combustor. The flow and combustion are modeled by the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the species-conservation equations. The chemistry model used herein is a two-step, global, finite-rate combustion model for methane and combustion gases. The governing equations are written in the strong conservation form and solved using a fully implicit, finite-difference approximation. The gas dynamics and chemistry equations are fully decoupled. A correction technique has been developed to enforce the conservation of mass fractions. The numerical algorithm developed herein has been used to investigate the flow and combustion in a one-stage turbine combustor.

  19. NOx results from two combustors tested on medium BTU coal gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherlock, T. P.; Carl, D. E.; Vermes, G.; Schwab, J.; Notardonato, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    The results of tests of two combustor configurations using coal gas from a 25 ton/day fluidized bed coal gasifier are reported. The trials were run with a ceramic-lined, staged rich/lean burner and an integral, all metal multiannular swirl burner (MASB) using a range of temperatures and pressures representative of industrial turbine inlet conditions. A lean mixture was examined at 104, 197, and 254 Btu/Scf, yielding NO(x) emissions of 5, 20, and 70 ppmv, respectively. The MASB was employed only with a gas rated at 220-270 Btu/Scf, producing 80 ppmv NO(x) at rated engine conditions. The results are concluded to be transferrable to current machines. Further tests on the effects of gas composition, the scaling of combustors to utility size, and the development of improved wall cooling techniques and variable geometry are indicated.

  20. Comprehensive Mathematical Model for Coal Combustion in a Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金晓钟; 吕俊复; 杨海瑞; 刘青; 岳光溪; 冯俊凯

    2001-01-01

    Char combustion is on a special reducing condition in the dense bed of a circulating fluidized bedcombustor. Experimental findings were used to develop a comprehensive mathematical model to simulate thehydrodynamic and combustion processes in a circulating fluidized bed combustor. In the model, gas-solidinteraction was used to account for the mass transfer between the bubble phase and the emulsion phase in thedense bed, which contributes to the reducing atmosphere in the dense bed. A core-annular structure wasassumed in the dilute area rather than a one-dimensional model. The submodels were combined to build thecomprehensive model to analyze the combustion in a circulating fluidized bed combustor and the effect ofoperating parameters on the coal combustion. The model predictions agree well with experimental results.

  1. Computational Analysis of Mixing and Transport of Air and Fuel in Co-Fired Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javaid Iqbal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational analysis for air fuel mixing and transport in a combustor used for co fired burner has been done by RANS (Reynolds-Averaged Navier?Stokes model comparing with 3D (Three Dimensional LES (Large Eddy Simulation. To investigate the better turbulence level and mixing within co fired combustor using the solid fuel biomass with coal is main purpose of this research work. The results show the difference in flow predicted by the two models, LES give better results than the RANS. For compressible flow the LES results show more swirling effect, The velocity decays along axial and radial distance for both swirling and non-swirling jet. Because of no slip condition near boundary the near the wall velocity is about zero

  2. Development of an LCV fuel gas combustor for an industrial gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constant, D.R.; Bevan, D.M.; Cannon, M.F.; Kelsall, G.J. [British Coal Corporation, Stoke Orchard (United Kingdom). Coal Technology Development Division

    1997-12-31

    An important component of the Air Blown Gasification Cycle (ABGC) development is the gas turbine combustion system. It must burn low calorific value (LCV) coal derived fuel gas, at high turbine inlet temperatures with minimum pollutant emissions. A phase development programme has been completed burning LCV fuel gas (3.6-4.1 MJ/m{sup 3}) with low emissions, particularly NO{sub x} derived from fuel bound nitrogen. Performance tests were carried out on a generic tubo-annular, prototype combustor, at Mach numbers generally lower than those typical to engine applications, with encouraging results. Five design variants, operating at conditions selected to represent a particular medium sized industrial gas turbine each returned an improvement in combustor performance. A further five variants were investigated to establish which design characteristics and operating parameters most affected NO{sub x} emissions. 5 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Experimental and computational study of the effect of shocks on film cooling effectiveness in scramjet combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Pradeep S.; Holden, Michael S.; Mcclinton, Charles R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents results from a study conducted to investigate the effect of incident oblique shocks on the effectiveness of a coolant film at Mach numbers, typical of those expected in a scramjet combustor at Mach 15 to 20 flight. Computations with a parabolic code are in good agreement with the measured pressures and heat fluxes, after accounting for the influence of the shock upstream of its point of impingement on the plate, and the expansion from the trailing edge of the shock generator. The test data shows that, for the blowing rates tested, the film is rendered largely ineffective by the shock. Computations show that coolant blowing rates five to ten times those tested are required to protect against shock-induced heating. The implications of the results to scramjet combustor design are discussed.

  4. CFD prediction of the reacting flow field inside a subscale scramjet combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitsomboon, T.; Northam, G. B.; Rogers, R. C.; Diskin, G. S.

    1988-01-01

    A three-dimensional, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes CFD code has been used to calculate the reacting flowfield inside a hydrogen-fueled, subscale scramjet combustor. Pilot fuel was injected transversely upstream of the combustor and the primary fuel was injected transversely downstream of a backward facing step. A finite rate combustion model with two-step kinetics was used. The CFD code used the explicit MacCormack algorithm with point-implicit treatment of the chemistry source terms. Turbulent mixing of the jets with the airstream was simulated by a simple mixing length scheme, whereas near wall turbulence was accounted for by the Baldwin-Lomax model. Computed results were compared with experimental wall pressure measurements.

  5. An Experimental Study of Turbulent Flow in Attachment Jet Combustors by LDV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JUNLI; CHENG-KANGWU

    1993-01-01

    Flame stabilization in attachment jet combustors is based on the existence of the high temperature recirculation zone,provided by the Coanda effect of an attachment jet.The single attachment jet in a rectangular channel is a fundamental form of this type of flow.In this paper,the detailed characteristics of turbulent flow of a single attachment jet were experimentally studied by using a 2-D LDV,The flowfield consists of a forward flow and two reverse flows.The forward one is composed of a curved and a straight section.The curved section resembles a bent turbulent free jet,and the straight part is basically a section of turbulent wall jet.A turbulent couter-gradient transport region exists at the curved section.According to the results,this kind of combustor should have a large sudden enlarge ment ratio and not too narrow in width.

  6. Large Eddy Simulations and Experimental Investigation of Flow in a Swirl Stabilized Combustor

    KAUST Repository

    Kewlani, Gaurav

    2012-01-09

    Swirling flows are the preferred mode of flame stabilization in lean premixed gas turbine engine combustors. Developing a fundamental understanding of combustion dynamics and flame stability in such systems requires a detailed investigation of the complex interactions between fluid mechanics and combustion. The turbulent reacting flow in a sudden expansion swirl combustor is studied using compressible large eddy simulations (LES) and compared with experimental data measured using PIV. Different vortex breakdown structures are observed, as the mixture equivalence ratio is reduced, that progressively diminish the stability of the flame. Sub-grid scale combustion models such as the artificially thickened flame method and the partially stirred reactor approach, along with appropriate chemical schemes, are implemented to describe the flame. The numerical predictions for average velocity correspond well with experimental results, and higher accuracy is obtained using the more detailed reaction mechanism. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc.

  7. Efficiency enhancement of wood stove integrated with catalytic combustor and modified chimney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Murali

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Domestic wood combustion produces smoke that is harmful to human health and increases fine particle level in the atmosphere. Some necessary changes in the design are essential in the domestic wood stove in order to improve the performance and scale down the emission. In this work, an improved wood stove integrated with the catalytic combustor and modified chimney that uses wood as fuel has been experimentally evaluated. Water boiling test, cooking test and emission test have been conducted to evaluate the performance of the stove. It was observed that emission has been considerably controlled because of the incorporation of catalytic combustor. The heat losses through the walls of stove decresed by providing ceramic insulation. The thermal efficiency value of an improved wood stove obtained was 41.18% and this is 31.52% higher than traditional stove. The improved wood stove results better performance than a traditional wood stove.

  8. Advanced Off-Gas Control System Design For Radioactive And Mixed Waste Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nick Soelberg

    2005-09-01

    Treatment of radioactive and mixed wastes is often required to destroy or immobilize hazardous constituents, reduce waste volume, and convert the waste to a form suitable for final disposal. These kinds of treatments usually evolve off-gas. Air emission regulations have become increasingly stringent in recent years. Mixed waste thermal treatment in the United States is now generally regulated under the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. These standards impose unprecedented requirements for operation, monitoring and control, and emissions control. Off-gas control technologies and system designs that were satisfactorily proven in mixed waste operation prior to the implementation of new regulatory standards are in some cases no longer suitable in new mixed waste treatment system designs. Some mixed waste treatment facilities have been shut down rather than have excessively restrictive feed rate limits or facility upgrades to comply with the new standards. New mixed waste treatment facilities in the U. S. are being designed to operate in compliance with the HWC MACT standards. Activities have been underway for the past 10 years at the INL and elsewhere to identify, develop, demonstrate, and design technologies for enabling HWC MACT compliance for mixed waste treatment facilities. Some specific off-gas control technologies and system designs have been identified and tested to show that even the stringent HWC MACT standards can be met, while minimizing treatment facility size and cost.

  9. Topping combustor status for second-generation pressurized fluidized bed cycle application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domeracki, W.F.; Dowdy, T.E. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States). Power Generation Business Unit; Bachovchin, D.M. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center

    1997-01-01

    Second-generation Pressurized Fluidized (PFB) combined cycle employ topping combustion to raise the turbine inlet temperature for enhanced cycle efficiency. This concept creates special combustion system requirements that are very different from requirements of conventional gas turbine systems. The topping combustor provides the means for achieving state-of-the-art turbine inlet temperatures and is the main contributor to enhanced plant performance. The objective of this program is to develop a topping combustor that provides low emissions, and is a durable, efficient device exhibiting stable combustion and manageable wall temperature. The combustor will be required to burn a low-Btu syngas under normal coal-fired conditions. However, for start-up and/or carbonizer outage, it may be necessary to fire a clean fuel, such as oil or natural gas. Prior testing has shown the Westinghouse Multi-Annular Swirl Burner (MASB) to have excellent potential for this application. Metal wall temperatures can be maintained at acceptable levels, even though most cooling is done by 1,600 F vitiated air. Good pattern factors and combustion efficiencies have been obtained. Additionally, low conversion rates of fuel bound nitrogen to NO{sub x} have been demonstrated. This paper presents an update of the status of an ongoing topping combustor development and test program for application to Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combined Cycles (PFBCC). The program is sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) and will first be applied commercially into the Clean Coal Technology Round V Four Rivers Energy Modernization Project. Phase 1 of the program involved a conceptual and economic study (Robertson et al., 1988); Phase 2 addresses design and subscale testing of components; and Phase 3 will cover pilot plant testing of components integrated into one system.

  10. Characterisation of a gas turbine prototype combustor design for an ABGC plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsall, G.J.; Whinfrey, J. [European Gas Turbines Ltd. (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    Advanced coal-based power generation systems, such as the Air Blown Gasification Cycle (ABGC), offer the potential for high efficiency electricity generation with low environmental impact. An important component of the ABGC development programme is the design of a gas turbine combustion system to burn the coal-derived low calorific value (LCV) fuel-gas, generated by the air-blown gasifier. The overall objective of this project was to characterise at full-scale the initial prototype combustor hardware designed for an ABGC Prototype Integrated Plant. As part of the project, European Gas Turbine Ltd., provisioned what is believed to be a unique combustion test facility within Europe for the development of LCV gas-fired gas turbine combustion systems. This facility utilises a synthetic fuel-gas system capable of providing a variable fuel-gas mixture at mass flow rates up to 3.0 kg s{sup -1} and temperatures up to 600{degree}C. This allows testing of turbine combustion systems at full engine operating pressure and fuel-gas flows appropriate to medium-sized industrial gas turbines. The facility was used to characterise the first prototype combustor firing a synthetic fuel-gas representing the essential features of a coal-derived LCV fuel-gas. Combustor performance was encouraging. Combustor performance firing distillate oil as supplementary fuel was satisfactory in regard to light-up and change-over to fuel-gas, but was not as good as that for synthetic fuel-gas operation. 6 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Coupling between Hydrodynamics, Acoustics, and Heat Release in a Self-Excited Unstable Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-07

    analysis of a laminar premixed M-flame to flow perturbations using a linearized compressible Navier-Stokes solver Phys. Fluids 27, 043602 (2015...10.1063/1.4918672 Ignition sequence of an annular multi-injector combustor Phys. Fluids 26, 091106 (2014); 10.1063/1.4893452 On the compressible...the expansion.4 Different source terms can then be interpreted as different contributing mechanisms. If only the first order linear terms are retained

  12. Pulse Combustor Driven Pressure Gain Combustion for High Efficiency Gas Turbine Engines

    KAUST Repository

    Lisanti, Joel

    2017-02-01

    The gas turbine engine is an essential component of the global energy infrastructure which accounts for a significant portion of the total fossil fuel consumption in transportation and electric power generation sectors. For this reason there is significant interest in further increasing the efficiency and reducing the pollutant emissions of these devices. Conventional approaches to this goal, which include increasing the compression ratio, turbine inlet temperature, and turbine/compressor efficiency, have brought modern gas turbine engines near the limits of what may be achieved with the conventionally applied Brayton cycle. If a significant future step increase in gas turbine efficiency is to be realized some deviation from this convention is necessary. The pressure gain gas turbine concept is a well established new combustion technology that promises to provide a dramatic increase in gas turbine efficiency by replacing the isobaric heat addition process found in conventional technology with an isochoric process. The thermodynamic benefit of even a small increase in stagnation pressure across a gas turbine combustor translates to a significant increase in cycle efficiency. To date there have been a variety of methods proposed for achieving stagnation pressure gains across a gas turbine combustor and these concepts have seen a broad spectrum of levels of success. The following chapter provides an introduction to one of the proposed pressure gain methods that may be most easily realized in a practical application. This approach, known as pulse combustor driven pressure gain combustion, utilizes an acoustically resonant pulse combustor to approximate isochoric heat release and thus produce a rise in stagnation pressure.

  13. Computational Analysis of Geometric Effects on Strut Induced Mixing in a Scramjet Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    NASA also aided in the understanding of how VULCAN worked. Thanks to my advisor, Dr. Robert Greendyke, and the rest of the AFIT faculty for imparting...Magre, A. Bresson , F. Grisch, M. Orain, and M. Kodera, “Exper- imental study of strut injectors in a supersonic combustor using oh-plif,” AIAA Paper...OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON Dr. Robert Greendyke Associate Professor a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE U 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include

  14. Spectral analysis of CFB data: Predictive models of Circulating Fluidized Bed combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamwo, I.K.; Miller, A.; Gidaspow, D.

    1992-04-01

    The overall objective of this investigation is to develop experimentally verified models for circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustors. Spectral analysis of CFB data obtained at Illinois Institute of Technology shows that the frequencies of pressure oscillations are less than 0.1 Hertz and that they increase with solids volume fraction to the usual value of one Hertz obtained in bubbling beds. These data are consistent with the kinetic theory interpretation of density wave propagation.

  15. Hygroscopic properties of jet engine combustor particles during the partemis campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gysel, M.; Nyeki, S.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Petzold, A. [Deutsche Luft- und Raumfahrt, Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany); Wilson, C.W.

    2002-03-01

    The influence of fuel sulphur content (FSC) on particle properties from a jet engine combustor test rig was investigated during the EC-project PartEmis. Hygroscopic growth factors were measured using a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (H-TDMA). While particles were hydrophobic at low FSC, hygroscopic growth factors increased significantly with increasing FSC. Under similar conditions small particles were more hygroscopic than large particles. (author)

  16. Report covering examination of parts from downhole steam generators. [Combustor head and sleeve parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettit, F. S.; Meier, G. H.

    1983-08-01

    Combustor head and sleeve parts were examined by using optical and scanning electron metallography after use in oxygen/diesel and air/diesel downhole steam generators. The degradation of the different alloy components is described in terms of reactions with oxygen, sulfur and carbon in the presence of cyclic stresses, all generated by the combustion process. Recommendations are presented for component materials (alloys and coatings) to extend component lives in the downhole steam generators. 9 references, 22 figures, 3 tables.

  17. Modeling of complex physics & combustion dynamics in a combustor with a partially premixed turbulent flame

    OpenAIRE

    Shahi, Mina

    2014-01-01

    To avoid the formation of the high temperature stoichiometric regions in flames in a gas turbine combustor, and hence the formation of nitric oxides, an alternative concept of combustion technology was introduced by means of lean premixed combustion. However, the low emission of nitric oxides and carbon monoxide of the lean premixed combustion of natural gas comes at the cost of increased sensitivity to thermoacoustic instabilities. These are driven by the feedback loop between heat release, ...

  18. Lagrangian coherent structures during combustion instability in a premixed-flame backward-step combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Ramgopal; Mathur, Manikandan; Chakravarthy, Satyanarayanan R.

    2016-12-01

    This paper quantitatively examines the occurrence of large-scale coherent structures in the flow field during combustion instability in comparison with the flow-combustion-acoustic system when it is stable. For this purpose, the features in the recirculation zone of the confined flow past a backward-facing step are studied in terms of Lagrangian coherent structures. The experiments are conducted at a Reynolds number of 18600 and an equivalence ratio of 0.9 of the premixed fuel-air mixture for two combustor lengths, the long duct corresponding to instability and the short one to the stable case. Simultaneous measurements of the velocity field using time-resolved particle image velocimetry and the C H* chemiluminescence of the flame along with pressure time traces are obtained. The extracted ridges of the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields delineate dynamically distinct regions of the flow field. The presence of large-scale vortical structures and their modulation over different time instants are well captured by the FTLE ridges for the long combustor where high-amplitude acoustic oscillations are self-excited. In contrast, small-scale vortices signifying Kelvin-Helmholtz instability are observed in the short duct case. Saddle-type flow features are found to separate the distinct flow structures for both combustor lengths. The FTLE ridges are found to align with the flame boundaries in the upstream regions, whereas farther downstream, the alignment is weaker due to dilatation of the flow by the flame's heat release. Specifically, the FTLE ridges encompass the flame curl-up for both the combustor lengths, and thus act as the surrogate flame boundaries. The flame is found to propagate upstream from an earlier vortex roll-up to a newer one along the backward-time FTLE ridge connecting the two structures.

  19. Validation of the NCC Code for Staged Transverse Injection and Computations for a RBCC Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmani, Kumud; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2005-01-01

    The NCC code was validated for a case involving staged transverse injection into Mach 2 flow behind a rearward facing step. Comparisons with experimental data and with solutions from the FPVortex code was then used to perform computations to study fuel-air mixing for the combustor of a candidate rocket based combined cycle engine geometry. Comparisons with a one-dimensional analysis and a three-dimensional code (VULCAN) were performed to assess the qualitative and quantitative performance of the NCC solver.

  20. Flow structures in a lean-premixed swirl-stabilized combustor with microjet air injection

    KAUST Repository

    LaBry, Zachary A.

    2011-01-01

    The major challenge facing the development of low-emission combustors is combustion instability. By lowering flame temperatures, lean-premixed combustion has the potential to nearly eliminate emissions of thermally generated nitric oxides, but the chamber acoustics and heat release rate are highly susceptible to coupling in ways that lead to sustained, high-amplitude pressure oscillations, known as combustion instability. At different operating conditions, different modes of instability are observed, corresponding to particular flame shapes and resonant acoustic modes. Here we show that in a swirl-stabilized combustor, these instability modes also correspond to particular interactions between the flame and the inner recirculation zone. Two stable and two unstable modes are examined. At lean equivalence ratios, a stable conical flame anchors on the upstream edge of the inner recirculation zone and extends several diameters downstream along the wall. At higher equivalence ratios, with the injection of counter-swirling microjet air flow, another stable flame is observed. This flame is anchored along the upstream edge of a stronger recirculation zone, extending less than one diameter downstream along the wall. Without the microjets, a stationary instability coupled to the 1/4 wave mode of the combustor shows weak velocity oscillations and a stable configuration of the inner and outer recirculation zones. Another instability, coupled to the 3/4 wave mode of the combustor, exhibits periodic vortex breakdown in which the core flow alternates between a columnar mode and a vortex breakdown mode. © 2010 Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of The Combustion Institute. All rights reserved.

  1. Flow Field Dynamics in a High-g Ultra-Compact Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    common-source upstream flow diffuser, and a complex hybrid guide vane design. This research capitalized on the availability of advanced flow diagnostic...competitive with traditional axial combustors while capitalizing on the space- and weight-saving characteristics of the UCC. To that end, the details of...characteristics. 2.4.6.1. Early Work The first work aimed at capitalizing on the benefits of high-g combustion in a practical engine design is

  2. Bed agglomeration in fluidized combustor fueled by wood and rice straw blends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thy, Peter; Jenkins, Brian; Williams, R.B.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Petrographic techniques have been used to examine bed materials from fluidized bed combustion experiments that utilized wood and rice straw fuel blends. The experiments were conducted using a laboratory-scale combustor with mullite sand beds, firing temperatures of 840 to 1030 °C, and run...... straw ash particles appear to have mostly been passively incorporated into the adhesive melt without melting or reaction....

  3. Efficiency and Pressure Loss Characteristics of an Ultra-Compact Combustor with Bulk Swirl

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    Compact Combustor UHC = Unburned hydrocarbons Symbols β = Angle or bypass ratio γ = Ratio of specific heats η = Efficiency π = Pressure ratio ρ...hydrocarbons ( UHC ), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx). Emissions of CO, UHCs , and NOx have had the most effort expended on them to reduce the quantity emitted...promise for lowered pollutant outputs because of its increased combustion efficiency. Typically, emissions of CO and UHC are the highest at idle

  4. Combustor and Vane Features and Components Tested in a Gas Turbine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roinson, R. Craig; Verrilli, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    The use of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) as combustor liners and turbine vanes provides the potential of improving next-generation turbine engine performance, through lower emissions and higher cycle efficiency, relative to today s use of superalloy hot-section components. For example, the introduction of film-cooling air in metal combustor liners has led to higher levels of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from the combustion process. An environmental barrier coated (EBC) siliconcarbide- fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix (SiC/SiC) composite is a new material system that can operate at higher temperatures, significantly reducing the film-cooling requirements and enabling lower NOx production. Evaluating components and subcomponents fabricated from these advanced CMCs under gas turbine conditions is paramount to demonstrating that the material system can perform as required in the complex thermal stress and environmentally aggressive engine environment. To date, only limited testing has been conducted on CMC combustor and turbine concepts and subelements of this type throughout the industry. As part of the Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program, the High Pressure Burner Rig (HPBR) at the NASA Glenn Research Center was selected to demonstrate coupon, subcomponent feature, and component testing because it can economically provide the temperatures, pressures, velocities, and combustion gas compositions that closely simulate the engine environments. The results have proven the HPBR to be a highly versatile test rig amenable to multiple test specimen configurations essential to coupon and component testing.

  5. Modeling of NO and N{sub 2}O emissions from biomass circulating fluidized bed combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.; Gibbs, B.M. [Leeds Univ., Leeds (United Kingdom). Dept. of Fuel and Energy

    2002-07-01

    In order to correctly model biomass combustion in a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustor, it is necessary to examine the four main stages in the combustion of biomass particles. These include drying, devolatilization, volatile combustion and char combustion in a CFB combustor. This paper presents a newly developed model for nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions from biomass-fired CFB combustors. A typical woody biomass of pinewood chips was selected for the model parameters. The drying and devolatilization of biomass particles was modeled with limited rates according to woody biomass fuels. The partition of fuel nitrogen between volatiles and char was chosen for pinewood based on available data from literature. It was assumed that the volatile nitrogen was composed of ammonia (NH{sub 3}), hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and nitrogen (N{sub 2}). The model included 25 chemical reactions, of which 20 belonged to global fuel-nitrogen reaction kinetics. A 12 MW CFB boiler was used to apply the model. Results were compared with experimental values as well as data from literature. The reaction between NO and char was found to be the key reaction that determines NO emissions. The catalytic effect of bed materials on the oxidation of NH{sub 3} and the the homogeneous reaction of NH{sub 3} with nitric oxide was also significant. 25 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  6. Microjet Injection Strategies for Mitigating Dynamics in a Lean Premixed Swirl-Stabilized Combustor

    KAUST Repository

    LaBry, Zachary

    2011-01-04

    Combustion dynamics remain a challenge in the development of low-emission, air-breathing combustors for power generation and aircraft propulsion. In this paper, we presenta parametric study on the use of microjet injectors for suppressing or mitigating the combustion dynamics that energize the thermoacoustic instability in a swirl-stabilized, premixed combustor. Microjet injectors consist of small inlet ports intended to inject flow with high momentum at relatively low mass flow rates into the flame-anchoring region. The microjets were configured to inject flow either axially, into the outer recirculation zone, or radially into the inner recirculation zone. Additionally, different injectors were tested with different relative senses of swirl (signs of angular momentum)with respect to the main flow: co-swirling, not swirling, or counter-swirling. We observed that injecting air or premixed fuel/air into the inner recirculation zone via counter-swirling radial microjets, we were able to reduce the overall sound pressure level in the combustor by over 20 dB in the lean end of the operating range. Other injector configurations were not observed to positively influence the combust or stability. Detailed PIV measurements are used to examine possible mechanisms of how the microjets impact the combustion dynamics, and the technology implications of our experiments are discussed.

  7. Flow-acoustic Characterisation of a Cavity-based Combustor Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Kant Agarwal

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study concerns the flow-acoustic characterisation of a cavity-based combustor configuration. A well-validated numerical tool has been used to simulate the unsteady, two-dimensional reacting flow. Initially, a conventional flow over a cavity with dimensions and conditions corresponding to a compact cavity combustor was studied. Cavity mass injections in the form of fuel and air injections required for trapped vortex formation were then employed and the resonance features of this configuration were studied. The results indicate that the cavity depth mode resonance mechanism is dominant at the conditions studied in this work and that the oscillation frequencies do not change with cavity air injection. This observation is important since it implies that the only important variable which can alter resonant frequencies is the cavity depth. With combustion, the pressure oscillation amplitude was observed to increases significantly due to periodic entrainment of the cavity air jet and fluctuation of fuel-air mixture composition to produce highly fluctuating heat-release rates. The underlying mechanisms of the unsteady flow in the cavity combustor identified in this study indicate the strong dependence of the acoustics on the cavity injection strategies.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(6, pp.523-528, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.870

  8. Parametric study of combustion oscillation in a single-side expansion scramjet combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Hao; Liu, Weidong; Sun, Mingbo

    2016-10-01

    As a promising candidate for future air-breathing systems, the viability and efficiency of scramjet propulsion is challenged by a variety of factors including the combustion oscillation in scramjet combustor. A series of comparative experiments focusing on the combustion oscillation issue has been carried out in the present work. The obtained experimental results show that as the global equivalence ratio increases, the combustion oscillation becomes more regular and frequent which is the most intensive in the vicinity of the fuel jet and the periodic combustion oscillation is more possible when the injectors and flame-holding cavity are mounted on the expansion-side wall. In order to avoid the combustion oscillation in scramjet combustor, distributed injection scheme is an effective method which can induce two parts interacting stable flame. In addition, the results reveal that the varying fuel including hydrogen, ethylene and kerosene with different chemical kinetics has a significant effect on the reaction process in scramjet combustor, which can result in stable combustion, periodic oscillation and failed ignition respectively on the same operating condition of this paper. We believe that the present work is helpful to the designing of scramjet propulsion device.

  9. NASA One-Dimensional Combustor Simulation--User Manual for S1D_ML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stueber, Thomas J.; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    The work presented in this paper is to promote research leading to a closed-loop control system to actively suppress thermo-acoustic instabilities. To serve as a model for such a closed-loop control system, a one-dimensional combustor simulation composed using MATLAB software tools has been written. This MATLAB based process is similar to a precursor one-dimensional combustor simulation that was formatted as FORTRAN 77 source code. The previous simulation process requires modification to the FORTRAN 77 source code, compiling, and linking when creating a new combustor simulation executable file. The MATLAB based simulation does not require making changes to the source code, recompiling, or linking. Furthermore, the MATLAB based simulation can be run from script files within the MATLAB environment or with a compiled copy of the executable file running in the Command Prompt window without requiring a licensed copy of MATLAB. This report presents a general simulation overview. Details regarding how to setup and initiate a simulation are also presented. Finally, the post-processing section describes the two types of files created while running the simulation and it also includes simulation results for a default simulation included with the source code.

  10. Ignition and Flame Stabilization of a Strut-Jet RBCC Combustor with Small Rocket Exhaust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jichao Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A Rocket Based Combined Cycle combustor model is tested at a ground direct connected rig to investigate the flame holding characteristics with a small rocket exhaust using liquid kerosene. The total temperature and the Mach number of the vitiated air flow, at exit of the nozzle are 1505 K and 2.6, respectively. The rocket base is embedded in a fuel injecting strut and mounted in the center of the combustor. The wall of the combustor is flush, without any reward step or cavity, so the strut-jet is used to make sure of the flame stabilization of the second combustion. Mass flow rate of the kerosene and oxygen injected into the rocket is set to be a small value, below 10% of the total fuel when the equivalence ratio of the second combustion is 1. The experiment has generated two different kinds of rocket exhaust: fuel rich and pure oxygen. Experiment result has shown that, with a relative small total mass flow rate of the rocket, the fuel rich rocket plume is not suitable for ignition and flame stabilization, while an oxygen plume condition is suitable. Then the paper conducts a series of experiments to investigate the combustion characteristics under this oxygen pilot method and found that the flame stabilization characteristics are different at different combustion modes.

  11. Augmentation of Stagnation Region Heat Transfer Due to Turbulence from a DLN Can Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanFossen, G. James; Bunker, Ronald S.

    2001-01-01

    Heat transfer measurements have been made in the stagnation region of a flat plate with a circular leading edge. Electrically heated aluminum strips placed symmetrically about the leading edge stagnation region were used to measure spanwise-averaged heat transfer coefficients. The maximum Reynolds number obtained, based on leading edge diameter, was about 100,000. The model was immersed in the flow field downstream of an approximately half-scale model of a can-type combustor from a low NO(x), ground-based power-generating turbine. The tests were conducted with room temperature air; no fuel was added. Room air flowed into the combustor through six vane-type fuel/air swirlers. The combustor can contained no dilution holes. The fuel/air swirlers all swirled the incoming airflow in a counterclockwise direction (facing downstream). A five-hole probe flow field survey in the plane of the model stagnation point showed the flow was one big vortex with flow angles up to 36 deg at the outer edges of the rectangular test section. Hot-wire measurements showed test section flow had very high levels of turbulence, around 28.5%, and had a relatively large axial-length scale-to-leading edge diameter ratio of 0.5. X-wire measurements showed the turbulence to be nearly isotropic. Stagnation heat transfer augmentation over laminar levels was around 77% and was about 14% higher than predicted by a previously developed correlation for isotropic grid-generated turbulence.

  12. Combustion Characteristics of Liquid Normal Alkane Fuels in a Model Combustor of Supersonic Combustion Ramjet Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    今村, 宰; 石川, 雄太; 鈴木, 俊介; 福本, 皓士郎; 西田, 俊介; 氏家, 康成; 津江, 光洋

    Effect of kinds of one-component n-alkane liquid fuels on combustion characteristics was investigated experimentally using a model combustor of scramjet engine. The inlet condition of a model combustor is 2.0 of Mach number, up to 2400K of total temperature, and 0.38MPa of total pressure. Five kinds of n-alkane are tested, of which carbon numbers are 7, 8, 10, 13, and 16. They are more chemically active and less volatile with an increase of alkane carbon number. Fuels are injected to the combustor in the upstream of cavity with barbotage nitrogen gas and self-ignition performance was investigated. The result shows that self-ignition occurs with less equivalence ratio when alkane carbon number is smaller. This indicates that physical characteristic of fuel, namely volatile of fuel, is dominant for self-ignition behavior. Effect on flame-holding performance is also examined with adding pilot hydrogen and combustion is kept after cutting off pilot hydrogen with the least equivalence ratio where alkane carbon number is from 8 to 10. These points are discussed qualitatively from the conflict effect of chemical and physical properties on alkane carbon number.

  13. Demonstration of a Reheat Combustor for Power Production With CO2 Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Chorpening; Geo. A. Richards; Kent H. Casleton; Mark Woike; Brian Willis; Larry Hoffman

    2005-10-01

    Concerns about climate change have encouraged significant interest in concepts for ultralow or “zero”-emissions power generation systems. In a concept proposed by Clean Energy Systems, Inc., nitrogen is removed from the combustion air and replaced with steam diluent. In this way, formation of nitrogen oxides is prevented, and the exhaust stream can be separated into concentrated CO2 and water streams. The concentrated CO2 stream could then serve as input to a CO2 sequestration process. In this study, experimental data are reported from a full-scale combustion test using steam as the diluent in oxy-fuel combustion. This combustor represents the “reheat” combustion system in a steam cycle that uses a high and low-pressure steam expansion. The reheat combustor serves to raise the temperature of the low-pressure steam turbine inlet, similar to the reheat stage of a conventional steam power cycle. Unlike a conventional steam cycle, the reheat enthalpy is actually generated by oxy-fuel combustion in the steam flow. This paper reports on the unique design aspects of this combustor, as well as initial emissions and operating performance.

  14. Ignition and flame stabilization of a strut-jet RBCC combustor with small rocket exhaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jichao; Chang, Juntao; Bao, Wen

    2014-01-01

    A Rocket Based Combined Cycle combustor model is tested at a ground direct connected rig to investigate the flame holding characteristics with a small rocket exhaust using liquid kerosene. The total temperature and the Mach number of the vitiated air flow, at exit of the nozzle are 1505 K and 2.6, respectively. The rocket base is embedded in a fuel injecting strut and mounted in the center of the combustor. The wall of the combustor is flush, without any reward step or cavity, so the strut-jet is used to make sure of the flame stabilization of the second combustion. Mass flow rate of the kerosene and oxygen injected into the rocket is set to be a small value, below 10% of the total fuel when the equivalence ratio of the second combustion is 1. The experiment has generated two different kinds of rocket exhaust: fuel rich and pure oxygen. Experiment result has shown that, with a relative small total mass flow rate of the rocket, the fuel rich rocket plume is not suitable for ignition and flame stabilization, while an oxygen plume condition is suitable. Then the paper conducts a series of experiments to investigate the combustion characteristics under this oxygen pilot method and found that the flame stabilization characteristics are different at different combustion modes.

  15. A Comparison of Combustion Dynamics for Multiple 7-Point Lean Direct Injection Combustor Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacina, K. M.; Hicks, Y. R.

    2017-01-01

    The combustion dynamics of multiple 7-point lean direct injection (LDI) combustor configurations are compared. LDI is a fuel-lean combustor concept for aero gas turbine engines in which multiple small fuel-air mixers replace one traditionally-sized fuel-air mixer. This 7-point LDI configuration has a circular cross section, with a center (pilot) fuel-air mixer surrounded by six outer (main) fuel-air mixers. Each fuel-air mixer consists of an axial air swirler followed by a converging-diverging venturi. A simplex fuel injector is inserted through the center of the air swirler, with the fuel injector tip located near the venturi throat. All 7 fuel-air mixers are identical except for the swirler blade angle, which varies with the configuration. Testing was done in a 5-atm flame tube with inlet air temperatures from 600 to 800 F and equivalence ratios from 0.4 to 0.7. Combustion dynamics were measured using a cooled PCB pressure transducer flush-mounted in the wall of the combustor test section.

  16. Gasifier-combustor using chips of eucalyptus firewood in drying pulped coffee; Gasificador/combustor a cavacos de lenha na secagem de cafe despolpado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jadir Nogueira da; Saiki, Emilio Takashi; Vilarinho, Mauricio Coelho; Cardoso Sobrinho, Jose [Vicosa Univ., MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Agricola

    2000-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the viability of the of a gasifier/combustor using chip of eucalyptus firewood as fuel, in drying pulped coffee. The gasifier used was designed by Silva (1988) with modifications in the gasification chamber, being the area of the grate reduced from 0,21 to 0,06m{sup 2}. An addition of a coating involving the gasifier was done and a damper was placed in the exit of the combustion chamber. The air heated up in the combustor was sent to dryer developed by Campos (1998) that possessed four movable metallic chambers with movement and hoisted by a pulleys system. It was dried coffee with initial moisture of 54,5% w.b. up to 11,1{+-}1,6% w.b. The moisture of the coffee was determined by equipment of the universal type, EDABO and stove. The temperature of the drying air was of 60 deg C, static pressure of the air in the exit of the fan of 9 mm ca with speed of 46,3m{sup 3}.min{sup -1}. It was ended that the gasifier using chips of eucalyptus firewood as fuel consumed among 15,3 and 18,8 kg/hour of the biomass and that the equipment is viable for the drying of pulped coffee, not impregnating it with smoke or other particles, usually generated in the direct fired furnaces. (author)

  17. Cogeneration fueled by solid waste utilizing a new technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanton, M.

    1982-10-01

    Energy recovery from solid waste has been common in Europe for many years. In the last 10 years the number of these facilities built in the United States has been increasing. However most of the solid waste energy recovery facilities have been built in large cities such as Nashville, Tennessee, Saugus, Massachusetts, Akron, Ohio, and Chicago, Illinois, using the well-developed water-wall furnaces similar to those found in large utility plants. The technologies available in sizes applicable to smaller communities have been found wanting in reliability and in the capability for producing high pressure steam to drive turbines. The water-wall rotary combustors being installed in a facility in Sumner County, Tennessee, offer the promise of reliability and capability heretofore not available to smaller communities.

  18. Prediction of soot and thermal radiation in a model gas turbine combustor burning kerosene fuel spray at different swirl levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Prakash; Patra, Jitendra; Datta, Amitava; Mukhopadhyay, Achintya

    2016-05-01

    Combustion of kerosene fuel spray has been numerically simulated in a laboratory scale combustor geometry to predict soot and the effects of thermal radiation at different swirl levels of primary air flow. The two-phase motion in the combustor is simulated using an Eulerian-Lagragian formulation considering the stochastic separated flow model. The Favre-averaged governing equations are solved for the gas phase with the turbulent quantities simulated by realisable k-ɛ model. The injection of the fuel is considered through a pressure swirl atomiser and the combustion is simulated by a laminar flamelet model with detailed kinetics of kerosene combustion. Soot formation in the flame is predicted using an empirical model with the model parameters adjusted for kerosene fuel. Contributions of gas phase and soot towards thermal radiation have been considered to predict the incident heat flux on the combustor wall and fuel injector. Swirl in the primary flow significantly influences the flow and flame structures in the combustor. The stronger recirculation at high swirl draws more air into the flame region, reduces the flame length and peak flame temperature and also brings the soot laden zone closer to the inlet plane. As a result, the radiative heat flux on the peripheral wall decreases at high swirl and also shifts closer to the inlet plane. However, increased swirl increases the combustor wall temperature due to radial spreading of the flame. The high incident radiative heat flux and the high surface temperature make the fuel injector a critical item in the combustor. The injector peak temperature increases with the increase in swirl flow mainly because the flame is located closer to the inlet plane. On the other hand, a more uniform temperature distribution in the exhaust gas can be attained at the combustor exit at high swirl condition.

  19. Experimental and Numerical Studies of Vitiated Air Effects on Hydrogen-fueled Supersonic Combustor Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Feiteng; SONG Wenyan; ZHANG Zhiqiang; LI Weiqiang; LI Jianping

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the vitiation effects of test air on the scramjet performance in the ground combustion heated facilities.The primary goal is to evaluate the effects of H2O and CO2,the two major vitiated species generated by combustion heater,on hydrogen-fueled supersonic combustor performance with experimental and numerical approaches.The comparative experiments in the clean air and vitiated air are conducted by using the resistance heated direct-connected facility,with the typical Mach 4 flight conditions simulated.The H2O and CO2 species with accurately controlled contents are added to the high enthalpy clean air from resistance heater,to synthesize the vitiated air of a combustion-type heater.Typically,the contents of H2O species can be varied within the range of 3.5%-30o% by mole,and 3.0%-10% for CO2 species.The total temperature,total pressure,Mach number and O2 mole fraction at the combustor entrance are well-matched between the clean air and vitiated air.The combustion experiments are completed at the fuel equivalence ratios of 0.53 and 0.42 respectively.Furthermore,three-dimensional (3D) reacting flow simulations of combustor towpath are performed to provide insight into flow field structures and combustion chemistry details that cannot resolved by experimental instruments available.Finally,the experimental data,combined with computational results,are employed to analyze the effects of H2O and CO2 vitiated air on supersonic combustion characteristics and performance.It is concluded that H2O and CO2 contaminants can significantly inhibit the combustion induced pressure rise measured from combustor wall,and the pressure profile decreases with the increasing H2O and CO2 contents in nonlinear trend;simulation results agree well with experimental data and the overall vitiation effects are captured; direct extrapolation of the results from vitiated air to predict the performance of actual flight conditions could result in over-fueling the combustor

  20. Gaseous emissions during concurrent combustion of biomass and non-recyclable municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laryea-Goldsmith, René; Oakey, John; Simms, Nigel J

    2011-02-01

    Biomass and municipal solid waste offer sustainable sources of energy; for example to meet heat and electricity demand in the form of combined cooling, heat and power. Combustion of biomass has a lesser impact than solid fossil fuels (e.g. coal) upon gas pollutant emissions, whilst energy recovery from municipal solid waste is a beneficial component of an integrated, sustainable waste management programme. Concurrent combustion of these fuels using a fluidised bed combustor may be a successful method of overcoming some of the disadvantages of biomass (high fuel supply and distribution costs, combustion characteristics) and characteristics of municipal solid waste (heterogeneous content, conflict with materials recycling). It should be considered that combustion of municipal solid waste may be a financially attractive disposal route if a 'gate fee' value exists for accepting waste for combustion, which will reduce the net cost of utilising relatively more expensive biomass fuels. Emissions of nitrogen monoxide and sulphur dioxide for combustion of biomass are suppressed after substitution of biomass for municipal solid waste materials as the input fuel mixture. Interactions between these and other pollutants such as hydrogen chloride, nitrous oxide and carbon monoxide indicate complex, competing reactions occur between intermediates of these compounds to determine final resultant emissions. Fluidised bed concurrent combustion is an appropriate technique to exploit biomass and municipal solid waste resources, without the use of fossil fuels. The addition of municipal solid waste to biomass combustion has the effect of reducing emissions of some gaseous pollutants.

  1. Gaseous emissions during concurrent combustion of biomass and non-recyclable municipal solid waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oakey John

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biomass and municipal solid waste offer sustainable sources of energy; for example to meet heat and electricity demand in the form of combined cooling, heat and power. Combustion of biomass has a lesser impact than solid fossil fuels (e.g. coal upon gas pollutant emissions, whilst energy recovery from municipal solid waste is a beneficial component of an integrated, sustainable waste management programme. Concurrent combustion of these fuels using a fluidised bed combustor may be a successful method of overcoming some of the disadvantages of biomass (high fuel supply and distribution costs, combustion characteristics and characteristics of municipal solid waste (heterogeneous content, conflict with materials recycling. It should be considered that combustion of municipal solid waste may be a financially attractive disposal route if a 'gate fee' value exists for accepting waste for combustion, which will reduce the net cost of utilising relatively more expensive biomass fuels. Results Emissions of nitrogen monoxide and sulphur dioxide for combustion of biomass are suppressed after substitution of biomass for municipal solid waste materials as the input fuel mixture. Interactions between these and other pollutants such as hydrogen chloride, nitrous oxide and carbon monoxide indicate complex, competing reactions occur between intermediates of these compounds to determine final resultant emissions. Conclusions Fluidised bed concurrent combustion is an appropriate technique to exploit biomass and municipal solid waste resources, without the use of fossil fuels. The addition of municipal solid waste to biomass combustion has the effect of reducing emissions of some gaseous pollutants.

  2. Effects of Combustion-Induced Vortex Breakdown on Flashback Limits of Syngas-Fueled Gas Turbine Combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahsan Choudhuri

    2011-03-31

    Turbine combustors of advanced power systems have goals to achieve very low pollutants emissions, fuel variability, and fuel flexibility. Future generation gas turbine combustors should tolerate fuel compositions ranging from natural gas to a broad range of syngas without sacrificing operational advantages and low emission characteristics. Additionally, current designs of advanced turbine combustors use various degrees of swirl and lean premixing for stabilizing flames and controlling high temperature NOx formation zones. However, issues of fuel variability and NOx control through premixing also bring a number of concerns, especially combustor flashback and flame blowout. Flashback is a combustion condition at which the flame propagates upstream against the gas stream into the burner tube. Flashback is a critical issue for premixed combustor designs, because it not only causes serious hardware damages but also increases pollutant emissions. In swirl stabilized lean premixed turbine combustors onset of flashback may occur due to (i) boundary layer flame propagation (critical velocity gradient), (ii) turbulent flame propagation in core flow, (iii) combustion instabilities, and (iv) upstream flame propagation induced by combustion induced vortex breakdown (CIVB). Flashback due to first two foregoing mechanisms is a topic of classical interest and has been studied extensively. Generally, analytical theories and experimental determinations of laminar and turbulent burning velocities model these mechanisms with sufficient precision for design usages. However, the swirling flow complicates the flashback processes in premixed combustions and the first two mechanisms inadequately describe the flashback propensity of most practical combustor designs. The presence of hydrogen in syngas significantly increases the potential for flashback. Due to high laminar burning velocity and low lean flammability limit, hydrogen tends to shift the combustor operating conditions towards

  3. Effects of Combustion-Induced Vortex Breakdown on Flashback Limits of Syngas-Fueled Gas Turbine Combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahsan Choudhuri

    2011-03-31

    Turbine combustors of advanced power systems have goals to achieve very low pollutants emissions, fuel variability, and fuel flexibility. Future generation gas turbine combustors should tolerate fuel compositions ranging from natural gas to a broad range of syngas without sacrificing operational advantages and low emission characteristics. Additionally, current designs of advanced turbine combustors use various degrees of swirl and lean premixing for stabilizing flames and controlling high temperature NOx formation zones. However, issues of fuel variability and NOx control through premixing also bring a number of concerns, especially combustor flashback and flame blowout. Flashback is a combustion condition at which the flame propagates upstream against the gas stream into the burner tube. Flashback is a critical issue for premixed combustor designs, because it not only causes serious hardware damages but also increases pollutant emissions. In swirl stabilized lean premixed turbine combustors onset of flashback may occur due to (i) boundary layer flame propagation (critical velocity gradient), (ii) turbulent flame propagation in core flow, (iii) combustion instabilities, and (iv) upstream flame propagation induced by combustion induced vortex breakdown (CIVB). Flashback due to first two foregoing mechanisms is a topic of classical interest and has been studied extensively. Generally, analytical theories and experimental determinations of laminar and turbulent burning velocities model these mechanisms with sufficient precision for design usages. However, the swirling flow complicates the flashback processes in premixed combustions and the first two mechanisms inadequately describe the flashback propensity of most practical combustor designs. The presence of hydrogen in syngas significantly increases the potential for flashback. Due to high laminar burning velocity and low lean flammability limit, hydrogen tends to shift the combustor operating conditions towards

  4. Assessment of Rich-Burn, Quick-Mix, Lean-Burn Trapped Vortex Combustor for Stationary Gas Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas L. Straub; Kent H. Casleton; Robie E. Lewis; Todd G. Sidwell; Daniel J. Maloney; George A. Richards

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of an alternative combustion approach to achieve low emissions for a wide range of fuel types. This approach combines the potential advantages of a staged rich-burn, quick-mix, lean-burn (RQL) combustor with the revolutionary trapped vortex combustor (TVC) concept. Although RQL combustors have been proposed for low-Btu fuels, this paper considers the application of an RQL combustor for high-Btu natural gas applications. This paper will describe the RQL/TVC concept and experimental results conducted at 10 atm (1013 kPa or 147 psia) and an inlet-air temperature of 644 K (700°F). The results from a simple network reactor model using detailed kinetics are compared to the experimental observations. Neglecting mixing limitations, the simplified model suggests that NOx and CO performance below 10 parts per million could be achieved in an RQL approach. The CO levels predicted by the model are reasonably close to the experimental results over a wide range of operating conditions. The predicted NOx levels are reasonably close for some operating conditions; however, as the rich-stage equivalence ratio increases, the discrepancy between the experiment and the model increases. Mixing limitations are critical in any RQL combustor, and the mixing limitations for this RQL/TVC design are discussed.

  5. NOx Emissions Characteristics and Correlation Equations of Two P and W's Axially Staged Sector Combustors Developed Under NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhuohui J.

    2017-01-01

    Two P&W (Pratt & Whitney)'s axially staged sector combustors have been developed under NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project. One combustor was developed under ERA Phase I, and the other was developed under ERA Phase II. Nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions characteristics and correlation equations for these two sector combustors are reported in this article. The Phase I design was to optimize the NOx emissions reduction potential, while the Phase II design was more practical and robust. Multiple injection points and fuel staging strategies are used in the combustor design. Pilot-stage injectors are located on the front dome plate of the combustor, and main-stage injectors are positioned on the top and bottom (Phase I) or on the top only (Phase II) of the combustor liners downstream. Low power configuration uses only pilot-stage injectors. Main-stage injectors are added to high power configuration to help distribute fuel more evenly and achieve lean burn throughout the combustor yielding very low NOx emissions. The ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization) landing-takeoff NOx emissions are verified to be 88 percent (Phase I) and 76 percent (Phase II) under the ICAO CAEP/6 (Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection 6th Meeting) standard, exceeding the ERA project goal of 75 percent reduction, and the combustors proved to have stable combustion with room to maneuver on fuel flow splits for operability.

  6. Design and fabrication of a meso-scale stirling engine and combustor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echekki, Tarek (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Haroldsen, Brent L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Krafcik, Karen L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Morales, Alfredo Martin (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Mills, Bernice E. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Liu, Shiling (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Lee, Jeremiah C. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Karpetis, Adionos N. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Chen, Jacqueline H. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Ceremuga, Joseph T. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Raber, Thomas N. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Hekmuuaty, Michelle A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-05-01

    Power sources capable of supplying tens of watts are needed for a wide variety of applications including portable electronics, sensors, micro aerial vehicles, and mini-robotics systems. The utility of these devices is often limited by the energy and power density capabilities of batteries. A small combustion engine using liquid hydrocarbon fuel could potentially increase both power and energy density by an order of magnitude or more. This report describes initial development work on a meso-scale external combustion engine based on the Stirling cycle. Although other engine designs perform better at macro-scales, we believe the Stirling engine cycle is better suited to small-scale applications. The ideal Stirling cycle requires efficient heat transfer. Consequently, unlike other thermodynamic cycles, the high heat transfer rates that are inherent with miniature devices are an advantage for the Stirling cycle. Furthermore, since the Stirling engine uses external combustion, the combustor and engine can be scaled and optimized semi-independently. Continuous combustion minimizes issues with flame initiation and propagation. It also allows consideration of a variety of techniques to promote combustion that would be difficult in a miniature internal combustion engine. The project included design and fabrication of both the engine and the combustor. Two engine designs were developed. The first used a cylindrical piston design fabricated with conventional machining processes. The second design, based on the Wankel rotor geometry, was fabricated by through-mold electroforming of nickel in SU8 and LIGA micromolds. These technologies provided the requisite precision and tight tolerances needed for efficient micro-engine operation. Electroformed nickel is ideal for micro-engine applications because of its high strength and ductility. A rotary geometry was chosen because its planar geometry was more compatible with the fabrication process. SU8 lithography provided rapid

  7. Application of numerical analysis to jet engine combustor design. Jet engine nenshoki sekkei eno suchi kaiseki no tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuji, H. (Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-11-01

    Numerical methods are applied in practice to complement and support jet engine combustor design and development. Part of the conventional design-trial fabrication-testing performance evaluation cycle replaced by iterated numerical analysis applied in a preliminary cycle of design-evaluation, undertaken before proceeding to actual trial fabrication testing and final evaluation. Presented examples are of numerical methods applied to design/development of a high temperature combustor of airblast fuel injector type, in which analysis is undertaken of flows through diffuser and through combustion liner, of temperature distributions, of flows through liner cooling slots, and liner skin temperature distributions. Furthermore, results of three-dimensional flow analysis are applied to optimizing the design parameters of a jet-swirl combustor and to calculation of the centrifugal force in a jet swirl combustion liner. 3 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Rayleigh/Raman/LIF measurements in a turbulent lean premixed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandula, S.P.; Pitz, R.W. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Barlow, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Much of the industrial electrical generation capability being added worldwide is gas-turbine engine based and is fueled by natural gas. These gas-turbine engines use lean premixed (LP) combustion to meet the strict NO{sub x} emission standards, while maintaining acceptable levels of CO. In conventional, diffusion flame gas turbine combustors, large amount of NO{sub x} forms in the hot stoichiometric zones via the Zeldovich (thermal) mechanism. Hence, lean premixed combustors are rapidly becoming the norm, since they are specifically designed to avoid these hot stoichiometric zones and the associated thermal NO, However, considerable research and development are still required to reduce the NO{sub x} levels (25-40 ppmvd adjusted to 15% O{sub 2} with the current technology), to the projected goal of under 10 ppmvd by the turn of the century. Achieving this objective would require extensive experiments in LP natural gas (or CH{sub 4}) flames for understanding the combustion phenomena underlying the formation of the exhaust pollutants. Although LP combustion is an effective way to control NO{sub x}, the downside is that it increases the CO emissions. The formation and destruction of the pollutants (NO{sub x} and CO) are strongly affected by the fluid mechanics, the finite-rate chemistry, and their (turbulence-chemistry) interactions. Hence, a thorough understanding of these interactions is vital for controlling and reducing the pollutant emissions. The present research is contributing to this goal by providing a detailed nonintrusive laser based data set with good spatial and temporal resolutions of the pollutants (NO and CO) along with the major species, temperature, and OH. The measurements reported in this work, along with the existing velocity data on a turbulent LP combustor burning CH{sub 4}, would provide insight into the turbulence-chemistry interactions and their effect on pollutant formation.

  9. Landfills - Municipal Waste Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — A Municipal Waste Operation is a DEP primary facility type related to the Waste Management Municipal Waste Program. The sub-facility types related to Municipal Waste...

  10. Two-phase flow in a swirling circulating fluidized bed (SCFB) coal combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilias, S.; Govind, R. (Cincinnati Univ., OH (USA). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering)

    1988-01-01

    Coal combustors are difficult to model accurately due to their inherent complexities of coal devolatization, char combustion and volatile combustion with simultaneous momentum, heat and mass transfer effects. A fluidized bed which takes the advantages of tangential injection of secondary air, termed as Swirling Circulating Fluidized Bed is being developed at the University of Cincinnati. Preliminary experimental studies on coal combustion using the pilot plant and hydrodynamics using a cold model have been conducted. The system has also been simulated. Results of these studies are presented in this paper. Results on three dimensional behavior of the fluid-particle system in the SCFB are presented.

  11. Stability analysis of thermo-acoustic nonlinear eigenproblems in annular combustors. Part II. Uncertainty quantification

    CERN Document Server

    Magri, Luca; Nicoud, Franck; Juniper, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo and Active Subspace Identification methods are combined with first- and second-order adjoint sensitivities to perform (forward) uncertainty quantification analysis of the thermo-acoustic stability of two annular combustor configurations. This method is applied to evaluate the risk factor, i.e., the probability for the system to be unstable. It is shown that the adjoint approach reduces the number of nonlinear-eigenproblem calculations by up to $\\sim\\mathcal{O}(M)$, as many as the Monte Carlo samples.

  12. A novel vortex-fluidized bed combustor with two combustion chambers for rice-husk fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhiyanon, T.

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel vortexing-fluidized bed combustor (VFBC using rice-husk as fuel was developed and presented. The combined characteristics of vortex combustion and fluidized bed combustion are the main features of the VFBC, which was designed to achieve high thermal capacity (MWth m-3, high thermal efficiency and low diameter to height ratio. The VFBC comprises a vertical cylinder chamber and a conical base, which provides a bed for incompletely combusted fuel. The overall dimensions are 1.10 m in height and 0.40 m in diameter. To evaluate combustor performance, the specific feed rate of fuel and mass flow rates of the primary, secondary, and tertiary air were varied independently of one another. The combustion appeared into two zones characterized by different combustion behaviors, i.e. 1 vortext combustion above the vortex ring and 2 fluidized bed combustion below the vortex ring. The fluidized bed zone has uniform temperature distributions across the cross-section of the combustor. The swirling of air above the vortex ringand the vortex ring itself played important roles in preventing the escape of combustion particulates. Bottomash appeared as fine black and grey particles of ash, which ranged in size from 200 to 600 µm. Fluidizationcould be initiated without the assistance of any inert material mixed into the bed. The experimental resultsindicated that thermal efficiency did not depend on the secondary or tertiary airflows, but was significantlyinfluenced by the excess air resulting from the combined total of the three airflows. The introduction of thetertiary airflow helped maintaining the temperature inside the combustor within acceptable levels. According to experimental conditions, i.e. a specific feed rate of 240 kg h-1m-3 and excess air (157%, it was found that the VFBC could achieve an exit gas temperature of 1060ºC, thermal efficiency of 95%, and thermal capacity of 0.91 MWth m-3. The amounts of CO2, CO, and O2 gases emitted were directly

  13. Spatially-resolved measurements of soot size and population in a swirl-stabilized combustor

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Isooctane, and mixtures of isooctane with various ring and aromatic compounds blended to yield the same smoke point were separately injected through a twin-fluid atomizer into a turbulent, swirl-stabilized model combustor. A nonintrusive optical probe based on larege angle (60°, 20°) intensity ratio scattering was used to yield a point measurement of soot particulate in the size range of 0.08 to 0.38 μm. The velocity and temperature fields were characterized by a two-color laser anemometer an...

  14. Experimental Studies on Swirling Gas—Particle Flows in a Spouting —Cyclone Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.X.Zhou; B.Zhou; 等

    1992-01-01

    The gas and particle time-averaged velocity and RMS fluctuation velocity of swirling gas-particle flows in a spouting-cyclone combustor were maesured by a hot-ball probe and a conventional LDV system.The results show large velocity slip between the two phases both in tangential and axial directions and high noisotropic turbulence of the two phases were also observed which is favorable to coal combustion.the particle RMS flutuation velocity is higher than the gas RMS fluctuation velocity only in some regions of the flow field.

  15. A nonlinear dynamical system for combustion instability in a pulse model combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Kazushi; Gotoda, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    We theoretically and numerically study the bifurcation phenomena of nonlinear dynamical system describing combustion instability in a pulse model combustor on the basis of dynamical system theory and complex network theory. The dynamical behavior of pressure fluctuations undergoes a significant transition from steady-state to deterministic chaos via the period-doubling cascade process known as Feigenbaum scenario with decreasing the characteristic flow time. Recurrence plots and recurrence networks analysis we adopted in this study can quantify the significant changes in dynamic behavior of combustion instability that cannot be captured in the bifurcation diagram.

  16. Radial flow fuel nozzle for a combustor of a gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Means, Gregory Scott; Boardman, Gregory Allen; Berry, Jonathan Dwight

    2016-07-05

    A combustor for a gas turbine generally includes a radial flow fuel nozzle having a fuel distribution manifold, and a fuel injection manifold axially separated from the fuel distribution manifold. The fuel injection manifold generally includes an inner side portion, an outer side portion, and a plurality of circumferentially spaced fuel ports that extend through the outer side portion. A plurality of tubes provides axial separation between the fuel distribution manifold and the fuel injection manifold. Each tube defines a fluid communication path between the fuel distribution manifold and the fuel injection manifold.

  17. Thermo-hydrodynamic design of fluidized bed combustors estimating metal wastage

    CERN Document Server

    Lyczkowski, Robert W; Bouillard, Jacques X; Folga, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    Thermo-Hydrodynamic Design of Fluidized Bed Combustors: Estimating Metal Wastage is a unique volume that finds that the most sensitive parameters affecting metal wastage are superficial fluidizing velocity, particle diameter, and particle sphericity.  Gross consistencies between disparate data sources using different techniques were found when the erosion rates are compared on the same basis using the concept of renormalization.  The simplified mechanistic models and correlations, when validated, can be used to renormalize any experimental data so they can be compared on a consistent basis using a master equation.

  18. Drag and distribution measurements of single-element fuel injectors for supersonic combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, L. A.

    1974-01-01

    The drag caused by several vortex generating fuel injectors for scramjet combustors was measured in a Mach 2 to 3.5 airstream. Injector drag was found to be strongly dependent on injector thickness ratio. The distribution of helium injected into the stream was measured both in the near field and the far field of the injectors for a variety of pressure ratios. The far field results differed appreciably from measurements in the near field. Injection pressure ratio was found to profoundly influence the penetration. One of the aerowing configurations tested yielded low drag consistent with desirable penetration and spreading characteristics.

  19. Characterization of complexities in combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine model combustor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoda, Hiroshi; Amano, Masahito; Miyano, Takaya; Ikawa, Takuya; Maki, Koshiro; Tachibana, Shigeru

    2012-12-01

    We characterize complexities in combustion instability in a lean premixed gas-turbine model combustor by nonlinear time series analysis to evaluate permutation entropy, fractal dimensions, and short-term predictability. The dynamic behavior in combustion instability near lean blowout exhibits a self-affine structure and is ascribed to fractional Brownian motion. It undergoes chaos by the onset of combustion oscillations with slow amplitude modulation. Our results indicate that nonlinear time series analysis is capable of characterizing complexities in combustion instability close to lean blowout.

  20. Refractory experience in circulating fluidized bed combustors, Task 7. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, R.Q.

    1989-11-01

    This report describes the results of an investigation into the status of the design and selection of refractory materials for coal-fueled circulating fluidized-bed combustors. The survey concentrated on operating units in the United States manufactured by six different boiler vendors: Babcock and Wilcox, Combustion Engineering, Foster Wheeler, Keeler Dorr-Oliver, Pyropower, and Riley Stoker. Information was obtained from the boiler vendors, refractory suppliers and installers, and the owners/operators of over forty units. This work is in support of DOE`s Clean Coal Technology program, which includes circulating fluidized-bed technology as one of the selected concepts being evaluated.

  1. Turbomachine combustor nozzle including a monolithic nozzle component and method of forming the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoia, Lucas John; Melton, Patrick Benedict; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Stevenson, Christian Xavier; Vanselow, John Drake; Westmoreland, James Harold

    2016-02-23

    A turbomachine combustor nozzle includes a monolithic nozzle component having a plate element and a plurality of nozzle elements. Each of the plurality of nozzle elements includes a first end extending from the plate element to a second end. The plate element and plurality of nozzle elements are formed as a unitary component. A plate member is joined with the nozzle component. The plate member includes an outer edge that defines first and second surfaces and a plurality of openings extending between the first and second surfaces. The plurality of openings are configured and disposed to register with and receive the second end of corresponding ones of the plurality of nozzle elements.

  2. Destruction and formation of dioxin-like PCBs in dedicated full scale waste incinerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Caneghem, Jo; Block, Chantal; Vandecasteele, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Destruction and formation of dioxin-like PCBs in full scale waste incinerators is studied by analysing input waste streams and boiler and fly ash of a grate furnace incinerator (GFI) incinerating MSW, of a Fluidised Bed Combustor (FBC) incinerating a mix of 50% sludge, 25% refuse derived fuel (RDF) and 25% automotive shredder residue (ASR) and of a rotary kiln incinerator (RKI) incinerating hazardous waste. The dioxin-like PCB fingerprints of the waste inputs show that PCB oils Aroclor 1242 and Aroclor 1254 late are the major dioxin-like PCB contamination source of sludge, RDF and ASR. The dioxin-like PCB fingerprints of the waste inputs are clearly different from the fingerprints of the outputs, i.e. boiler and fly ash, indicating that in full scale waste incinerators dioxin-like PCBs in the input waste are destroyed and other dioxin-like PCBs are newly formed in the post combustion zone. The dioxin-like PCB fingerprint of boiler and fly ash of all three incinerators corresponds well to the fly ash fingerprint obtained in lab scale de novo synthesis experiments, indicating that dioxin-like PCBs are mainly formed through this mechanism. The high PCB concentration in the input waste mix of the RKI does not promote the formation of dioxin-like PCBs through precursor condensation.

  3. Human waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, Md Nurul; Kroeze, Carolien; Strokal, Maryna

    2017-01-01

    Many people practice open defecation in south Asia. As a result, lot of human waste containing nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) enter rivers. Rivers transport these nutrients to coastal waters, resulting in marine pollution. This source of nutrient pollution is, however, ignored in

  4. Waste disposal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    We should like to remind you that you can have all commonplace, conventional waste (combustible, inert, wood, etc.) disposed of by the TS-FM Group. Requests for the removal of such waste should be made by contacting FM Support on tel. 77777 or by e-mail (Fm.Support@cern.ch). For requests to be acted upon, the following information must be communicated to FM Support: budget code to be debited for the provision and removal of the skip / container. type of skip required (1m3, 4 m3, 7 m3, 15 m3, 20 m3, 30 m3). nature of the waste to be disposed of (bulky objects, cardboard boxes, etc.). building concerned. details of requestor (name, phone number, department, group, etc.). We should also like to inform you that the TS-FM Group can arrange for waste to be removed from work-sites for firms under contract to CERN, provided that the prior authorisation of the CERN Staff Member in charge of the contract is obtained and the relevant disposal/handling charges are paid. You are reminded that the selective sorting o...

  5. Waste disposal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    We should like to remind you that you can have all commonplace, conventional waste (combustible, inert, wood, etc.) disposed of by the TS-FM Group. Requests for the removal of such waste should be made by contacting FM Support on tel. 77777 or by e-mail (Fm.Support@cern.ch). For requests to be acted upon, the following information must be communicated to FM Support: budget code to be debited for the provision and removal of the skip / container; type of skip required (1m3, 4 m3, 7 m3, 15 m3, 20 m3, 30 m3); nature of the waste to be disposed of (bulky objects, cardboard boxes, etc.); building concerned; details of requestor (name, phone number, department, group, etc.). We should also like to inform you that the TS-FM Group can arrange for waste to be removed from work-sites for firms under contract to CERN, provided that the prior authorisation of the CERN Staff Member in charge of the contract is obtained and the relevant disposal/handling charges are paid. You are reminded that the selective sorting...

  6. Alternative strategies for energy recovery from municipal solid waste Part A: Mass and energy balances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consonni, S; Giugliano, M; Grosso, M

    2005-01-01

    This two-part paper assesses four strategies for energy recovery from municipal solid waste (MSW) by dedicated waste-to-energy (WTE) plants generating electricity through a steam cycle. The feedstock is the residue after materials recovery (MR), assumed to be 35% by weight of the collected MSW. In strategy 1, the MR residue is fed directly to a grate combustor. In strategy 2, the MR residue is first subjected to light mechanical treatment. In strategies 3 and 4, the MR residue is converted into RDF, which is combusted in a fluidized bed combustor. To examine the relevance of scale, we considered a small waste management system (WMS) serving 200,000 people and a large WMS serving 1,200,000 people. A variation of strategy 1 shows the potential of cogeneration with district heating. The assessment is carried out by a Life Cycle Analysis where the electricity generated by the WTE plant displaces electricity generated by fossil fuel-fired steam plants. Part A focuses on mass and energy balances, while Part B focuses on emissions and costs. Results show that treating the MR residue ahead of the WTE plant reduces energy recovery. The largest energy savings are achieved by combusting the MR residue "as is" in large scale plants; with cogeneration, primary energy savings can reach 2.5% of total societal energy use.

  7. Concentration Measurements in a Cold Flow Model Annular Combustor Using Laser Induced Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Douglas C.

    1996-01-01

    A nonintrusive concentration measurement method is developed for determining the concentration distribution in a complex flow field. The measurement method consists of marking a liquid flow with a water soluble fluorescent dye. The dye is excited by a two dimensional sheet of laser light. The fluorescent intensity is shown to be proportional to the relative concentration level. The fluorescent field is recorded on a video cassette recorder through a video camera. The recorded images are analyzed with image processing hardware and software to obtain intensity levels. Mean and root mean square (rms) values are calculated from these intensity levels. The method is tested on a single round turbulent jet because previous concentration measurements have been made on this configuration by other investigators. The previous results were used to comparison to qualify the current method. These comparisons showed that this method provides satisfactory results. 'Me concentration measurement system was used to measure the concentrations in the complex flow field of a model gas turbine annular combustor. The model annular combustor consists of opposing primary jets and an annular jet which discharges perpendicular to the primary jets. The mixing between the different jet flows can be visualized from the calculated mean and rms profiles. Concentration field visualization images obtained from the processing provide further qualitative information about the flow field.

  8. Lean blowout limits of a gas turbine combustor operated with aviation fuel and methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wei; Huang, Yong

    2016-05-01

    Lean blowout (LBO) limits is critical to the operational performance of combustion systems in propulsion and power generation. The swirl cup plays an important role in flame stability and has been widely used in aviation engines. Therefore, the effects of swirl cup geometry and flow dynamics on LBO limits are significant. An experiment was conducted for studying the lean blowout limits of a single dome rectangular model combustor with swirl cups. Three types of swirl cup (dual-axial swirl cup, axial-radial swirl cup, dual-radial swirl cup) were employed in the experiment which was operated with aviation fuel (Jet A-1) and methane under the idle condition. Experimental results showed that, with using both Jet A-1 and methane, the LBO limits increase with the air flow of primary swirler for dual-radial swirl cup, while LBO limits decrease with the air flow of primary swirler for dual-axial swirl cup. In addition, LBO limits increase with the swirl intensity for three swirl cups. The experimental results also showed that the flow dynamics instead of atomization poses a significant influence on LBO limits. An improved semi-empirical correlation of experimental data was derived to predict the LBO limits for gas turbine combustors.

  9. The Two-Dimensional Supersonic Flow and Mixing with a Perpendicular Injection in a Scramjet Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Ali; S.Ahmed; A.K.M.Sadrul Islam

    2003-01-01

    A numerical investigation has been performed on supersonic mixing of hydrogen with air in a Scramjet(Supersonic Combustion Ramjet) combustor and its flame holding capability by solving Two-Dimensional full Navier-Stokes equations. The main flow is air entering through a finite width of inlet and gaseous hydrogen is injected perpendicularly from the side wall. An explicit Harten-Yee Non-MUSCL Modified-flux-type TVD scheme has been used to solve the system of equations, and a zero-equation algebraic turbulence model to calculate the eddy viscosity coefficient. In this study the enhancement of mixing and good flame holding capability of a supersonic combustor have been investigated by varying the distance of injector position from left boundary keeping constant the backward-facing step height and other calculation parameters. The results show that the configuration for small distance of injector position has high mixing efficiency but the upstream recirculation can not evolved properly which is an important factor for flame holding capability. On the other hand, the configuration for very long distance has lower mixing efficiency due to lower gradient of hydrogen mass concentration on the top of injector caused by the expansion of side jet in both upstream and downstream of injector. For moderate distance of injector position, large and elongated upstream recirculation can evolve which might be activated as a good flame holder.

  10. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composites for Shrouds and Combustor Liners of Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra; Jill Jonkowski; Joseph Mavec; Paul Bakke; Debbie Haught; Merrill Smith

    2011-01-07

    This report covers work performed under the Advanced Materials for Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines (AMAIGT) program by GE Global Research and its collaborators from 2000 through 2010. A first stage shroud for a 7FA-class gas turbine engine utilizing HiPerComp{reg_sign}* ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material was developed. The design, fabrication, rig testing and engine testing of this shroud system are described. Through two field engine tests, the latter of which is still in progress at a Jacksonville Electric Authority generating station, the robustness of the CMC material and the shroud system in general were demonstrated, with shrouds having accumulated nearly 7,000 hours of field engine testing at the conclusion of the program. During the latter test the engine performance benefits from utilizing CMC shrouds were verified. Similar development of a CMC combustor liner design for a 7FA-class engine is also described. The feasibility of using the HiPerComp{reg_sign} CMC material for combustor liner applications was demonstrated in a Solar Turbines Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine (CSGT) engine test where the liner performed without incident for 12,822 hours. The deposition processes for applying environmental barrier coatings to the CMC components were also developed, and the performance of the coatings in the rig and engine tests is described.

  11. Measurement of nitrogen species NO{sub y} at the exhaust of an aircraft engine combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristori, A. [Office National d`Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), Palaiseau (France); Baudoin, C. [Societe Nationale d`Etude et de Construction de Moteurs d`Aviation (SNECMA), Villaroche (France)

    1997-12-31

    A research programme named AEROTRACE was supported by the EC (CEC contract AERA-CT94-0003) in order to investigate trace species measurements at the exhaust of aero-engines. Within this project, NO{sub y}, NO, HNO{sub 3} and HONO were measured at the exhaust of aircraft engine combustors. Major species (NO{sub y},NO) were measured by using a chemiluminescence instrument. Minor species (HNO{sub 3},HONO) were measured by using filter packs. Two combustors were tested under various running conditions; the first one at ONERA (Task 2) and the second one at DRA (Task 5). Results show that EI{sub NOy} < 50 g/kg, EI{sub HNO3} < 0.2 g/kg and EI{sub HONO} < 0.55 g/kg. Regarding ratios, (HNO{sub 3})/(NO{sub y}) < 0.5%, (HONO)/(NO{sub y}) < 8%, (HONO)/(NO{sub 2}) {approx} 19.2%, and (HNO{sub 3})/(NO{sub 2}) {approx} 0.8% was found. (author) 9 refs.

  12. Instability Suppression in a Swirl-Stabilized Combustor Using Microjet Air Injection

    KAUST Repository

    LaBry, Zachary

    2010-01-04

    In this study, we examine the effectiveness of microjet air injection as a means of suppressing thermoacoustic instabilities in a swirl-stabilized, lean-premixed propane/air combustor. High-speed stereo PIV measurements, taken to explore the mechanism of combustion instability, reveal that the inner recirculation zone plays a dominant role in the coupling of acoustics and heat release that leads to combustion instability. Six microjet injector configurations were designed to modify the inner and outer recirculation zones with the intent of decoupling the mechanism leading to instability. Microjets that injected air into the inner recirculation zone, swirling in the opposite sense to the primary swirl were effective in suppressing combustion instability, reducing the overall sound pressure level by up to 17 dB within a certain window of operating conditions. Stabilization was achieved near an equivalence ratio of 0.65, corresponding to the region where the combustor transitions from a 40 Hz instability mode to a 110 Hz instability mode. PIV measurements made of the stabilized flow revealed significant modification of the inner recirculation zone and substantial weakening of the outer recirculation zone.

  13. Effect of flue gas recirculation on heat transfer in a supercritical circulating fluidized bed combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaszczuk, Artur

    2015-09-01

    This paper focuses on assessment of the effect of flue gas recirculation (FGR) on heat transfer behavior in 1296t/h supercritical coal-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustor. The performance test in supercritical CFB combustor with capacity 966 MWth was performed with the low level of flue gas recirculation rate 6.9% into furnace chamber, for 80% unit load at the bed pressure of 7.7 kPa and the ratio of secondary air to the primary air SA/PA = 0.33. Heat transfer behavior in a supercritical CFB furnace between the active heat transfer surfaces (membrane wall and superheater) and bed material has been analyzed for Geldart B particle with Sauter mean diameters of 0.219 and 0.246 mm. Bed material used in the heat transfer experiments had particle density of 2700 kg/m3. A mechanistic heat transfer model based on cluster renewal approach was used in this work. A heat transfer analysis of CFB combustion system with detailed consideration of bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient distributions along furnace height is investigated. Heat transfer data for FGR test were compared with the data obtained for representative conditions without recycled flue gases back to the furnace through star-up burners.

  14. Restricted Modal Analysis Applied to Internal Annular Combustor Autospectra and Cross-Spectra Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2007-01-01

    A treatment of the modal decomposition of the pressure field in a combustor as determined by two pressure time history measurements is developed herein. It is applied to a Pratt and Whitney PW4098 engine combustor over a range of operating conditions. For modes other than the plane wave the assumption is made that there are distinct frequency bands in which the individual modes, including the plane wave mode, overlap such that if circumferential mode m and circumferential mode m-1 are present then circumferential mode m-2 is not. In the analysis used herein at frequencies above the first cutoff mode frequency, only pairs of circumferential modes are individually present at each frequency. Consequently, this is a restricted modal analysis. As part of the analysis one specifies mode cut-on frequencies. This creates a set of frequencies that each mode spans. One finding was the successful use of the same modal span frequencies over a range of operating conditions for this particular engine. This suggests that for this case the cut-on frequencies are in proximity at each operating condition. Consequently, the combustion noise spectrum related to the circumferential modes might not change much with operating condition.

  15. Restricted Acoustic Modal Analysis Applied to Internal Combustor Spectra and Cross-Spectra Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2006-01-01

    A treatment of the modal decomposition of the pressure field in a combustor as determined by two Kulite pressure measurements is developed herein. It is applied to a Pratt & Whitney PW4098 engine combustor over a range of operating conditions. For modes other than the plane wave the new part of the treatment is the assumption that there are distinct frequency bands in which the individual modes, including the plane wave mode, overlap such that if circumferential mode m and circumferential mode m-1 are present than circumferential mode m 2 is not. Consequently, in the analysis used herein at frequencies above the first cut-off mode frequency, only pairs of circumferential modes are individually present at each frequency. Consequently, this is a restricted modal analysis. A new result is that the successful use of the same modal span frequencies over a range of operating conditions for this particular engine suggests that the temperature, T, and the velocity, v, of the flow at each operating condition are related by c(sup 2)-v(sup 2) = a constant where c is the speed of sound.

  16. Numerical Studies on the Performance of Scramjet Combustor with Alternating Wedge-Shaped Strut Injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Gautam; Pandey, K. M.

    2017-04-01

    Numerical analysis of the supersonic combustion and flow structure through a scramjet engine at Mach 7 with alternating wedge fuel injection and with three angle of attack (α=-3°, α=0°, α=3°) have been studied in the present research article. The configuration used here is slight modification of the Rabadan et al. scramjet model. Steady two dimensional (2D) Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation and Shear stress transport (SST) based on k-ω turbulent model is used to predict the shock structure and combustion phenomenon inside the scramjet combustor. All the simulations are done by using Ansys 14-Fluent code. The combustion model used here is the combination of eddy dissipation and finite rate chemistry models since this model avoids Arrhenius calculations in which reaction rates are controlled by turbulence. Present results show that the geometry with negative angle of attack (α=-3°) have lowest ignition delay and it improves the performance of scramjet combustor as compared to geometry with α=0°, α=3°. The combustion phenomena and efficiency is also found to be stronger and highest in case of α=-3°.

  17. Effect of flue gas recirculation on heat transfer in a supercritical circulating fluidized bed combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błaszczuk Artur

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on assessment of the effect of flue gas recirculation (FGR on heat transfer behavior in 1296t/h supercritical coal-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB combustor. The performance test in supercritical CFB combustor with capacity 966 MWth was performed with the low level of flue gas recirculation rate 6.9% into furnace chamber, for 80% unit load at the bed pressure of 7.7 kPa and the ratio of secondary air to the primary air SA/PA = 0.33. Heat transfer behavior in a supercritical CFB furnace between the active heat transfer surfaces (membrane wall and superheater and bed material has been analyzed for Geldart B particle with Sauter mean diameters of 0.219 and 0.246 mm. Bed material used in the heat transfer experiments had particle density of 2700 kg/m3. A mechanistic heat transfer model based on cluster renewal approach was used in this work. A heat transfer analysis of CFB combustion system with detailed consideration of bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient distributions along furnace height is investigated. Heat transfer data for FGR test were compared with the data obtained for representative conditions without recycled flue gases back to the furnace through star-up burners.

  18. High temperature degradation by erosion-corrosion in bubbling fluidized bed combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Peggy Y.; MacAdam, S.; Niu, Y.; Stringer, J.

    2003-04-22

    Heat-exchanger tubes in fluidized bed combustors (FBCs) often suffer material loss due to combined corrosion and erosion. Most severe damage is believed to be caused by the impact of dense packets of bed material on the lower parts of the tubes. In order to understand this phenomenon, a unique laboratory test rig at Berkeley was designed to simulate the particle hammering interactions between in-bed particles and tubes in bubbling fluidized bed combustors. In this design, a rod shaped specimen is actuated a short distance within a partially fluidized bed. The downward specimen motion is controlled to produce similar frequencies, velocities and impact forces as those experienced by the impacting particle aggregates in practical systems. Room temperature studies have shown that the degradation mechanism is a three-body abrasion process. This paper describes the characteristics of this test rig, reviews results at elevated temperatures and compares them to field experience. At higher temperatures, deposits of the bed material on tube surfaces can act as a protective layer. The deposition depended strongly on the type of bed material, the degree of tube surface oxidation and the tube and bed temperatures. With HCl present in the bed, wastage was increased due to enhanced oxidation and reduced oxide scale adherence.

  19. Experimental Study in a Swirl-Stabilized Combustor with and Without Spray Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffarpour, Mohammad-Reza

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the combustion characteristics and structure of hollow-cone spray flames similar to those occurring in the primary zone of gas turbine combustion chambers, a swirl-stabilized combustor and a water-cooled stainless-steel gas sampling probe were designed. A kerosene spray was generated by a simplex atomizer with a nominal angle of 30 degrees. Swirling air with swirl number of 1.5 was produced from an air swirl plate. Video imaging and photography were employed to document the flame stability and its structure with changes in both design and operating conditions. A Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) was used to measure the drop size, mean and rms values of axial drop velocity and other relevant parameters with and without combustion. Air and fuel flow rates and other conditions were kept identical for reacting and non-reacting cases to investigate effects of combustion alone on the spray. A thermocouple was used to measure the average uncorrected temperature in this turbulent spray flame. A gas chromatograph was also employed to measure the gaseous species concentrations such as hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, and carbon dioxide in this combustor.

  20. 3D measurements of ignition processes at 20 kHz in a supersonic combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lin; Lei, Qingchun; Wu, Yue; Ombrello, Timothy M.; Carter, Campbell D.

    2015-05-01

    The ignition dynamics in a Mach 2 combustor were investigated using a three-dimensional (3D) diagnostic with 20 kHz temporal resolution. The diagnostic was based on a combination of tomographic chemiluminescence and fiber-based endoscopes (FBEs). Customized FBEs were employed to capture line-of-sight integrated chemiluminescence images (termed projections) of the combustor from eight different orientations simultaneously at 20 kHz. The measured projections were then used in a tomographic algorithm to obtain 3D reconstruction of the sparks, ignition kernel, and stable flame. Processing the reconstructions frame by frame resulted in 4D measurements. Key properties were then extracted to quantify the ignition processes, including 3D volume, surface area, sphericity, and velocity of the ignition kernel. The data collected in this work revealed detailed spatiotemporal dynamics of the ignition kernel, which are not obtainable with planar diagnostics, such as its growth, movement, and development into "stable" combustion. This work also illustrates the potential for obtaining quantitative 3D measurements using tomographic techniques and the practical utility of FBEs.

  1. Drop Dynamics and Speciation in Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes by Reactive Scavenging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arne J. Pearlstein; Alexander Scheeline

    2002-08-30

    Computational and experimental studies of the motion and dynamics of liquid drops in gas flows were conducted with relevance to reactive scavenging of metals from atomized liquid waste. Navier-Stoke's computations of deformable drops revealed a range of conditions from which prolate drops are expected, and showed how frajectiones of deformable drops undergoing deceleration can be computed. Experimental work focused on development of emission fluorescence, and scattering diagnostics. The instrument developed was used to image drop shapes, soot, and nonaxisymmetric departures from steady flow in a 22kw combustor

  2. Preparation of clinker from paper pulp industry wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buruberri, Leire H; Seabra, M P; Labrincha, J A

    2015-04-01

    The production of paper pulp by the Kraft method generates considerable amounts of wastes. Namely, lime mud generated in the recovery circuit of chemical reagents, biological sludge from the wastewater treatment of wood digestion process and fly ash collected in the fluidized bed combustor used to generate electricity from biomass burning. The final destination of such wastes is an important concern, since environmental regulations are becoming stricter regarding their landfill. Driven by this fact, industries are looking for more sustainable solutions, such as the recycling in distinct products. This work tested these wastes as secondary raw materials to produce clinker/cement that was then experienced in mortar formulations. The first step involved the residues detailed characterization and a generated amounts survey. Then, specific but simple steps were suggested, aiming to facilitate transport and manipulation. Distinct blends were prepared and fired in order to get belitic and Portland clinkers. The Portland clinkers were processed at lower temperatures than the normally used in the industry due to the presence of mineralizing impurities in some wastes. Belite-based cements were used to produce mortars that developed satisfactory mechanical strength and did not reveal signs of deterioration or durability weaknesses.

  3. Screening Level Risk Assessment for the New Waste Calcining Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. L. Abbott; K. N. Keck; R. E. Schindler; R. L. VanHorn; N. L. Hampton; M. B. Heiser

    1999-05-01

    This screening level risk assessment evaluates potential adverse human health and ecological impacts resulting from continued operations of the calciner at the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The assessment was conducted in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) report, Guidance for Performing Screening Level Risk Analyses at Combustion Facilities Burning Hazardous Waste. This screening guidance is intended to give a conservative estimate of the potential risks to determine whether a more refined assessment is warranted. The NWCF uses a fluidized-bed combustor to solidify (calcine) liquid radioactive mixed waste from the INTEC Tank Farm facility. Calciner off volatilized metal species, trace organic compounds, and low-levels of radionuclides. Conservative stack emission rates were calculated based on maximum waste solution feed samples, conservative assumptions for off gas partitioning of metals and organics, stack gas sampling for mercury, and conservative measurements of contaminant removal (decontamination factors) in the off gas treatment system. Stack emissions were modeled using the ISC3 air dispersion model to predict maximum particulate and vapor air concentrations and ground deposition rates. Results demonstrate that NWCF emissions calculated from best-available process knowledge would result in maximum onsite and offsite health and ecological impacts that are less then EPA-established criteria for operation of a combustion facility.

  4. CFD Analysis of Fuel Atomization, Secondary Droplet Breakup and Spray Dispersion in the Premix Duct of a LPP Combustor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmehl, R.; Maier, G.; Wittig, S.

    2000-01-01

    The two phase flow in the premix duct of a LPP combustor is computed using a Lagrangian droplet tracking method. To reproduce the characteristic spray structure of an air-assisted pressure-swirl atomizer, a sheet spray model is de-rived from measured sheet parameters and combined with an advanced co

  5. Thermodynamic optimisation and computational analysis of irreversibilities in a small-scale wood-fired circulating fluidised bed adiabatic combustor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Baloyi, J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of irreversibilities generated due to combustion in an adiabatic combustor burning wood was conducted. This was done for a reactant mixture varying from a rich to a lean mixture. A non-adiabatic non-premixed combustion model of a...

  6. Laser Doppler velocimeter measurements and laser sheet imaging in an annular combustor model. M.S. Thesis, Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwenger, Richard Dale

    1995-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted in annular combustor model to provide a better understanding of the flowfield. Combustor model configurations consisting of primary jets only, annular jets only, and a combination of annular and primary jets were investigated. The purpose of this research was to provide a better understanding of combustor flows and to provide a data base for comparison with computational models. The first part of this research used a laser Doppler velocimeter to measure mean velocity and statistically calculate root-mean-square velocity in two coordinate directions. From this data, one Reynolds shear stress component and a two-dimensional turbulent kinetic energy term was determined. Major features of the flowfield included recirculating flow, primary and annular jet interaction, and high turbulence. The most pronounced result from this data was the effect the primary jets had on the flowfield. The primary jets were seen to reduce flow asymmetries, create larger recirculation zones, and higher turbulence levels. The second part of this research used a technique called marker nephelometry to provide mean concentration values in the combustor. Results showed the flow to be very turbulent and unsteady. All configurations investigated were highly sensitive to alignment of the primary and annular jets in the model and inlet conditions. Any imbalance between primary jets or misalignment of the annular jets caused severe flow asymmetries.

  7. Influence of hydrogen temperature on the stability of a rocket engine combustor operated with hydrogen and oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröning, Stefan; Hardi, Justin; Suslov, Dmitry; Oschwald, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Since the late 1960s, low hydrogen injection temperature is known to have a destabilising effect on rocket engines with the propellant combination hydrogen/oxygen. Self-excited combustion instabilities of the first tangential mode have been found recently in a research rocket combustor operated with the propellant combination hydrogen/oxygen with a hydrogen temperature of 95 K. A hydrogen temperature ramping experiment has been performed with this research combustor to analyse the impact of hydrogen temperature on the self-excited combustion instabilities. The temperature was varied between 40 and 135 K. Contrary to past results found in literature, the combustor was found to be stable at low hydrogen temperatures while increased oscillation amplitudes of the first tangential mode were found at higher temperatures of around 100 K and above, which is consistent with previous observations of instabilities in this combustor. Further analysis shows that hydrogen temperature has a strong impact on the combustion chamber resonance frequencies. By varying the hydrogen injection temperature, the frequency of the first tangential mode is shifted to coincide with the second longitudinal resonance frequency of the liquid oxygen injector. Excitation of combustion chamber pressure oscillations was observed during such events.

  8. Flow field characteristics analysis and combustion modes classification for a strut/cavity dual-mode combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenlin; Chang, Juntao; Zhang, Yuanshi; Wang, Youyin; Bao, Wen

    2017-08-01

    Experimental and numerical study of a strut/cavity dual-mode combustor has been conducted in this paper. Under different fuel equivalence ratio and allocation proportion conditions, the pressure distribution and flow field structure of combustor show distinct characteristics. For strut fuel injecting at a low equivalence ratio, the luminosity images show that combustion zone distributes in the shear layer behind the strut. The wall fuel injecting before strut would change the starting point of pressure rising. Based on the flow field structure, the dual-mode combustor operation process is classified into three combustion modes, including scramjet mode, weak ramjet mode and strong ramjet mode. Because of a strong interaction of the shock wave with the boundary layer, weak ramjet mode has a stronger isolator compression effect and higher combustion efficiency than scramjet mode. With heat release increasing, the thermal throat formation is an indication of the strong ramjet mode, which has a subsonic gap in the isolator. Further, by judging the pressure from dominant pressure sensor before the strut, the three different combustion modes could be classified. Comparing the specific impulse of combustor, it has an obvious distinction in the different combustion modes.

  9. Volatile properties of jet engine combustor particles during the hot-end simulator (HES) PartEmis campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyeki, S.; Gysel, M.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.; Petzold, A.; Wilson, C.W.

    2003-03-01

    Test rig measurements on a combustor in 2001 were extended in 2002 on a Hot-End Simulator (HES), designed to simulate the turbine section of a jet engine. Volatile properties were measured using a Volatility Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (VTDMA). Initial analyses indicate that the HES has a negligible influence on particle properties. (author)

  10. In-situ measurement of residence time distributions in a turbulent oxy-fuel gas-flame combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürkle, Sebastian; Becker, Lukas G.; Agizza, Maria Angela; Dreizler, Andreas; Ebert, Volker; Wagner, Steven

    2017-07-01

    For improving the design of combustors, the knowledge of residence-time distributions (RTD) is important as they influence exhaust gas compositions. Measuring RTDs in combustors is challenging, due to high temperatures, chemical reactions, the presence of particles or corrosive species as well as high turbulence levels. This paper presents a technique for the in situ measurement of RTDs in combustors. Based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), the temporal evolution of the concentration of tracers is tracked simultaneously at the combustion chamber inlet and outlet. Using either air or mixtures of oxygen and carbon dioxide (oxy-fuel atmosphere) as oxidants, the method is applied to reacting and non-reacting operating conditions in a 20-kWth methane combustor. For reacting conditions, hydrogen chloride is used as a tracer, whereas for non-reacting conditions methane was chosen. Depending on the tracer, for a repetition rate of approximately 2 kHz detection limits of 16-40 ppmV are achieved. For deriving RTDs, low-pass filtering is compared to reactor network modeling. Different RTDs observed for varying operating conditions are discussed.

  11. The effect of water injection on nitric oxide emissions of a gas turbine combustor burning ASTM Jet-A fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchionna, N. R.; Diehl, L. A.; Trout, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the effect of water injection on oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions of a full annular, ram induction gas turbine combustor burning ASTM Jet-A fuel. The combustor was operated at conditions simulating sea-level takeoff and cruise conditions. Water at ambient temperature was injected into the combustor primary zone at water-fuel ratios up to 2. At an inlet-air temperature of 589 K (600 F) water injection decreased the NOx emission index at a constant exponential rate: NOx = NOx (o) e to the -15 W/F power (where W/F is the water-fuel ratio and NOx(o) indicates the value with no injection). The effect of increasing combustor inlet-air temperature was to decrease the effect of the water injection. Other operating variables such as pressure and reference Mach number did not appear to significantly affect the percent reduction in NOx. Smoke emissions were found to decrease with increasing water injection.

  12. The influence of cavity parameters on the combustion oscillation in a single-side expansion scramjet combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Hao; Liu, Weidong; Sun, Mingbo

    2017-08-01

    Cavity has been validated to be efficient flameholders for scramjet combustors, but the influence of its parameters on the combustion oscillation in scramjet combustor has barely been studied. In the present work, a series of experiments focusing on this issue have been carried out. The influence of flameholding cavity position, its length to depth ratio L/D and aft wall angle θ and number on ethylene combustion oscillation characteristics in scramjet combustor has been researched. The obtained experimental results show that, as the premixing distance between ethylene injector and flameholding cavity varies, the ethylene combustion flame will take on two distinct forms, small-amplitude high frequency fluctuation, and large-amplitude low frequency oscillation. The dominant frequency of the large-amplitude combustion oscillation is in inverse proportion to the pre-mixing distance. Moreover, the influence of cavity length to depth ratio and the aft wall angleθexists diversity when the flameholding cavity position is different and can be recognized as unnoticeable compared to the impact of the premixing distance. In addition, we also find that, when the premixing distance is identical and sufficient, increasing the number of tandem flameholding cavities can change the dominant frequency of combustion oscillation hardly, let alone avoid the combustion oscillation. It is believed that the present investigation will provide a useful reference for the design of the scramjet combustor.

  13. 40 CFR Appendix to Subpart Eee of... - Quality Assurance Procedures for Continuous Emissions Monitors Used for Hazardous Waste Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and data sheets. 4. Preventive maintenance procedures. 5. Description of the media, format, and... reference materials. 6.5Rolling Average. A rolling average is the arithmetic average of all one-minute... the arithmetic average of the four most recent 15-second observations and must be calculated using the...

  14. Experimental investigations on effect of different materials and varying depths of one turn exhaust channel swiss roll combustor on its thermal performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mane Deshmukh, Sagar B.; Krishnamoorthy, A.; Bhojwani, V. K.; Pawane, Ashwini

    2017-05-01

    More energy density of hydrocarbon fuels compared to advanced batteries available in the market demands for development of systems which will use hydrocarbon fuels at small scale to generate power in small quantity (i.e. in few watts) and device efficiency should be reasonably good, but the basic requirement is to generate heat from the fuels like methane, propane, hydrogen, LPG and converting into power. Swiss roll combustor has proved to be best combustor at small scale. Present work is carried out on one turn exhaust channel and half turn of inlet mixture channel Swiss roll combustor. Purpose of keeping exhaust channel length more than the inlet mixture channel to ensure sufficient time for heat exchange between burned and unburned gases, which is not reported in earlier studies. Experimental study mentions effects of different design parameters like materials of combustor, various depths, equivalence ratio, mass flow rates of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), volume of combustion space and environmental conditions (with insulation and without insulation to combustors) on fuel lean limit and fuel rich limit, temperature profile obtained on all external surfaces, in the main combustion chamber, in the channel carrying unburned gas mixture and burned gas mixture, heat loss to atmosphere from all the walls of combustor, flame location. Different combustor materials tested were stainless steel, Aluminum, copper, brass, bronze, Granite. Depths considered were 22mm, 15mm, 10mm and 5mm. It was observed that flame stability inside the combustion chamber is affected by materials, depths and flow rates. Unburned mixture carrying channel was kept below quenching distance of flame to avoid flash back. Burned gas carrying channel dimension was more than the quenching distance. Considerable temperature rise was observed with insulation to combustors. But combustors with more thermal conductivity showed more heat loss to atmosphere which led to instability of flame.

  15. Rethinking the waste hierarchy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, C.; Vigsoe, D. (eds.)

    2005-03-01

    There is an increasing need to couple environmental and economic considerations within waste management. Consumers and companies alike generate ever more waste. The waste-policy challenges of the future lie in decoupling growth in waste generation from growth in consumption, and in setting priorities for the waste management. This report discusses the criteria for deciding priorities for waste management methods, and questions the current principles of EU waste policies. The basis for the discussion is the so-called waste hierarchy which has dominated the waste policy in the EU since the mid-1970s. The waste hierarchy ranks possible methods of waste management. According to the waste hierarchy, the very best solution is to reduce the amount of waste. After that, reuse is preferred to recycling which, in turn, is preferred to incineration. Disposal at a landfill is the least favourable solution. (BA)

  16. Other Special Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Line Kai-Sørensen; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    separately from MSW. Some of these other special wastes are briefly described in this chapter with respect to their definition, quantity and composition, and management options. The special wastes mentioned here are batteries, tires, polyvinylchloride (PVC) and food waste.......In addition to the main types of special waste related to municipal solid waste (MSW) mentioned in the previous chapters (health care risk waste, WEEE, impregnated wood, hazardous waste) a range of other fractions of waste have in some countries been defined as special waste that must be handled...

  17. Other Special Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Line Kai-Sørensen; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    In addition to the main types of special waste related to municipal solid waste (MSW) mentioned in the previous chapters (health care risk waste, WEEE, impregnated wood, hazardous waste) a range of other fractions of waste have in some countries been defined as special waste that must be handled...... separately from MSW. Some of these other special wastes are briefly described in this chapter with respect to their definition, quantity and composition, and management options. The special wastes mentioned here are batteries, tires, polyvinylchloride (PVC) and food waste....

  18. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

  19. Experimental investigation and mathematical modelling of the combustion of brown coal, refuse and mixed fuels in a circulating fluidized bed combustor; Experimentelle Untersuchung und mathematische Modellierung der Verbrennung von Braunkohle, Abfallstoffen und Mischbrennstoffen in einer zirkulierenden Wirbelschichtfeuerung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, W.; Brunne, T.; Hiller, A. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Energietechnik; Albrecht, J. [Lurgi Umwelt GmbH, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Quang, N. [Polytechnic Inst., Danang (Viet Nam)

    1998-09-01

    Extensive experiments on combustion of biological materials and residues in fluidized bed combustors and dust combustors have been carried out at the Department of Power Plant Engineering of Dresden University since the early nineties. Particular interest was taken in mixing brown coal with sewage sludge, sugar pulp and waste wood. The experiments were supplemented by modelling in a research project funded jointly by the BMBF and Messrs. Lurgi since early 1997. A combustion cell model designed by Siegen University is being modified for the new mixed fuels, and preliminary investigations were carried out on a batch reactor while the modelling work was continued. (orig.) [Deutsch] An dem Lehrstuhl fuer Kraftwerkstechnik der TU Dresden werden seit Anfang der 90-iger Jahre umfangreiche experimentelle Untersuchungen zur Verbrennung von Bio- und Reststoffen in Wirbelschicht- und Staubfeuerungen durchgefuehrt. Dabei war vor allem die Zufeuerung dieser Stoffe in Waermeerzeugeranlagen auf Braunkohlenbasis von besonderem Interesse. Experimentell konnte nachgewiesen werden, dass sowohl Biobrennstoffe als auch Abfaelle in zirkulierenden Wirbelschichtfeuerungen umweltschonend zur Waermeerzeugung eingesetzt werden koennen. Als Beispiel wird das an Hand von Braunkohle-Klaerschlammgemischen sowie Bagasse- und Holz-Braunkohlegemischen gezeigt. Neben den experimentellen Untersuchungen bietet die Modellierung der Verbrennungsvorgaenge ein geeignetes Mittel um Voraussagen zu anderen Mischungsanteilen sowie anderen geometrischen Abmessungen machen zu koennen. Seit Anfang 1997 wird dazu ein vom BMBF und der Firma Lurgi gefoerdertes Forschungsvorhaben bearbeitet. Ein von der Universitaet Gesamthochschule Siegen fuer die Braunkohleverbrennung konzipiertes Zellenmodell wird auf die neuen Brennstoffgemische erweitert. Da grundsaetzlich andere Stoffzusammensetzungen vorliegen, wurden an einem Batch-Reaktor Voruntersuchungen zum Pyrolyseverhalten der Brennstoffe durchgefuehrt. Erste

  20. Combustor Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    Diagnostics in Gas Phase Combustion Systems", Progress in Astrona.utics and Aeronautics, ed. B.T. Zinn, vol. 53, pp. 421, 1977. 21. Tipler , W. "The...obtained on the disc-in-duct (Fig. 1C ) flameholder (negligible together: the result is shown in Fig. 5 with the universal fueopertrtinaefecs) stc 1

  1. Waste Not, Want Not: Analyzing the Economic and Environmental Viability of Waste-to-Energy (WTE) Technology for Site-Specific Optimization of Renewable Energy Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, K.; Milford, J.; Simpkins, T.

    2013-02-01

    Waste-to-energy (WTE) technology burns municipal solid waste (MSW) in an environmentally safe combustion system to generate electricity, provide district heat, and reduce the need for landfill disposal. While this technology has gained acceptance in Europe, it has yet to be commonly recognized as an option in the United States. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of WTE as a renewable energy technology and describes a high-level model developed to assess the feasibility of WTE at a site. Section 2 reviews results from previous life cycle assessment (LCA) studies of WTE, and then uses an LCA inventory tool to perform a screening-level analysis of cost, net energy production, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and conventional air pollution impacts of WTE for residual MSW in Boulder, Colorado. Section 3 of this report describes the federal regulations that govern the permitting, monitoring, and operating practices of MSW combustors and provides emissions limits for WTE projects.

  2. Combustion Characteristics of Lignite Char in a Laboratory-scale Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takahiro; Suzuki, Yoshizo

    In a dual fluidized bed gasifier, the residual char after steam gasification is burnt in riser. The objectives of this work are to clarify the effect of parameters (temperature, pressure, and particle size of lignite char) of char combustion using a laboratory-scale pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC). As a result, the burnout time of lignite char can be improved with increasing operating pressure, and temperature. In addition, the decrease in the particle size of char enhanced the effect on burnout time. The initial combustion rate of the char can be increased with increasing operating pressure. The effect was decreased with increasing operating temperature. However, the effect of operating pressure was slightly changed in small particle size, such as 0.5-1.0 mm. It takes about 20 sec to burn 50% of char in the operating pressure of 0.5 MPa and the particle size of 0.5-1.0 mm.

  3. Stability analysis of thermo-acoustic nonlinear eigenproblems in annular combustors. Part I. Sensitivity

    CERN Document Server

    Magri, Luca; Juniper, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    We present an adjoint-based method for the calculation of eigenvalue perturbations in nonlinear, degenerate and non self-adjoint eigenproblems. This method is applied to a thermo-acoustic annular combustor network, the stability of which is governed by a nonlinear eigenproblem. We calculate the first- and second-order sensitivities of the growth rate and frequency to geometric, flow and flame parameters. Three different configurations are analysed. The benchmark sensitivities are obtained by finite difference, which involves solving the nonlinear eigenproblem at least as many times as the number of parameters. By solving only one adjoint eigenproblem, we obtain the sensitivities to any thermo-acoustic parameter, which match the finite-difference solutions at much lower computational cost.

  4. Investigation of LPP combustors under elevated pressure conditions; Untersuchungen zu LPP-Flugtriebwerksbrennkammern unter erhoehtem Druck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, R.

    2001-05-01

    The development of new combustor concepts for aero engines to meet future emissions regulations in based on a detailed knowledge of the combustion process and the velocity field. In the presented thesis, non intrusive measurements were performed in a model combustion chamber under almost realistic pressure and temperature conditions. The species OH, NO, unburned hydrocarbons and fuel droplets were detected in 2 dimensions with the Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). The velocity field was measured with the Particle Image Velocimetry technique (PIV). [German] Die Weiterentwicklung neuer Brennkammerkonzepte zur Erfuellung zukuenftiger Schadstoffemissionsrichtlinien erfordert genaue Kenntnisse der ablaufenden Verbrennungs- und Stroemungsvorgaenge in der Brennkammer. Bei den in der Arbeit vorgestellten Untersuchungen wurden in einer LPP-Modellbrennkammer unter annaehernd realistischen Eintrittsbedingungen die Spezies OH, NO, unverbrannte Kohlenwasserstoffe sowie noch fluessiger Brennstoff zweidimensional anhand der Laserinduzierten Fluoreszenz (LIF) nachgewiesen. Das Stroemungsfeld wurde mit Hilfe der Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) gemessen.

  5. Biomass Fuel and Combustion Conditions Selection in a Fixed Bed Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María E. Arce

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The biomass market has experienced an increase in development, leading to research and development efforts that are focused on determining optimal biofuel combustion conditions. Biomass combustion is a complex process that involves divergent parameters and thus requires the use of advanced analysis methods. This study proposes combining grey relational analysis (GRA and error propagation theory (EPT to select a biofuel and its optimal combustion conditions. This research will study three biofuels that are currently used in a region of South Europe (Spain, and the most important variables that affect combustion are the ignition front propagation speed and the highest temperature that is reached at the fixed bed combustor. The results demonstrate that a combination of both theories for the analysis of solid-state thermochemical phenomena enables a fast and simple way of choosing the best configuration for each fuel.

  6. The effect of kerosene injection on ignition probability of local ignition in a scramjet combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Heng; Zhou, Jin; Pan, Yu

    2017-03-01

    The spark ignition of kerosene is investigated in a scramjet combustor with a flight condition of Ma 4, 17 km. Based plentiful of experimental data, the ignition probabilities of the local ignition have been acquired for different injection setups. The ignition probability distributions show that the injection pressure and injection location have a distinct effect on spark ignition. The injection pressure has both upper and lower limit for local ignition. Generally, the larger mass flow rate will reduce the ignition probability. The ignition position also affects the ignition near the lower pressure limit. The reason is supposed to be the cavity swallow effect on upstream jet spray near the leading edge, which will make the cavity fuel rich. The corner recirculation zone near the front wall of the cavity plays a significant role in the stabilization of local flame.

  7. Development of a gas turbine combustor strategy - for low volatile coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelsall, G.J.; Mina, T.I. [Alstom Power Technology Centre, Leicester (United Kingdom)

    2004-11-01

    The objective of this project was to compare the current diffusion flame combustion system design against a lean premix combustion system (based on ALSTOM G30 design) and a catalytic combustion design approach. The G30 based combustion system has been designed as apart of a separate DTI Foresight Challenge project (GR/K77235). The three approaches were compared with regard to ease of application, operability, lowest total emissions and commonality with current ALSTOM combustor design. The overall aim was to provide a recommendation on the way forward for the commercial exploitation of the LCV gas fuel market, particularly for biomass and underground coal applications. To achieve this objective, the project has been divided into a number of activities as follows: 1) hardware design and manufacture; 2) LCV combustion testing; 3) turbulent diffusion combustion methods assessment; 4) catalytic combustion methods assessment; 5) LCV combustion technology review; and 6) project management and reporting. 66 refs., 110 figs., 16 tabs.

  8. LES study of intermittency in soot formation in a model aircraft combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Heeseok; Raman, Venkat; Mueller, Michael; Geigle, Klaus Peter

    2015-11-01

    Intermittent soot formation is one of the modeling challenges that prevent accurate predictions of soot concentration in a turbulent reacting flow. Due to the highly unsteady and irregular sooting behavior, formation of soot is acutely sensitive to the flow and gas phase history. Therefore, we need to accurately capture interactions between soot chemistry, particle dynamics, and turbulent flame as well as the turbulent reacting flow. In this study, large eddy simulation (LES) is used to understand the model sensitivity to the soot prediction. Hybrid method of moment (HMOM) soot model is used that accommodates detailed process of soot particle and soot precursor evolution. Gas phase chemistry uses flamelet progress variable approach with an additional enthalpy dimension to include soot radiation effect. The developed numerical model is tested on the DLR swirl combustor that emulates the rich-quench-lean (RQL) configuration using secondary oxidation air injection.

  9. Measurement of Turbulent Pressure and Temperature Fluctuations in a Gas Turbine Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, Louis (Technical Monitor); LaGraff, John E.; Bramanti, Cristina; Pldfield, Martin; Passaro, Andrea; Biagioni, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    The report summarizes the results of the redesign efforts directed towards the gas-turbine combustor rapid-injector flow diagnostic probe developed under sponsorship of NASA-GRC and earlier reported in NASA-CR-2003-212540. Lessons learned during the theoretical development, developmental testing and field-testing in the previous phase of this research were applied to redesign of both the probe sensing elements and of the rapid injection device. This redesigned probe (referred to herein as Turboprobe) has been fabricated and is ready, along with the new rapid injector, for field-testing. The probe is now designed to capture both time-resolved and mean total temperatures, total pressures and, indirectly, one component of turbulent fluctuations.

  10. Large-Eddy Simulation of combustion instabilities in a variable-length combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garby, Romain; Selle, Laurent; Poinsot, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a simulation of a model rocket combustor with continuously variable acoustic properties thanks to a variable-length injector tube. Fully compressible Large-Eddy Simulations are conducted using the AVBP code. An original flame stabilization mechanism is uncovered where the recirculation of hot gases in the corner recirculation zone creates a triple flame structure. An unstable operating point is then chosen to investigate the mechanism of the instability. The simulations are compared to experimental results in terms of frequency and mode structure. Two-dimensional axi-symmetric computations are compared to full 3D simulations in order to assess the validity of the axi-symmetry assumption for the prediction of mean and unsteady features of this flow. Despite the inaccuracies inherent to the 2D description of a turbulent flow, for this configuration and the particular operating point investigated, the axi-symmetric simulation qualitatively reproduces some features of the instability.

  11. Large-eddy simulations of real-fluid effects in rocket engine combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Peter C.; Hickey, Jean-Pierre; Ihme, Matthias

    2013-11-01

    This study is concerned with the LES-modeling of real-fluid effects in rocket combustors. The non-ideal fluid behavior is modeled using the Peng-Robinson equation of state, and high-pressure effects on the thermo-viscous transport properties are also considered. An efficient and robust algorithm is developed to evaluate the thermodynamic state-vector. The highly non-linear coupling of the primitive thermodynamic variables in regions near the critical point requires special consideration to avoid spurious numerical oscillations. To avoid these non-physical oscillations, a second-order essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) scheme is applied in regions that are identified by a density-based sensor. The resulting algorithm is applied in LES to a coaxial rocket-injector, and super- and transcritical operating conditions are considered. Simulation results and comparisons with experimental data will be presented, and the influence of boundary conditions on the mixing characteristics will be discussed.

  12. A Computer Code for Swirling Turbulent Axisymmetric Recirculating Flows in Practical Isothermal Combustor Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, D. G.; Rhode, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    A primitive pressure-velocity variable finite difference computer code was developed to predict swirling recirculating inert turbulent flows in axisymmetric combustors in general, and for application to a specific idealized combustion chamber with sudden or gradual expansion. The technique involves a staggered grid system for axial and radial velocities, a line relaxation procedure for efficient solution of the equations, a two-equation k-epsilon turbulence model, a stairstep boundary representation of the expansion flow, and realistic accommodation of swirl effects. A user's manual, dealing with the computational problem, showing how the mathematical basis and computational scheme may be translated into a computer program is presented. A flow chart, FORTRAN IV listing, notes about various subroutines and a user's guide are supplied as an aid to prospective users of the code.

  13. Predictions and measurements of isothermal flowfields in axisymmetric combustor geometries. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, D. L.; Lilley, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    Numerical predictions, flow visualization experiments and time-mean velocity measurements were obtained for six basic nonreacting flowfields (with inlet swirl vane angles of 0 (swirler removed), 45 and 70 degrees and sidewall expansion angles of 90 and 45 degrees) in an idealized axisymmetric combustor geometry. A flowfield prediction computer program was developed which solves appropriate finite difference equations including a conventional two equation k-epsilon eddy viscosity turbulence model. The wall functions employed were derived from previous swirling flow measurements, and the stairstep approximation was employed to represent the sloping wall at the inlet to the test chamber. Recirculation region boundaries have been sketched from the entire flow visualization photograph collection. Tufts, smoke, and neutrally buoyant helium filled soap bubbles were employed as flow tracers. A five hole pitot probe was utilized to measure the axial, radial, and swirl time mean velocity components.

  14. Status of Superheated Spray and Post Combustor Particulate Modeling for NCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Raju, Suri; Wey, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    At supersonic cruise conditions, high fuel temperatures, coupled with low pressures in the combustor, create potential for superheated fuel injection leading to shorter fuel jet break-up time and reduced spray penetration. Another issue particularly important to the supersonic cruise is the aircraft emissions contributing to the climate change in the atmosphere. Needless to say, aircraft emissions in general also contribute to the air pollution in the neighborhood of airports. The objectives of the present efforts are to establish baseline for prediction methods and experimental data for (a) liquid fuel atomization and vaporization at superheated conditions and (b) particle sampling systems and laboratory or engine testing environments, as well as to document current capabilities and identify gaps for future research.

  15. System for supporting a bundled tube fuel injector within a combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; Melton, Patrick Benedict; Westmoreland, III, James Harold; Flanagan, James Scott

    2016-06-21

    A combustor includes an end cover having an outer side and an inner side, an outer barrel having a forward end that is adjacent to the inner side of the end cover and an aft end that is axially spaced from the forward end. An inner barrel is at least partially disposed concentrically within the outer barrel and is fixedly connected to the outer barrel. A fluid conduit extends downstream from the end cover. A first bundled tube fuel injector segment is disposed concentrically within the inner barrel. The bundled tube fuel injector segment includes a fuel plenum that is in fluid communication with the fluid conduit and a plurality of parallel tubes that extend axially through the fuel plenum. The bundled tube fuel injector segment is fixedly connected to the inner barrel.

  16. Vortex-acoustic lock-on in bluff-body and backward-facing step combustors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S R Chakravarthy; R Sivakumar; O J Shreenivasan

    2007-02-01

    Experimental data on acoustic pressure measurements obtained over a wide range of conditions is reported for two simple geometries that are commonly studied for their combustion dynamics behaviour. These geometries are the confined bluff-body and the confined backward-facing steps. The data indicate regimes of flow-acoustic lock-on that signifies the onset of combustion instability, marked by the excitation of high-amplitude discrete tones of sound in the combustor. The highspeed chemiluminescence imaging of the combustion zone indicates heat-release-rate fluctuations occurring at the same frequencies as observed in the acoustic spectra. Attention is then devoted to the data obtained under cold-flow conditions to illustrate distinctly different behaviour than when combustion instability occurs, contrary to the commonly held view that the combustion process does not alter the underlying fluid mechanical processes under low-Mach number conditions.

  17. Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ELLEFSON, M.D.

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

  18. The aerodynamics of the near field of pressurised pulverized fuel combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeles, G.; Anagnostopoulos, J.; Papadakis, G.; Mouzakis, F.; Voyages, C. [National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece). Lab. for Aerodynamics, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1998-12-31

    This research aims at improving knowledge of an effective design of pressurized pulverized fuel combustors (PPFC). Problems investigated are slag, cleaning efficiency, near burner aerodynamics and effects of pressure on combustion characteristics and on NO concentration levels. The Coal Combustion Algorithm (CO. C.A.-3D code) was the basis for the numerical work performed. Several new models were developed and incorporated into the basic code; a model for the calculation of slag formation, thickness and flow inside a PPFC, three different techniques for domain decomposition by the use of locally refined, staggered or collocated grids; an improved NO postprocessor to account for elevated pressure and turbulence effects. A new version of the final code was developed to obtain solutions in 3-D, cylindrical co-ordinates. All the above models were validated using available experimental data. The slag model predictions were in agreement with the practical evidence. The advantages and disadvantages of each of the domain decomposition techniques were assessed. The best proposed technique was found to combine simplicity, increased accuracy of the predictions in complex flow regions, and significantly reduced computer memory and storage requirements. The use of cylindrical co-ordinates for calculations inside cylindrical-type combustion chambers was found to achieve a more stable convergence of the algorithm and a considerable reduction of numerical diffusion. The proposed modifications of a basic NO formation model produced very encouraging predictions in a wide range of combustion conditions examined (various pressures, temperatures and oxygen concentrations). The numerical work performed provides a engineering tool to improve the physical understanding of the effects of pressurization on the performance and efficiency of combustor design. 33 refs., 25 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Measurements of gas velocity in the freeboard of a pressurized fluidized bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verloop, W.C. [Lab. for Thermal Power Engineering, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Marine Technology, Univ. of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der [Interfaculty Reactor Inst., Dept. of Reactor Physics, Univ. of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Boersma, D. [Lab. for Thermal Power Engineering, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Marine Technology, Univ. of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Hein, K.R.G. [Lab. for Thermal Power Engineering, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Marine Technology, Univ. of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    1992-12-31

    The processes in the freeboard of a fluidized bed combustor have an important impact on both the elutriation of fly ash particles and the emission of noxious gases. The main features have been studied for already several decades. In order to understand the phenomena more thoroughly, the details have to be studied. This paper presents the results of measurements of the gas velocity at different locations in the freeboard. Experiments were performed in the pressurized fluidized bed combustor of the Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands, at 8 bar and a freeboard temperature of 850 C. The measuring method used the temperature flucutations naturally present in the combustion process which were recorded by axially displaced thermocouples. By means of mathematical correlation of the recorded signals, the local gas velocity is calculated. The resulting radial velocity profiles of the upper part of the freeboard are very similar to one-phase turbulent pipe flow profiles. Deviations from the expected axial symmetrical velocity profile which were measured at the lowest level are described to the non-axial symmetrical bed behaviour. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Vorgaenge im Freiraum ueber Wirbelbettverbrennungssysteme spielen eine bedeutende Rolle bei der Entstehung und der Minimierung von festen und gasfoermigen Emissionen. Obwohl in diesem Zusammenhang schon seit langem wesentlichste Kenngroessen des Freiraums Gegenstand von Untersuchungen sind, beduerfen Einzelheiten der Gas- und Partikelstroemung noch weiterhin detaillierter Erfassung. Hierzu werden Daten der Geschwindigkeitsverteilung benoetigt, deren Ermittlung mit konventionellen Messtechniken, insbesondere in Druckwirbelschichtfeuerungen, technisch problematisch ist. In dem Vortrag wird ueber eine Messmethode zur Geschwindigkeitsbestimmung berichtet, bei der feuerungsseitige Temperaturschwankungen ueber in Stroemungsrichtung versetzte Thermoelemente aufgenommen und mathematisch korreliert werden. Diese Methode wurde

  20. Waste remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halas, Nancy J.; Nordlander, Peter; Neumann, Oara

    2017-01-17

    A system including a steam generation system and a chamber. The steam generation system includes a complex and the steam generation system is configured to receive water, concentrate electromagnetic (EM) radiation received from an EM radiation source, apply the EM radiation to the complex, where the complex absorbs the EM radiation to generate heat, and transform, using the heat generated by the complex, the water to steam. The chamber is configured to receive the steam and an object, wherein the object is of medical waste, medical equipment, fabric, and fecal matter.

  1. Hazardous Waste Generators

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The HazWaste database contains generator (companies and/or individuals) site and mailing address information, waste generation, the amount of waste generated etc. of...

  2. Household hazardous waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjelsted, Lotte; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2007-01-01

    'Paint waste', a part of the 'household hazardous waste', amounting to approximately 5 tonnes was collected from recycling stations in two Danish cities. Sorting and analyses of the waste showed paint waste comprised approximately 65% of the mass, paint-like waste (cleaners, fillers, etc.......) comprised 15-25% and foreign items comprised 10-20%. Water-based paint was the dominant part of the paint waste. The chemical composition of the paint waste and the paint-like waste was characterized by an analysis of 27 substances in seven waste fractions. The content of critical substances was tow...... and the paint waste was less contaminated with heavy metals than was the ordinary household waste. This may suggest that households no longer need to source-segregate their paint if the household waste is incinerated, since the presence of a small quantity of solvent-based paint will not be harmful when...

  3. Informative document waste plastics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelhout D; Sein AA; Duvoort GL

    1989-01-01

    This "Informative document waste plastics" forms part of a series of "informative documents waste materials". These documents are conducted by RIVM on the indstruction of the Directorate General for the Environment, Waste Materials Directorate, in behalf of the program of

  4. Deployed Force Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-11-01

    Granath J., Baky A., Thhyselius L., (2004). Municipal Solid Waste Management from a Systems Perspective. Journal of Cleaner Production , forthcoming...Municipal Solid Waste Management from a Systems Perspective. Journal of Cleaner Production , forthcoming article In this paper different waste

  5. Consideraciones sobre una cámara de combustión experimental de 400 kW // Considerations on a 400 kW experimental combustor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Cabrera Rodríguez

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available El trabajo aborda el diseño térmico y constructivo de la cámara de combustión de un combustor experimental para lasimulación de procesos reales de combustión. Se analizan distintas variantes constructivas y se valora su influencia en elcomportamiento del horno, su estabilidad térmica y los gastos energéticos incurridos durante su funcionamiento.Palabras claves: Cámara de combustión, diseño, combustor.________________________________________________________________________________AbstractThe work approaches the thermal and mechanical design of a combustion chamber of an experimental combustor for thesimulation of real combustion process. Different designs are analyzed and their influence is valued in the behavior of thefurnace, thermal stability and cost incurred during their operation.Key words: Combustor, furnace design, thermical design .

  6. Waste Characterization Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Naranjo, Felicia Danielle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-02

    This report discusses ways to classify waste as outlined by LANL. Waste Generators must make a waste determination and characterize regulated waste by appropriate analytical testing or use of acceptable knowledge (AK). Use of AK for characterization requires several source documents. Waste characterization documentation must be accurate, sufficient, and current (i.e., updated); relevant and traceable to the waste stream’s generation, characterization, and management; and not merely a list of information sources.

  7. Monitoring Space Disturbances using KACST MWC detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghrabi, Abdullrahman; Alenizi, Mohammed; Almuteri, Mohammed; AlDosari, Abdullah; Alshehri, Abdullah

    2016-04-01

    Forbush decreases are short term variations in cosmic ray observations due to the solar transient events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections which affect the interplanetary field and heliospheric structure. They are defined as a sharp reduction of cosmic ray intensity followed by a gradual recovery over a period of a few days. We have constructed and operated a three layer small MultiWire Proportional Chamber (MWPC) for cosmic ray muon monitoring. The detector is located at KACST radiation detector laboratory (769 m; Rc=14.4 GV), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. In this paper, data from this newly developed detector were used to study FD observed during 5-30 December 2015. Interplanetary data were used to characterize the solar and interplanetary conditions causing the observed FD. The obtained results were comparable with those obtained by the existed 1 m2 scintillator detector and with data obtained from different neutron monitors around the world.

  8. Waste Transfer Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    tion and transport is usually the most costly part of any waste management system; and when waste is transported over a considerable distance or for a long time, transferring the waste from the collection vehicles to more efficient transportation may be economically beneficial. This involves...... a transfer station where the transfer takes place. These stations may also be accessible by private people, offering flexibility to the waste system, including facilities for bulky waste, household hazardous waste and recyclables. Waste transfer may also take place on the collection route from small...... describes the main features of waste transfer stations, including some considerations about the economical aspects on when transfer is advisable....

  9. Materials for Advanced Turbine Engines (MATE): Project 3: Design, fabrication and evaluation of an oxide dispersion strengthened sheet alloy combustor liner, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henricks, R. J.; Sheffler, K. D.

    1984-01-01

    The suitability of wrought oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) superalloy sheet for gas turbine engine combustor applications was evaluated. Incoloy MA 956 (FeCrAl base) and Haynes Developmental Alloy (HDA) 8077 (NiCrAl base) were evaluated. Preliminary tests showed both alloys to be potentially viable combustor materials, with neither alloy exhibiting a significant advantage over the other. Both alloys demonstrated a +167C (300 F) advantage of creep and oxidation resistance with no improvement in thermal fatigue capability compared to a current generation combustor alloy (Hastelloy X). MA956 alloy was selected for further demonstration because it exhibited better manufacturing reproducibility than HDA8077. Additional property tests were conducted on MA956. To accommodate the limited thermal fatigue capability of ODS alloys, two segmented, mechanically attached, low strain ODS combustor design concepts having predicted fatigue lives or = 10,000 engine cycles were identified. One of these was a relatively conventional louvered geometry, while the other involved a transpiration cooled configuration. A series of 10,000 cycle combustor rig tests on subscale MA956 and Hastelloy X combustor components showed no cracking, thereby confirming the beneficial effect of the segmented design on thermal fatigue capability. These tests also confirmed the superior oxidation and thermal distortion resistance of the ODS alloy. A hybrid PW2037 inner burner liner containing MA956 and Hastelloy X components was designed and constructed.

  10. Atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (AFBC) co-firing of coal and hospital waste. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-01

    The proposed project involves co-firing of coal and medical waste (including infectious medical waste) in an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) to safely dispose of medical waste and produce steam for hospital needs. Combustion at the design temperature and residence time (duration) in the AFBC has been proven to render infectious medical waste free of disease producing organisms. The project would be located at the Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center in Lebanon, Pennsylvania. The estimated cost of the proposed AFBC facility is nearly $4 million. It would be jointly funded by DOE, Veterans Affairs, and Donlee Technologies, Inc., of York, Pennsylvania, under a cooperative agreement between DOE and Donlee. Under the terms of this agreement, $3.708 million in cost-shared financial assistance would be jointly provided by DOE and the Veterans Affairs (50/50), with $278,000 provided by Donlee. The purposes of the proposed project are to: (1) provide the VA Medical Center and the Good Samaritan Hospital (GSH), also of Lebanon, Pennsylvania, with a solution for disposal of their medical waste; and (2) demonstrate that a new coal-burning technology can safely incinerate infectious medical waste, produce steam to meet hospital needs, and comply with environmental regulations.

  11. Frequent Questions About Universal Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frequent questions such as Who is affected by the universal waste regulations? What is “mercury-containing equipment”? How are waste batteries managed under universal waste? How are waste pesticides managed under universal waste?

  12. Introduction to Waste Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Solid waste management is as old as human civilization, although only considered an engineering discipline for about one century. The change from the previous focus on public cleansing of the cities to modern waste management was primarily driven by industrialization, which introduced new materials...... and chemicals, dramatically changing the types and composition of waste, and by urbanization making waste management in urban areas a complicated and costly logistic operation. This book focuses on waste that commonly appears in the municipal waste management system. This chapter gives an introduction to modern...... waste management, including issues as waste definition, problems associated with waste, waste management criteria and approaches to waste management. Later chapters introduce aspects of engineering (Chapter 1.2), economics (Chapter 1.3) and regulation (Chapter 1.4)....

  13. Numerical Investigation on Hydrogen-Fueled Scramjet Combustor with Parallel Strut Fuel Injector at a Flight Mach Number of 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Pandey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical analysis of the inlet-combustor interaction and flow structure through a scramjet engine at a flight Mach number M = 6 with parallel injection (Strut with circular inlet is presented in the present research article. Three different angles of attack (α=-4°, α=0°, α=4° have been studied for parallel injection. The scramjet configuration used here is a modified version of DLR scramjet model. Fuel is injected at supersonic speed (M=2 through a parallel strut injector. For parallel injection, the shape of the strut is chosen in a way to produce strong stream wise vorticity and thus to enhance the hydrogen/air mixing inside the combustor. These numerical simulations are aimed to study the flow structure, supersonic mixing, and combustion phenomena for the three different types of geometries along with circular shaped strut configuration.

  14. Fuel nozzle assembly for use as structural support for a duct structure in a combustor of a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, David J; Fox, Timothy A

    2015-03-31

    A fuel nozzle assembly for use in a combustor apparatus of a gas turbine engine. An outer housing of the fuel nozzle assembly includes an inner volume and provides a direct structural connection between a duct structure and a fuel manifold. The duct structure defines a flow passage for combustion gases flowing within the combustor apparatus. The fuel manifold defines a fuel supply channel therein in fluid communication with a source of fuel. A fuel injector of the fuel nozzle assembly is provided in the inner volume of the outer housing and defines a fuel passage therein. The fuel passage is in fluid communication with the fuel supply channel of the fuel manifold for distributing the fuel from the fuel supply channel into the flow passage of the duct structure.

  15. Determination of an acoustic reflection coefficient at the inlet of a model gas turbine combustor for power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W. J.; Cha, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    A phenomenon that potentially influences the reliability of power generation systems is the presence of thermo-acoustic oscillations in the combustion chamber of a land- based gas turbine. To develop specific measures that prevent the instability, it is essential to predict and/or evaluate the underlying physics of the thermo-acoustics, which requires the acoustic boundary condition at the exit of the burner, that is, at the inlet of the combustor. Here we report a procedure for calculating acoustic reflection coefficients at the burner exit by utilizing two microphone method (TMM) for dynamic pressure signals. The procedure has been verified by comparing its results with reported ones and further successfully employed to determine the acoustic boundary condition of the burner of a partially-premixed model gas turbine combustor.

  16. Prediction of hydrodynamics and chemistry of confined turbulent methane-air frames in a two concentric tube combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markatos, N. C.; Spalding, D. B.; Srivatsa, S. K.

    1978-01-01

    A formulation of the governing partial differential equations for fluid flow and reacting chemical species in a two-concentric-tube combustor is presented. A numerical procedure for the solution of the governing differential equations is described and models for chemical-equilibrium and chemical-kinetics calculations are presented. The chemical-equilibrium model is used to characterize the hydrocarbon reactions. The chemical-kinetics model is used to predict the concentrations of the oxides of nitrogen. The combustor considered consists of two coaxial ducts. Concentric streams of gaseous fuel and air enter the inlet duct at one end; the flow then reverses and flows out through the outer duct. Two sample cases with specified inlet and boundary conditions are considered and the results are discussed.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF HELMHOLTZ-TYPE PULSE COMBUSTOR%Helmholtz型脉动燃烧器的研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李保国; 洪新华

    2001-01-01

    对膜片阀式Helmholtz型脉动燃烧器进行了研究,设计功率为25 kW,以液化石油气为燃料,工作频率从60~110Hz可调,还分析了脉动燃烧器各主要部件的结构,确定了设计原则.%A Helmholtz-type pulse combustor with a flapper valve is designed. The capacity of the combustor is 25kW and it uses liquefied petroleum gas as fuel, and frequency ranges from 60~110Hz. Its main units are analyzed and design principle is determined.

  18. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 3, Part 1, Waste Management Facility report, dangerous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation, and amount of waste.

  19. Spectral analysis of CFB data: Predictive models of Circulating Fluidized Bed combustors. 11th technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamwo, I.K.; Miller, A.; Gidaspow, D.

    1992-04-01

    The overall objective of this investigation is to develop experimentally verified models for circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustors. Spectral analysis of CFB data obtained at Illinois Institute of Technology shows that the frequencies of pressure oscillations are less than 0.1 Hertz and that they increase with solids volume fraction to the usual value of one Hertz obtained in bubbling beds. These data are consistent with the kinetic theory interpretation of density wave propagation.

  20. Testing of DLR C/C-SiC and C/C for HIFiRE 8 Scramjet Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David E.; Capriotti, Diego P.; Reimer, Thomas; Kutemeyer, Marius; Smart, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) have been proposed for use as lightweight hot structures in scramjet combustors. Previous studies have calculated significant weight savings by utilizing CMCs (active and passive) versus actively cooled metallic scramjet structures. Both a carbon/carbon (C/C) and a carbon/carbon-silicon carbide (C/C-SiC) material fabricated by DLR (Stuttgart, Germany) are being considered for use in a passively cooled combustor design for Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) 8, a joint Australia / Air Force Research Laboratory hypersonic flight program, expected to fly at Mach 7 for approximately 30 sec, at a dynamic pressure of 55 kilopascals. Flat panels of the DLR C/C and C/C-SiC materials were installed downstream of a hydrogen-fueled, dual-mode scramjet combustor and tested for several minutes at conditions simulating flight at Mach 5 and Mach 6. Gaseous hydrogen fuel was used to fuel the scramjet combustor. The test panels were instrumented with embedded Type K and Type S thermocouples. Zirconia felt insulation was used during some of the tests to reduce heat loss from the back surface and thus increase the heated surface temperature of the C/C-SiC panel approximately 177 C (350 F). The final C/C-SiC panel was tested for three cycles totaling over 135 sec at Mach 6 enthalpy. Slightly more erosion was observed on the C/C panel than the C/C-SiC panels, but both material systems demonstrated acceptable recession performance for the HIFiRE 8 flight.

  1. Optical Characterization of a Multipoint Lean Direct Injector for Gas Turbine Combustors: Velocity and Fuel Drop Size Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Christopher M.; Anderson, Robert C.; Locke, Randy J.; Hicks, Yolanda R.

    2010-01-01

    Performance of a multipoint, lean direct injection (MP-LDI) strategy for low emission aero-propulsion systems has been tested in a Jet-A fueled, lean flame tube combustion rig. Operating conditions for the series of tests included inlet air temperatures between 672 and 828 K, pressures between 1034 and 1379 kPa and total equivalence ratios between 0.41 and 0.45, resulting in equilibrium flame temperatures approaching 1800 K. Ranges of operation were selected to represent the spectrum of subsonic and supersonic flight conditions projected for the next-generation of commercial aircraft. This document reports laser-based measurements of in situ fuel velocities and fuel drop sizes for the NASA 9-point LDI hardware arranged in a 3 3 square grid configuration. Data obtained represent a region of the flame tube combustor with optical access that extends 38.1-mm downstream of the fuel injection site. All data were obtained within reacting flows, without particle seeding. Two diagnostic methods were employed to evaluate the resulting flow path. Three-component velocity fields have been captured using phase Doppler interferometry (PDI), and two-component velocity distributions using planar particle image velocimetry (PIV). Data from these techniques have also offered insight into fuel drop size and distribution, fuel injector spray angle and pattern, turbulence intensity, degree of vaporization and extent of reaction. This research serves to characterize operation of the baseline NASA 9- point LDI strategy for potential use in future gas-turbine combustor applications. An additional motive is the compilation of a comprehensive database to facilitate understanding of combustor fuel injector aerodynamics and fuel vaporization processes, which in turn may be used to validate computational fluid dynamics codes, such as the National Combustor Code (NCC), among others.

  2. Construction and Demolition Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Andersen, L.

    2011-01-01

    Construction and demolition waste (C&D waste) is the waste generated during the building, repair, remodeling or removal of constructions. The constructions can be roads, residential housing and nonresidential buildings. C&D waste has traditionally been considered without any environmental problems...

  3. Experimental investigation on combustion performance of cavity-strut injection of supercritical kerosene in supersonic model combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming-bo; Zhong, Zhan; Liang, Jian-han; Wang, Hong-bo

    2016-10-01

    Supersonic combustion with cavity-strut injection of supercritical kerosene in a model scramjet engine was experimentally investigated in Mach 2.92 facility with the stagnation temperatures of approximately 1430 K. Static pressure distribution in the axial direction was determined using pressure transducers installed along the centerline of the model combustor top walls. High speed imaging camera was used to capture flame luminosity and combustion region distribution. Multi-cavities were used to and stabilize the combustion in the supersonic combustor. Intrusive injection by thin struts was used to enhance the fuel-air mixing. Supercritical kerosene at temperatures of approximately 780 K and various pressures was prepared using a heat exchanger driven by the hot gas from a pre-burner and injected at equivalence ratios of approximately 1.0. In the experiments, combustor performances with different strut injection schemes were investigated and compared to direct wall injection scheme based on the measured static pressure distributions, the specific thrust increments and the images obtained by high-speed imaging camera. The experimental results showed that the injection by thin struts could obtain an enhanced mixing in the field but could not acquire a steady flame when mixing field cannot well match cavity separation region. There is no significant difference on performance between different schemes since the unsteady intermittent and oscillating flame leads to no actual combustion efficiency improvement.

  4. Evaluation of dust cake filtration at high temperature with effluence from an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, R.A.

    1990-08-01

    In the spring of 1989, two separate test series were simultaneously conducted at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to examine applied and fundamental behavior of dust cake filtration under high temperature and high pressure (HTHP) conditions. The purpose was to provide information on dust-cake filtration properties to gas stream cleanup researchers associated with the Tidd 70 megawatt (MW) pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC). The two test facilities included (1) a high-pressure natural-gas combustor with injected particulate, which was fed to two full-size candle filters; and (2) an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) with coal and limestone sorbent to generate a particulate-laden combustion exhaust gas, which was sent to a single full-size candle filter and a small-scale disc filter. Several major conclusions from these studies are noted below. On average reducing the mean particulate size by 33% and the associated loading carried in the filtrate will increase the dust cake specific flow resistance (K{sub 2}) by 498%. High-temperature and high-pressure filtration can be successfully performed with ceramic candle filters at moderate filtration face velocities and reasonable system pressure drops. Off-line filter cleaning can produce a filter system with a higher apparent permeability than that produced from on-line filter cleaning at the same face velocity. 19 refs., 89 figs., 13 tabs.

  5. Experimental study of cone-struts and cavity flameholders in a kerosene-fueled round scramjet combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongqing; Song, Wenyan

    2017-10-01

    Experimental investigations of liquid kerosene ignition and flameholding in a round supersonic combustor are presented. Three kinds of flameholders, a cone-struts structure, a cavity and the combination of the both, are studied for the kerosene ignition and flameholding. Results show that ignition and flameholding cannot be achieved by using the sole cone-struts flameholder, although flames are observed at the combustor outlet. The ignition and flameholding are achieved in a narrow range of equivalence ratios by using the cavity flameholder. This range is widened by employing the combination of the cone-struts and the cavity flameholders. It is observed that the back pressure disrupts the isolator entrance flow slightly by using the larger cone-struts (CR = 0.261). However, it does not happen when the smaller cone-struts (CR = 0.221) is employed. Then a characteristic air mass flow rate in the round combustor is redefined to calculate a modified Damkohler number that correlates the nonpremixed flame stability limits. The correlations are in good agreements with the experimental results.

  6. Studies on the heat shield structure of ceramic gas turbine components, first report: heat shield properties of the ceramic combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, K.; Hisamatsu, T.; Yuri, I. (CRIEPI, Yokosuka-shi (Japan). Yokosuka Research Lab.)

    1993-04-01

    The ceramic gas turbine for power generation consists of ceramic parts and metal parts. In order to improve the performance and reliability of the ceramic gas turbine, it is important to develop a heat shield structure between ceramics and metal. CRIEPI proposed a heat shield structure for the ceramic combustor wall in which a small amount of air is introduced in a ceramic fibre layer in the ceramic combustor wall. It was confirmed that the heat shield structure has excellent performance in a high pressure combustion test. This report describes the heat transfer property of the heat shield structure in the ceramic combustor wall by numerical analysis. As a result of analysis, it was clarified that the ceramic fibre temperature changes rapidly near the ceramic tiles, and that the heat transfer property of the heat shield structure is as follows: heat shield performance is maintained by introducing a small amount of air; metal wall temperature is little affected by combustion gas temperature, thermophysical property of ceramic fibres and so on. 9 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Numerical investigations on effects of bluff body in flat plate micro thermo photovoltaic combustor with sudden expansion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鄂加强; 黄海蛟; 赵晓欢

    2016-01-01

    In order to reveal combustion characteristics of H2/air mixture in a micro-combustor with and without bluff body, the effects of inlet velocities, equivalence ratios and bluff body’s blockage ratios on the temperature field, pressure of the combustor wall, combustion efficiency and blow-off limit were investigated. The numerical results indicate that the sudden expansion plate micro combustor with bluff body could enhance the turbulent disturbance of the mixed gas in the combustion chamber and the combustion condition is improved. Moreover, a low-speed and high temperature recirculation region was formed between the sudden expansion step and the bluff body so that the high and uniform wall temperature (>1000 K) could be gotten. As a result, it could strengthen the mixing process, prolong the residence time of gas, control the flame position effectively and widen the operation range by the synergistic effect of the bluff body and steps. When the blockage ratio ranged from 0.3 to 0.6, it could be found that the bluff body could play a stabilizing effect and expand combustion blow burning limit, and combustion efficiency firstly was increased with the inlet velocity and equivalence ratio, and then was decreased.

  8. Experimental investigations on active cooling thermal protection structure of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustor in arc heated facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianqiang, Tu; Jinlong, Peng; Xianning, Yang; Lianzhong, Chen

    2016-10-01

    The active cooling thermal protection technology is the efficient method to resolve the long-duration work and reusable problems of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustor, where worst thermo-mechanical loads occur. The fuel is passed through coolant channels adjacent to the heated surfaces to absorb heat from the heating exchanger panels, prior to injection into the combustor. The heating exchanger both cooled down the wall temperature of the combustor wall and heats and cracks the hydrocarbon fuel inside the panel to permit an easier combustion and satisfying combustion efficiency. The subscale active cooling metallic panels, with dimensions of 100×100 mm and different coolant channel sizes, have been tested under typical combustion thermal environment produced by arc heated Turbulent Flow Duct (TFD). The heat exchange ability of different coolant channel sizes has been obtained. The big-scale active cooling metallic panel, with dimensions of 100 × 750 mm and the coolant channel sizes of better heating exchange performance, has been made and tested in the big-scale arc heated TFD facility. The test results show that the local superheated ablation is easy to happen for the cooling fuel assigned asymmetrically in the bigscale active cooling metallic panel, and the cooling fuel rate can reduce 8%˜10% after spraying the Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) in the heating surface.

  9. Thermal Barrier and Protective Coatings to Improve the Durability of a Combustor Under a Pulse Detonation Engine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Zhu, Dongming

    2008-01-01

    Pulse detonation engine (PDE) concepts are receiving increasing attention for future aeronautic propulsion applications, due to their potential thermodynamic cycle efficiency and higher thrust to density ratio that lead to the decrease in fuel consumption. But the resulting high gas temperature and pressure fluctuation distributions at high frequency generated with every detonation are viewed to be detrimental to the combustor liner material. Experimental studies on a typical metal combustion material exposed to a laser simulated pulse heating showed extensive surface cracking. Coating of the combustor materials with low thermal conductivity ceramics is shown to protect the metal substrate, reduce the thermal stresses, and hence increase the durability of the PDE combustor liner material. Furthermore, the temperature fluctuation and depth of penetration is observed to decrease with increasing the detonation frequency. A crack propagation rate in the coating is deduced by monitoring the variation of the coating apparent thermal conductivity with time that can be utilized as a health monitoring technique for the coating system under a rapid fluctuating heat flux.

  10. Experimental studies on Gas—Particle Flows and Coal Combustion in New Generation Spouting—Cyclone COmbustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.X.Wang; Z.H.Ma; 等

    1996-01-01

    Besed on previous studies,an improved non-slagging spouting-cyclone combustor with two-stage combustion,organized in perpendicularly vortexing flows,is developed for clean coal combustion applied is small-size industrial furnaces and domestic furnaces.The isothermal model test and the combustion test give some encouraging results.In this study,further improvement of the gemoetrical configuration was made,a visualization method and a LDA system were used to study the gas-particle flow behavior and the temperature and gas composition in combustion experiments were measured by using thermocouples and a COSA-6000-CD Portable Stack Analyzer.Stronger recirculation in the sopouting zone and the strongly swirling efect in the cyclone zone were obtained in the improved combustor.The combustion temperature distribution is uniform.These results indicate that the improved geometrical configuration of the combustor is favorable to the stabilization of coal flame and the intensification of coal combustion.and is provides a basis for the practical application of this technique.

  11. Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ELLEFSON, M.D.

    2000-01-06

    The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source special nuclear and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this document. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. This document has been revised to meet the interim status waste analysis plan requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173 303-300(5). When the final status permit is issued, permit conditions will be incorporated and this document will be revised accordingly.

  12. PRODUCTION OF NEW BIOMASS/WASTE-CONTAINING SOLID FUELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David J. Akers; Glenn A. Shirey; Zalman Zitron; Charles Q. Maney

    2001-04-20

    existing boilers, evaluation of these composite fuels to determine their applicability to the major combustor types, development of preliminary designs and economic projections for commercial facilities producing up to 200,000 tons per year of biomass/waste-containing fuels, and the development of dewatering technologies to reduce the moisture content of high-moisture biomass and waste materials during the pelletization process.

  13. Introduction to Waste Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Solid waste management is as old as human civilization, although only considered an engineering discipline for about one century. The change from the previous focus on public cleansing of the cities to modern waste management was primarily driven by industrialization, which introduced new materials...... waste management, including issues as waste definition, problems associated with waste, waste management criteria and approaches to waste management. Later chapters introduce aspects of engineering (Chapter 1.2), economics (Chapter 1.3) and regulation (Chapter 1.4)....

  14. Investigation of combustion control in a dump combustor using the feedback free fluidic oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Eric J.

    The feedback free fluidic oscillator uses the unsteady nature of two colliding jets to create a single oscillating outlet jet with a wide sweep angle. These devices have the potential to provide additional combustion control, boundary layer control, thrust vectoring, and industrial flow deflection. Two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics, CFD, was used to analyze the jet oscillation frequency over a range of operating conditions and to determine the effect that geometric changes in the oscillator design have on the frequency. Results presented illustrate the changes in jet oscillation frequency with gas type, gas temperature, operating pressure, pressure ratio across the oscillator, aspect ratio of the oscillator, and the frequency trends with various changes to the oscillator geometry. A fluidic oscillator was designed and integrated into single element rocket combustor with the goal of suppressing longitudinal combustion instabilities. An array of nine fluidic oscillators was tested to mimic modulated secondary oxidizer injection into the dump plane using 15% of the oxidizer flow. The combustor has a coaxial injector that uses gaseous methane and decomposed hydrogen peroxide at an O/F of 11.66. A sonic choke plate on an actuator arm allows for continuous adjustment of the oxidizer post acoustics for studying a variety of instability magnitudes. The fluidic oscillator unsteady outlet jet performance is compared with equivalent steady jet injection and a baseline design with no secondary oxidizer injection. At the most unstable operating conditions, the unsteady outlet jet saw a 60% reduction in the instability pressure oscillation magnitude when compared to the steady jet and baseline data. The results indicate open loop propellant modulation for combustion control can be achieved through fluidic devices that require no moving parts or electrical power to operate. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics, 3-D CFD, was conducted to determine the

  15. Understanding radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

  16. Biomedical Waste Management

    OpenAIRE

    Sikovska, Biljana; Dimova, Cena; Sumanov, Gorgi; Vankovski, Vlado

    2016-01-01

    Medical waste is all waste material generated at health care facilities, such as hospitals, clinics, physician’s offices, dental practices, blood banks, and veterinary hospitals/clinics, as well as medical research facilities and laboratories. Poor management of health care waste potentially exposes health care workers, waste handlers, patients and the community at large to infection, toxic effects and injuries, and risks polluting the environment. It is essential that all medical waste ma...

  17. Municipal Solid Waste Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-06-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a source of biomass material that can be utilized for bioenergy production with minimal additional inputs. MSW resources include mixed commercial and residential garbage such as yard trimmings, paper and paperboard, plastics, rubber, leather, textiles, and food wastes. Waste resources such as landfill gas, mill residues, and waste grease are already being utilized for cost-effective renewable energy generation. MSW for bioenergy also represents an opportunity to divert greater volumes of residential and commercial waste from landfills.

  18. Turbine endwall film cooling with combustor-turbine interface gap leakage flow: Effect of incidence angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Yuan, Xin

    2013-04-01

    This paper is focused on the film cooling performance of combustor-turbine leakage flow at off-design condition. The influence of incidence angle on film cooling effectiveness on first-stage vane endwall with combustor-turbine interface slot is studied. A baseline slot configuration is tested in a low speed four-blade cascade comprising a large-scale model of the GE-E3Nozzle Guide Vane (NGV). The slot has a forward expansion angle of 30 deg. to the endwall surface. The Reynolds number based on the axial chord and inlet velocity of the free-stream flow is 3.5 × 105 and the testing is done in a four-blade cascade with low Mach number condition (0.1 at the inlet). The blowing ratio of the coolant through the interface gap varies from M = 0.1 to M = 0.3, while the blowing ratio varies from M = 0.7 to M = 1.3 for the endwall film cooling holes. The film-cooling effectiveness distributions are obtained using the pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique. The results show that with an increasing blowing ratio the film-cooling effectiveness increases on the endwall. As the incidence angle varies from i = +10 deg. to i = -10 deg., at low blowing ratio, the averaged film-cooling effectiveness changes slightly near the leading edge suction side area. The case of i = +10 deg. has better film-cooling performance at the downstream part of this region where the axial chord is between 0.15 and 0.25. However, the disadvantage of positive incidence appears when the blowing ratio increases, especially at the upstream part of near suction side region where the axial chord is between 0 and 0.15. On the main passage endwall surface, as the incidence angle changes from i = +10 deg. to i = -10 deg., the averaged film-cooling effectiveness changes slightly and the negative incidence appears to be more effective for the downstream part film cooling of the endwall surface where the axial chord is between 0.6 and 0.8.

  19. Laser High-Cycle Thermal Fatigue of Pulse Detonation Engine Combustor Materials Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Fox, Dennis S.; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Pulse detonation engines (PDE's) have received increasing attention for future aerospace propulsion applications. Because the PDE is designed for a high-frequency, intermittent detonation combustion process, extremely high gas temperatures and pressures can be realized under the nearly constant-volume combustion environment. The PDE's can potentially achieve higher thermodynamic cycle efficiency and thrust density in comparison to traditional constant-pressure combustion gas turbine engines (ref. 1). However, the development of these engines requires robust design of the engine components that must endure harsh detonation environments. In particular, the detonation combustor chamber, which is designed to sustain and confine the detonation combustion process, will experience high pressure and temperature pulses with very short durations (refs. 2 and 3). Therefore, it is of great importance to evaluate PDE combustor materials and components under simulated engine temperatures and stress conditions in the laboratory. In this study, a high-cycle thermal fatigue test rig was established at the NASA Glenn Research Center using a 1.5-kW CO2 laser. The high-power laser, operating in the pulsed mode, can be controlled at various pulse energy levels and waveform distributions. The enhanced laser pulses can be used to mimic the time-dependent temperature and pressure waves encountered in a pulsed detonation engine. Under the enhanced laser pulse condition, a maximum 7.5-kW peak power with a duration of approximately 0.1 to 0.2 msec (a spike) can be achieved, followed by a plateau region that has about one-fifth of the maximum power level with several milliseconds duration. The laser thermal fatigue rig has also been developed to adopt flat and rotating tubular specimen configurations for the simulated engine tests. More sophisticated laser optic systems can be used to simulate the spatial distributions of the temperature and shock waves in the engine. Pulse laser high

  20. Wasted waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemczynowicz, J

    1996-11-01

    This article presents the increasing mismanagement of water as a result of increasing delivery of water volume, water pollution, and water wasting. One example of water mismanagement is irrigation, through which 67% of water is withdrawn from the hydrological cycle. In addition, reports from European communities reveal that pesticides from agriculture worsen the existing underground pollution. Furthermore, a 25% drop in land productivity was observed in Africa due to erosion, salinization, water logging, and desertification. Also, 23% of withdrawn water goes to industries, which are the major polluters. Since 1900 about 250,000 tons of cadmium have been produced worldwide, which eventually enter and harm the aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Moreover, high mercury levels were observed in Malaysia's Kelang River in the late 1980s, and river pollution in Thailand and Malaysia is recorded to be 30-100 times higher than accepted levels. Aside from that, the human race must also understand that there is a connection between water scarcity and water quality. When there is water pollution, it is expected that many people will suffer diarrheal diseases and intestinal parasite infections, which will further increase the mortality rate to 3.3 million per year. Realizing the severity of the problem, it is suggested that the human race must learn to recycle water like stormwater to prevent scarcity with drinking water.

  1. TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James T. Cobb, Jr.

    2003-09-12

    Metal-laden wastes can be stabilized and solidified using advanced clean coal technology by-products (CCTBs)--fluid bed combustor ash and spray drier solids. These utility-generated treatment chemicals are available for purchase through brokers, and commercial applications of this process are being practiced by treaters of metal-laden hazardous waste. A complex of regulations governs this industry, and sensitivities to this complex has discouraged public documentation of treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with CCTBs. This report provides a comprehensive public documentation of laboratory studies that show the efficacy of the stabilization and solidification of metal-laden hazardous wastes--such as lead-contaminated soils and sandblast residues--through treatment with CCTBs. It then describes the extensive efforts that were made to obtain the permits allowing a commercial hazardous waste treater to utilize CCTBs as treatment chemicals and to install the equipment required to do so. It concludes with the effect of this lengthy process on the ability of the treatment company to realize the practical, physical outcome of this effort, leading to premature termination of the project.

  2. Summary of the GASP code application and evaluation effort for scramjet combustor flowfields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Shivakumar; Bittner, Robert D.; Bobskill, Glenn J.

    1993-01-01

    Numerical simulations of 3D turbulent mixing and reacting flows have been systematically evaluated by comparison with experimental data and other numerical solutions to provide confidence in the General Aerodynamic Simulation Program (GASP) code version 1.3. Specifically, the GASP flow solver has been used to model high speed flow through scram jet combustors. Unit injector problems evaluated include (1) UVA staged sonic normal injection of air into Mach 2 air stream, (2) the VPI Mach 1.7 low angled (15 deg) flush wall helium injection into an unconfined Mach 6 'cold air' stream, and (3) the HYPULSE angled (30 deg) flush wall hydrogen injection into a Mach 6, high enthalpy (flight Mach 17 simulation) nitrogen and air test gases. Results of the numerical simulation for the first two test cases have been compared with detailed in-stream measurements and with SPARK CFD solutions. The results for the last two cases have been compared with measured wall pressure and heat flux data and with SPARK CFD solutions. The present GASP solutions compare favorably with both the experimental data and the SPARK solutions.

  3. Development of a micro gas turbine combustor with T-type vaporizers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Quan-hong; LIU Jun; XU Jian; LIN Yu-zhen; LIU Gao-en

    2007-01-01

    The study includes the experimental investigation of the evaporation performance of T-type vaporizer, mainly studied the relationship of the inlet air temperature and vaporizer wall temperature with the evaporation ratio. Then, it studied the LBO(lean blow out) and combustion efficiency of the micro aero-engine combustor with T-type vaporizer on the normal pressure test rig. The inlet air condition is environmental pressure and temperature. The gas analysis method is used to study the combustion efficiency, and the inlet air temperature is 300 K, 400 K and 500 K.It could be concluded that the evaporation performance is improved with the increasing of the inlet air temperature and vaporizer wall temperature;the average LBO is 0.003;the combustion efficiency rises with the inlet air temperature, and it remain constant when the fuel/air ratio changed in the range from 0.008 to 0.02. The vaporization ratio is the key factor to determine the combustion performance.

  4. Experimental investigations on the power extraction of a turbine driven by a pulse detonation combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xiaofeng; Zheng Longxi; Qiu Hua; Chen Jingbin

    2013-01-01

    In order to grasp the interaction mechanism between the pulse detonation combustor (PDC) and the turbine, the experimental work in this paper investigates the key factors on the power extraction of a turbocharger turbine driven by a PDC. A PDC consisting of an unvalved tube is integrated with a turbocharger turbine which has a nominal mass flow rate of 0.6 kg/s and 50000 r/min. The PDC-turbine hybrid engine is operated on gasoline-air mixtures and runs for 6+min to achieve a thermal steady state, and then the engine performance is evaluated under dif-ferent operating conditions. Results show that the momentum difference per unit area between the turbine inlet and outlet plays an important role in the power extraction, while the pressure peak of the detonation has little effect. The equivalence ratio of fuel and air mixture and the transition structure between PDC and turbine are also important to the power extraction of the turbine. The present work is promising as it suggests that the performance benefit of a PDC-turbine hybrid engine can be realized by increasing the momentum difference per unit area through the optimal design of transition section between the PDC and turbine.

  5. Probe effects in gas turbine combustor emissions measurements. Final report 1 Mar--1 Oct 78

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, J.A.; Peters, J.E.; Mellor, A.M.

    1979-06-01

    Four geometrically distinct, stainless steel probes are used to study the concentrations of CO, HC,, NO, and NOX at several different radial and two different axial positions within a simplified gas turbine combustor. The probes are all water cooled but do not employ an aerodynamic quench. They are designed to assess the effect of tip shape, tip to body proximity, and probe entry point on measured pollutant concentrations. Though probe entry point and tip to body proximity are shown to imperceptibly affect the pollutant concentrations, probe tip geometry has a marked impact on the measured pollutant levels. Specifically, the aerodynamic, tapered-tip probe yields depressed CO and HC, and elevated NO concetrations compared to other three blunt-tipped probes. Regarding reproducibility, the pollutant concentratins measured with one of the blunt-tipped probes in this study are compared to pollutant levels measured with the same probe three years ago Tuttle, et al. 1975). CO and HC are shown to be the most reproducible species, while NO and NOX acceptably but less accurately agree with past studies.

  6. Experiments and numerical studies on a Syngas-fired Ultra low NOx combustor

    KAUST Repository

    S, Krishna

    2017-06-06

    Exhaust measurements of temperature and pollutants in a syngas-fired model trapped vortex combustor for stationary power generation applications are reported. The performance was further evaluated for configurations where mixing enhancement was obtained using struts in the mainstream flow. Mainstream premixing of fuel was also studied to investigate its effect on emissions. The exhaust temperature pattern factor was found to be poor for baseline cases, but improved with the introduction of struts. NO emissions were steadily below 3-ppm across various flow conditions, whereas CO emissions tended to increase with increasing Momentum Flux Ratios (MFRs) and mainstream fuel addition. Combustion efficiencies ~96% were observed for all conditions. The performance characteristics were found to be favourable at higher MFRs with low pattern factors and high combustion efficiencies. Numerical simulations employing RANS and LES with Presumed Probability Distribution Function (PPDF) model were also carried out. Mixture fraction profiles in the TVC cavity for non-reacting conditions show that LES simulations are able to capture the mean mixing field better than the RANS-based approach. This is attributed to the prediction of the jet decay rate and is reflected on the mean velocity magnitude fields, which reinforce this observation at different sections in the cavity. Both RANS and LES simulations show close agreement with the experimentally measured OH concentration, however, the RANS approach does not perform satisfactorily in capturing the trend of velocity magnitude. LES simulations clearly capture the trend observed in exhaust measurements which is primarily attributed to the flame stabilization mechanism.

  7. Combustion instability of pilot flame in a pilot bluff body stabilized combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Xiao; Yang Fujiang; Guo Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability of pilot flame has been investigated in a model pilot bluff body stabilized combustor by running the pilot flame only. The primary objectives are to investigate the pilot flame dynamics and to provide bases for the study of the interaction mechanisms between the pilot flame and the main flame. Dynamic pressures are measured by dynamic pressure transduc-ers. A high speed camera with CH*bandpass filter is used to capture the pilot flame dynamics. The proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) is used to further analyze the high speed images. With the increase of the pilot fuel mass flow rate, the pilot flame changes from stable to unstable state grad-ually. The combustion instability frequency is 136 Hz when the pilot flame is unstable. Numerical simulation results show that the equivalence ratios in both the shear layer and the recirculation zone increase as the pilot fuel mass flow rate increases. The mechanism of the instability of the pilot flame can be attributed to the coupling between the second order acoustic mode and the unsteady heat release due to symmetric vortex shedding. These results illustrate that the pilot fuel mass flow rate has significant influences on the dynamic stability of the pilot flame.

  8. Characterization of kerosene distribution around the ignition cavity in a scramjet combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xipeng; Liu, Weidong; Pan, Yu; Yang, Leichao; An, Bin; Zhu, Jiajian

    2017-05-01

    Kerosene distribution before its ignition in a scramjet combustor with dual cavity was measured using kerosene-PLIF under transverse injection upstream of the cavity and different injection pressures. The simulated flight condition is Ma 5.5, and the isolator entrance has a Mach number of 2.52, a total pressure of 1.6 MPa and a stagnation temperature of 1486 K. Effects of injection pressure on fuel distribution characteristics were analyzed. The majority of kerosene is present in the cavity shear layer as well as its upper region. Kerosene extends gradually into the cavity, almost, at a constant angle. Large scale structures are evident on the windward side of kerosene. The cavity shear layer plays an important role in determining the kerosene distribution and its entrainment into the cavity. The middle part of cavity is the most suitable location for ignition as a result of a favorable local equivalent ratio. As the injection pressure increases, the penetration height gets higher with the rate of increase getting slower at higher injection pressure. Meanwhile, the portion of kerosene entrained into cavity through shear layer becomes smaller as injection pressure increases. However, the kerosene entrained into cavity still increase due to the increased mass flow rate of kerosene.

  9. Effects of injection pressure variation on mixing in a cold supersonic combustor with kerosene fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Lai; Zhu, Lin; Qi, Yin-Yin; Ge, Jia-Ru; Luo, Feng; Zou, Hao-Ran; Wei, Min; Jen, Tien-Chien

    2017-10-01

    Spray jet in cold kerosene-fueled supersonic flow has been characterized under different injection pressures to assess the effects of the pressure variation on the mixing between incident shock wave and transverse cavity injection. Based on the real scramjet combustor, a detailed computational fluid dynamics model is developed. The injection pressures are specified as 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 and 4.0 MPa, respectively, with the other constant operation parameters (such as the injection diameter, angle and velocity). A three dimensional Couple Level Set & Volume of Fluids approach incorporating an improved Kelvin-Helmholtz & Rayleigh-Taylor model is used to investigate the interaction between kerosene and supersonic air. The numerical simulations primarily concentrate on penetration depth, span expansion area, angle of shock wave and sauter mean diameter distribution of the kerosene droplets with/without evaporation. Validation has been implemented by comparing the calculated against the measured in literature with good qualitative agreement. Results show that the penetration depth, span-wise angle and expansion area of the transverse cavity jet are all increased with the injection pressure. However, when the injection pressure is further increased, the value in either penetration depth or expansion area increases appreciably. This study demonstrates the feasibility and effectiveness of the combination of Couple Level Set & Volume of Fluids approach and an improved Kelvin-Helmholtz & Rayleigh-Taylor model, in turn providing insights into scramjet design improvement.

  10. Measurements on NASA Langley Durable Combustor Rig by TDLAT: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busa, Kristin; Ellison, Erik N.; McGovern, Brian J.; McDaniel, James C.; Diskin, Glenn S.; DePiro, Maxwell J.; Capriotti, Diego P.; Gaffney, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the internal structure of high-enthalpy flows can provide valuable insight to the performance of scramjet combustors. Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) is often employed to measure temperature and species concentration. However, TDLAS is a path-integrated line-of-sight (LOS) measurement, and thus does not produce spatially resolved distributions. Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Tomography (TDLAT) is a non-intrusive measurement technique for determining two-dimensional spatially resolved distributions of temperature and species concentration in high enthalpy flows. TDLAT combines TDLAS with tomographic image reconstruction. Several separate line-of-sight TDLAS measurements are analyzed in order to produce highly resolved temperature and species concentration distributions. Measurements have been collected at the University of Virginia's Supersonic Combustion Facility (UVaSCF) as well as at the NASA Langley Direct-Connect Supersonic Combustion Test Facility (DCSCTF). Measurements collected at the DCSCTF required significant modifications to system hardware and software designs due to its larger measurement area and shorter test duration. Initial LOS measurements from the NASA Langley DCSCTF operating at an equivalence ratio of 0.5 are presented. Results show the capability of TDLAT to adapt to several experimental setups and test parameters.

  11. OH PLIF Visualization of a Premixed Ethylene-fueled Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, Luca M. L.; Gallo, Emanuela C. A.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Danehy, Paul M.; Johansen, Craig T.; Rockwell, Robert D.; Goyne, Christopher P.; McDaniel, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical (OH) planar induced laser fluorescence (PLIF) measurements have been performed in a small-scale scramjet combustor at the University of Virginia Aerospace Research Laboratory at nominal simulated Mach 5 enthalpy. OH lines were carefully chosen to have fluorescent signal that is independent of pressure and temperature but linear with mole fraction. The OH PLIF signal was imaged in planes orthogonal to and parallel to the freestream flow at different equivalence ratios. Flameout limits were tested and identified. Instantaneous planar images were recorded and analyzed to compare the results with width increased dual-pump enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (WIDECARS) measurements in the same facility and large eddy simulation/Reynolds average Navier-Stokes (LES/RANS) numerical simulation. The flame angle was found to be approximately 10 degrees for several different conditions, which is in agreement with numerical predictions and measurements using WIDECARS. Finally, a comparison between NO PLIF non-combustion cases and OH PLIF combustion cases is provided: the comparison reveals that the dominant effect of flame propagation is freestream turbulence rather than heat release and concentration gradients.

  12. Combustion instability of pilot flame in a pilot bluff body stabilized combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Xiao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Combustion instability of pilot flame has been investigated in a model pilot bluff body stabilized combustor by running the pilot flame only. The primary objectives are to investigate the pilot flame dynamics and to provide bases for the study of the interaction mechanisms between the pilot flame and the main flame. Dynamic pressures are measured by dynamic pressure transducers. A high speed camera with CH∗ bandpass filter is used to capture the pilot flame dynamics. The proper orthogonal decomposition (POD is used to further analyze the high speed images. With the increase of the pilot fuel mass flow rate, the pilot flame changes from stable to unstable state gradually. The combustion instability frequency is 136 Hz when the pilot flame is unstable. Numerical simulation results show that the equivalence ratios in both the shear layer and the recirculation zone increase as the pilot fuel mass flow rate increases. The mechanism of the instability of the pilot flame can be attributed to the coupling between the second order acoustic mode and the unsteady heat release due to symmetric vortex shedding. These results illustrate that the pilot fuel mass flow rate has significant influences on the dynamic stability of the pilot flame.

  13. Numerical Analysis of Turbulent Combustion in a Model Swirl Gas Turbine Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Cemal Benim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbulent reacting flows in a generic swirl gas turbine combustor are investigated numerically. Turbulence is modelled by a URANS formulation in combination with the SST turbulence model, as the basic modelling approach. For comparison, URANS is applied also in combination with the RSM turbulence model to one of the investigated cases. For this case, LES is also used for turbulence modelling. For modelling turbulence-chemistry interaction, a laminar flamelet model is used, which is based on the mixture fraction and the reaction progress variable. This model is implemented in the open source CFD code OpenFOAM, which has been used as the basis for the present investigation. For validation purposes, predictions are compared with the measurements for a natural gas flame with external flue gas recirculation. A good agreement with the experimental data is observed. Subsequently, the numerical study is extended to syngas, for comparing its combustion behavior with that of natural gas. Here, the analysis is carried out for cases without external flue gas recirculation. The computational model is observed to provide a fair prediction of the experimental data and predict the increased flashback propensity of syngas.

  14. Evaluation by Rocket Combustor of C/C Composite Cooled Structure Using Metallic Cooling Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takegoshi, Masao; Ono, Fumiei; Ueda, Shuichi; Saito, Toshihito; Hayasaka, Osamu

    In this study, the cooling performance of a C/C composite material structure with metallic cooling tubes fixed by elastic force without chemical bonding was evaluated experimentally using combustion gas in a rocket combustor. The C/C composite chamber was covered by a stainless steel outer shell to maintain its airtightness. Gaseous hydrogen as a fuel and gaseous oxygen as an oxidizer were used for the heating test. The surface of these C/C composites was maintained below 1500 K when the combustion gas temperature was about 2800 K and the heat flux to the combustion chamber wall was about 9 MW/m2. No thermal damage was observed on the stainless steel tubes that were in contact with the C/C composite materials. The results of the heating test showed that such a metallic tube-cooled C/C composite structure is able to control the surface temperature as a cooling structure (also as a heat exchanger) as well as indicated the possibility of reducing the amount of coolant even if the thermal load to the engine is high. Thus, application of this metallic tube-cooled C/C composite structure to reusable engines such as a rocket-ramjet combined-cycle engine is expected.

  15. Development of pressurized coal partial combustor; Kaatsu sekitan bubun nenshoro gijutsu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T. [Center for Coal Utilization, Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Kawamura, K. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan); Tanaka, T. [Chubu Electric Power Co. Inc., Nagoya (Japan); Muramatsu, T. [Electric Power Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-09-01

    The coal partial combustor (CPC) uses a combustion technology with which coal is burned at elevated temperatures and under revolution, the constituents are captured on the furnace wall and removed as molten slag from the furnace. This is a combustion technology to reduce load of ash on subsequent devices. To generate a molten condition, it is necessary to raise the combustion temperature as high as possible (to about 1600 degC in the furnace), but this is effective for a gas turbine composite power generation system. An efficiency of higher than 45% may be expected at the power transmission terminal. As an operation on subsidy from the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy, the normal-pressure CPC technology has already been established, and a research on pressurized CPC is being progressed since fiscal 1991. The research is in progress with a schedule that elemental tests for 7 tons per day production are conducted until fiscal 1995, a 25 tons per day pilot plant will be completed by November 1997, and verification tests for long-term continuous operation will be implemented until 1998. The 7 tons per day elemental tests have identified gasification performance and slag extraction performance using five types of coal having different properties. 7 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Experimental study of the effects of flameholder geometry on emissions and performance of lean premixed combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffe, G.; Venkataramani, K. S.; Duerr, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    Emissions of NOx, CO and unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) are reported for a lean premixed propane-air system at inlet conditions of 800K and 1 MPa using twelve flameholder designs. The flameholders tested represent six design concepts with two values of blockage for each concept. Data were obtained at reference velocities of 35 m/s, 25 m/s and 20 m/s at combustor stations 10 cm and 30 cm downstream of the flameholders. Flameholder pressure drop was found to be a principal determinant of emissions performance. Designs producing larger pressure drops also produced less NOx, CO and UHC emissions. The lean stability limit equivalence ratio was found to be approximately 0.35 for all designs. Flashback velocities (axial components in the flameholder passages) varied between 30 m/s and 40 m/s. A perforated plate flameholder was operated with a velocity as low as 23 m/s through the perforations at equivalence ratio 0.7 without producing flashback.

  17. LES Investigation of Core Noise Mechanisms inside a Combustor-Nozzle System

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Jeffrey; Bake, Friedrich; Kim, Jeonglae; Ihme, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the work is to expand knowledge of core noise physics through the study of a representative aviation-type combustor with converging-diverging nozzle attached to the exhaust. First, a fully compressible LES of the entire flowpath is performed and validated against experimental measurements. From this calculation, the time history of the flow is sampled in a plane near the nozzle entrance to construct a library of representative fluctuations that are potential precursors to the direct & indirect noise observed at the nozzle outlet. This data is then used as an inflow for a series of separate nozzle simulations in which fluctuations in pressure, temperature ("hot spots"), and mixture composition are imposed separately to isolate their effect on the emitted noise. This methodology allows quantitative investigation of core-noise physics that lower-order models do not, including: the effect of non-linearity of high-amplitude perturbations, superposition of forcing types, the impact of the spatial structure of the perturbations, and the restriction to low-frequency perturbations and calorically perfect gas assumption. The calculations also represent the first time variations in mixture composition have been shown to induce downstream noise in a high-fidelity, 3D simulation.

  18. Commercial and Institutional Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Fruergaard, Thilde

    2011-01-01

    is handled in the municipal waste system, where information is easily accessible. An important part of commercial and institutional waste is packaging waste, and enterprises with large quantities of clean paper, cardboard and plastic waste may have their own facilities for baling and storing their waste......Commercial and institutional waste is primarily from retail (stores), hotels, restaurants, health care (except health risk waste), banks, insurance companies, education, retirement homes, public services and transport. Within some of these sectors, e.g. retail and restaurants, large variations...... are found in terms of which products and services are offered. Available data on unit generation rates and material composition as well as determining factors are discussed in this chapter. The characterizing of commercial and institutional waste is faced with the problem that often only a part of the waste...

  19. EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES ON SWIRLING ANDRECIRCULATING TWO-PHASE FLOW FIELD IN A COLD MODEL OF DUAL-INLET SUDDEN-EXPANSION COMBUSTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The dual-inlet liquid-spray-fuelled sudden-expansion combustors are frequently adopted in ramjet engines. The original combustors with swirlers in the inlet tubes frequently suffer from poor ignition, low flame stabilization and poor combustion performance due to insufficient sizes of recirculation zones in the head part of the combustor. There are only very small recirculation zones behind the swirlers. To improve the performance of the combustors, a new configuration is proposed by the authors, in which a small central tube instead of the original swirler is mounted in the inlet tube of the combustor with a tangential angle for creating swirling flows and enlarging the recirculation zones. So, it is expected to know the gas-droplet flow behavior after mounting the central tube. The turbulent swirling and recirculating gas-droplet flows in a dual-inlet sudden-expansion combustor are very complex. In the head part of the combustor there are recirculating flows. In the whole combustor there are swirling flows with a Rankine-vortex structure (solid-body rotation plus free vortex) of tangential velocity profiles. There should be obvious velocity slip between the gas and droplet phases due to the differences in inertia and centrifugal forces. The recirculating and swirling gas-particle flows were previously measured using LDV or PDPA[1~3]. In this paper the experimental studies on two-phase flows were carried out in a cold model of the combustor, and the motion of solid particles is used to simulate that of liquid droplets. The gas and particle (simulating the droplets) velocities were measured using a 2-D LDV system and the particle (simulating the droplet) concentration distribution is measured using a laser optic fiber system and a sampling probe. The purpose of this experimental study is not to simulate the real combustion regime, but to understand the features of the improved two-phase flow field using a central tube in the inlet tube and to provide the data

  20. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 2, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous materials at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

  1. Introduction to Waste Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Solid waste management as introduced in Chapter 1.1 builds in many ways on engineering. Waste engineering here means the skills and ability to understand quantitatively how a waste management system works in such a detail that waste management can be planned, facilities can be designed and sited......) regional plans for waste management, including (3) the selection of main management technologies and siting of facilities, (4) the design of individual technological units and, for example, (5) the operation of recycling schemes within a municipality. This chapter gives an introduction to waste engineering...

  2. Construction and Demolition Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Andersen, L.

    2011-01-01

    Construction and demolition waste (C&D waste) is the waste generated during the building, repair, remodeling or removal of constructions. The constructions can be roads, residential housing and nonresidential buildings. C&D waste has traditionally been considered without any environmental problems...... and has just been landfilled. However, in recent years more focus has been put on C&D waste and data are starting to appear. One reason is that it has been recognized that C&D waste may include many materials that are contaminated either as part of their original design or through their use and therefore...

  3. Investigation of novel incineration technology for hospital waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangsheng; Ma, Lanlan; Liu, Yushan; Kong, Guoxing

    2006-10-15

    Conventional incineration systems for hospital waste (HW) emit large amounts of particulate matter (PM) and heavy metals, as well as dioxins, due to the large excess air ratio. Additionally, the final process residues--bottom and fly ashes containing high levels of heavy metals and dioxins--also constitute a serious environmental problem. These issues faced by HW incineration processes are very similar to those confronted by conventional municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerators. In our previous work, we developed a novel technology integrating drying, pyrolysis, gasification, combustion, and ash vitrification (DPGCV) in one step, which successfully solved these issues in MSW incineration. In this study, many experiments are carried out to investigate the feasibility of employing the DPGCV technology to solve the issues faced by HW incineration processes, although there was no MSW incinerator used as a HW incinerator till now. Experiments were conducted in an industrial HW incineration plant with a capacity of 24 tons per day (TPD), located in Zhenzhou, Henan Province. Results illustrated that this DPGCV technology successfully solved these issues as confronted by the conventional HW incinerators and achieved the expected results for HW incineration as it did for MSW incineration. The outstanding performance of this DPGCV technology is due to the fact that the primary chamber acted as both gasifier for organic matter and vitrifying reactor for ashes, and the secondary chamber acted as a gas combustor.

  4. Business unusual - Waste Act implementation: solid waste

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oelofse, Suzanna HH

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The preamble to the Waste Act (2008) is very clear that, as a result of this legislation, waste management in South Africa will never be the same again. This should send a clear message that ‘business as usual’ will no longer be sufficient....

  5. Solid waste handling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parazin, R.J.

    1995-05-31

    This study presents estimates of the solid radioactive waste quantities that will be generated in the Separations, Low-Level Waste Vitrification and High-Level Waste Vitrification facilities, collectively called the Tank Waste Remediation System Treatment Complex, over the life of these facilities. This study then considers previous estimates from other 200 Area generators and compares alternative methods of handling (segregation, packaging, assaying, shipping, etc.).

  6. Biohazardous waste management plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Todd W.

    2004-01-01

    This plan describes the process for managing non-medical biohazardous waste at Sandia National Laboratories California. It applies to operations at the Chemical and Radiation Detection Laboratory (CRDL), Building 968, and other biosafety level 1 or 2 activities at the site. It addresses the accumulation, storage, treatment and disposal of biohazardous waste and sharps waste. It also describes the procedures to comply with regulatory requirements and SNL policies applicable to non-medical biohazardous waste.

  7. Medical waste management plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Todd W.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.

    2004-12-01

    This plan describes the process for managing research generated medical waste at Sandia National Laboratories/California. It applies to operations at the Chemical and Radiation Detection Laboratory (CRDL), Building 968, and other biosafety level 1 or 2 activities at the site. It addresses the accumulation, storage, treatment and disposal of medical waste and sharps waste. It also describes the procedures to comply with regulatory requirements and SNL policies applicable to medical waste.

  8. Operation and maintenance experiences of DLN combustors for heavy duty gas turbines GE MS9001E (type DLN1) and FIAT 701D (type k point)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrighi, L.; Tirone, G.; Napoli, V.; Errico, R.; Ippolito, V.

    1998-07-01

    In ENEL at the moment (first half 1998) three 701D FIAT and six MS9001E GE/Nuovo Pignone gas turbines are in operation with DLN combustors; additional four 701D with DLN are in erection stage. The paper contains the operation and maintenance experience after some service years. The result of the combustion inspection of one 701D unit after four years of peak load operation and of two 701D units after two years of base load operation are included; the DLN combustors are ``K-point'' type. The paper contains also the results of the combustion inspection of two MS9001E units after three years of base load operation; the DLN combustors are type ``1''. Encountered problems and adopted repair actions are also included.

  9. Incineration of kitchen waste with high nitrogen in vortexing fluidized-bed incinerator and its NO emission characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Feng; Chyang, Chiensong; Wen, Jiaruei; Tso, Jim

    2013-09-01

    Some municipal solid waste (MSW) can be used as the fuel. Combustion of MSW with high nitrogen content is successfully conducted in a lab-scale vortexing fluidized-bed incinerator (VFBI). Pigskin with 16.5 wt.% nitrogen content was used to simulate the high nitrogen content kitchen waste, and silica sand was used as the bed material. The effects of operating conditions, such as the bed temperature, freeboard temperature, excess oxygen ratio, and static bed height on the CO and NO concentrations at the exit of combustor and cyclone were investigated. The experimental results show that the freeboard temperature is the most important factor for CO emission. The order of operating conditions impact on the NO emission is: (1) excess oxygen ratio; (2) bed temperature; (3) freeboard temperature; and (4) static bed height. Utilizing cyclone can significantly reduce the CO emission concentration when the CO concentration released from the freeboard is higher than 50 ppm. On the other hand, the cyclone has no significant effect on the NO emission. Despite having high nitrogen content, a low conversion from fuel-N to NO was attained. Compared with other types of combustors, VFBI reduces the CO and NO emission concentrations much better when burning MSW with high nitrogen content.

  10. Incineration of kitchen waste with high nitrogen in vortexing fluidized-bed incinerator and its NO emission characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Duan; Chiensong Chyang; Jiaruei Wen; Jim Tso

    2013-01-01

    Some municipal solid waste (MSW) can be used as the fuel.Combustion of MSW with high nitrogen content is successfully conducted in a lab-scale vortexing fluidized-bed incinerator (VFBI).Pigskin with 16.5 wt.% nitrogen content was used to simulate the high nitrogen content kitchen waste,and silica sand was used as the bed material.The effects of operating conditions,such as the bed temperature,freeboard temperature,excess oxygen ratio,and static bed height on the CO and NO concentrations at the exit of combustor and cyclone were investigated.The experimental results show that the freeboard temperature is the most important factor for CO emission.The order of operating conditions impact on the NO emission is:(1) excess oxygen ratio; (2) bed temperature; (3)freeboard temperature; and (4) static bed height.Utilizing cyclone can significantly reduce the CO emission concentration when the CO concentration released from the freeboard is higher than 50 ppm.On the other hand,the cyclone has no significant effect on the NO emission.Despite having high nitrogen content,a low conversion from fuel-N to NO was attained.Compared with other types of combustors,VFBI reduces the CO and NO emission concentrations much better when burning MSW with high nitrogen content.

  11. Mixing enhancement in a scramjet combustor using fuel jet injection swirl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesberg, Sonja M.

    The scramjet engine has proven to be a viable means of powering a hypersonic vehicle, especially after successful flights of the X-51 WaveRider and various Hy-SHOT test vehicles. The major challenge associated with operating a scramjet engine is the short residence time of the fuel and oxidizer in the combustor. The fuel and oxidizer have only milliseconds to mix, ignite and combust in the combustion chamber. Combustion cannot occur until the fuel and oxidizer are mixed on a molecular level. Therefore the improvement of mixing is of utmost interest since this can increase combustion efficiency. This study investigated mixing enhancement of fuel and oxidizer within the combustion chamber of a scramjet by introducing swirl to the fuel jet. The investigation was accomplished with numerical simulations using STAR-CCM+ computational fluid dynamic software. The geometry of the University of Virginia Supersonic Combustion Facility was used to model the isolator, combustor and nozzle of a scramjet engine for simulation purposes. Experimental data from previous research at the facility was used to verify the simulation model before investigating the effect of fuel jet swirl on mixing. The model used coaxial fuel jet with a swirling annular jet. Single coaxial fuel jet and dual coaxial fuel jet configurations were simulated for the investigation. The coaxial fuel jets were modelled with a swirling annular jet and non-swirling core jet. Numerical analysis showed that fuel jet swirl not only increased mixing and entrainment of the fuel with the oxidizer but the mixing occurred further upstream than without fuel jet swirl. The burning efficiency was calculated for the all the configurations. An increase in burning efficiency indicated an increase in the mixing of H2 with O2. In the case of the single fuel jet models, the maximum burning efficiency increase due to fuel injection jet swirl was 23.3%. The research also investigated the possibility that interaction between two

  12. Household food waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahlen, S.; Winkel, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Food waste is debated not only in the light of sustainable consumption in research and policy, but also in the broader public. This article focuses on food waste in household contexts, what is widely believed the end of the food chain. However, household food waste is far more complex and intricate

  13. Radioactive Wastes. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Charles H.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This booklet deals with the handling, processing and disposal of radioactive wastes. Among the topics discussed are: The Nature of Radioactive Wastes; Waste Management; and Research and Development. There are…

  14. Look into Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undy, Harry, Ed.

    This booklet is designed to help British teachers introduce concepts of waste to secondary school students. The document focuses on various types of waste and pollution--air, land, water, and industrial--and suggests activities to help students understand and combat waste of natural and human resources. It is presented in 11 chapters. Six chapters…

  15. Waste disposal package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M.J.

    1985-06-19

    This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

  16. Informative document waste plastics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelhout D; Sein AA; Duvoort GL

    1989-01-01

    This "Informative document waste plastics" forms part of a series of "informative documents waste materials". These documents are conducted by RIVM on the indstruction of the Directorate General for the Environment, Waste Materials Directorate, in behalf of the program of acti

  17. Nuclear wastes; Dechets nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    Here is made a general survey of the situation relative to radioactive wastes. The different kinds of radioactive wastes and the different way to store them are detailed. A comparative evaluation of the situation in France and in the world is made. The case of transport of radioactive wastes is tackled. (N.C.)

  18. Waste vs Resource Management

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oelofse, Suzanna HH

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent global waste statistics show that in the order of 70% of all municipal waste generated worldwide is disposed at landfill, 11% is treated in thermal and Waste-to-Energy (WtE) facilities and the rest (19%) is recycled or treated by mechanical...

  19. On the Role of Chemical Kinetics Modeling in the LES of Premixed Bluff Body and Backward-Facing Step Combustors

    KAUST Repository

    Chakroun, Nadim W.

    2017-01-05

    Recirculating flows in the wake of a bluff body, behind a sudden expansion or down-stream of a swirler, are pivotal for anchoring a flame and expanding the stability range. The size and structure of these recirculation zones and the accurate prediction of the length of these zones is a very important characteristic that computational simulations should have. Large eddy simulation (LES) techniques with an appropriate combustion model and reaction mechanism afford a balance between computational complexity and predictive accuracy. In this study, propane/air mixtures were simulated in a bluff-body stabilized combustor based on the Volvo test case and also in a backward-facing step combustor. The main goal is to investigate the role of the chemical mechanism and the accuracy of estimating the extinction strain rate on the prediction of important ow features such as recirculation zones. Two 2-step mechanisms were employed, one which gave reasonable extinction strain rates and another modi ed 2-step mechanism where it grossly over-predicted the values. This modified mechanism under-predicted recirculation zone lengths compared to the original mechanism and had worse agreement with experiments in both geometries. While the recirculation zone lengths predicted by both reduced mechanisms in the step combustor scale linearly with the extinction strain rate, the scaling curves do not match experimental results as none of the simpli ed mechanisms produce extinction strain rates that are consistent with those predicted by the comprehensive mechanisms. We conclude that it is very important that a chemical mechanism is able to correctly predict extinction strain rates if it is to be used in CFD simulations.

  20. Radiative heat transfer in strongly forward scattering media of circulating fluidized bed combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Cihan; Ozen, Guzide; Selçuk, Nevin; Kulah, Gorkem

    2016-10-01

    Investigation of the effect of particle scattering on radiative incident heat fluxes and source terms is carried out in the dilute zone of the lignite-fired 150 kWt Middle East Technical University Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor (METU CFBC) test rig. The dilute zone is treated as an axisymmetric cylindrical enclosure containing grey/non-grey, absorbing, emitting gas with absorbing, emitting non/isotropically/anisotropically scattering particles surrounded by grey diffuse walls. A two-dimensional axisymmetric radiation model based on Method of Lines (MOL) solution of Discrete Ordinates Method (DOM) coupled with Grey Gas (GG)/Spectral Line-Based Weighted Sum of Grey Gases Model (SLW) and Mie theory/geometric optics approximation (GOA) is extended for incorporation of anisotropic scattering by using normalized Henyey-Greenstein (HG)/transport approximation for the phase function. Input data for the radiation model is obtained from predictions of a comprehensive model previously developed and benchmarked against measurements on the same CFBC burning low calorific value indigenous lignite with high volatile matter/fixed carbon (VM/FC) ratio in its own ash. Predictive accuracy and computational efficiency of nonscattering, isotropic scattering and forward scattering with transport approximation are tested by comparing their predictions with those of forward scattering with HG. GG and GOA based on reflectivity with angular dependency are found to be accurate and CPU efficient. Comparisons reveal that isotropic assumption leads to under-prediction of both incident heat fluxes and source terms for which discrepancy is much larger. On the other hand, predictions obtained by neglecting scattering were found to be in favorable agreement with those of forward scattering at significantly less CPU time. Transport approximation is as accurate and CPU efficient as HG. These findings indicate that negligence of scattering is a more practical choice in solution of the radiative