WorldWideScience

Sample records for waste combustion impact

  1. The impact of municipal waste combustion in small heat sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vantúch, Martin; Kaduchová, Katarína; Lenhard, Richard

    2016-06-01

    At present there is a tendency to make greater use for heating houses for burning solid fuel, such as pieces of wood, coal, coke, local sources of heat to burn natural gas. This tendency is given both the high price of natural gas as well as the availability of cheaper solid fuel. In many cases, in the context saving heating costs, respectively in the context of the disposal of waste is co-incinerated with municipal solid fuels and wastes of different composition. This co entails increased production emissions such as CO (carbon monoxide), NOx (nitrogen oxides), particulate matter (particulate matter), PM10, HCl (hydrogen chloride), PCDD/F (polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans), PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) and others. The experiment was focused on the emission factors from the combustion of fossil fuels in combination with municipal waste in conventional boilers designed to burn solid fuel.

  2. Import of combustible waste and its impact on emissions of climate gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haraldsson, Maarten; Sundberg, Johan (Profu, Moelndal (Sweden))

    2010-07-01

    Import of combustible waste for waste incineration in Sweden has increased over the last decade and prognosis show that importation will increase even further in the future. The reason for the projected increase is that many new incineration facilities are being built and several of those plan to use a portion of imported combustible waste as fuel. From an environmental perspective import of waste is controversial and some argue that the import short be restricted. Because of this controversial aspect it is essential to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the environmental impacts of the importation of combustible waste to Swedish incineration facilities. This project is a study of the impact of the import of combustible waste on climate emissions. This is a system analysis study which included both direct as well as indirect emissions from the activity of importation of combustible waste. Direct emissions occur from the incineration of waste while indirect emissions occur in systems that interact with the incineration facility. These systems are: transport of waste, alternative waste treatment, alternative electricity production and alternative heat production in the district heating system which the incineration facility is connected with. From the perspective of a system analysis the import of combustible waste to incineration leads to the following consequences regarding emissions of climate gases: - The imported waste is used as fuel in the incineration facility which generates heat and electricity. During the combustion process climate gases are being emitted - As the combustible waste is being imported it has to be transported from the country of origin to the incineration facility. The vehicle used for the transport is emitting climate gases - By importing combustible waste an alternative treatment method in the country of origin is avoided by that country. Emissions from the alternative treatment method are thereby avoided - Import of combustible waste

  3. Advancing grate-firing for greater environmental impacts and efficiency for decentralized biomass/wastes combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Li, Shuangshuang

    2017-01-01

    to well suit decentralized biomass and municipal/industrial wastes combustion. This paper discusses with concrete examples how to advance grate-firing for greater efficiency and environmental impacts, e.g., use of advanced secondary air system, flue gas recycling and optimized grate assembly, which...

  4. Issues in waste combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsson, Lennart; Robertson, Kerstin; Tullin, Claes [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden); Sundquist, Lena; Wrangensten, Lars [AaF-Energikonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Blom, Elisabet [AaF-Processdesign AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-05-01

    The main purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art on research and development issues related to waste combustion with relevance for Swedish conditions. The review focuses on co-combustion in grate and fluidised bed furnaces. It is primarily literature searches in relevant databases of scientific publications with to material published after 1995. As a complement, findings published in different report series, have also been included. Since the area covered by this report is very wide, we do not claim to cover the issues included completely and it has not been possitile to evaluate the referred studies in depth. Basic knowledge about combustion issues is not included since such information can be found elsewhere in the literature. Rather, this review should be viewed as an overview of research and development in the waste-to-energy area and as such we hope that it will inspire scientists and others to further work in relevant areas.

  5. Impact of fluidized bed combustion waste on metal content of crops and soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mays, D.A.; Giordano, P.M.; Behel, A.D. Jr. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Muscle Shoals, AL (USA). Agricultural Research Dept.)

    1991-08-01

    The fluidized bed combustion process for removing SO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plant stack gases results in generation of large tonnages of waste requiring environmentally acceptable storage or disposal. A field study was initiated in fall 1985 to determine limits of fluidized bed combustion wasted (FBCW) applications to agronomic crops without causing significant yield reduction or accumulation of heavy metals in plants or the soil. Rates of FBCW ranging from 22 to 560 t ha{sup -1} were incorporated in soil by plowing down single and split applications. Conventional agricultural lime treatments were included for comparison. Tall fescue ({ital Festuca arundinacea}), alfalfa ({ital Medicago sativa L.}), corn ({ital Zea mays L.}), and soybeans ({ital Glycine max. L.}) were grown from 1986-88. Annual applications of 22 t ha{sup -1} did not affect yield or metal uptake of any test crop. A single 112 t ha{sup -1} application had no adverse effect, but repeated applications of that rate lowered corn and soybean yields. The rate of 560 t ha{sup -1} resulted in depressed or eliminated growth of all crops. A high pH and high concentrations of Ca and S were associated with this rate but heavy metals and B concentrations in soil and plant tissue were not significantly affected. 7 refs., 12 tabs.

  6. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  7. 30 CFR 56.4104 - Combustible waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Combustible waste. 56.4104 Section 56.4104... Control Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 56.4104 Combustible waste. (a) Waste materials, including... properly, waste or rags containing flammable or combustible liquids that could create a fire hazard shall...

  8. Gaseous emissions from waste combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werther, Joachim

    2007-06-18

    An overview is given on methods and technologies for limiting the gaseous emissions from waste combustion. With the guideline 2000/76/EC recent European legislation has set stringent limits not only for the mono-combustion of waste in specialized incineration plants but also for co-combustion in coal-fired power plants. With increased awareness of environmental issues and stepwise decrease of emission limits and inclusion of more and more substances into the network of regulations a multitude of emission abatement methods and technologies have been developed over the last decades. The result is the state-of-the-art waste incinerator with a number of specialized process steps for the individual components in the flue gas. The present work highlights some new developments which can be summarized under the common goal of reducing the costs of flue gas treatment by applying systems which combine the treatment of several noxious substances in one reactor or by taking new, simpler routes instead of the previously used complicated ones or - in the case of flue gas desulphurisation - by reducing the amount of limestone consumption. Cost reduction is also the driving force for new processes of conditioning of nonhomogenous waste before combustion. Pyrolysis or gasification is used for chemical conditioning whereas physical conditioning means comminution, classification and sorting processes. Conditioning yields a fuel which can be used in power plants either as a co-fuel or a mono-fuel and which will burn there under much better controlled conditions and therefore with less emissions than the nonhomogeneous waste in a conventional waste incinerator. Also for cost reasons, co-combustion of wastes in coal-fired power stations is strongly pressing into the market. Recent investigations reveal that the co-firing of waste can also have beneficial effects on the operating behavior of the boiler and on the gaseous emissions.

  9. 30 CFR 57.4104 - Combustible waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Combustible waste. 57.4104 Section 57.4104... Control Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 57.4104 Combustible waste. (a) Waste materials, including liquids, shall not accumulate in quantities that could create a fire hazard. (b) Waste or rags containing...

  10. Environmental optimisation of waste combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, Robert [AaF Energikonsult, Stockholm (Sweden); Berge, Niclas; Stroemberg, Birgitta [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2000-12-01

    The regulations concerning waste combustion evolve through R and D and a strive to get better and common regulations for the European countries. This study discusses if these rules of today concerning oxygen concentration, minimum temperature and residence time in the furnace and the use of stand-by burners are needed, are possible to monitor, are the optimum from an environmental point of view or could be improved. No evidence from well controlled laboratory experiments validate that 850 deg C in 6 % oxygen content in general is the best lower limit. A lower excess air level increase the temperature, which has a significant effect on the destruction of hydrocarbons, favourably increases the residence time, increases the thermal efficiency and the efficiency of the precipitators. Low oxygen content is also necessary to achieve low NO{sub x}-emissions. The conclusion is that the demands on the accuracy of the measurement devices and methods are too high, if they are to be used inside the furnace to control the combustion process. The big problem is however to find representative locations to measure temperature, oxygen content and residence time in the furnace. Another major problem is that the monitoring of the operation conditions today do not secure a good combustion. It can lead to a false security. The reason is that it is very hard to find boilers without stratifications. These stratifications (stream lines) has each a different history of residence time, mixing time, oxygen and combustible gas levels and temperature, when they reach the convection area. The combustion result is the sum of all these different histories. The hydrocarbons emission is in general not produced at a steady level. Small clouds of unburnt hydrocarbons travels along the stream lines showing up as peaks on a THC measurement device. High amplitude peaks has a tendency to contain higher ratio of heavy hydrocarbons than lower peaks. The good correlation between some easily detected

  11. IMPROVED COMBUSTION PROCESSES IN MEDICAL WASTES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IMPROVED COMBUSTION PROCESSES IN MEDICAL WASTES INCINERATORS FOR RURAL APPLICATIONS. ... African Journal of Science and Technology ... In particular, the demand for health services has increased to an extent that the health sector produces large quantities of biomedical wastes that can have severe ...

  12. Coal Combustion Wastes Reuse in Low Energy Artificial Aggregates Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Raffaele Cioffi; Barbara Liguori; Fabio Iucolano; Francesco Colangelo; Francesco Messina; Claudio Ferone

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable building material design relies mostly on energy saving processes, decrease of raw materials consumption, and increase of waste and by-products recycling. Natural and lightweight artificial aggregates production implies relevant environmental impact. This paper addresses both the issues of residues recycling and energy optimization. Particularly, three coal combustion wastes (Weathered Fly Ash, WFA; Wastewater Treatment Sludge, WTS; Desulfurization Device Sludge, DDS) supplied by ...

  13. IMPROVED COMBUSTION PROCESSES IN MEDICAL WASTES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In particular, the demand for health services has increased to an extent that the health sector produces large quantities of biomedical wastes that can have severe impact on the environment if not properly disposed. Although incineration is not a clean process of disposing these wastes, it is still a preferred method especially ...

  14. Combustion of char from plastic wastes pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saptoadi, Harwin; Rohmat, Tri Agung; Sutoyo

    2016-06-01

    A popular method to recycle plastic wastes is pyrolysis, where oil, gas and char can be produced. These products can be utilized as fuels because they are basically hydrocarbons. The research investigates char properties, including their performance as fuel briquettes. There are 13 char samples from PE (Polyethylene) pyrolyzed at temperatures of around 450 °C, with and without a catalyst. Some of the samples were obtained from PE mixed with other types, such as Polystyrene (PS), Polypropylene (PP), Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET), and Others. Char properties, such as moisture, ash, volatile matter, and fixed carbon contents, are revealed from the proximate analysis, whereas calorific values were measured with a bomb calorimeter. Briquettes are made by mixing 4 g of char with 0.5 - 1 g binder. Briquettes are hollow cylinders with an outer and inner diameter of around 1.75 cm and 0.25 cm, respectively. Combustion is carried out in a furnace with wall temperatures of about 230°C and a constant air velocity of 0.7 m/s. Five out of 13 char briquettes are not feasible because they melt during combustion. Briquettes made from 100% PE wastes burn in substantially shorter duration than those from mixed plastic wastes. Char #1 and #5 are excellent due to their highest energy release, whereas #10 show the worst performance.

  15. Coal Combustion Wastes Reuse in Low Energy Artificial Aggregates Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferone, Claudio; Colangelo, Francesco; Messina, Francesco; Iucolano, Fabio; Liguori, Barbara; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2013-10-31

    Sustainable building material design relies mostly on energy saving processes, decrease of raw materials consumption, and increase of waste and by-products recycling. Natural and lightweight artificial aggregates production implies relevant environmental impact. This paper addresses both the issues of residues recycling and energy optimization. Particularly, three coal combustion wastes (Weathered Fly Ash, WFA; Wastewater Treatment Sludge, WTS; Desulfurization Device Sludge, DDS) supplied by the Italian electric utility company (ENEL) have been employed in the manufacture of cold bonded artificial aggregates. Previously, the residues have been characterized in terms of chemical and mineralogical compositions, water content, particle size distribution, and heavy metal release behavior. These wastes have been used in the mix design of binding systems with the only addition of lime. Finally, the artificial aggregates have been submitted to physical, mechanical, and leaching testing, revealing that they are potentially suitable for many civil engineering applications.

  16. Coal Combustion Wastes Reuse in Low Energy Artificial Aggregates Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferone, Claudio; Colangelo, Francesco; Messina, Francesco; Iucolano, Fabio; Liguori, Barbara; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable building material design relies mostly on energy saving processes, decrease of raw materials consumption, and increase of waste and by-products recycling. Natural and lightweight artificial aggregates production implies relevant environmental impact. This paper addresses both the issues of residues recycling and energy optimization. Particularly, three coal combustion wastes (Weathered Fly Ash, WFA; Wastewater Treatment Sludge, WTS; Desulfurization Device Sludge, DDS) supplied by the Italian electric utility company (ENEL) have been employed in the manufacture of cold bonded artificial aggregates. Previously, the residues have been characterized in terms of chemical and mineralogical compositions, water content, particle size distribution, and heavy metal release behavior. These wastes have been used in the mix design of binding systems with the only addition of lime. Finally, the artificial aggregates have been submitted to physical, mechanical, and leaching testing, revealing that they are potentially suitable for many civil engineering applications. PMID:28788372

  17. Coal Combustion Wastes Reuse in Low Energy Artificial Aggregates Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Cioffi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable building material design relies mostly on energy saving processes, decrease of raw materials consumption, and increase of waste and by-products recycling. Natural and lightweight artificial aggregates production implies relevant environmental impact. This paper addresses both the issues of residues recycling and energy optimization. Particularly, three coal combustion wastes (Weathered Fly Ash, WFA; Wastewater Treatment Sludge, WTS; Desulfurization Device Sludge, DDS supplied by the Italian electric utility company (ENEL have been employed in the manufacture of cold bonded artificial aggregates. Previously, the residues have been characterized in terms of chemical and mineralogical compositions, water content, particle size distribution, and heavy metal release behavior. These wastes have been used in the mix design of binding systems with the only addition of lime. Finally, the artificial aggregates have been submitted to physical, mechanical, and leaching testing, revealing that they are potentially suitable for many civil engineering applications.

  18. Comparing the greenhouse gas emissions from three alternative waste combustion concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainikka, Pasi; Tsupari, Eemeli; Sipilä, Kai; Hupa, Mikko

    2012-03-01

    Three alternative condensing mode power and combined heat and power (CHP) waste-to-energy concepts were compared in terms of their impacts on the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from a heat and power generation system. The concepts included (i) grate, (ii) bubbling fluidised bed (BFB) and (iii) circulating fluidised bed (CFB) combustion of waste. The BFB and CFB take advantage of advanced combustion technology which enabled them to reach electric efficiency up to 35% and 41% in condensing mode, respectively, whereas 28% (based on the lower heating value) was applied for the grate fired unit. A simple energy system model was applied in calculating the GHG emissions in different scenarios where coal or natural gas was substituted in power generation and mix of fuel oil and natural gas in heat generation by waste combustion. Landfilling and waste transportation were not considered in the model. GHG emissions were reduced significantly in all of the considered scenarios where the waste combustion concepts substituted coal based power generation. With the exception of condensing mode grate incinerator the different waste combustion scenarios resulted approximately in 1 Mton of fossil CO(2)-eq. emission reduction per 1 Mton of municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerated. When natural gas based power generation was substituted by electricity from the waste combustion significant GHG emission reductions were not achieved. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Legislative and Regulatory Timeline for Fossil Fuel Combustion Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    This timeline walks through the history of fossil fuel combustion waste regulation since 1976 and includes information such as regulations, proposals, notices, amendments, reports and meetings and site visits conducted.

  20. Co-combustion of Fossil Fuels and Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hao

    and the utilization of a waste-derived material as an additive; 3) the combustion of a biomass residue rich in phosphorus. Co-combustion of coal and SRF was conducted in an entrained flow reactor (EFR). The work revealed that when coal was co-fired with up to 25 wt% SRF, the burnout and the emissions of SO2...

  1. Improved Economic Performance of Municipal Solid Waste Combustion Plants by Model Based Combustion Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leskens, M.

    2013-01-01

    The combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW) is used for its inertisation, reduction of its volume and the conversion of its energy content into heat and/or electricity. Operation and control of modern large scale MSW combustion (MSWC) plants is determined by economic and environmental objectives

  2. Utilization of ash products from combustion of shredded solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, P.F.; Mullen, J.F. (Energy Answers Corp, Albany, NY (US))

    1988-01-01

    One of the major problems with the siting, permitting, construction, and operation of a municipal solid waste-to- energy facility is the disposal of residues. As resource recovery increasingly becomes the disposal option of choice and necessity for municipalities across the country, the foci of environmental concerns has switched from groundwater contamination and inappropriate land use issues associated with landfilling, to air pollution control and residue disposal issues associated with waste combustion. It is suggested that the two separate ash streams can no longer reasonably be considered one and should be analyzed and treated separately, thereby increasing and enhancing the opportunity to recycle from the bottom ash (75 percent) and to focus on a reduced quantity of fly ash material (25 percent) for fixation and reuse or disposal. Such action would conform to the principles of, and the present regulatory trend towards waste minimization. However, there are many regulatory, institutional, and logistical barriers to such promising and seemingly simple waste reduction strategies. While the spirit of solid and hazardous waste legislation may emphasize waste minimization, ambiguities in the regulations have undermined the actual intent, creating an environment of confusion and indecisiveness with respect to treatment and disposal of ash from resource recovery facilities. This book reports on a research and development program to assess the feasibility and possible environmental impacts of utilizing a selected fraction of the bottom ash stream from processed refuse fuel-fired boilers as an aggregate substitute. The purpose of the research program is to develop data on the characteristics of bottom ash during exposure to rain and weathering in proposed applications.

  3. The combustion of solid fuels and wastes

    CERN Document Server

    Tillman, David

    1991-01-01

    Careful organization and empirical correlations help clarify the prodigious technical information presented in this useful reference.Key Features* Written for practicing engineers, this comprehensive book supplies an overall framework of the combustion process; It connects information on specific reactions and reaction sequences with current applications and hardware; Each major group of combustion solids is evaluated; Among the many topics covered are:* Various biomass forms* The coalification process* Grate, kiln, and suspension firing* Fluidized bed combustion

  4. Municipal solid waste combustion: Fuel testing and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushnell, D.J.; Canova, J.H.; Dadkhah-Nikoo, A.

    1990-10-01

    The objective of this study is to screen and characterize potential biomass fuels from waste streams. This will be accomplished by determining the types of pollutants produced while burning selected municipal waste, i.e., commercial mixed waste paper residential (curbside) mixed waste paper, and refuse derived fuel. These materials will be fired alone and in combination with wood, equal parts by weight. The data from these experiments could be utilized to size pollution control equipment required to meet emission standards. This document provides detailed descriptions of the testing methods and evaluation procedures used in the combustion testing and characterization project. The fuel samples will be examined thoroughly from the raw form to the exhaust emissions produced during the combustion test of a densified sample.

  5. Utilization of ash from municipal solid waste combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, C.; Hahn, J.; Magee, B.; Yuen, N.; Sandefur, K.; Tom, J.; Yap, C.

    1999-09-01

    This ash study investigated the beneficial use of municipal waste combustion combined ash from the H-POWER facility in Oahu. These uses were grouped into intermediate cover for final closure of the Waipahu landfill, daily cover at the Waimanalo Gulch Landfill, and partial replacement for aggregate in asphalt for road paving. All proposed uses examine combined fly and bottom ash from a modern waste-to-energy facility that meets requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments for Maximum Achievable Control Technology.

  6. Prevention of spontaneous combustion of backfilled plant waste material.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adamski, SA

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Since Grootegeluk Coal Mine commenced operation in 1980 all plant discards and inter-burden material have been stacked on discards dumps, a practice that has led to the spontaneous combustion of the waste material on these dumps. From 1980 to 1988...

  7. Phytostabilization of a landfill containing coal combustion waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher Barton; Donald Marx; Domy Adriano; Bon Jun Koo; Lee Newman; Stephen Czapka; John Blake

    2005-01-01

    The establishment of a vegetative cover to enhance evapotranspiration and control runoff and drainage was examined as a method for stabilizing a landfill containing coal combustion waste. Suitable plant species and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and chemical stabilization were evaluated. A randomized plot design consisting of three...

  8. Photostabilization of a landfill containing coal combustion waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher Barton; Donald Marx; Domy Adriano; Bon Jun Koo; Lee Newman; Stephen Czapka; John Blake

    2005-01-01

    The establishment of a vegetative cover to enhance evapotranspiration and control runoff and drainage was examined as a method for stabilizing a landfill containing coal combustion waste. Suitable plant species and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and chemical stabilization were evaluated. A randomized plot design consisting of three...

  9. Emission of nanoparticles during combustion of waste biomass in fireplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drastichová, Vendula; Krpec, Kamil; Horák, Jiří; Hopan, František; Kubesa, Petr; Martiník, Lubomír; Koloničný, Jan; Ochodek, Tadeáš; Holubčík, Michal

    2014-08-01

    Contamination of air by solid particles is serious problem for human health and also environment. Small particles in nano-sizes are more dangerous than same weight of larger size. Negative effect namely of the solid particles depends on (i) number, (ii) specific surface area (iii) respirability and (iv) bonding of others substances (e.g. PAHs, As, Cd, Zn, Cu etc.) which are higher for smaller (nano-sizes) particles compared to larger one. For this reason mentioned above this contribution deals with measuring of amount, and distribution of nanoparticles produced form combustion of waste city biomass in small combustion unit with impactor DLPI.

  10. Process aspects in combustion and gasification Waste-to-Energy (WtE) units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckner, Bo

    2015-03-01

    The utilisation of energy in waste, Waste to Energy (WtE), has become increasingly important. Waste is a wide concept, and to focus, the feedstock dealt with here is mostly municipal solid waste. It is found that combustion in grate-fired furnaces is by far the most common mode of fuel conversion compared to fluidized beds and rotary furnaces. Combinations of pyrolysis in rotary furnace or gasification in fluidized or fixed bed with high-temperature combustion are applied particularly in Japan in systems whose purpose is to melt ashes and destroy dioxins. Recently, also in Japan more emphasis is put on WtE. In countries with high heat demand, WtE in the form of heat and power can be quite efficient even in simple grate-fired systems, whereas in warm regions only electricity is generated, and for this product the efficiency of boilers (the steam data) is limited by corrosion from the flue gas. However, combination of cleaned gas from gasification with combustion provides a means to enhance the efficiency of electricity production considerably. Finally, the impact of sorting on the properties of the waste to be fed to boilers or gasifiers is discussed. The description intends to be general, but examples are mostly taken from Europe. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of released source terms from burning mock combustible waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Koji; Tashiro, Shinsuke; Takada, Junichi; Uchiyama, Gunzo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-11-01

    To evaluate quantitatively confinement capability of the radioactive materials in the nuclear fuel facility under the fire accident, analysis of accident sequence, including clogging characteristics of the ventilation filters, needs to be performed. For the purpose of the evaluation, accumulation of the source term data such as release rates of the smoke and energy, and particle size distribution of the smoke during the fire accident is necessary. Therefore, experiments for evaluating burning characteristics of combustible solid wastes and recovered solvents, which are disposed from the facilities, have been performed by using the mock combustible wastes and the method for estimating the source terms has been investigated. When mixtures of rubber and cloth gloves as mock combustible solid wastes were burnt, the smoke with above 1 {mu}m in diameter was confined in the carbonized residue of cloth gloves and the release ratio of the smoke in the burning of mixtures was decreased compared with the burning of only rubber gloves. The source terms were evaluated with the cell ventilation system safety analysis code CELVA-1D by using the experimental results as the input, such as temperature of the gas phase, total burnt weight and total collected weight of the smoke under the burning of rubber gloves as mock wastes. The source terms calculated by the CELVA-1D reasonably agreed with the values estimated from the recommended calculation parameters in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facility Accident Analysis Handbook (NUREG-1320). Therefore, the present CELVA-1D method for evaluating the source terms during burning is considered to be valid. This means that the source terms can be estimated by using this method if the information such as the temperature of the gas phase, total burnt weight and total collected weight of the smoke are given. (author)

  12. Biogenic carbon in combustible waste: Waste composition, variability and measurement uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anna Warberg; Fuglsang, Karsten; Pedersen, Niels H.

    2013-01-01

    described in the literature. This study addressed the variability of biogenic and fossil carbon in combustible waste received at a municipal solid waste incinerator. Two approaches were compared: (1) radiocarbon dating (14C analysis) of carbon dioxide sampled from the flue gas, and (2) mass and energy......, the measurement uncertainties related to the two approaches were determined. Two flue gas sampling campaigns at a full-scale waste incinerator were included: one during normal operation and one with controlled waste input. Estimation of carbon contents in the main waste types received was included. Both the 14C...... method and the balance method represented promising methods able to provide good quality data for the ratio between biogenic and fossil carbon in waste. The relative uncertainty in the individual experiments was 7–10% (95% confidence interval) for the 14C method and slightly lower for the balance method....

  13. Municipal-waste combustion study: recycling of solid waste. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheverly, D.

    1987-06-01

    In this report, background information on recycling, its status in the United States and abroad, and its technical feasibility are examined. Also, because recycling is expected to be an integral part of a solid-waste management plan that includes combustion, potential effects on combustion of removing materials from the waste are considered. The report is designed to convey a sense of the current status of recycling and its technical feasibility, rather than to embody comprehensive authoritative reference material. Subjects addressed in the report include the current extent of recycling in the United States and in several other countries; feasibility of recycling; methods for separation of materials; information on uses and markets for recovered materials; and questions concerning the effects of recycling activities on combustion processes.

  14. Co-combustion of fossil fuels and waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hao

    2011-05-15

    The Ph.D. thesis deals with the alternative and high efficiency methods of using waste-derived fuels in heat and power production. The focus is on the following subjects: 1) co-combustion of coal and solid recovered fuel (SRF) under pulverized fuel combustion conditions; 2) dust-firing of straw and the utilization of a waste-derived material as an additive; 3) the combustion of a biomass residue rich in phosphorus. Co-combustion of coal and SRF was conducted in an entrained flow reactor (EFR). The work revealed that when coal was co-fired with up to 25 wt% SRF, the burnout and the emissions of SO{sub 2} and NO were decreased with increasing share of SRF. The Cl content in the fly ash was very low (<0.07 wt%) when coal was co-fired up to 25 wt% SRF, indicating that the majority of the Cl in the SRF were released to gas phase during cocombustion. The formation of fouling deposits on a probe was reduced with increasing share of SRF and the resulting deposits had a very small Cl content (<0.01 wt%). On the other hand, when NaCl or PVC was added to the mixture of coal and SRF, the formation of alkali chlorides was significantly promoted. The partitioning of trace elements (As, Cd, Cr, Pb, Sb and Zn) during co-combustion of coal and SRF was investigated through the experiments in the EFR. They revealed that As, Cd, Pb, Sb and Zn were highly volatile during combustion, while the volatility of Cr was relatively low. The volatility of Cd, Pb and Zn increased significantly with the injection of Cl based additives such as PVC and NaCl, while the addition of ammonium sulphate generally decreased the volatility of trace elements. The addition of kaolinite reduced the volatility of Pb, while the effect on other trace elements was insignificant. Full-scale tests on co-combustion of coal and SRF were carried out in a pulverized coal-fired power plant, and the formation of fine particles was evaluated by applying a low-pressure cascade impactor. Compared to dedicated coal

  15. Reversed combustion of waste in a grate furnace - an experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markovic, Miladin; Brem, Gerrit; Bramer, Eduard A.

    2012-01-01

    Most widely used concept for municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration is combustion on a moving grate with energy recovery. In MSW incinerators fresh waste stacked on a grate enters the combustion chamber, heats up by radiation from the flame above the layer and ignition occurs. Ignition front

  16. 40 CFR 60.1370 - What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? 60.1370 Section 60.1370 Protection of Environment... Recordkeeping § 60.1370 What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon? For municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury...

  17. 40 CFR 62.15310 - What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? 62.15310 Section 62.15310 Protection of Environment... for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon? For municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must keep records of five...

  18. 40 CFR 60.1855 - What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? 60.1855 Section 60.1855 Protection of Environment... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? For municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must keep records of five items: (a...

  19. On-Line analysis of gas-phase composition in the combustion chamber and particle emission characteristics during combustion of wood and waste in a small batch reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Ferge, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    On-Line analysis of gas-phase composition in the combustion chamber and particle emission characteristics during combustion of wood and waste in a small batch reactor / R. Zimmermann ... - In: Environmental science & technology. 39. 2005. S. 1393-1402

  20. Heating value prediction for combustible fraction of municipal solid waste in Semarang using backpropagation neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuriati, Ainie; Setiabudi, Wahyu; Nur, Muhammad; Istadi, Istadi

    2015-12-01

    Backpropgation neural network was trained to predict of combustible fraction heating value of MSW from the physical composition. Waste-to-Energy (WtE) is a viable option for municipal solid waste (MSW) management. The influence of the heating value of municipal solid waste (MSW) is very important on the implementation of WtE systems. As MSW is heterogeneous material, direct heating value measurements are often not feasible. In this study an empirical model was developed to describe the heating value of the combustible fraction of municipal solid waste as a function of its physical composition of MSW using backpropagation neural network. Sampling process was carried out at Jatibarang landfill. The weight of each sorting sample taken from each discharged MSW vehicle load is 100 kg. The MSW physical components were grouped into paper wastes, absorbent hygiene product waste, styrofoam waste, HD plastic waste, plastic waste, rubber waste, textile waste, wood waste, yard wastes, kitchen waste, coco waste, and miscellaneous combustible waste. Network was trained by 24 datasets with 1200, 769, and 210 epochs. The results of this analysis showed that the correlation from the physical composition is better than multiple regression method .

  1. Handbook of Combustion of urban solid wastes; Manual de Incineracion de Residuos Solidos Urbanos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The book presents the state of the art of urban solid wastes combustion in the European Union and more specifically in Spain. the technical, economics, environmental and administrative aspects are analyzed.

  2. Combustion of Waste Wood. Second phase of the collaboration project on waste wood combustion; Foerbraenning av returtraeflis. Etapp 2 av ramprojekt returtraeflis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Annika; Andersson, Christer; Eriksson, Jan; Hemstroem, Bengt; Jungstedt, Jenny; Kling, Aasa [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden); Bahr, Bo von; Ekvall, Annika; Eskilsson, David; Tullin, Claes [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden); Harnevie, Henrik; Sieurin, Jan [SwedPower AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Keihaes, Juha; Mueller, Christian [Aabo Akademi (Finland); Berg, Magnus; Wikman, Karin [AaF-Energi och Miljoe AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-08-01

    Combustion of waste wood has during the last decade increased dramatically and this has resulted in a number of Swedish plants using this fuel, e.g. Handeloe P11 (Norrkoeping) and ldbaecken P3 (Nykoeping), and yet other plants that are under construction (e.g. Nynaeshamn). The experience from these plants are that waste wood combustion results in a number of operational problems. To some extent these problems are different compared with the problems related to combustion of other biofuels but the situation is not directly comparable to waste incinerators. The problems are mainly related to slagging and fouling of heat exchanger surfaces and accelerated corrosion at relatively low temperature compared to the situation for ordinary biofuels. In some cases an increase in the emissions of specific substances can also result in difficulties to fulfil the EC-directive on waste combustion. Within previous projects the main problems related to combustion of waste wood have been identified and to some extent the cause of these problems has been clarified. One result of this reported investigation is a deeper understanding of the actual causes of these problems. However, the most important result is a number of recommendations for different measures on how to achieve disturbance-free combustion of waste wood. These recommendations actually summarises the most important possible solutions on how to achieve a disturbance-free operation and a lower maintenance cost for boilers combusting waste wood and can thereby be regarded as a short summery of the whole project: 1) Improving fuel quality by Improved sorting at the source and Sieving of the fuel -> Reducing the amount of metals and chlorine and Separation of fines and thereby reducing the amount of metals. 2) Combustion modifications by Avoiding reducing conditions at the heat exchanger surfaces -> Minimising slagging, fouling and corrosion. 3) Additives or co-combustion by Addition of sulphur with the fuel; Injection of

  3. Incineration and co-combustion of waste: accounting of greenhouse gases and global warming contributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas; Møller, Jacob; Fruergaard, Thilde

    2009-01-01

    Important greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to waste incineration and co-combustion of waste were identified and considered relative to critical aspects such as: the contents of biogenic and fossil carbon, N2O emissions, fuel and material consumptions at the plants, energy recovery, and soli...

  4. NOx reduction using amine reclaimer wastes (ARW) generated in post combustion CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Botheju, Deshai; Glarborg, Peter; Tokheim, Lars-Andre

    2012-01-01

    Amine reclaimer wastes (ARW) generated in CO2 capture processes demand suitable disposal means. Such wastes contain remaining amine, NH3 and other degradation compounds. This study investigated the potential of using ARW as a NOx reducing agent, under laboratory conditions in a flow reactor. A si...... to combustion processes, including cement industry kilns....

  5. Economic growth, combustible renewables and waste consumption, and CO₂ emissions in North Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Jebli, Mehdi; Ben Youssef, Slim

    2015-10-01

    This paper uses panel cointegration techniques and Granger causality tests to examine the dynamic causal link between per capita real gross domestic product (GDP), combustible renewables and waste (CRW) consumption, and CO2 emissions for a panel of five North African countries during the period 1971-2008. Granger causality test results suggest short- and long-run unidirectional causalities running from CO2 emissions and CRW consumption to real GDP and a short-run unidirectional causality running from CRW to CO2 emissions. The results from panel long-run fully modified ordinary least squares (FMOLS) and dynamic ordinary least squares (DOLS) estimates show that CO2 emissions and CRW consumption have a positive and statistically significant impact on GDP. Our policy recommendations are that these countries should use more CRW because this increases their output, reduces their energy dependency on fossil energy, and may decrease their CO2 emissions.

  6. An assessment of clinical waste combustion and pollution abatement technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scutter, J.; Tipping, P.; Storey, R. [Atkins (W.S.) and Partners, Epsom (United Kingdom)

    1995-09-01

    This report examines legislation related to the incineration of clinical waste, clinical waste incineration facilities, alternative treatment techniques, and incineration capacity and costs. Incineration and fluegas cleaning technologies are dealt with in an appendix.

  7. Energy from Waste--clean, efficient, renewable: transitions in combustion efficiency and NOx control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldner, M H; Halter, R; Sigg, A; Brosch, B; Gehrmann, H J; Keunecke, M

    2013-02-01

    Traditionally EfW (Energy from Waste) plants apply a reciprocating grate to combust waste fuel. An integrated steam generator recovers the heat of combustion and converts it to steam for use in a steam turbine/generator set. This is followed by an array of flue gas cleaning technologies to meet regulatory limitations. Modern combustion applies a two-step method using primary air to fuel the combustion process on the grate. This generates a complex mixture of pyrolysis gases, combustion gases and unused combustion air. The post-combustion step in the first pass of the boiler above the grate is intended to "clean up" this mixture by oxidizing unburned gases with secondary air. This paper describes modifications to the combustion process to minimize exhaust gas volumes and the generation of noxious gases and thus improving the overall thermal efficiency of the EfW plant. The resulting process can be coupled with an innovative SNCR (Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction) technology to form a clean and efficient solid waste combustion system. Measurements immediately above the grate show that gas compositions along the grate vary from 10% CO, 5% H(2) and 0% O(2) to essentially unused "pure" air, in good agreement with results from a mathematical model. Introducing these diverse gas compositions to the post combustion process will overwhelm its ability to process all these gas fractions in an optimal manner. Inserting an intermediate step aimed at homogenizing the mixture above the grate has shown to significantly improve the quality of combustion, allowing for optimized process parameters. These measures also resulted in reduced formation of NO(x) (nitrogenous oxides) due to a lower oxygen level at which the combustion process was run (2.6 vol% O(2,)(wet) instead of 6.0 vol% O(2,)(wet)). This reduction establishes optimal conditions for the DyNOR™ (Dynamic NO(x) Reduction) NO(x) reduction process. This innovative SNCR technology is adapted to situations typically

  8. 40 CFR 60.1025 - Do subpart E new source performance standards also apply to my municipal waste combustion unit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... subpart E of this part does not apply to your municipal waste combustion unit. ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Do subpart E new source performance standards also apply to my municipal waste combustion unit? 60.1025 Section 60.1025 Protection of...

  9. Igneous Intrusion Impacts on Waste Packages and Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Bernot

    2004-08-16

    The purpose of this model report is to assess the potential impacts of igneous intrusion on waste packages and waste forms in the emplacement drifts at the Yucca Mountain Repository. The model is based on conceptual models and includes an assessment of deleterious dynamic, thermal, hydrologic, and chemical impacts. This constitutes the waste package and waste form impacts submodel of the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) model assessing the impacts of a hypothetical igneous intrusion event on the repository total system performance. This submodel is carried out in accordance with Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of SR and LA (BSC 2003a) and Total System Performance Assessment-License Application Methods and Approaches (BSC 2002a). The technical work plan is governed by the procedures of AP-SIII.10Q, Models. Any deviations from the technical work plan are documented in the TSPA-LA approach to implementing the models for waste package and waste form response during igneous intrusion is based on identification of damage zones. Zone 1 includes all emplacement drifts intruded by the basalt dike, and Zone 2 includes all other emplacement drifts in the repository that are not in Zone 1. This model report will document the following model: (1) Impacts of magma intrusion on the components of engineered barrier system (e.g., drip shields and cladding) of emplacement drifts in Zone 1, and the fate of waste forms. (2) Impacts of conducting magma heat and diffusing magma gases on the drip shields, waste packages, and cladding in the Zone 2 emplacement drifts adjacent to the intruded drifts. (3) Impacts of intrusion on Zone 1 in-drift thermal and geochemical environments, including seepage hydrochemistry. The scope of this model only includes impacts to the components stated above, and does not include impacts to other engineered barrier system (EBS) components such as the invert and

  10. Characterization of gaseous emissions and ashes from the combustion of furniture waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Ana Isabel; Font, Rafael; Conesa, Juan A

    2016-12-01

    Gaseous emissions and ash obtained in the combustion of furniture waste have been studied, with particular emphasis on the emissions of hazardous pollutants, such as PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBS. Two different combustion procedures were carried out, one of them in a conventional residential stove (without an automatic control of combustion air and bad mixing of combustion gases with air), and the other in a laboratory-scale reactor (operating under substoichiometric conditions). Three different experiments were carried out in the residential stove, in which the gaseous emissions and ashes obtained were analysed. The fuel burnt out in two of the experiments was furniture wood waste and in one of the experiments, the fuel burnt out was briquettes composed of a mixture of furniture wood with 10wt.% of polyurethane foam. One of the purposes of these experiments was the evaluation of the possible inhibition effect of the higher nitrogen content on the formation of PCDD/Fs. Slight inhibition of the PCDD/F formation was found although, it is noteworthy that the lowest yield of PAHs, volatile and semi-volatile compounds were obtained in the combustion of these briquettes. In all experiments, the emission factors of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs) were between 29 and 74ng WHO-TEQ/kg sample burnt, lower than that obtained by other authors in the burning of pine needles and cones. PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs emissions from furniture wood waste combustion were also analysed in the laboratory scale reactor at 850°C and the results were compared with the values obtained from the combustion of solid wood (untreated wood). The total equivalent toxicity obtained was 21.1ng WHO-TEQ/kg sample for combustion of furniture wood waste, which is low in comparison with those obtained for other waste combustion in similar conditions. In the laboratory scale reactor, PCDFs were the dominant compounds in the profiles of PCDD

  11. Incineration and co-combustion of waste: accounting of greenhouse gases and global warming contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrup, Thomas; Møller, Jacob; Fruergaard, Thilde

    2009-11-01

    Important greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to waste incineration and co-combustion of waste were identified and considered relative to critical aspects such as: the contents of biogenic and fossil carbon, N(2)O emissions, fuel and material consumptions at the plants, energy recovery, and solid residues generated. GHG contributions were categorized with respect to direct emissions from the combustion plant as well as indirect upstream contributions (e.g. provision of fuels and materials) and indirect downstream contributions (e.g. substitution of electricity and heat produced elsewhere). GHG accounting was done per tonne of waste received at the plant. The content of fossil carbon in the input waste, for example as plastic, was found to be critical for the overall level of the GHG emissions, but also the energy conversion efficiencies were essential. The emission factors for electricity provision (also substituted electricity) affected the indirect downstream emissions with a factor of 3-9 depending on the type of electricity generation assumed. Provision of auxiliary fuels, materials and resources corresponded to up to 40% of the direct emission from the plants (which were 347-371 kg CO(2)-eq. tonne( -1) of waste for incineration and 735-803 kg CO(2)-eq. tonne(-1) of waste for co-combustion). Indirect downstream savings were within the range of -480 to -1373 kg CO(2)eq. tonne(-1) of waste for incineration and within -181 to -2607 kg CO(2)-eq. tonne(- 1) of waste for co-combustion. N(2)O emissions and residue management did not appear to play significant roles.

  12. Nonisothermal particle modeling of municipal solid waste combustion with heavy metal vaporization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazza, G. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, IDEPA (CONICET - UNCo), Buenos Aires 1400, 8300 Neuquen (Argentina); Falcoz, Q.; Gauthier, D.; Flamant, G. [Laboratoire Procedes et Materiaux et Energie Solaire (CNRS-PROMES), 7 Rue du Four Solaire, Odeillo, 66120 Font-Romeu Cedex (France); Soria, J. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, IDEPA (CONICET - UNCo), Buenos Aires 1400, 8300 Neuquen (Argentina); Laboratoire Procedes et Materiaux et Energie Solaire (CNRS-PROMES), 7 Rue du Four Solaire, Odeillo, 66120 Font-Romeu Cedex (France)

    2010-12-15

    A particulate model was developed for municipal solid-waste incineration in a fluidized bed combining solid-waste-particle combustion and heavy metal vaporization from the burning particles. Based on a simpler, isothermal version presented previously, this model combines an asymptotic-combustion model for carbonaceous-solid combustion and a shrinking-core model to describe the heavy metal vaporization phenomenon, in which the particle is now considered nonisothermal. A parametric study is presented that shows the influence of temperature on the global metal-vaporization process. The simulation results are compared to experimental data obtained with a lab-scale fluid bed incinerator and to the results of the simpler isothermal model. It is shown that conduction in the particle strongly affects the variation of the vaporization rate with time and that the present version of the model well fits both the shape of the plots and the maximum heavy metal vaporization rates for all bed temperatures. (author)

  13. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    1987-01-01

    Combustion, Second Edition focuses on the underlying principles of combustion and covers topics ranging from chemical thermodynamics and flame temperatures to chemical kinetics, detonation, ignition, and oxidation characteristics of fuels. Diffusion flames, flame phenomena in premixed combustible gases, and combustion of nonvolatile fuels are also discussed. This book consists of nine chapters and begins by introducing the reader to heats of reaction and formation, free energy and the equilibrium constants, and flame temperature calculations. The next chapter explores the rates of reactio

  14. Health impacts of domestic coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkelman, R.B.

    1999-07-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has concluded that, with the possible exception of mercury, there is no compelling evidence to indicate that emissions from coal-burning electric utility generators cause human health problems. The absence of detectable health problems is in part due to the fact that the coals burned in the US generally contain low to modest concentrations of potentially toxic trace elements and that many coal-burning utilities employ sophisticated pollution control systems that efficiently reduce the emissions of hazardous elements. This is not so in many developing countries, especially in homes where coal is used for heating and cooking. Domestic use of coal can present serious human health problems because the coals are generally mined locally with little regard to their composition and the coals are commonly burned in poorly vented or unvented stoves directly exposing residents to the emissions. In China alone several hundred million people commonly burn raw coal in unvented stoves that permeate their homes with high levels of toxic metals and organic compounds. At least 3,000 people in Guizhou Province in southwest China are suffering from severe arsenic poisoning. The primary source of the arsenic appears to be consumption of chili peppers dried over fires fueled with high-arsenic coal. Coal's in the region contain up to 35,000 ppm arsenic. Chili peppers dried over these high-arsenic coal fires absorb 500 ppm arsenic on average. More than 10 million people in Guizhou Province and surrounding areas suffer from dental and skeletal fluorosis. The excess fluorine is due to eating corn dried over burning briquettes made from high-fluorine coals and high-fluoring clay binders. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons formed during coal combustion are believed to cause or contribute to the high incidence of esophageal and lung cancers in parts of China. Domestic coal combustion has also caused selenium poisoning and possibly mercury

  15. A life cycle assessment of environmental performances of two combustion- and gasification-based waste-to-energy technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Umberto; Ardolino, Filomena; Di Gregorio, Fabrizio

    2015-07-01

    An attributional life cycle analysis (LCA) was developed to compare the environmental performances of two waste-to-energy (WtE) units, which utilize the predominant technologies among those available for combustion and gasification processes: a moving grate combustor and a vertical shaft gasifier coupled with direct melting. The two units were assumed to be fed with the same unsorted residual municipal waste, having a composition estimated as a European average. Data from several plants in operation were processed by means of mass and energy balances, and on the basis of the flows and stocks of materials and elements inside and throughout the two units, as provided by a specific substance flow analysis. The potential life cycle environmental impacts related to the operations of the two WtE units were estimated by means of the Impact 2002+ methodology. They indicate that both the technologies have sustainable environmental performances, but those of the moving grate combustion unit are better for most of the selected impact categories. The analysis of the contributions from all the stages of each specific technology suggests where improvements in technological solutions and management criteria should be focused to obtain further and remarkable environmental improvements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Emissions minimization of chlorinated micropollutants in coal solid waste co-combustion by primary measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandelova, M.; Lenoir, D.; Schramm, K.W. [GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    This study addresses co-combustion of coal-solid waste mixtures in pilot and laboratory-scale combustors, with emphasis on monitoring of toxic chlorinated hydrocarbon emissions like: polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and polychlorinated benzenes (PCBz). The objectives of the work are stress on the so-called primary measures technique which cause reduction of the toxic emission prior formation the chlorinated micropollutants. Thermally resistant inorganic compounds were added directly to the fuel. The fuel-types used in this study are lignite coal from Puertollano (CIEMAT, Spain), pre-treated municipal solid waste (Rethmann Plano GmbH) and PVC (waste from ground floor). Two low cost and non- toxic nitrogen- and sulfur-compounds were considered as the most effective inhibitors for PCDD/F formation. That makes them applicable for use in a full scale combustion unit. (orig.)

  17. Obtaining zeolites from slags and ashes from a waste combustion plant in an autoclave process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grela Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Waste combustion is associated with the generation of post-processing solid products – waste such as slag and ash. One of the promising technologies in waste management and processing is the synthesis of zeolites and other materials exhibiting sorption properties. The aim of this study was to characterise and assess the physicochemical properties of the waste and the products synthesised from it. This paper presents the possibility of synthesis zeolites from the slag and ash from two waste combustion plants. The investigated waste is classified as hazardous waste and denoted by the EWC code 190111*. The paper presents the results of physicochemical studies of these materials. As a result of synthesis in an autoclave at 140°C with the use of 2 M NaOH, and other compounds, such zeolite forms as chabazite and sodalite were obtained. Textural studies and ion-exchange capacity investigations carried out allowed characterisation of the sorption properties of the materials. It was found that the materials obtained are characterised by the BET specific surface areas of 25.45 m2/g and 16.79 m2/g.

  18. Impact of impregnation with boron compounds on combustion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the impacts of varnishing after impregnation with boron compounds on combustion properties of oriental beech. The test samples prepared from oriental beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky) wood were impregnated according to ASTM D 1413–76–99 with boric acid (Ba) or borax (Bx) using a vacuum ...

  19. Impact of impregnation with boron compounds on combustion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-04-11

    Apr 11, 2011 ... This study examined the impacts of varnishing after impregnation with boron compounds on combustion properties of oriental beech. The test samples prepared from oriental beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky) wood were impregnated according to ASTM D 1413–76–99 with boric acid (Ba) or borax (Bx) using ...

  20. Combustion of animal or vegetable based liquid waste products; Foerbraenning av flytande animaliska/vegetabiliska restprodukter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikman, Karin; Berg, Magnus [AaF-Energikonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-04-01

    In this project experiences from combustion of animal and vegetable based liquid waste products have been compiled. Legal aspects have also been taken into consideration and the potential for this type of fuel on the Swedish energy market has been evaluated. Today the supply of animal and vegetable based liquid waste products for energy production in Sweden is limited. The total production of animal based liquid fat is about 10,000 tonnes annually. The animal based liquid waste products origin mainly from the manufacturing of meat and bone meal. Since meat and bone meal has been banned from use in animal feeds it is possible that the amount of animal based liquid fat will decrease. The vegetable based liquid waste products that are produced in the processing of vegetable fats are today used mainly for internal energy production. This result in limited availability on the commercial market. The potential for import of animal and vegetable based liquid waste products is estimated to be relatively large since the production of this type of waste products is larger in many other countries compared to Sweden. Vegetable oils that are used as food or raw material in industries could also be imported for combustion, but this is not reasonable today since the energy prices are relatively low. Restrictions allow import of SRM exclusively from Denmark. This is today the only limit for increased imports of animal based liquid fat. The restrictions for handle and combustion of animal and vegetable based liquid waste products are partly unclear since this is covered in several regulations that are not easy to interpret. The new directive for combustion of waste (2000/76/EG) is valid for animal based waste products but not for cadaver or vegetable based waste products from provisions industries. This study has shown that more than 27,400 tonnes of animal based liquid waste products and about 6,000 tonnes of vegetable based liquid waste products were used for combustion in Sweden

  1. IGNEOUS INTRUSION IMPACTS ON WASTE PACKAGES AND WASTE FORMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Bernot

    2004-04-19

    The purpose of this model report is to assess the potential impacts of igneous intrusion on waste packages and waste forms in the emplacement drifts at the Yucca Mountain Repository. The models are based on conceptual models and includes an assessment of deleterious dynamic, thermal, hydrologic, and chemical impacts. The models described in this report constitute the waste package and waste form impacts submodel of the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) model assessing the impacts of a hypothetical igneous intrusion event on the repository total system performance. This submodel is carried out in accordance with Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of LA (BSC 2004 [DIRS:167796]) and Total System Performance Assessment-License Application Methods and Approaches (BSC 2003 [DIRS: 166296]). The technical work plan was prepared in accordance with AP-2.27Q, Planning for Science Activities. Any deviations from the technical work plan are documented in the following sections as they occur. The TSPA-LA approach to implementing the models for waste package and waste form response during igneous intrusion is based on identification of damage zones. Zone 1 includes all emplacement drifts intruded by the basalt dike, and Zone 2 includes all other emplacement drifts in the repository that are not in Zone 1. This model report will document the following model assessments: (1) Mechanical and thermal impacts of basalt magma intrusion on the invert, waste packages and waste forms of the intersected emplacement drifts of Zone 1. (2) Temperature and pressure trends of basaltic magma intrusion intersecting Zone 1 and their potential effects on waste packages and waste forms in Zone 2 emplacement drifts. (3) Deleterious volatile gases, exsolving from the intruded basalt magma and their potential effects on waste packages of Zone 2 emplacement drifts. (4) Post-intrusive physical

  2. Controlled combustion tests and bottom ash analysis using household waste with varying composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanjun; Bakker, Maarten; Brem, Gerrit; Chen, Guanyi

    2011-02-01

    The influence of the co-combustion of household waste with either sewage sludge, shredder fluff, electronic and electrical waste (WEEE) or PVC on the bottom ash quality and content was investigated under controlled laboratory conditions using a pot furnace. This laboratory approach avoids the interpretation problems related to large variations in input waste composition and combustion conditions that are observed in large scale MSW incinerators. The data for metals content, transfer coefficients and leaching values are presented relative to data for a base household waste composition that did not contain any of the added special wastes. The small WEEE invited direct measurement of precious metals content in the ashes, where measurement accuracy is facilitated by using only mobile phone scrap for small WEEE. The analyses were carried out for different particle size ranges that are of relevance to the recyclability of metals and minerals in the ashes. Positive correlations were found between elements content of the input waste and the bottom ashes, and also between increased levels of Cl, Mo and Cu in the input waste and their leaching in the bottom ashes. These correlations indicate that addition of PVC, small WEEE and shredder fluff in input waste can have a negative influence on the quality of the bottom ashes. Enrichment of Au and Ag occurred in the fractions between 0.15 and 6 mm. The precious metals content represents an economically interesting intrinsic value, even when the observed peak values are properly averaged over a larger volume of ashes. Overall, it has been shown that changes in quality and content of bottom ashes may be traced back to the varied input waste composition. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Disposal of residue from sifting of combustible waste; Avsaettning av siktrest fraan foerbehandling av braennbart avfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niklasson, Fredrik

    2012-11-01

    In waste to energy plants, unwanted species in the fuel may cause corrosion, deposits, agglomeration in the fuel bed, and emissions of pollutants. Countermeasures to such problems are often costly. For at least some of the waste, the fuel properties can be improved by introducing a pretreatment system in which the fine fraction is separated from the waste by sifting. This method has been studied in an earlier Waste Refinery project, WR-06. That study pointed at advantages in performance of the boiler plant and a rough economical analysis indicated substantial benefits. The drawback of the pretreatment was that the residue (the fine fraction) showed as high content of total organic carbon (TOC) as 37 %, by weight. Such a waste fraction is not allowed to be landfilled in Sweden. High TOC content is also a limiting factor for usage as a secondary construction material. To become an applicable pretreatment method, it is necessary to find an appropriate disposal method for the residue material. Present work investigates different possibilities to handle the sifting residue, assuming it has the same properties as in previous study. The residue from sifting needs further treatment, preferably with energy recovery. There are some alternatives, such as combustion, gasification, anaerobic or aerobic digestion. To reduce problems associated by combustion, the waste may be burnt in another more suitable furnace. An alternative is gasification, but that treatment method is not yet an established process for waste fuels. Another option is treatment by anaerobic or aerobic digestion. The high concentrations of metals, however, limit the use of the biologically treated waste to landfilling sites, where it may be utilized as a construction material. The high metal concentrations in the sifting residue imply that it must be kept separate from other biodegradable wastes which are used to produce fertilizers. Thus, this treatment alternative will likely require substantial new

  4. Hydrothermal carbonization of typical components of municipal solid waste for deriving hydrochars and their combustion behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yousheng; Ma, Xiaoqian; Peng, Xiaowei; Yu, Zhaosheng

    2017-11-01

    In this work, five typical components were employed as representative pseudo-components to indirectly complete previous established simulation system during hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of municipal solid waste. The fuel characteristics and combustion behavior of HTC-derived hydrochars were evaluated. Results clearly illustrated that the energy ranks of hydrochars were upgraded after HTC. For paper and wood, superior combustion performances of their hydrochars could achieve under suitable conditions. While for food, none positive enrichments on combustion loss rate were observed for hydrochars due to its high solubilization and decomposition under hot compressed water. It was noteworthy that a new weight loss peak was detected for paper and food, suggesting that new compounds were formed. For rubber, the HTC process made the properties of styrene butadiene rubber more close to natural rubber. Therefore, the first peak of hydrochars became significantly intense. While for plastic, only physical changes of polypropylene and polyethylene were observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Jjj of... - Class I Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Class I Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Limits 2 Table 2 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Pt. 62, Subpt. JJJ, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart JJJ...

  6. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Jjj of... - Class II Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Unitsa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Class II Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Unitsa 4 Table 4 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Pt. 62, Subpt. JJJ, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart JJJ...

  7. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Jjj of... - Carbon Monoxide Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carbon Monoxide Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units 5 Table 5 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Pt. 62, Subpt. JJJ, Table 5 Table 5 to Subpart JJJ...

  8. Assessing the environmental impact of energy production from hydrochar generated via hydrothermal carbonization of food wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Nicole D; Li, Liang; Flora, Joseph R V; Ro, Kyoung S

    2015-09-01

    Although there are numerous studies suggesting hydrothermal carbonization is an environmentally advantageous process for transformation of wastes to value-added products, a systems level evaluation of the environmental impacts associated with hydrothermal carbonization and subsequent hydrochar combustion has not been conducted. The specific objectives of this work are to use a life cycle assessment approach to evaluate the environmental impacts associated with the HTC of food wastes and the subsequent combustion of the generated solid product (hydrochar) for energy production, and to understand how parameters and/or components associated with food waste carbonization and subsequent hydrochar combustion influence system environmental impact. Results from this analysis indicate that HTC process water emissions and hydrochar combustion most significantly influence system environmental impact, with a net negative GWP impact resulting for all evaluated substituted energy-sources except biomass. These results illustrate the importance of electricity production from hydrochar particularly when it is used to offset coal-based energy sources. HTC process water emissions result in a net impact to the environment, indicating a need for developing appropriate management strategies. Results from this analysis also highlight a need for additional exploration of liquid and gas-phase composition, a better understanding of how changes in carbonization conditions (e.g., reaction time and temperature) influence metal and nutrient fate, and the exploration of liquid-phase treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The generation and disposal of solid wastes from circulating fluidised bed combustion plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P.; Tomlinson, P. (Ove Arup Partners, London (United Kingdom). Arup Environmental)

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the environmental issues arising from proposals by British Coal and East Midlands Electricity to construct a circulating fluidised bed combustion (CFBC) Power Station and an associated waste disposal facility at Bilsthorpe in the East Midlands of England. CFBC ash is novel to the UK and the problems of co-disposal of ash and colliery spoil from the power station and adjacent deep coal mine at a surface disposal site are highlighted. The chemical and physical properties of the wastes, research on the revegetation of the ash/spoil mound and the design philosophy developed for the disposal site are reported. 3 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Combustion of municipal solid wastes with oil shale in a circulating fluidized bed. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-30

    The problem addressed by our invention is that of municipal solid waste utilization. The dimensions of the problem can be visualized by the common comparison that the average individual in America creates in five years time an amount of solid waste equivalent in weight to the Statue of Liberty. The combustible portion of the more than 11 billion tons of solid waste (including municipal solid waste) produced in the United States each year, if converted into useful energy, could provide 32 quads per year of badly needed domestic energy, or more than one-third of our annual energy consumption. Conversion efficiency and many other factors make such a production level unrealistic, but it is clear that we are dealing with a very significant potential resource. This report describes research pertaining to the co-combustion of oil shale with solid municipal wastes in a circulating fluidized bed. The oil shale adds significant fuel content and also constituents that can possible produce a useful cementitious ash.

  11. "Cold combustion" as a new method of toxic waste destruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Екатерина Юрьевна Ткаченко

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a promising new method for the destruction of toxic industrial waste, obsolete pesticides and military poisons and explosives. The proposed method can be used to create mobile modular units that will produce the destruction of the "field", to clean the soil and water containing low concentrations of a pollutant, to solve the problem of disposal of explosives, which is often accompanied by the destruction of uncontrolled detonation. The proposed method is environmentally friendly, using ice as the working body

  12. Nuclear Waste: Increasing Scale and Sociopolitical Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Porte, Todd R.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the impact of radioactive waste management system on social and political development. The article also presents (1) types of information necessary to estimate the costs and consequences of radioactive waste management; and (2) an index of radioactive hazards to improve the basis for policy decisions. (HM)

  13. DYNAMICS OF CHANGES IN VEGETATION OF A MODEL EXPERIMENT ON COAL COMBUSTION WASTE DEPOSITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz H. Dyguś

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains the evaluation of the reclamation efficiencyon coal combustion waste deposits fertilized with composts and sewage sludge. Based on multiannual studies, the dynamics of changes in vegetation in the performed experiment have been shown. The firstphase of the experiment concerning the reclamation efficiencyof the employed fertilizers was carried out from 2006 to 2007. The second phase was carried out between 2011 and 2012. In order to show a broader spectrum of dynamics of changes in vegetation, the floristicobservation was repeated in 2013 and this paper is the presentation of its outcome. Based on the observation (2011–2013 and its results it was found that apart from plants cultivated in experimental containers also a self-sown florahas had a significantcontribution in shap-ing the vegetation cover. The results of floristic and ecological research have proven that composts and sewage sludge constitute a favorable environment for the development of spontaneous vegetation cover on coal combustion waste deposits. Based on the evaluation of the vegetation cover level in particular models it was shown that models with Complex composts (kC and Radiowo ones (kRa as well as the model with sewage sludge have pre-sented the highest reclamation efficienc. The lowest efficiencyhas been shown in models with ZUSOK composts (kZ and the plant ones (kr. The conclusions have highlighted the share of ecological, systematic and syntaxonomic plant groups in the process of reclamation of combustion waste deposits.

  14. The formation of aerosol particles during combustion of biomass and waste. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjerrild Zeuthen, J.

    2007-05-15

    This thesis describes the formation of aerosol particles during combustion of biomass and waste. The formation of aerosol particles is investigated by studying condensation of alkali salts from synthetic flue gasses in a laboratory tubular furnace. In this so-called laminar flow aerosol condenser-furnace gaseous alkali chlorides are mixed with sulphur dioxide, water vapour and oxygen. At high temperatures the alkali chloride reacts with sulphur dioxide to form alkali sulphate. During subsequent cooling of the synthetic flue gas the chlorides and sulphates condense either as deposits on walls or on other particles or directly from the gas phase by homogenous nucleation. A previously developed computer code for simulation of one-component nucleation of particles in a cylindrical laminar flow is extended to include a homogeneous gas phase reaction to produce gaseous alkali sulphate. The formation of aerosol particles during full-scale combustion of wheat straw is investigated in a 100 MW grate-fired boiler. Finally, aerosols from incineration of waste are investigated during full-scale combustion of municipal waste in a 22 MW grate-fired unit. (BA)

  15. Environmental impact assessment of solid waste management in Beijing City, China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Yan; Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Lu, Wenjing

    2011-01-01

    of auxiliary fuels to support combustion of wet waste. As for the long-term future scenario, efficient source separation of food waste could result in significant environmental improvements, primarily because of increase in calorific value of remaining waste incinerated with energy recovery. Sensitivity...... analysis emphasized the importance of efficient source separation of food waste, as well as the electricity recovery in incinerators, in order to obtain an environmentally friendly waste management system in Beijing City.......The environmental impacts of municipal solid waste management in Beijing City were evaluated using a life-cycle-based model, EASEWASTE, to take into account waste generation, collection, transportation, treatment/disposal technologies, and savings obtained by energy and material recovery...

  16. Results concerning a clean co-combustion technology of waste biomass with fossil fuel, in a pilot fluidised bed combustion facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ionel, Ioana; Trif-Tordai, Gavril; Ungureanu, Corneliu; Popescu, Francisc; Lontis, Nicolae [Politehnica Univ. Timisoara (Romania). Faculty for Mechanical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    The research focuses on a facility, the experimental results, interpretation and future plans concerning a new developed technology of using waste renewable energy by applying the cocombustion of waste biomass with coal, in a fluidised bed system. The experimental facility is working entirely in accordance to the allowed limits for the exhaust flue gas concentration, with special concern for typical pollutants. The experiments conclude that the technology is cleaner, has as main advantage the possibility to reduce both the SO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} exhaust in comparison to standard fossil fuel combustion, under comparable circumstances. The combustion is occurring in a stable fluidised bed. (orig.)

  17. Disposal of coal combustion wastes in the hydraulic backfill process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierzyna, Piotr

    2017-11-01

    This article presents the results of studies regarding the physical properties of selected combustion by-products (CCPs) currently produced in the energy production industry. These properties have been compared with the requirements of the technologies applied in the Polish underground mines. The article gives special consideration to the application of the products in the hydraulic backfill technology. The possibility of using bottom-ashes and slags was considered. The amount of CCPs disposed in Polish hard coal mines is approximately 1.1 million Mg and the tendency is decreasing. In the past two years, approximately 100-150 thousand Mg of CCPs was used in the hydraulic backfill technology. The percentage of the fraction smaller than 0.1 mm is determining for the possibility of using a given type of CCPs in the backfill material. This practically excludes the possibility of using any fly ashes in that technology. In slags from conventional boilers and bottom ashes from fluidized bed boilers the fraction below 0.1 mm constitutes 25% of the total at maximum, which allows for their use in the materials used in hydraulic backfill as a component comprising from 30% to 60%, respectively. Slags (10 01 01) are characterized by the lack of bonding properties, which, in case of open backfill systems that are exposed to atmospheric conditions, constitutes an advantage in comparison to bottom ashes (10 01 24), which in turn definitely exhibit bonding properties. The solution of the problem of using bottom ashes is their supply and application on a current basis.

  18. Brayton cycle for internal combustion engine exhaust gas waste heat recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Galindo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An average passenger car engine effectively uses about one-third of the fuel combustion energy, while the two-thirds are wasted through exhaust gases and engine cooling. It is of great interest to automotive industry to recover some of this wasted energy, thus increasing the engine efficiency and lowering fuel consumption and contamination. Waste heat recovery for internal combustion engine exhaust gases using Brayton cycle machine was investigated. The principle problems of application of such a system in a passenger car were considered: compressor and expander machine selection, machine size for packaging under the hood, efficiency of the cycle, and improvement of engine efficiency. Important parameters of machines design have been determined and analyzed. An average 2-L turbocharged gasoline engine’s New European Driving Cycle points were taken as inlet points for waste heat recovery system. It is theoretically estimated that the recuperated power of 1515 W can be achieved along with 5.7% improvement in engine efficiency, at the point where engine power is 26550 W.

  19. Pyrolysis and combustion kinetics and emissions of waste lube oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Rico, Maria F.; Martin-Gullon, Ignacio; Fullana, Andres; Conesa, Juan A.; Font, Rafael [Chemical Engineering Department, Universidad de Alicante, PO Box 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2003-08-01

    The present work studies first the kinetics of the global primary thermal decomposition of raw waste lubricant oils in helium atmosphere conditions and with different proportions of helium:oxygen by TGA. In addition, pyrolysis and partial oxidation runs were carried out in a tubular reactor at 723 and 1123 K, where the volatiles and semivolatiles evolved were quantified by gas chromatography. TGA analysis shows nearly no difference between helium and helium-oxygen atmosphere, yielding no appreciable residue. Primary decomposition, which takes place between 450 and 700 K, can be modeled with two different processes: the main one (92.6% of the initial material) is an evaporation of the motor oil (with apparent zero order and a kinetic constant dependent on the mass and heating rate) and a small contribution of a typical solid carbonaceous pyrolysis. In the tubular reactor, gases evolved in pyrolysis at 773 K corroborate TG findings that the process is mainly an evaporation, with little changes with respect to the original chemical structure of the oil. Nevertheless, the gas composition changes completely in the presence of air, where the partial oxidation in the gas phase after evaporation yields lower chain paraffins and olefines. Gas evolution at 1123 K is completely different, yielding showing typical cracked flue gas composition: light gases with abundant olefins and poly-condensed aromatics.

  20. On-line calorific value sensor and validation of dynamic models applied to municipal solid waste combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessel, L.B.M. van; Leskens, M.; Brem, G.

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals with two aspects concerning the optimization of municipal solid waste combustion (MSWC) processes. First of all, an on-line calorific value sensor is discussed by means of which the calorific value of the waste can be estimated from actual process data. Experimental results on a

  1. Computer simulation of waste combustion in a moving grate furnace as a tool for process optimization and operator trainings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brem, G.; Kessel, L.B.M. van

    1998-01-01

    A computer model has been developed to simulate the waste combustion process in a moving grate furnace. The computer model describes the main processes occurring both in the waste layer on the grate, and in the gas phase in the furnace. The boiler section and the flue gas cleaning equipment are also

  2. Life cycle environmental impacts of different construction wood waste and wood packaging waste processing methods

    OpenAIRE

    Manninen, Kaisa; Judl, Jáchym; Myllymaa, Tuuli

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the life cycle environmental impacts of different wood waste processing methods in three impact categories: climate impact, acidification impacts and eutrophication impacts. The wood waste recovery methods examined were the use of wood waste in terrace boards made out of wood composite which replace impregnated terrace boards, incineration of wood waste in a multi-fuel boiler instead of peat and the use of wood waste in the production of particleboard in either Finland or ...

  3. Atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (AFBC) co-firing of coal and hospital waste. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-01

    The proposed project involves co-firing of coal and medical waste (including infectious medical waste) in an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) to safely dispose of medical waste and produce steam for hospital needs. Combustion at the design temperature and residence time (duration) in the AFBC has been proven to render infectious medical waste free of disease producing organisms. The project would be located at the Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center in Lebanon, Pennsylvania. The estimated cost of the proposed AFBC facility is nearly $4 million. It would be jointly funded by DOE, Veterans Affairs, and Donlee Technologies, Inc., of York, Pennsylvania, under a cooperative agreement between DOE and Donlee. Under the terms of this agreement, $3.708 million in cost-shared financial assistance would be jointly provided by DOE and the Veterans Affairs (50/50), with $278,000 provided by Donlee. The purposes of the proposed project are to: (1) provide the VA Medical Center and the Good Samaritan Hospital (GSH), also of Lebanon, Pennsylvania, with a solution for disposal of their medical waste; and (2) demonstrate that a new coal-burning technology can safely incinerate infectious medical waste, produce steam to meet hospital needs, and comply with environmental regulations.

  4. Sorting efficiency and combustion properties of municipal solid waste during bio-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong-Qing; He, Pin-Jing; Shao, Li-Ming

    2009-11-01

    One aerobic and two combined bio-drying processes were set up to investigate the quantitative relationships of sorting efficiency and combustion properties with organics degradation and water removal during bio-drying. Results showed that the bio-drying could enhance the sorting efficiency of municipal solid waste (MSW) up to 71% from the initial of 34%. The sorting efficiency was correlated with water content negatively (correlation coefficient, r=-0.89) and organics degradation rate positively (r=0.92). The higher heating values (HHVs) were correlated with organics degradation negatively for FP (i.e. the sum of only food and paper) (r=-0.93) but positively for the mixing waste (MW) (r=0.90), whereas the lower heating values (LHVs) were negatively correlated with water content for both FP (r=-0.71) and MW (r=-0.96). Other combustion properties depended on organics degradation performance, except for ignition performance and combustion rate. The LHVs could be greatly enhanced by the combined process with insufficient aeration during the hydrolytic stage. Compared with FP, MW had higher LHVs and ratios of volatile matter to fixed carbon. Nevertheless, FP had higher final burnout values than MW.

  5. Evaluating the emissions from the gasification processing of municipal solid waste followed by combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Evandro José; Queiroz, Neide; Yamamoto, Carlos Itsuo; da Costa Neto, Pedro Ramos

    2018-03-01

    In this study, we evaluated the emissions of pollutants generated from the combustion of syngas in the gasification of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) in Brazil using a mobile grille gasifier fed with domestic waste without any previous separation or grinding. The basic syngas composition (H 2 , CH 4 and CO) was analyzed by gas chromatography and the Lower Calorific Value was calculated, which ranged from 1.9 to 10.2 MJ/kg. In the monitoring of combustion gases (CO 2 , CO, NO , NO 2 , SO 2 and Total Hydrocarbon Content), values were found for these pollutants that were lower than the values established by the Brazilian legislation, except for SO 2 . Regarding the determination of the emission of metals, values lower than those permissible in the legislation were found for the most toxic metals grouped as class I (Cd, Hg, Tl). Therefore, it was evident that gasification followed by the combustion of syngas from MSW without prior segregation at source has the advantages of having fewer process steps, allowing the low emission of pollutants into the environment and it avoids that the residues are deposited in landfills, which are generators of leachate and greenhouse gas (methane). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Climate impacts from import of waste fuels; Klimatpaaverkan fraan import av braennbart avfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haraldsson, Maarten; Sundberg, Johan (Profu, Moelndal (Sweden))

    2009-04-15

    Imports of combustible waste has increased in recent years and imported waste has become an increasingly important fuel in the Swedish district heating systems. The projections for the next few years show that the imports can be much higher, partly due to reduced amounts of waste in the wake of economic downturn the world economy, partly because several new incinerators will be put into operation. In a environmental perspective, imports are controversial and it has been proposed that imports should be restricted. This report provides an assessment of the climate impact of importing waste for combustion. The report shows that greenhouse gas emissions due to imports of waste to the Swedish district heating plants in 2007 was reduced by 500 000 tonnes of carbon dioxide. This is equivalent to the emissions from 300 000 Swedes car journeys a year, or 2.5% of the total emission reduction target set by the Government for the non-trading sector until 2020. Imports of wood waste-chips accounts for the largest reduction, but the study shows that imports of other types of waste contribute to a reduction in emissions of greenhouse gases. The reasons for the reduction is that the use of imported waste fuel substitute for other heating and electricity generation, which gives the consequence that emissions are avoided. The largest emission reductions are obtained, however, by the importation of household waste by replacing the alternative waste treatment of the corresponding waste in the country of origin. In the countries from which imports of waste currently takes place there is a lack of treatment capacity for organic waste. The alternative treatment available is primarily deposition. This treatment causes significant emissions of methane, which is a very strong greenhouse gas. The shipment of waste that occur as a result of imports gives a marginal contribution of greenhouse gases, compared against the emission reductions outlined above

  7. Co-combustion of household waste in small-scale energy supply and waste disposal plants; Co-Verbrennung von Siedlungsabfaellen in Kleinanlagen zur dezentralen Energieversorgung und Abfallentsorgung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeer, Ramona

    2012-07-01

    The studies described in this book demonstrate that the co-combustion of household waste in small-scale combustion plants constitutes an alternative disposal concept which facilitates the operation of decentralised waste disposal and heat supply systems. The basic idea of the concept is the co-combustion of different waste fractions in common household logwood heating systems. The experiments performed have shown that this is technically feasible using currently available technology without further modification and that these plants are capable of combusting various waste fractions at low emission levels. Several co-combustion systems were compared with basic oil, pellet and logwood heating systems in both economic and ecological respects. For this purpose cost-effectiveness calculations and a life cycle assessment were performed and brought together in an eco-efficiency analysis. The results show that the most cost-effective and eco-efficient solution is achieved when the co-combustion system is operated for high energy yield and simultaneous reduction of incombustible fractions.

  8. Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 5, Appendix C, Fluidized-bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-10-01

    This appendix provides information on fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) technology as it has been applied to municipal waste combustion (MWC). A review of the literature was conducted to determine: (1) to what extent FBC technology has been applied to MWC, in terms of number and size of units was well as technology configuration; (2) the operating history of facilities employing FBC technology; and (3) the cost of these facilities as compared to conventional MSW installations. Where available in the literature, data on operating and performance characteristics are presented. Tabular comparisons of facility operating/cost data and emissions data have been complied and are presented. The literature review shows that FBC technology shows considerable promise in terms of providing improvements over conventional technology in areas such as NOx and acid gas control, and ash leachability. In addition, the most likely configuration to be applied to the first large scale FBC dedicated to municipal solid waste (MSW) will employ circulating bed (CFB) technology. Projected capital costs for the Robbins, Illinois 1600 ton per day CFB-based waste-to-energy facility are competitive with conventional systems, in the range of $125,000 per ton per day of MSW receiving capacity.

  9. Energetic utilize municipal waste – technik combined combustion coal and waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustínová Edita

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The Coal -Waste System (CWS demonstrates how convencional power station steam generation can be intelligently combined with enwironmentally responsible waste disposal. A grate-firing instalation, operated as a plant satellite parallel to a power station steam generator, converts the chemical energy of the household waste into thermal energy in the form of hot flue gas. This flue gas is introduced as a coal substitute into the lower section of the steam generator and supplies a part of the thermal energy reqiured. The application of this process engineering offers a series of economic and ecological advantages.

  10. The recovery of waste and off-gas in Large Combustion Plants subject to IPPC National Permit in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Marco, Giuseppe; Manuzzi, Raffaella

    2018-03-01

    The recovery of off-gas, waste, and biomass in Large Combustion Plants for energy production gives the opportunity to recycle waste and by-products and to recover materials produced in agricultural and industrial activities. The paper illustrates the Italian situation regarding the production of energy from off-gas, biomass, and waste in Large Combustion Plants subject to Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control (IPPC) National Permit. Moreover, it focuses on the 4 Italian Large Combustion Plants producing energy from biomass and waste. For these ones it illustrates the specific issues related to and provides a description of the solutions adopted in the 4 Italian plants. Given that air emission performance is the most relevant aspect of this kind of plants, the paper specifically focuses and reports results about this subject. In particular, in Italy among 113 LCPs subject to IPPC National Permit we have found that 4 plants use as fuel waste (i.e. solid or liquid biomasses and Solid Recovered Fuels), or a mixture of waste and traditional fuels (co-combustion of Solid Recovered Fuels and coal), and that 11 plants use as fuel off-gases listed in Annex X (i.e. Refinery Fuel Gas, Syngas, and gases produced in iron and steel industries). Moreover, there are 2 IPPC chemical plants that recovery energy from different off-gases not listed in Annex X. Regarding the 4 LCPs that produce energy from waste combustion or co-combustion, we find that they take into account all the specific issues related to this kind of plants (i.e. detailed waste characterization, waste acceptance procedures, waste handling and storage, waste pretreatment and emissions to air), and adopt solutions that are best available techniques to prevent pollution. Moreover for one of these plants, the only one for which we have a significant set of monitoring data because it obtained the IPPC National Permit in 2008, we find that energy efficiency and air emissions of the principal pollutants are in

  11. Managing nuclear waste: Social and economic impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemphill, R.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bassett, G.W. Jr. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Economics

    1993-03-01

    Recent research has focused on perceptions of risk dominant source of economic impacts due to siting a high level radioactive waste facility. This article addresses the social and economic considerations involved with the issue of risk perception and other types of negative imagery. Emphasis is placed on ways of measuring the potential for economic effects resulting from perceptions prior to construction and operation of a HLW facility. We describe the problems in arriving at defensible estimates of economic impacts. Our review has found that although legal and regulatory bases may soon allow inclusion of these impacts in EIS and for compensation purposes, credible scientific methods do not currently exist for predicting the existence or magnitude of changes in economic decision-making. Policy-makers should recognize the potential for perception-based economic impacts in determining the location and means of managing radioactive waste; but, they also need be cognizant of the current limitations of quantitative estimates of impacts in this area.

  12. Combustion Characteristics of Chlorine-Free Solid Fuel Produced from Municipal Solid Waste by Hydrothermal Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunio Yoshikawa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study on converting municipal solid waste (MSW into chlorine-free solid fuel using a combination of hydrothermal processing and water-washing has been performed. After the product was extracted from the reactor, water-washing experiments were then conducted to obtain chlorine-free products with less than 3000 ppm total chlorine content. A series of combustion experiments were then performed for the products before and after the washing process to determine the chlorine content in the exhaust gas and those left in the ash after the combustion process at a certain temperature. A series of thermogravimetric analyses were also conducted to compare the combustion characteristics of the products before and after the washing process. Due to the loss of ash and some volatile matter after washing process, there were increases in the fixed carbon content and the heating value of the product. Considering the possible chlorine emission, the washing process after the hydrothermal treatment should be necessary only if the furnace temperature is more than 800 °C.

  13. Biomass waste carbon materials as adsorbents for CO2 capture under post-combustion conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Muñoz, Elisa; García-Mateos, Francisco José; Rosas, Juana; Rodríguez-Mirasol, José; Cordero, Tomás

    2016-05-01

    A series of porous carbon materials obtained from biomass waste have been synthesized, with different morphologies and structural properties, and evaluated as potential adsorbents for CO2 capture in post-combustion conditions. These carbon materials present CO2 adsorption capacities, at 25 ºC and 101.3 kPa, comparable to those obtained by other complex carbon or inorganic materials. Furthermore, CO2 uptakes under these conditions can be well correlated to the narrow micropore volume, derived from the CO2 adsorption data at 0 ºC (VDRCO2). In contrast, CO2 adsorption capacities at 25 ºC and 15 kPa are more related to only pores of sizes lower than 0.7 nm. The capacity values obtained in column adsorption experiments were really promising. An activated carbon fiber obtained from Alcell lignin, FCL, presented a capacity value of 1.3 mmol/g (5.7 %wt). Moreover, the adsorption capacity of this carbon fiber was totally recovered in a very fast desorption cycle at the same operation temperature and total pressure and, therefore, without any additional energy requirement. Thus, these results suggest that the biomass waste used in this work could be successfully valorized as efficient CO2 adsorbent, under post-combustion conditions, showing excellent regeneration performance.

  14. Biomass waste carbon materials as adsorbents for CO2 capture under post-combustion conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa M Calvo-Muñoz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A series of porous carbon materials obtained from biomass waste have been synthesized, with different morphologies and structural properties, and evaluated as potential adsorbents for CO2 capture in post-combustion conditions. These carbon materials present CO2 adsorption capacities, at 25 ºC and 101.3 kPa, comparable to those obtained by other complex carbon or inorganic materials. Furthermore, CO2 uptakes under these conditions can be well correlated to the narrow micropore volume, derived from the CO2 adsorption data at 0 ºC (VDRCO2. In contrast, CO2 adsorption capacities at 25 ºC and 15 kPa are more related to only pores of sizes lower than 0.7 nm. The capacity values obtained in column adsorption experiments were really promising. An activated carbon fiber obtained from Alcell lignin, FCL, presented a capacity value of 1.3 mmol/g (5.7 %wt. Moreover, the adsorption capacity of this carbon fiber was totally recovered in a very fast desorption cycle at the same operation temperature and total pressure and, therefore, without any additional energy requirement. Thus, these results suggest that the biomass waste used in this work could be successfully valorized as efficient CO2 adsorbent, under post-combustion conditions, showing excellent regeneration performance.

  15. Residues from combustion of heavy oils, orimulsion, biomass, peat and municipal waste in connection with power production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovsenius, G. (Elforsk AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the quantities of slag and ash in 1990 from combustion of heavy oils, orimulsion, biomass, peat and municipal waste in connection with power production for the following countries: United Kingdom, Ireland, France, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Austria, Denmark, Switzerland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Poland, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Norway, Sweden and Finland. Residues from combustion of municipal waste account for more than 90% of the quantities and for 97-99 % of the heavy metals in connection with power production from the fuels covered in this paper.

  16. Systems Analysis of Technologies for Energy Recovery from Waste. Part I. Gasification followed by Catalytic Combustion, PEM Fuel Cells and Solid Oxide Fuel Cells for Stationary Applications in Comparison with Incineration. Part - II. Catalytic combustion - Experimental part

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assefa, Getachew; Frostell, Bjoern [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Industrial Ecology; Jaeraas, Sven; Kusar, Henrik [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Chemical Technology

    2005-02-01

    This project is entitled 'Systems Analysis: Energy Recovery from waste, catalytic combustion in comparison with fuel cells and incineration'. Some of the technologies that are currently developed by researchers at the Royal Institute of Technology include catalytic combustion and fuel cells as downstream units in a gasification system. The aim of this project is to assess the energy turnover as well as the potential environmental impacts of biomass/waste-to-energy technologies. In second part of this project economic analyses of the technologies in general and catalytic combustion and fuel cell technologies in particular will be carried out. Four technology scenarios are studied: (1) Gasification followed by Low temperature fuel cells (Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells) (2) Gasification followed by high temperature fuel cells (Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) (3) Gasification followed by catalytic combustion and (4) Incineration with energy recovery. The waste used as feedstock is an industrial waste containing parts of household waste, paper waste, wood residues and poly ethene. In the study compensatory district heating is produced by combustion of biofuel. The power used for running the processes in the scenarios will be supplied by the waste-to-energy technologies themselves while compensatory power is assumed to be produced from natural gas. The emissions from the system studied are classified and characterised using methodology from Life Cycle Assessment in to the following environmental impact categories: Global Warming Potential, Acidification Potential, Eutrophication Potential and finally Formation of Photochemical Oxidants. Looking at the result of the four technology chains in terms of the four impact categories with impact per GWh electricity produced as a unit of comparison and from the perspective of the rank each scenario has in all the four impact categories, SOFC appears to be the winner technology followed by PEM and CC as second

  17. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Jjj of... - Class I Nitrogen Oxides Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Unitsa,b,c

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Unitsa,b,c 3 Table 3 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62... Municipal Waste Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Pt. 62, Subpt. JJJ, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62—Class I Nitrogen Oxides Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal...

  18. Municipal Solid Waste Combustion : Fuel Testing and Characterization : Task 1 Report, May 30, 1990-October 1, 1990.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushnell, Dwight J.; Canova, Joseph H.; Dadkhah-Nikoo, Abbas.

    1990-10-01

    The objective of this study is to screen and characterize potential biomass fuels from waste streams. This will be accomplished by determining the types of pollutants produced while burning selected municipal waste, i.e., commercial mixed waste paper residential (curbside) mixed waste paper, and refuse derived fuel. These materials will be fired alone and in combination with wood, equal parts by weight. The data from these experiments could be utilized to size pollution control equipment required to meet emission standards. This document provides detailed descriptions of the testing methods and evaluation procedures used in the combustion testing and characterization project. The fuel samples will be examined thoroughly from the raw form to the exhaust emissions produced during the combustion test of a densified sample.

  19. The combustion of biomass - the impact of its types and combustion technologies on the emission of nitrogen oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Milica R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Harmonization of environmental protection and the growing energy needs of modern society promote the biomass application as a replacement for fossil fuels and a viable option to mitigate the green house gas emissions. For domestic conditions this is particularly important as more than 60% of renewables belongs to biomass. Beside numerous benefits of using biomass for energy purposes, there are certain drawbacks, one of which is a possible high emission of NOx during the combustion of these fuels. The paper presents the results of the experiments with multiple biomass types (soybean straw, cornstalk, grain biomass, sunflower oil, glycerin and paper sludge, using different combustion technologies (fluidized bed and cigarette combustion, with emphasis on the emission of NOx in the exhaust gas. A presentation of the experimental installations is given, as well as an evaluation of the effects of the fuel composition, combustion regimes and technology on the NOx emissions. As the biomass combustion took place at temperatures low enough that thermal and prompt NOx can be neglected, the conclusion is the emissions of nitrogen oxides primarily depend on the biomass composition- it is increasing with the increase of the nitrogen content, and decreases with the increase of the char content which provides catalytic surface for NOx reduction by CO. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR33042: Improvement of the industrial fluidized bed facility, in scope of technology for energy efficient and environmentally feasible combustion of various waste materials in fluidized bed i br. III42011: Development and improvement of technologies for efficient use of energy of several forms of agricultural and forest biomass in an environmentally friendly manner, with the possibility of cogeneration

  20. Combustion Analysis of a CI Engine Performance Using Waste Cooking Biodiesel Fuel with an Artificial Neural Network Aid

    OpenAIRE

    Najafi, Gholamhassan; Ghobadian, Barat; TALAL F. YUSAF; Hadi RAHIMI

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive combustion analysis has been conducted to evaluate the performance of a commercial DI engine, water cooled two cylinders, in-line, naturally aspirated, RD270 Ruggerini diesel engine using waste vegetable cooking oil as an alternative fuel. In order to compare the brake power and the torques values of the engine, it has been tested under same operating conditions with diesel fuel and waste cooking biodiesel fuel blends. The results were found to be very comparable. The properti...

  1. Element partitioning in combustion- and gasification-based waste-to-energy units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, Umberto, E-mail: umberto.arena@unina2.it [Department of Environmental, Pharmaceutical and Biological Sciences and Technologies – Second University of Naples, Via Vivaldi, 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy); AMRA s.c.a r.l., Via Nuova Agnano, 11, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Di Gregorio, Fabrizio [Department of Environmental, Pharmaceutical and Biological Sciences and Technologies – Second University of Naples, Via Vivaldi, 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Element partitioning of waste-to-energy units by means of a substance flow analysis. ► A comparison between moving grate combustors and high temperature gasifiers. ► Classification of key elements according to their behavior during WtE processes. ► Slags and metals from waste gasifiers are completely and immediately recyclable. ► Potential reduction of amounts of solid residue to be sent to landfill disposal. - Abstract: A critical comparison between combustion- and gasification-based waste-to-energy systems needs a deep knowledge of the mass flows of materials and elements inside and throughout the units. The study collected and processed data from several moving grate conventional incinerators and high-temperature shaft gasifiers with direct melting, which are in operation worldwide. A material and substance flow analysis was then developed to systematically assess the flows and stocks of materials and elements within each waste-to-energy unit, by connecting the sources, pathways, and intermediate and final sinks of each species. The patterns of key elements, such as carbon, chloride and heavy metals, in the different solid and gaseous output streams of the two compared processes have been then defined. The combination of partitioning coefficients with the mass balances on atomic species and results of mineralogical characterization from recent literatures was used to estimate a composition of bottom ashes and slags from the two types of waste-to-energy technologies. The results also allow to quantify some of the performance parameters of the units and, in particular, the potential reduction of the amount of solid residues to be sent to final disposal.

  2. Improved electrical efficiency and bottom ash quality on waste combustion plants. Appendix A11 to A14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedegaard Madsen, O.; Boejer, M.; Jensen, Peter A.; Dam-Johansen, K.; Lundtorp, K. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Mogensen, Erhardt (Babcock and Wilcox Voelund A/S, Glostrup (Denmark))

    2010-07-01

    Investigations making it possible to evaluate and further develop concepts to improve electrical efficiency in a waste combustion plant were performed. Furthermore, one objective of the study was to investigate the possibilities of improving waste bottom ash leaching properties by use of a rotary kiln treatment. The project work included construction of a bench-scale rotary kiln, performing ash rotary kiln treatment experiments, conducting gas suction probe measurements on a waste incineration plant and making some concept evaluations. The influence of the rotary kiln thermal treatment on the leaching of Ca, Al, Si, Mg, Ba, Sr, Cl, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Mo, sulfate, DOC and carbonate was determined. As a result of these tests, the rotary kiln thermal treatment of bottom ashes can be recommended for reducing the leaching of Cu, Pb, Cl, Zn and DOC; however, an increased leaching of Cr and Mo should be expected. The combustion conditions above the grate of a waste incineration plant were investigated and the release and concentration of volatile ash species in the flue gas such as Cl, Na, K, Ca, Pb, Zn and S were measured. The conducted measurements show that flue gas from grate sections 3 and 4 can produce a sufficiently hot flue gas that contains only low concentrations of corrosive species, and therefore can be used to increase superheater temperatures. Implementation of the so-called flue gas split concept together with other steam circle modifications on a waste combustion plant, and using a reasonable increase in final steam temperature from 400 to 500 deg. C, have the potential to increase electrical efficiency from 24 to 30% (with respect to lower fuel heating value) in a waste combustion plant. The appendices deal with electrical efficiency by dividing the combustion products; release of potentially corrosive constituents from the grate; CFD modeling of grate with and without vertical divider. (Author)

  3. Soil attenuation of leachates from low-rank coal combustion wastes: a literature survey. [116 references

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauntt, R. O.; DeOtte, R. E.; Slowey, J. F.; McFarland, A. R.

    1984-01-01

    In parallel with pursuing the goal of increased utilization of low-rank solid fuels, the US Department of Energy is investigating various aspects associated with the disposal of coal-combustion solid wastes. Concern has been expressed relative to the potential hazards presented by leachates from fly ash, bottom ash and scrubber wastes. This is of particular interest in some regions where disposal areas overlap aquifer recharge regions. The western regions of the United States are characterized by relatively dry alkaline soils which may effect substantial attenuation of contaminants in the leachates thereby reducing the pollution potential. A project has been initiated to study the contaminant uptake of western soils. This effort consists of two phases: (1) preparation of a state-of-the-art document on soil attenuation; and (2) laboratory experimental studies to characterize attenuation of a western soil. The state-of-the-art document, represented herein, presents the results of studies on the characteristics of selected wastes, reviews the suggested models which account for the uptake, discusses the specialized columnar laboratory studies on the interaction of leachates and soils, and gives an overview of characteristics of Texas and Wyoming soils. 116 references, 10 figures, 29 tables.

  4. Element partitioning in combustion- and gasification-based waste-to-energy units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Umberto; Di Gregorio, Fabrizio

    2013-05-01

    A critical comparison between combustion- and gasification-based waste-to-energy systems needs a deep knowledge of the mass flows of materials and elements inside and throughout the units. The study collected and processed data from several moving grate conventional incinerators and high-temperature shaft gasifiers with direct melting, which are in operation worldwide. A material and substance flow analysis was then developed to systematically assess the flows and stocks of materials and elements within each waste-to-energy unit, by connecting the sources, pathways, and intermediate and final sinks of each species. The patterns of key elements, such as carbon, chloride and heavy metals, in the different solid and gaseous output streams of the two compared processes have been then defined. The combination of partitioning coefficients with the mass balances on atomic species and results of mineralogical characterization from recent literatures was used to estimate a composition of bottom ashes and slags from the two types of waste-to-energy technologies. The results also allow to quantify some of the performance parameters of the units and, in particular, the potential reduction of the amount of solid residues to be sent to final disposal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Improved electrical efficiency and bottom ash quality on waste combustion plants. Appendix A4 to A6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloeft, H.; Jensen, Peter A.; Nesterov, I.; Hyks, J.; Astrup, T. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Mogensen, Erhardt (Babcock and Wilcox Voelund A/S, Glostrup (Denmark))

    2010-07-01

    Investigations making it possible to evaluate and further develop concepts to improve electrical efficiency in a waste combustion plant were performed. Furthermore, one objective of the study was to investigate the possibilities of improving waste bottom ash leaching properties by use of a rotary kiln treatment. The project work included construction of a bench-scale rotary kiln, performing ash rotary kiln treatment experiments, conducting gas suction probe measurements on a waste incineration plant and making some concept evaluations. The influence of the rotary kiln thermal treatment on the leaching of Ca, Al, Si, Mg, Ba, Sr, Cl, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Mo, sulfate, DOC and carbonate was determined. As a result of these tests, the rotary kiln thermal treatment of bottom ashes can be recommended for reducing the leaching of Cu, Pb, Cl, Zn and DOC; however, an increased leaching of Cr and Mo should be expected. The combustion conditions above the grate of a waste incineration plant were investigated and the release and concentration of volatile ash species in the flue gas such as Cl, Na, K, Ca, Pb, Zn and S were measured. The conducted measurements show that flue gas from grate sections 3 and 4 can produce a sufficiently hot flue gas that contains only low concentrations of corrosive species, and therefore can be used to increase superheater temperatures. Implementation of the so-called flue gas split concept together with other steam circle modifications on a waste combustion plant, and using a reasonable increase in final steam temperature from 400 to 500 deg. C, have the potential to increase electrical efficiency from 24 to 30% (with respect to lower fuel heating value) in a waste combustion plant. The appendices deal with collection of slags for the rotary kiln experiments; overview of the thermal treatment experiments - phase 1; a journal paper with the title ''Quantification of leaching from waste incineration bottom ash treated in a rotary kiln

  6. A particulate model of solid waste incineration in a fluidized bed combining combustion and heavy metal vaporization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazza, G. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, UE Neuquen (CONICET - UNCo), Buenos Aires 1400, 8300 Neuquen (Argentina); Falcoz, Q.; Gauthier, D.; Flamant, G. [Laboratoire Procedes Materiaux et Energie Solaire (CNRS-PROMES), 7 Rue du Four Solaire, Odeillo, 66120 Font-Romeu (France)

    2009-11-15

    This study aims to develop a particulate model combining solid waste particle combustion and heavy metal vaporization from burning particles during MSW incineration in a fluidized bed. The original approach for this model combines an asymptotic combustion model for the carbonaceous solid combustion and a shrinking core model to describe the heavy metal vaporization. A parametric study is presented. The global metal vaporization process is strongly influenced by temperature. Internal mass transfer controls the metal vaporization rate at low temperatures. At high temperatures, the chemical reactions associated with particle combustion control the metal vaporization rate. A comparison between the simulation results and experimental data obtained with a laboratory-scale fluid bed incinerator and Cd-spiked particles shows that the heavy metal vaporization is correctly predicted by the model. The predictions are better at higher temperatures because of the temperature gradient inside the particle. Future development of the model will take this into account. (author)

  7. Spatial distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil, sediment, and combusted residue at an e-waste processing site in southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Anna O W; Cheung, Kwai Chung; Wong, Ming Hung

    2015-06-01

    The environmental pollution and health impacts caused by the primitive and crude recycling of e-waste have become urgent global issues. Guiyu, China is a major hotspot of e-waste recycling. In this study, the levels and distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil in Guiyu were determined to investigate the effect of e-waste activities on the environment and to identify possible sources of these pollutants. Sediment samples from a local duck pond, water gullies, a river tributary, and combusted residue from e-waste burning sites were also investigated. The general trend found in soil (Σ16 PAHs) was acid leaching site > duck pond > rice field > printer roller dump site > reservoir (control site) and ranged from 95.2 ± 54.2 to 5,210 ± 89.6 ng/g (dry wt). The highest average total PAH concentrations were found in combusted residues of wires, cables, and other computer electrical components located at two e-waste open burning sites (18,600 and 10,800 ± 3,940 ng/g). These were 195- and 113-fold higher than the PAH concentrations of soil at the control site. Sediment PAH concentrations ranged from 37.2 ± 6 to 534 ± 271 ng/g. Results of this study provide further evidence of significant input of PAHs to the environment attributed to crude e-waste recycling.

  8. On the causal links between health indicator, output, combustible renewables and waste consumption, rail transport, and CO2 emissions: the case of Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Jebli, Mehdi

    2016-08-01

    This study employs the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) approach and Granger causality test to investigate the short- and long-run relationships between health indicator, real GDP, combustible renewables and waste consumption, rail transport, and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions for the case of Tunisia, spanning the period of 1990-2011. The empirical findings suggest that the Fisher statistic of the Wald test confirm the existence of a long-run relationship between the variables. Moreover, the long-run estimated elasticities of the ARDL model provide that output and combustible renewables and waste consumption have a positive and statistically significant impact on health situation, while CO2 emissions and rail transport both contribute to the decrease of health indicator. Granger causality results affirm that, in the short-run, there is a unidirectional causality running from real GDP to health, a unidirectional causality from health to combustible renewables and waste consumption, and a unidirectional causality from all variables to CO2 emissions. In the long-run, all the computed error correction terms are significant and confirm the existence of long-run association among the variables. Our recommendations for the Tunisian policymakers are as follows: (i) exploiting wastes and renewable fuels can be a good strategy to eliminate pollution caused by emissions and subsequently improve health quality, (ii) the use of renewable energy as a main source for national rail transport is an effective strategy for public health, (iii) renewable energy investment projects are beneficial plans for the country as this contributes to the growth of its own economy and reduce energy dependence, and (iii) more renewable energy consumption leads not only to decrease pollution but also to stimulate health situation because of the increase of doctors and nurses numbers.

  9. Physicochemical characteristics of various inorganic combustible solid waste (ICSW) mixed as sustainable solid fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukarni, Sumarli, Puspitasari, Poppy; Suryanto, Heru; Wati, Rita Fajar

    2017-09-01

    The potential of inorganic combustible solid waste (ICSW) as sustainable solid fuel regarding its physical and chemical properties have investigated. The physical characterization was obtained by conducting the proximate test using Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA). This ICSW showed excellent physical properties, which its water, volatile, fixed carbon and ash content were 2.25, 65.45, 28.94 and 3.36 (wt%, air dry basis), respectively. The calorific value of 33.87 MJ/kg was found in the ICSW, which it to be comparable to the medium class of bituminous coal. The energy density of ICSW was 3612,8 MJ/m3. The ICSW chemical properties, which analyzed by using energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometry, indicated that it has a high content of C (79,49 wt%) and relatively small content of incombustible ingredient.

  10. System catalytic neutralization control of combustion engines waste gases in mining technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshunov, G. I.; Solnitsev, R. I.

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents the problems solution of the atmospheric air pollution with the exhaust gases of the internal combustion engines, used in mining technologies. Such engines are used in excavators, bulldozers, dump trucks, diesel locomotives in loading and unloading processes and during transportation of minerals. NOx, CO, CH emissions as the waste gases occur during engine operation, the concentration of which must be reduced to the standard limits. The various methods and means are used for the problem solution, one of which is neutralization based on platinum catalysts. A mathematical model of a controlled catalytic neutralization system is proposed. The simulation results confirm the increase in efficiency at start-up and low engine load and the increase in the catalyst lifetime.

  11. AKUT-II: an experimental plant for purifying the HTR loop of combustion waste gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaujean, H.; Vygen, H.

    1976-02-15

    A plant for the separation of aerosols, krypton and tritium (AKUT) used for purifying the head end of the reprocessing of thorium-containing fuel elements from combustion waste gases is described. Data are to be collected to enable a process engineer to plan and construct a large-scale plant, and the correctness and practicability of the concept adopted is to be proved in conjunction with the JUPITER plant. It is true that the tests on the AKUT I plant confirmed that the flow scheme was basically correct, but the actual experimental operation was considerably limited by a fixed and rigid coupling to the combustion furnace. Some operational conditions were encountered which did not meet the design values. Part of the plant (krypton separation) is being tested in the USA. The German concept was taken over in the early stages of tests and adapted to existing apparatuses, the result inevitably being different experimental conditions. The AKUT II plant can now be used for consideration of the economic and safety conditions, and comparisons can be made.

  12. Analysis of biomass and waste gasification lean syngases combustion for power generation using spark ignition engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marculescu, Cosmin; Cenuşă, Victor; Alexe, Florin

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a study for food processing industry waste to energy conversion using gasification and internal combustion engine for power generation. The biomass we used consisted in bones and meat residues sampled directly from the industrial line, characterised by high water content, about 42% in mass, and potential health risks. Using the feedstock properties, experimentally determined, two air-gasification process configurations were assessed and numerically modelled to quantify the effects on produced syngas properties. The study also focused on drying stage integration within the conversion chain: either external or integrated into the gasifier. To comply with environmental regulations on feedstock to syngas conversion both solutions were developed in a closed system using a modified down-draft gasifier that integrates the pyrolysis, gasification and partial oxidation stages. Good quality syngas with up to 19.1% - CO; 17% - H2; and 1.6% - CH4 can be produced. The syngas lower heating value may vary from 4.0 MJ/Nm(3) to 6.7 MJ/Nm(3) depending on process configuration. The influence of syngas fuel properties on spark ignition engines performances was studied in comparison to the natural gas (methane) and digestion biogas. In order to keep H2 molar quota below the detonation value of ⩽4% for the engines using syngas, characterised by higher hydrogen fraction, the air excess ratio in the combustion process must be increased to [2.2-2.8]. The results in this paper represent valuable data required by the design of waste to energy conversion chains with intermediate gas fuel production. The data is suitable for Otto engines characterised by power output below 1 MW, designed for natural gas consumption and fuelled with low calorific value gas fuels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The combustion of Municipal Solid Waste in the Netherlands. Emissions occurring during Combustion. Dispersal of dioxins and the associated risks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slob W; Troost LM; Krijgsman M; Koning J de; Sein AA

    1993-01-01

    Elevated dioxin concentrations in Dutch cow's milk originating from areas near municipal solid waste incinerators triggered an extensive research programme in the Netherlands, including (1) emission measurements of all Dutch municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerators, (2) compliance of

  14. Coal combustion waste management at landfills and surface impoundments 1994-2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elcock, D.; Ranek, N. L.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-09-08

    On May 22, 2000, as required by Congress in its 1980 Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a Regulatory Determination on Wastes from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels. On the basis of information contained in its 1999 Report to Congress: Wastes from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels, the EPA concluded that coal combustion wastes (CCWs), also known as coal combustion by-products (CCBs), did not warrant regulation under Subtitle C of RCRA, and it retained the existing hazardous waste exemption for these materials under RCRA Section 3001(b)(3)(C). However, the EPA also determined that national regulations under Subtitle D of RCRA were warranted for CCWs that are disposed of in landfills or surface impoundments. The EPA made this determination in part on the basis of its findings that 'present disposal practices are such that, in 1995, these wastes were being managed in 40 percent to 70 percent of landfills and surface impoundments without reasonable controls in place, particularly in the area of groundwater monitoring; and while there have been substantive improvements in state regulatory programs, we have also identified gaps in State oversight' (EPA 2000). The 1999 Report to Congress (RTC), however, may not have reflected the changes in CCW disposal practices that occurred since the cutoff date (1995) of its database and subsequent developments. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the EPA discussed this issue and decided to conduct a joint DOE/EPA study to collect new information on the recent CCW management practices by the power industry. It was agreed that such information would provide a perspective on the chronological adoption of control measures in CCW units based on State regulations. A team of experts from the EPA, industry, and DOE (with support from Argonne National Laboratory) was established to develop a mutually acceptable approach for collecting and analyzing data

  15. Improved electrical efficiency and bottom ash quality on waste combustion plants. Appendix A1 to A3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesterov, I.; Jensen, Peter A.; Dam-Johansen, K.; Kloeft, H.; Boejer, M. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Mogensen, Erhardt (Babcock and Wilcox Voelund A/S, Esbjerg (Denmark))

    2010-07-01

    Investigations making it possible to evaluate and further develop concepts to improve electrical efficiency in a waste combustion plant were performed. Furthermore, one objective of the study was to investigate the possibilities of improving waste bottom ash leaching properties by use of a rotary kiln treatment. The project work included construction of a bench-scale rotary kiln, performing ash rotary kiln treatment experiments, conducting gas suction probe measurements on a waste incineration plant and making some concept evaluations. The influence of the rotary kiln thermal treatment on the leaching of Ca, Al, Si, Mg, Ba, Sr, Cl, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Mo, sulfate, DOC and carbonate was determined. As a result of these tests, the rotary kiln thermal treatment of bottom ashes can be recommended for reducing the leaching of Cu, Pb, Cl, Zn and DOC; however, an increased leaching of Cr and Mo should be expected. The combustion conditions above the grate of a waste incineration plant were investigated and the release and concentration of volatile ash species in the flue gas such as Cl, Na, K, Ca, Pb, Zn and S were measured. The conducted measurements show that flue gas from grate sections 3 and 4 can produce a sufficiently hot flue gas that contains only low concentrations of corrosive species, and therefore can be used to increase superheater temperatures. Implementation of the so-called flue gas split concept together with other steam circle modifications on a waste combustion plant, and using a reasonable increase in final steam temperature from 400 to 500 deg. C, have the potential to increase electrical efficiency from 24 to 30% (with respect to lower fuel heating value) in a waste combustion plant. The appendices deal with incineration bottom ash leaching properties; design and construction of rotary kiln facility; manual to rotary kiln experiments. (Author)

  16. Improved electrical efficiency and bottom ash quality on waste combustion plants. Appendix A7 to A10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyks, J.; Astrup, T.; Jensen, Peter A.; Nesterov, I.; Boejer, M.; Frandsen, F.; Dam-Johansen, K.; Hedegaard Madsen, O.; Lundtorp, K. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Mogensen, Erhardt (Babcock and Wilcox Voelund A/S, Glostrup (Denmark))

    2010-07-01

    Investigations making it possible to evaluate and further develop concepts to improve electrical efficiency in a waste combustion plant were performed. Furthermore, one objective of the study was to investigate the possibilities of improving waste bottom ash leaching properties by use of a rotary kiln treatment. The project work included construction of a bench-scale rotary kiln, performing ash rotary kiln treatment experiments, conducting gas suction probe measurements on a waste incineration plant and making some concept evaluations. The influence of the rotary kiln thermal treatment on the leaching of Ca, Al, Si, Mg, Ba, Sr, Cl, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Mo, sulfate, DOC and carbonate was determined. As a result of these tests, the rotary kiln thermal treatment of bottom ashes can be recommended for reducing the leaching of Cu, Pb, Cl, Zn and DOC; however, an increased leaching of Cr and Mo should be expected. The combustion conditions above the grate of a waste incineration plant were investigated and the release and concentration of volatile ash species in the flue gas such as Cl, Na, K, Ca, Pb, Zn and S were measured. The conducted measurements show that flue gas from grate sections 3 and 4 can produce a sufficiently hot flue gas that contains only low concentrations of corrosive species, and therefore can be used to increase superheater temperatures. Implementation of the so-called flue gas split concept together with other steam circle modifications on a waste combustion plant, and using a reasonable increase in final steam temperature from 400 to 500 deg. C, have the potential to increase electrical efficiency from 24 to 30% (with respect to lower fuel heating value) in a waste combustion plant. The appendices deal with the influence of kiln treatment on incineration bottom ash leaching; the influence of kiln treatment on corrosive species in deposits; operational strategy for rotary kiln; alkali/chloride release during refuse incineration on a grate. (Author)

  17. Study on Combustion Performance of Diesel Engine Fueled by Synthesized Waste Cooking Oil Biodiesel Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duraid F. Maki

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The waste cooking oil or used cooking oil is the best source of biodiesel synthesizing because it enters into the so-called W2E field whereas not only get rid of the used cooking oils but produce energy from waste fuel. In this study, biodiesel was synthesized from the used cooking oil and specifications are tested. From 1 liter of used cooking oil, 940 ml is gained. The remaining of liter is glycerin and water. Blend of 20% of biodiesel with 80% of net diesel by volume is formed. Blends of 100% diesel and 100% biodiesel are prepared too. The diesel engine combustion performance is studied. Brake thermal efficiency, brake specific fuel consumption, volumetric efficiency, mean effective pressure, and engine outlet temperature. Cylinder pressure variation with crank angle is analyzed. At last not least, the concentrations of hydro carbon and nitrogen pollutants are measured. The results showed significant enhancement in engine power and pollutant gases emitted. There is positive compatible with other critical researches.

  18. Leaching of coal solid waste; Lixiviacion de Residuos de Combustion de Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    Combustion process to generate electrical energy in Thermal power Stations causes a big volume of solid wastes. Their store and removal has to be check for possible risks in the Environment. In this study, ashes and slags from eleven Spanish Thermal power Station has been selected. Physical chemical assays have been developed for determining twenty four parameters by; ionic chromatography, atomic absorption spectrophotometry liquid chromatography. (HPLC): UV and selective electrodes, selective electrodes espectrophotometry. Moreover, six biological tests have been realized: Bioluminescence with Photobacterium phosphoreum, Daphnia magna assay. Inhibition on Algae, Inhibition of respiration of Activated Sludges, Acute Toxicity on Fish and Earth-worm Toxicity tests. Samples treatment has been carrying out by two leaching methods: 1 o EP and DIN 38414-4 No toxic level has been found for physical-chemical parameters. The CE50 values of biological tests have allowed to stablish organisms sensibilities to waste samples, differences between ashes and slags and relationship between the carbon type and his effects on the biological organisms. (Author)

  19. Integral valorisation of waste orange peel using combustion, biomethanisation and co-composting technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siles, J A; Vargas, F; Gutiérrez, M C; Chica, A F; Martín, M A

    2016-07-01

    Although recent research has demonstrated that waste orange peel (WOP) is a potentially valuable resource that can be transformed into high value products, heat generation, biomethanisation and composting might be considered the most feasible alternatives in terms of yield. This study revealed that WOP can be successfully valorised through combustion. However, a previous drying step, which generates hazardous wastewater, is required and harmful NOx are emitted with the flue gases. In contrast, a high yield of renewable methane (280LSTPCH4/kg added COD, chemical oxygen demand) and an organic amendment can be obtained through the thermophilic biomethanisation of WOP following the removal of valuable essential oils from the peel. Co-composting of WOP combined at different proportions (17-83%) with the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) was also demonstrated to be suitable. Moreover, a 37% reduction in odour generation was observed in co-composting of WOP compared to single composting of OFMSW. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Pollutant emissions during pyrolysis and combustion of waste printed circuit boards, before and after metal removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortuño, Nuria; Conesa, Juan A; Moltó, Julia; Font, Rafael

    2014-11-15

    The constant increase in the production of electronic devices implies the need for an appropriate management of a growing number of waste electrical and electronic equipment. Thermal treatments represent an interesting alternative to recycle this kind of waste, but particular attention has to be paid to the potential emissions of toxic by-products. In this study, the emissions from thermal degradation of printed circuit boards (with and without metals) have been studied using a laboratory scale reactor, under oxidizing and inert atmosphere at 600 and 850 °C. Apart from carbon oxides, HBr was the main decomposition product, followed by high amounts of methane, ethylene, propylene, phenol and benzene. The maximum formation of PAHs was found in pyrolysis at 850 °C, naphthalene being the most abundant. High levels of 2-, 4-, 2,4-, 2,6- and 2,4,6-bromophenols were found, especially at 600 °C. Emissions of PCDD/Fs and dioxin-like PCBs were quite low and much lower than that of PBDD/Fs, due to the higher bromine content of the samples. Combustion at 600 °C was the run with the highest PBDD/F formation: the total content of eleven 2,3,7,8-substituted congeners (tetra- through heptaBDD/Fs) was 7240 and 3250 ng WHO2005-TEQ/kg sample, corresponding to the sample with and without metals, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Environmental impact of PV cell waste scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogacka, M; Pikoń, K; Landrat, M

    2017-12-01

    Rapid growth of the volume of waste from PV cells is expected in the following years. The problem of its utilization seems to be the most important issue for future waste management systems. The environmental impacts of the PV recycling scenario are presented in the manuscript. The analysis is based on the LCA approach and the average data available in specialized databases for silicon standard PV cell is used. The functional unit includes parameters like: efficiency, composition, surface area. The discussion on the environmental impact change due to the location of the PV production and waste processing plants is presented in the manuscript. Additionally, the discussion on the environmental effect of substituting different energy resources with PV cells is presented in the manuscript. The analysis of the PV cell life cycle scenario presented in the article was performed using the SIMA PRO software and data from Ecoinvent 3.0 database together with additional data obtained from other sources. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Sample conditioning system for quality assurance in waste combustion and waste recycling; Probenaufbereitungssystem zur Qualitaetssicherung fuer Abfaelle zur energetischen (stofflichen) Verwertung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spuziak-Salzenberg, D.; Riemer, S.; Bayley-Blackwedel, B.; Baer, G.

    1998-10-01

    Effective quality assurance is an indispensable element of waste recycling and waste utilization in order to make a recycling-based economy efficient and sustainable. Quality criteria and target or limiting values for waste to be recycled or disposed of have already been defined in different guidelines or drafts by LAGA and corresponding regulations (for instance, waste combustion in cements works, combustion of used wood; ordinance on biocompost, RAL quality criteria for used wood, LAGA guidelines). Whereas there exist methods of analysis and conditioning for samples for mineral, or mainly mineral, wastes in analogy to those for the bulk material used in road building, no such methods exist for mainly non-mineral material and, especially, heterogeneous mixtures of waste. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im Rahmen einer effizienten und nachhaltigen Kreislaufwirtschaft ist eine effektive Qualitaetssicherung fuer die stoffliche und energetische Verwertung von Abfaellen unerlaesslich. Zur Verwertung bzw. Beseitigung der Abfaelle sind bereits in verschiedenen Richtlinien/Entwuerfen der LAGA und entsprechenden Verwertungsvorschriften Guetekriterien und Richt- bzw. Grenzwerte definiert (u.a. energetische Verwertung in Zementwerken, Altholz-Verwertung, Biokompost-VO, RAL-Guetekriterien-Gebrauchtholz, LAGA-Richtlinien). Liegen fuer mineralische bzw. ueberwiegend mineralische Abfaelle entsprechende Probenaufbereitungs- und Analysemethoden in Analogie zum Bereich der Boden-Schuettgut-Untersuchung vor, so muss dies fuer ueberwiegend nichtmineralische Stoffe und besonders fuer heterogene Abfallgemische verneint werden. (orig.)

  3. Dropping the hammer: Examining impact ignition and combustion using pre-stressed aluminum powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kevin J.; Warzywoda, Juliusz; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Levitas, Valery I.

    2017-09-01

    Pre-stressing aluminum (Al) particles by annealing and quenching Al powder alters particle mechanical properties and has also been linked to an increase in particle reactivity. Specifically, energy propagation in composites consisting of aluminum mixed with copper oxide (Al + CuO) exhibits a 24% increase in flame speed when using pre-stressed aluminum (PS Al) compared to Al of the same particle size. However, no data exist for the reactivity of PS Al powders under impact loading. In this study, a drop weight impact tester with pressure cell was designed and built to examine impact ignition sensitivity and combustion of PS Al when mixed with CuO. Both micron and nanometer scale powders (i.e., μAl and nAl, respectively) were pre-stressed, then combined with CuO and analyzed. Three types of ignition and combustion events were identified: ignition with complete combustion, ignition with incomplete combustion, and no ignition or combustion. The PS nAl + CuO demonstrated a lower impact ignition energy threshold for complete combustion, differing from nAl + CuO samples by more than 3.5 J/mg. The PS nAl + CuO also demonstrated significantly more complete combustion as evidenced by pressure history data during ignition and combustion. Additional material characterization provides insight on hot spot formation in the incomplete combustion samples. The most probable reasons for higher impact-induced reactivity of pre-stressed particles include (a) delayed but more intense fracture of the pre-stressed alumina shell due to release of energy of internal stresses during fracture and (b) detachment of the shell from the core during impact due to high tensile stresses in the Al core leading to much more pronounced fracture of unsupported shells and easy access of oxygen to the Al core. The μAl + CuO composites did not ignite, even under pre-stressed conditions.

  4. Possible global environmental impacts of solid waste practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.M.; Holter, G.M.; DeForest, T.J.; Stapp, D.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Dibari, J.C. [Heritage College, Toppenish, WA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Pollutants resulting from the management of solid waste have been shown to affect the air, land, oceans, and waterways. In addition, solid wastes have other, more indirect impacts such as reduction in feedstocks of natural resources, because useful materials are disposed of rather than recycled. The objective of this study is to evaluate solid waste management practices that have negative implications on the global environment and develop recommendations for reducing such impacts. Recommendations identifying needed changes are identified that will reduce global impacts of solid waste practices in the future. The scope of this study includes the range of non-hazardous solid wastes produced within our society, including municipal solid waste (MSW) and industrial solid waste (ISW), as well as industry-specific wastes from activities such as construction, demolition, and landclearing. Most solid waste management decisions continue to be made and implemented at very local levels, predominantly with a short-term focus to respond to relatively immediate pressures of landfill shortages, funding problems, political considerations, and the like. In this rush to address immediate local problems, little consideration is being given to potential impacts, either short- or long-term, at the national or global level resulting from solid waste management practices. More and more, the cumulative impacts from local decisions concerning solid waste management are beginning to manifest themselves in broader, longer-term impacts than are being addressed by the decision-makers or, at the very least, are presenting a greater and greater potential for such impacts.

  5. The combustion of Municipal Solid Waste in the Netherlands. Emissions occurring during Combustion. Dispersal of dioxins and the associated risks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slob W; Troost LM; Krijgsman M; de Koning J; Sein AA

    1993-01-01

    Elevated dioxin concentrations in Dutch cow's milk originating from areas near municipal solid waste incinerators triggered an extensive research programme in the Netherlands, including (1) emission measurements of all Dutch municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerators, (2) compliance of MSW

  6. Combustion of bark and wood waste in the fluidized bed boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleshanov, K. A.; Ionkin, I. L.; Roslyakov, P. V.; Maslov, R. S.; Ragutkin, A. V.; Kondrat'eva, O. E.

    2016-11-01

    In the Energy Development Strategy of Russia for the Period until 2035, special attention is paid to increased use of local fuel kinds—one of which is biofuel, in particular, bark and wood waste (BWW)— whose application at thermal power plants in Russia has been not developed due to the lack of appropriate technologies mastered by domestic energy mechanical engineering. The article describes the experience of BWW combustion in fluidized bed boilers installed on the energy objects of northern European countries. Based on this, reference points were defined (it is the section of boiler air-gas path where initially the approximate temperatures are set), making it possible to carry out a thermal design of a boiler and ensure its operation reliability. Permissible gas temperature at the furnace outlet at BWW combustion amounted to 950-1000°C. Exit gas temperature, depending on the implementation of special measures on protection of air heater from corrosion, amounted to 140-190°C. Recommended hot air temperature is within the range of 200-250°C. Recommendations for determining the boiler furnace dimensions are presented. Based on the presented reference temperatures in the main reference points, the thermal design of hot water boiler of KV-F-116-150 type with 116 MW capacity was carried out. The analysis of the results and comparison of designed boiler characteristics with operating energy boilers, in which a fuel is burned in a fluidized bed, were carried out. It is shown that, with increasing the boiler capacity, the ratio of its heating power Q to the crosssectional area of furnace chamber F rises. For power-generating boiler of thermal capacity of 100 MW, the ratio is within 1.8-2.2MW/m2. The boiler efficiency exceeds 90% in the range of changes of exit gas temperature typical for such equipment.

  7. Highly efficient combustion with low excess air in a modern energy-from-waste (EfW) plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Reto; Waldner, Maurice H; Gablinger, Helen

    2017-07-07

    The effect of low excess air and high adiabatic combustion temperatures on CO and NOx formation has been investigated on a commercially operated energy-from-waste plant. With optimal combination of low O2 levels and stable combustion control, uncontrolled NOx levels could be lowered to 100-150mg/Nm(3) (dry, at 11% O2) while keeping CO emissions at low levels. Even at adiabatic temperatures above 1400°C thermal NOx hardly contributed to the total NOx emissions in a grate-fired EfW plant. An advanced combustion control system allowed continuous operation with very little excess air (λ<1.2) while keeping CO and NOx at levels well below the legal emission limits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Responsiveness of the hypothalamo-pituitary-interrenal axis in an amphibian (Bufo terrestris) exposed to coal combustion wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, W.A.; Mendonca, M.T. [Department of Zoology and Wildlife, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Congdon, J.D. [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (United States)

    1999-02-01

    To assess the responsiveness of the interrenal axis to stress, we injected toads exposed to coal combustion wastes and toads from an unpolluted reference site with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), as well as the vehicle alone (saline). Initial circulating levels of corticosterone in toads captured at the polluted area were significantly higher than levels in toads from the reference site. Corticosterone levels in toads from the polluted site remained high even after 2 weeks of laboratory acclimation and injection with saline. The results may suggest disruption of hepatic enzymes responsible for the metabolicclearance of steroid hormones. Injection of toads from the polluted site with ACTH had no effect on plasma corticosterone levels, whereas a similar treatment of toads from the reference site stimulated a marked increase in corticosterone. Our study provides evidence that toads exposed to coal combustion wastes may be less efficient at responding to additional environmental stressors. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  9. Molecular hydrogen (H2) combustion emissions and their isotope (D/H) signatures from domestic heaters, diesel vehicle engines, waste incinerator plants, and biomass burning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollmer, M.K.; Walter, S.; Mohn, J.; Steinbacher, M.; Bond, S.W.; Röckmann, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304838233; Reimann, S.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2), its stable isotope signature ( D), and the key combustion parameters carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4) were measured from various combustion processes. H2 in the exhaust of gas and oil-fired heaters and of waste incinerator plants was generally

  10. Influence of combustion conditions on the PCDD/F-, PCB-, PCBz- and PAH-concentrations in the post-combustion chamber of a waste incineration pilot plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstock, M; Zimmermann, R; Schramm, K W; Kettrup, A

    2000-01-01

    Experiments at a pilot scale waste incinerator (0.5 MW thermal power) showed that the conditions in the post-combustion chamber (650-900 degrees C) are strongly influencing the formation of chlorinated and non-chlorinated aromatics. Non-optimal combustion conditions resulted in increased concentrations of mono- to trichlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD), dibenzofurans (PCDF) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), while chlorinated benzenes (PCBz), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and the higher chlorinated PCDD/F are only weakly affected or even decrease. The changes in concentration of the compounds investigated over a time span of hours gave hints on 'memory effects' in this combustion zone. For mono- and dichlorinated benzenes, a high correlation (r2 = 0.80) with the international toxicity equivalent (I-TEQ) value of PCDD/F was observed. As recently has been demonstrated, this correlation can be utilized for an indirect on-line measurement of the I-TEQ by a novel laser mass spectrometric technique (REMPI-TO-FMS).

  11. Demonstration of high temperature thermoelectric waste heat recovery from exhaust gases of a combustion engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trottmann, Matthias; Weidenkaff, Anke; Populoh, Sascha; Brunko, Oliver; Veziridis, Angelika; Bach, Christian; Cabalzar, Urs [Empa, Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    The energy efficiency of passenger cars becomes increasingly important due to a growing awareness in terms of climate change and shortages of resources associated with rising fuel prices. In addition to the efforts towards the optimization of the engine's internal efficiency, waste heat recovery is the main objective. In this respect, thermoelectric (TE) devices seem to be suited as heat recuperation systems. Thermoelectric generators allow for direct transformation of thermal into electrical energy. In order to thoroughly investigate this type of recovery system a TE demonstrator was mounted on the muffler of a VW Touran and tested. The waste heat of the exhaust gas was converted into electricity with a conversion rate of {proportional_to}. 3.5%. The limiting factor was the low thermal stability of the commercial modules used in this pre-study to elaborate reference values. Thermoelectric modules based on sustainable and temperature-stable materials are being developed to improve the measured values. A thermoelectric test generator with perovskite-type oxide modules was constructed confirm the function and stability at elevated temperatures. Despite all the advantages of this material class, the TE performance is still to be improved. A quantitative measure of a material's TE performance is the temperature-independent Figure of Merit ZT. ZT increases with decreasing thermal and increasing electrical conductivity. An approach to thermal conductivity reduction is nanostructuring of the material. The Ultrasonic Spray Combustion (USC) technique allows to produce powders with a grain size on the nanoscale and was tested in this study. (orig.)

  12. Pollutant emissions during pyrolysis and combustion of waste printed circuit boards, before and after metal removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortuño, Nuria; Conesa, Juan A., E-mail: ja.conesa@ua.es; Moltó, Julia; Font, Rafael

    2014-11-15

    The constant increase in the production of electronic devices implies the need for an appropriate management of a growing number of waste electrical and electronic equipment. Thermal treatments represent an interesting alternative to recycle this kind of waste, but particular attention has to be paid to the potential emissions of toxic by-products. In this study, the emissions from thermal degradation of printed circuit boards (with and without metals) have been studied using a laboratory scale reactor, under oxidizing and inert atmosphere at 600 and 850 °C. Apart from carbon oxides, HBr was the main decomposition product, followed by high amounts of methane, ethylene, propylene, phenol and benzene. The maximum formation of PAHs was found in pyrolysis at 850 °C, naphthalene being the most abundant. High levels of 2-, 4-, 2,4-, 2,6- and 2,4,6-bromophenols were found, especially at 600 °C. Emissions of PCDD/Fs and dioxin-like PCBs were quite low and much lower than that of PBDD/Fs, due to the higher bromine content of the samples. Combustion at 600 °C was the run with the highest PBDD/F formation: the total content of eleven 2,3,7,8-substituted congeners (tetra- through heptaBDD/Fs) was 7240 and 3250 ng WHO{sub 2005}-TEQ/kg sample, corresponding to the sample with and without metals, respectively. - Highlights: • Thermal decomposition of printed circuit boards (with and without metals) is studied. • Important differences were found at the different experimental conditions. • Emission of brominated pollutants is much higher than that of chlorinated. • Metal enhances emission of halogenated compounds. • An increase in the temperature produces the destruction of pollutants.

  13. Effective utilization of waste ash from MSW and coal co-combustion power plant: Zeolite synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yun; Zhang, Fu-Shen; Zhu, Jianxin; Liu, Zhengang

    2008-05-01

    The solid by-product from power plant fueled with municipal solid waste and coal was used as a raw material to synthesize zeolite by fusion-hydrothermal process in order to effectively use this type of waste material. The effects of treatment conditions, including NaOH/ash ratio, operating temperature and hydrothermal reaction time, were investigated, and the product was applied to simulated wastewater treatment. The optimal conditions for zeolite X synthesis were: NaOH/ash ratio=1.2:1, fusion temperature=550 degrees C, crystallization time=6-10 h and crystallization temperature=90 degrees C. In the synthesis process, it was found that zeolite X tended to transform into zeolite HS when NaOH/ash ratio was 1.8 or higher, crystallization time was 14-18 h, operating temperature was 130 degrees C or higher. The CEC value, BET surface area and pore volume for the synthesized product at optimal conditions were 250 cmol kg(-1), 249 m(2) g(-1) and 0.46 cm(3) g(-1) respectively, higher than coal fly ash based zeolite. Furthermore, when applied to Zn(2+) contaminated wastewater treatment, the synthesized product presented larger adsorption capacity and bond energy than coal fly ash based zeolite, and the adsorption isotherm data could be well described by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. These results demonstrated that the special type of co-combustion ash from power plant is suitable for synthesizing high quality zeolite, and the products are suitable for heavy metal removal from wastewater.

  14. Characterization and quantification of corticosteroid-binding globulin in a southern toad, Bufo terrestris, exposed to coal-combustion-waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, C.K.; Fontes, C.; Breuner, C.W.; Mendonca, M.T. [Auburn University, Auburn, AL (USA). Dept. of Biological Science

    2007-05-15

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) is a plasma protein that binds corticosterone and may regulate access of hormone to tissues. The role of CBG during a stress response is not clear. In this study, southern toads, Bufo terrestris, were exposed to a chronic pollutant (coal-combustion-waste), to determine changes in CBG and free corticosterone levels. Since toads exposed to chronic pollutants in previous studies did not exhibit the predicted changes in metabolic rate and mass, but did experience a significant elevation in total corticosterone, we hypothesized that CBG would likewise increase and thus, mitigate the effects of a chronic (i.e. 2 months) pollutant stressor. To conduct this study, we first characterized the properties of CBG in southern toads. After characterization, we monitored the changes in CBG, total corticosterone, and free corticosterone in male toads that were exposed to either coal-combustion-waste or control conditions. CBG increased in all groups throughout the experiment. Total corticosterone, on the other hand, was only significantly elevated at four weeks of exposure to coal-combustion-waste. The increase in CBG did not parallel the increase in total corticosterone; as a result, free corticosterone levels were not buffered by CBG, but showed a peak at four weeks similar to total corticosterone. This finding indicates that, in this species, CBG may not provide a protective mechanism during long-term pollution exposure.

  15. Fluidized bed combustion of pelletized biomass and waste-derived fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chirone, R.; Scala, F.; Solimene, R. [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione - C.N.R., Piazzale V. Tecchio 80, 80125 Naples (Italy); Salatino, P.; Urciuolo, M. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica - Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale V. Tecchio 80, 80125 Naples (Italy)

    2008-10-15

    The fluidized bed combustion of three pelletized biogenic fuels (sewage sludge, wood, and straw) has been investigated with a combination of experimental techniques. The fuels have been characterized from the standpoints of patterns and rates of fuel devolatilization and char burnout, extent of attrition and fragmentation, and their relevance to the fuel particle size distribution and the amount and size distribution of primary ash particles. Results highlight differences and similarities among the three fuels tested. The fuels were all characterized by limited primary fragmentation and relatively long devolatilization times, as compared with the time scale of particle dispersion away from the fuel feeding ports in practical FBC. Both features are favorable to effective lateral distribution of volatile matter across the combustor cross section. The three fuels exhibited distinctively different char conversion patterns. The high-ash pelletized sludge burned according to the shrinking core conversion pattern with negligible occurrence of secondary fragmentation. The low-ash pelletized wood burned according to the shrinking particle conversion pattern with extensive occurrence of secondary fragmentation. The medium-ash pelletized straw yielded char particles with a hollow structure, resembling big cenospheres, characterized by a coherent inorganic outer layer strong enough to prevent particle fragmentation. Inert bed particles were permanently attached to the hollow pellets as they were incorporated into ash melts. Carbon elutriation rates were very small for all the fuels tested. For pelletized sludge and straw, this was mostly due to the shielding effect of the coherent ash skeleton. For the wood pellet, carbon attrition was extensive, but was largely counterbalanced by effective afterburning due to the large intrinsic reactivity of attrited char fines. The impact of carbon attrition on combustion efficiency was negligible for all the fuels tested. The size

  16. Impacts on waste planning and management

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oelofse, Suzan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available the skills or experience to manage this waste responsibly. Available waste water infrastructure in the study area is under pressure and requires urgent intervention. The technologies and capacity at these already stressed facilities are not sufficient...

  17. High Impact Technology Compact Combustion (HITCC) Compact Core Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    characterization of key combustion phenomena. • Continue efforts to integrate increasingly sophisticated chemistry and kinetics models with fluid dynamics to...chemical kinetics , and 5) detonation-stabilized turbulent flames. Lean blowout data was collected on propane and jet fuel bluff-body stabilized flames...ignition delay time is an adequate representation of the chemical timescale. 15. SUBJECT TERMS flameholder, combustor, chemical, kinetics , detonation

  18. Assessment of the greenhouse effect impact of technologies used for energy recovery from municipal waste: a case for England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, A; Barton, J R; Karagiannidis, A

    2009-07-01

    Waste management activities contribute to global greenhouse gas emissions approximately by 4%. In particular the disposal of waste in landfills generates methane that has high global warming potential. Effective mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions is important and could provide environmental benefits and sustainable development, as well as reduce adverse impacts on public health. The European and UK waste policy force sustainable waste management and especially diversion from landfill, through reduction, reuse, recycling and composting, and recovery of value from waste. Energy from waste is a waste management option that could provide diversion from landfill and at the same time save a significant amount of greenhouse gas emissions, since it recovers energy from waste which usually replaces an equivalent amount of energy generated from fossil fuels. Energy from waste is a wide definition and includes technologies such as incineration of waste with energy recovery, or combustion of waste-derived fuels for energy production or advanced thermal treatment of waste with technologies such as gasification and pyrolysis, with energy recovery. The present study assessed the greenhouse gas emission impacts of three technologies that could be used for the treatment of Municipal Solid Waste in order to recover energy from it. These technologies are Mass Burn Incineration with energy recovery, Mechanical Biological Treatment via bio-drying and Mechanical Heat Treatment, which is a relatively new and uninvestigated method, compared to the other two. Mechanical Biological Treatment and Mechanical Heat Treatment can turn Municipal Solid Waste into Solid Recovered Fuel that could be combusted for energy production or replace other fuels in various industrial processes. The analysis showed that performance of these two technologies depends strongly on the final use of the produced fuel and they could produce GHG emissions savings only when there is end market for the fuel. On the

  19. Waste package/repository impact study: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-09-01

    The Waste Package/Repository Impact Study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using the current reference salt waste package in the salt repository conceptual design. All elements of the repository that may impact waste package parameters, i.e., (size, weight, heat load) were evaluated. The repository elements considered included waste hoist feasibility, transporter and emplacement machine feasibility, subsurface entry dimensions, feasibility of emplacement configuration, and temperature limits. The evaluations are discussed in detail with supplemental technical data included in Appendices to this report, as appropriate. Results and conclusions of the evaluations are discussed in light of the acceptability of the current reference waste package as the basis for salt conceptual design. Finally, recommendations are made relative to the salt project position on the application of the reference waste package as a basis for future design activities. 31 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs.

  20. RED-IMPACT. Impact of partitioning, transmutation and waste reduction technologies on the final nuclear waste disposal. Synthesis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lensa, Werner von; Nabbi, Rahim; Rossbach, Matthias (eds.) [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The impact of partitioning and transmutation (P and T) and waste reduction technologies on the nuclear waste management and particularly on the final disposal has been analysed within the EU-funded RED-IMPACT project. Five representative scenarios, ranging from direct disposal of the spent fuel to fully closed cycles (including minor actinide (MA) recycling) with fast neutron reactors or accelerator-driven systems (ADS), were chosen in the project to cover a wide range of representative waste streams, fuel cycle facilities and process performances. High and intermediate level waste streams have been evaluated for all of these scenarios with the aim of analysing the impact on geological disposal in different host formations such as granite, clay and salt. For each scenario and waste stream, specific waste package forms have been proposed and their main characteristics identified. Both equilibrium and transition analyses have been applied to those scenarios. The performed assessments have addressed parameters such as the total radioactive and radiotoxic inventory, discharges during reprocessing, thermal power and radiation emission of the waste packages, corrosion of matrices, transport of radioisotopes through the engineered and geological barriers or the resulting doses from the repository. The major conclusions of include the fact, that deep geological repository to host the remaining high level waste (HLW) and possibly the long-lived intermediate level waste (ILW) is unavoidable whatever procedure is implemented to manage waste streams from different fuel cycle scenarios including P and T of long-lived transuranic actinides.

  1. Contribution of individual waste fractions to the environmental impacts from landfilling of municipal solid waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfredi, Simone; Tonini, Davide; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2010-01-01

    by leaching of heavy metals from ashes (e.g. residues from roads cleaning and vacuum cleaning bags), batteries, paper and metals. On the other hand, substantial net environmental savings are estimated for the categories Global Warming (GW; -31 mPE/tonne) and Eco-Toxicity in water chronic (ETwc; -53 m......A number of LCA-based studies have reported on the environmental performance of landfilling of mixed waste, but little is known about the relative contributions of individual waste fractions to the overall impact potentials estimated for the mixed waste. In this paper, an empirical model has been...... used to estimate the emissions to the environment from landfilling of individual waste fractions. By means of the LCA-model EASEWASTE, the emissions estimated have been used to quantify how much of the overall impact potential for each impact category is to be attributed to the individual waste...

  2. Elemental analysis of ash residue from combustion of CCA treated wood waste before and after electrodialytic extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2006-01-01

    Element distribution in a combined fly ash and bottom ash from combustion of copper chromate arsenate (CCA) treated wood waste was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDX) before and after electrodialytic extraction. The untreated ash contained various particles, including pieces....... Chemical analyses of untreated and treated ash confirmed that most As, but only smaller amounts of Cu and Cr was removed due to the electrodialytic extraction. Overall metal contents in the original ash residue were: 1.4 g As, 2.76 g Cu and 2.48 g Cr, after electrodialytic extraction these amounts were...

  3. Thermal impact of waste emplacement and surface cooling associated with geologic disposal of nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Mangold, D.C.; Spencer, R.K.; Tsang, C.F.

    1982-08-01

    The thermal effects associated with the emplacement of aged radioactive wastes in a geologic repository were studied, with emphasis on the following subjects: the waste characteristics, repository structure, and rock properties controlling the thermally induced effects; the current knowledge of the thermal, thermomechanical, and thermohydrologic impacts, determined mainly on the basis of previous studies that assume 10-year-old wastes; the thermal criteria used to determine the repository waste loading densities; and the technical advantages and disadvantages of surface cooling of the wastes prior to disposal as a means of mitigating the thermal impacts. The waste loading densities determined by repository designs for 10-year-old wastes are extended to older wastes using the near-field thermomechanical criteria based on room stability considerations. Also discussed are the effects of long surface cooling periods determined on the basis of far-field thermomechanical and thermohydrologic considerations. The extension of the surface cooling period from 10 years to longer periods can lower the near-field thermal impact but have only modest long-term effects for spent fuel. More significant long-term effects can be achieved by surface cooling of reprocessed high-level waste.

  4. Potential Impacts of Organic Wastes on Small Stream Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, S. S.; Groffman, P. M.; Findlay, S. E.; Fischer, D. T.; Burke, R. A.; Molinero, J.

    2005-05-01

    We monitored concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved oxygen (DO) and other parameters in 17 small streams of the South Fork Broad River (SFBR) watershed on a monthly basis for 15 months. The subwatersheds were chosen to reflect a range of land uses including forested, pasture, mixed, and developed. The SFBR watershed is heavily impacted by organic wastes, primarily from its large poultry industry, but also from its rapidly growing human population. The poultry litter is primarily disposed of by application to pastures. Our monthly monitoring results showed a strong inverse relationship between mean DOC and mean DO and suggested that concentrations of total nitrogen (TN), DOC, and the trace gases nitrous oxide, methane and carbon dioxide are impacted by organic wastes and/or nutrients from animal manure applied to the land and/or human wastes from wastewater treatment plants or septic tanks in these watersheds. Here we estimate the organic waste loads of these watersheds and evaluate the impact of organic wastes on stream DOC and alkalinity concentrations, electrical conductivity, sediment potential denitrification rate and plant stable nitrogen isotope ratios. All of these water quality parameters are significantly correlated with watershed waste loading. DOC is most strongly correlated with total watershed waste loading whereas conductivity, alkalinity, potential denitrification rate and plant stable nitrogen isotope ratio are most strongly correlated with watershed human waste loading. These results suggest that more direct inputs (e.g., wastewater treatment plant effluents, near-stream septic tanks) have a greater relative impact on stream water quality than more dispersed inputs (land applied poultry litter, septic tanks far from streams) in the SFBR watershed. Conductivity, which is generally elevated in organic wastes, is also significantly correlated with total watershed waste loading suggesting it may be a useful indicator of overall

  5. Numerical and experimental studies on effects of moisture content on combustion characteristics of simulated municipal solid wastes in a fixed bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Rui, E-mail: Sunsr@hit.edu.cn [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 92, West Dazhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China); Ismail, Tamer M., E-mail: temoil@aucegypt.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Ren, Xiaohan [School of Energy Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 92, West Dazhi Street, Harbin 150001 (China); Abd El-Salam, M. [Department of Basic Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • The effects of moisture content on the burning process of MSW are investigated. • A two-dimensional mathematical model was built to simulate the combustion process. • Temperature distributions, process rates, gas species were measured and simulated. • The The conversion ratio of C/CO and N/NO in MSW are inverse to moisture content. - Abstract: In order to reveal the features of the combustion process in the porous bed of a waste incinerator, a two-dimensional unsteady state model and experimental study were employed to investigate the combustion process in a fixed bed of municipal solid waste (MSW) on the combustion process in a fixed bed reactor. Conservation equations of the waste bed were implemented to describe the incineration process. The gas phase turbulence was modeled using the k–ε turbulent model and the particle phase was modeled using the kinetic theory of granular flow. The rate of moisture evaporation, devolatilization rate, and char burnout was calculated according to the waste property characters. The simulation results were then compared with experimental data for different moisture content of MSW, which shows that the incineration process of waste in the fixed bed is reasonably simulated. The simulation results of solid temperature, gas species and process rate in the bed are accordant with experimental data. Due to the high moisture content of fuel, moisture evaporation consumes a vast amount of heat, and the evaporation takes up most of the combustion time (about 2/3 of the whole combustion process). The whole bed combustion process reduces greatly as MSW moisture content increases. The experimental and simulation results provide direction for design and optimization of the fixed bed of MSW.

  6. Impacts of dung combustion on the carbon cycle of alpine grassland of the north Tibetan plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zengrang; Cheng, Shengkui; Zhen, Lin; Pan, Ying; Zhang, Xianzhou; Wu, Junxi; Zou, Xiuping; Bijaya, G C Dhruba

    2013-08-01

    Alpine grassland of Tibet is a frangible ecosystem in terms of carbon (C) emission. Yak dung is an important resident energy with about 80 % of yak dung combusted for energy in the north Tibetan plateau. This paper investigated the impact of dung combustion on the C cycle of the alpine grassland ecosystem in north Tibet, China. During the growing season of 2011, from a field survey and household questionnaires, the main impacts of dung collection for fuel on the C cycle of the ecosystem were identified. (1) The C sequestration and storage capacity, including the dung-derived C stored in soil and C captured by vegetation, decreased. The net primary production decreased remarkably because of the reduction of dung returned to soil. (2) In a given period, more C was emitted to the atmosphere in the dung combustion situation than that in the dung returned to soil situation. (3) The energy grazing alpine meadow ecosystem changed into a net C source, and the net biome production of the ecosystem dropped to -15.18 g C/m2 year in the dung combustion situation, 42.95 g C/m2 year less than that in the dung returned situation. To reduce the CO2 emission derived from dung use, the proportion of dung combustion should be reduced and alternative renewable energy such as solar, wind, or hydro energy should be advocated, which is suitable for, and accessible to, the north Tibetan plateau.

  7. Impact of Fuel Type on the Internal Combustion Engine Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdravko Schauperl

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies the influence of liquefied petroleum gas as alternative fuel on the condition of the internal combustion engine. The traffic, energy, economic and ecological influence as well as the types of fuel are studied and analyzed in an unbiased manner, objectively, and in detail, and the obtained results are compared with the condition of the engine of a vehicle powered by the stipulated fuel, petrol Eurosuper 95. The study was carried out on two identical passenger cars with one being fitted with gas installation. The obtained results show that properly installed gas installations in vehicles and the usage of LPG have no significant influence on the driving performances, but they affect significantly the ecological and economic parameters of using passenger cars.

  8. Waste wood as bioenergy feedstock. Climate change impacts and related emission uncertainties from waste wood based energy systems in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röder, Mirjam; Thornley, Patricia

    2017-12-01

    Considering the urgent need to shift to low carbon energy carriers, waste wood resources could provide an alternative energy feedstock and at the same time reduce emissions from landfill. This research examines the climate change impacts and related emission uncertainties of waste wood based energy. For this, different grades of waste wood and energy application have been investigated using lifecycle assessment. Sensitivity analysis has then been applied for supply chain processes and feedstock properties for the main emission contributing categories: transport, processing, pelletizing, urea resin fraction and related N 2 O formation. The results show, depending on the waste wood grade, the conversion option, scale and the related reference case, that emission reductions of up to 91% are possible for non-treated wood waste. Compared to this, energy from treated wood waste with low contamination can achieve up to 83% emission savings, similar to untreated waste wood pellets, but in some cases emissions from waste wood based energy can exceed the ones of the fossil fuel reference - in the worst case by 126%. Emission reductions from highly contaminated feedstocks are largest when replacing electricity from large-scale coal and landfill. The highest emission uncertainties are related to the wood's resin fraction and N 2 O formation during combustion and, pelletizing. Comparing wood processing with diesel and electricity powered equipment also generated high variations in the results, while emission variations related to transport are relatively small. Using treated waste wood as a bioenergy feedstock can be a valid option to reduce emissions from energy production but this is only realisable if coal and landfill gas are replaced. To achieve meaningful emission reduction in line with national and international climate change targets, pre-treatment of waste wood would be required to reduce components that form N 2 O during the energy conversion. Copyright © 2017

  9. Prospects for using a full-scale installation for wet combustion of organic wastes in closed life support systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifonov, Sergey V; Kudenko, Yurii A; Tikhomirov, Alexander A

    2015-11-01

    The issue of recycling organic wastes in closed life support systems (CLSS) includes both fundamental aspects of environmental safety of the recycled products and their effective involvement in material cycles and technical aspects related to the structure of the system and the crew's demands. This study estimates the effectiveness of wet combustion of different amounts of organic wastes in hydrogen peroxide under application of an alternating current electric field. The study also addresses the possibility of controlling the process automatically. The results show that processing of greater amounts of wastes reduces specific power consumption and shortens the duration of the process, without significantly affecting the level of oxidation of the products. An automatic control system for a semi-commercial installation has been constructed and tested experimentally. The solution of mineralized human wastes prepared in the automatically controlled process in this installation was successfully used to grow radish plants, with the main production parameters being similar to those of the control. Copyright © 2015 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact assessment of waste management options in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Reginald B H; Khoo, Hsien H

    2006-03-01

    This paper describes the application of life cycle assessment for evaluating various waste management options in Singapore, a small-island city state. The impact assessment method by SimaPro is carried out for comparing the potential environmental impacts of waste treatment options including landfilling, incineration, recycling, and composting. The inventory data include gases and leachate from landfills, air emissions and energy recovery from incinerators, energy (and emission) savings from recycling, composting gases, and transport pollution. The impact assessment results for climate change, acidification, and ecotoxicity show that the incineration of materials imposes considerable harm to both human health and the environment, especially for the burning of plastics, paper/cardboard, and ferrous metals. The results also show that, although some amount of energy can be derived from the incineration of wastes, these benefits are outweighed by the air pollution (heavy metals and dioxins/furans) that incinerators produce. For Singapore, landfill gases and leachate generate minimal environmental damage because of the nation's policy to landfill only 10% of the total disposed wastes. Land transportation and separation of waste materials also pose minimal environmental damage. However, sea transportation to the landfill could contribute significantly to acidification because of the emissions of sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides from barges. The composting of horticultural wastes hardly imposes any environmental damage. Out of all the waste strategies, the recycling of wastes offers the best solution for environmental protection and improved human health for the nation. Significant emission savings can be realized through recycling.

  11. Study on Influence to Waste Water Treatment Plant’s Sludge by Low-carbon Catalytic Combustion Furnace of Natural Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren TianQi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There are two parts in this experiment. One of is about the concentration of Variation of exhaust gas while heating sludge of waste water treatment plant. The other one is about introduce the problems of the traditional incineration processes of sludge of waste water treatment as compared between the sludge heated by natural gas catalytic combustion furnace and the tradition’s. We can see that natural gas low-carbon catalytic combustion furnace realize the near-zero emission of contaminates.

  12. Combustion, Performance, and Emission Evaluation of a Diesel Engine with Biodiesel Like Fuel Blends Derived From a Mixture of Pakistani Waste Canola and Waste Transformer Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Qasim

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the combustion, performance, and emission characteristics of a 5.5 kW four-stroke single-cylinder water-cooled direct-injection diesel engine operated with blends of biodiesel-like fuel (BLF15, BLF20 & BLF25 obtained from a 50:50 mixture of transesterified waste transformer oil (TWTO and waste canola oil methyl esters (WCOME with petroleum diesel. The mixture of the waste oils was named as biodiesel-like fuel (BLF.The engine fuelled with BLF blends was evaluated in terms of combustion, performance, and emission characteristics. FTIR analysis was carried out to know the functional groups in the BLF fuel. The experimental results revealed the shorter ignition delay and marginally higher brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC, brake thermal efficiency (BTE and exhaust gas temperature (EGT values for BLF blends as compared to diesel. The hydrocarbon (HC and carbon monoxide (CO emissions were decreased by 10.92–31.17% and 3.80–6.32%, respectively, as compared to those of diesel fuel. Smoke opacity was significantly reduced. FTIR analysis has confirmed the presence of saturated alkanes and halide groups in BLF fuel. In comparison to BLF20 and BLF25, the blend BLF15 has shown higher brake thermal efficiency and lower fuel consumption values. The HC, CO, and smoke emissions of BLF15 were found lower than those of petroleum diesel. The fuel blend BLF15 is suggested to be used as an alternative fuel for diesel engines without any engine modification.

  13. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Pollutants from Combustion Formation and Impact on Atmospheric Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This volume is based on the lectures presented at the NATO Advanced Study Institute: (ASI) «Pollutants Formation from Combustion. Formation Mechanisms and Impact on th th Atmospheric Chemistry» held in Maratea, Italy, from 13 to 26 september 1998. Preservation of the environment is of increasing concern in individual countries but also at continental or world scales. The structure of a NATO ASI which involve lecturers and participants of different nationalities was thought as especially well suited to address environmental issues. As combustion is known to substantially contribute to the damaging of the atmosphere, it was natural to concentrate the ASI program on reviewing the currently available knowledge of the formation mechanisms of the main pollutants liberated by combustion systems. In most situations, pollutants are present as trace components and their formation and removal is strongly conditioned by the chemical reactions initiated by fuel consumption. Therefore specific lectures were aimed at defi...

  14. Release to the gas phase of metals, S and Cl during combustion of dedicated waste fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; van Lith, Simone Cornelia; Frandsen, Flemming

    2010-01-01

    wood, shoes, automotive shredder waste and PVC (poly-vinyl-chloride). The waste fractions were characterized by use of wet chemical analysis, and, based on the chemical composition of the initial fuel sample and the ash residue after the experiments; the release of inorganic elements was quantified......The release to the gas phase of inorganic elements such as alkali metals. Cl, S, and heavy metals in Waste-to-Energy (WtE) boilers is a challenge. Besides the risk of harmful emissions to the environment, inorganic elements released from the grate may cause severe ash deposition and corrosion...... and the link to the formation of fly ash and aerosols in full-scale waste incinerators. The release of metals, S and Cl from four dedicated waste fractions was quantified as a function of temperature in a lab-scale fixed-bed reactor. The waste fractions comprised chromated copper arsenate (CCA) impregnated...

  15. The impact of equivalence ratio oscillations on combustion dynamics in a backward-facing step combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murat Altay, H.; Speth, Raymond L.; Hudgins, Duane E.; Ghoniem, Ahmed F. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    The combustion dynamics of propane-air flames are investigated in an atmospheric pressure, atmospheric inlet temperature, lean, premixed backward-facing step combustor. We modify the location of the fuel injector to examine the impact of equivalence ratio oscillations arriving at the flame on the combustion dynamics. Simultaneous pressure, velocity, heat-release rate and equivalence ratio measurements and high-speed video from the experiments are used to identify and characterize several distinct operating modes. When the fuel is injected far upstream from the step, the equivalence ratio arriving at the flame is steady and the combustion dynamics are controlled only by flame-vortex interactions. In this case, different dynamic regimes are observed depending on the operating parameters. When the fuel is injected close to the step, the equivalence ratio arriving at the flame exhibits oscillations. In the presence of equivalence ratio oscillations, the measured sound pressure level is significant across the entire range of lean mean equivalence ratios even if the equivalence ratio oscillations arriving at the flame are out-of-phase with the pressure oscillations. The combustion dynamics are governed primarily by the flame-vortex interactions, while the equivalence ratio oscillations have secondary effects. The equivalence ratio oscillations could generate variations in the combustion dynamics in each cycle under some operating conditions, destabilize the flame at the entire range of the lean equivalence ratios, and increase the value of the mean equivalence ratio at the lean blowout limit. (author)

  16. Relationship between ecotoxicity and PAH content in coal combustion waste samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastral, A.M.; Callen, M.S.; Garcia, T.; Lopez, J.M.; Maranon, E. [Inst. Carboquim, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Three different series of combustion samples (from the ash pan, samples C; from the particulate matter trapped on cyclone, samples PM; and from the finest particulate matter, samples M) have been analyzed looking for any relationship between their PAH content and their ecotoxicity. PAH content was analyzed by synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. Ecotoxicity of the combustion samples was determined by using the Photobacterium phosphoreum test to assess their toxicity through an ecotoxicity assay. Results obtained are shown and discussed in relation to the PAH content of the samples.

  17. The influence of composition and final pyrolysis temperature variations on global kinetics of combustion of segregated municipal solid waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranoto; Himawanto, D. A.; Arifin, N. A.

    2017-04-01

    The combustion of segregated municipal solid waste (MSW) and the resulted char from the pyrolysis process were investigated in this research. The segregated MSW that was collected and used can be divided into organic and inorganic waste materials. The organic materials were bamboo and banana leaves and the inorganic materials were Styrofoam and snack wrappings. The composition ratio of the waste was based on the percentage of weight of each sample. The thermal behaviour of the segregated MSW was investigated by thermo gravimetric analysis. For the pyrolysis process the prepared samples of 200gram were heated from ambient temperature until a variance of final pyrolysis temperature of 550°C, 650°C and 750°C at a constant heating rate of 25°C/min. It was found that the highest activation energy of the raw materials is achieved from sample CC1 (Char with 100% inorganic materials). The activation energy of the raw materials is relatively lower than that of the char. The higher the final pyrolysis temperature, the lower the calorific value of char. The calorific value gradually increases with the amount of inorganic materials.

  18. Multiple Threats to Child Health from Fossil Fuel Combustion: Impacts of Air Pollution and Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Frederica P

    2017-02-01

    Approaches to estimating and addressing the risk to children from fossil fuel combustion have been fragmented, tending to focus either on the toxic air emissions or on climate change. Yet developing children, and especially poor children, now bear a disproportionate burden of disease from both environmental pollution and climate change due to fossil fuel combustion. This commentary summarizes the robust scientific evidence regarding the multiple current and projected health impacts of fossil fuel combustion on the young to make the case for a holistic, child-centered energy and climate policy that addresses the full array of physical and psychosocial stressors resulting from fossil fuel pollution. The data summarized here show that by sharply reducing our dependence on fossil fuels we would achieve highly significant health and economic benefits for our children and their future. These benefits would occur immediately and also play out over the life course and potentially across generations. Going beyond the powerful scientific and economic arguments for urgent action to reduce the burning of fossil fuels is the strong moral imperative to protect our most vulnerable populations. Citation: Perera FP. 2017. Multiple threats to child health from fossil fuel combustion: impacts of air pollution and climate change. Environ Health Perspect 125:141-148; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP299.

  19. Field test of waste oil combustion and empty drum cleaning at Alexandra Fiord, NWT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCourt, J.; Ross, S.; Buist, I.; Morisson, J. [Ross (S.L.) Environmental Research Ltd., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1996-09-01

    The disposal of waste petroleum products in remote Arctic locations was discussed. Thousands of oil drums have been stockpiled and abandoned in the Canadian Arctic over the past 50 years. These drums contain various waste fuels and lubricating oils such as antifreeze and assorted solvents. The waste fuels were tested for contaminants, and it was determined that disposal by flaring was acceptable. A remediation project was carried out to dispose of this waste petroleum. At one infrequently used RCMP site, 10 people safely and cleanly disposed of 40,000 litres of waste fuel in five days, using portable flare burners. The empty fuel drums, several car batteries and the empty metal and plastic 1 qt lube oil containers were removed from the site. Oily water and sorbent pads from the clean up operation that had not passed through the burner were also removed from the site and taken south for disposal. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Final environmental impact statement. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    This volume contains the appendices for the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Alternative geologic environs are considered. Salt, crystalline rock, argillaceous rock, and tuff are discussed. Studies on alternate geologic regions for the siting of WIPP are reviewed. President Carter's message to Congress on the management of radioactive wastes and the findings and recommendations of the interagency review group on nuclear waste management are included. Selection criteria for the WIPP site including geologic, hydrologic, tectonic, physicochemical compatability, and socio-economic factors are presented. A description of the waste types and the waste processing procedures are given. Methods used to calculate radiation doses from radionuclide releases during operation are presented. A complete description of the Los Medanos site, including archaeological and historic aspects is included. Environmental monitoring programs and long-term safety analysis program are described. (DMC)

  1. Combustible gas and biochar production from co-pyrolysis of agricultural plastic wastes and animal manures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers report that manure-derived biochar has considerable potential both for improving soil quality and reducing water pollution. One of obstacles in obtaining manure biochar is its high energy requirement for pyrolyzing wet and low-energy-density animal manures. The combustible gas produced f...

  2. Health Risk Assessments of Waste Combustion Emissions Using Surrogate Analyte Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    destructors, typically use blowers to form a curtain of air above the fire in order to recirculate emissions, theoretically improving combustion...CO into CO2 in addition to the formation of soot . Conversely, the smoldering stage has a lack of visible flames, lower CO2 emissions, and increasing

  3. Long term analysis of the biomass content in the feed of a waste-to-energy plant with oxygen-enriched combustion air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellner, Johann; Cencic, Oliver; Zellinger, Günter; Rechberger, Helmut

    2011-10-01

    Thermal utilization of municipal solid waste and commercial wastes has become of increasing importance in European waste management. As waste materials are generally composed of fossil and biogenic materials, a part of the energy generated can be considered as renewable and is thus subsidized in some European countries. Analogously, CO(2) emissions of waste incinerators are only partly accounted for in greenhouse gas inventories. A novel approach for determining these fractions is the so-called balance method. In the present study, the implementation of the balance method on a waste-to-energy plant using oxygen-enriched combustion air was investigated. The findings of the 4-year application indicate on the one hand the general applicability and robustness of the method, and on the other hand the importance of reliable monitoring data. In particular, measured volume flows of the flue gas and the oxygen-enriched combustion air as well as corresponding O(2) and CO(2) contents should regularly be validated. The fraction of renewable (biogenic) energy generated throughout the investigated period amounted to between 27 and 66% for weekly averages, thereby denoting the variation in waste composition over time. The average emission factor of the plant was approximately 45 g CO(2) MJ(-1) energy input or 450 g CO(2) kg(-1) waste incinerated. The maximum error of the final result was about 16% (relative error), which was well above the error (<8%) of the balance method for plants with conventional oxygen supply.

  4. Characterization of Oxy-combustion Impacts in Existing Coal-fired Boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Bradley [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Davis, Kevin [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Senior, Constance [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Shim, Hong Shim [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Otten, Brydger Van [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Fry, Andrew [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Wendt, Jost [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Eddings, Eric [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Paschedag, Alan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shaddix, Christopher [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cox, William [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States); Tree, Dale [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Reaction Engineering International (REI) managed a team of experts from University of Utah, Siemens Energy, Praxair, Vattenfall AB, Sandia National Laboratories, Brigham Young University (BYU) and Corrosion Management Ltd. to perform multi-scale experiments, coupled with mechanism development, process modeling and CFD modeling, for both applied and fundamental investigations. The primary objective of this program was to acquire data and develop tools to characterize and predict impacts of CO{sub 2} flue gas recycle and burner feed design on flame characteristics (burnout, NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, mercury and fine particle emissions, heat transfer) and operational concerns (fouling, slagging and corrosion) inherent in the retrofit of existing coal-fired boilers for oxy-coal combustion. Experimental work was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories’ Entrained Flow Reactor, the University of Utah Industrial Combustion Research Facility, and Brigham Young University. Process modeling and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling was performed at REI. Successful completion of the project objectives resulted in the following key deliverables: 1) Multi-scale test data from 0.1 kW bench-scale, 100 kW and 200 kW laboratory-scale, and 1 MW semi-industrial scale combustors that describe differences in flame characteristics, fouling, slagging and corrosion for coal combustion under air-firing and oxygen-firing conditions, including sensitivity to oxy-burner design and flue gas recycle composition. 2) Validated mechanisms developed from test data that describe fouling, slagging, waterwall corrosion, heat transfer, char burnout and sooting under coal oxy-combustion conditions. The mechanisms were presented in a form suitable for inclusion in CFD models or process models. 3) Principles to guide design of pilot-scale and full-scale coal oxy-firing systems and flue gas recycle configurations, such that boiler operational impacts from oxy-combustion retrofits are minimized. 4

  5. Environmental Impacts Assessment of Recycling of Construction and Demolition Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butera, Stefania

    Construction and demolition waste (C&DW) is waste derived from the construction, demolition and renovation of buildings and civil infrastructure. With 900 million tons generated every year in Europe, it is the largest waste stream on the continent. C&DW is mainly constituted of mineral fractions, i...... to potential adverse impacts, especially related to the water-borne emission of pollutants, which need to be avoided. This requires first of all an estimation of their magnitude, and so the goal of this PhD is to provide an assessment of potential environmental impacts related to C&DW utilisation. C...... by appropriate measures within the C&DW waste management system, for instance by promoting source segregation of the concrete fraction stream or actively pursuing its carbonation. We found that leaching of Se, and to a lower extent Cr, Sb, SO4, Cl-, appears critical for C&DW in relation to existing national...

  6. Incineration/vitrification of radioactive wastes and combustion of pyrolysis gases in thermal plasmas; Incineration/vitrification de dechets radioactifs et combustion de gaz de pyrolyse en plasma d`arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girold, Ch. [CEA de la Vallee du Rhone, Departement de Retraitement des Dechets et du Demantelemnet, 30 - Marcoule (France)]|[Limoges Univ., 87 (France)

    1997-03-01

    Two thermal plasma processes used for incineration of radioactive technological wastes (cellulose, plastics, rubber...) have been investigated. First, the different types of radioactive wastes are presented, with a special attention to those which may benefit from a high temperature thermal treatment. The most significant thermal plasma processes, suitable for this goal, are described. Then, the author deals with the post-combustion, in an oxygen plasma jet reactor, of gases from burnable radioactive waste pyrolysis. An experimental planning method as been used to evaluate the combustion performances in the reactor, with a wide range of gas composition and running parameters such as oxygen excess and electrical power. The results of a modeling of kinetics, based on 116 chemicals reactions between 25 species, are compared with experimental values. Finally, an oxygen plasma reactor where the arc is transferred on a basalt melt is experimented. The efficiency of the combustion and the homogeneity of the glass are discussed. The volatility of some glass elements and tracers added to the wastes is also approached in two different ways: by post-trial material balance and by an optical emission spectroscopic method. The author built a diagnostic method that allows the following versus time of the metallic vapours above the melt. (author) 51 refs.

  7. Plasma-based determination of inorganic contaminants in waste of electric and electronic equipment after microwave-induced combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Paola A.; Diehl, Lisarb O.; Oliveira, Jussiane S.S.; Muller, Edson I. [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Av. Roraima, 1000, 97105-900, Santa Maria (Brazil); Mesko, Marcia F. [Centro de Ciências Químicas, Farmacêuticas e de Alimentos, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Campus Capão do Leão, 96900-010 Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Flores, Erico M.M., E-mail: ericommf@gmail.com [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Av. Roraima, 1000, 97105-900, Santa Maria (Brazil)

    2015-03-01

    A systematic study was performed for the determination of inorganic contaminants in polymeric waste from electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) for achieving an efficient digestion to minimize interferences in determination using plasma-based techniques. The determination of As, Br, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sb, and Zn by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and also by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) was carried out after digestion using microwave-induced combustion (MIC). Arsenic and Hg were determined by flow-injection chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-CVG-ICP-MS). Dynamic reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (DRC-ICP-MS) with ammonia was also used for Cr determination. The suitability of MIC for digestion of sample masses up to 400 mg was demonstrated using microcrystalline cellulose as aid for combustion of polymers from waste of EEEs that usually contain flame retardants that impair the combustion. The composition and concentration of acid solutions (HNO{sub 3} or HNO{sub 3} plus HCl) were evaluated for metals and metalloids and NH{sub 4}OH solutions were investigated for Br absorption. Accuracy was evaluated by comparison of results with those obtained using high pressure microwave-assisted wet digestion (HP-MAWD) and also by the analysis of certified reference material (CRM) of polymer (EC680k—low-density polyethylene). Bromine determination was only feasible using digestion by MIC once losses were observed when HP-MAWD was used. Lower limits of detection were obtained for all analytes using MIC (from 0.005 μg g{sup −1} for Co by ICP-MS up to 3.120 μg g{sup −1} for Sb by ICP OES) in comparison to HP-MAWD due to the higher sample mass that can be digested (400 mg) and the use of diluted absorbing solutions. The combination of HNO{sub 3} and HCl for digestion showed to be crucial for quantitative recovery of some elements, as Cr and Sb

  8. A comparison of circulating fluidised bed combustion and gasification power plant technologies for processing mixtures of coal, biomass and plastic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIlveen-Wright, D.R.; Huang, Y.; McMullan, J.T. [NICERT, University of Ulster at Jordanstown, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Pinto, F.; Franco, C.; Gulyurtlu, I. [INETI-DEECA, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 22, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); Armesto, L.; Cabanillas, A. [CIEMAT, Avda Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Caballero, M.A.; Aznar, M.P. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, Centro Politecnico Superior, Maria de Luna, University of Saragossa, 50018 Saragossa (Spain)

    2006-09-15

    Environmental regulations concerning emission limitations from the use of fossil fuels in large combustion plants have stimulated interest in biomass for electricity generation. The main objective of the present study was to examine the technical and economic viability of using combustion and gasification of coal mixed with biomass and plastic wastes, with the aim of developing an environmentally acceptable process to decrease their amounts in the waste stream through energy recovery. Mixtures of a high ash coal with biomass and/or plastic using fluidised bed technologies (combustion and gasification) were considered. Experiments were carried out in laboratory and pilot plant fluidised bed systems on the combustion and air/catalyst and air/steam gasification of these feedstocks and the data obtained were used in the techno-economic analyses. The experimental results were used in simulations of medium to large-scale circulating fluidised bed (CFB) power generation plants. Techno-economic analysis of the modelled CFB combustion systems showed efficiencies of around 40.5% (and around 46.5% for the modelled CFB gasification systems) when fuelled solely by coal, which were only minimally affected by co-firing with up to 20% biomass and/or wastes. Specific investments were found to be around $2150/kWe to $2400/kWe ($1350/kWe to $1450/kWe) and break-even electricity selling prices to be around $68/MWh to $78/MWh ($49/MWh to $54/MWh). Their emissions were found to be within the emission limit values of the large combustion plant directive. Fluidised bed technologies were found to be very suitable for co-firing coal and biomass and/or plastic waste and to offer good options for the replacement of obsolete or polluting power plants. (author)

  9. Co-combustion of pulverized coal, pine shells, and textile wastes in a propane-fired furnace: Measurements and predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, T.H.Y.J.; Costa, M.; Semiao, V. [Inst. of Super Technics, Lisbon (Portugal). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes an experimental and numerical investigation of the co-combustion of propane with pulverized coal, pine shells, and textile wastes. Measurements have been performed in a large-scale laboratory furnace fired by an industrial-type swirl burner. Data are reported for in-flame major gas-phase species concentration, including NOx, in-flame gas temperature, and overall char burnout for three flames: a propane/coal flame, a propane/pine shells flame, and a propane/textile wastes flame. For comparison purposes, data are also reported for a pure propane flame. The cofiring of propane with pine shells and textile wastes yielded particle burnout values much higher than that of the propane/coal flame despite the similarities of the three flames revealed by the in-flame data. This is because of the higher volatile matter content of the pine shells and textile wastes, in spite of their much larger particle sizes compared with coal. The experimental conditions were then simulated numerically. For the numerical predictions, gas-phase calculations were based oil the Eulerian approach whereas the particulate phase predictions were based on a stochastic Lagrangian approach. The turbulence model used was the standard two-equation eddy viscosity model. From the comparisons of the predictions with the experimental data, a good agreement was generally found, except in the near-burner region close to the furnace symmetry axis. The discrepancies are due to the limitations of the k-epsilon turbulence model to simulate high swirling flows. Moreover, the simplified fuel-NO model used requires further improvements to yield more accurate results.

  10. Combining woody biomass for combustion with green waste composting: Effect of removal of woody biomass on compost quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandecasteele, Bart; Boogaerts, Christophe; Vandaele, Elke

    2016-12-01

    The question was tackled on how the green waste compost industry can optimally apply the available biomass resources for producing both bioenergy by combustion of the woody fraction, and high quality soil improvers as renewable sources of carbon and nutrients. Compost trials with removal of woody biomass before or after composting were run at 9 compost facilities during 3 seasons to include seasonal variability of feedstock. The project focused on the changes in feedstock and the effect on the end product characteristics (both compost and recovered woody biomass) of this woody biomass removal. The season of collection during the year clearly affected the biochemical and chemical characteristics of feedstock, woody biomass and compost. On one hand the effect of removal of the woody fraction before composting did not significantly affect compost quality when compared to the scenario where the woody biomass was sieved from the compost at the end of the composting process. On the other hand, quality of the woody biomass was not strongly affected by extraction before or after composting. The holocellulose:lignin ratio was used in this study as an indicator for (a) the decomposition potential of the feedstock mixture and (b) to assess the stability of the composts at the end of the process. Higher microbial activity in green waste composts (indicated by higher oxygen consumption) and thus a lower compost stability resulted in higher N immobilization in the compost. Removal of woody biomass from the green waste before composting did not negatively affect the compost quality when more intensive composting was applied. The effect of removal of the woody fraction on the characteristics of the green waste feedstock and the extracted woody biomass is depending on the season of collection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. CROPS AND CHEMISM OF PLANTS OF A MULTIVARIANT MODEL EXPERIMENT ON COAL COMBUSTION WASTE DEPOSITS. PART II (2012 – 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Siuta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Reclamation efficiency of composts produced from the mixture of municipal waste (Radiowo and ZUSOK, urban green waste composts (Complex, housing estate lawn mowing waste (plants and sewage sludge, as well as mineral fertilizer (NPK – without the use of any organic fertilizer, was assessed in a model experiment on an ash soil. The experiment was launched in 2005 and continued until the end of 2013. Crops were collected and subjected to the analysis in 2005, 2006 and between 2011 and 2012. In the period between 2007 and 2010 no agrotechnical treatments were carried out, with the experiment being limited to mere observation of the natural (spontaneous succession of plants. Reclamation doses of composts and sewage sludge were measured quantitatively, therefore they differed in the content of dry matter as well as in the contents of organic substances and minerals in the dry matter. The largest aggregated dry matter yield of plants (2005–2013 was reported in the Complex variant, and similarly, in the Radiowo and plant variants, whereas the ZUSOK variant reported the lowest aggregated dry matter field of plants. The yield-forming efficiency of NPK fertilizer was lower than in the case of compost and sludge variants. However, the field-forming efficiency of sewage sludge was lower than its fertilization potential as it was unstable and difficult to mix with the experimental soil. The results showed the yield-forming potential of plants on the experimental coal combustion waste deposits fertilized with composts and sewage sludge as well as the examples of the sites where sewage sludge could be used for the biological reclamation of landfills and spoil tips.

  12. Refined weighted sum of gray gases model for air-fuel combustion and its impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2013-01-01

    evaluated by Smith et al. for several partial pressures of CO2 and H2O vapor are often used for gas temperatures up to 2400 K, which is supplemented by the coefficient values presented by Coppalle and Vervisch for higher temperatures until 3000 K. This paper refines the air-fuel WSGGM in terms of accuracy......, completeness, and implementation and demonstrates the use and impacts of the refined model in CFD simulation of a conventional air-fuel utility boiler. The refined model is found to make a remarkable difference from the existing models in CFD results, when the particle−radiation interaction is negligible...... and not taken into account (e.g., in gaseous fuel combustion). Comparatively, the impacts of the refined model are greatly compromised under a solid-fuel combustion scenario because of the important role of the particle−radiation interaction. As the conclusion, the refined air-fuel WSGGM is highly recommended...

  13. Impact Initiated Combustion of Aluminum Exposed to Mechanical Pre-Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breidenich, Jennifer; Thadhani, Naresh

    2013-06-01

    The impact initiation of as-received and mechanically activated aluminum powder compacts is investigated using uniaxial stress rod-on-anvil impact experiments. The compacts reveal light emission due to combustion reaction at velocities greater than 320m/s. Mechanical pre-activation, such as that achieved via high-energy ball milling (HEBM) or high strain machining, strain hardens the starting materials, affecting their combustion initiation behavior. The starting materials are characterized by their lattice strain, hardness, and quasi-static compaction behavior. High speed imaging reveals that the ``threshold'' velocity (minimum velocity necessary for reaction initiation) changes as function of the mechanical pre-activation. Meso-scale simulations performed in CTH are used to correlate the effects of material properties within the powder compact with the crush up, deformation, and reaction behavior. Research funding provided by DTRA Grant No. HDTRA1-10-1-0038.

  14. Bioactivity studies of calcium magnesium silicate prepared from eggshell waste by sol–gel combustion synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan Choudhary

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study focused on the synthesis of calcium magnesium silicate (akermanite, Ca2MgSi2O7 using eggshell biowaste (as calcium source, magnesium nitrate and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS as starting materials. Sol–gel combustion method was adopted to obtain calcium magnesium silicate. Citric acid was used as a fuel (reducing agent and nitrate ions present in the metal nitrates acts as an oxidizing agent during combustion process. The characterization of synthesized calcium magnesium silicate was carried out by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques. Calcium magnesium silicate crystallite size was observed in nano regime which can effectively mimic natural bone apatite composition. In-vitro bioactivity was investigated by immersing calcium magnesium silicate pellet in simulated body fluid (SBF for three weeks. Results show effective deposition of crystallized hydroxyapatite (HAP layer on its surface and predicting its possibilities for applications in hard tissue regeneration.

  15. Beneficial Use and Recycling of Municipal Waste Combustion Residues - A Comprehensive Resource Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiles, C.; Shepherd, P.

    1999-04-26

    This document summarizes information from worldwide sources on the beneficial use of residues from the combustion of municipal. The information presented, including results of numerous research projects, field demonstrations, and actual full-scale projects, demonstrates that the ash can be safely used. It includes data on ash characteristics, environmental considerations, guidance on selected ash use applications, and information on federal and state regulations and policies affecting ash use.

  16. Biomass waste carbon materials for post-combustion CO2 capture

    OpenAIRE

    Calvo-Muñoz, Elisa; García-Mateos, Francisco J.; Rosas, Juana M.; Rodríguez-Mirasol, J.; Cordero, Tomás

    2016-01-01

    Low-carbon energy systems based on carbon capture and storage (CCS) have become of great interest due to the imperative necessity of mitigating the carbon footprint derived from the currently fossil fuels-based energy technologies. In this sense, post-combustion CO2 adsorption over porous solids results particularly attractive from several viewpoints. In a green context, the use of carbon-based materials as adsorbents would entail important economic and environmental profits, such as the valo...

  17. Advanced combustion, emission control, health impacts, and fuels merit review and peer evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2006-10-01

    This report is a summary and analysis of comments from the Advisory Panel at the FY 2006 DOE National Laboratory Advanced Combustion, Emission Control, Health Impacts, and Fuels Merit Review and Peer Evaluation, held May 15-18, 2006 at Argonne National Laboratory. The work evaluated in this document supports the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. The results of this merit review and peer evaluation are major inputs used by DOE in making its funding decisions for the upcoming fiscal year.

  18. Immobilization of {sup 14}C from reactor graphite waste by use of combustion synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosc Rouessac, Florence; Marin-Ayral, Rose-Marie; Haidoux, Abel; Massoni, Nicolas [Institut Charles Gerhardt UMR 5253 UM II /CNRS / ENSCM- cc1504, Place Eugene Bataillon 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Bart, Florence [CEA Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Division, DTCD/ SECM/LM2C, BP 17171 30200 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Among radio elements potentially present in future nuclear systems, exits long-lived radionuclide {sup 14}C. Thanks to their very interesting physico-chemical properties and more precisely their corrosion resistance, carbides (Ti,Si,C) are potential candidates for the preparation of ceramic matrices for immobilization of {sup 14}C. Several methods of synthesizing silicon carbide exist but this study deals with the utilization of combustion synthesis or SHS (Self propagating High temperature synthesis). Indeed, its rapidity and its low cost make this technique an excellent tool in conditioning {sup 14}C. The synthesis of SiC from elements by the SHS process can not be realized under normal conditions due to a low adiabatic combustion temperature of SiC system. It is calculated as 1600-1700 K which considerably lacks the empirically established minimum of 1800 K for SHS reaction. Hence, an additional energy source needs to be introduced into the system. In this work, our aim is to find experimental conditions to allow and to control ignition and propagation of the combustion wave along the sample. The reaction between silicon, titanium and graphite is optimized using two different ignition systems, with several nature and size of the carbon powders. Materials are characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. (authors)

  19. IMPACT OF DRILLING WASTE ON HYDROBIONTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Guseinova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim is to determine and make an analysis of the concentration of petroleum hydrocarbons and other metals in the waste drilling: drill cuttings (DC and mud (DM, collected in the area of drilling, to assess and forecast the state of biological resources of natural sea water.Methods. Experimental studies of DC and DM showed the petroleum hydrocarbons content, the concentration of which varies depending on the timing of exposure. By quantitative and qualitative indicators, the metal content in the drill cuttings and mud is nonequivalent and this depends on the structure and hardness achieved during drilling the rocks as well as on the degree of contamination with metals.Results. The concentration level of petroleum hydrocarbons and other metals in the drilling waste (drill cuttings and mud imposes a major problem associated with the conservation of biological resources of the Caspian Sea.Main conclusions. Environmental effects from the discharges of drilling waste on the high seas can be detected only during drilling operations and in close proximity (typically up to 200-500 m from the discharge point. Persistent damages in communities and ecosystems occur only at long exposures and are adaptive in nature.

  20. Environmental and Human Health Impacts of Usage of Oil Industry Products and Wastes as Alternative Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek BOLAT

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The need for oil industry products has been increasing in parallel to the rapid population growth and industrialization. Physical and chemical properties of these products change after usage based on the media and operating conditions. Then, these products lose the eligibility and turn into the form of waste. The most commonly used method for the disposal of waste oils is combustion due to its high calorific value. In this study, the possible effects on the environment and human health of combustion of oil industry products and wastes are evaluated. Poor combustion conditions lead emissions from the process depending on the ingredients of wastes in addition to incomplete combustion products such as particulate matter, carbon monoxide, volatile organic chemicals polyaromatic hydrocarbons, metals etc. that may occur according to the type of waste. These emissions are released into the environment and partition between soil, water and air media related to their physicochemical characteristics. In addition to environmental problems, these emissions are a risk factor for human health in terms of carcinogenicity and mutagenicity. Regulations and control measures should be put into practice in order to get rid of the effects of non-standard diesel like product named number 10 lube on human health and environment. In this context, emission measurements should be done simultaneously to determine the effects of combustion of these wastes and products of oil industry.

  1. Radioactive waste combustion / vitrification under arc plasma: thermal and dynamic modelling; Combustion - vitrification de dechets radioactifs par plasma d'arc: modelisation de la thermique et de la dynamique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthelemy, B

    2003-07-01

    This thesis concerns the thermal and dynamic modelling for a combustion/vitrification process of surrogate radioactive waste under transferred arc plasma. The writer presents the confinement processes for radioactive waste using arc plasma and the different software used to model theses processes. This is followed by a description of our experimental equipment including a plasma arc reactor and an inductive system allowing the homogenization of glass temperature. A combustion/vitrification test is described. Thermal and material balances were discussed. The temperature fields of plasma arc and the glass frit conductivity are measured. Finally, the writer describes and clarifies the equations solved for the simulations of the electrically plasma arc and the glass melting including the thin layer of glass frit coating the crucible cold walls. The modelling results are presented in the form of spatial distribution of temperature, velocity and volume power... (author)

  2. Radioactive waste combustion-vitrification under arc plasma: thermal and dynamic modelling; Combustion - vitrification de dechets radioactifs par plasma d'arc: modelisation de la thermique et de la dynamique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthelemy, B

    2003-06-01

    This thesis concerns the thermal and dynamic modelling for a combustion/vitrification process of surrogate radioactive waste under transferred arc plasma. The writer presents the confinement processes for radioactive waste using arc plasma and the different software used to model theses processes. This is followed by a description of our experimental equipment including a plasma arc reactor and an inductive system allowing the homogenization of glass temperature. A combustion/vitrification test is described. Thermal and material balances were discussed. The temperature fields of plasma arc and the glass frit conductivity are measured. Finally, the writer describes and clarifies the equations solved for the simulations of the electrically plasma arc and the glass melting including the thin layer of glass frit coating the crucible cold walls. The modelling results are presented in the form of spatial distribution of temperature, velocity and voluminal power... (author)

  3. Computational Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C K; Mizobuchi, Y; Poinsot, T J; Smith, P J; Warnatz, J

    2004-08-26

    Progress in the field of computational combustion over the past 50 years is reviewed. Particular attention is given to those classes of models that are common to most system modeling efforts, including fluid dynamics, chemical kinetics, liquid sprays, and turbulent flame models. The developments in combustion modeling are placed into the time-dependent context of the accompanying exponential growth in computer capabilities and Moore's Law. Superimposed on this steady growth, the occasional sudden advances in modeling capabilities are identified and their impacts are discussed. Integration of submodels into system models for spark ignition, diesel and homogeneous charge, compression ignition engines, surface and catalytic combustion, pulse combustion, and detonations are described. Finally, the current state of combustion modeling is illustrated by descriptions of a very large jet lifted 3D turbulent hydrogen flame with direct numerical simulation and 3D large eddy simulations of practical gas burner combustion devices.

  4. Co-combustion of automotive shredder residue (ASR) and sewage sludge with a mixture of industrial and household waste in an 20MW fluidized bed combustor; Samfoerbraenning av bilfluff, roetslam och avfall i en 20 MW fluidbaeddpanna - Studier av braenslesammansaettningens paaverkan paa belaeggningsbildning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskilsson, David; Johansson, Andreas; Johansson, Linda; Wikstroem-Blomqvist, Evalena

    2007-07-01

    In order to prevent a further increased use of resources and to decrease the environmental impact from landfills, organic wastes are today diverted towards material and energy recovery. This creates a waste market with an increasing number of waste fractions that needs to be treated properly. As an example, in Sweden it has recently been prohibited to landfill source separated combustible waste (2002) and organic waste (2005). Wastes as automotive shredder residue (ASR) and sewage sludge can no longer be landfilled and needs to be either material or energy recovered, which challenge the waste treatment sector. This work investigates the effects of ASR and sewage sludge co-combustion in a 20 MW Energy-from-Waste plant (bubbling fluidised bed). The long term objective of the work is to increase the fuel flexibility, the boiler availability and the power production. This report focus on boiler operation and combustion performance in terms of agglomeration, deposit rates and emissions. In addition to the tests with ASR and sewage sludge, repeated measurements were performed during normal load as a reference. The results show that the co-combusted fractions of ASR and sewage sludge, which on mass basis constituted 6 % and 15 % respectively, did not increase the risk for agglomeration or deposits on heat-exchanging surfaces. Instead, compared to the two reference cases, the deposit rates decreased when sewage sludge was added. Only minor variation in the emissions was seen between the different cases. The levels of I-TEQs were far below the legislated values in all cases

  5. Greenhouse Impact Due to the Use of Combustible Fuels: Life Cycle Viewpoint and Relative Radiative Forcing Commitment

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkinen, Johanna; Palosuo, Taru; Holmgren, Kristina; Savolainen, Ilkka

    2008-01-01

    Extensive information on the greenhouse impacts of various human actions is important in developing effective climate change mitigation strategies. The greenhouse impacts of combustible fuels consist not only of combustion emissions but also of emissions from the fuel production chain and possible effects on the ecosystem carbon storages. It is important to be able to assess the combined, total effect of these different emissions and to express the results in a comprehensive way. In this stud...

  6. Impact of the Flameholder Heat Conductivity on Combustion Instability Characteristics

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Seunghyuck

    2012-06-11

    In this paper, we investigate the impact of heat transfer between the flame and the flame-holder on the dynamic stability characteristics in a 50-kW backward facing step combustor. We conducted tests where we use a backward step block made of two different materials: ceramic and stainless steel whose thermal conductivities are 1.06 and 12 W/m/K, respectively. A set of experiments was conducted using a propane/air mixture at Re = 6500 for the inlet temperature of 300 - 500 K at atmospheric pressure. We measure the dynamic pressure and flame chemiluminescence to examine distinct stability characteristics using each flame-holder material over a range of operating conditions. We find that for tests with a flame-holder made of ceramic, the onset of instability is significantly delayed in time and, for certain operating conditions, disappears altogether. Stated differently, for certain operating conditions, the combustor can be stabilized by reducing the thermal conductivity of the flame-holder. As the thermal conductivity of the flame-holder increases, the combustor becomes increasingly unstable over a range of operating conditions. These results imply that the dynamic stability characteristics depend strongly on the heat transfer between the flame and the combustor wall near the flame anchoring region. Copyright © 2012 by ASME.

  7. Combustion quality analysis of briquettes from variety of agricultural waste as source of alternative fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryaningsih, S.; Nurhilal, O.; Yuliah, Y.; Mulyana, C.

    2017-05-01

    The increasing in world population and the industrial sector led to increased demand for energy sources. To do this by utilizing the agricultural waste as a fuel source of alternative energy in the form of bio briquette. The aim at this study was to obtain data onto the characteristics of a wide variety of biomass briquettes from waste agricultural industry. The basic ingredients used are biomass waste from coconut husks, sawdust, rice husks and coffee husks. Each of these biomass residues are dried, crushed, then mixed with starch adhesives. This mixture is molded and dried using sunlight. Each type of briquettes was characterized and analyzed the physical-chemical properties, including calorific value, water content, fixed carbon content and the results were compared with charcoal and coal that was used as fuel in public. The results showed that bio briquettes from coconut husks get the highest calorific value of 4,451 cal/g.

  8. Concept of waste and its impact on human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashkov, Vitalii M; Batyhina, Olena M; Trotska, Maryna V

    2017-01-01

    Impact of the environment on human health is increasingly being paid attention both at the international level and at the level of individual countries. Among the factors that anyhow can affect it negatively, various objects are distinguished and waste is not of the last consequence. It has different nature of origin, ways of further utilization and a degree of impact on human health and the environment. Its generation, utilization and neutralization are determined by the relevant processes; their research allows continuous improvement and reduction of their negative impact on human health and the environment. To analyze provisions of the international legislation concerning the concept of waste and its classification, as well as its potential impacts on human health and the environment. The study analyzes and uses international legal documents, data of international organizations and scientists' deductions. Furthermore, the study integrates information from scientific journals with scientific methods from the medical and legal point of view. Within the framework of the system approach, as well as analysis and synthesis, the concept of waste, its classification and impact on human health and the environment have been researched. In consequence of the conducted study, it has been found that at the European level, considerable attention is paid to waste in the context of its possible negative impact on human health and the environment. Solution of this problem is carried out with the integrated approach, which is expressed both in enacting statutory acts and amending existing ones, as well as elucidating various aspects at the scientific, methodological, statistical and other levels. Waste in itself has different nature of origin, negative impact, ways of its further utilization. Some kinds of it can be used further in order to achieve other goals and needs that are not related to their generation, others can no longer be used for human benefits taking into account

  9. Study of combustion and emission characteristics of fuel derived from waste plastics by various waste to energy (W-t-E) conversion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazrat, M. A.; Rasul, M. G.; Khan, M. M. K.

    2016-07-01

    Reduction of plastic wastes by means of producing energy can be treated as a good investment in the waste management and recycling sectors. In this article, conversion of plastics into liquid fuel by two thermo-chemical processes, pyrolysis and gasification, are reviewed. The study showed that the catalytic pyrolysis of homogenous waste plastics produces better quality and higher quantity of liquefied fuel than that of non-catalytic pyrolysis process at a lower operating temperature. The syngas produced from gasification process, which occurs at higher temperature than the pyrolysis process, can be converted into diesel by the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reaction process. Conducive bed material like Olivine in the gasification conversion process can remarkably reduce the production of tar. The waste plastics pyrolysis oil showed brake thermal efficiency (BTE) of about 27.75%, brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) of 0.292 kg/kWh, unburned hydrocarbon emission (uHC) of 91 ppm and NOx emission of 904 ppm in comparison with the diesel for BTE of 28%, BSFC of 0.276 kg/kWh, uHC of 57 ppm and NOx of 855 ppm. Dissolution of Polystyrene (PS) into biodiesel also showed the potential of producing alternative transport fuel. It has been found from the literature that at higher engine speed, increased EPS (Expanded Polystyrene) quantity based biodiesel blends reduces CO, CO2, NOx and smoke emission. EPS-biodiesel fuel blend increases the brake thermal efficiency by 7.8%, specific fuel consumption (SFC) by 7.2% and reduces brake power (Pb) by 3.2%. More study using PS and EPS with other thermoplastics is needed to produce liquid fuel by dissolving them into biodiesel and to assess their suitability as a transport fuel. Furthermore, investigation to find out most suitable W-t-E process for effective recycling of the waste plastics as fuel for internal combustion engines is necessary to reduce environmental pollution and generate revenue which will be addressed in this article.

  10. Ignition and combustion phenomena on a moving grate: with application to the thermal conversion of biomass and municipal solid waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blijderveen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Combustion can be defined as a fast oxidation process of a solid, gaseous or liquid fuel at elevated temperatures. In any combustion process, ignition plays an essential role. Not only to initiate the combustion process, but also to maintain it. Especially in solid fuel combustion on a grate, where

  11. Assessment of landfill reclamation and the effects of age on the combustion of recovered municipal solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, G A [Lancaster Environmental Foundation, PA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This report summarized the Lancaster county Solid Waste Management Authorities`s (LCSWMA)landfill reclamation activities, ongoing since 1991. All aspects have been analyzed from the manpower and equipment requirements at the landfill to the operational impacts felt at the LCSWMA Resource Recovery Facility (RRF) where the material is delivered for processing. Characteristics of the reclaimed refuse and soil recovered from trommeling operations are discussed as are results of air monitoring performed at the landfill excavation site and the RRF. The report also discusses the energy value of the reclaimed material and compares this value with those obtained for significantly older reclaimed waste streams. The effects of waste age on the air emissions and ash residue quality at the RRF are also provided. The report concludes by summarizing the project benefits and provides recommendations for other landfill reclamation operations and areas requiring further research.

  12. EMISSIONS FROM CO-COMBUSTION OF COAL AND MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE IN DOMESTIC CENTRAL HEATING BOILER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Maria Cieślik

    2017-04-01

    The results were analyzed in terms of combustion efficiency, emissions of major pollutants (NOx, CO, SO2 and fly ash with adsorbed of PAHs on its surface. The average concentration of emitted particulate matter was 764 mg m-3, and CO - 1944, SO2 - 1256 NOx - 555 mg m-3 (STP, 3% O2, dry gas. The flue gases contain fly ash, with a significant carbon content EC (average 31% and a high proportion of PM10 and PM2.5 - respectively 100 and 75% by volume.

  13. Final environmental impact statement. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this document as environmental input to future decisions regarding the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which would include the disposal of transuranic waste, as currently authorized. The alternatives covered in this document are the following: (1) Continue storing transuranic (TRU) waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) as it is now or with improved confinement. (2) Proceed with WIPP at the Los Medanos site in southeastern New Mexico, as currently authorized. (3) Dispose of TRU waste in the first available repository for high-level waste. The Los Medanos site would be investigated for its potential suitability as a candidate site. This is administration policy and is the alternative preferred by the DOE. (4) Delay the WIPP to allow other candidate sites to be evaluated for TRU-waste disposal. This environmental impact statement is arranged in the following manner: Chapter 1 is an overall summary of the analysis contained in the document. Chapters 2 and 4 set forth the objectives of the national waste-management program and analyze the full spectrum of reasonable alternatives for meeting these objectives, including the WIPP. Chapter 5 presents the interim waste-acceptance criteria and waste-form alternatives for the WIPP. Chapters 6 through 13 provide a detailed description and environmental analysis of the WIPP repository and its site. Chapter 14 describes the permits and approvals necessary for the WIPP and the interactions that have taken place with Federal, State, and local authorities, and with the general public in connection with the repository. Chapter 15 analyzes the many comments received on the DEIS and tells what has been done in this FEIS in response. The appendices contain data and discussions in support of the material in the text.

  14. Impact of aviation non-CO₂ combustion effects on the environmental feasibility of alternative jet fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Russell W; Wolfe, Philip J; Hileman, James I

    2011-12-15

    Alternative fuels represent a potential option for reducing the climate impacts of the aviation sector. The climate impacts of alternatives fuel are traditionally considered as a ratio of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to those of the displaced petroleum product; however, this ignores the climate impacts of the non-CO(2) combustion effects from aircraft in the upper atmosphere. The results of this study show that including non-CO(2) combustion emissions and effects in the life cycle of a Synthetic Paraffinic Kerosene (SPK) fuel can lead to a decrease in the relative merit of the SPK fuel relative to conventional jet fuel. For example, an SPK fuel option with zero life cycle GHG emissions would offer a 100% reduction in GHG emissions but only a 48% reduction in actual climate impact using a 100-year time window and the nominal climate modeling assumption set outlined herein. Therefore, climate change mitigation policies for aviation that rely exclusively on relative well-to-wake life cycle GHG emissions as a proxy for aviation climate impact may overestimate the benefit of alternative fuel use on the global climate system.

  15. Dry additives-reduction catalysts for flue waste gases originating from the combustion of solid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    Hard coal is the basic energy generating raw material in Poland. In 1990, 60% of electricity and thermal energy was totally obtained from it. It means that 100 million tons of coal were burned. The second position is held by lignite - generating 38% of electricity and heat (67.3 million tons). It is to be underlined that coal combustion is particularly noxious to the environment. The coal composition appreciably influences the volume of pollution emitted in the air. The contents of incombustible mineral parts - ashes - oscillates from 2 to 30%; only 0.02 comes from plants that had once originated coal and cannot be separated in any way. All the rest, viz. the so-called external mineral substance enters the fuel while being won. The most indesirable hard coal ingredient is sulfur whose level depends on coal sorts and its origin. The worse the fuel quality, the more sulfur it contains. In the utilization process of this fuel, its combustible part is burnt: therefore, sulfur dioxide is produced. At the present coal consumption, the SO{sub 2} emission reaches the level of 3.2 million per year. The intensifies the pressure on working out new coal utilization technologies, improving old and developing of pollution limiting methods. Research is also directed towards such an adaptation of technologies in order that individual users may also make use thereof (household furnaces) as their share in the pollution emission is considerable.

  16. Characterisation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in flue gas and residues of a full scale fluidized bed combustor combusting non-hazardous industrial waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Caneghem, J; Vandecasteele, C

    2014-11-01

    This paper studies the fate of PAHs in full scale incinerators by analysing the concentration of the 16 EPA-PAHs in both the input waste and all the outputs of a full scale Fluidized Bed Combustor (FBC). Of the analysed waste inputs i.e. Waste Water Treatment (WWT) sludge, Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) and Automotive Shredder Residue (ASR), RDF and ASR were the main PAH sources, with phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene being the most important PAHs. In the flue gas sampled at the stack, naphthalene was the only predominant PAH, indicating that the PAHs in FBC's combustion gas were newly formed and did not remain from the input waste. Of the other outputs, the boiler and fly ash contained no detectable levels of PAHs, whereas the flue gas cleaning residue contained only low concentrations of naphthalene, probably adsorbed from the flue gas. The PAH fingerprint of the bottom ash corresponded rather well to the PAH fingerprint of the RDF and ASR, indicating that the PAHs in this output, in contrast to the other outputs, were mainly remainders from the PAHs in the waste inputs. A PAH mass balance showed that the total PAH input/output ratio of the FBC ranged from about 100 to about 2600 depending on the waste input composition and the obtained combustion conditions. In all cases, the FBC was clearly a net PAH sink. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A model for numerical simulation of devolatilization and combustion of waste material in packed beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, B. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Thermo- und Fluiddynamik (IATF)

    1994-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a numerical simulation method for the calculation of an unsteady, three-dimensional flow and combustion phenomena in a packed bed of a furnace. The entire arrangement of a furnace partly filled with solid particles is separated into a gas phase and a solid phase. The gas flow within the void space between particles is approximated by flow through porous media according to Darcy`s law. The outer flow region of the combustion chamber will be modelled as a laminar/turbulent viscous flow. Therefore a set of equations, i.e. continuity, momentum and energy equation including the homogeneous combustion between a gaseous fuel and air are applied to describe accurately the behaviour of the phenomena encountered. The motion of the solid phase, as a flow of one particle past another, is accounted for by particle-to-particle friction. As heating up and combustion of particles significantly changes their size, temeprature and composition this behaviour is treated by a special particle modelling step. It takes into account a size reduction due to heterogeneous combustion, non-uniform temperature distribution due to internal heat generation and both convective and radiative heat transfer within the gas phase and the solid phase, and a varying composition due to pyrolysation and gasification. Similar to the gas phase, a set of conservation equations applied to particles yields the solution for the relevant variables. The sets of equations for both the solid and the gas phases will be solved by a time-marching finite volume approach on an unstructured computational mesh with arbitrarily shaped cells. This novelty enhances body fitted meshing and resolution of high gradient domains. An efficient non-iterative solution algorithm is employed, which allows the size of the computational time step to be controlled solely by accuracy considerations, rather than numerical stability, in the interest of economy. [Deutsch] Innerhalb des vorliegenden

  18. The impact of industrial waste of Venezuelan marine water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Frank [Bechtel Corp., Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Guarino, Carmen [Guarino Engineers, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Arias, Marlene [Ministerio del Ambiente y Recursos Naturales Renovables, Caracas (Venezuela)

    1993-12-31

    The Puerto Cabello-Marron coastal area of Venezuela is an ideal location for industries that require large land areas, water, marine transportation, minimum habitation, cooling water, etc. However, mercury spills have produced concern in the entire coastal zone. The area was investigated and negative impacts were identified. Consequently, recommendations for waste water management were proceeded. 13 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Groundwater Impacts of Radioactive Wastes and Associated Environmental Modeling Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Liu, Chongxuan

    2012-11-01

    This article provides a review of the major sources of radioactive wastes and their impacts on groundwater contamination. The review discusses the major biogeochemical processes that control the transport and fate of radionuclide contaminants in groundwater, and describe the evolution of mathematical models designed to simulate and assess the transport and transformation of radionuclides in groundwater.

  20. Impact Of Municipal Solid Waste On Trace Metal Concentrations In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The impact of municipal solid waste on the levels of cadmium, copper, nickel, lead and zinc in herbage and soil samples within Abuja municipality was studied. The flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used in the determination of the metals. The average concentration of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in the herbage ...

  1. 21-PWR Waste Package Side and End Impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Schmitt

    2005-08-29

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of a 21-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel waste package impacting an unyielding surface. A range of initial velocities and initial angles between the waste package and the unyielding surface is studied. The scope of this calculation is limited to estimating the area of the outer shell (OS) where the residual stress exceeds a given limit (hereafter ''damaged area''). The stress limit is defined as a fraction of the yield strength of the OS material, Alloy 22 (SB-575 N06022), at the appropriate temperature. The design of the 21-PWR waste package used in this calculation is that defined in Reference 8. However, a value of 4 mm was used for the gap between the inner shell and the OS, and the thickness of the OS was reduced by 2 mm. The sketch in Attachment I provides additional information not included in Reference 8. All obtained results are valid for this design only. This calculation is associated with the waste package design and was performed by the Specialty Analyses and Waste Package Design Section. The waste package (i.e. uncanistered spent nuclear fuel disposal container) is classified as Quality Level 1.

  2. 78 FR 75913 - Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    ... Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland... Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland... security and management). Activities under the Environmental Assessment, Sodium Residuals Reaction/Removal...

  3. Preliminary assessment of the health and environmental impacts of fluidized-bed combustion of coal as applied to electrical utility systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the health and environmental impacts of fluidized-bed combustion of coal (FBC), specifically as applied to base-load generation of electrical energy by utilities. The public health impacts of Fluidized-Bed Combustion (FBC) plants are expected to be quite similar to those for Low Sulfur Coal (LSC) and Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) plants because all appear to be able to meet Federal emission standards; however, there are emissions not covered by standards. Hydrocarbon emissions are higher and trace element emissions are lower for FBC than for conventional technologies. For FBC, based on an analytical model and a single emission data point, the polycyclic organic material decreases the anticipated lifespan of the highly exposed public very slightly. Added health protection due to lower trace element emissions is not known. Although there is a large quantity of solid wastes from the generating plant, the environmental impact of the FBC technology due to solid residue appears lower than for FGD, where sludge management requires larger land areas and presents problems due to the environmentally noxious calcium sulfite in the waste. Fixing the sludge may become a requirement that increases the cost of wet-limestone FGD but makes that system more acceptable. The potential for aquatic or terrestrial impacts from hydrocarbon emissions is low. If application of AFBC technology increases the use of local high-sulfur coals to the detriment of western low-sulfur coal, a sociological benefit could accrue to the FBC (or FGD) technology, because impacts caused by western boom towns would decrease. The infrastructure of areas that mine high-sulfur coal in the Midwest are better equipped to handle increased mining than the West.

  4. Combustible gas production (methane) and biodegradation of solid and liquid mixtures of meat industry wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcos, A.; Al-Kassir, A.; Cuadros, F.; Lopez-Rodriguez, F. [School of Engineering, University of Extremadura, Avda. De Elva, s/n, 06071, Badajoz (Spain); Mohamad, A.A. [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Calgary, 2500 University Dr. N.W., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2010-05-15

    This work is devoted to determine the optimal operational conditions on the methane production as well as on the biodegradation obtained from the anaerobic codigestion of solid (fat, intestines, rumen, bowels, whiskers, etc.) and liquid (blood, washing water, manure, etc.) wastes of meat industry, particularly the ones rising from the municipal slaughterhouse of Badajoz (Spain). The experiments were performed using a 2 l capacity discontinuous digester at 38 C. The loading rate were 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4.5 g COD for wastewater (washing water and blood; Mixture 1), and 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4 g COD for the co-digestion of a mixture of 97% liquid effluent and 3% solid wastes v/v (Mixture 2) which represents the annual mean composition of the waste generated by the slaughterhouse. The maximal biodegradation rates obtained were: Mixture 1, 56.9% for a COD load of 1 g; and Mixture 2, 19.1% for a COD load of 2 g. For both mixtures, the greatest methane production was for the maximum COD load (4.5 g for Mixture 1, and 4 g for Mixture 2), at which values the amounts of methane obtained during and at the end of the co-digestion were practically indistinguishable between the two mixtures. The results will be used to design, construct, and establish the optimal operating conditions of a continuous complete-mixture biodigester. (author)

  5. Sulfur Removal in Bio-Briquette Combustion Using Seashell Waste Adsorbent at Low Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahidin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Presently, biomass is mostly utilized as co-fuel in coal combustion in view of energy diversification and emission reduction. However, since the coal content of bio-briquettes is high (up to 80% in this study, gas emissions such as those of SOx still occur. Therefore, the introduction of SO2 adsorbent is common in coal briquette or bio-briquette combustion. A calcium-based material is usually used for this goal. The aim of this study was to observe the effects of desulfurization temperature and Ca/S ratio (Ca = calcium content in adsorbent; S = sulfur content in coal and biomass on desulfurization efficiency and kinetics. The ratio of coal to biomass (palm kernel shell/PKS was fixed at 90:10 (wt/wt and the ratios of Ca to S were varied at 1:1, 1.25:1, 1.5:1, 1.75:1 and 2:1. The mixtures of coal, PKS and adsorbent were briquetted at a molding pressure of 6 ton/cm2 with Jatropha curcas seeds and starch mixture as binding agents. Desulfurization was performed within a temperature range of 300 to 500°C for 720 seconds at an airflow rate of 1.2 L/min. The results showed that the highest desulfurization efficiency (90.6% was associated with the Ca/S ratio of 2:1 and temperature of 400°C. Moreover, the highest reaction rate constant of desulfurization was 0.280 min-1.

  6. Problematic issues of air protection during thermal processes related to the energetic uses of sewage sludge and other waste. Case study: Co-combustion in peaking power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hroncová, Emília; Ladomerský, Juraj; Musil, Juraj

    2017-08-19

    Currently, it is necessary to deal with issues related to the emissions as there is a constantly increasing interest in combusting sludge from sewage treatment plants in the boilers for wood. An analysis of the energetic importance of the combustion of sewage sludge has already been carried out, but the effects of various treatments of the sludge are not always clear, e.g. composting and subsequent combustion to the air pollution. Investments in other thermal processes of energetic utilisation of sewage sludge and organic waste are not always successfully implemented. The objective of this paper is to point out some problematic cases for acceptance of thermal processes related to energetic use of waste in terms of the air protection. The other aim is to mention the experience with solutions of such issues in Slovakia. There are mentioned first results of the operational validation experiments during the energy generation in circulating fluidized bed boiler in peaking power plant (Power 110MW) with the addition of the so-called alternative fuel based on wood and sewage sludge to the main fuel - black coal (anthracite). And there has already been achieved the highest share of 12.4%w. (dry matter) of sewage sludge in form of compost in blend with black coal, which is technologically viable. Moreover analyzed the problems of the authorization and operation of the co-combustion of sewage sludge and of combustion of products of various kinds of pyrolysis waste - pyrolysis gas and pyrolysis oil are analyzed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Solo Mycoremediation Impacted by Waste Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Santos Freire

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Oil and its derivatives are the principal means of energy generation for vehicles that transport raw materials and goods produced in developed and developing regions accentuating the risk of accidents by spills in stockpiling, transport, use or discarding. The contamination by total hydrocarbons suggests the elevated propension to mutations and to the formation of carcinogenic tumors, as a consequence of the exposure to human contamination by these products. This work had as aims: a To investigate, in a laboratorial scale, the degrading capacity of autochthonous microbiota in the presence of differing concentrations of hydrocarbons (0%, 2,5%, 5% e 7,5%; b To isolate fungi tolerant to the contaminant; c To quantify and analyze the biodegradation capacity of soil through the microbial biomass and metabolic quotient; and d To set, in laboratory, ideal conditions of biodegradation of the xenobiotic compound. Some parameters of microbial activity have been evaluated, such as: biological (Carbon of microbial biomass, CO2 , qCO2 emission, and fungi growth, chemical (pH, electrical conductivity –EC –, analysis of fertility and total hydrocarbons and physical (physical composition of the soil for analysis and comparisons. The obtained results suggest that the adding of 5% of waste oil in the ground provided ideal condition for the biodegradation of he   contaminant in the environment. From the evaluated parameters, the emission of CO2 and microbial C were considered more indicative of changes in soil microbial activity subject to the addition of hydrocarbons, confirming the possibility of microremediation use.

  8. Combustion aerosols from municipal waste incineration - Effect of fuel feedstock and plant operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuthen, J.H.; Pedersen, Anne Juul; Hansen, Jørn

    2007-01-01

    ( NaCl), batteries, and automotive shredder waste. Also, runs with different changes in the operational conditions of the incinerator were made. Mass- based particle size distributions were measured using a cascade impactor and the number- based size distributions were measured using a Scanning...... Mobility Particle Sizer. The plant is equipped with flue gas cleaning and the penetration through this was determined. The particle morphology was investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy ( TEM) and chemical analysis of the aerosol particles was made by Energy Dispersive X- ray Spectroscopy ( EDS...

  9. Characterization of Oxy-combustion Impacts in Existing Coal-fired Boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Bradley R. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Fry, Andrew R. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Senior, Constance L. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Shim, Hong Shig [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Otten, Brydger Van [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Wendt, Jost [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Shaddix, Christopher [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tree, Dale [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

    2010-06-01

    This report summarizes Year 2 results of a research program designed to use multi-scale experimental studies and fundamental theoretical models to characterize and predict the impacts of retrofit of existing coal-fired utility boilers for oxy-combustion. Year 2 focused extensively on obtaining experimental data from the bench-scale, lab-scale and pilot-scale reactors. These data will be used to refine and validate submodels to be implemented in CFD simulations of full-scale boiler retrofits. Program tasks are on schedule for Year 3 completion. Both Year 2 milestones were completed on schedule and within budget.

  10. Physical and chemical characterisation of crude meat and bone meal combustion residue: 'waste or raw material?'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deydier, Eric [Laboratoire de Chimie Inorganique et Sante, Universite Paul Sabatier, IUT A, Avenue Georges Pompidou, 81100 Castres (France)]. E-mail: eric.deydier@iut-tlse3.fr; Guilet, Richard [Laboratoire de Chimie Inorganique et Sante, Universite Paul Sabatier, IUT A, Avenue Georges Pompidou, 81100 Castres (France); Sarda, Stephanie [Laboratoire de Chimie Inorganique et Sante, Universite Paul Sabatier, IUT A, Avenue Georges Pompidou, 81100 Castres (France); Sharrock, Patrick [LCBM, Universite Paul Sabatier, Avenue Georges Pompidou, 81100 Castres (France)

    2005-05-20

    As a result of the recent bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) crisis in the European beef industry, the use of animal by-product is now severely controlled. Meat and bone meal (MBM) production can no longer be used to feed cattle and must be safely disposed of or transformed. Main disposal option is incineration, producing huge amounts of ashes the valorisation of which becomes a major concern. The aim of this work is to characterise MBM combustion residue in order to evaluate their physical and chemical properties to propose new valorisation avenues. The thermal behaviour of crude meat and bone meal was followed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and (24 wt.%) inorganic residue was collected. The resulting ashes were characterised by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), particle size distribution, specific surface area (BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) couple with energy disperse X-ray analysis (EDX). Elemental analysis revealed the presence of chloride, sodium, potassium, magnesium with high level of phosphate (56 wt.%) and calcium (31 wt.%), two major constituents of bone, mainly as a mixture of Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2} and Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} phases. The impact of combustion temperature (from 550 to 1000 deg. C) on the constitution of ashes was followed by TGA, XRD and specific surface measurements. We observed a strong decrease of surface area for the ashes with crystallisation of calcium phosphates phases without major changes of chemical composition.

  11. Between hype and veracity; privatization of municipal solid waste management and its impacts on the informal waste sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Kiran; Burton, Paul; Dedekorkut-Howes, Aysin

    2017-01-01

    The informal waste recycling sector has been an indispensable but ironically invisible part of the waste management systems in developing countries as India, often completely disregarded and overlooked by decision makers and policy frameworks. The turn towards liberalization of economy since 1991 in India opened the doors for privatization of urban services and the waste sector found favor with private companies facilitated by the local governments. In joining the privatization bandwagon, the local governments aim to create an image of a progressive city demonstrated most visibly through apt management of municipal solid waste. Resultantly, the long important stakeholder, the informal sector has been sidelined and left to face the adverse impacts of privatization. There is hardly any recognition of its contributions or any attempt to integrate it within the formal waste management systems. The study investigates the impacts of privatization on the waste pickers in waste recycling operations. Highlighting the other dimension of waste collection and management in urban India the study focuses on the waste pickers and small time informal scrap dealers and this is done by taking the case study of Amritsar city, which is an important historic centre and a metropolitan city in the state of Punjab, India. The paper develops an analytical framework, drawing from literature review to analyze the impacts. In conclusion, it supports the case for involving informal waste sector towards achieving sustainable waste management in the city. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Short mechanical biological treatment of municipal solid waste allows landfill impact reduction saving waste energy content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglia, Barbara; Salati, Silvia; Di Gregorio, Alessandra; Carrera, Alberto; Tambone, Fulvia; Adani, Fabrizio

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of full scale MBT process (28 d) in removing inhibition condition for successive biogas (ABP) production in landfill and in reducing total waste impact. For this purpose the organic fraction of MSW was treated in a full-scale MBT plant and successively incubated vs. untreated waste, in simulated landfills for one year. Results showed that untreated landfilled-waste gave a total ABP reduction that was null. On the contrary MBT process reduced ABP of 44%, but successive incubation for one year in landfill gave a total ABP reduction of 86%. This ABP reduction corresponded to a MBT process of 22 weeks length, according to the predictive regression developed for ABP reduction vs. MBT-time. Therefore short MBT allowed reducing landfill impact, preserving energy content (ABP) to be produced successively by bioreactor technology since pre-treatment avoided process inhibition because of partial waste biostabilization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Washing of fly ash from combustion of municipal solid waste using water as leachant; Vattentvaett av flygaska fraan avfallsfoerbraenning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steenari, Britt-Marie; Zhao, Dongmei

    2010-03-15

    Ashes from combustion of municipal solid waste contain a large amount of minerals, salts and other metal compounds that are more or less soluble in water. The metal salts are often enriched in the fly ash which leads to a classification of the ash as hazardous waste. This makes ash management complicated and costly. Many stabilisation methods for Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) fly ash have been developed and most of them are based on a removal of chloride and sulfate in addition to a binding of metals in less soluble forms. The aim is to avoid the common situation that the ash does not comply to leaching limit values due to release of harmless salts. The aim of this project was to investigate if a simple washing with water can remove enough of the fly ash content of chloride and sulphate so that the ash can be landfilled in a simpler and less costly way than today. The project was focused on fly ashes from the MSWI units owned by Boraas Energi och Miljoe AB and Renova AB Goeteborg, i.e. a electro filter ash from grate fired boilers at Renova and a cyclone ash from a fluid bed boiler at Boraas. The results show that the main part of the chloride content of the ashes can be removed easily, but the washing with water is less effective in the removal of sulphate. A water-to-ash ratio of 1-2 l/kg removes about 100% of chloride but only 8-16% of the sulphate content. In many cases, the leachability of sulphate increases after the washing step. This is due to the rather complex sulphate chemistry with several possible reactions taking place in the ash-water system. For both the tested ashes the high level of chloride leaching is an important factor that prevents admittance on a landfill for hazardous waste without treatment.. The leaching of certain metals, such as Pb, is also high from both ashes but in the case of the Renova fly ash this is dealt with by treatment of the ash according to the Bamberg method. After a water washing with L/S 1-2 (L/kg dry ash

  14. Research Needs and Impacts in Predictive Simulation for Internal Combustion Engines (PreSICE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckerle, Wayne [Cummins, Inc., Columbus, IN (United States); Rutland, Chris [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Rohlfing, Eric [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science; Singh, Gurpreet [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; McIlroy, Andrew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-03-03

    This report is based on a SC/EERE Workshop to Identify Research Needs and Impacts in Predictive Simulation for Internal Combustion Engines (PreSICE), held March 3, 2011, to determine strategic focus areas that will accelerate innovation in engine design to meet national goals in transportation efficiency. The U.S. has reached a pivotal moment when pressures of energy security, climate change, and economic competitiveness converge. Oil prices remain volatile and have exceeded $100 per barrel twice in five years. At these prices, the U.S. spends $1 billion per day on imported oil to meet our energy demands. Because the transportation sector accounts for two-thirds of our petroleum use, energy security is deeply entangled with our transportation needs. At the same time, transportation produces one-quarter of the nation’s carbon dioxide output. Increasing the efficiency of internal combustion engines is a technologically proven and cost-effective approach to dramatically improving the fuel economy of the nation’s fleet of vehicles in the near- to mid-term, with the corresponding benefits of reducing our dependence on foreign oil and reducing carbon emissions. Because of their relatively low cost, high performance, and ability to utilize renewable fuels, internal combustion engines—including those in hybrid vehicles—will continue to be critical to our transportation infrastructure for decades. Achievable advances in engine technology can improve the fuel economy of automobiles by over 50% and trucks by over 30%. Achieving these goals will require the transportation sector to compress its product development cycle for cleaner, more efficient engine technologies by 50% while simultaneously exploring innovative design space. Concurrently, fuels will also be evolving, adding another layer of complexity and further highlighting the need for efficient product development cycles. Current design processes, using “build and test” prototype engineering, will not

  15. Environmental and health impacts of using food waste as animal feed: a comparative analysis of food waste management options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salemdeeb, Ramy; Zu Ermgassen, Erasmus K H J; Kim, Mi Hyung; Balmford, Andrew; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2017-01-01

    The disposal of food waste is a large environmental problem. In the United Kingdom (UK), approximately 15 million tonnes of food are wasted each year, mostly disposed of in landfill, via composting, or anaerobic digestion (AD). European Union (EU) guidelines state that food waste should preferentially be used as animal feed though for most food waste this practice is currently illegal, because of disease control concerns. Interest in the potential diversion of food waste for animal feed is however growing, with a number of East Asian states offering working examples of safe food waste recycling - based on tight regulation and rendering food waste safe through heat treatment. This study investigates the potential benefits of diverting food waste for pig feed in the UK. A hybrid, consequential life cycle assessment (LCA) was conducted to compare the environmental and health impacts of four technologies for food waste processing: two technologies of South Korean style-animal feed production (as a wet pig feed and a dry pig feed) were compared with two widespread UK disposal technologies: AD and composting. Results of 14 mid-point impact categories show that the processing of food waste as a wet pig feed and a dry pig feed have the best and second-best scores, respectively, for 13/14 and 12/14 environmental and health impacts. The low impact of food waste feed stems in large part from its substitution of conventional feed, the production of which has substantial environmental and health impacts. While the re-legalisation of the use of food waste as pig feed could offer environmental and public health benefits, this will require support from policy makers, the public, and the pig industry, as well as investment in separated food waste collection which currently occurs in only a minority of regions.

  16. Climate impact analysis of waste treatment scenarios--thermal treatment of commercial and pretreated waste versus landfilling in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragossnig, A M; Wartha, C; Pomberger, R

    2009-11-01

    A major challenge for modern waste management lies in a smart integration of waste-to-energy installations in local energy systems in such a way that the energy efficiency of the waste-to-energy plant is optimized and that the energy contained in the waste is, therefore, optimally utilized. The extent of integration of thermal waste treatment processes into regular energy supply systems plays a major role with regard to climate control. In this research, the specific waste management situation looked at scenarios aiming at maximizing the energy recovery from waste (i.e. actual scenario and waste-to-energy process with 75% energy efficiency [22.5% electricity, 52.5% heat]) yield greenhouse gas emission savings due to the fact that more greenhouse gas emissions are avoided in the energy sector than caused by the various waste treatment processes. Comparing dedicated waste-to-energy-systems based on the combined heat and power (CHP) process with concepts based on sole electricity production, the energy efficiency proves to be crucial with regard to climate control. This underlines the importance of choosing appropriate sites for waste-to-energy-plants. This research was looking at the effect with regard to the climate impact of various waste management scenarios that could be applied alternatively by a private waste management company in Austria. The research is, therefore, based on a specific set of data for the waste streams looked at (waste characteristics, logistics needed, etc.). Furthermore, the investigated scenarios have been defined based on the actual available alternatives with regard to the usage of treatment plants for this specific company. The standard scenarios for identifying climate impact implications due to energy recovery from waste are based on the respective marginal energy data for the power and heat generation facilities/industrial processes in Austria.

  17. Low-level waste management alternatives and analysis in DOE`s programmatic environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerstein, J.S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

    1993-03-01

    The Department of Energy is preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. The PEIS has been divided into an Environmental Restoration section and a Waste Management section. Each section has a unique set of alternatives. This paper will focus on the waste management alternatives and analysis. The set of alternatives for waste management has been divided into waste categories. These categories are: high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, greater-than-class C and low-level waste from commercial sources, hazardous waste, and spent nuclear fuel. This paper will discuss the alternatives and analytical approach that will be used to evaluate these alternatives for the low-level waste section. Although the same alternatives will be considered for all waste types, the analysis will be performed separately for each waste type. In the sections that follow, information will be provided on waste management configurations, the analysis of waste management alternatives, waste types and locations, facility and transportation activities, the facility and transportation impacts assessment, and the compilation of impacts.

  18. Characterization of Oxy-combustion Impacts in Existing Coal-fired Boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley Adams; Andrew Fry; Constance Senior; Hong Shim; Huafeng Wang; Jost Wendt; Christopher Shaddix

    2009-06-30

    This report summarizes Year 1 results of a research program designed to use multi-scale experimental studies and fundamental theoretical models to characterize and predict the impacts of retrofit of existing coal-fired utility boilers for oxy-combustion. Through the course of Year 1 activities, great progress was made toward understanding the issues associated with oxy-combustion retrofit of coal-fired boilers. All four Year 1 milestones and objectives have been, or will be, completed on schedule and within budget. Progress in the four milestone areas may be summarized as follows: • University of Utah has performed size segregated ash composition measurements in the Oxy-Fuel Combustor (OFC). These experiments indicate that oxy-combustion retrofit may impact ash aerosol mineral matter composition. Both flame temperature and flue gas composition have been observed to influence the concentration of calcium, magnesium and iron in the fine particulate. This could in turn impact boiler fouling and slagging. • Sandia National Labs has shown that char oxidation rate is dependent on particle size (for sizes between 60 and 100 microns) by performing fundamental simulations of reacting char particles. These predictions will be verified by making time-resolved optical measurements of char particle temperature, velocity and size in bench-scale experiments before the end of Year 1. • REI and Siemens have completed the design of an oxy-research burner that will be mounted on University of Utah’s pilot-scale furnace, the L1500. This burner will accommodate a wide range of O2, FGR and mixing strategies under conditions relevant for utility boiler operation. Through CFD modeling of the different burner designs, it was determined that the key factor influencing flame stabilization location is particle heat-up rate. The new oxy-research burner and associated equipment is scheduled for delivery before the end of Year 1. • REI has completed a literature survey of slagging and

  19. Greenhouse impact due to the use of combustible fuels: life cycle viewpoint and relative radiative forcing commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkinen, Johanna; Palosuo, Taru; Holmgren, Kristina; Savolainen, Ilkka

    2008-09-01

    Extensive information on the greenhouse impacts of various human actions is important in developing effective climate change mitigation strategies. The greenhouse impacts of combustible fuels consist not only of combustion emissions but also of emissions from the fuel production chain and possible effects on the ecosystem carbon storages. It is important to be able to assess the combined, total effect of these different emissions and to express the results in a comprehensive way. In this study, a new concept called relative radiative forcing commitment (RRFC) is presented and applied to depict the greenhouse impact of some combustible fuels currently used in Finland. RRFC is a ratio that accounts for the energy absorbed in the Earth system due to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations (production and combustion of fuel) compared to the energy released in the combustion of fuel. RRFC can also be expressed as a function of time in order to give a dynamic cumulative picture on the caused effect. Varying time horizons can be studied separately, as is the case when studying the effects of different climate policies on varying time scales. The RRFC for coal for 100 years is about 170, which means that in 100 years 170 times more energy is absorbed in the atmosphere due to the emissions of coal combustion activity than is released in combustion itself. RRFC values of the other studied fuel production chains varied from about 30 (forest residues fuel) to 190 (peat fuel) for the 100-year study period. The length of the studied time horizon had an impact on the RRFC values and, to some extent, on the relative positions of various fuels.

  20. Process optimisation in waste combustion and gasification; Prozessoptimierung bei der Verbrennung und Vergasung von Abfaellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Born, M. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg, Inst. IEC, Fakultaet 4 (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    Optimisation of thermal treatment processes is chiefly geared to the following aims: in terms of process engineering, to the homogenisation of input materials, improvement of process effectivity (increased reaction rates), intensification of mixing and exploitation of residence time (approximation to thermodynamic equilibria); in ecological terms, to the minimisation of material flows and pollutant generation and limitation of emissions; and in economic terms to the simplification of process techniques, maximisation of net energy production, and minimisation of the quantity and pollutant content of arising wastes. The present contribution takes a closer look at some of these ways of optimisation. [Deutsch] Die Optimierung der thermischen Behandlungsprozesse wird vor allem mit folgenden Zielstellung durchgefuehrt: - verfahrenstechnisch durch - Homogenisierung der Input-Materialien, Verbesserung der Effektivitaet der Prozesse (Erhoehung der Reaktionsgeschwindigkeit), Intensivierung der Mischung und Nutzung der Verweilzeit (Annaeherung an thermodynamische Gleichgewichte). - Oekologisch durch - Minimierung der Stoffstroeme, Minimierung der Schadstoffentstehung, Begrenzung der Emissionen. - Oekonomisch durch - Vereinfachung der Verfahrenstechnik, Maximierung der Nettoenergieproduktion, Minimierung der Mengen und Schadstoffgehalte entstehender Abfaelle. In den folgenden Ausfuehrungen sollen einige dieser Optimierungsmoeglichkeiten naeher betrachtet werden. (orig./SR)

  1. Energy and cost impact of materials separation on municipal waste combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stodolsky, F. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Moses, D.O. (USDOE Office of Policy, Planning and Analysis, Washington, DC (USA). Office of Environmental Analysis)

    1991-01-01

    New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for new municipal waste combustors (MWCs) and emission guidelines for existing MWCs have been promulgated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). A 25 wt % materials separation requirement was included in the standards (new sources) and guidelines (existing sources), but was subsequently dropped. In proposing the requirements, EPA believed that there would be both direct air emissions reduction, and nonair quality benefits considering net costs, energy, and other environmental impacts. In this paper, we assessed the energy impact and associated costs of materials separation. Impact from a national perspective and from the perspective of the MWC owner was assessed. From a national perspective, the energy required to recycle must be compared against the energy needed for extraction and manufacture from virgin raw materials, and this in turn must be compared against the energy value of the combustible MSW fraction. At times, the economics of material separation and recycling appear poor because of competing efficiencies of scale of traditional extraction and processing of virgin raw materials, as well as a lack of markets for recovered materials. In this analysis, we address these issues. 8 refs., 5 figs. , 3 tabs.

  2. Experimental characterization of jet static forces impacting waste tank components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamberger, J.A.; Bates, J.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Waters, E.D. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company plans to install mixer pumps in doubleshell waste tanks to mobilize and suspend settled sludge to allow eventual retrieval for treatment and permanent storage. The mixer pumps produce high momentum, horizontally directed jets that impact and mobilize the sludge and mix it into slurry for removal. There is concern that the force of the jet may damage tank internal components in its path. Scaled experiments were conducted to characterize the velocity profiles of the floor jet and to quantify the drag coefficients and impact forces for three tank components: radiation dry well, air lift circulator, and steam coil. Jet impact forces were measured on the scaled models at a 4 to 1 range of hydraulically scaled flow rates and a scaled range of distances between discharge nozzle and test component. The test were designed to provide hydraulic similarity between test conditions and expected actual waste tank conditions by using equal Reynolds number the jet maximum velocity impacted the test component. Forces measured on the models were used to calculate expected forces on the full scale components. Correlations of force on the test article versus distance from the nozzle were derived for the radiation dry well and air lift circulator based on the velocity correlation and drag parameter. The force data were also used to derive equivalent drag parameters which accounted for component shape factors including variation of jet impact area on the test article with distance from the nozzle. 8 refs., 44 figs., 42 tabs.

  3. impact of waste disposal on health of a poor urban community

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2004-08-08

    Aug 8, 2004 ... IMPACT OF WASTE DISPOSAL ON HEALTH OF A POOR URBAN COMMUNITY IN ZIMBAMBWF. F. S. Makoni MSc, J. Ndamba ... Objective: To assess excreta and waste disposal facilities available and their impact on sanitation related ..... especially when there is no proper waste disposal mechanism and ...

  4. On-line analysis of gas-phase composition in the combustion chamber and particle emission characteristics during combustion of wood and waste in a small batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferge, T; Maguhn, J; Hafner, K; Mühlberger, F; Davidovic, M; Warnecke, R; Zimmermann, R

    2005-03-15

    The emission of particulate matter and gaseous compounds during combustion of wood and refuse-derived fuel in a small batch reactor is investigated by laser mass-spectrometric on-line measurement techniques for gas-phase analysis and simultaneous registration of physical aerosol properties (number size distribution). The gas-phase composition is addressed by a laser-based mass spectrometric method, namely, vacuum-UV single-photon ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (VUV-SPI-TOFMS). Particle-size distributions are measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer. Furthermore, a photoelectric aerosol sensor is applied for detection of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The different phases of wood combustion are distinguishable by both the chemical profiles of gas-phase components (e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAH) and the particle-size distribution. Furthermore, short disturbances of the combustion process due to air supply shortages are investigated regarding their effect on particle-size distribution and gas-phase composition, respectively. It is shown that the combustion conditions strongly influence the particle-size distribution as well as on the emission of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  5. Ash and heavy metals in fluidized-bed combustion of wood wastes; Tuhka ja raskasmetallit puuperaeisen jaetteen kerrosleijupoltossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaessi, T.; Aittoniemi, P. [IVO Power Engineering, Vantaa (Finland); Kauppinen, E.; Latva-Somppi, J.; Kurkela, J. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Partanen, J. [IVO Technology Centre, Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Ash formation and deposition mechanisms during co-combustion of pulp mill sludge and bark in industrial bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) combustor have been studied. Similar fuels were used in a bench-scale BFB for co-combustion of sludge and bark pellets and comparative studies with separate combustion of these fuels. Results indicated that in industrial scale unit significant fraction of ash had vaporization. About 14 mass-% of the total fly ash was found in the particle size below 0.2 {mu}m. The vaporized species consisted of potassium (K), sulfur (S), chlorine (Cl) and also of minor quantities of sodium (Na). In the benchscale similar vaporization fractions during co-combustion were measured, about 11 mass-%. During the combustion of bark this ratio, about 20 mass-%, was higher than during sludge combustion. The vaporized ash fraction was in the case of dried sludge combustion about 7 mass-%, but with wet sludge the vaporization rate was remarkably lower, about 1-2 mass-%. An increase in the bed temperature increased also ash vaporization. Test run period without combustion at elevated temperatures produced very low quantities of vaporized ash. The vaporized species in bench-scale test during bark pellet combustion were K, S and Cl, for sludge combustion also Na was clearly detected. No condensation of the vaporized species in bed area or furnace walls was observed. Bed defluidization was studied in the bench-scale unit. During bark pellet combustion the bed-agglomeration proceeded via small ash particle, below 2 {mu}m, coating on sand particle surface and consequent bonding between the ash layers. In the case of sludge combustion the accumulation of large ash particles and sintering of these porous agglomerates was observed to cause bed coarsening and defluidization. (orig.)

  6. Fuel spray combustion of waste cooking oil and palm oil biodiesel: Direct photography and detailed chemical kinetics

    KAUST Repository

    Kuti, Olawole

    2013-10-14

    This paper studies the ignition processes of two biodiesel from two different feedstock sources, namely waste cooked oil (WCO) and palm oil (PO). They were investigated using the direct photography through high-speed video observations and detailed chemical kinetics. The detailed chemical kinetics modeling was carried out to complement data acquired using the high-speed video observations. For the high-speed video observations, an image intensifier combined with OH* filter connected to a high-speed video camera was used to obtain OH* chemiluminscence image near 313 nm. The OH* images were used to obtain the experimental ignition delay of the biodiesel fuels. For the high-speed video observations, experiments were done at an injection pressure of 100, 200 and 300 MPa using a 0.16 mm injector nozzle. Also a detailed chemical kinetics for the biodiesel fuels was carried out using ac chemical kinetics solver adopting a 0-D reactor model to obtain the chemical ignition delay of the combusting fuels. Equivalence ratios obtained from the experimental ignition delay were used for the detailed chemical kinetics analyses. The Politecnico di Milano\\'s thermochemical and reaction kinetic data were adopted to simulate the ignition processes of the biodiesels using the five fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) major components in the biodiesel fuels. From the high-speed video observations, it was observed that at increasing injection pressure, experimental ignition delay increased as a result of improvement in fuel and air mixing effects. Also the palm oil biodiesel has a shorter ignition delay compared to waste cooked oil biodiesel. This phenomenon could be attributed to the higher cetane number of palm biodiesel. The fuel spray ignition properties depend on both the physical ignition delay and chemical ignition delay. From the detailed chemical kinetic results it was observed that at the low temperature, high ambient pressure conditions reactivity increased as equivalent ratio

  7. The impacts of decision uncertainty on municipal solid waste management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Atousa; Sadiq, Rehan; Hewage, Kasun

    2017-07-15

    Municipal solid waste treatment options are not necessarily pragmatic if the stakeholders in the system don't mutually agree on their shares of liabilities. Stakeholders will select an option if their benefits are maximized and costs are minimized. A decision support framework is required to assess various waste treatment options and predict the optimal decision, considering multiple criteria and conflicting preferences of multiple stakeholders. Because of the inherent complexity, uncertainty is unavoidable and should be acknowledged to enhance the reliability in the decision-making process. Uncertainties in the cost and benefit estimates, and stakeholders' ability in verbalizing their preferences and their knowledge about each other's priorities can impact the outcome of such environmental management problem. In this study, uncertainty assessment methods such as sensitivity analysis, fuzzy Analytical Hierarchy Process, and Bayesian games have been explored. A case study in Vancouver (BC, Canada) has been used as a proof of concept. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. High Level Waste System Impacts from Acid Dissolution of Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KETUSKY, EDWARD

    2006-04-20

    This research evaluates the ability of OLI{copyright} equilibrium based software to forecast Savannah River Site High Level Waste system impacts from oxalic acid dissolution of Tank 1-15 sludge heels. Without further laboratory and field testing, only the use of oxalic acid can be considered plausible to support sludge heel dissolution on multiple tanks. Using OLI{copyright} and available test results, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Material and energy balances, coupled with the model, identify potential safety concerns. Overpressurization and overheating are shown to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen could, however, overwhelm the tank ventilation. While pH adjustment can restore the minimal hydrogen generation, resultant precipitates will notably increase the sludge volume. OLI{copyright} is used to develop a flowsheet such that additional sludge vitrification canisters and other negative system impacts are minimized. Sensitivity analyses are used to assess the processability impacts from variations in the sludge/quantities of acids.

  9. Fault Diagnosis of Internal Combustion Engine Valve Clearance Using the Impact Commencement Detection Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhinong; Mao, Zhiwei; Wang, Zijia; Zhang, Jinjie

    2017-12-15

    Internal combustion engines (ICEs) are widely used in many important fields. The valve train clearance of an ICE usually exceeds the normal value due to wear or faulty adjustment. This work aims at diagnosing the valve clearance fault based on the vibration signals measured on the engine cylinder heads. The non-stationarity of the ICE operating condition makes it difficult to obtain the nominal baseline, which is always an awkward problem for fault diagnosis. This paper overcomes the problem by inspecting the timing of valve closing impacts, of which the referenced baseline can be obtained by referencing design parameters rather than extraction during healthy conditions. To accurately detect the timing of valve closing impact from vibration signals, we carry out a new method to detect and extract the commencement of the impacts. The results of experiments conducted on a twelve-cylinder ICE test rig show that the approach is capable of extracting the commencement of valve closing impact accurately and using only one feature can give a superior monitoring of valve clearance. With the help of this technique, the valve clearance fault becomes detectable even without the comparison to the baseline, and the changing trend of the clearance could be trackable.

  10. Fault Diagnosis of Internal Combustion Engine Valve Clearance Using the Impact Commencement Detection Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhinong Jiang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Internal combustion engines (ICEs are widely used in many important fields. The valve train clearance of an ICE usually exceeds the normal value due to wear or faulty adjustment. This work aims at diagnosing the valve clearance fault based on the vibration signals measured on the engine cylinder heads. The non-stationarity of the ICE operating condition makes it difficult to obtain the nominal baseline, which is always an awkward problem for fault diagnosis. This paper overcomes the problem by inspecting the timing of valve closing impacts, of which the referenced baseline can be obtained by referencing design parameters rather than extraction during healthy conditions. To accurately detect the timing of valve closing impact from vibration signals, we carry out a new method to detect and extract the commencement of the impacts. The results of experiments conducted on a twelve-cylinder ICE test rig show that the approach is capable of extracting the commencement of valve closing impact accurately and using only one feature can give a superior monitoring of valve clearance. With the help of this technique, the valve clearance fault becomes detectable even without the comparison to the baseline, and the changing trend of the clearance could be trackable.

  11. Analysis of the Effect of Injection Pressure on Ignition Delay and Combustion Process of Biodiesel from Palm Oil, Algae and Waste Cooking Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irham Anas, Mohd; Khalid, Amir; Hakim Zulkifli, Fathul; Jaat, Norrizam; Faisal Hushim, Mohd; Manshoor, Bukhari; Zaman, Izzuddin

    2017-10-01

    Biodiesel is a domestically produced, renewable fuel that can be manufactured from vegetable oils, animal fats, or recycled restaurant grease for use in diesel engines. The objective of this research is investigation the effects of the variant injection pressure on ignition delay and emission for different biodiesel using rapid compression machine. Rapid Compression Machine (RCM) is used to simulate a single compression stroke of an internal combustion engine as a real engine. Four types of biodiesel which are waste cooking oil, crude palm oil, algae and jatropha were tested at injection pressure of 80 MPa, 90 MPa and 130 MPa under constant ambient temperature at 950 K. Increased in injection pressure resulted shorter ignition delay proven by WCO5 which decreased from 1.3 ms at 80 MPa to 0.7 ms at 130 MPa. Meanwhile, emission for CO2 increased due to better fuel atomization for fuel-air mixture formation lead to completed combustion.

  12. Identifying potential environmental impacts of waste handling strategies in textile industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacout, Dalia M M; Hassouna, M S

    2016-08-01

    Waste management is a successful instrument to minimize generated waste and improve environmental conditions. In spite of the large share of developing countries in the textile industry, limited information is available concerning the waste management strategies implemented for textiles on those countries and their environmental impacts. In the current study, two waste management approaches for hazardous solid waste treatment of acrylic fibers (landfill and incineration) were investigated. The main research questions were: What are the different impacts of each waste management strategy? Which waste management strategy is more ecofriendly? Life cycle assessment was employed in order to model the environmental impacts of each waste streaming approach separately then compare them together. Results revealed that incineration was the more ecofriendly approach. Highest impacts of both approaches were on ecotoxicity and carcinogenic potentials due to release of metals from pigment wastes. Landfill had an impact of 46.8 % on human health as compared to 28 % by incineration. Incineration impact on ecosystem quality was higher than landfill impact (68.4 and 51.3 %, respectively). As for resources category, incineration had a higher impact than landfill (3.5 and 2.0 %, respectively). Those impacts could be mitigated if state-of-the-art landfill or incinerator were used and could be reduced by applying waste to energy approaches for both management systems In conclusion, shifting waste treatment from landfill to incineration would decrease the overall environmental impacts and allow energy recovery. The potential of waste to energy approach by incineration with heat recovery could be considered in further studies. Future research is needed in order to assess the implementation of waste management systems and the preferable waste management strategies in the textile industry on developing countries.

  13. Performance analysis of single stage libr-water absorption machine operated by waste thermal energy of internal combustion engine: Case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Hafiz Zafar; Leman, A. M.; Muthuraman, S.; Salleh, Mohd Najib Mohd; Zakaria, Supaat

    2017-09-01

    Combined heating, cooling, and power is also known as Tri-generation. Tri-generation system can provide power, hot water, space heating and air -conditioning from single source of energy. The objective of this study is to propose a method to evaluate the characteristic and performance of a single stage lithium bromide-water (LiBr-H2O) absorption machine operated with waste thermal energy of internal combustion engine which is integral part of trigeneration system. Correlations for computer sensitivity analysis are developed in data fit software for (P-T-X), (H-T-X), saturated liquid (water), saturated vapor, saturation pressure and crystallization temperature curve of LiBr-H2O Solution. Number of equations were developed with data fit software and exported into excel work sheet for the evaluation of number of parameter concerned with the performance of vapor absorption machine such as co-efficient of performance, concentration of solution, mass flow rate, size of heat exchangers of the unit in relation to the generator, condenser, absorber and evaporator temperatures. Size of vapor absorption machine within its crystallization limits for cooling and heating by waste energy recovered from exhaust gas, and jacket water of internal combustion engine also presented in this study to save the time and cost for the facilities managers who are interested to utilize the waste thermal energy of their buildings or premises for heating and air conditioning applications.

  14. 40 CFR 60.1555 - Are any small municipal waste combustion units exempt from my State plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pyrolysis/combustion unit is an integrated part of a plastics/rubber recycling unit as defined under... that combust fuels made from products of plastics/rubber recycling plants. Units are exempt from your... chemical plants or petroleum refineries that use feed stocks produced by plastics/rubber recycling units...

  15. 40 CFR 62.15020 - Can my small municipal waste combustion unit be exempt from this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Plastics/rubber recycling units. Your unit is exempt from this subpart if four requirements are met: (1) Your pyrolysis/combustion unit is an integrated part of a plastics/rubber recycling unit as defined... the feed stocks. (i) Units that combust fuels made from products of plastics/rubber recycling plants...

  16. Current situation regarding the co-combustion of waste materials in power plants; Aktuelle Situation der Mitverbrennung von Abfallstoffen in Kraftwerken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schirmer, U.; Krueger, H.; Puch, K.H. [VGB Technische Vereinigung der Grosskraftwerksbetreiber e.V., Essen (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    In view of the wholly insufficient capacity, relative to current arisings, of waste incineration plants, residue processing plants and plants for the utilisation of other combustible materials we are inevitably faced with the question whether power plant furnaces might not be suited for the thermal treatment and utilisation of wastes and residues. This possibility has been studied by many VGB member companies and seriously investigated for its practicability in several cases. The investigations were premised on the following fundamental positions. The VGB members are prepared to contribute to the solution of the above problems as long as this is possible without detriment to their duties as energy suppliers. They can only assume this responsibility if the requirements of the licensing laws are observed. This concerns the quality and arising quantities of wastes to be taken in, emissions, and the disposal of combustion residues. Power plants typically make more or less complete use of their own process residues, a feature which as far as possible should not be impaired by the co-combustion process. The technical problems posed by the co-combustion of suitable residues and wastes are usually solvable. Co-combustion offers an alternative and a supplement to dedicated waste utilisation plants or plants for the utilisation of suitable residues. Beyond this some companies are interested in profiting from the fees that will be due to them for utilising wastes. From 1990 to 1992 a VGB working group studied the option of co-combustion on the basis of the above premises. The material elaborated by the group now in turn serves as a basis for the following deliberations. [Deutsch] Da die Kapazitaet der Abfallverbrennungsanlagen, der Anlagen zur Reststoffverwertung und der Anlagen zur Nutzung sonstiger brennbaren Stoffe fuer das vorhandene Angebot bei weitem nicht ausreicht, ergibt sich die Frage der Eignung von Kraftwerksfeuerungen zur thermischen Behandlung und Verwertung von

  17. THE IMPACT OF INDUSTRIAL WASTE LANDFILL ON THE ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Janas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to assess the environmental impact of a shut down industrial waste landfill. A detailed analysis of the quality of groundwater around the landfill in the years 1995-2016 was conducted. Assessment of the status of groundwater in the landfill area was made based on the results of monitoring tests. It includes the measurement of pH, specific electrical conductivity (SEC and the content of chlorides, sulfates, phosphates, heavy metals: copper (Cu, lead (Pb, chromium (Cr and a number of other pollution indicators. The analysis confirms that the landfill during the operation did not constitute a threat because of a number of employed security measures and sealing layers. Only in recent years, the industrial waste landfill which is already out of operation has become an extremely serious environmental threat. The results of water analyses from the piezometers clearly indicate that there is a problem of groundwater contamination. There was a significant increase in the value of some of the analyzed indicators (such as chlorides and sulfates, mainly in the piezometers located on the flow line of groundwater in the landfill area. The observed situation is probably a result of damage to the sealing layers and leaching of pollutants from waste deposited in the landfill by rain water.

  18. Flue gas cleaning for co-combustion of waste in biomass boilers 10-25 MW; Roekgasrening vid samfoerbraenning i biobraenslepannor i storleken 10-25 MW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyllenhammar, Marianne; Larsson, Sara [S.E.P. Scandinavian Energy Project AB, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2003-11-01

    Incineration of waste fuel in existing biomass boilers in the power range 10-25 MW is not very common in Sweden today. With increasing waste streams it will be interesting to use such fuel also in these types of boilers. This report gives a description of which regulations you have to comply with when you start to burn waste fuel, the increasing costs it will bring, and different types of flue gas cleaning equipment that are available. For existing boilers the EC-directive for incineration of waste will have to be implemented from 2005. Newly built boilers have to implement the directive from the start. The new requirements that have to be met for co-combustion plants are: The flue gas has to have a temperature of 850 deg C or more for at least two seconds in the combustion chamber. Exceptions can be allowed, but then the emission limit for CO for waste combustion must be met. The emission limit will then be 50 mg/Nm{sup 3} at 11 % O{sub 2}. Exceptions can be allowed for fluid-bed combustion if 100 mg/Nm{sup 3} at 11 % O{sub 2} as a hourly average can be met. There has to be a fuel handling system that automatically stops the waste flow if the temperature drops below 850 deg C, or when any of the emission limit values are exceeded. Some operating parameters have to be measured continuously. Emission limit values for dust, TOC, HCl, HF, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO, metals, dioxins and furans. Increased documentation, reporting and control. This report has been focusing on how to meet the regulations on emissions to air. Following conclusions have been drawn: To avoid exceeding the limit value for dust emission a bag filter or an electric precipitator will be needed. Multi-cyclones are not enough. If the limit value for dust is met, the limit value of metals will also be met. To avoid exceeding the limit value for chloride a flue gas condenser/scrubbing tower or a dry flue gas cleaning system is needed, if the waste fuel is not very low in chloride. With a low sulphur

  19. Turbulent combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  20. The KONVOI thermal waste treatment concept. A flexible modular combination of grate firing, carbonization and combustion, and flue gas purifiaction. Konvoi-Konzept fuer die thermische Abfallbehandlung. Flexibel einsetzbare Kombination von Rostfeuerung, Schwel-Brenn-Verfahren und Rauchgasreinigung in Modulbauweise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittmer, H.H. (Vereinigte Elektrizitaetswerke Westfalen (VEW), Dortmund (Germany))

    1994-09-01

    The residual wastes are degassed hermetically at 450 C in the carbonizing drum. This carbonization/combustion process causes the formation of a combustible process gas and a solid residue which contains a carboniferous powder and ferrous metals, nonferrous metals, glass, and stones. These solids are classified and separated prior to combustion and can be reused without difficulties. The carboniferous dusts and process gas are burned at 1300 C in a high-temperature combustion chamber which corresponds to the proven melting combustion chambers used in power plants. Organic pollutants such as dioxins and furans are destroyed, and inorganic pollutants such as heavy metals are molten. As the melts solidify in a water bath they are converted into non-leaching granules. (orig.)

  1. Thermogravimetric analysis of the combustion of microalgae and microalgae blended with waste in N2/O2 and CO2/O2 atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, YuTing; Ma, XiaoQian; Lai, ZhiYi

    2011-01-01

    The combustion of microalgae and municipal solid waste (MSW) under N2/O2 and CO2/O2 atmospheres was analyzed using a thermogravimetric instrument. The onset temperature of volatile release (Tv), maximum rate of weight loss (Rmax) and the temperature at the maximal peak (Tmax) were measured. As the blending ratio of microalgae was increased from 10% to 70% under N2/O2 atmosphere, Tv decreased from 269.4 to 247.4 °C, Tmax decreased from 310.8 to 288.0 °C, Rmax decreased from 11.94% to 7.88% and residual weight decreased from 30% to 20%. Thus, blending with microalgae can improve MSW combustion. The type of atmosphere did not affect Tv and Tmax, but replacement of N2 by CO2, resulted in the later appearance of the small humps (>600 °C) in the mass loss and rate of weight loss curves, burnout was less complete, and Rmax was lower, thus some improvement measures, such as an increase in oxygen concentration, are required under CO2/O2 atmosphere to achieve the same combustion performances in air. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Fuel to Synthesis of CaTiO3 by Solution Combustion Synthesis for High-Level Nuclear Waste Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Choong-Hwan; Kim, Yeon-Ku; Han, Young-Min; Lee, Sang-Jin

    2016-02-01

    A solution combustion process for the synthesis of perovskite (CaTiO3) powders is described. Perovskite is one of the crystalline host matrics for the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW) because it immobilizes Sr and Lns elements by forming solid solutions. Solution combustion synthesis, which is a self-sustaining oxi-reduction reaction between nitrate and organic fuel, the exothermic reaction, and the heat evolved convert the precursors into their corresponding oxide products above 1100 degrees C in air. To investigate the effects of amino acid on the combustion reaction, various types of fuels were used; a glycine, amine and carboxylic ligand mixture. Sr, La and Gd-nitrate with equivalent amounts of up to 20% of CaTiO3 were mixed with Ca and Ti nitrate and amino acid. X-ray diffraction analysis, SEM and TEM were conducted to confirm the formed phases and morphologies. While powders with an uncontrolled shape are obtained through a general oxide-route process, Ca(Sr, Lns)TiO3 powders with micro-sized soft agglomerates consisting of nano-sized primary particles can be prepared using this method.

  3. The direct environmental impact of hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement: a surgical waste audit of five cases

    OpenAIRE

    de SA, Darren; Stephens, Kellee; Kuang, Michelle; Simunovic, Nicole; Karlsson, Jon; Ayeni, Olufemi R

    2016-01-01

    Health care facilities produce significant waste (2200?kg/bed/year) creating 2% of greenhouse gas emissions and 1% total solid waste nationwide, with 20?70% of waste coming from operating rooms. We performed a waste audit of hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) to understand its environmental impact and identify areas for greening practices. A waste audit of five hip arthroscopy procedures for FAI was performed. All waste was collected and separated into six waste streams in...

  4. Guidance for classification of residues from combustion and incineration in accordance with the Swedish ordinance for waste; Vaegledning foer klassificering av foerbraenningsrester enligt Avfallsfoerordningen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, Peter [AaF Energi och Miljoe AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Haglund, Jan-Erik [Soederenergi AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Sjoeblom, Rolf [Tekedo AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2004-05-01

    A new ordinance for waste came into force in Sweden on the first of January 2002, replacing some previous ordinances. The new ordinance is based on certain EU directives and contains amongst other things new rules regarding how certain streams of waste are to be classified into hazardous waste and non-hazardous waste. In a number of cases, the classification is to be made according to whether or not the waste possesses one or more of a number o properties H1 - H14, i e if the waste contains hazardous substances. The new rules are based on the regulation that exists for chemical substances and preparations. When attempts have been made to use these new rules in practice - e g for residues from incineration and combustion - it has become apparent that they are very difficult or even impossible to apply. The primary reason for this is that the residues contain a very large number (thousands) of substances which would have to be analysed and for which the hazard would have to be assessed correctly in accordance with the criteria for the properties (H4 - H8 and H10 - H11). Furthermore, some of the properties listed in the ordinance for waste lack criteria for assessment of hazard. These are H13 (can give rise to another substance which may be hazardous, e g leachate) and H14 (hazardous to the environment). Moreover, there are significant differences between the Ordinance of waste and the regulation of the National Chemicals Inspectorate. It is on the latter that the rules in the Ordinance of waste are based, and this is also the cause of many of the questions and of the uncertainties in the classification. In the present report, a method is developed and described for classification of residues from combustion and incineration. The method is to be applicable in practice without compromising environmental and health aspects. As a part of the present work, a compilation of content and alteration of chemical substances in is carried out. In another chapter, the experience

  5. Influence of shape and size on the combustion time of solid waste in a fluidized bed furnace; Ryudosoro niokeru kokeihaikibutsu no nenshojikan ni oyobosu keijo to ookisa no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kita, Teruyuk; Sugiyama, Hideko; Kamiya, Hidehiro; Horio, Masayuki [Tokyo Unversity of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-02-05

    The combustion time of volatile matters and fixed carbon matters in a model waste having various shapes, sizes and materials in a fluidized bed furnace was theoretically and experimentally examined. Concerning the combustion of volatile matters, an estimation model of volatile matter combustion time was developed for the cases when a fixed carbon layer was formed or not formed. The estimation values of combustion time almost agreed with the experimental results of a model waste combustion having various shapes and sizes when the Carman shape coefficient {phi}{sub s0} was in the range of 0.3 to 0.9. In the case of the formation of a fixed carbon layer, combustion time of volatile matter was estimated by using a numerical analysis method for the moving boundary problem, and its results were confirmed to agree with the un-reacting karyotype heat transfer model solution in assumption of quasistationary heat transfer and experimental results. According to these results, it could be proved that the combustible time of volatile matter in the case of formation of a fixed carbon layer could be simply estimated by the un-reacting karyotype heat transfer model. (translated by NEDO)

  6. Combustion of a fuel mix containing animal waste, industry and household waste in FB-boilers; Foerbraenning av en braenslemix bestaaende av animaliskt avfall, industri- och hushaallsavfall i FB-pannor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Anita; Herstad Svaerd, Solvie; Moradian, Farzad

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this project is to evaluate how the operation conditions and the combustion chemistry is changed in a Bubbling Fluidized Bed (BFB) Boiler when adding approx. 20 wt-% Biomal into the fuel mixture. The following issues were addressed in the project: 1. How does the new chemical composition of the fuel mix influence bed agglomeration, deposit growth, ash flows, flue gases and particle size distribution? 2. Is it possible to run the boiler at a reduced bed temperature of about 750 deg C due to the increased moisture content originating from the biomal fuel? The project is based on combustion tests in the two Waste to Energy boilers at 20 MWth each owned by Boraas Energy and Environment AB (BEM). Furthermore, results from the Waste Refinery Project 'Reduced bed temperature in FB-boilers burning waste - part II' has been used as reference in some cases. At normal conditions the boilers are run on a fuel mixture containing 80 % sorted industrial waste and 20 % household waste. This fuel mixture consists mainly of paper, plastics and wood. In Boraas the organic part of the household waste is sorted out and used for biogas production. With the addition of biomal, which consists of animal by-products crushed to a pumpable fuel, the chemical composition of the fuel mixture is changed to some extent. The results from the combustion tests shows that biomal influences the chemical fuel composition, but also that there are large variations in the ordinary waste fuel composition as well. The most evident changes with addition of biomal are: 1. Increased moisture. 2. Reduced heat value. 3. Increased amount nitrogen, calcium and phosphorus. 4. Decreased amount lead due to the low concentration in biomal. However, there were no changes in sodium, potassium, sulphur and chlorine, elements important for increased/reduced fuel related problems, derived from biomal. The increase of calcium and phosphorus with biomal derive from bone and the calcium

  7. Impact on mortality of biomass combustion from wildfires in Spain: A regional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, C; Carmona, R; Salvador, P; Díaz, J

    2017-12-06

    Studies that analyse the impact on mortality of particulate matter (PM) produced by biomass combustion from wildfires mostly focus on a single city or on cities in different countries, with very few concentrating on one country as a whole. Accordingly, the aim of this paper was to analyse the impact that PM has on daily mortality in Spain on days with biomass combustion from wildfires. To analyse natural PM advections the Ministry of Agriculture and Fishing, Food & Environment divides Spain into 9 geographical regions. One province representative of each region for was selected analysis purposes, with provincial daily natural-cause mortality across the period 2004-2009 as the dependent variable, and daily mean PM concentrations in the provincial capital as the independent variable. We controlled for the effect of other chemical pollutants (NO2 and O3), maximum daily temperature on heat-wave days, day of the week, trends, seasonalities and the autoregressive nature of the series, using generalised linear models with the Poisson regression link to calculate relative risks (RRs) and the increase in RR (IRR) of PM-related mortality. The analysis was performed for days with and without biomass advections (DBA and DNBA respectively), with a breakdown by year, summer, and the remainder of the year (i.e., excluding summer). The results indicated that daily mean PM concentrations were higher on DBA than on DNBA, with statistically significant differences in most provinces. Furthermore, PM10 was associated with higher daily mortality on DBA in regions where wildfires were most frequent, but not in the remaining provinces. This translated as an IRR per 10μg/m3 of PM of 7.93 (2.36-13.81) in the North-west, 3.76 (1.36-6.22) in the Centre and 4.46 (2.99-5.94) in the South-west, values which in all cases were statistically higher than those obtained on DNBA. The increase in PM caused by biomass advections from wildfires is linked to a significant IRR of mortality in Spain. Hence

  8. Impacts of discarded coffee waste on human and environmental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, A S; Mello, F V C; Thode Filho, S; Carpes, R M; Honório, J G; Marques, M R C; Felzenszwalb, I; Ferraz, E R A

    2017-07-01

    Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages throughout the world. So far, many studies have shown the properties of coffee beverages, but little is known about its impacts on human and environmental health from its discard in the environment. So, the present work aims to investigate the mutagenic, genotoxic, cytotoxic and ecotoxic effects of leached (LE) and solubilized (SE) extracts from coffee waste, simulating the disposal of this residue in landfills and via sewage systems, respectively. Chemical analyses were also carried out. LE and SE induced mutagenicity in the TA98 Salmonella strain with and without exogenous metabolization (S9). In the TA100 only SE induced mutagenicity, what was observed without S9. An increase in the frequency of micronuclei was observed in HepG2 cell line after 3 and 24h of exposure to both extracts. No cytotoxic effects were observed in HepG2 cells by WST-1 assay. The EC50 values for the LE and SE were 1.5% and 11.26% for Daphnia similis, 0.12% and 1.39% for Ceriodaphnia dubia and 6.0% and 5.5% for Vibrio fischeri, respectively. Caffeine and several transition metals were found in both extracts. Coffee waste discarded in the environment may pose a risk to human and environmental health, since this compound can cause DNA damage and present toxicity to aquatic organisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Environmental impact of ICT and implications for e-waste management in Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Valentina TARTIU; Stefan BURCEA; Nadia CIOCOIU

    2010-01-01

    The development of Information and communications technology (ICT), as core of the digital economy, presents contradictory effects on the environment. The paper presents the main perspectives of environmental impact of ICT, especially in relation with waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE, e-waste), as they result from the approaches found in literature and the reports of official international and national bodies. The analysis of impact on environment and e-waste is done on two lev...

  10. E-waste: impacts, issues and management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Mumtaz; Mumtaz, Saniea

    2014-01-01

    The present electronic era has seen massive proliferation of electrical and electronic equipment especially during the last two decades. These gadgets have become indispensable components of human life. The gravity of this sensitive 21st century problem is being felt by relevant stakeholders from the community to global level. Consequently, the annual global generation of e-waste is estimated to be 20-50 million tons. According to the Basel Action Network, 500 million computers contain 287 billion kilograms (kg) plastics; 716.7 million kg lead; and 286,700 kg mercury. These gadgets contain over 50 elements from the periodic table. The lethal components include heavy metals (like cadmium, mercury, copper, nickel, lead, barium, hexavalent chromium and beryllium); phosphor; plastics; and brominated flame retardants. These are persistent, mobile, and bioaccumulative toxins that remain in the environment but their forms are changed and are carcinogens, mutagens and teratogens. The ensuing hazardous waste has created deleterious impacts on physical, biological and socioeconomic environments. The lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and atmosphere of Earth are being gravely polluted. Human beings and other biodiversity face fatal diseases, such as cancer, reproductive disorders, neural damages, endocrine disruptions, asthmatic bronchitis, and brain retardation. Marginal populations of developing countries living in squatter/slums are most vulnerable. Numerous issues are associated with uncontrolled generation, unscientific and environmentally inappropriate recycling processes for the extraction of heavy and precious metals (e.g., gold, platinum, and silver), illegal transboundary shipments from advanced to developing countries and weak conventions/legislations at global and national levels. Although the Basel Convention has been ratified by most countries, illicit trading/trafficking of hazardous substances remains unchecked, sometimes "disguised" as donations. The fact

  11. 77 FR 74472 - Notice of Availability of the Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    ... of Availability of the Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the... Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (Final TC & WM EIS, DOE/EIS-0391), prepared pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This final...

  12. Numerical Methods and Turbulence Modeling for LES of Piston Engines: Impact on Flow Motion and Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misdariis A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, Large Eddy Simulations (LES of Spark Ignition (SI engines are performed to evaluate the impact of the numerical set-upon the predictedflow motion and combustion process. Due to the high complexity and computational cost of such simulations, the classical set-up commonly includes “low” order numerical schemes (typically first or second-order accurate in time and space as well as simple turbulence models (such as the well known constant coefficient Smagorinsky model (Smagorinsky J. (1963 Mon. Weather Rev. 91, 99-164. The scope of this paper is to evaluate the feasibility and the potential benefits of using high precision methods for engine simulations, relying on higher order numerical methods and state-of-the-art Sub-Grid-Scale (SGS models. For this purpose, two high order convection schemes from the Two-step Taylor Galerkin (TTG family (Colin and Rudgyard (2000 J. Comput. Phys. 162, 338-371 and several SGS turbulence models, namely Dynamic Smagorinsky (Germano et al. (1991 Phys. Fluids 3, 1760-1765 and sigma (Baya Toda et al. (2010 Proc. Summer Program 2010, Stanford, Center for Turbulence Research, NASA Ames/Stanford Univ., pp. 193-202 are considered to improve the accuracy of the classically used Lax-Wendroff (LW (Lax and Wendroff (1964 Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 17, 381-398 - Smagorinsky set-up. This evaluation is performed considering two different engine configurations from IFP Energies nouvelles. The first one is the naturally aspirated four-valve spark-ignited F7P engine which benefits from an exhaustive experimental and numerical characterization. The second one, called Ecosural, is a highly supercharged spark-ignited engine. Unique realizations of engine cycles have been simulated for each set-up starting from the same initial conditions and the comparison is made with experimental and previous numerical results for the F7P configuration. For the Ecosural engine, experimental results are not available yet and only

  13. The impact of uncontrolled waste disposal on surface water quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main threat to the surface water quality in Addis Ababa is environmental pollution derived from domestic and industrial activities. Due to the inadequacy of controlled waste management strategies and waste treatment plants, people are forced to discharge wastes both on open surface and within water bodies.

  14. Production of hydrogen driven from biomass waste to power Remote areas away from the electric grid utilizing fuel cells and internal combustion engines vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawfik, Hazem [Farmingdale State College, NY (United States)

    2017-03-10

    Recent concerns over the security and reliability of the world’s energy supply has caused a flux towards the research and development of renewable sources. A leading renewable source has been found in the biomass gasification of biological materials derived from organic matters such as wood chips, forest debris, and farm waste that are found in abundance in the USA. Accordingly, there is a very strong interest worldwide in the development of new technologies that provide an in-depth understanding of this economically viable energy source. This work aims to allow the coupling of biomass gasification and fuel cell systems as well as Internal Combustion Engines (ICE) to produce high-energy efficiency, clean environmental performance and near-zero greenhouse gas emissions. Biomass gasification is a process, which produces synthesis gas (syngas) that contains 19% hydrogen and 20% carbon monoxide from inexpensive organic matter waste. This project main goal is to provide cost effective energy to the public utilizing remote farms’ waste and landfill recycling area.

  15. Inventory of radioactive waste and spent fuel. Edition 2004; Inventario de residuos radiactivos y combustible gastado. Edificio 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    Since it was founded, ENRESA has drafted and updated an inventory of radioactive waste in Spain, based on the data received from the producers of this waste. Initially, a study was made of the situation at 1 January 1986 regarding the main producers generating radioactive waste, using the resources available with a view to preparing the first draft of the 1st General Radioactive Waste Plan. Subsequently, with the collaboration of the electricity companies, hospital and research centres, industrial companies using radioactive isotopes, etc. our detailed knowledge of the situation has improved. This has enabled us to elaborate strategies and management programmes with greater precision. In order to facilitate the availability of data, computer based systems have been developed which allow information on the situation to be collected instantaneously for use in short and medium term projects, which in turn facilitate long term predictions. This document constitutes a synthesis of the radioactive waste inventory based on the information available to ENRESA. The inventory is basically intended to provide information on the volume of the waste which was stored at each installation as of 31 December 2004, as well as providing a forecast of future waste generation for all producer installations and, consequently, supplying data on the total inventory of waste to be managed in Spain. Nevertheless, it should be pointed out that the values for forecasts given in this report are based on the experience of ENRESA and on studies carried out, and it was decided to round off the values. Therefore, this data may not match other data given in the past or at a possible future data. After describing the classification of radioactive waste to be managed, chapter 3 of this document lists and briefly describes the radioactive waste producers and the main characteristics of the waste generated. Chapter 4 contains the inventory of radioactive waste, focused on the type of producer

  16. Automotive Thermoelectric Generator impact on the efficiency of a drive system with a combustion engine

    OpenAIRE

    Ziolkowski Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Increasing the combustion engine drive systems efficiency is currently being achieved by structural changes in internal combustion engines and its equipment, which are geared towards limiting mechanical, thermal and outlet losses. For this reason, downsizing. In addition to these changes, all manner of exhaust gas energy recovery systems are being investigated and implemented, including turbocompound, turbogenerators and thermoelectric generators. The article presents the author’s idea of a t...

  17. Environmental assessment of waste incineration and alternatives; Miljoevurdering af affaldsforbraending og alternativer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, J.; Fruergaard, T.; Riber, C.; Astrup, T.; Hoejlund Christensen, T.

    2008-06-15

    Life cycle environmental assessment of waste combustion and alternatives were made using the LCA model EASEWASTE. Possible environmental effects for nine effect categories and the resource consumption of fossil fuels through treating 1 ton combustible waste were defined for several waste systems, including waste-only incineration, co-combustion in a fossil-fueled cogeneration plant, and combined biogas and compost production from household waste. The main conclusions of the analyses are: 1) with an optimum location, i.e. in the vicinity to a coal-fueled cogeneration plant, waste-only incineration, co-combustion , and combined biogas and compost production are all equal environmentally viable alternatives . 2) Regarding potential toxic impacts in the area of a coal-fueled cogeneration plant, waste-only incineration and combined biogas and compost production will result in slightly less net emissions compared to co-combustion because of better flue gas cleaning of heavy metals in incinerators than in power plants. 3) Siting the incinerator in a decentralized natural gas cogeneration area, co-combustion in a cogeneration plant is a better solution. 4) Combined biogas and compost production and waste-only combustion are environmentally equal treatments in all power plant areas. (ln)

  18. Acceptable knowledge summary report for combustible/noncombustible, metallic, and HEPA filter waste resulting from {sup 238}Pu fabrication activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, P.S.Z.; Foxx, C.L.

    1998-02-19

    All transuranic (TRU) waste must be sufficiently characterized and certified before it is shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) allows use of acceptable knowledge (AK) for waste characterization. EPA uses the term AK in its guidance document and defines AK and provides guidelines on how acceptable knowledge should be obtained and documented. This AK package has been prepared in accordance with Acceptable Knowledge Documentation (TWCP-QP-1.1-021,R.2). This report covers acceptable knowledge information for five waste streams generated at TA-55 during operations to fabricate various heat sources using feedstock {sup 238}Pu supplied by the Savannah River Site (SRS). The {sup 238}Pu feedstock itself does not contain quantities of RCRA-regulated constituents above regulatory threshold limits, as known from process knowledge at SRS and as confirmed by chemical analysis. No RCRA-regulated chemicals were used during {sup 238}Pu fabrication activities at TA-55, and all {sup 238}Pu activities were physically separated from other plutonium processing activities. Most of the waste generated from the {sup 238}Pu fabrication activities is thus nonmixed waste, including waste streams TA-55-43, 45, and 47. The exceptions are waste streams TA-55-44, which contains discarded lead-lined rubber gloves used in the gloveboxes that contained the {sup 238}Pu material, and TA-55-46, which may contain pieces of discarded lead. These waste streams have been denoted as mixed because of the presence of the lead-containing material.

  19. Hazardous E-waste and its impact on soil structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharini, K.; Cynthia, J. Bernadette; Kamalambikai, B.; Sudar Celestina, J. P. Arul; Muthu, D.

    2017-07-01

    E-waste disposal has been a significant issue over the past few decades with the development of technology and the plethora of electronic products produced. The inclusive term E-Waste encapsulates various forms of electrical and electronical equipment which provides no value to the current owners and it is one among the fastest growing waste streams. E-Waste is a complex, non-biodegradable waste which is generally dumped in mountain like heaps. These wastes are said to have a large quantities of lead, cadmium, arsenic etc.it is mandatory to dispose such scrupulously since they have the ability to affect the soil and water parameters. Solid waste management is a blooming field which strives to reduce the accumulation of used electronic gadgets. Rainwater gets infiltrated through the e-waste landfill and it leaches through the soil which in turn reaches the groundwater directly thereby affecting the water intended for drinking and domestic purposes. This study focuses on the consequences of toxic waste by comparing the difference in properties of the soil structure prior to and after the e-waste landfill at various concentrations.

  20. Advanced air/flue gas staging based on CFD modelling for enhanced combustion and burnout in a waste-wood fired boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajh, Boštjan; Yin, Chungen; Samec, Niko

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the impacts of the jet momentum, position and orientation of air and Recycled Flue Gas (RFG) streams on the performance of a grate-fired boiler burning waste wood via a comprehensive CFD-based parametric study. It is found that the air and RFG jets can be optimized to enhance m...

  1. Ecological valuation of mechanic-biological waste treatment and waste combustion on the basis of energy balances and air pollutant balances; Oekologische Bewertung der mechanisch-biologischen Restabfallbehandlung und der Muellverbrennung auf Basis von Energie- und Schadgasbilanzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallmann, R.

    1999-04-01

    The work aims at an ecological valuation of air pollutant emissions and energy consumption as particularly relevant aspects of waste treatment and waste combustion plants, based on new scientific results, in order to draw up ecological budgets and make system comparisons in waste treatment. The target set is particularly effectively achieved by the following: documentation and scientific derivation of relevant boundary conditions, careful surveying and data processing for the purpose of making up an ecological budget, and objective valuation and interpretation of results. The high transparency of the methodics should be emphasized. They make the results obtained conclusive and verifiable. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel der vorliegenden Arbeit ist die oekologische Bewertung der besonders relevanten Aspekte Abluftemissionen und Energieverbrauch von MBA und MVA auf Basis aktueller Forschungsergebnisse als Grundlage fuer Oekobilanzen und Systemvergleiche zur Restabfallbehandlung. Diese Zielvorgabe wird durch die Dokumentation und wissenschaftliche Herleitung relevanter Rahmenbedingungen, sorgfaeltige Erhebung und Aufbereitung der Daten unter Gesichtspunkten der Erstellung einer Oekobilanz und letztendlich aufgrund der objektiven Bewertung und Interpretation der Ergebnisse im besonderen Masse erreicht. Besonders hervorzuheben hierbei ist die hohe Transparenz bei der methodischen Vorgehensweise. Die ermittelten Ergebnisse sind somit nachvollziehbar und ueberpruefbar. (orig.)

  2. Fresh, frozen, or ambient food equivalents and their impact on food waste generation in Dutch households

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Anke M.; Nijenhuis, Mariska; Boer, Eric P.J.; Kremer, Stefanie

    2017-01-01

    In Europe, it is estimated that more than 50% of total food waste - of which most is avoidable - is generated at household level. Little attention has been paid to the impact on food waste generation of consuming food products that differ in their method of food preservation. This exploratory study

  3. Wood waste minimization in the timber sector of Ghana: a systems approach to reduce environmental impact.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eshun, J.F.; Potting, J.; Leemans, R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the potential of minimizing wood waste to reduce the environmental impact in the timber sector i.e. forestry and timber industry subsystem of Ghana. This study is a follow up of 3 earlier studies on the timber sector. These studies consistently identified minimizing wood waste as

  4. Simulating sanitation and waste flows and their environmental impacts in East African urban centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oyoo, R.

    2014-01-01

    Simulating Sanitation and Waste Flows and their Environmental Impacts in East African Urban Centres Abstract If improperly managed, urban waste flows can pose a significant threat to the quality of both the natural environment and public health. Just as many urban

  5. Sulfur Chemistry in Combustion I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Glarborg, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Most fossil fuels contain sulphur and also biofuels and household waste have a sulphur content. As a consequence sulphur species will often be present in combustion processes. In this paper the fate and influence of fuel sulphur species in combustion will be treated. First a description...... of the sulphur compounds in fossil fuels and the possibilities to remove them will be given. Then the combustion of sulphur species and their influence on the combustion chemistry and especially on the CO oxidation and the NOx formation will be described. Finally the in-situ removal of sulphur in the combustion...

  6. SUSTAINABILITY AND ITS IMPACT ON SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The MSW DST was initially developed in the 1990s and has evolved over the years to better account for changes in waste management practices, waste composition, and improvements in decision support tool design and functionality. The most recent version of the tool is publicly ava...

  7. Particulate Matter and Noise Impact Studies of Waste Rock Dump ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adansi Gold Company Limited identified an economically viable gold deposit at Nkran in the Amansie West District of Ghana. Mining of this deposit requires the disposal of waste rock materials at a proposed waste rock dump near Nkran and Koninase communities. Since particulates and noise emissions from the ...

  8. FY 1992 Annual report: Mediated electrochemical oxidation treatment for Rocky Flats combustible low-level mixed waste. Final report to Rocky Flats Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiba, Z.; Lewis, P.R.; Kahle, R.W.

    1993-03-01

    The Mediated Electrochemical Oxidation (MEO) process was studied for destroying low-level combustible mixed wastes at Rocky Flats (RFP). Tests were performed with nonradioactive surrogate materials: Trimsol for the contaminated oils, and reagent-grade cellulose for the cellulosic wastes. Extensive testing was carried out on Trimsol in both small laboratory-scale apparatus and on a large-scale system incorporating an industrial-size electrochemical cell. Preliminary tests were also carried out in the small-scale system with cellulose. The following operating and system parameters were studied: use of a silver-nitric acid versus a cobalt-sulfuric acid system, effect of electrolyte temperature, effect of acid concentration, effect of current density, and use of ultrasonic agitation. Destruction and coulombic efficiencies were calculated using data obtained from continuous carbon dioxide monitors and total organic carbon (TOC) analysis of electrolyte samples. For Trimsol, the best performance was achieved with the silver-nitrate system at high acid concentrations, temperatures, and current densities. Destruction efficiencies of 98% or greater and coulombic efficiencies close to 50% were obtained in both small- and large-scale systems. For the cellulose, high destruction efficiencies and reasonable coulombic efficiencies were obtained for both silver-nitrate and cobalt-sulfate systems.

  9. Recycling of rubber tires in electric arc furnace steelmaking: simultaneous combustion of metallurgical coke and rubber tyres blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magdalena Zaharia; Veena Sahajwalla; Byong-Chul Kim; Rita Khanna; N. Saha-Chaudhury; Paul O' Kane; Jonathan Dicker; Catherine Skidmore; David Knights [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    2009-05-15

    The present study investigates the effect of addition of waste rubber tires on the combustion behavior of its blends with coke for carbon injection in electric arc furnace steelmaking. Waste rubber tires were mixed in different proportions with metallurgical coke (MC) (10:90, 20:80, 30:70) for combustion and pyrolysis at 1473 K in a drop tube furnace (DTF) and thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA), respectively. Under experimental conditions most of the rubber blends indicated higher combustion efficiencies compared to those of the constituent coke. In the early stage of combustion the weight loss rate of the blends is much faster compared to that of the raw coke due to the higher volatile yield of rubber. The presence of rubber in the blends may have had an impact upon the structure during the release and combustion of their high volatile matter (VM) and hence increased char burnout. Measurements of micropore surface area and bulk density of the chars collected after combustion support the higher combustion efficiency of the blends in comparison to coke alone. The surface morphology of the 30% rubber blend revealed pores in the residual char that might be attributed to volatile evolution during high temperature reaction in oxygen atmosphere. Physical properties and VM appear to have a major effect upon the measured combustion efficiency of rubber blends. The study demonstrates that waste rubber tires can be successfully co-injected with metallurgical coke in electric arc furnace steelmaking process to provide additional energy from combustion. 44 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of Coal Combustion By-Product Disposal and Utilizaton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher; Mei Xin; Mae Sexauer Gustin; Rob Jung

    2007-03-31

    The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) conducted a multiyear study to evaluate the impact of mercury and other air toxic elements (ATEs) on the management of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). The ATEs evaluated in this project were arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, and selenium. The study included laboratory tasks to develop measurement techniques for mercury and ATE releases, sample characterization, and release experiments. A field task was also performed to measure mercury releases at a field site. Samples of fly ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials were collected preferentially from full-scale coal-fired power plants operating both without and with mercury control technologies in place. In some cases, samples from pilot- and bench-scale emission control tests were included in the laboratory studies. Several sets of 'paired' baseline and test fly ash and FGD materials collected during full-scale mercury emission control tests were also included in laboratory evaluations. Samples from mercury emission control tests all contained activated carbon (AC) and some also incorporated a sorbent-enhancing agent (EA). Laboratory release experiments focused on measuring releases of mercury under conditions designed to simulate CCB exposure to water, ambient-temperature air, elevated temperatures, and microbes in both wet and dry conditions. Results of laboratory evaluations indicated that: (1) Mercury and sometimes selenium are collected with AC used for mercury emission control and, therefore, present at higher concentrations than samples collected without mercury emission controls present. (2) Mercury is stable on CCBs collected from systems both without and with mercury emission controls present under most conditions tested, with the exception of vapor-phase releases of mercury exposed to elevated temperatures. (3) The presence of carbon either from added AC or from unburned coal can result in mercury

  11. Evaluation of environmental impacts from municipal solid waste management in the municipality of Aarhus, Denmark (EASEWASTE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkeby, Janus T; Birgisdottir, Harpa; Hansen, Trine Lund; Christensen, Thomas H; Bhander, Gurbakhash Singh; Hauschild, Michael

    2006-02-01

    A new computer based life cycle assessment model (EASEWASTE) was used to evaluate a municipal solid waste system with the purpose of identifying environmental benefits and disadvantages by anaerobic digestion of source-separated household waste and incineration. The most important processes that were included in the study are optical sorting and pre-treatment, anaerobic digestion with heat and power recovery, incineration with heat and power recovery, use of digested biomass on arable soils and finally, an estimated surplus consumption of plastic in order to achieve a higher quality and quantity of organic waste to the biogas plant. Results showed that there were no significant differences in most of the assessed environmental impacts for the two scenarios. However, the use of digested biomass may cause a potential toxicity impact on human health due to the heavy metal content of the organic waste. A sensitivity analysis showed that the results are sensitive to the energy recovery efficiencies, to the extra plastic consumption for waste bags and to the content of heavy metals in the waste. A model such as EASEWASTE is very suitable for evaluating the overall environmental consequences of different waste management strategies and technologies, and can be used for most waste material fractions existing in household waste.

  12. Control of the Development of Swirling Airflow Dynamics and Its Impact on Biomass Combustion Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmina, I.; Valdmanis, R.; Zaķe, M.

    2017-06-01

    The development of the swirling flame flow field and gasification/ combustion dynamics at thermo-chemical conversion of biomass pellets has experimentally been studied using a pilot device, which combines a biomass gasifier and combustor by varying the inlet conditions of the fuel-air mixture into the combustor. Experimental modelling of the formation of the cold nonreacting swirling airflow field above the inlet nozzle of the combustor and the upstream flow formation below the inlet nozzle has been carried out to assess the influence of the inlet nozzle diameter, as well primary and secondary air supply rates on the upstream flow formation and air swirl intensity, which is highly responsible for the formation of fuel-air mixture entering the combustor and the development of combustion dynamics downstream of the combustor. The research results demonstrate that at equal primary axial and secondary swirling air supply into the device a decrease in the inlet nozzle diameter enhances the upstream air swirl formation by increasing swirl intensity below the inlet nozzle of the combustor. This leads to the enhanced mixing of the combustible volatiles with the air swirl below the inlet nozzle of the combustor providing a more complete combustion of volatiles and an increase in the heat output of the device.

  13. Environmental impact assessment of waste electronic and electric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    WEEE) management practices in developing countries through leaching tests. ... Lead was the predominant heavy metal to leach from the waste material and 5617±739 mg/kg Pb was released by the standard pH-controlled leaching test.

  14. Fresh, frozen, or ambient food equivalents and their impact on food waste generation in Dutch households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Anke M; Nijenhuis-de Vries, Mariska A; Boer, Eric P J; Kremer, Stefanie

    2017-09-01

    In Europe, it is estimated that more than 50% of total food waste - of which most is avoidable - is generated at household level. Little attention has been paid to the impact on food waste generation of consuming food products that differ in their method of food preservation. This exploratory study surveyed product-specific possible impacts of different methods of food preservation on food waste generation in Dutch households. To this end, a food waste index was calculated to enable relative comparisons of the amounts of food waste from the same type of foods with different preservation methods on an annual basis. The results show that, for the majority of frozen food equivalents, smaller amounts were wasted compared to their fresh or ambient equivalents. The waste index (WI) proposed in the current paper confirms the hypothesis that it may be possible to reduce the amount of food waste at household level by encouraging Dutch consumers to use (certain) foods more frequently in a frozen form (instead of fresh or ambient). However, before this approach can be scaled to population level, a more detailed understanding of the underlying behavioural causes with regard to food provisioning and handling and possible interactions is required. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Primary measures for reduction of PCDD/F in co-combustion of lignite coal and waste: effect of various inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchela E. Pandelova; Dieter Lenoir; Antonius Kettrup; Karl-Werner Schramm [Institute of Ecological Chemistry, Neuherberg (Germany). GSF National Research Center for Environment and Health

    2005-05-01

    A series of experiments was performed focusing on the prevention of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and furan (PCDD/F) formation by the use of various inhibitors added to the fuel before co-combustion. A mixture of lignite coal, solid waste, and poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) was thermally treated in a laboratory-scale furnace at 400{degree} C. Twenty additives were investigated at a level of 10 wt % of the total fuel during the experiments. These were divided into four groups: metal oxides,N-containing compounds, S-containing compounds, and N- and S-containing compounds. The resulting values showed a significant reduction of PCDD/F levels when N- and S-containing compounds were used as additives to the fuel. Principle component analysis (PCA) was used to illustrate the effect of the 20 different inhibitors on the congener patterns emitted. The most effective inhibitors for PCDD/F formation in flue gases were determined to be (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Both compounds can suppress the formation ofPCDD/Fs by more than 98-99%. (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} resulted in over 90% reduction of PCDD/F even when composing only 3% of the fuel combusted. Less than 5% (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3} resulted in far weaker inhibition. Higher percentages of the inhibitors produced a lower percentage of lower chlorinated PCDDs. The opposite effect was found for PCDFs. 33 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Numerical simulation of combustion initiation in hydrogen-air mixture in supersonic flow with energy impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedarev, I. A.; Vankova, O. S.; Goldfeld, M. A.; Temerbekov, V. M.; Fedorova, N. N.; Fedorov, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    The results of numerical studies of the interaction of a detonation wave and an electron beam with supersonic reacting flows in channel of various configurations like channel with backward-facing step, symmetrical channel with abrupt expansion and channel with a cavity are presented. A mathematical technology has been created to implement such interaction based on the ANSYS Fluent software. The flow parameters at the outlet of the channel are compared for different channel configurations and ignition initiation ways. The possibility is shown to intensify the ignition in a supersonic flow by electron beams and pulsating detonation. The possibility is identified to use a cavity for stabilizing the combustion in a supersonic combustion chamber when exposed to a detonation wave.

  17. Impact of wood combustion on particle levels in a residential area in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glasius, Marianne; Ketzel, Matthias; Wåhlin, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The influence of residential wood-combustion on local air quality was studied during two periods in 2002 and 2003/04 in a small rural town with widespread use of wood combustion for heating. During one 6-week winter period, particle levels (PM2.5) in the residential area were about 4 μg m-3 higher...... than at a nearby background site. This was comparable to the local traffic contribution observed at a busy street (about 70,000 vehicles per day) in the city of Copenhagen. The diurnal variation in the residential area showed increased particle levels (PM2.5) in the evening and night as expected from...

  18. Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 2. Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This volume contains appendices of supplementary data on waste management systems, geologic disposal, radiological standards, radiation dose calculation models, related health effects, baseline ecology, socio-economic conditions, hazard indices, comparison of defense and commercial wastes, design considerations, and wastes from thorium-based fuel cycle alternatives. (DMC)

  19. Wastes behavior and environmental impacts, researches and methods; Comportement des dechets et impacts environnementaux, recherches et methodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labeyrie, J.; Chateau, L. [Agence de l' Environnement et de la Maitrise de l' Energie, (ADEME), 49 - Angers (France); Gin, St. [CEA/VALRHO - site de Marcoule, Dept. de Recherche en Retraitement et en Vitrification DRRV, 30 - Marcoule (France)] [and others

    2001-07-01

    The wastes management policy takes into account more and more often the environmental impacts mastership. This evolution is particularly appreciable when the wastes directly interact with the environment: storage, utilization for roads construction and so on. In this context the ADEME organized the 8 june 2000 a colloquium to present the new evaluation methods and tools, to describe the regulations and to identify the research programs needed for this environmental policy. Eleven papers are presented. (A.L.B.)

  20. Co-combustion of sewage sludge and energy-rich waste fuels or forest fuels; Sameldning av roetslam och energirika avfallsbraenslen eller skogsbraenslen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linder, Kristina [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2003-10-01

    In this report literature on incineration of sewage sludge is summarises. In Sweden there is a yearly production of about 0,24 million-ton dry sewage sludge of which 50% is deposited. Recent changes in legislation will restrict and later prohibit the dumping of sewage sludge. Alternative methods for handling the material have not yet been found. In other parts of Europe the problem has been solved by incineration. Sludge incineration can be performed in several ways depending of the pretreatment. The sludge can be raw or digested, dewatered or dried. The sludge can be burnt as single fuel or in mixtures with other fuels. Focus in this work has been on co-combustion with biofuel or waste, as it will make use of existing plants. Digested sludge is also of major interest as 70% of the Swedish sludge is digested. The report describes the situation both in Sweden and in the rest of Europe. Sludge has a varying quality depending on origin and treatment, which affects the combustion properties. Ash and moisture contents differ from other fuels. The heating value of sewage sludge is approximately 20 MJ/kg per dry combustible matter and the amount of organic is around 70%. Compared to forest residue and demolition wood, sludge contains high levels of nitrogen and sulphur, which will cause emissions. The nitrogen level is about 10 times higher and the sulphur level 25 to 50 times higher. Sulphur, in combination with alkali metals, can cause deposit problems in boilers. However, sludge contains low levels of alkali. In the experimental investigation leaching of digested sludge showed low values on water conductivity which indicates a low concentration of sintering ash species in the sludge. A comparison of the aerodynamic properties of dried digested sludge and wood chips from energy coppice showed that sludge has a lower fraction of fines. This indicates that the sewage sludge is not likely to be carried over in the furnace but rather to stay in the fuel and ash bed on the

  1. Advanced solutions in combustion-based WtE technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Johannes J E; Koralewska, Ralf; Wohlleben, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    Thermal treatment of waste by means of combustion in grate-based systems has gained world-wide acceptance as the preferred method for sustainable management and safe disposal of residual waste. In order to maintain this position and to address new challenges and/or priorities, these systems need to be further developed with a view to energy conservation, resource and climate protection and a reduction in the environmental impact in general. MARTIN GmbH has investigated continuously how the implementation of innovative concepts in essential parts of its grate-based Waste-to-Energy (WtE) combustion technology can be used to meet the above-mentioned requirements. As a result of these efforts, new "advanced solutions" were developed, four examples of which are shown in this article. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cleaning of condensate from flue gas condensing plants at co-combustion of waste fuels. Follow-up of emissions; Rening av kondensat fraan roekgaskondenseringsanlaeggningar vid samfoerbraenning av avfallsbraenslen. Uppfoeljning av utslaepp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundquist, Lena; Dejfors, Charlotte; Wrangensten, Lars [AaF Energikonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-03-01

    Limits of discharges in waste water at flue gas cleaning are one of the fields included in the EC-directive (2000/76/EG) regarding combustion of waste from December 28th, 2000. The pollutants included in the limits are suspended material, Hg, Cd, Tl, As, Pb, Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn as well as dioxins and furans. The limits of the directive applies generally for plants with combustion of waste, regardless of type of waste fraction, the degree of admixture or if it is a so called co-combustion plant or not. For new plants, the limits shall be fulfilled within two years after the date of the directive whereas existing plants have another three years to meet the new demands. In this project, the condensate from the flue gas has been analysed at five different combustion plants. Samples of the fuel have also been analysed as a reference at the evaluation of the results. The results from the analysed condensate have then been compared and evaluated with regards to the limit values in the EC-directive. However, one exception is dioxins and furans that are not included in this study. The analysis of the pure condensate show that at most plants the content of pollutants is below, or in some cases well below, the limits of the EC-directive. At plants with co-combustion of recovered biofuels, even the contents of pollutants in the non-purified raw condensate are below the limits of the directive. This means that plants with co-combustion of recovered wood waste and biofuels most likely will meet the requirements for emissions to waste water in the EC-directive. The water treatment process in these plants normally consists of a pH-adjustment stage followed by adding of chemicals before the condensate enters into a sand filter. The cleaned condensate from the sand filter is normally released to a recipient whereas the dirty condensate goes through a lamell separator in order to separate rest sludge. The most polluted raw condensate was found at a plant with 100 % combustion of municipal

  3. Impacts of internal fuel reforming and varied levels of EGR on ethanol/air HCCI combustion: a second law analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanam, G.; Johnson, M.; Sobiesiak, A.; Reader, G. [Windsor Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical, Automotive and Materials Engineering

    2005-07-01

    A study of internal fuel reforming on ethanol/air homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion engines was presented. Fuel reforming is carried out to generate hydrogen or hydrogen-rich products from primary fuel. Hydrogen has the advantage of relatively wide flammability limits and good burning quality, and a hydrogen addition allows the operation of the methane or propane fuelled engine at a leaner equivalence ratio, with less cycle-to-cycle variations. Leaner mixtures have the advantage of reducing the peak cycle temperatures with a concurrent reduction in engine-out nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions. This analysis was based on the second law of thermodynamics and it calculated the values of thermodynamic function availability and its distribution during the HCCI engine cycle. The engine modelling involved a multi-step simulation of the engine cycle, which consisted of a fuel reformation cycle and a HCCI combustion cycle. The modelling was carried out using a single zone well-stirred reactor model and established reaction mechanisms. The HCCI engine cycle was fuelled with a lean mixture of air and ethanol. Simulation results indicated that internal reforming has the advantage of operating the HCCI engine with lower charge preheating and had fewer efficiency losses than the HCCI engine operated with no internal reforming. In addition, the composition of reformation products as a whole rather than just the hydrogen concentration had a high impact on the efficiency of the HCCI engine. Results indicate that there is an optimal internal reforming duration, for which the hydrogen yield is maximized. However, heat transfer losses had a major impact on the availability analysis calculations, contributing to availability transfer and destruction, and should be included in the model. It was concluded that in order to fully investigate the effects of heat transfer losses and combustion, a dedicated model needs to be developed to separately calculate the

  4. 'Away' is a place: The impact of electronic waste recycling on blood lead levels in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amankwaa, Ebenezer Forkuo; Adovor Tsikudo, Kwame A; Bowman, Jay A

    2017-12-01

    E-waste recycling remains a major source of livelihood for many urban poor in developing countries, but this economic activity is fraught with significant environmental health risk. Yet, human exposure to the toxic elements associated with e-waste activities remains understudied and not evidently understood. This study investigates the impact of informal e-waste processing on the blood lead levels (BLLs) of e-waste workers and non-e-waste workers (mainly females working in activities that serve the Agbogbloshie e-waste site), and relates their lead exposure to socio-demographic and occupational characteristics. A total of 128 blood samples were analysed for lead levels. Surprisingly, the mean BLL (3.54μg/dL) of non-e-waste workers was slightly higher than that of e-waste workers (3.49μg/dL), although higher BLLs ranges were found among e-waste workers (0.50-18.80μg/dL) than non-e-waste workers (0.30-8.20μg/dL). Workers who engaged in e-waste burning tended to have the highest BLLs. In general, the BLLs are within the ABLES/US CDC reference level of 5μg/dL, although 12.3% of the workers have elevated BLLs, i.e. BLL ≥5μg/dL. The study concludes that the impact of e-waste recycling is not limited to workers alone. Traders and residents within the Agbogbloshie enclave are equally at risk through a range of environmental vectors. This calls for increased public awareness about the effects of human exposure to lead and other toxic elements from e-waste recycling. A key contribution is that government and stakeholder projects for safe e-waste infrastructure should disaggregate the e-waste value chain, recognize differential risk and resist one-size-fits-all strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Recycling of aluminosilicate waste: Impact onto geopolymer formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essaidi, N.; Gharzouni, A.; Vidal, L.; Gouny, F.; Joussein, E.; Rossignol, S.

    2015-07-01

    Geopolymers are innovative ecomaterials resulting from the activation of an aluminosilicate source by an alkaline solution. Their properties depend on the used raw materials. This paper focuses on the possibility to obtain geopolymer materials with aluminosilicate laboratory waste. The effect of these additions on the geopolymer properties was studied by FTIR spectroscopy and mechanical test. It was evidenced a slowdown of the polycondensation reaction as well as the compressive strength due to the addition of laboratory waste which decreases the Si/K ratio of mixture.

  6. The Assessment of Alumina Production Waste Impact on Natural Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Sergeevich Kuznetsov

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper is dedicated to the issue of assessment of alumina (red mud production waste on natural water. The growth of the number of aluminium-producing facilities leads to the expansion of exclusion areas to store the production waste – sludge dumps. A considerable part of research on red mud utilisation is focused on its use in the iron-and-steel industry. Furthermore, the technologies of red mud usage in the construction industry gain substantial significance for land reclamation, isolation of polluted industrial and agricultural lands as well as the effluent and industrial emissions treatment.

  7. Impact of diet on the design of waste processors in CELSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waleh, Ahmad; Kanevsky, Valery; Nguyen, Thoi K.; Upadhye, Ravi; Wydeven, Theodore

    1991-01-01

    The preliminary results of a design analysis for a waste processor which employs existing technologies and takes into account the constraints of human diet are presented. The impact of diet is determined by using a model and an algorithm developed for the control and management of diet in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS). A material and energy balance model for thermal oxidation of waste is developed which is consistent with both physical/chemical methods of incineration and supercritical water oxidation. The two models yield quantitative analysis of the diet and waste streams and the specific design parameters for waste processors, respectively. The results demonstrate that existing technologies can meet the demands of waste processing, but the choice and design of the processors or processing methods will be sensitive to the constraints of diet. The numerical examples are chosen to display the nature and extent of the gap in the available experiment information about CELSS requirements.

  8. The Impact of the Information Logistics Flows on the Processes of Municipal Wastes Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samohovych Oleksandr S.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at identifying the impact of information incompleteness and asymmetry, irrational behavior of actors on the processes of municipal wastes management. It has been found that, at the present moment in Ukraine, quality of the transfer of information flows on the municipal wastes management between the State authority, local government bodies, enterprises, and the public stays at a low level. The urban sanitation schemes are being adopted and waste management technologies are being introduced at the local level, but the local government bodies have not been provided with sufficient information to make optimal decisions. Acting independently, the market mechanism would not be able to overcome the asymmetry of information in the short terms, and the State intervention would be needed to correct the information inadequacy of the municipal waste market. Prospect for future research will be determining conditions for an effective distribution of information flows in the process of municipal wastes management.

  9. Environmental impact of ICT and implications for e-waste management in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina TARTIU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of Information and communications technology (ICT, as core of the digital economy, presents contradictory effects on the environment. The paper presents the main perspectives of environmental impact of ICT, especially in relation with waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE, e-waste, as they result from the approaches found in literature and the reports of official international and national bodies. The analysis of impact on environment and e-waste is done on two levels: the impact of ICT sectors and the impact of electronic applications (including the electronic commerce. The article ends with customizing the characteristics of the digital economy in Romania. Particular attention is paid to WEEE generated from the development of the digital economy and the significant challenges which the systems of collection, treatment and disposal must meet the environmental requirements.

  10. Recovery of essential nutrients from municipal solid waste - Impact of waste management infrastructure and governance aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zabaleta, Imanol; Rodic-Wiersma, Ljiljana

    2015-01-01

    Every year 120-140. million tonnes of bio-waste are generated in Europe, most of which is landfilled, incinerated or stabilized and used as covering material in landfill operation. None of these practices enables the recovery of essential nutrients such as phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N), which

  11. Waste Water Management and Infectious Disease. Part II: Impact of Waste Water Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Robert C.

    1975-01-01

    The ability of various treatment processes, such as oxidation ponds, chemical coagulation and filtration, and the soil mantle, to remove the agents of infectious disease found in waste water is discussed. The literature concerning the efficiency of removal of these organisms by various treatment processes is reviewed. (BT)

  12. Environmental impact assessment of waste electronic and electric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In addition, under the toxicity characteristics leaching procedure (TCLP) extraction test, 6879 ± 1342 mg/kg dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was measured. It was also confirmed that the leachability of Pb and Cd exceeds the regulatory limit of TCLP. Lead was the predominant heavy metal to leach from the waste material ...

  13. Improved combustion performance of waste-fired FB-boilers -The influence of the dynamics of the bed on the air-/fuel interaction; Foerbaettrad foerbraenningsprestanda vid avfallsfoerbraenning i FB-pannor -Baeddynamikens inverkan paa luft-/braensleomblandningen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Johanna (Hoegskolan i Boraas (Sweden)); Pallares, David; Thunman, Henrik; Johnsson, Filip (Chalmers (Sweden)); Andersson, Bengt-Aake (E.on/Hoegskolan i Boraas (Sweden)); Victoren, Anders (Metso Power AB (Sweden)); Johansson, Andreas (SP, Boraas (Sweden))

    2010-07-01

    One of the key benefits of fluidized bed combustion is that the bed - through mixing of fuel and air and accumulated heat - facilitates combustion at low stoichiometry and with low emissions. Even so, it is not unusual that waste-fired FB-boilers are operated at 6-8% oxygen that corresponds to 30-40% higher flows of gas than theoretically needed. In addition to that and in comparison to grate furnaces, FB-boiler can cause high pressure drop losses because of the fluidization of the bottom bed, which in turn are associated with high costs for power (fans). This work aims therefore at increasing the knowledge for how the dynamics of the bed affects the air and fuel mixture. Methods to explain and characterize the phenomenon have been derived within this work showing: - Distribution of air in a bed for various cases and the influence of pressure drop, bed height and fluidization velocity - A semi-empiric method to calculate an even bubble distribution - The relation between fluidization and fuel distribution for various fluidization flows and fuels - Dispersion rates for various fuels - Volatilization rates for waste in relation to biomass The result can be useful when optimizing units, for instance through finding as low pressure drops as possible with an even bubble distribution, low risk for sintering and unwanted emissions. The work has thereby reached its ultimate goal of increasing the generic knowledge about waste combustion in FB-boiler

  14. Impact of KCl impregnation on single particle combustion of wood and torrefied wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Zhimin; Jian, Jie; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2017-01-01

    In this work, single particle combustion of raw and torrefied 4 mm wood particles with different potassium content obtained by KCl impregnation and washing was studied experimentally under a condition of 1225 °C, 3.1% O2 and 26.1% H2O. The ignition time and devolatilization time depended almost......, and unchanged by torrefaction. Compared to the raw wood particle, the char conversion time was increased by torrefaction, decreased by washing, and almost unchanged by KCl impregnation due to its promoting effect on both char yield and reactivity....

  15. Fission product determination in irradiated fuel processing waste (electrophoresis); Dosage des produits de fission dans les effluents de traitement des combustibles irradies (electrophorese)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auchapt, J.M.; Tret, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de Marcoule, 30 - Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France). Centre de Production de Plutonium de Marcoule. Services d' Extraction du Plutonium

    1966-07-01

    This dosage method concerns fission products present in the waste produced from the processing of cooled irradiated fuels. - Sr, Cs, Ce, Y, Ru by quantitative analysis; - Zr, Nb by qualitative analysis. It includes electrophoresis on paper strips one meter long which is then analysed between two window-less Geiger counters. For an activity of 10{sup -2} {mu}Ci of any cation in a 10 {mu}l spot, the standard error {sigma} if 3 to 4 per cent. complete analysis lasts about 5 hours. (authors) [French] Cette methode de dosage concerne les produits de fission presents dans les effluents de traitement des combustibles irradies refroidis: - Sr, Cs, Ce, Y, Ru en analyse quantitative; - Zr, Nb en analyse qualitative. Elle comporte une electrophorese sur bande de papier de un metre de longueur suivie d'un depouillement entre deux compteurs Geiger sans fenetre. Pour une activite de 10{sup -2} {mu}Ci d'un cation quelconque dans une tache de 10 {mu}l l'erreur standard {sigma} est de 3 a 4 pour cent. L'analyse complete demande environ 5 heures. (auteurs)

  16. Modeling and Experimental Validation of a Volumetric Expander Suitable for Waste Heat Recovery from an Automotive Internal Combustion Engine Using an Organic Rankine Cycle with Ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Galindo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Waste heat recovery (WHR in exhaust gas flow of automotive engines has proved to be a useful path to increase the overall efficiency of internal combustion engines (ICE. Recovery potentials of up to 7% are shown in several works in the literature. However, most of them are theoretical estimations. Some present results from prototypes fed by steady flows generated in an auxiliary gas tank and not with actual engine exhaust gases. This paper deals with the modeling and experimental validation of an organic Rankine cycle (ORC with a swash-plate expander integrated in a 2 L turbocharged petrol engine using ethanol as working fluid. A global simulation model of the ORC was developed with a maximum difference of 5%, validated with experimental results. Considering the swash-plate as the main limiting factor, an additional specific submodel was implemented to model the physical phenomena in this element. This model allows simulating the fluid dynamic behavior of the swash-plate expander using a 0D model (Amesim. Differences up to 10.5% between tests and model results were found.

  17. Automotive Thermoelectric Generator impact on the efficiency of a drive system with a combustion engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziolkowski Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the combustion engine drive systems efficiency is currently being achieved by structural changes in internal combustion engines and its equipment, which are geared towards limiting mechanical, thermal and outlet losses. For this reason, downsizing. In addition to these changes, all manner of exhaust gas energy recovery systems are being investigated and implemented, including turbocompound, turbogenerators and thermoelectric generators. The article presents the author’s idea of a thermoelectric generator system of automotive applications ATEG (Automotive Thermoelectric Generator and the study of the recovery of exhaust gas energy stream. The ATEG consists of a heat exchanger, thermoelectric modules and a cooling system. In this solution, 24 commercial thermoelectric modules based on Bi2Te3 (bismuth telluride were used. Measurements were made at two engine test sites on which SI and CI engines were installed. The exhaust gas parameters (temperature and mass flow rate, fuel consumption and operating parameters of the ATEG – the intensity and the voltage generated by the thermoelectric modules and the temperature on the walls of the heat exchanger – were all measured in the experiments. Based on the obtained results, the exhaust gas energy flow and the power of the ATEG were determined as well as its effect on the diesel engine drive system efficiency.

  18. Low-level waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyette, M.L.; Dolak, D.A.

    1996-12-01

    This report provides technical support information for use in analyzing environmental impacts associated with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management alternatives in the Waste-Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Waste loads treated and disposed of for each of the LLW alternatives considered in the DOE WM PEIS are presented. Waste loads are presented for DOE Waste Management (WM) wastes, which are generated from routine operations. Radioactivity concentrations and waste quantities for treatment and disposal under the different LLW alternatives are described for WM waste. 76 refs., 14 figs., 42 tabs.

  19. Assessment of the environmental impact of landfill sites with open combustion located in arid regions by combined chemical and ecotoxicological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, H; Kolb, M; Jopke, P; Schmidt, C; Alawi, M; Bahadir, M

    2006-12-01

    Two different waste disposal sites in Jordan were investigated in order to determine the environmental situation in context with waste disposal techniques. One landfill, located at Marka/Amman, had been closed about 25 years ago and covered with soil. Here, the waste had been actively open combusted and openings in the cover, still emitting smoke, indicated that waste was still smoldering inside the landfill's body. The second disposal site close to Ekeeder/Irbid is still operated. On this ground, the solid waste is not intentionally burned, although spontaneous fires frequently come up. Samples of waste, soil, and entrained dust were collected and analyzed. From the solid samples, respectively, their eluates, sum parameters, ecotoxicological effects as well as contents of elements/heavy metals and organic pollutants (PAH, PCDD/F) were determined. In general, the Ekeeder-samples were low-contaminated. The investigation of the Marka-samples showed higher contamination of the site's center, clearly being influenced by combustion processes. A significant contamination of the landfill's vicinity by its emissions could not be derived from the analytical data. Ecotoxicological investigations, applying a bio-test battery, revealed correlations with the sum parameters but not with the trace pollutants. Thus, the Marka-samples with the highest measured values of sum parameters caused adverse effects on three different test species, whereas other samples from Marka and Ekeeder had small or no effects. The results of these investigations depict the influence of different disposal techniques on the contamination situation of a landfill and they shall contribute to assess the conditions of other disposal sites in (semi)arid regions.

  20. Environmental impact assessment of the incineration of municipal solid waste with auxiliary coal in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Yan; Xing, Wei; Lu, Wenjing

    2012-01-01

    The environmental impacts of waste incineration with auxiliary coal were investigated using the life-cycle-based software, EASEWASTE, based on the municipal solid waste (MSW) management system in Shuozhou City. In the current system, MSW is collected, transported, and incinerated with 250kg of coal...... per ton of waste. Based on observed environmental impacts of incineration, fossil CO2 and heavy metals were primary contributors to global warming and ecotoxicity in soil, respectively. Compared with incinerators using excess coal, incineration with adequate coal presents significant benefits...... (GB13223-2011)” implemented in 2012 introduced stricter policies on controlling SO2 and NOx emissions from coal power plants. Thus, increased use of auxiliary coal during incineration yields fewer avoided impacts on acidification and nutrient enrichment. When two-thirds of ash is source-separated...

  1. [Methods for health impact assessment of policies for municipal solid waste management: the SESPIR Project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmagnani, Federica; Ranzi, Andrea; Ancona, Carla; Angelini, Paola; Chiusolo, Monica; Cadum, Ennio; Lauriola, Paolo; Forastiere, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The Project Epidemiological Surveillance of Health Status of Resident Population Around the Waste Treatment Plants (SESPIR) included five Italian regions (Emilia-Romagna, Piedmont, Lazio, Campania, and Sicily) and the National Institute of Health in the period 2010-2013. SESPIR was funded by the Ministry of Health as part of the National centre for diseases prevention and control (CCM) programme of 2010 with the general objective to provide methods and operational tools for the implementation of surveillance systems for waste and health, aimed at assessing the impact of the municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment cycle on the health of the population. The specific objective was to assess health impacts resulting from the presence of disposal facilities related to different regional scenarios of waste management. Suitable tools for analysis of integrated assessment of environmental and health impact were developed and applied, using current demographic, environmental and health data. In this article, the methodology used for the quantitative estimation of the impact on the health of populations living nearby incinerators, landfills and mechanical biological treatment plants is showed, as well as the analysis of three different temporal scenarios: the first related to the existing plants in the period 2008-2009 (baseline), the second based on regional plans, the latter referring to MSW virtuous policy management based on reduction of produced waste and an intense recovery policy.

  2. Monetising the impacts of waste incinerators sited on brownfield land using the hedonic pricing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas Casado, Monica; Serafini, Jan; Glen, John; Angus, Andrew

    2017-03-01

    In England and Wales planning regulations require local governments to treat waste near its source. This policy principle alongside regional self-sufficiency and the logistical advantages of minimising distances for waste treatment mean that energy from waste incinerators have been built close to, or even within urban conurbations. There is a clear policy and research need to balance the benefits of energy production from waste incinerators against the negative externalities experienced by local residents. However, the monetary costs of nuisance emissions from incinerators are not immediately apparent. This study uses the Hedonic Pricing Method to estimate the monetary value of impacts associated with three incinerators in England. Once operational, the impact of the incinerators on local house prices ranged from approximately 0.4% to 1.3% of the mean house price for the respective areas. Each of the incinerators studied had been sited on previously industrialised land to minimise overall impact. To an extent this was achieved and results support the effectiveness of spatial planning strategies to reduce the impact on residents. However, negative impacts occurred in areas further afield from the incinerator, suggesting that more can be done to minimise the impacts of incinerators. The results also suggest that in some case the incinerator increased the value of houses within a specified distance of incinerators under specific circumstances, which requires further investigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Environmental impacts and benefits of state-of-the-art technologies for E-waste management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikhlayel, Mahdi

    2017-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate the environmental impacts and benefits of state-of-the-art technologies for proper e-waste handling using Jordan as a case study. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) was employed to evaluate five advanced management systems represent state-of-the-art treatment technologies, including sanitary landfilling; proper recycling of metals, materials, and precious metals (PMs); and incineration of plastic and the hazardous portion of printed circuit boards (PCBs). Six e-waste products that contribute the most to the e-waste in Jordan were included in the assessment of each scenario, which resulted in 30 total cases of e-waste management. The findings indicated that landfills for the entire components of the e-waste stream are the worst option and should be avoided. The most promising e-waste management scenario features integrated e-waste processes based on the concept of Integrated Waste Management (IWM), including recycling materials such as non-PMs and PMs, incinerating plastic and the hazardous content of PCBs using the energy recovered from incineration, and using sanitary landfills of residues. For this scenario, the best environmental performance was obtained for the treatment of mobile phones. Incineration of the portion of hazardous waste using energy recovery is an option that deserves attention. Because scenario implementation depends on more than just the environmental benefits (e.g., economic cost and technical aspects), the study proposes a systematic approach founded on the IWM concept for e-waste management scenario selection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Informal E-waste recycling in developing countries: review of metal(loid)s pollution, environmental impacts and transport pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackah, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Crude or primitive recycling practices are often adopted in material resource recovery from E-waste in developing nations. Significant human health and environmental impacts may occur because of such practices. Literature on metal(loid)s pollution during E-waste processing is fragmented. Here, I review the health and environmental impacts of E-waste recycling operations and transport pathways of metal(loid)s, dispersed during operations. This paper is organised into five sections. Section 1 relates to the background of global E-waste generation and legal/illegal trade, citing specific cases from Ghana and other developing nations. Section 2 provides a brief information on sources of metal(loid)s in E-waste. Section 3 describes characteristics of informal E-waste recycling operations in developing nations. Section 4 examines the health and environmental impacts in E-waste recycling while section 5 evaluates major transport pathways of metal(loid)s contaminants.

  5. Environmental impact by toxic compounds from waste treatment; Miljoepaaverkan fraan toxiska aemnen vid hantering av avfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loefblad, Gun; Bisaillon, Mattias; Sundberg, Johan (Profu AB (Sweden))

    2010-07-01

    The study deals with emissions of toxic compounds from waste treatment to the environment with the aim of improving the state of knowledge and to find a way of describing the environmental impact from these substances. Toxicity is one of a number of environmental aspects necessary to address in the planning of waste treatment and in the daily waste treatment routines in order to fulfill the environmental objective A Non-Toxic Environment and other environmental requirements. The study includes waste to incineration, composting and anaerobic digestion. A comparison between methods were made for biological household waste. According to our study, the compounds of importance for waste treatment are metals and persistent organic compounds. These tend to bioaccumulate and enrich in food chains. The substances are important for the environmental objective A Non-Toxic Environment. In a first step the compounds chosen in this study may be suggested for describing toxicity from waste treatment: As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, dioxin, PCB, the phthalate DEHP and the brominated flame retardant HBCDD. Other substances may be added to the list in a next step from up-dated and quality-assured characterisation factors or from other requirements or preferences. There is a limited knowledge on toxic compounds in waste flows and in different environmental compartments. More data are available for metals than for organic substances. There is also a limited knowledge on the fate of the compounds during the waste treatment processes. Most information is found for incineration. During composting and anaerobic digestion the metals will mainly be emitted to the environment by use of the compost and the anaerobic digestion residue. Organic substances will to some extent be degraded during the processes. However, there are gaps of knowledge to fill for the further work on estimating toxic emissions. There is mainly a need for more extensive data on toxic compounds in waste and their variations. A test

  6. The direct environmental impact of hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement: a surgical waste audit of five cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sa, Darren; Stephens, Kellee; Kuang, Michelle; Simunovic, Nicole; Karlsson, Jon; Ayeni, Olufemi R

    2016-07-01

    Health care facilities produce significant waste (2200 kg/bed/year) creating 2% of greenhouse gas emissions and 1% total solid waste nationwide, with 20-70% of waste coming from operating rooms. We performed a waste audit of hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) to understand its environmental impact and identify areas for greening practices. A waste audit of five hip arthroscopy procedures for FAI was performed. All waste was collected and separated into six waste streams in real time: (i) normal/landfill waste; (ii) recyclable cardboards and plastics; (iii) biohazard waste; (iv) sharp items; (v) linens and (vi) sterile wrapping. The surgical waste (except laundered linens) from five FAI surgeries totaled 47.4 kg, including 21.7 kg (45.7%) of biohazard waste, 11.7 kg (24.6%) of sterile wrap, 6.4 kg (13.5%) of normal/landfill waste, 6.4 kg (13.5%) of recyclable plastics and 1.2 kg (2.6%) of sharp items. An average of 9.4 kg (excluding laundered linens) of waste was produced per procedure. Given the considerable biohazard waste produced by FAI procedures, additional recycling programs, continued adherence to proper waste segregation and an emphasis on 'green outcomes' is encouraged to demonstrate environmental responsibility and effectively manage and allocate finite resources.

  7. NO and N{sub 2}O formation during the combustion of wood, straw, malt waste and peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, F.; Wartha, C.; Hofbauer, H. [Institute of Chemical Engineering, Vienna (Austria)

    1999-10-01

    The NO and N{sub 2}O formation behavior of six biofuels (spruce wood, beech wood, alder wood, straw, malt waste, peat) was studied in a formation-rate unit under conditions relevant to a fluidized-bed combustor and a grate-furnace. The concentrations of CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, other hydrocarbons, NO, N{sub 2}O, HCN and NH{sub 3} were measured in the flue gas, shortly after the burning fuel particles. Most of the fuel nitrogen was released during devolatilization (66- 75%). Relatively high conversions to NO were found. N{sub 2}O was formed but also rapidly destroyed. HCN was also formed in quantities similar to NH{sub 3}. The HCN/NH{sub 3} ratios seemed to depend on the fuel H/N ratios. The experimental results supported the hypothesis that the nitrogen in wood and other biofuels also exists in heterocyclic structures. With the proposed NO and N{sub 2}O formation mechanism the effects of fuel nitrogen content, temperature and oxygen partial pressure can be explained.

  8. [Solid urban waste: socio-environmental impacts and prospects for sustainable management with social inclusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Nelson

    2012-06-01

    Strategies to reconcile development with the protection of ecosystems will yet again be discussed at the forthcoming Rio +20 Summit. The management of solid urban waste is an issue which has barely been touched upon in such discussions. Given the institutionalization of the National Solid Waste Policy, this paper seeks to contribute to this debate and to single out alternatives to tackle this issue with an emphasis on social inclusion. For this purpose, specialized scientific literature was consulted as well as information on solid waste management. It is clearly seen that inadequate management of solid waste has immediate impacts on the environment and health, and contributes to climate change. Considering the limitations of the current options for waste disposal, it is essential to minimize the quantities produced by reducing, reusing and recycling. In this context, the role of independent waste gatherers who have been conducting work of great environmental importance is highlighted. Given the vulnerabilities of this population, it is necessary to devise public policies to ensure that waste gathering is a more respected and less risky activity that guarantees an income, so as to move towards more healthy, equitable and sustainable development.

  9. Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume 3, Appendix A: Public response to revised NOI, Appendix B: Environmental restoration, Appendix C, Environmental impact analysis methods, Appendix D, Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    Volume three contains appendices for the following: Public comments do DOE`s proposed revisions to the scope of the waste management programmatic environmental impact statement; Environmental restoration sensitivity analysis; Environmental impacts analysis methods; and Waste management facility human health risk estimates.

  10. Bromine based mercury abatement in waste and coal combustion. Mercury retention in the catalyst bed of a tail-end-SCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vosteen, Bernhard W. [Vosteen Consulting GmbH, Koeln (Germany); Kanefke, Rico; Beyer, Joachim; Bonkhofer, Theodor Gerhard [CURRENTA GmbH und Co. OHG, Leverkusen (Germany); Ullrich, Rick [WastePro Engineering Inc., Kennett Square, PA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Observations and testing at a CURRENTA waste incineration plant and several coal fired power plants has derived the following aspects of mercury behavior in the plant's waste heat boiler and its gas cleaning train: - Hg{sub met} is oxidized to Hg{sub ion} most readily by bromine, and also by chlorine, - sulfur (SO{sub 2}) inhibit the Hg{sub met} chlorination but not the Hg{sub met} bromination, - Hg{sub met} passes through scrubbers and is adsorbed onto the catalyst bed of a tail-end SCR, slowly oxidized and finally elutes off as Hg{sub ion}, - sulfur (SO{sub 2}) impacts the reduction of molecular halogens in different ways; SO{sub 2} reduces Cl{sub 2} at elevated temperatures (boiler range), but reduces Br{sub 2} only at low temperatures (scrubber range) The operational tests and studies performed in the spring and summer of 2000 at this plant led to some specific knowledge about Hg{sub met} adsorption and also Hg{sub ion} desorption at the catalyst bed of a tail-end SCR. This knowledge, which was at that time in many respects novel, has provided more insight into the mercury oxidation behaviour. Today, process options derived from this knowledge could be implemented in hazardous waste incineration plants and also municipal solid waste incineration plants, to achieve complete mercury halogenation in the boiler flue gas, ahead of the scrubber system, at any time. This might prevent penetration of metallic mercury to the tail-end SCR and avoid the corresponding long time mercury elution. For effective prevention to be achieved in practice, it is strongly recommended to also install a continuously measuring (possibly uncalibrated) AAS mercury monitor for immediate detection of any unexpected Hg{sub met} breakthrough, for example caused by ''hidden mercury'' in the waste feed, and to initiate the rapid (preferably automized) injection of some bromine compound before even more mercury is transferred into the tail-end SCR, stored there as Hg

  11. The progressive increase of food waste in America and its environmental impact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D Hall

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Food waste contributes to excess consumption of freshwater and fossil fuels which, along with methane and CO(2 emissions from decomposing food, impacts global climate change. Here, we calculate the energy content of nationwide food waste from the difference between the US food supply and the food consumed by the population. The latter was estimated using a validated mathematical model of metabolism relating body weight to the amount of food eaten. We found that US per capita food waste has progressively increased by approximately 50% since 1974 reaching more than 1400 kcal per person per day or 150 trillion kcal per year. Food waste now accounts for more than one quarter of the total freshwater consumption and approximately 300 million barrels of oil per year.

  12. Environmental impacts of waste produced from processing of different uraniferous rock samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim E. El Aassy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Radon exhalation rates from five studied laboratory waste samples resulted from five different sedimentary rock types named sandy dolostone, siltstone –two samples-, marly claystone and black shale were measured using ‘‘Sealed Can technique”. These rates were found to vary between 0.005 and 0.015 Bq m−2 h−1. A positive correlation was found between the radon exhalation rates and the radium activities. The emanation coefficients were calculated for these laboratory waste samples which varied between 0.0004 and 0.0007 according to the physical and chemical characterize of the wastes. These results are partially in accordance with autonite acid leached tailings on laboratory scale (USA. These results led us to pay attention about the effect and impact of these wastes on the environment.

  13. Potential health impacts of burning coal beds and waste banks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelman, R.B.

    2004-01-01

    Uncontrolled release of pollutants from burning coal beds and waste banks presents potential environmental and human health hazards. On a global scale, the emissions of large volumes of greenhouse gases from burning coal beds may contribute to climate change that alters ecosystems and patterns of disease occurrence. On regional and local scales, the emissions from burning coal beds and waste banks of acidic gases, particulates, organic compounds, and trace elements can contribute to a range of respiratory and other human health problems. Although there are few published reports of health problems caused by these emissions, the potential for problems can be significant. In India, large numbers of people have been displaced from their homes because of health problems caused by emissions from burning coal beds. Volatile elements such as arsenic, fluorine, mercury, and selenium are commonly enriched in coal deposits. Burning coal beds can volatilize these elements, which then can be inhaled, or adsorbed on crops and foods, taken up by livestock or bioaccumulated in birds and fish. Some of these elements can condense on dust particles that can be inhaled or ingested. In addition, selenium, arsenic, lead, tin, bismuth, fluorine, and other elements condense where the hot gaseous emissions come in contact with ambient air, forming mats of concentrated efflorescent minerals on the surface of the ground. These mats can be leached by rainwater and washed into local water bodies providing other potential routes of exposure. Although there are little data linking burning coal beds and waste banks to known health problems, a possibly analogous situation exists in rural China where mineralized coal burned in a residential environment has caused widespread and severe health problems such as fluorosis and arseniasis. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Waste management programmatic environmental impact statement methodology for estimating human health risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergenback, B. [Midwest Technical, Inc. (United States); Blaylock, B.P.; Legg, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has produced large quantities of radioactive and hazardous waste during years of nuclear weapons production. As a result, a large number of sites across the DOE Complex have become chemically and/or radiologically contaminated. In 1990, the Secretary of Energy charged the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste management (EM) with the task of preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The PEIS should identify and assess the potential environmental impacts of implementing several integrated Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) alternatives. The determination and integration of appropriate remediation activities and sound waste management practices is vital for ensuring the diminution of adverse human health impacts during site cleanup and waste management programs. This report documents the PEIS risk assessment methodology used to evaluate human health risks posed by WM activities. The methodology presents a programmatic cradle to grave risk assessment for EM program activities. A unit dose approach is used to estimate risks posed by WM activities and is the subject of this document.

  15. Smoldering Combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Rein, G

    2016-01-01

    Smoldering combustion is the slow, low temperature, flameless burning of porous fuels and is the most persistent type of combustion phenomena. It is especially common in porous fuels which form a char on heating, like cellulosic insulation, polyurethane foam or peat. Smoldering combustion is among the leading causes of residential fires, and it is a source of safety concerns in industrial premises as well as in commercial and space flights. Smoldering is also the dominant combustion phenomena...

  16. Environmental impacts of waste management in the hospitality industry: Creating a waste management plan for Bergvik Kartano

    OpenAIRE

    Adigwe, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Many hospitality industries find it difficult to control or manage solid wastes, such as food, containers, paper, cardboard and scrap metals, which are waste generated on a daily basis depending on the industry. Most hospitality industries tend to lag behind when it comes to the collection of waste. Only a fraction of the¬¬ waste collected receives proper disposal. When waste is not collected sufficiently and the disposal is inappropriate the waste can accumulate and cause water, land and air...

  17. K-BREF(Korean BAT reference document) development : BAT and BAT-AELs for large combustion plants and waste incinerators in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Heungmin; Lee, Daegyun; Park, Jaehong

    2017-04-01

    Since the initial environmental policy namely "Regulation on assigning license for environmental pollutant emission facilities" was introduced in 1971, the previous environmental policy that assign licenses on emission facilities of each pollutant has been implementing in Korea. From this, economic standard and environmental quality of Korea are recognized as level of developed countries, even though various development activities for industrialization. However, amount of pollutant, emission route and emission source are increasing with development of various industries, and citizens recognition for environment have been changed as well. Thus, ministry of environment of Korea needs systematic policy based on scientific grounds for conversion of paradigm. For this, ministry of environment was introduced new policy namely "integrated pollution prevention and control(IPPC)", and it will be implemented from 2017 in Korea. IPPC is established for considering environment, economic and efficiency: 10 licenses on each pollutant emission will be integrated to one license, and it can be expected simplification for business licensing process. As well, this policy can be upgraded and processed while considering characteristics on location and industry types, in the future. However, to conduct this system harmoniously, policy demanders have to apply integrated control system to their facilities. Especially, the first applied industries by IPPC are two industries, such as large combustion plants for power generation and waste incineration facilities. Therefore, ministry of environment has to publish technical guideline books firstly for those industries, and they were named to "BAT reference document(BREF)". In this study, essential information for BREFs publishment, that is including emission levels, best available technique(BAT) and so on was investigated. In addition, the BAT-associated emission levels (BAT-AELs) of each industry were set using emission data obtained from

  18. Valorisation of fish by-products against waste management treatments--Comparison of environmental impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Carla; Antelo, Luis T; Franco-Uría, Amaya; Alonso, Antonio A; Pérez-Martín, Ricardo

    2015-12-01

    Reuse and valorisation of fish by-products is a key process for marine resources conservation. Usually, fishmeal and oil processing factories collect the by-products generated by fishing port and industry processing activities, producing an economical benefit to both parts. In the same way, different added-value products can be recovered by the valorisation industries whereas fishing companies save the costs associated with the management of those wastes. However, it is important to estimate the advantages of valorisation processes not only in terms of economic income, but also considering the environmental impacts. This would help to know if the valorisation of a residue provokes higher impact than other waste management options, which means that its advantages are probably not enough for guarantying a sustainable waste reuse. To that purpose, there are several methodologies to evaluate the environmental impacts of processes, including those of waste management, providing different indicators which give information on relevant environmental aspects. In the current study, a comparative environmental assessment between a valorisation process (fishmeal and oil production) and different waste management scenarios (composting, incineration and landfilling) was developed. This comparison is a necessary step for the development and industrial implementation of these processes as the best alternative treatment for fish by-products. The obtained results showed that both valorisation process and waste management treatments presented similar impacts. However, a significant benefit can be achieved through valorisation of fish by-products. Additionally, the implications of the possible presence of pollutants were discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Environmental indicators of the combustion of prospective coal water slurry containing petrochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrienko, Margarita A; Nyashina, Galina S; Strizhak, Pavel A

    2017-09-15

    Negative environmental impact of coal combustion has been known to humankind for a fairly long time. Sulfur and nitrogen oxides are considered the most dangerous anthropogenic emissions. A possible solution to this problem is replacing coal dust combustion with that of coal water slurry containing petrochemicals (CWSP). Coal processing wastes and used combustible liquids (oils, sludge, resins) are promising in terms of their economic and energy yield characteristics. However, no research has yet been conducted on the environmental indicators of fuels based on CWSP. The present work contains the findings of the research of CO, CO2, NOx, SOx emissions from the combustion of coals and CWSPs produced from coal processing waste (filter cakes). It is demonstrated for the first time that the concentrations of dangerous emissions from the combustion of CWSPs (carbon oxide and dioxide), even when combustible heavy liquid fractions are added, are not worse than those of coal. As for the concentration of sulfur and nitrogen oxides, it is significantly lower for CWSPs combustion as compared to coals. The presented research findings illustrate the prospects of the wide use of CWSPs as a fuel that is cheap and beneficial, in terms of both energy output and ecology, as compared to coal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Hydrogen production with CO 2 capture by coupling steam reforming of methane and chemical-looping combustion: Use of an iron-based waste product as oxygen carrier burning a PSA tail gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, María; Gayán, Pilar; de Diego, Luis F.; García-Labiano, Francisco; Abad, Alberto; Pans, Miguel A.; Adánez, Juan

    In this work it is analyzed the performance of an iron waste material as oxygen carrier for a chemical-looping combustion (CLC) system. CLC is a novel combustion technology with the benefit of inherent CO 2 separation that can be used as a source of energy for the methane steam reforming process (SR). The tail gas from the PSA unit is used as fuel in the CLC system. The oxygen carrier behaviour with respect to gas combustion was evaluated in a continuous 500 W th CLC prototype using a simulated PSA off-gas stream as fuel. Methane or syngas as fuel were also studied for comparison purposes. The oxygen carrier showed enough high oxygen transport capacity and reactivity to fully convert syngas at 880 °C. However, lower conversion of the fuel was observed with methane containing fuels. An estimated solids inventory of 1600 kg MW th -1 would be necessary to fully convert the PSA off-gas to CO 2 and H 2O. An important positive effect of the oxygen carrier-to-fuel ratio up to 1.5 and the reactor temperature on the combustion efficiency was found. A characterization of the calcined and after-used particles was carried out showing that this iron-based material can be used as oxygen carrier in a CLC plant since particles maintain their properties (reactivity, no agglomeration, high durability, etc.) after more than 111 h of continuous operation.

  1. The impacts of regulation on business in the Waste Sector: Evidence from the Western Cape

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oelofse, Suzanna HH

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available . In this regard, the Western Cape Department of Economic Development and Tourism commissioned a project to do a regulatory impact assessment for the waste economy in the Western Cape. The findings of this research suggest that a number of the legislative barriers...

  2. 77 FR 6548 - Environmental Impact Statement for the Implementation of Energy, Water, and Solid Waste...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    ... enhance the energy and water security of Fort Bliss, Texas, which is operationally necessary, financially... waste reduction, and energy and water conservation policies and practices; (2) the construction of a new... Department of the Army Environmental Impact Statement for the Implementation of Energy, Water, and Solid...

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF THE STORED DUST-LIKE ZINC AND IRON CONTAINING WASTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana A. Lytaeva

    2017-05-01

    On the basis of laboratory research and field observations of the environmental components in the impact area of the storage of dust-like zinc and iron containing wastes, the article describes regularities of formation of hydrogeochemical halos of contamination by heavy metals and iron. Results include also the description of changes in physico-chemical groundwater composition under the storage area.

  4. Waste-based materials; capability, application and impact on indoor environment – literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejcirikova, Barbora; Rode, Carsten; Kolarik, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews and discusses various sustainable materials utilizing waste products with the focus on their properties having an impact on the indoor environmental conditions and indoor air quality (IAQ). Materials included in the review are selected considering the following aspects...

  5. Impact of waste water on irrigation water quality in Minna, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Irrigation. water from two typical ·suburbs in Nigeria; namely Minna Abattoir and Maizube Farm were analysed to ascertain the impact of waste water on their quality. The parameters investigated include total dissolved ·solids · (TDS), electrical conductivity (ECw), pH, temperature, turbidity, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) ...

  6. The impact of socioeconomic factors on municipal solid waste generation in São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Victor H Argentino de Morais; Matheus, Dácio R

    2018-01-01

    Social factors have not been sufficiently explored in municipal solid waste management studies. Latin America has produced even fewer studies with this approach; technical and economic investigations have prevailed. We explored the impacts of socioeconomic factors on municipal solid waste generation in Greater Sao Paulo, which includes 39 municipalities. We investigated the relations between municipal solid waste generation and social factors by Pearson's correlation coefficient. The Student's t-test (at p ← 0.01) proved significance, and further regression analysis was performed with significant factors. We considered 10 socioeconomic factors: population, rural population, density, life expectancy, education (secondary, high and undergraduate level), income per capita, inequality and human development. A later multicollinearity analysis resulted in the determination of inequality (r p = 0.625) and income per capita (r p = 0.607) as major drivers. The results showed the relevance of considering social aspects in municipal solid waste management and isolated inequality as an important factor in planning. Inequality must be used as a complementary factor to income, rather than being used exclusively. Inequality may explain differences of waste generation between areas with similar incomes because of consumption patterns. Therefore, unequal realities demand unequal measures to avoid exacerbation, for example, pay-as-you-throw policies instead of uniform fees. Unequal realities also highlight the importance of tiering policies beyond the waste sector, such as sustainable consumption.

  7. Life cycle environmental impacts of substituting food wastes for traditional anaerobic digestion feedstocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Camacho, María Natividad; Curry, Robin; Cromie, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    In this study, life cycle assessment has been used to evaluate life cycle environmental impacts of substituting traditional anaerobic digestion (AD) feedstocks with food wastes. The results have demonstrated the avoided GHG emissions from substituting traditional AD feedstocks with food waste (avoided GHG-eq emissions of 163.33 CO 2 -eq). Additionally, the analysis has included environmental benefits of avoided landfilling of food wastes and digestate use as a substitute for synthetic fertilisers. The analysis of the GHG mitigation benefits of resource management/circular economy policies, namely, the mandating of a ban on the landfilling of food wastes, has demonstrated the very substantial GHG emission reduction that can be achieved by these policy options - 2151.04 kg CO 2 eq per MWh relative to UK Grid. In addition to the reduction in GHG emission, the utilization of food waste for AD instead of landfilling can manage the leakage of nutrients to water resources and eliminate eutrophication impacts which occur, typically as the result of field application. The results emphasise the benefits of using life-cycle thinking to underpin policy development and the implications for this are discussed with a particular focus on the analysis of policy development across the climate, renewable energy, resource management and bioeconomy nexus and recommendations made for future research priorities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The impact of nanoparticles on aerobic degradation of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici Guvenc, Senem; Alan, Burcu; Adar, Elanur; Bilgili, Mehmet Sinan

    2017-04-01

    The amount of nanoparticles released from industrial and consumer products has increased rapidly in the last decade. These products may enter landfills directly or indirectly after the end of their useful life. In order to determine the impact of TiO2 and Ag nanoparticles on aerobic landfilling processes, municipal solid waste was loaded to three pilot-scale aerobic landfill bioreactors (80 cm diameter and 350 cm height) and exposed to TiO2 (AT) and Ag (AA) nanoparticles at total concentrations of 100 mg kg-1 of solid waste. Aerobic landfill bioreactors were operated under the conditions about 0.03 L min-1 kg-1 aeration rate for 250 days, during which the leachate, solid waste, and gas characteristics were measured. The results indicate that there was no significant difference in the leachate characteristics, gas constituents, solid quality parameters, and temperature variations, which are the most important indicators of landfill operations, and overall aerobic degradation performance between the reactors containing TiO2 and Ag nanoparticles, and control (AC) reactor. The data also indicate that the pH levels, ionic strength, and the complex formation capacity of nanoparticles with Cl- ions can reduce the toxicity effects of nanoparticles on aerobic degradation processes. The results suggest that TiO2 and Ag nanoparticles at concentrations of 100 mg kg-1 of solid waste do not have significant impacts on aerobic biological processes and waste management systems.

  9. Food waste conversion options in Singapore: environmental impacts based on an LCA perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Hsien H; Lim, Teik Z; Tan, Reginald B H

    2010-02-15

    Proper management and recycling of huge volumes of food waste is one of the challenges faced by Singapore. Semakau island - the only offshore landfill of the nation - only accepts inert, inorganic solid waste and therefore a large bulk of food waste is directed to incinerators. A remaining small percent is sent for recycling via anaerobic digestion (AD), followed by composting of the digestate material. This article investigates the environmental performance of four food waste conversion scenarios - based on a life cycle assessment perspective - taking into account air emissions, useful energy from the incinerators and AD process, as well as carbon dioxide mitigation from the compost products derived from the digestate material and a proposed aerobic composting system. The life cycle impact results were generated for global warming, acidification, eutrophication, photochemical oxidation and energy use. The total normalized results showed that a small-scale proposed aerobic composting system is more environmentally favorable than incinerators, but less ideal compared to the AD process. By making full use of the AD's Recycling Phase II process alone, the Singapore Green Plan's 2012 aim to increase the recycling of food waste to 30% can easily be achieved, along with reduced global warming impacts.

  10. Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 1 of 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This EIS reflects the public review of and comments offered on the draft statement. Included are descriptions of the characteristics of nuclear waste, the alternative disposal methods under consideration, and potential environmental impacts and costs of implementing these methods. Because of the programmatic nature of this document and the preliminary nature of certain design elements assumed in assessing the environmental consequences of the various alternatives, this study has been based on generic, rather than specific, systems. At such time as specific facilities are identified for particular sites, statements addressing site-specific aspects will be prepared for public review and comment.

  11. Environmental impacts and costs of solid waste: a comparison of landfill and incineration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabl, Ari; Spadaro, Joseph V; Zoughaib, Assaad

    2008-04-01

    The methodology for evaluating the impacts and damage costs ('external costs') due to pollution from waste treatment is described and the results are presented, based on the ExternE project series of the European Commission. The damage costs of landfill and incineration of municipal solid waste are compared, with due account for energy and materials recovery, as well as possible differences in transport distance. We have not been able to quantify the total damage costs of leachates because of the complexity of the environmental pathways and of the long time horizon of some persistent pollutants, but we consider an extreme scenario to show that they are not worth worrying about in the sense that reducing the pollutants in leachates beyond current regulations would bring negligible benefit in comparison with the abatement of other sources of the same pollutants. The damage costs due to the construction of the waste treatment facility are negligible. The damage costs of waste transport, which are illustrated by an arbitrary choice of a 100 km round trip by a 16 tonne truck, are also negligible. The benefits of materials recovery make a small contribution to the total damage cost. The only significant contributions come from direct emissions (of the landfill or incinerator) and from avoided emissions due to energy recovery (from an incinerator). Damage costs for incineration range from about 4 to 21 EUR tonne waste(-1), and they are extremely dependent on the assumed scenario for energy recovery. For landfill the cost ranges from about 10 to 13 EUR tonne waste(-1); it is dominated by greenhouse gas emissions because only a fraction of the CH4 can be captured (here assumed to be 70%). Amenity costs (odour, visual impact, noise) are highly site-specific and we only cite results from a literature survey which indicates that such costs could make a significant contribution, very roughly on the order of 1 EUR tonne waste(-1).

  12. Impacts of a jet's exit flow pattern on mixing and combustion performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathan, G.J.; Mi, J.; Newbold, G.J.R.; Nobes, D.S. [Turbulence, Energy and Combustion Group, School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Alwahabi, Z.T. [Turbulence, Energy and Combustion Group, Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia)

    2006-09-15

    The influence of modifying a jet's exit flow pattern on both the near and far-field turbulent mixing processes and on the resulting combustion performance, is explored. This reveals that, in contradiction to some common assumptions, increasing the coherence of large-scale motions can decrease molecular mixing rates, and yet can still be beneficial in some applications. Even relatively minor changes to the exit flow pattern of a non-reacting round jet, through changes to the nozzle profile are found to propagate downstream into the far field, apparently through the underlying turbulent structure. Importantly, while a jet from a smoothly contracting nozzle is found to have higher rates of entrainment, mean spread and mean decay of the scalar field than does a long pipe jet, it has a lower rate of molecular mixing. That is, increased large-scale mixing does not necessarily result in increased fine-scale mixing. A range of devices are reviewed which enhance, or stimulate the large-scale, coherent motions in an emerging jet using acoustic, mechanical or fluidic methods. The available evidence suggests that those methods which induce instantaneously asymmetric flow structure are more effective at increasing the near-field spreading than are those which induce instantaneously axisymmetric flow structure. Only limited data are available of the effects of such near-field changes on the far-field properties. Nevertheless, the available data reveal a clear trend that this near-field flow undergoes a transition to a far-field state whose spread and decay is comparable with that of a steady jet, albeit being indelibly altered by the near-field excitation. It also suggests that 'self-exciting' devices (i.e. that are not externally forced), cause a net reduction in the total entrainment relative to the unexcited jet, due to the losses induced by the device itself. Nevertheless, the changes which they can impart to the flow, such as redistributing the turbulent

  13. Evaluation of combustion experiments conducted during the research and development project ``Mechanical-biological waste conditioning in combination with thermal processing of partial waste fractions``; Auswertung der Verbrennungsversuche zum Forschungs- und Entwicklungsvorhaben ``mechanisch-biologische Restmuellbehandlung unter Einbindung thermischer Verfahren fuer Teilfraktionen``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jager, J.; Lohf, A.; Herr, C. [Institut WAR, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The technical code on municipal waste makes specific demands on waste to be deposited at landfills which can only be met if mechanical-biological conditioning of waste as well as thermal processing of partial waste fractions are continued also in the future. But waste that has undergone mechanical or mechanical-biological conditioning presents different combustion properties from those of unconditioned waste. In this second stage of the research project, the thermal processability of waste having undergone mechanical or mechanical-biological conditioning was studied. Together with the results from the first project stage, where the throughput represented exclusively mechanically conditioned material, the results of the latter measuring campaigns comprehensively demonstrate possibilities for the thermal processing of partial waste fractions having undergone biological-mechanical conditioning, and inform on changes in plant performance. (orig.) [Deutsch] Um die in der TA-Siedlungsabfall an den abzulagernden Restmuell gestellten Deponieeingangsbedingungen zu erfuellen, muss neben einer mechanisch-biologischen Aufbereitung bei Teilfraktionen auch weiterhin eine thermische Behandlung eingeplant werden. Die Verbrennungseigenschaften von mechanisch oder mechanisch-biologisch vorbehandeltem Restmuell weichen allerdings von denen von unbehandeltem Restmuell ab. In dieser zweiten Projektphase des Forschungsvorhabens wurde eine Untersuchung bezueglich der thermischen Behandelbarkeit von mechanisch und auch biologisch vorbehandeltem Muell durchgefuehrt. Die Ergebnisse der Messkampagnen bilden zusammen mit den Ergebnissen der ersten Projektphase, in der ausschliesslich mechanisch vorbehandeltes Material durchgesetzt wurde, eine umfassende Darstellung ueber Moeglichkeiten und veraenderte Anlagenverhalten bei der thermischen Behandlung von Teilfraktionen aus der biologisch-mechanisch Vorbehandlung. (orig.)

  14. ACTUAL WASTE TESTING OF GYCOLATE IMPACTS ON THE SRS TANK FARM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, C.

    2014-05-28

    Glycolic acid is being studied as a replacement for formic acid in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed preparation process. After implementation, the recycle stream from DWPF back to the high-level waste Tank Farm will contain soluble sodium glycolate. Most of the potential impacts of glycolate in the Tank Farm were addressed via a literature review and simulant testing, but several outstanding issues remained. This report documents the actual-waste tests to determine the impacts of glycolate on storage and evaporation of Savannah River Site high-level waste. The objectives of this study are to address the following: Determine the extent to which sludge constituents (Pu, U, Fe, etc.) dissolve (the solubility of sludge constituents) in the glycolate-containing 2H-evaporator feed. Determine the impact of glycolate on the sorption of fissile (Pu, U, etc.) components onto sodium aluminosilicate solids. The first objective was accomplished through actual-waste testing using Tank 43H and 38H supernatant and Tank 51H sludge at Tank Farm storage conditions. The second objective was accomplished by contacting actual 2H-evaporator scale with the products from the testing for the first objective. There is no anticipated impact of up to 10 g/L of glycolate in DWPF recycle to the Tank Farm on tank waste component solubilities as investigated in this test. Most components were not influenced by glycolate during solubility tests, including major components such as aluminum, sodium, and most salt anions. There was potentially a slight increase in soluble iron with added glycolate, but the soluble iron concentration remained so low (on the order of 10 mg/L) as to not impact the iron to fissile ratio in sludge. Uranium and plutonium appear to have been supersaturated in 2H-evaporator feed solution mixture used for this testing. As a result, there was a reduction of soluble uranium and plutonium as a function of time. The change in soluble uranium concentration was

  15. Hospital Workers' Awareness of Health and Environmental Impacts of Poor Clinical Waste Disposal in the Northwest Region of Cameroon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mochungong, Peter I K; Gulis, Gabriel; Sodemann, Morten

    2010-01-01

    a survey to evaluate hospital workers' awareness of health and environmental impacts of poor clinical waste disposal in Cameroon. We randomly distributed 500 questionnaires to hospital workers in three hospitals in the Northwest Region of Cameroon in April 2008. In addition, we observed collection......, segregation, transportation, and disposal of clinical waste at the three hospitals. Of 475 total respondents, most lacked sufficient awareness of any environmental or public health impacts of poor clinical waste disposal and had never heard of any policy--national or international--on safe clinical waste...

  16. Impact of pulp and paper mill effluents and solid wastes on soil mineralogical and physicochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Gopi; Bhattacharyya, Krishna G

    2015-03-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the impact of the effluents and the solid wastes generated by a giant pulp and paper mill in the northeastern part of India on soil mineralogy of the area. The impacts were monitored by analysis of soil samples from seven sites located in the potential impact zone and a control site where any kind of effluent discharge or solid waste dumping was absent. The soil belonged to medium texture type (sandy clay loam, sandy loam, loamy sand, and silt loam), and the soil aggregate analysis indicated higher levels of organic carbon, pH, electrical conductivity, effective cation exchange capacity, and mean weight diameter at sites receiving effluents and solid wastes from the pulp and paper mill. Depletion in soil silica level and in feldspar and quartz contents and rise in iron and calcium contents at the sites receiving effluents from the pulp and paper mill indicated significant influence on soil mineralogy. The soil contained a mixture of minerals consisting of tectosilicates (with silicate frameworks as in quartz or feldspar), phylosilicates (layered clays like kaolinite, smectite, chlorite, illite, etc.), and carbonates. Absence of pure clay minerals indicated a state of heterogeneous intermediate soil clay transformation. The significance of the mixed mineralogy in relation to the disposal of effluents and dumping of solid wastes is discussed in details.

  17. Potential resource and toxicity impacts from metals in waste electronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Seung H; Lee, Dae Sung; Lim, Seong-Rin

    2016-04-01

    As a result of the continuous release of new electronic devices, existing electronic devices are quickly made obsolete and rapidly become electronic waste (e-waste). Because e-waste contains a variety of metals, information about those metals with the potential for substantial environmental impact should be provided to manufacturers, recyclers, and disposers to proactively reduce this impact. This study assesses the resource and toxicity (i.e., cancer, noncancer, and ecotoxicity) potentials of various heavy metals commonly found in e-waste from laptop computers, liquid-crystal display (LCD) monitors, LCD TVs, plasma TVs, color cathode ray tube (CRT) TVs, and cell phones and then evaluates such potentials using life cycle impact-based methods. Resource potentials derive primarily from Cu, Sb, Ag, and Pb. Toxicity potentials derive primarily from Pb, Ni, and Hg for cancer toxicity; from Pb, Hg, Zn, and As for noncancer toxicity; and from Cu, Pb, Hg, and Zn for ecotoxicity. Therefore, managing these heavy metals should be a high priority in the design, recycling, and disposal stages of electronic devices. © 2015 SETAC.

  18. assessment of environmental impact of solid waste dumpsites using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    iguniwari ekeuwei

    -physical approaches previously applied in the same study area. 3. Identify the factors that contribute to increased dumpsite impact on the environment. 2. MATERIALS AND METHOD. 2.1. Study Area: Benin City. Edo state (Figure 1) is in the ...

  19. assessment of environmental impact of solid waste dumpsites using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    iguniwari ekeuwei

    This study presents a remote sensing approach of using freely available Landsat 8 satellite Indicators (Land Surface. Temperature (LST), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI)) and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) Digital. Elevation Model (DEM) geospatial data to assess the impact of dumpsites on the ...

  20. Quantitative analysis of impact of awareness-raising activities on organic solid waste separation behaviour in Balikpapan City, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Noriaki; Murayama, Takehiko; Nishikizawa, Shigeo; Sato, Yuriko

    2017-10-01

    Many cities in Indonesia are under pressure to reduce solid waste and dispose of it properly. In response to this pressure, the Japan International Cooperation Agency and the Indonesian Government have implemented a solid waste separation and collection project to reduce solid waste in the target area (810 households) of Balikpapan City. We used a cluster randomised controlled trial method to measure the impact of awareness-raising activities that were introduced by the project on residents' organic solid waste separation behaviour. The level of properly separated organic solid waste increased by 6.0% in areas that conducted awareness-raising activities. Meanwhile, the level decreased by 3.6% in areas that did not conduct similar activities. Therefore, in relative comparison, awareness-raising increased the level by 9.6%. A comparison among small communities in the target area confirmed that awareness-raising activities had a significant impact on organic solid waste separation. High frequencies of monitoring at waste stations and door-to-door visits by community members had a positive impact on organic solid waste separation. A correlation between the proximity of environmental volunteers' houses to waste stations and a high level of separation was also confirmed. The awareness-raising activities introduced by the project led to a significant increase in the separation of organic solid waste.

  1. Lifetime analysis of waste processing: environmental comparison between sanitary landfills and combustion; Analisis del ciclo de vida del tratamiento de residuos: comparacion ambiental entre vertido controlado e incineracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domenech Antunez, X.; Rieradevall Pons, J. [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain)

    1999-11-01

    In this work it`s carried out an environmental comparative balance between two methodologies of treatment of residuals: the pored controlled and the incineration. This study has been carried out applying the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) like tool. The LCA bases an opinion on evaluate the environmental associate loads to a product or activity, in all the stages of that consist; from the obtaining of materials cousins and energy resources, until their elimination. The treatment of a ton of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) has been elected like functional unit; like compasses of the system are considered the Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) since they are deposited in the street until the treatment concludes, that is to say, until the life chemistry of the residual finishes in the spillway or until it is incinerated. Starting from the data picked up in the inventory, meetly classified and characterized, an environmental comparison between the two methods of treatment could have been carried out, considering several stages. The outputs are discussed in function of the environmental impact of each one of the constituent stages of both procedures. (Author) 4 refs.

  2. Anaerobic digestion of animal waste: waste strength versus impact of mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Khursheed; Hoffmann, Rebecca; Klasson, Thomas; Al-Dahhan, M H

    2005-11-01

    We studied the effect of mode of mixing (biogas recirculation, impeller mixing, and slurry recirculation) and waste strength on the performance of laboratory scale digesters. The digesters were fed with 5% and 10% manure slurry, at a constant energy supply per unit volume (8 W/m3). The experiments were conducted in eight laboratory scale digesters, each having a working volume of 3.73 L, at a controlled temperature of 35+/-2 degrees C. Hydraulic retention time (HRT) was kept constant at 16.2 days, resulting in a total solids (TS) loading rate of 3.08 g/Ld and 6.2 g/Ld for 5% and 10% manure slurry feeds, respectively. Results showed that the unmixed and mixed digesters performed quite similarly when fed with 5% manure slurry and produced biogas at a rate of 0.84-0.94 L/Ld with a methane yield of 0.26-0.31 L CH4/g volatile solids (VS) loaded. This was possibly because of the low solids concentration in the case of 5% manure slurry, where mixing created by the naturally produced gas might be sufficient to provide adequate mixing. However, the effect of mixing and the mode of mixing became prominent in the case of the digesters fed with thicker manure slurry (10%). Digesters fed with 10% manure slurry and mixed by slurry recirculation, impeller, and biogas recirculation produced approximately 29%, 22% and 15% more biogas than unmixed digester, respectively. Deposition of solids inside the digesters was not observed in the case of 5% manure slurry, but it became significant in the case of 10% manure slurry. Therefore, mixing issue becomes more critical with thicker manure slurry.

  3. Implementation Plan. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    In accordance with the Department of Energy`s National Environmental Policy Act implementing procedures in Volume 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Section 1021,312, the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Implementation Plan has two primary purposes: to provide guidance for the preparation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement and to record the issues resulting from the scoping and the extended public participation process. The Implementation Plan identifies and discusses the following: background of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities, the purpose of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, and the relationship of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement to other Departmental initiatives (Chapter 1); need and purposes for action (Chapter 2); scoping process and results of the public participation program in defining the scope of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, including a summary of the comments received and their disposition (Chapter 3); planned scope and content of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Chapter 4); consultations with other agencies and the role of cooperating agencies (Chapter 5); planned schedule of major Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement milestones (Chapter 6); and responsibilities for preparation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Chapter 7).

  4. The Impact of Zeolites During Co-Combustion of Municipal Sewage Sludge with Alkali and Chlorine Rich Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, A.; Elledt, A.-L.; Moöler, A.; Steenari, B.-M.; Åmand, L.-E.

    Municipal sewage sludge has proven to eliminate alkali metals and chlorine related problems during combustion of straw and refuse derived fuels (RDF). However, the mechanisms involved have not been clarified. The aim of this work was to gain more knowledge about the behaviour of sewage sludge and detergent zeolites in combustion and about their effects on alkali metal chemistry.

  5. On the thermal impact on the excavation damaged zone around deep radioactive waste disposal

    CERN Document Server

    Delage, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Clays and claystones are considered in some countries (including Belgium, France and Switzerland) as a potential host rock for high activity long lived radioactive waste disposal at great depth. One of the aspects to deal with in performance assessment is related to the effects on the host rock of the temperature elevation due to the placement of exothermic wastes. The potential effects of the thermal impact on the excavated damaged zone in the close field are another important issue that was the goal of the TIMODAZ European research project. In this paper, some principles of waste disposal in clayey host rocks at great depth are first presented and a series of experimental investigations carried out on specific equipment specially developed to face the problem are presented. Both drained and undrained tests have been developed to investigate the drained thermal volume changes of clays and claystone and the thermal pressurization occurring around the galleries. This importance of proper initial saturation (un...

  6. Impact of nanoparticles and butanol on properties and spray characteristics of waste cooking oil biodiesel and pure rapeseed oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, K. H.; Hossain, A. K.

    2017-11-01

    Renewable biofuels can offset greenhouse gases by replacing fossil fuels destined for internal combustion engines. However, biofuels have their own setbacks and may lead to poor combustion inside the engine cylinder. In this study, nanoparticles and butanol were blended either separately or together with waste cooking oil biodiesel and neat rape seed oil to investigate the impact of these additives on the properties and spray characteristics. The investigation comprised of three stages, with each having an effect on how the next stage of the investigation was conducted. Initially, the physicochemical characteristics of 25ppm, 50ppm, 75ppm and 100ppm concentrations of aluminium oxide and copper oxide nanoparticle blends with fossil diesel, waste cooking oil biodiesel and rapeseed oil were investigated. The results from first stage investigation showed that, in general, blends containing aluminium oxide nanoparticles gave better results for almost all the concentrations when compared with copper oxide nanoparticle blends with the same nanoparticle concentrations. Overall, waste cooking oil biodiesel blended with 100ppm aluminium oxide nanoparticle showed most promising results like the flash point of 159.3°C, kinematic viscosity @40°C of 4.66 cSt, and gross calorific value of 44.43 MJ/kg. These values were 61.6% higher, 51.3% higher and 3.2% lower than that of corresponding fossil diesel values. Subsequently, in the second stage of the study, the addition of butanol was investigated to assess its ability to enhance the emulsion of biofuel-nanoparticles blends. Four blends containing 90% biodiesel & 10% butanol, and 90% rapeseed oil & 10% butanol, with and without 100ppm Al2O3 were prepared. Results showed that the kinematic viscosity of the fuel blends containing 100ppm aluminium oxide nanoparticles were decreased by 0.4% and 3.3%, for 90% biodiesel & 10% butanol and 90% rapeseed oil & 10% butanol blends respectively, when compared to without the nanoparticles. The

  7. Impact of nanoparticles and butanol on properties and spray characteristics of waste cooking oil biodiesel and pure rapeseed oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad K. H.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Renewable biofuels can offset greenhouse gases by replacing fossil fuels destined for internal combustion engines. However, biofuels have their own setbacks and may lead to poor combustion inside the engine cylinder. In this study, nanoparticles and butanol were blended either separately or together with waste cooking oil biodiesel and neat rape seed oil to investigate the impact of these additives on the properties and spray characteristics. The investigation comprised of three stages, with each having an effect on how the next stage of the investigation was conducted. Initially, the physicochemical characteristics of 25ppm, 50ppm, 75ppm and 100ppm concentrations of aluminium oxide and copper oxide nanoparticle blends with fossil diesel, waste cooking oil biodiesel and rapeseed oil were investigated. The results from first stage investigation showed that, in general, blends containing aluminium oxide nanoparticles gave better results for almost all the concentrations when compared with copper oxide nanoparticle blends with the same nanoparticle concentrations. Overall, waste cooking oil biodiesel blended with 100ppm aluminium oxide nanoparticle showed most promising results like the flash point of 159.3°C, kinematic viscosity @40°C of 4.66 cSt, and gross calorific value of 44.43 MJ/kg. These values were 61.6% higher, 51.3% higher and 3.2% lower than that of corresponding fossil diesel values. Subsequently, in the second stage of the study, the addition of butanol was investigated to assess its ability to enhance the emulsion of biofuel-nanoparticles blends. Four blends containing 90% biodiesel & 10% butanol, and 90% rapeseed oil & 10% butanol, with and without 100ppm Al2O3 were prepared. Results showed that the kinematic viscosity of the fuel blends containing 100ppm aluminium oxide nanoparticles were decreased by 0.4% and 3.3%, for 90% biodiesel & 10% butanol and 90% rapeseed oil & 10% butanol blends respectively, when compared to without

  8. Environmental costs connected to various types of waste; Miljoekostander knyttet til ulike typer avfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vennemo, Haakon

    1995-07-01

    The report estimates environmental costs (external impacts) from municipal waste through discharges into air, water and soil. We look at the wastes paper/cardboard, plastic, metal, wood and glass and give separate estimates for wastes at fillings with and without gaseous collection and combusted waste. The figure estimates are uncertain. Paper/cardboard at fillings without gas exhaust have the highest external impacts, about 2.5 pr. kg as the best estimate. The main reason is methane discharge. Plastic and wood at fillings also have high external impacts. These components ought to be combusted if the aim is low environmental costs. Metal and glass have external impacts beneath 0.01 pr. kg at the fillings. This is due to discharges from the fillings take long time and do not go into air. These components ought to be deposited if the aim is low environmental costs.

  9. Assessing the impact of hazardous waste on children's health: The exposome paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarigiannis, D A

    2017-10-01

    Assessment of the health impacts related to hazardous waste is a major scientific challenge with multiple societal implications. Most studies related to associations between hazardous waste and public health do not provide established of mechanistic links between environmental exposure and disease burden, resulting in ineffective waste management options. The exposome concept comes to overhaul the nature vs. nurture paradigm and embraces a world of dynamic interactions between environmental exposures, endogenous exposures and genetic expression in humans. In this context, the exposome paradigm provides a novel tool for holistic hazardous waste management. Waste streams and the related contamination of environmental media are not viewed in isolation, but rather as components of the expotype, the vector of exposures an individual is exposed to over time. Thus, a multi-route and multi-pathway exposure estimation can be performed setting a realistic basis for integrated health risk assessment. Waste management practices are thus assessed not only regarding their technological edge and efficacy but also their effects on human health at the individual and community level, considering intra-subject variability in the affected population. The effectiveness of the exposome approach is demonstrated in the case of Athens, the capital of Greece, where the health effects associated to long term and short term exposure to two major waste management facilities (landfill and plastic recycling) are presented. Using the exposome analysis tools, we confirmed that proximity to a landfill is critical for children neurodevelopment. However, this effect is significantly modified by parameters such as parental education level, socioeconomic status and nutrition. Proximity to a plastics recycling plant does not pose significant threats under normal operating conditions; yet, in the case of an accidental fire, release of persistent carcinogenic compounds (dioxins and furans) even for a

  10. Impact of Climate Change on Soil and Groundwater Chemistry Subject to Process Waste Land Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNab, W. W.

    2013-12-01

    Nonhazardous aqueous process waste streams from food and beverage industry operations are often discharged via managed land application in a manner designed to minimize impacts to underlying groundwater. Process waste streams are typically characterized by elevated concentrations of solutes such as ammonium, organic nitrogen, potassium, sodium, and organic acids. Land application involves the mixing of process waste streams with irrigation water which is subsequently applied to crops. The combination of evapotranspiration and crop salt uptake reduces the downward mass fluxes of percolation water and salts. By carefully managing application schedules in the context of annual climatological cycles, growing seasons, and process requirements, potential adverse environmental impacts to groundwater can be mitigated. However, climate change poses challenges to future process waste land application efforts because the key factors that determine loading rates - temperature, evapotranspiration, seasonal changes in the quality and quantity of applied water, and various crop factors - are all likely to deviate from current averages. To assess the potential impact of future climate change on the practice of land application, coupled process modeling entailing transient unsaturated fluid flow, evapotranspiration, crop salt uptake, and multispecies reactive chemical transport was used to predict changes in salt loading if current practices are maintained in a warmer, drier setting. As a first step, a coupled process model (Hydrus-1D, combined with PHREEQC) was calibrated to existing data sets which summarize land application loading rates, soil water chemistry, and crop salt uptake for land disposal of process wastes from a food industry facility in the northern San Joaquin Valley of California. Model results quantify, for example, the impacts of evapotranspiration on both fluid flow and soil water chemistry at shallow depths, with secondary effects including carbonate mineral

  11. The new energy processes and the new approaches of the combustion. The environmental impact decrease; Nouveaux procedes energetiques et nouvelles approches de la combustion. Reduction de l'impact environnemental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabot, G. [CORIA, 76 - Mont Saint Aignan (France); Caillat, S. [Ecole des Mines de Douai, Dept. Energetique, 59 (France); Guillet, R. [Gaz de France, GDF DR, 93 - La Plaine Saint-Denis (France)] [and others

    2001-07-01

    During this day organized by the french society of the science of heat (SFT), seven papers have been presented. They deal with new processes of combustion leading to a better air quality for the environment. The first process concerns the wet combustion, an energy efficient and environmentally friendly technique, its properties and the DHC (hygrometric diagram of combustion) analysis. The flames mechanisms and the swirl process are presented in a second part with the analysis of the radiant heat transfers and the nitrogen oxides emissions. (A.L.B.)

  12. [Health impact assessment of policies for municipal solid waste management: findings of the SESPIR Project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranzi, Andrea; Ancona, Carla; Angelini, Paola; Badaloni, Chiara; Cernigliaro, Achille; Chiusolo, Monica; Parmagnani, Federica; Pizzuti, Renato; Scondotto, Salvatore; Cadum, Ennio; Forastiere, Francesco; Lauriola, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The SESPIR Project (Epidemiological Surveillance of Health Status of Resident Population Around the Waste Treatment Plants) assessed the impact on health of residents nearby incinerators, landfills and mechanical biological treatment plants in five Italian regions (Emilia-Romagna, Piedmont, Lazio, Campania, and Sicily). The assessment procedure took into account the available knowledge on health effects of waste disposal facilities. Analyses were related to three different scenarios: a Baseline scenario, referred to plants active in 2008-2009; the regional future scenario, with plants expected in the waste regional plans; a virtuous scenario (Green 2020), based on a policy management of municipal solid waste (MSW) through the reduction of production and an intense recovery policy. Facing with a total population of around 24 million for the 5 regions, the residents nearby the plants were more than 380,000 people at Baseline. Such a population is reduced to approximately 330.000 inhabitants and 170.000 inhabitants in the regional and Green 2020 scenarios, respectively. The health impact was assessed for the period 2008-2040. At Baseline, 1-2 cases per year of cancer attributable to MSW plants were estimated, as well as 26 cases per year of adverse pregnancy outcomes (including low birth weight and birth defects), 102 persons with respiratory symptoms, and about a thousand affected from annoyance caused by odours. These annual estimates are translated into 2,725 years of life with disability (DALYs) estimated for the entire period. The DALYs are reduced by approximately 20% and 80% in the two future scenarios. Even in these cases, health impact is given by the greater effects on pregnancy and the annoyance associated with the odours of plants. In spite of the limitations due to the inevitable assumptions required by the present exercise, the proposed methodology is suitable for a first approach to assess different policies that can be adopted in regional planning in

  13. Combustion engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Ragland, Kenneth W

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Combustion Engineering The Nature of Combustion Combustion Emissions Global Climate Change Sustainability World Energy Production Structure of the Book   Section I: Basic Concepts Fuels Gaseous Fuels Liquid Fuels Solid Fuels Problems Thermodynamics of Combustion Review of First Law Concepts Properties of Mixtures Combustion StoichiometryChemical EnergyChemical EquilibriumAdiabatic Flame TemperatureChemical Kinetics of CombustionElementary ReactionsChain ReactionsGlobal ReactionsNitric Oxide KineticsReactions at a Solid SurfaceProblemsReferences  Section II: Combustion of Gaseous and Vaporized FuelsFlamesLaminar Premixed FlamesLaminar Flame TheoryTurbulent Premixed FlamesExplosion LimitsDiffusion FlamesGas-Fired Furnaces and BoilersEnergy Balance and EfficiencyFuel SubstitutionResidential Gas BurnersIndustrial Gas BurnersUtility Gas BurnersLow Swirl Gas BurnersPremixed-Charge Engine CombustionIntroduction to the Spark Ignition EngineEngine EfficiencyOne-Zone Model of Combustion in a Piston-...

  14. Analysis of long-term impacts of TRU waste remaining at generator/storage sites for No Action Alternative 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, J.W.; Bagaasen, L.M.; Bergeron, M.P.; Streile, G.P. [and others

    1997-09-01

    This report is a supplement to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal-Phase Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS-II). Described herein are the underlying information, data, and assumptions used to estimate the long-term human-health impacts from exposure to radionuclides and hazardous chemicals in transuranic (TRU) waste remaining at major generator/storage sites after loss of institutional control under No Action Alternative 2. Under No Action Alternative 2, TRU wastes would not be emplaced at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) but would remain at generator/storage sites in surface or near-surface storage. Waste generated at smaller sites would be consolidated at the major generator/storage sites. Current TRU waste management practices would continue, but newly generated waste would be treated to meet the WIPP waste acceptance criteria. For this alternative, institutional control was assumed to be lost 100 years after the end of the waste generation period, with exposure to radionuclides and hazardous chemicals in the TRU waste possible from direct intrusion and release to the surrounding environment. The potential human-health impacts from exposure to radionuclides and hazardous chemicals in TRU waste were analyzed for two different types of scenarios. Both analyses estimated site-specific, human-health impacts at seven major generator/storage sites: the Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The analysis focused on these seven sites because 99 % of the estimated TRU waste volume and inventory would remain there under the assumptions of No Action Alternative 2.

  15. Socioeconomic assessment of defense waste processing facility impacts in the Savannah River Plant region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peelle, E.; Reed, J.H.; Stevenson, R.H.

    1981-09-01

    The DWPF will immobilize highly radioactive defense wastes for storage on site until shipment to an approved federal repository for radioactive wastes. This document assesses the socioeconomic impacts of constructing and operating the proposed facility and presents the assessment methodology. Because various schedules and various ways of staging the construction of the DWPF are considered and because in some of these instances a large nearby construction project (the Vogtle Nuclear Power Station) may influence the socioeconomic impacts, four scenarios involving different facility options and schedules are assessed. In general, the impacts were found not to be large. In the scenario where the socioeconomic effects were the greatest, it was found that there are likely to be some impacts on schools in Barnwell County as well as a shortage of mobile homes in that county. Aiken, Allendale, and Bamberg counties are also likely to experience slight-to-moderate housing shortages. Minor impacts are anticipated for fire and police services, roads, traffic, and land use. There will be noticeable economic impact from the project. Other scenarios had fewer socioeconomic impacts.

  16. Effects of heat recovery for district heating on waste incineration health impact: a simulation study in Northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordioli, Michele; Vincenzi, Simone; De Leo, Giulio A

    2013-02-01

    The construction of waste incinerators in populated areas always causes substantial public concern. Since the heat from waste combustion can be recovered to power district heating networks and allows for the switch-off of domestic boilers in urbanized areas, predictive models for health assessment should also take into account the potential benefits of abating an important source of diffuse emission. In this work, we simulated the dispersion of atmospheric pollutants from a waste incinerator under construction in Parma (Italy) into different environmental compartments and estimated the potential health effect of both criteria- (PM(10)) and micro-pollutants (PCDD/F, PAH, Cd, Hg). We analyzed two emission scenarios, one considering only the new incinerator, and the other accounting for the potential decrease in pollutant concentrations due to the activation of a district heating network. We estimated the effect of uncertainty in parameter estimation on health risk through Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, we analyzed the robustness of health risk to alternative assumptions on: a) the geographical origins of the potentially contaminated food, and b) the dietary habits of the exposed population. Our analysis showed that under the specific set of assumptions and emission scenarios explored in the present work: (i) the proposed waste incinerator plant appears to cause negligible harm to the resident population; (ii) despite the net increase in PM(10) mass balance, ground-level concentration of fine particulate matter may be curbed by the activation of an extensive district heating system powered through waste combustion heat recovery and the concurrent switch-off of domestic/industrial heating boilers. In addition, our study showed that the health risk caused by waste incineration emissions is sensitive to assumptions about the typical diet of the resident population, and the geographical origins of food production. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Life cycle modelling of environmental impacts from application of processed organic municipal solid waste on agricultural land (EASEWASTE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Trine Lund; Bhander, Gurbakhash Singh; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2006-01-01

    A model capable of quantifying the potential environmental impacts of agricultural application of composted or anaerobically digested source-separated organic municipal solid waste (MSW) is presented. In addition to the direct impacts, the model accounts for savings by avoiding the production...... and use of commercial fertilizers. The model is part of a larger model, Environmental Assessment of Solid Waste Systems and Technology (EASEWASTE), developed as a decisionsupport model, focusing on assessment of alternative waste management options. The environmental impacts of the land application...... of processed organic waste are quantified by emission coefficients referring to the composition of the processed waste and related to specific crop rotation as well as soil type. The model contains several default parameters based on literature data, field experiments and modelling by the agro-ecosystem model...

  18. Optimal utilization of waste-to-energy in an LCA perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Thilde; Astrup, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Energy production from two types of municipal solid waste was evaluated using life cycle assessment (LCA): (1) mixed high calorific waste suitable for production of solid recovered fuels (SRF) and (2) source separated organic waste. For SRF, co-combustion was compared with mass burn incineration....... For organic waste, anaerobic digestion (AD) was compared with mass burn incineration. In the case of mass burn incineration, incineration with and without energy recovery was modelled. Biogas produced from anaerobic digestion was evaluated for use both as transportation fuel and for heat and power production...... alternatives were comparable for SRF. For organic waste, mass burn incineration with energy recovery was preferable over anaerobic digestion in most impact categories. Waste composition and flue gas cleaning at co-combustion plants were critical for the environmental performance of SRF treatment, while...

  19. The future of the nuclear wastes and the spent fuels at the United States; Le devenir des dechets nucleaires et des combustibles uses aux Etats-Unis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The USA regulation distinguishes three classes of nuclear wastes: the low activity wastes under the federal states control, the wastes contaminated by long life radionuclides (transuranic elements) and the high activity wastes. The two last classes are controlled by the DOE (Department of energy). The different classes management are discussed as the DOE obligations towards the operators, the storage project of Yucca Mountain and Private fuel storage of Skull Valley. (A.L.B.)

  20. Using monosaccharide anhydrides to estimate the impact of wood combustion on fine particles in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarnio, K.; Saarikoski, S. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki (Finland); Niemi, J.V. [HSY Helsinki Region Environmental Services Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-11-01

    The spatiotemporal variation of ambient particles under the influence of biomass burning emissions was studied in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area (HMA) in selected periods during 2005-2009. Monosaccharide anhydrides (MAs; levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan), commonly known biomass burning tracers, were used to estimate the wood combustion contribution to local particulate matter (PM) concentration levels at three urban background sites close to the city centre, and at three suburban sites influenced by local small-scale wood combustion. In the cold season (October-March), the mean MAs concentrations were 115-225 ng m{sup -3} and 83-98 ng m{sup -} {sup 3}at the suburban and urban sites, respectively. In the warm season, the mean MAs concentrations were low (19-78 ng m{sup -3}), excluding open land fire smoke episodes (222-378 ng m{sup -}3{sup )}. Regionally distributed wood combustion particles raised the levels over the whole HMA while particles from local wood combustion sources raised the level at suburban sites only. The estimated average contribution of wood combustion to fine particles (PM{sub 2.5}) ranged from 18% to 29% at the urban sites and from 31% to 66% at the suburban sites in the cold season. The PM measurements from ambient air and combustion experiments showed that the proportions of the three MAs can be utilised to separate the wildfire particles from residential wood combustion particles. (orig.)

  1. Estimating design impact on waste reduction: examining decentralized nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Debajyoti; Harvey, Thomas E; Thurston, Terry

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the impact that decentralization of nursing support spaces may have on the total distances nurses walk and hence the magnitude of time that can be diverted to productive use. Reducing nurse walking has attracted attention from multiple perspectives-human factor, system performance, lean process, care quality, and safety. A simulation-based experimental study was designed that incorporated task frequency data from a nationwide sample of 700 RNs. The simulation runs were conducted on a 30-bed medical-surgical unit, over 12-hour day shifts, in which physical locations of 8 nursing support spaces were systematically manipulated. Findings suggest that total walking time can be reduced by as much as 67.9%, depending on the level of decentralization. Care quality and efficiency issues can be significantly addressed through appropriate levels of decentralization.

  2. 75 FR 1048 - Notice of Public Hearings on the Draft Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-08

    ... Draft Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland..., Office of Environmental Compliance, Office of Environmental Management. [FR Doc. 2010-224 Filed 1-7-10; 8...: 2010-224] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Notice of Public Hearings on the Draft Tank Closure and Waste Management...

  3. Predicting the impact from significant storm events on a hazardous waste site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, U.P. [CH2M Hill, Oakland, CA (United States); Dixon, N.P. [CH2M Hill, Redding, CA (United States); Mitchell, J.S. [CH2M Hill, Helena, MT (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The Stringfellow Hazardous Waste Site is a former Class 1 industrial waste disposal facility located near the community of Glen Avon in southern California. In response to community concerns regarding flooding and possible exposure to contaminants via the surface water pathway, a study was performed to evaluate the potential effect significant/episodic storm events may have on the site and its engineered structures as they exist during present day conditions. Specific storm events such as significant recorded historic storms as well as synthetic design storms were considered and the impact on the onsite area and surface channels in Pyrite Canyon downstream of the site was evaluated. Conclusions were reached, and recommendations were made to minimize the potential flood impacts and exposure to contaminants via the surface water pathway in the areas downstream of the site.

  4. Modeling for waste management associated with environmental-impact abatement under uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P; Li, Y P; Huang, G H; Zhang, J L

    2015-04-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment can generate significant amounts of pollutants, and thus pose a risk on human health. Besides, in MSW management, various uncertainties exist in the related costs, impact factors, and objectives, which can affect the optimization processes and the decision schemes generated. In this study, a life cycle assessment-based interval-parameter programming (LCA-IPP) method is developed for MSW management associated with environmental-impact abatement under uncertainty. The LCA-IPP can effectively examine the environmental consequences based on a number of environmental impact categories (i.e., greenhouse gas equivalent, acid gas emissions, and respiratory inorganics), through analyzing each life cycle stage and/or major contributing process related to various MSW management activities. It can also tackle uncertainties existed in the related costs, impact factors, and objectives and expressed as interval numbers. Then, the LCA-IPP method is applied to MSW management for the City of Beijing, the capital of China, where energy consumptions and six environmental parameters [i.e., CO2, CO, CH4, NOX, SO2, inhalable particle (PM10)] are used as systematic tool to quantify environmental releases in entire life cycle stage of waste collection, transportation, treatment, and disposal of. Results associated with system cost, environmental impact, and the related policy implication are generated and analyzed. Results can help identify desired alternatives for managing MSW flows, which has advantages in providing compromised schemes under an integrated consideration of economic efficiency and environmental impact under uncertainty.

  5. The toxic impact of petro-chemical and oil-refining waste on hydrobionts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramshina, N.G.; Kuramshin, E.M.; Pavlov, S.V. [Institute for Problems of Applied Ecology and Natural Resources Use, Ufa, Bashkortostan (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes research carried out on the potential impacts of petro-chemical and oil refining wastes on molluscs. The acute and chronic effects of 4,4-dimethyl-1,3-dioxane on gastropod molluscs are described. Studies were also conducted on the effects of diesel fuel, aviation fuel and multigrade oil. The results indicate the importance of assessing both lethal and sub-lethal effects. Sub-lethal effects noted included behavioural changes and effects on hemolymph. (Author)

  6. Bulky waste quantities and treatment methods in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anna Warberg; Petersen, Claus; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2012-01-01

    were identified of which ten were recyclable and constituted 50–60% of the total quantity. The others were combustible waste for incineration (30–40%) and non-combustible waste for landfilling (10%). The largest fractions by mass were combustible waste, bricks and tile, concrete, non-combustible waste....... In addition a sorting analysis was conducted on combustible waste, which is a major fraction of bulky waste in Denmark. The generation of bulky waste was found to be 150–250 kg capita−1 year−1, and 90% of the waste was collected at recycling centres; the rest through kerbside collection. Twelve main fractions......, wood, and metal scrap, which together made up more than 90% of the total waste amounts. The amount of combustible waste could be significantly reduced through better sorting. Many of the waste fractions consisted of composite products that underwent thorough separation before being recycled...

  7. Estimating particulate matter health impact related to the combustion of different fossil fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuenen, Jeroen; Kranenburg, Richard; Hendriks, Carlijn; Schaap, Martijn [TNO, Utrecht (Netherlands); Gschwind, Benoit; Lefevre, Mireille; Blanc, Isabelle [MINES ParisTech, Sophia Antipolis (France); Drebszok, Kamila; Wyrwa, Artur [AGH Univ. of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland); Stetter, Daniel [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Stuttgart (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) in ambient air leads to adverse health effects. To design cost effective mitigation strategies, a thorough understanding of the sources of particulate matter is crucial. We have successfully generated a web map service that allows to access information on fuel dependent health effects due to particulate matter. For this purpose, the LOTOS-EUROS air pollution model was equipped with a source apportionment module that tracks the origin of the modelled particulate matter distributions thoughout a simulation. Combined with a dedicated emission inventory PM2.5 maps specified by fuel type were generated for 2007-2009. These maps were combined with a health impact calculation to estimate Lost of Life Expectancy for each fuel categories. An user friendly web client was generated to access the results and use the web mapping service in an easy manner. (orig.)

  8. Devastating Transboundary Impacts of Sea Star Wasting Disease on Subtidal Asteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecino-Latorre, Diego; Eisenlord, Morgan E; Turner, Margaret; Yoshioka, Reyn; Harvell, C Drew; Pattengill-Semmens, Christy V; Nichols, Janna D; Gaydos, Joseph K

    2016-01-01

    Sea star wasting disease devastated intertidal sea star populations from Mexico to Alaska between 2013-15, but little detail is known about its impacts to subtidal species. We assessed the impacts of sea star wasting disease in the Salish Sea, a Canadian / United States transboundary marine ecosystem, and world-wide hotspot for temperate asteroid species diversity with a high degree of endemism. We analyzed roving diver survey data for the three most common subtidal sea star species collected by trained volunteer scuba divers between 2006-15 in 5 basins and on the outer coast of Washington, as well as scientific strip transect data for 11 common subtidal asteroid taxa collected by scientific divers in the San Juan Islands during the spring/summer of 2014 and 2015. Our findings highlight differential susceptibility and impact of sea star wasting disease among asteroid species populations and lack of differences between basins or on Washington's outer coast. Specifically, severe depletion of sunflower sea stars (Pycnopodia helianthoides) in the Salish Sea support reports of major declines in this species from California to Alaska, raising concern for the conservation of this ecologically important subtidal predator.

  9. Devastating Transboundary Impacts of Sea Star Wasting Disease on Subtidal Asteroids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Montecino-Latorre

    Full Text Available Sea star wasting disease devastated intertidal sea star populations from Mexico to Alaska between 2013-15, but little detail is known about its impacts to subtidal species. We assessed the impacts of sea star wasting disease in the Salish Sea, a Canadian / United States transboundary marine ecosystem, and world-wide hotspot for temperate asteroid species diversity with a high degree of endemism. We analyzed roving diver survey data for the three most common subtidal sea star species collected by trained volunteer scuba divers between 2006-15 in 5 basins and on the outer coast of Washington, as well as scientific strip transect data for 11 common subtidal asteroid taxa collected by scientific divers in the San Juan Islands during the spring/summer of 2014 and 2015. Our findings highlight differential susceptibility and impact of sea star wasting disease among asteroid species populations and lack of differences between basins or on Washington's outer coast. Specifically, severe depletion of sunflower sea stars (Pycnopodia helianthoides in the Salish Sea support reports of major declines in this species from California to Alaska, raising concern for the conservation of this ecologically important subtidal predator.

  10. Environmental impact associated with activated carbon preparation from olive-waste cake via life cycle assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjaila, K; Baccar, R; Sarrà, M; Gasol, C M; Blánquez, P

    2013-11-30

    The life cycle assessment (LCA) environmental tool was implemented to quantify the potential environmental impacts associated with the activated carbon (AC) production process from olive-waste cakes in Tunisia. On the basis of laboratory investigations for AC preparation, a flowchart was developed and the environmental impacts were determined. The LCA functional unit chosen was the production of 1 kg of AC from by-product olive-waste cakes. The results showed that impregnation using H3PO4 presented the highest environmental impacts for the majority of the indicators tested: acidification potential (62%), eutrophication (96%), ozone depletion potential (44%), human toxicity (64%), fresh water aquatic ecotoxicity (90%) and terrestrial ecotoxicity (92%). One of the highest impacts was found to be the global warming potential (11.096 kg CO2 eq/kg AC), which was equally weighted between the steps involving impregnation, pyrolysis, and drying the washed AC. The cumulative energy demand of the AC production process from the by-product olive-waste cakes was 167.63 MJ contributed by impregnation, pyrolysis, and drying the washed AC steps. The use of phosphoric acid and electricity in the AC production were the main factors responsible for the majority of the impacts. If certain modifications are incorporated into the AC production, such as implementing synthesis gas recovery and reusing it as an energy source and recovery of phosphoric acid after AC washing, additional savings could be realized, and environmental impacts could be minimized. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Semivolatile POA and parameterized total combustion SOA in CMAQv5.2: impacts on source strength and partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounting evidence from field and laboratory observations coupled with atmospheric model analyses shows that primary combustion emissions of organic compounds dynamically partition between the vapor and particulate phases, especially as near-source emissions dilute and cool to amb...

  12. Assessment of impacts of combined treatment of solid urban waste landfill leachate and sewage on aquatic biota

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Camille Ferreira Mannarino; Josino Costa Moreira; João Alberto Ferreira; Ana Rosa Linde Arias

    2013-01-01

      The impact on tilapia fish of combined treatment of landfill leachate and domestic sewage was monitored in a waste treatment plant that operated on a pilot scale using the activated sludge process...

  13. Impact of the Flame-Holder Heat-Transfer Characteristics on the Onset of Combustion Instability

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Seunghyuck

    2013-10-03

    In this article, we investigate the impact of heat transfer between the flame and the flameholder on the dynamic stability characteristics of a 50-kW backward-facing step combustor. We conducted a series of tests where two backward step blocks were used, made of ceramic and stainless steel, whose thermal conductivities are 1.06 and 12 W/m/K, respectively. Stability characteristics of the two flame-holder materials were examined using measurements of the dynamic pressure and flame chemiluminescence over a range of operating conditions. Results show that with the ceramic flameholder, the onset of instability is significantly delayed in time and, for certain operating conditions, disappears altogether, whereas with the higher conductivity material, the combustor becomes increasingly unstable over a range of operating conditions. We explain these trends using the heat flux through the flameholder and the change in the burning velocity near the step wall. Results suggest a potential approach using low-thermal-conductivity material near the flame-holder as passive dynamics suppression methods. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  14. Impact of health education on community knowledge, attitudes and behaviour towards solid waste management in Al Ghobeiry, Beirut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karout, N; Altuwaijri, S

    2012-07-01

    The risks posed by accumulation of solid waste are most obvious in developing countries, where waste collection and treatment is often inadequate. This study aimed to determine the impact of a health education intervention (based on lectures and focus group discussions) on community knowledge, attitudes and behaviours concerning solid waste management in Al Ghobeiry, Beirut. A randomly selected sample of 320 inhabitants were divide into intervention and control groups who completed the same questionnaire in the pre- and post-intervention phases. Compared with the control group the intervention group, who attended the health education sessions, showed: significantly better knowledge about the problems of and diseases spread by accumulation of solid waste; better attitudes to management of solid waste collection; and improved practices in terms of handling and recycling of household waste. There was an observed increased participation by people in cleaning campaigns and voluntary work in all the municipality activities.

  15. Evaluation of the impact of asbestos wastes on soils in Emene-Enugu, Southeastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igwe, O; Omonona, O V; Onwuka, O S; Nnebedum, O D

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the impacts of asbestos wastes on soils in Emene-Enugu, southeastern Nigeria, generated by the activities of a major asbestos products manufacturing company in southeastern Nigeria. The methods of investigation included vertical electrical sounding (VES), 2-D horizontal resistivity profiling (HRP), induced polarization (IP) survey, chemical analysis of plant tissues and standard penetration tests of soil samples. The 2-D HRP and IP identified six closed waste pits alongside the two active pits. The VES revealed four geoelectrical layers in the area: from bottom to top; the inferred lithologies included dark shale, clay, gravel and recent sands. The geochemical data results revealed that Cd concentration of the soils of the waste pits is above the contaminated land exposure assessment soil guideline value for residential and allotment land uses. The geochemical pollution indices classified the soils as "unpolluted" to "extremely polluted". Bioconcentration factor of Pb in plant tissues was found to be above recommended limits of 0.045. The geotechnical parameters indices revealed that the soils varied from "very soft" to "stiff" and "very loose" to "medium". Soils of the active pits have very low strength and bearing capacity while closed pits have high strength and bearing capacity. It may be safe, therefore, to conclude that as the wastes are completely turned into soils, they will assume geotechnical properties similar to those of natural soils.

  16. Drivers of Housing Demolition Decision Making and the Impact on Timber Waste Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry John Forsythe

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates housing demolition and timber waste recovery – with the aim to identify ways of improving recovery. Using case studies the research focused on demolisher decision making, their onsite processes and the associated network of participants that influence timber recovery. From the data, a process model was developed that identifies and orders the drivers of demolition decision making. One aspect of the model identified the initiators of demolition and the waste created, including issues revolving around the demolition feedstock. Another aspect covers organisational business drivers and includes site safety, productivity, economies of scale, market value of waste and supply chain entrepreneurship. A third component deals with project specific drivers including the recurring cost versus income equation that impacts on the viability of project level decisions. The model includes a typology of the operational onsite response to the above drivers. Here, the deconstruction approach was found to provide high timber recovery mainly used where high-value timber waste was involved; the miscellaneous salvage approach provided some recovery of high and low-value timber; the crunch and dump approach provided low recovery or dumping at landfill and was used where low and no-value timber was involved. An expected increase in supply of these latter timber categories creates a significant need to increase the market value of currently low value timber groups. Designing for deconstruction is also posed as a long term strategy for this. 

  17. Drivers of Housing Demolition Decision Making and the Impact on Timber Waste Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry John Forsythe

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates housing demolition and timber waste recovery – with the aim to identify ways of improving recovery. Using case studies the research focused on demolisher decision making, their onsite processes and the associated network of participants that influence timber recovery. From the data, a process model was developed that identifies and orders the drivers of demolition decision making. One aspect of the model identified the initiators of demolition and the waste created, including issues revolving around the demolition feedstock. Another aspect covers organisational business drivers and includes site safety, productivity, economies of scale, market value of waste and supply chain entrepreneurship. A third component deals with project specific drivers including the recurring cost versus income equation that impacts on the viability of project level decisions. The model includes a typology of the operational onsite response to the above drivers. Here, the deconstruction approach was found to provide high timber recovery mainly used where high-value timber waste was involved; the miscellaneous salvage approach provided some recovery of high and low-value timber; the crunch and dump approach provided low recovery or dumping at landfill and was used where low and no-value timber was involved. An expected increase in supply of these latter timber categories creates a significant need to increase the market value of currently low value timber groups. Designing for deconstruction is also posed as a long term strategy for this.

  18. High Level Waste System Impacts from Small Column Ion Exchange Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, D. J.; Hamm, L. L.; Aleman, S. E.; Peeler, D. K.; Herman, C. C.; Edwards, T. B.

    2005-08-18

    The objective of this task is to identify potential waste streams that could be treated with the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) and perform an initial assessment of the impact of doing so on the High-Level Waste (HLW) system. Design of the SCIX system has been performed as a backup technology for decontamination of High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SCIX consists of three modules which can be placed in risers inside underground HLW storage tanks. The pump and filter module and the ion exchange module are used to filter and decontaminate the aqueous tank wastes for disposition in Saltstone. The ion exchange module contains Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST in its engineered granular form is referred to as IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-911), and is selective for removal of cesium ions. After the IE-911 is loaded with Cs-137, it is removed and the column is refilled with a fresh batch. The grinder module is used to size-reduce the cesium-loaded IE-911 to make it compatible with the sludge vitrification system in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). If installed at the SRS, this SCIX would need to operate within the current constraints of the larger HLW storage, retrieval, treatment, and disposal system. Although the equipment has been physically designed to comply with system requirements, there is also a need to identify which waste streams could be treated, how it could be implemented in the tank farms, and when this system could be incorporated into the HLW flowsheet and planning. This document summarizes a preliminary examination of the tentative HLW retrieval plans, facility schedules, decontamination factor targets, and vitrified waste form compatibility, with recommendations for a more detailed study later. The examination was based upon four batches of salt solution from the currently planned disposition pathway to treatment in the SCIX. Because of differences in capabilities between the SRS baseline and SCIX, these four batches were

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Nano-crystaline CaFe2O4 via Solution Combustion Method from Solid Waste Egg Shells as Source of Calcium

    OpenAIRE

    M. Veerabhadraswamy; H.Bhagya Lakshmi,; B. J. Madhu,

    2017-01-01

    The liable application of solid egg shell waste obtained from food processing industry into biocompatible calcium ferrite nano materials will put in significance to the waste generated.Million tons of egg shell waste are produced every day which has contributed to environmental pollution.In this framework blending of nanotechnology with science, ensuing green chemistry moralities has led to arrival of innovative and improved technologies in the field of material science. Our present work aims...

  20. Initial evaluation of the impact of post-combustion capture of carbon dioxide on supercritical pulverised coal power plant part load performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannah Chalmer; Jon Gibbins [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Energy Technology for Sustainable Development Group, Mechanical Engineering Department

    2007-09-15

    Pulverised coal-fired plants often play an important role in electricity grids as mid-merit plants that can operate flexibly in response to changes in supply and demand. As a consequence, these plants are required to operate over a wide output range. This paper presents an initial evaluation of some potential impacts of adding post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture on the part load performance of pulverised coal-fired plants. Preliminary results for ideal cases analysed using a simple high-level model indicate that post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture could increase the options available to power plant operators. In particular, solvent storage could allow higher effective plant load factors to be achieved to assist with capital recovery while still permitting flexible operation for grid support. A number of areas for more detailed analysis are identified. 11 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Environmentally conscious coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickmott, D.D.; Brown, L.F.; Currier, R.P. [and others

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to evaluate the environmental impacts of home-scale coal combustion on the Navajo Reservation and develop strategies to reduce adverse health effects associated with home-scale coal combustion. Principal accomplishments of this project were: (1) determination of the metal and gaseous emissions of a representative stove on the Navajo Reservation; (2) recognition of cyclic gaseous emissions in combustion in home-scale combustors; (3) `back of the envelope` calculation that home-scale coal combustion may impact Navajo health; and (4) identification that improved coal stoves require the ability to burn diverse feedstocks (coal, wood, biomass). Ultimately the results of Navajo home-scale coal combustion studies will be extended to the Developing World, particularly China, where a significant number (> 150 million) of households continue to heat their homes with low-grade coal.

  2. Impact of Corrections to the Spallings Volume Calculation on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Performance Assessment [Poster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kicker, Dwayne Curtis; Herrick, Courtney G; Zeitler, Todd

    2016-01-01

    The numerical code DRSPALL (from direct release spallings) is written to calculate the volume of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant solid waste subject to material failure and transport to the surface (i.e., spallings) as a result of a hypothetical future inadvertent drilling intrusion into the repository. An error in the implementation of the DRSPALL finite difference equations was discovered and documented in a software problem report in accordance with the quality assurance procedure for software requirements. This paper describes the corrections to DRSPALL and documents the impact of the new spallings data from the modified DRSPALL on previous performance assessment calculations. Updated performance assessments result in more simulations with spallings, which generally translates to an increase in spallings releases to the accessible environment. Total normalized radionuclide releases using the modified DRSPALL data were determined by forming the summation of releases across each potential release pathway, namely borehole cuttings and cavings releases, spallings releases, direct brine releases, and transport releases. Because spallings releases are not a major contributor to the total releases, the updated performance assessment calculations of overall mean complementary cumulative distribution functions for total releases are virtually unchanged. Therefore, the corrections to the spallings volume calculation did not impact Waste Isolation Pilot Plant performance assessment calculation results.

  3. Impact of Corrections to the Spallings Volume Calculation on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Performance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kicker, Dwayne Curtis [Stoller Newport News Nuclear, Inc., Carlsbad, NM (United States); Herrick, Courtney G [Sandia National Laboratories., Carlsbad, NM (United States); Zeitler, Todd [Sandia National Laboratories., Carlsbad, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The numerical code DRSPALL (from direct release spallings) is written to calculate the volume of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant solid waste subject to material failure and transport to the surface (i.e., spallings) as a result of a hypothetical future inadvertent drilling intrusion into the repository. An error in the implementation of the DRSPALL finite difference equations was discovered and documented in a software problem report in accordance with the quality assurance procedure for software requirements. This paper describes the corrections to DRSPALL and documents the impact of the new spallings data from the modified DRSPALL on previous performance assessment calculations. Updated performance assessments result in more simulations with spallings, which generally translates to an increase in spallings releases to the accessible environment. Total normalized radionuclide releases using the modified DRSPALL data were determined by forming the summation of releases across each potential release pathway, namely borehole cuttings and cavings releases, spallings releases, direct brine releases, and transport releases. Because spallings releases are not a major contributor to the total releases, the updated performance assessment calculations of overall mean complementary cumulative distribution functions for total releases are virtually unchanged. Therefore, the corrections to the spallings volume calculation did not impact Waste Isolation Pilot Plant performance assessment calculation results.

  4. The impact of tourism on municipal solid waste generation: the case of Menorca Island (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateu-Sbert, Josep; Ricci-Cabello, Ignacio; Villalonga-Olives, Ester; Cabeza-Irigoyen, Elena

    2013-12-01

    Tourism can sustain high levels of employment and income, but the sector is a source of environmental and health impacts. One of the most important is the generation of municipal solid waste (MSW). However, there is a lack of studies which quantify how much the tourist population engages in total MSW and separately collected recyclables. The aim of this paper is to estimate the impact of the tourist population on MSW, both total and separately collected, for the period 1998-2010, for the Mediterranean island of Menorca (Spain). We use dynamic regressions models, including data for monthly stocks of tourists. The results show that, on average, a 1% increase in the tourist population in Menorca causes an overall MSW increase of 0.282% and one more tourist in Menorca generates 1.31 kg day(-1) (while one more resident generates 1.48 kg day(-1)). This result could be useful to better estimate the seasonal population of different regions, since intrannual fluctuation of MSW is used as a proxy measure of actual population (the sum of residents and tourists). Moreover, an increase of 1% in the tourist population causes an increase of 0.232% in separately collected recyclables and an additional tourist generates 0.160 kg day(-1). One resident selectively collects on average 47.3% more than one tourist. These results can help in the planning of waste infrastructure and waste collection services in tourist areas. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of Combustion and Potash Production as Options for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed combustion and potash production as options for management of wood waste. The percentage reduction in volume by combustion and potash generation potential of wood waste from nine different common species of wood obtained from a wood factory in Ibadan were evaluated. Potash from the ashes ...

  6. Avocado waste for finishing pigs: Impact on muscle composition and oxidative stability during chilled storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-López, Silvia H; Rodríguez-Carpena, Javier G; Lemus-Flores, Clemente; Grageola-Nuñez, Fernando; Estévez, Mario

    2016-06-01

    The utilization of agricultural waste materials for pig feeding may be an interesting option for reducing production costs and contributing to sustainability and environmental welfare. In the present study, a mixed diet enriched with avocado waste (TREATED) is used for finishing industrial genotype pigs. The muscle longissimus thoracis et lomborum (LTL) from TREATED pigs was analyzed for composition and oxidative and color stability and compared with muscles obtained from pigs fed a CONTROL diet. Dietary avocado had significant impact on the content and composition of intramuscular fat (IMF), reducing the lipid content in LTL muscles and increasing the degree of unsaturation. This did not increase the oxidative instability of samples. On the contrary, muscles from TREATED pigs had significantly lower lipid and protein oxidation rates during chilled storage. The color of the muscles from TREATED pigs was also preserved from oxidation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of flameless combustion; Desarrollo de la combustion sin flama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores Sauceda, M. Leonardo; Cervantes de Gortari, Jaime Gonzalo [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: 8344afc@prodigy.net.mx; jgonzalo@servidor.unam.mx

    2010-11-15

    The paper intends contribute to global warming mitigation joint effort that develops technologies to capture the CO{sub 2} produced by fossil fuels combustion and to reduce emission of other greenhouse gases like the NO{sub x}. After reviewing existing combustion bibliography is pointed out that (a) touches only partial aspects of the collective system composed by Combustion-Heat transfer process-Environment, whose interactions are our primary interest and (b) most specialists think there is not yet a clearly winning technology for CO{sub 2} capture and storage. In this paper the study of combustion is focused as integrated in the aforementioned collective system where application of flameless combustion, using oxidant preheated in heat regenerators and fluent gas recirculation into combustion chamber plus appropriated heat and mass balances, simultaneously results in energy saving and environmental impact reduction. [Spanish] El trabajo pretende contribuir al esfuerzo conjunto de mitigacion del calentamiento global que aporta tecnologias para capturar el CO{sub 2} producido por la combustion de combustibles fosiles y para disminuir la emision de otros gases invernadero como NOx. De revision bibliografica sobre combustion se concluye que (a) trata aspectos parciales del sistema compuesto por combustion-proceso de trasferencia de calor-ambiente, cuyas interacciones son nuestro principal interes (b) la mayoria de especialistas considera no hay todavia una tecnologia claramente superior a las demas para captura y almacenaje de CO{sub 2}. Se estudia la combustion como parte integrante del mencionado sistema conjunto, donde la aplicacion de combustion sin flama, empleando oxidante precalentado mediante regeneradores de calor y recirculacion de gases efluentes ademas de los balances de masa y energia adecuados, permite tener simultaneamente ahorros energeticos e impacto ambiental reducido.

  8. What is the future potential for imports of combustible municipal waste to countries with extensive district heating hetworks? - A case study of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizarro, Amalia Rosa; Münster, Marie; Salvucci, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    In Europe landfilling is the most widely used method for managing municipal solid waste. By constrart, the northern European waste market is characterized by high capacities from energy recovery plants, mostly incineration in cogeneration facilities. In Denmark, there is an overcapacity of incine...

  9. A study conducted on the impact of effluent waste from machining process on the environment by water analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovoor, Punnose P.; Idris, Mohd Razif [Kuala Lumpur Univ. (Malaysia). Inst. of Product Design and Manufacturing, IPROM; Hassan, Masjuki Haji [Univ. of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Tengku Yahya, Tengku Fazli [Kuala Lumpur Univ., Melaka (Malaysia). Malaysian Inst. of Chemical and Bio Engineering Technology, MICET

    2012-11-01

    Ferrous block metals are used frequently in large quantities in various sectors of industry for making automotive, furniture, electrical and mechanical items, body parts for consumables, and so forth. During the manufacturing stage, the block metals are subjected to some form of material removal process either through turning, grinding, milling, or drilling operations to obtain the final product. Wastes are generated from the machining process in the form of effluent waste, solid waste, atmospheric emission, and energy emission. These wastes, if not recycled or treated properly before disposal, will have a detrimental impact on the environment through air, water, and soil pollution. The purpose of this paper is to determine the impact of the effluent waste from the machining process on the environment through water analysis. A twofold study is carried out to determine the impact of the effluent waste on the water stream. The preliminary study consists of a scenario analysis where five scenarios are drawn out using substances such as spent coolant, tramp oil, solvent, powdered chips, and sludge, which are commonly found in the effluent waste. The wastes are prepared according to the scenarios and are disposed through the Institute of Product Design and Manufacturing (IPROM) storm water drain. Samples of effluent waste are collected at specific locations according to the APHA method and are tested for parameters such as pH, ammoniacal nitrogen, dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, and total suspended solids. A subsequent study is done by collecting 30 samples of the effluent waste from the machining operations from two small- and medium-scale enterprise locations and the IPROM workshop to test the quality of water. The results obtained from the tests showed high values of chemical oxygen demand, ammoniacal nitrogen, and total suspended solids when compared with the Standard B specification for inland water bodies as specified by the

  10. Management of immunization solid wastes in Kano State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oke, I A

    2008-12-01

    Inadequate management of waste generated from injection activities can have a negative impact on the community and environment. In this paper, a report on immunization wastes management in Kano State (Nigeria) is presented. Eight local governments were selected randomly and surveyed by the author. Solid wastes generated during the Expanded Programme on Immunization were characterised using two different methods: one by weighing the waste and the other by estimating the volume. Empirical data was obtained on immunization waste generation, segregation, storage, collection, transportation, and disposal; and waste management practices were assessed. The study revealed that immunization offices were accommodated in either in local government buildings, primary health centres or community health care centres. All of the stations demonstrated a high priority for segregation of the infectious wastes. It can be deduced from the data obtained that infectious waste ranged from 67.6% to 76.7% with an average of 70.1% by weight, and 36.0% to 46.1% with an average of 40.1% by volume. Non-infectious waste generated ranged from 23.3% to 32.5% with an average of 29.9% by weight and 53.9% to 64.0% with an average of 59.9% by volume. Out of non-infectious waste (NIFW) and infectious waste (IFW), 66.3% and 62.4% by weight were combustible and 33.7% and 37.6% were non-combustible respectively. An assessment of the treatment revealed that open pit burning and burial and small scale incineration were the common methods of disposal for immunization waste, and some immunization centres employed the services of the state or local government owned solid waste disposal board for final collection and disposal of their immunization waste at government approved sites.

  11. Hospital workers' awareness of health and environmental impacts of poor clinical waste disposal in the Northwest Region of Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochungong, Peter I K; Gulis, Gabriel; Sodemann, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Due to the infectious nature of some clinical waste, poor disposal practices have sparked concern regarding the impact on public health and the environment. Lack of sufficient knowledge of the associated risks may be a strong factor contributing to inadequate disposal practices. We conducted a survey to evaluate hospital workers' awareness of health and environmental impacts of poor clinical waste disposal in Cameroon. We randomly distributed 500 questionnaires to hospital workers in three hospitals in the Northwest Region of Cameroon in April 2008. In addition, we observed collection, segregation, transportation, and disposal of clinical waste at the three hospitals. Of 475 total respondents, most lacked sufficient awareness of any environmental or public health impacts of poor clinical waste disposal and had never heard of any policy--national or international--on safe clinical waste management. Methods of collecting, segregating, transporting and disposing clinical waste at the three hospitals was poor. The development of a comprehensive policy on efficient clinical waste management in Cameroon is imperative.

  12. The history and evolution of optically accessible research engines and their impact on our understanding of engine combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, Paul C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The development and application of optically accessible engines to further our understanding of in-cylinder combustion processes is reviewed, spanning early efforts in simplified engines to the more recent development of high-pressure, high-speed engines that retain the geometric complexities of modern production engines. Limitations of these engines with respect to the reproduction of realistic metal test engine characteristics and performance are identified, as well as methods that have been used to overcome these limitations. Finally, the role of the work performed in these engines on clarifying the fundamental physical processes governing the combustion process and on laying the foundation for predictive engine simulation is summarized.

  13. Impacts and implementation of fuel moisture release and radiation properties in modelling of pulverized fuel combustion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen

    2015-01-01

    to add the free moisture into the primary air stream while lump the moisture retained in the feed after the mills with volatiles in PF combustion modelling. For gas and particle radiation in PF boilers, it is found that particle radiation largely overwhelms gas radiation due to high particle loading....... Therefore, cares must be taken in particle radiation, especially particle radiative properties. The refined weighted-sum-of-gray-gases model (WSGGM) and conversion-dependent particle radiative property models presented in the paper are recommended for use in generic CFD modelling of PF combustion....

  14. Cost of organic waste technologies: A case study for New Jersey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gal Hochman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the benefits of converting food waste and manure to biogas and/or fertilizer, while focusing on four available waste treatment technologies: direct combustion, landfilling, composting, and anaerobic digestion. These four alternative technologies were simulated using municipal-level data on food waste and manure in New Jersey. The criteria used to assess the four technologies include technological productivity, economic benefits, and impact on land scarcity. Anaerobic digestion with gas collection has the highest technological productivity; using anaerobic digesters would supply electricity to nearly ten thousand families in New Jersey. In terms of economic benefits, the landfill to gas method is the least costly method of treating waste. In comparison, direct combustion is by far the most costly method of all four waste-to-energy technologies.

  15. Impact of rinsing in pesticide packaging waste management: Economic and environmental benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marčeta Una

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides have become dailiness due to inevitable application of these preparations in agricultural activities, with the consequence of generation of large amounts of waste packaging. Impact on the environment and expenses of management of packaging waste can be minimized if the packaging is immediately rinsed after the application of devices and if identified as non-hazardous. Besides, financial losses may be reduced by maximum utilization of the preparation. Considering these two financial aspects this work shows evaluation of quantitative losses of preparations if the triple rising method is not applied. The research was conducted in two phases. Phase I included the examination of the impact of different formulations of the same volume on quantitative and financial losses. Based on the results of the first phase of the research, it was noted that the SC formulation is the most interesting to study because this type of formulation has the highest percentage of residue, as well as the fact that the highest annual consumption is noted percisely in this preparation group. This paper presents the results which indicate the impact of packaging volume of SC formulation (ALVERDE 240 SC, INTERMEZZO and ANTRE PLUS on percentage of preparation residue in packaging if there was no rinsing. The results have shown that the quantitative loss is inversely proportional to the volume of packaging, while financial losses do not only depend on the percentage of residue but also on price and quantity of utilization of preparations.

  16. Environmental impact assessment of Gonabad municipal waste landfill site using Leopold Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjadi, Seyed Ali; Aliakbari, Zohreh; Matlabi, Mohammad; Biglari, Hamed; Rasouli, Seyedeh Samira

    2017-01-01

    Introduction An environmental impact assessment (EIA) before embarking on any project is a useful tool to reduce the potential effects of each project, including landfill, if possible. The main objective of this study was to assess the environmental impact of the current municipal solid waste disposal site of Gonabad by using the Iranian Leopold matrix method. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the environmental impacts of a landfill site in Gonabad in 2015 by an Iranian matrix (modified Leopold matrix). This study was conducted based on field visits of the landfill, and collected information from various sources and analyzing and comparing between five available options, including the continuation of the current disposal practices, construction of new sanitary landfills, recycling plans, composting, and incineration plants was examined. The best option was proposed to replace the existing landfill. Results The current approach has a score of 2.35, the construction of new sanitary landfill has a score of 1.59, a score of 1.57 for the compost plant, and recycling and incineration plant, respectively, have scores of 1.68 and 2.3. Conclusion Results showed that continuation of the current method of disposal, due to severe environmental damage and health problems, is rejected. A compost plant with the lowest negative score is the best option for the waste disposal site of Gonabad City and has priority over the other four options. PMID:28465797

  17. Life Cycle Assessment of landfill biogas management: sensitivity to diffuse and combustion air emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beylot, Antoine; Villeneuve, Jacques; Bellenfant, Gaël

    2013-02-01

    GOAL AND SCOPE: The life cycle inventory of landfill emissions is a key point in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of waste management options and is highly subject to discussion. Result sensitivity to data inventory is accounted for through the implementation of scenarios that help examine how waste landfilling should be modeled in LCA. Four landfill biogas management options are environmentally evaluated in a Life Cycle Assessment perspective: (1) no biogas management (open dump), conventional landfill with (2) flaring, (3) combined heat and power (CHP) production in an internal combustion engine and (4) biogas upgrading for use as a fuel in buses. Average, maximum and minimum literature values are considered both for combustion emission factors in flares and engines and for trace pollutant concentrations in biogas. Biogas upgrading for use as a fuel in buses appears as the most relevant option with respect to most non-toxic impact categories and ecotoxicity, when considering average values for trace gas concentrations and combustion emission factors. Biogas combustion in an engine for CHP production shows the best performances in terms of climate change, but generates significantly higher photochemical oxidant formation and marine eutrophication impact potentials than flaring or biogas upgrading for use as a fuel in buses. However the calculated environmental impact potentials of landfill biogas management options depend largely on the trace gas concentrations implemented in the model. The use of average or extreme values reported in the literature significantly modifies the impact potential of a given scenario (up to two orders of magnitude for open dumps with respect to human toxicity). This should be taken into account when comparing landfilling with other waste management options. Also, the actual performances of a landfill top cover (in terms of oxidation rates) and combustion technology (in terms of emission factors) appear as key parameters affecting the

  18. MANAGEMENT OF SOLID WASTE GENERATED BY THE INTEGRATED STEELWORKS ACTIVITY AND SOLUTIONS TO REDUCE THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anişoara CIOCAN

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of steel industry is subject to solve major problems arising from industry-nature relationship, strictly targeted on pollution control and protection of natural resources and energy. In this paper we discussed about the management of solid waste generated by an integrated steelwork located near a major urban area and the adopted solutions for the reduction of environmental impact. There are summarized technical solutions that are currently applied and were proposed some solutions that can be applied in accordance with the environmental legislations. The new solutions are proposed for integrated management of solid wastes in accordance with: the exact quantification (quantitative, qualitative and the generation sources of emissions and solid wastes; controlled storage; minimization of the wastes and its harmfulness; transformation of the wastes into valuable by-products used directly by the company in a subsequent process, or by external down-stream user.

  19. Combustion Power Unit--400: CPU-400.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combustion Power Co., Palo Alto, CA.

    Aerospace technology may have led to a unique basic unit for processing solid wastes and controlling pollution. The Combustion Power Unit--400 (CPU-400) is designed as a turboelectric generator plant that will use municipal solid wastes as fuel. The baseline configuration is a modular unit that is designed to utilize 400 tons of refuse per day…

  20. Application of coal combustion residues to the stabilization/solidification of industrial wastes (IRIS); Desarrollo de un Proceso, a Escala Piloto de Inertizacion de Residuos Industriales con Cenizas Volantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    Stabilization/solidification (S/S) processes, also called inertization processes, are a group of techniques which employ additives to reduce the mobility of the hazardous components from the waste and make possible for the residue to be accepted for its disposal in a safe way. These processes, mainly applied to wastes that contain heavy metals (such as lead, zinc, cadminum, mercury, copper, nickel, titanium, chromium-III, chromium-VI, arsenic,....) change the waste into a solid-like material in which the metals are trapped (nets and matrix) by physical or chemical links. The IRIS Project, carried out by AICIA through the ECSC Coal Programme with the participation of two industrial partners (Sevillana de Electricidad and EGMASA, a public-owned company for waste treatment), has developed, at pilot scale, a new S/S process for inorganic industrial wastes that uses great quantities of fly ash in the place of other more commonly used and expansive reagents. A pilot plant for 200 kg/h has been designed, built and operated. This facility has allowed to add improvements and scientific foundations to existing S/S technology. It has also allowed to obtain industrial scale parameters for fixed and portable plants. Experiencie have been mainly carried out using fly ash from high quality coals, but types of ash have been tested coming from coals with a greater calcium content, from fluidised bed combustion boilers and from desulphurisation processes, giving very suitable characteristics for their application to S/S processes. The addition of fly ash (up to 30%) in the IRIS process improves the results in comparison with the S/S processes that use only cement, because the final pH obtained (8-11) does not allow amphoteric metallic ions to escape in the leachate. The same as other S/S processes, IRIS can be applied also to wastes that contain certain metals (chromium-VI, arsenic, for example) with specific pre-treatments (redox, for example). The efficiency of the IRIS treatment

  1. Impact of Waste Materials and Organic Amendments on Soil Properties and Vegetative Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L. McGeehan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Waste materials, and materials derived from wastes, possess many characteristics that can improve soil fertility and enhance crop performance. These materials can be particularly useful as amendments to severely degraded soils associated with mining activities. This study evaluated biosolids, composts, log yard wastes, and two organic soil treatments for improved soil fertility and vegetative performance using side-by-side comparisons. Each plot was seeded with a standardized seed mix and evaluated for a series of soil chemical and physical parameters, total vegetation response, species diversity, ecological plant response, and invasion indices. All treatments were successful at improving soil fertility and promoting a self-sustaining vegetative cover. The level of available nitrogen had a strong impact on vegetative coverage, species distribution, and extent of unseeded vegetation. For example, high nitrogen treatments promoted a grass-dominated (low forb plant community with a low content of unseeded vegetation. In contrast, low nitrogen treatments promoted a more balanced plant community with a mixture of grass and forb species and greater susceptibility to unseeded vegetation establishment.

  2. Hazardous waste management system design under population and environmental impact considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ozge; Kara, Bahar Y; Yetis, Ulku

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a multi objective mixed integer location/routing model that aims to minimize transportation cost and risks for large-scale hazardous waste management systems (HWMSs). Risks induced by hazardous wastes (HWs) on both public and the environment are addressed. For this purpose, a new environmental impact definition is proposed that considers the environmentally vulnerable elements including water bodies, agricultural areas, coastal regions and forestlands located within a certain bandwidth around transportation routes. The solution procedure yields to Pareto optimal curve for two conflicting objectives. The conceptual model developed prior to mathematical formulation addresses waste-to-technology compatibility and HW processing residues to assure applicability of the model to real-life HWMSs. The suggested model was used in a case study targeting HWMS in Turkey. Based on the proposed solution, it was possible to identify not only the transportation routes but also a set of information on HW handling facilities including the types, locations, capacities, and investment/operational cost. The HWMS of this study can be utilized both by public authorities and private sector investors for planning purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nitrogen amendment of green waste impacts microbial community, enzyme secretion and potential for lignocellulose decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Chaowei; Harrold, Duff R.; Claypool, Joshua T.; Simmons, Blake A.; Singer, Steven W.; Simmons, Christopher W.; VanderGheynst, Jean S.

    2017-01-01

    Microorganisms involved in biomass deconstruction are an important resource for organic waste recycling and enzymes for lignocellulose bioconversion. The goals of this paper were to examine the impact of nitrogen amendment on microbial community restructuring, secretion of xylanases and endoglucanases, and potential for biomass deconstruction. Communities were cultivated aerobically at 55 °C on green waste (GW) amended with varying levels of NH4Cl. Bacterial and fungal communities were determined using 16S rRNA and ITS region gene sequencing and PICRUSt (Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States) was applied to predict relative abundance of genes involved in lignocellulose hydrolysis. Nitrogen amendment significantly increased secretion of xylanases and endoglucanases, and microbial activity; enzyme activities and cumulative respiration were greatest when nitrogen level in GW was between 4.13–4.56 wt% (g/g), but decreased with higher nitrogen levels. The microbial community shifted to one with increasing potential to decompose complex polymers as nitrogen increased with peak potential occurring between 3.79–4.45 wt% (g/g) nitrogen amendment. Finally, the results will aid in informing the management of nitrogen level to foster microbial communities capable of secreting enzymes that hydrolyze recalcitrant polymers in lignocellulose and yield rapid decomposition of green waste.

  4. Final Environmental Impact Statement for Treating Transuranic (TRU)/Alpha Low-level Waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2000-06-30

    The DOE proposes to construct, operate, and decontaminate/decommission a TRU Waste Treatment Facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The four waste types that would be treated at the proposed facility would be remote-handled TRU mixed waste sludge, liquid low-level waste associated with the sludge, contact-handled TRU/alpha low-level waste solids, and remote-handled TRU/alpha low-level waste solids. The mixed waste sludge and some of the solid waste contain metals regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and may be classified as mixed waste. This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated with five alternatives--No Action, the Low-Temperature Drying Alternative (Preferred Alternative), the Vitrification Alternative, the Cementation Alternative, and the Treatment and Waste Storage at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Alternative.

  5. 75 FR 3902 - Notice of Public Hearings on the Draft Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    ... of Public Hearings on the Draft Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for... Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (DOE/EIS-0391) (Draft TC... National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). A Notice of Availability of the Draft EIS was published on...

  6. Chemical waste risk reduction and environmental impact generated by laboratory activities in research and teaching institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth de Souza Nascimento

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The environmental impact caused by teaching and research with regard to chemical waste is of increasing concern, and attempts to solve the issue are being made. Education and research-related institutions, in most laboratory and non-laboratory activities, contribute to the generation of small quantities of waste, many of them highly toxic. Of this waste, some is listed by government agencies who are concerned about environmental pollution: disposal of acids, metals, solvents, chemicals and toxicity of selected products of synthesis, whose toxicity is often unknown. This article presents an assessment of the problem and identifies possible solutions, indicating pertinent laws, directives and guidelines; examples of institutions that have implemented protocols in order to minimize the generation of waste; harmonization of procedures for waste management and waste minimization procedures such as reduction, reuse and recycling of chemicals.O impacto ambiental acarretado por atividades de pesquisa e ensino no que se refere aos resíduos químicos vem sendo cada vez mais discutido e tentativas de solucionar a questão vêm sendo apresentadas. As instituições de ensino e pesquisa, em quase todas as atividades e não somente as laboratoriais, contribuem para a geração de pequenas quantidades de resíduos, muitos deles altamente tóxicos. Destes, alguns constam em listas de agências governamentais que se preocupam com a qualidade do meio ambiente: descartes de ácidos, metais, solventes, agentes químicos de elevada toxicidade e ainda os produtos de síntese, cuja toxicidade é frequentemente desconhecida. Este artigo apresenta uma avaliação do problema identificando possíveis soluções, a partir da apresentação de legislações pertinentes, exemplos de instituições que vêm implantando protocolos que minimizam a geração de resíduos, sistemas de harmonização de processos de gerenciamento de resíduos e procedimentos de minimização de

  7. Influence of construction and demolition waste management on the environmental impact of buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, André; de Brito, Jorge

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify comparable environmental impacts within a Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) perspective, for buildings in which the first (Materials) and last (End of Life) life cycle stages are adjusted to several waste/material management options. Unlike most LCAs, the approach is "top-down" rather than "bottom-up", which usually involves large amounts of data and the use of specific software applications. This approach is considered appropriate for a limited but expedient LCA designed to compare the environmental impacts of different life cycle options. Present results, based on real buildings measurements and demolition contractor activities, show that shallow, superficial, selective demolition may not result in reduced environmental impacts. Calculations actually show an increase (generally less than 5%) in most impact categories for the Materials and End of Life stages because of extra transportation needs. However, core material separation in demolition operations and its recycling and/or reuse does bring environmental benefits. A reduction of around 77% has been estimated in the climate change impact category, 57% in acidification potential and 81% in the summer smog impact (for the life cycle stages referred). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Burnout model of a grate-firing waste incinerator for complete simulation of the combustion space; Abbrandmodell einer Muellrostfeuerung fuer eine vollstaendige Feuerraumsimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruell, F.; Kremer, H.; Wirtz, S. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl Energieanlagentechnik

    1998-09-01

    In the past few decades, grate firing has become an established technology for incineration of residual waste and other materials of the domestic waste type. Process control is difficult because of the heterogeneous nature of the waste which is also subject to seasonal and regional variations. In addition, the waste composition may change significantly as a result of recycling as required by new laws. (orig.) [Deutsch] In den letzten Jahrzehnten hat sich die Rostfeuerung fuer die thermische Entsorgung von Restmuell und hausmuellaehnlichem Gewerbemuell bewaehrt. Die Prozessfuehrung bzw. die Feuerfuehrung solcher Anlagen wird insbesondere durch die starke Heterogenitaet des Muells erschwert, der zusaetzlich jahreszeitlichen und regionalen Schwankungen unterliegt. Zudem kann es in der Zusammensetzung der einzelnen Abfallarten durch die Entnahme von Wertstoffen infolge der Umsetzung von gesetzlichen Vorschriften und Gesetzen - wie Abfallgesetz und Kreislaufwirtschaftsgesetz - zu signifikanten Verschiebungen kommen. (orig.)

  9. Environmental assessment, finding of no significant impact, and response to comments. Radioactive waste storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (the Site), formerly known as the Rocky Flats Plant, has generated radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste (waste with both radioactive and hazardous constituents) since it began operations in 1952. Such wastes were the byproducts of the Site`s original mission to produce nuclear weapons components. Since 1989, when weapons component production ceased, waste has been generated as a result of the Site`s new mission of environmental restoration and deactivation, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of buildings. It is anticipated that the existing onsite waste storage capacity, which meets the criteria for low-level waste (LL), low-level mixed waste (LLM), transuranic (TRU) waste, and TRU mixed waste (TRUM) would be completely filled in early 1997. At that time, either waste generating activities must cease, waste must be shipped offsite, or new waste storage capacity must be developed.

  10. Nuclear wastes. The spent fuel using as false problem; Alquimica de los Residuos Nucleares: de pecado a virtud. El combustible usado como falso problema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Gomez, A.

    2006-07-01

    Firstly this article presents the energy potential and advantages of nuclear waste in comparison with other types of energy residues. As a consequences the existing denomination of residue or waste applied to the uranium used in nuclear power plants is discussed. This semantic issue is relevant when analysing present opposition to nuclear energy and also favours the arguments against its viability posed by antinuclear groups. (Author)

  11. Reduced-portion entr?es in a worksite and restaurant setting: impact on food consumption and waste

    OpenAIRE

    Berkowitz, Sarah; Marquart, Len; Mykerezi, Elton; Degeneffe, Dennis; Reicks, Marla

    2016-01-01

    Objective Large portion sizes in restaurants have been identified as a public health risk. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether customers in two different food-service operator segments (non-commercial worksite cafeteria and commercial upscale restaurant) would select reduced-portion menu items and the impact of selecting reduced-portion menu items on energy and nutrient intakes and plate waste. Design Consumption and plate waste data were collected for 5 weeks before and...

  12. Dosimetric impact of an accident in a laboratory treating irradiated fuels. Analysis of the doses sensitivity to the fuel characteristics; Impact dosimetrique d'un accident dans un laboratoire traitant des combustibles irradies. Analyse de la sensibilite des doses aux caracteristiques du combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermuse, M

    1998-07-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the sensitivity of dosimetric impact of a dimensioning accident to the characteristics (combustion rate, cooling time, enrichment) of spent fuels treated in the facility. The study has to allow to define the most penalizing characteristics of the fuel in regard of dosimetric consequences during a dimensioning accident and to display the most preponderant radionuclides for the considered ways of attack. (N.C.)

  13. Emissions from waste combustion. An application of statistical experimental design in a laboratory-scale boiler and an investigation from large-scale incineration plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xiaojing

    1997-05-01

    The aim of this thesis is a study of the emissions from the combustion of household refuse. The experiments were both on a laboratory-scale boiler and on full-scale incineration plants. In the laboratory, an artificial household refuse with known composition was fed into a pilot boiler with a stationary grate. Combustion was under non-optimum conditions. Direct sampling with a Tenax adsorbent was used to measure a range of VOCs. Measurements were also made of incompletely burnt hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, oxygen and flue gas temperature. Combustion and emission parameters were recorded continuously by a multi-point data logger. VOCs were analysed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The full-scale tests were on seven Swedish incineration plants. The data were used to evaluate the emissions from large-scale incineration plants with various type of fuels and incinerators, and were also compared with the laboratory results. The response surface model developed from the laboratory experiments was also validated. This thesis also includes studies on the gasification of household refuse pellets, estimations of particulate and soot emissions, and a thermodynamic analysis of PAHs from combustion flue gas. For pellet gasification, experiments were performed on single, well characterised refuse pellets under carefully controlled conditions. The aim was to see if the effects of pellets were different from those of untreated household refuse. The results from both laboratory and full-scale tests showed that the main contributions to emissions from household refuse are plastics and moisture. 142 refs, 82 figs, 51 tabs

  14. Environmental impacts of residual Municipal Solid Waste incineration: A comparison of 110 French incinerators using a life cycle approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beylot, Antoine, E-mail: a.beylot@brgm.fr; Villeneuve, Jacques

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • 110 French incinerators are compared with LCA based on plant-specific data. • Environmental impacts vary as a function of plants energy recovery and NO{sub x} emissions. • E.g. climate change impact ranges from −58 to 408 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/tonne of residual MSW. • Implications for LCA of waste management in a decision-making process are detailed. - Abstract: Incineration is the main option for residual Municipal Solid Waste treatment in France. This study compares the environmental performances of 110 French incinerators (i.e. 85% of the total number of plants currently in activity in France) in a Life Cycle Assessment perspective, considering 5 non-toxic impact categories: climate change, photochemical oxidant formation, particulate matter formation, terrestrial acidification and marine eutrophication. Mean, median and lower/upper impact potentials are determined considering the incineration of 1 tonne of French residual Municipal Solid Waste. The results highlight the relatively large variability of the impact potentials as a function of the plant technical performances. In particular, the climate change impact potential of the incineration of 1 tonne of waste ranges from a benefit of −58 kg CO{sub 2}-eq to a relatively large burden of 408 kg CO{sub 2}-eq, with 294 kg CO{sub 2}-eq as the average impact. Two main plant-specific parameters drive the impact potentials regarding the 5 non-toxic impact categories under study: the energy recovery and delivery rate and the NO{sub x} process-specific emissions. The variability of the impact potentials as a function of incinerator characteristics therefore calls for the use of site-specific data when required by the LCA goal and scope definition phase, in particular when the study focuses on a specific incinerator or on a local waste management plan, and when these data are available.

  15. Bubble Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Jackie

    2004-01-01

    A method of energy production that is capable of low pollutant emissions is fundamental to one of the four pillars of NASA s Aeronautics Blueprint: Revolutionary Vehicles. Bubble combustion, a new engine technology currently being developed at Glenn Research Center promises to provide low emissions combustion in support of NASA s vision under the Emissions Element because it generates power, while minimizing the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx), both known to be Greenhouse gases. and allows the use of alternative fuels such as corn oil, low-grade fuels, and even used motor oil. Bubble combustion is analogous to the inverse of spray combustion: the difference between bubble and spray combustion is that spray combustion is spraying a liquid in to a gas to form droplets, whereas bubble combustion involves injecting a gas into a liquid to form gaseous bubbles. In bubble combustion, the process for the ignition of the bubbles takes place on a time scale of less than a nanosecond and begins with acoustic waves perturbing each bubble. This perturbation causes the local pressure to drop below the vapor pressure of the liquid thus producing cavitation in which the bubble diameter grows, and upon reversal of the oscillating pressure field, the bubble then collapses rapidly with the aid of the high surface tension forces acting on the wall of the bubble. The rapid and violent collapse causes the temperatures inside the bubbles to soar as a result of adiabatic heating. As the temperatures rise, the gaseous contents of the bubble ignite with the bubble itself serving as its own combustion chamber. After ignition, this is the time in the bubble s life cycle where power is generated, and CO2, and NOx among other species, are produced. However, the pollutants CO2 and NOx are absorbed into the surrounding liquid. The importance of bubble combustion is that it generates power using a simple and compact device. We conducted a parametric study using CAVCHEM

  16. Biofuels combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Charles K

    2013-01-01

    This review describes major features of current research in renewable fuels derived from plants and from fatty acids. Recent and ongoing fundamental studies of biofuel molecular structure, oxidation reactions, and biofuel chemical properties are reviewed, in addition to combustion applications of biofuels in the major types of engines in which biofuels are used. Biofuels and their combustion are compared with combustion features of conventional petroleum-based fuels. Two main classes of biofuels are described, those consisting of small, primarily alcohol, fuels (particularly ethanol, n-butanol, and iso-pentanol) that are used primarily to replace or supplement gasoline and those derived from fatty acids and used primarily to replace or supplement conventional diesel fuels. Research efforts on so-called second- and third-generation biofuels are discussed briefly.

  17. Circulating atmospheric fluidized bed combustion in the management concept for residual wastes of industrial plants: operating experience and projects; Die zirkulierende atmosphaerische Wirbelschichtfeuerung im Reststoffentsorgungskonzept von Industriebetrieben: Betriebserfahrungen und Planungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gungl, E. [Austrian Energy and Environment SGP/Waagner-Biro GmbH, Graz (Austria); Bobik, M. [Austrian Energy and Environment SGP/Waagner-Biro GmbH, Graz (Austria)

    1992-12-31

    In the future, the central range of application of fluidized bed combustion systems may be - to an ever increasing extent - their use as a component within a waste management concept. In Austria, it has been mainly the paper and pulp industry which has tried to overcome the problem of increasingly scarce and more and more expensive dumping sites by the early use of this technology. Like today, the following questions of a producing company had been of decisive importance then: - (production blackouts), - cost of the energy production (combustibles, ash dumping grounds, systems for the protection of the environment by law etc.) - connections within an overall energy concept (base-load boiler, controllability, load change speeds etc.). For the calculation of the economy of the systems more and more internal facts (elimination of residuals) and regional requirements (available volume of dumping sites, and the restrictions imposed by the public authorities) are to be considered in addition to the prices of the combustibles oil, natural gas and coal. By means of the experience made with the plants built up to now, we will illustrate the planning concept specific to the combustion of sewage sludge, concerning the following points: - Self-subsistance of the combustion process, - corrosion, - erosion (cyclone), - fouling (superheater, combustion chamber walls). - dust precipitation, - emissions, - utilization and depositing of ashes. Finally, the examples of - slag disposal of a bituminous coal-fired big power plant and - the combustion of residuals from the production of chip-boards are two further possibilites for the use of the fluidized bed technology. (orig./GL) [Deutsch] Als zentrales Einsatzgebiet von Wirbelschichtfeuerungen duerfte in Zukunft wieder staerker deren Eignung als Baustein in einem Entsorgungskonzept hervortreten. In Oesterreich war dies aus verschiedenen Gruenden bereits bisher der Fall: Vor allem die Papier- und Zellstoffindustrie versuchte

  18. Combustion of hazardous biological waste derived from the fermentation of antibiotics using TG-FTIR and Py-GC/MS techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shijun; Zhu, Xiangdong; Wang, Junsheng; Jin, Xing; Liu, Yuchen; Qian, Feng; Zhang, Shicheng; Chen, Jianmin

    2015-10-01

    The combustion characteristics for three kinds of antibiotics residue (AR) materials were investigated by TG-FTIR and Py-GC/MS technique. The TG results indicated that AR combustion involved three stages, and correlation between the H/C atomic ratio of the raw materials and peak temperature of weight loss for the second stage was obtained. The FTIR spectra identified evolving gaseous products as CO2, CH4, HCNO, NH3, HCN, and NO. An AR material with a low H/C ratio promoted the formation of CO2 and HCN, but suppressed the yields of NH3 and CH4. The Py-GC/MS results suggested that abundant volatiles can be produced, including alkenes, benzene, phenols, furans, acid, and heterocyclic-N, nitrile-N and amine-N compounds, and confirmed the FTIR absorption characteristics in the low temperature range. A possible pathway for the AR combustion was also tentatively presented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of an educational program on knowledge and practice of health care staff toward pharmaceutical waste management in Gaza, Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabash, Mohammed I; Hussein, Rim A; Mahmoud, Aleya H; El-Borgy, Mohamed D; Abu-Hamad, Bassam A

    2016-04-01

    In health care facilities, pharmaceutical waste is generally discharged down the drain or sent to landfill. Poor knowledge about their potential downstream impacts may be a primary factor for improper disposal behavior. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of an intervention program on knowledge and practice of health care staff regarding pharmaceutical waste management. The study was designed as a pre/posttest intervention study. Total sample size was 530 in the pre-intervention phase, and then a subsample of 69 individuals was selected for the intervention and the post-intervention phases. Paired-sample t test was used to assess the difference between pretest and follow-up test results. A statistically significant improvement in knowledge and practice was achieved (Ppharmaceutical waste management. In health care facilities, pharmaceutical waste is generally discharged down the drain or sent to landfill. A lack of knowledge about the potential impacts of this type of waste may be a leading factor in improper disposal behavior. Following an educational program, statistically significant improvement in knowledge and practice of health care staff as regards to pharmaceutical waste management (PWM) was achieved. It is thus recommended that authorities implement training-of-trainers (TOT) programs to educate health care staff on PWM and organize refreshment workshops regularly.

  20. Solid waste for health: environmental impact health and feedback in case-disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Ferraz dos Anjos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the reality of the city of Vitoria da Conquista, with regard to the handling and final provisions of solid waste, health, it becomes imperative to raise so reflective, environmental impact and harm to health caused by them. This aims to describe research on the environmental impacts generated by Solid Wastes of Health (RSS and its implicativos in the health-disease; reflect on the ethical point of view focusing on professional negligence on the part of these, identifying the responsibilities of each involved in context; propose suggestions for improvements to creation of specific areas and handling appropriate to their final destination, to promote a balance of the environment and a healthy life. Through bibliographic methods, descriptive and exploratory with empirical basis, it was emphasized the conduct of that employed the landfill council, whose information based on photographic images of the site, showing thus the breach of the rules of the National Environmental Council ( CONAMA, the resolution 5 / 93 establishing standards of environmental quality in ralação to RSS1. Among other bodies engaged in monitoring the performance of health standards, is also SURVEILLANCE OF DIRECTORS AND CONTROL HEALTH, ENVIRONMENT (DIVISAM 2. The situation, if not circumvented quickly, tends to increase the rates of infections caused by such waste and degradation of the environment due to the exorbitant amount of them, that the landfill receives daily from various establishments of health. To this apparatus pejorativo, perceives itself as a city seen as a model in health, and this concept is linked directly with the environment, once you see an unconnected with reality and nature, and this source and stage of human life and well divides his words as a form of protest or a coincidence "Natu Reza"

  1. Investigating co-combustion characteristics of bamboo and wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Fang; Wang, Ruijuan; Jiang, Changle; Yang, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Tao; Hu, Wanhe; Mi, Bingbing; Liu, Zhijia

    2017-11-01

    To investigate co-combustion characteristics of bamboo and wood, moso bamboo and masson pine were torrefied and mixed with different blend ratios. The combustion process was examined by thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The results showed the combustion process of samples included volatile emission and oxidation combustion as well as char combustion. The main mass loss of biomass blends occurred at volatile emission and oxidation combustion stage, while that of torrefied biomass occurred at char combustion stage. With the increase of bamboo content, characteristic temperatures decreased. Compared with untreated biomass, torrefied biomass had a higher initial and burnout temperature. With the increase of heating rates, combustion process of samples shifted to higher temperatures. Compared with non-isothermal models, activation energy obtained from isothermal model was lower. The result is helpful to promote development of co-combustion of bamboo and masson pine wastes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Preliminary assessment of the aquatic impacts of a proposed defense waste processing facility at the Savannah River Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A review of the literature indicates that a significant body of descriptive information exists concerning the aquatic ecology of Upper Three Runs Creek and Four Mile Creek of the Savannah River Plant south of Aiken, South Carolina. This information is adequate for preparation of an environmental document evaluating these streams. These streams will be impacted by construction and operation of a proposed Defense Waste Processing Facility for solidification of high level defense waste. Potential impacts include (1) construction runoff, erosion, and siltation, (2) effluents from a chemical and industrial waste treatment facility, and (3) radionuclide releases. In order to better evaluate potential impacts, recommend mitigation methods, and comply with NEPA requirements, additional quantitative biological information should be obtained through implementation of an aquatic baseline program.

  3. Numerical prediction of the chemical composition of gas products at biomass combustion and co-combustion in a domestic boiler

    OpenAIRE

    Radomiak Henryk; Bala-Litwiniak Agnieszka; Zajemska Monika; Musiał Dorota

    2017-01-01

    In recent years the numerical modelling of biomass combustion has been successfully applied to determine the combustion mechanism and predict its products. In this study the influence of the addition of waste glycerin in biomass wood pellets on the chemical composition of exhaust gases has been investigated. The pellets have been prepared from spruceand pine wood sawdust without and with addition of waste glycerin. The waste glycerol is a undesirable by-product of biodiesel transesterificatio...

  4. Combining mechanical-biological residual waste treatment plants with the carbonisation-combustion process; Kombination MBA mit dem Schwel-Brenn-Verfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diekmann, J.; Wiehn, G. [Siemens AG Unternehmensbereich KWU, Erlangen (Germany). Bereich Energieerzeugung

    1998-09-01

    The disposal market for household waste is strongly influenced by the legal framework governing it. A further factor that makes it difficult for the authorities responsible for disposal to decide on residual waste disposal by means of thermal or mechanical-biological treatment plants is the downward pressure on disposal prices from inexpensive, underused landfills. This makes it all the more important for a future-oriented waste management to develop a both economically and ecologically optimised waste disposal concept. In this situation there is much in favour of adopting a concept consisting of a combination of mechanical, mechanical-biological, and thermal treatment which takes due account of waste disposal concepts at the regional and supraregional scale. [Deutsch] Der Entsorgungsmarkt fuer Siedlungsabfaelle wird stark durch die Entwicklung der rechtlichen Rahmenbedingungen beeinflusst. Hinzu kommt, dass der Entscheidungsprozess der oeffentlichen Entsorgungstraeger zur Restabfallentsorgung mittels thermischer oder mechanisch-biologischer Anlagen durch den Druck auf die Entsorgungspreise aufgrund der kostenguenstigen, nicht ausgelasteten Deponien erschwert wird. Umso mehr muss das Ziel einer zukunftsorientierten Abfallwirtschaft sein, unter oekonomischen und oekologischen Gesichtspunkten ein optimiertes Abfallkonzept aufzubauen. Hier kann es sehr hilfreich sein, sich eines Konzeptes, bestehend aus der Kombination von mechanischer, mechanisch-biologischer und thermischer Behandlung unter Beruecksichtigung des regionalen und ueberregionalen Abfallkonzeptes zu bedienen. (orig./SR)

  5. A review and framework for understanding the potential impact of poor solid waste management on health in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziraba, Abdhalah K; Haregu, Tilahun Nigatu; Mberu, Blessing

    2016-01-01

    The increase in solid waste generated per capita in Africa has not been accompanied by a commensurate growth in the capacity and funding to manage it. It is reported that less than 30% of urban waste in developing countries is collected and disposed appropriately. The implications of poorly managed waste on health are numerous and depend on the nature of the waste, individuals exposed, duration of exposure and availability of interventions for those exposed. To present a framework for understanding the linkages between poor solid waste management, exposure and associated adverse health outcomes. The framework will aid understanding of the relationships, interlinkages and identification of the potential points for intervention. Development of the framework was informed by a review of literature on solid waste management policies, practices and its impact on health in developing countries. A configurative synthesis of literature was applied to develop the framework. Several iterations of the framework were reviewed by experts in the field. Each linkage and outcomes are described in detail as outputs of this study. The resulting framework identifies groups of people at a heightened risk of exposure and the potential health consequences. Using the iceberg metaphor, the framework illustrates the pathways and potential burden of ill-health related to solid waste that is hidden but rapidly unfolding with our inaction. The existing evidence on the linkage between poor solid waste management and adverse health outcomes calls to action by all stakeholders in understanding, prioritizing, and addressing the issue of solid waste in our midst to ensure that our environment and health are preserved. A resulting framework developed in this study presents a clearer picture of the linkages between poor solid waste management and could guide research, policy and action.

  6. Experimental investigation of wood combustion in a fixed bed with hot air

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markovic, Miladin; Bramer, Eduard A.; Brem, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    Waste combustion on a grate with energy recovery is an important pillar of municipal solid waste (MSW) management in the Netherlands. In MSW incinerators fresh waste stacked on a grate enters the combustion chamber, heats up by radiation from the flame above the layer and ignition occurs. Typically,

  7. Environmental impacts and resource losses of incinerating misplaced household special wastes (WEEE, batteries, ink cartridges and cables)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigum, Marianne Kristine Kjærgaard; Damgaard, Anders; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    to quantify the impact of abiotic resources not recovered from incineration residues. This appeared to be a significant impact category, and the special waste contributed about 96% of this category although it by weight makes up only 0.5% of the waste. Furthermore, enhancing the recovery of iron (Fe......) and aluminum (Al) from the ashes would not affect the loss of abiotic resources significantly. Only by recovering elements as platinum (Pt), copper (Cu), gold (Au), and silver (Ag) would it be possible to reduce the loss of abiotic resources from the system. These elements are primarily found in misplaced...

  8. Evaluating environmental impacts of alternative construction waste management approaches using supply-chain-linked life-cycle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucukvar, Murat; Egilmez, Gokhan; Tatari, Omer

    2014-06-01

    Waste management in construction is critical for the sustainable treatment of building-related construction and demolition (C&D) waste materials, and recycling of these wastes has been considered as one of the best strategies in minimization of C&D debris. However, recycling of C&D materials may not always be a feasible strategy for every waste type and therefore recycling and other waste treatment strategies should be supported by robust decision-making models. With the aim of assessing the net carbon, energy, and water footprints of C&D recycling and other waste management alternatives, a comprehensive economic input-output-based hybrid life-cycle assessment model is developed by tracing all of the economy-wide supply-chain impacts of three waste management strategies: recycling, landfilling, and incineration. Analysis results showed that only the recycling of construction materials provided positive environmental footprint savings in terms of carbon, energy, and water footprints. Incineration is a better option as a secondary strategy after recycling for water and energy footprint categories, whereas landfilling is found to be as slightly better strategy when carbon footprint is considered as the main focus of comparison. In terms of construction materials' environmental footprint, nonferrous metals are found to have a significant environmental footprint reduction potential if recycled. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. The waste management concept of the Wupper administration union as based on the Wuppertal-Buchenhofen sewage sludge combustion plant; Abfallwirtschaftskonzept des Wupperverbandes auf der Basis der Klaerschlammverbrennungsanlage Wuppertal-Buchenhofen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Londong, J.; Rueck, A.

    1996-02-01

    The Wupper administration union takes care of sewage treatment for the towns, communities and industrial members of the entire catchment area of the Wupper. As the disposal of sludge in the long run remains an open issue for many sewage treatment plants, the government in Duesseldorf, under section 5a of the waste management act of North-Rhine-Westphalia (LAbfG), required district governments, towns constituting an administrative district in their own right, and water management unions on 4 June 1992 to set up practicable waste management concepts demonstrating that their sludge disposal will be secure for a period of ten years. The Wupper administration union submitted this plan at the end of 1992, within the period allowed.- In spring 1973, the union had decided to erect a combustion plant ``for the environmentally friendly disposal of sewage treatment sludge, material trapped in screening chambers and sand catchers, and waste oil``.- The plant, as it was planned more than ten years ago, safeguards sludge disposal for the Wupper administration union also in the future. At present, environmental pollution is still caused by the transport of sludge to the plant. In the area of the administration union or the surrounding districts, no thermal sludge processing plants exist that are fit to be included in the Wupper union`s waste management concept in terms of capacity, technology, or licensing standard. If combustion plants are erected in the future in a sufficient number and distribution, it is reasonable to expect a minimization of transport capacities, for instance by means of compensation contracts.- Disposal of the residual products accruing from combustion will be secure once the landfill at the Buchenhofen sewage treatment plant has been enlarged, as planned. Moreover, the Wupper administration union is making efforts to establish the ash as an industrial product in the market. (orig./ABI) [Deutsch] Der Wupperverband betreibt im gesamten Einzugsgebiet der

  10. Waste to energy

    CERN Document Server

    Syngellakis, S

    2014-01-01

    Waste to Energy deals with the very topical subject of converting the calorific content of waste material into useful forms of energy. Topics included cover: Biochemical Processes; Conversions by Thermochemical Processes; Computational Fluid Dynamics Modelling; Combustion; Pyrolysis; Gasification; Biofuels; Management and Policies.

  11. The impact of co-combustion of polyethylene plastics and wood in a small residential boiler on emissions of gaseous pollutants, particulate matter, PAHs and 1,3,5- triphenylbenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsej, Tomas; Horak, Jiri; Tomsejova, Sarka; Krpec, Kamil; Klanova, Jana; Dej, Milan; Hopan, Frantisek

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to simulate a banned but widely spread practice of co-combustion of plastic with wood in a small residential boiler and to quantify its impact on emissions of gaseous pollutants, particulate matter (PM), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene (135TPB), a new tracer of polyethylene plastic combustion. Supermarket polyethylene shopping bags (PE) and polyethylene terephthalate bottles (PET) were burnt as supplementary fuels with beech logs (BL) in an old-type 20 kW over-fire boiler both at a nominal and reduced heat output. An impact of co-combustion was more pronounced at the nominal heat output: an increase in emissions of PM, total organic carbon (TOC), toxic equivalent (TEQ) of 7 carcinogenic PAHs (c-PAHs) and a higher ratio of c-PAHs TEQ in particulate phase was observed during co-combustion of both plastics. 135TPB was found in emissions from both plastics both at a nominal and reduced output. In contrast to findings reported in the literature, 135TPB was a dominant compound detected by mass spectrometry on m/z 306 exclusively in emissions from co-combustion of PE. Surprisingly, six other even more abundant compounds of unknown identity were found on this m/z in emissions from co-combustion of PET. One of these unknown compounds was identified as p-quaterphenyl (pQ). Principal component analysis revealed strong correlation among 135TPB, pQ and five unknown compounds. pQ seems to be suitable tracers of polyethylene terephthalate plastic co-combustion, while 135TPB proved its suitability to be an all-purpose tracer of polyethylene plastics combustion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Combustion and regulation; Combustion et reglementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This conference was organized after the publication of the French by-law no 2010 relative to combustion installations and to the abatement of atmospheric pollution. Five topics were discussed during the conference: the new regulations, their content, innovations and modalities of application; the means of energy suppliers to face the new provisions and their schedule; the manufacturers proposals for existing installations and the new equipments; the administration control; and the impact of the new measures on exploitation and engineering. Twenty papers and 2 journal articles are reported in these proceedings. (J.S.)

  13. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Bbbb of... - Model Rule-Class I Emission Limits for Existing Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units a

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... electrostatic precipitator-based emission control system -or- 3-run average (minimum run duration is 4 hours... an electrostatic precipitator-based emission control system 2. Metals: Cadmium 0.040 milligrams per... solid waste. See § 60.1940 for definitions. b All emission limits (except for opacity) are measured at 7...

  14. MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTION MULTIPOLLUTANT STUDY EMISSION TEST REPORT, MAINE ENERGY RECOVERY COMPANY, RE- FUSE DERIVED FUEL FACILITY, BIDDEFORD, MAINE - VOLUME I: SUMMARY OF RESULTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of an emission test of a new municipal solid waste combustor, in Biddeford, ME, that burns refuse-derived fuel and is equipped with a lime spray dryer fabric filter (SD/FF) emission control system. ontrol efficiency of the SD/FF emission control system wa...

  15. Process-related aspects to the co-combustion of wastes in rotary kilns; Verfahrenstechnische Gesichtspunkte zur Mitverbrennung von Abfaellen in Drehrohroefen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endres, G. [Pillard Feuerungen GmbH, Taunusstein (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    Apart from large quantities of energy, the cement industry also depends for the manufacture of its product on certain raw materials such as limestone, marl, alum earth etc. which are typically produced by open pit mining. As a consequence, cement works in the course of time become surrounded with holes of different depth in the Earth`s surface which are later used for the disposal of household waste. Interestingly, the chemical composition of this household waste is not substantially different from that of the raw materials initially extracted from the Earth for the purpose of cement manufacture. Moreover, in contravention of medium-term trends in legislation on surface landfilling this dumped waste contains chemically bound energy. What could be more obvious, therefore, than to consider using household waste as a raw material and energy source for cement burning? [Deutsch] Die Zementindustrie benoetigt zur Herstellung ihres verkaufsfaehigen Produkts neben grossen Mengen von thermischer Energie insbesondere Rohstoffe wie Kalkstein, Mergel, Tonerde usw., die typischerweise im Tagebau gewonnen werden, es entstehen in der Nachbarschaft von Zementwerken also mehr oder weniger tiefe Loecher in der Erdoberflaeche, die in vielen Faellen bereits wieder zur Deponierung von Siedlungsabfaellen genutzt werden. Diese Siedlungsabfaelle unterscheiden sich in der chemischen Zusammenarbeit ihrer Asche interessanterweise nicht sehr von den Rohstoffen, die fuer die Zementproduktion aus der Erde gegraben werden, desweiteren enthalten sie chemisch gebundene Waermeenergie, was gemaess der mittelfristigen Gesetzeslage einer oberirdischen Deponierung eigentlich entgegensteht. Was liegt also naeher, als ueber eine Nutzung dieser Abfaelle als Rohstoff und Energietraeger im Zementbrennprozess nachzudenken? (orig.)

  16. Characterisation of recycled acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high-impact polystyrene from waste computer equipment in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Denise; Saron, Clodoaldo

    2015-06-01

    Polymeric materials constitute a considerable fraction of waste computer equipment and polymers acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high-impact polystyrene are the main thermoplastic polymeric components found in waste computer equipment. Identification, separation and characterisation of additives present in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high-impact polystyrene are fundamental procedures to mechanical recycling of these polymers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the methods for identification of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high-impact polystyrene from waste computer equipment in Brazil, as well as their potential for mechanical recycling. The imprecise utilisation of symbols for identification of the polymers and the presence of additives containing toxic elements in determinate computer devices are some of the difficulties found for recycling of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high-impact polystyrene from waste computer equipment. However, the considerable performance of mechanical properties of the recycled acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high-impact polystyrene when compared with the virgin materials confirms the potential for mechanical recycling of these polymers. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Recovery of essential nutrients from municipal solid wasteImpact of waste management infrastructure and governance aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabaleta, Imanol, E-mail: imanol.zabaleta@eawag.ch [Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries (Sandec), P.O. Box 611, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Rodic, Ljiljana, E-mail: ljiljana.rodic@gmail.com [Wageningen University, Education and Competence Studies, Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2015-10-15

    Every year 120–140 million tonnes of bio-waste are generated in Europe, most of which is landfilled, incinerated or stabilized and used as covering material in landfill operation. None of these practices enables the recovery of essential nutrients such as phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N), which are in great demand for agricultural production. Recovery of these nutrients is a matter of international concern considering the non-renewable nature of P sources and the energy intensive production process required for the synthesis of N fertilizers. The objective of this research is to understand the relation between the municipal solid waste management (MSWM) system, both its the physical components and governance aspects, and the recovery of nutrients in Vitoria-Gasteiz (Basque Country) as a benchmark for European medium-size cities. The analysis shows that the existing physical infrastructure and facilities for bio-waste have high potential for nutrient recovery, 49% for N and 83% for P contained in bio-waste. However, governance aspects of the MSWM system such as legislation and user inclusivity play an important role and decrease the actual nutrient recovery to 3.4% and 7.4% for N and P respectively.

  18. Recovery of essential nutrients from municipal solid waste--Impact of waste management infrastructure and governance aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabaleta, Imanol; Rodic, Ljiljana

    2015-10-01

    Every year 120-140 million tonnes of bio-waste are generated in Europe, most of which is landfilled, incinerated or stabilized and used as covering material in landfill operation. None of these practices enables the recovery of essential nutrients such as phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N), which are in great demand for agricultural production. Recovery of these nutrients is a matter of international concern considering the non-renewable nature of P sources and the energy intensive production process required for the synthesis of N fertilizers. The objective of this research is to understand the relation between the municipal solid waste management (MSWM) system, both its the physical components and governance aspects, and the recovery of nutrients in Vitoria-Gasteiz (Basque Country) as a benchmark for European medium-size cities. The analysis shows that the existing physical infrastructure and facilities for bio-waste have high potential for nutrient recovery, 49% for N and 83% for P contained in bio-waste. However, governance aspects of the MSWM system such as legislation and user inclusivity play an important role and decrease the actual nutrient recovery to 3.4% and 7.4% for N and P respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of biochar on the anaerobic digestion of citrus peel waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagbohungbe, Michael O; Herbert, Ben M J; Hurst, Lois; Li, Hong; Usmani, Shams Q; Semple, Kirk T

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the impact of different types of biochar and biochar ratios on the anaerobic digestion of citrus peel waste was investigated. Citrus peel has an inhibitory effect on anaerobic digestion. The presence of biochar had two effects: a reduction in the length of the lag phase and greater production of methane relative to citrus peel waste only incubations. The microbial lag phases decreased with increase in citrus peel to biochar ratios, with 2:1 having the longest lag phase of 9.4days and 1:3, the shortest, with the value of 7.5days. The cumulative methane production in incubations containing biochar and citrus peel ranged from 163.9 to 186.8ml CH4 gVS(-1), while citrus peel only produced 165.9ml CH4 gVS(-1). Examination of the biochar material revealed colonies of putative methanogens. The synergy of d-limonene adsorption and microbial immobilization by biochar appears to improve the performance of anaerobic digestion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Hydrogen sulfide generation in simulated construction and demolition debris landfills: impact of waste composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kenton; Xu, Qiyong; Townsend, Timothy G; Chadik, Paul; Bitton, Gabriel; Booth, Matthew

    2006-08-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) generation in construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfills has been associated with the biodegradation of gypsum drywall. Laboratory research was conducted to observe H2S generation when drywall was codisposed with different C&D debris constituents. Two experiments were conducted using simulated landfill columns. Experiment 1 consisted of various combinations of drywall, wood, and concrete to determine the impact of different waste constituents and combinations on H2S generation. Experiment 2 was designed to examine the effect of concrete on H2S generation and migration. The results indicate that decaying drywall, even alone, leached enough sulfate ions and organic matter for sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to generate large H2S concentrations as high as 63,000 ppmv. The codisposed wastes show some effect on H2S generation. At the end of experiment 1, the wood/drywall and drywall alone columns possessed H2S concentrations > 40,000 ppmv. Conversely, H2S concentrations were < 1 ppmv in those columns containing concrete. Concrete plays a role in decreasing H2S by increasing pH out of the range for SRB growth and by reacting with H2S. This study also showed that wood lowered H2S concentrations initially by decreasing leachate pH values. Based on the results, two possible control mechanisms to mitigate H2S generation in C&D debris landfills are suggested.

  1. The impact of silver nanoparticles on the composting of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitipour, Alireza; El Badawy, Amro; Arambewela, Mahendranath; Miller, Bradley; Scheckel, Kirk; Elk, Michael; Ryu, Hodon; Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Santo Domingo, Jorge; Thiel, Stephen; Tolaymat, Thabet

    2013-12-17

    The study evaluates the impact of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coated silver nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs) on the composting of municipal solid waste. The results suggest that there was no statistically significant difference in the leachate, gas, and solid quality parameters and overall composting performance between the treatments containing the AgNPs, Ag(+), and negative control. Nonetheless, taxonomical analyses of 25 Illumina 16S rDNA barcoded libraries containing 2 393 504 sequences indicated that the bacterial communities in composted samples were highly diverse and primarily dominated by Clostridia (48.5%), Bacilli (27.9%), and beta-Proteobacteria (13.4%). Bacterial diversity studies showed that the overall bacterial community structure in the composters changed in response to the Ag-based treatments. However, the data suggest that functional performance was not significantly affected due to potential bacterial functional redundancy within the compost samples. The data also indicate that while the surface transformation of AgNPs to AgCl and Ag2S can reduce the toxicity, complexation with organic matter may also play a major role. The results of this study further suggest that at relatively low concentrations, the organically rich waste management systems' functionality may not be influenced by the presence of AgNPs.

  2. Health impact assessment of waste management facilities in three European countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Policies on waste disposal in Europe are heterogeneous and rapidly changing, with potential health implications that are largely unknown. We conducted a health impact assessment of landfilling and incineration in three European countries: Italy, Slovakia and England. Methods A total of 49 (Italy), 2 (Slovakia), and 11 (England) incinerators were operating in 2001 while for landfills the figures were 619, 121 and 232, respectively. The study population consisted of residents living within 3 km of an incinerator and 2 km of a landfill. Excess risk estimates from epidemiological studies were used, combined with air pollution dispersion modelling for particulate matter (PM10) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). For incinerators, we estimated attributable cancer incidence and years of life lost (YoLL), while for landfills we estimated attributable cases of congenital anomalies and low birth weight infants. Results About 1,000,000, 16,000, and 1,200,000 subjects lived close to incinerators in Italy, Slovakia and England, respectively. The additional contribution to NO2 levels within a 3 km radius was 0.23, 0.15, and 0.14 μg/m3, respectively. Lower values were found for PM10. Assuming that the incinerators continue to operate until 2020, we are moderately confident that the annual number of cancer cases due to exposure in 2001-2020 will reach 11, 0, and 7 in 2020 and then decline to 0 in the three countries in 2050. We are moderately confident that by 2050, the attributable impact on the 2001 cohort of residents will be 3,621 (Italy), 37 (Slovakia) and 3,966 (England) YoLL. The total exposed population to landfills was 1,350,000, 329,000, and 1,425,000 subjects, respectively. We are moderately confident that the annual additional cases of congenital anomalies up to 2030 will be approximately 2, 2, and 3 whereas there will be 42, 13, and 59 additional low-birth weight newborns, respectively. Conclusions The current health impacts of landfilling and incineration can be

  3. Health impact assessment of waste management facilities in three European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preiss Philipp

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Policies on waste disposal in Europe are heterogeneous and rapidly changing, with potential health implications that are largely unknown. We conducted a health impact assessment of landfilling and incineration in three European countries: Italy, Slovakia and England. Methods A total of 49 (Italy, 2 (Slovakia, and 11 (England incinerators were operating in 2001 while for landfills the figures were 619, 121 and 232, respectively. The study population consisted of residents living within 3 km of an incinerator and 2 km of a landfill. Excess risk estimates from epidemiological studies were used, combined with air pollution dispersion modelling for particulate matter (PM10 and nitrogen dioxide (NO2. For incinerators, we estimated attributable cancer incidence and years of life lost (YoLL, while for landfills we estimated attributable cases of congenital anomalies and low birth weight infants. Results About 1,000,000, 16,000, and 1,200,000 subjects lived close to incinerators in Italy, Slovakia and England, respectively. The additional contribution to NO2 levels within a 3 km radius was 0.23, 0.15, and 0.14 μg/m3, respectively. Lower values were found for PM10. Assuming that the incinerators continue to operate until 2020, we are moderately confident that the annual number of cancer cases due to exposure in 2001-2020 will reach 11, 0, and 7 in 2020 and then decline to 0 in the three countries in 2050. We are moderately confident that by 2050, the attributable impact on the 2001 cohort of residents will be 3,621 (Italy, 37 (Slovakia and 3,966 (England YoLL. The total exposed population to landfills was 1,350,000, 329,000, and 1,425,000 subjects, respectively. We are moderately confident that the annual additional cases of congenital anomalies up to 2030 will be approximately 2, 2, and 3 whereas there will be 42, 13, and 59 additional low-birth weight newborns, respectively. Conclusions The current health impacts of landfilling and

  4. Modeling study of impact of water on carbon monoxide, PAH and nitrogen oxide emissions from combustion of surrogate fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsinawi, Abdulaziz H.

    Methods for reducing emissions are required to meet the new and increasingly stringent emission regulations for diesel engines. Water-emulsified fuel is one of the few promising emission reduction techniques with the potential to simultaneously reduce NOX and soot in diesel engines. Even though a better understanding could be obtained by modeling the processes involved, little effort has been directed toward modeling the combustion of water-in-fuel emulsion. This dissertation provides a better understanding of the effects of the presence of water in fuel in the form of emulsion on spray combustion and pollutant emissions, namely NOX, soot, and carbon monoxide by modeling the relevant processes and focusing on the variables behind the emission reduction and performance. The modeling study was performed using the commercially available software package CFD-ACE+ to simulate spray combustion at conditions relevant to diesel engines. Surrogate fuel (80% n-heptane and 20% toluene) was used instead of the conventional diesel fuel because the detailed kinetic and thermodynamic data needed for modeling is available for this surrogate fuel but not available for diesel. An emulsified fuel with 3, 5, 8 and 15% water by volume was used as an engine feed for each separate run and the results are compared with that of the dry surrogate fuel with 0% water. The modeling results are also validated against experimental data for 2-stroke diesel engines available in the literature [1]. The modeling results show that water had a significant effect on reducing engine operating temperature, NOX and the formation of soot precursors. However, the reduction of NOX and soot formation is at the expense of an increase in carbon monoxide (CO) emissions and elongated ignition delay time, which is disadvantageous for the steady running of diesel engines.

  5. The potential impact of municipal solid waste incinerators ashes on the anthropogenic osmium budget

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funari, Valerio, E-mail: valerio.funari@unibo.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Biologiche, Geologiche e Ambientali (BiGeA), University of Bologna, Piazza di Porta San Donato 1, Bologna (Italy); Meisel, Thomas [General and Analytical Chemistry, Montanuniversität Leoben, Franz-Josef-Str. 18, Leoben (Austria); Braga, Roberto [Dipartimento di Scienze Biologiche, Geologiche e Ambientali (BiGeA), University of Bologna, Piazza di Porta San Donato 1, Bologna (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    Osmium release from Municipal Solid Waste Incinerators (MSWI), even if acknowledged to occur at least over the last fifteen years, remains overlooked in the majority of recent studies. We present the osmium concentration and {sup 187}Os/{sup 188}Os isotopic measurements of different kinds of bottom and fly ash samples from MSWI plants and reference materials of incinerator fly ash (BCR176 and BCR176R). The analysis of the unknown ash samples shows a relatively wide range of {sup 187}Os/{sup 188}Os ratios (0.24–0.70) and Os concentrations (from 0.026 ng/g to 1.65 ng/g). Osmium concentrations and isotopic signatures differ from those of other known Os sources, either natural or manmade, suggesting a mixture of both contributions in the MSWI feedstock material. Furthermore, the comparison between the BCR176 and the renewed BCR176R indicates a decrease in Os concentration of one order of magnitude over the years (from 1 to 0.1 ng/g) due to improved recycling efficiency of Os-bearing waste. The estimated annual amount of Os from a typical incinerator (using average Os values and MSWI mass balance) is 13.4 g/a. The osmium potentially released from MSWI smokestacks is predicted to be from 16 to 38 ng Os/m{sup 2}/a, considering a medium size country having 50 MSWI facilities; therefore much higher than the naturally transported osmium from continental dust in the atmosphere (about 1 pg Os/m{sup 2}/a). MSWI systems are considered one of the best options for municipal solid waste management in industrialised countries, but their contribution to the Os budget can be significant. - Highlights: • Bottom and fly ashes from municipal solid waste incinerators are investigated. • Their Os levels and Os isotopic signatures are discussed. • An estimate of Os release from incinerators and incinerated ashes is given. • Os contamination from incineration plants impacts the geochemical Os cycle.

  6. A mathematical model of combustion kinetics of municipal solid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Municipal Solid Waste has become a serious environmental problem troubling many cities. In this paper, a mathematical model of combustion kinetics of municipal solid waste with focus on plastic waste was studied. An analytical solution is obtained for the model. From the numerical simulation, it is observed that the ...

  7. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal phase supplemental environmental impact statement. Implementation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The Implementation Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS-II) has two primary purposes: (1) To report on the results of the scoping process (2) To provide guidance for preparing SEIS-II SEIS-II will be the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review for WIPP`s disposal phase. Chapter 1 of this plan provides background on WIPP and this NEPA review. Chapter 2 describes the purpose and need for action by the Department of Energy (hereafter DOE or the Department), as well as a description of the Proposed Action and alternatives being considered. Chapter 3 describes the work plan, including the schedule, responsibilities, and planned consultations with other agencies and organizations. Chapter 4 describes the scoping process, presents major issues identified during the scoping process, and briefly indicates how issues will be addressed in SEIS-II.

  8. Tubular combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    Tubular combustors are cylindrical tubes where flame ignition and propagation occur in a spatially confined, highly controlled environment, in a nearly flat, elongated geometry. This allows for some unique advantages where extremely even heat dispersion is required over a large surface while still maintaining fuel efficiency. Tubular combustors also allow for easy flexibility in type of fuel source, allowing for quick changeover to meet various needs and changing fuel pricing. This new addition to the MP sustainable energy series will provide the most up-to-date research on tubular combustion--some of it only now coming out of private proprietary protection. Plentiful examples of current applications along with a good explanation of background theory will offer readers an invaluable guide on this promising energy technology. Highlights include: * An introduction to the theory of tubular flames * The "how to" of maintaining stability of tubular flames through continuous combustion * Examples of both small-scal...

  9. Impact of Salt Waste Processing Facility Streams on the Nitric-Glycolic Flowsheet in the Chemical Processing Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-08-08

    An evaluation of the previous Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) testing was performed to determine whether the planned concurrent operation, or “coupled” operations, of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) with the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) has been adequately covered. Tests with the nitricglycolic acid flowsheet, which were both coupled and uncoupled with salt waste streams, included several tests that required extended boiling times. This report provides the evaluation of previous testing and the testing recommendation requested by Savannah River Remediation. The focus of the evaluation was impact on flammability in CPC vessels (i.e., hydrogen generation rate, SWPF solvent components, antifoam degradation products) and processing impacts (i.e., acid window, melter feed target, rheological properties, antifoam requirements, and chemical composition).

  10. Advanced Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  11. Microbial activity in argillite waste storage cells for the deep geological disposal of French bituminous medium activity long lived nuclear waste: Impact on redox reaction kinetics and potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, A.; Leone, L.; Charlet, L.

    2009-04-01

    Micro-organisms are ubiquitous and display remarkable capabilities to adapt and survive in the most extreme environmental conditions. It has been recognized that microorganisms can survive in nuclear waste disposal facilities if the required major (P, N, K) and trace elements, a carbon and energy source as well as water are present. The space constraint is of particular interest as it has been shown that bacteria do not prosper in compacted clay. An evaluation of the different types of French medium and high level waste, in a clay-rich host rock storage environment at a depth between 500 and 600 m, has shown that the bituminous waste is the most likely candidate to accommodate significant microbial activity. The waste consists of a mixture of bitumen (source of bio-available organic matter and H2 as a consequence of its degradation and radiolysis) and nitrates and sulphates kept in a stainless steel container. The assumption, that microbes only have an impact on reaction kinetics needs to be reassessed in the case where nitrates and sulphates are present since both are known not to react at low temperatures without bacterial catalysis. The additional impact of both oxy-anions and their reduced species on redox conditions, radionuclide speciation and mobility gives this evaluation their particular relevance. Storage architecture proposes four primary waste containers positioned into armoured cement over packs and placed with others into the waste storage cell itself composed of a cement mantle enforcing the argillite host rock, the latter being characterized by an excavation damaged zone constricted both in space and in time and a pristine part of 60 m thickness. Bacterial activity within the waste and within the pristine argillite is disregarded because of the low water activity (microbial activity, those likely to develop sustainable biofilms are within the interface zones. A major restriction for the initial development of microbial colonies is the high p

  12. Impacts of long-term waste-water irrigation on the development of sandy Luvisols: consequences for metal pollutant distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, van F.; Jongmans, A.G.; Lamy, I.; Baize, D.; Chevallier, P.

    2008-01-01

    Studies relating macro- and microscopic aspects of impacts of long-term contaminative practices on soils are scarce. We performed such an approach by assessing the fate of metal pollutants in an area close to Paris, where sandy Luvisols were irrigated for 100 years with urban waste water. As a

  13. Measurements of emissions during waste wood combustion to identify refurbishment needs; Maetning av emissioner vid foerbraenning av RT-flis foer att identifiera eventuella ombyggnadsaatgaerder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindau, Leif

    2003-01-01

    The background to this project is the new EU directive 2000/76/EG regarding incineration of waste. This directive may have an effect on emission limits for Swedish plants firing waste wood. It may lead to needs of refurbishment in e.g. the area of flue gas cleaning equipment. In order to produce a basis to evaluate the need for such upgrading, measurement of metals, HCI, SO{sub 2} , CO, TOC and dioxin have been carried out on three plants firing wood waste: a grate boiler (Handeloeverket P11), one circulating fluid bed boiler (Aaterbruket in Lomma), and a bubbling fluidised bed boiler (Johannes in Gaevle, firing 50% waste wood). The measurements have mainly been carried out after boiler, equivalent to upstream flue gas cleaning. The results are that the demands of the EU directive on most points can be managed with existing equipment if this consists of electrostatic precipitator or bag filter with good performance and flue gas condensor. Without flue gas condensor, there is a need for other measures for 1-10 and for grate boilers, SO{sub 2} as well. The requirements in the directive for TOC is weaker than the demand on CO, and correspondingly, the demand on CO is driving. The level of dioxin from the boiler (upstream filter) exceeds allowed emission, and is in the range of 0,1-2 ng TE/Nm{sup 3} tg, 6 % O{sub 2} . Existing equipment will meet the emission limit for the lower levels (0,1-0,3) , but not safely for the higher levels (1,5-2). Correspondingly, there may be a need for equipment upgrading, e.g. in the form of activated carbon injection upstream flue gas filter.

  14. Spain and the Joint Convention on the management of spent fuel and radioactive waste; Espana y la Convencion Conjunta de Gestion del Combustible Gastado y Residuos Radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Ojangueren, M. F.; Franco Matilla, F.

    2009-07-01

    A specific Convention sponsored by the IAEA has been put in place with a view to identifying generally applicable solutions to the problem of irradiated nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management. The third meeting of the signatories was held in Vienna last May. This article describes the essential elements of the Convention and the details of the meeting, during which Spain submitted its corresponding National Report. (Author)

  15. Numerical investigation of spray combustion towards HITAC conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Shanglong

    2017-01-01

    The features of High Temperature Air Combustion (HiTAC), i.e. high-efficiency combustion processes creating a uniform temperature distribution with low NOX and CO emissions, lend itself ideally for the combustion of all sorts of "difficult” fuels, ranging from low-calorific gases such as waste-gases, to heavy fuel-oils. However, to date most of the applications of HiTAC are for gaseous fuels and solid fuels, while little has been investigated on liquid fuel spray combustion in such combustion...

  16. Impact of animal waste application on runoff water quality in field experimental plots

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hill, Dagne D; Owens, William E; Tchoounwou, Paul B

    2005-01-01

    .... The disposal of animal wastes on land is a potential nonpoint source of water degradation. Water degradation and human health is a major concern when considering the disposal of large quantities of animal waste...

  17. Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 3. Public comments hearing board report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This volume contains written public comments and hearing board responses and reports offered on the draft statement.

  18. The impact of policy interactions on the recycling of plastic packaging waste in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Gandenberger, Carsten; Orzanna, Robert; Klingenfuß, Sara; Sartorius, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Due to the environmental challenges associated with the strong growth of plastic waste worldwide, the EU Commission recently published a green paper on a European Strategy on Plastic Waste in the Environment (COM (2013), 123 final), which highlights the challenges and opportunities that arise from improving the management of plastic waste in the EU. The European Waste Directive (2008/98/EC) which was transposed into German law through the Kreislaufwirtschaftsgesetz (KrWG) established the so-c...

  19. Participatory health impact assessment used to support decision-making in waste management planning: A replicable experience from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linzalone, Nunzia; Coi, Alessio; Lauriola, Paolo; Luise, Daniela; Pedone, Alessandra; Romizi, Roberto; Sallese, Domenico; Bianchi, Fabrizio

    2017-01-01

    The lack of participatory tools in Health Impact Assessment (HIA) to support decision-makers is a critical factor that negatively affects the impacts of waste policies. This study describes the participatory HIA used in deciding on the possible doubling of the municipal solid waste incinerating plant located near the city of Arezzo, Italy. Within the framework of the new waste management plan, a methodology for the democratic participation of stakeholders was designed adopting the Local Agenda 21 methodology. Communication and participation events with the stakeholders were set up from the plan's development to its implementation. Eleven different categories of stakeholders including individual citizens were involved in 21 local events, reaching over 500 participants in three years. Actions were performed to build the commitment and ownership of the local administrators. Then, together with the environment and health agencies and a representative from the local committees, the local administrators collaborated with scientists and technicians in the knowledge-building and scoping stages. Focus groups of voluntary citizens worked together with the researchers to provide qualitative and quantitative evidence in the assessment stage. Periodic public forums were held to discuss processes, methods and findings. The local government authority considered the HIA results in the final decision and a new waste strategy was adopted both in the short term (increased curbside collection, waste sustainability program) and in the long term (limited repowering of the incinerator, new targets for separate collection). In conclusion, an effective participatory HIA was carried out at the municipal level to support decision makers in the waste management plan. The HIA21 study contributed to evidence-based decisions and to make a broadly participatory experience. The authors are confident that these achievements may improve the governance of the waste cycle and the trust in the public

  20. The impact of the weather conditions on the cooling performance of the heat pump driven by an internal natural gas combustion engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janovcová Martina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Market with sources of heat and cold offers unlimited choice of different power these devices, design technology, efficiency and price categories. New progressive technologies are constantly discovering, about which is still little information, which include heat pumps powered by a combustion engine running on natural gas. A few pieces of these installations are in Slovakia, but no studies about their work and effectiveness under real conditions. This article deals with experimental measurements of gas heat pump efficiency in cooling mode. Since the gas heat pump works only in system air – water, air is the primary low – energy source, it is necessary to monitor the impact of the climate conditions for the gas heat pump performance.

  1. Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled ``Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management`` was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois` and the Midwest`s solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

  2. Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management'' was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois' and the Midwest's solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

  3. Aerosols from biomass combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nussbaumer, T.

    2001-07-01

    This report is the proceedings of a seminar on biomass combustion and aerosol production organised jointly by the International Energy Agency's (IEA) Task 32 on bio energy and the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE). This collection of 16 papers discusses the production of aerosols and fine particles by the burning of biomass and their effects. Expert knowledge on the environmental impact of aerosols, formation mechanisms, measurement technologies, methods of analysis and measures to be taken to reduce such emissions is presented. The seminar, visited by 50 participants from 11 countries, shows, according to the authors, that the reduction of aerosol emissions resulting from biomass combustion will remain a challenge for the future.

  4. Agricultural Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ling; Zhang, Panpan; Shu, Huajie; Chang, Chein-Chi; Wang, Renqing; Zhang, Shuping

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, the quantity of agricultural waste has been rising rapidly all over the world. As a result, the environmental problems and negative impacts of agricultural waste are drawn more and more attention. Therefore, there is a need to adopt proper approaches to reduce and reuse agricultural waste. This review presented about 200 literatures published in 2015 relating to the topic of agricultural waste. The review examined research on agricultural waste in 2015 from the following four aspects: the characterization, reuse, treatment, and management. Researchers highlighted the importance to reuse agricultural waste and investigated the potential to utilize it as biofertilizers, cultivation material, soil amendments, adsorbent, material, energy recycling, enzyme and catalyst etc. The treatment of agricultural waste included carbonization, biodegradation, composting hydrolysis and pyrolysis. Moreover, this review analyzed the differences of the research progress in 2015 from 2014. It may help to reveal the new findings and new trends in this field in 2015 comparing to 2014.

  5. Impact of heating rate and solvent on Ni-based catalysts prepared by solution combustion method for syngas methanation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Yan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ni-Al2O3 catalysts prepared by solution combustion method for syngas methanation were enhanced by employing various heating rate and different solvent. The catalytic properties were tested in syngas methanation. The result indicates that both of heating rate and solvent remarkably affect Ni particle size, which is a key factor to the catalytic activity of Ni-Al2O3 catalysts for syngas methanation. Moreover, the relationship between Ni particle size and the production rate of methane per unit mass was correlated. The optimal Ni-Al2O3 catalyst prepared in ethanol at 2°C/min, achieves a maximum production rate of methane at the mean size of 20.8 nm.

  6. Quantifying of the Thermal Dynamic Characteristics of the Combustion System for Underground Coal Fire and its Impact on Environment in Xinjiang region, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZENG, Qiang; Tiyip, Tashpolat; Wuttke, Manfred; NIE, Jing; PU, Yan

    2015-04-01

    Underground Coal fire (UCF) is one disaster associated with coal mining activities around the world. The UCF not only burns up the coal reservoir, but also causes serious environmental problems, such as the pollution to air, the damage to soils, and the contamination to surface and underground water and consequently the health problem to human beings. In the present paper, the authors attempts to quantify the thermal dynamic characteristics of the combustion system for UCF and its impact on environment by modeling, including delineating the physical boundary of UCF zone, modeling of the capacity of the oxygen supply to UCF, modeling the intensity of heat generation from UCF and modeling the process of heat transfer within UCF and its surrounding environment. From this research, results were obtained as follows: First of all, based on the rock control theory, a model was proposed to depict the physical boundary of UCF zone which is important for coal fire research. Secondly, with analyzing the characteristics of air and smoke flow within UCF zone, an air/smoke flow model was proposed and consequently a method was put forward to calculate the capacity of oxygen supply to the UCF. Thirdly, with analyzing the characteristics of coal combustion within UCF zone, a method of calculating the intensity of heat generation from UCF, i.e., the heat source models, was established. Heat transfer with UCF zone includes the heat conductivity within UCF zone, the heat dissipation by radiation from the surface of fire zone, and the heat dissipation by convection as well as the heat loss taken away by mass transport. The authors also made an effort to depict the process of heat transfer by quantitative methods. Finally, an example of Shuixigou coal fire was given to illustrate parts of above models. Further more, UCF's impact on environment, such as the heavy metals contamination to surface soil of fire zone and the characteristics of gaseous pollutants emission from the UCF also was

  7. Sustainable Supply Chain Management: The Influence of Disposal Scenarios on the Environmental Impact of a 2400 L Waste Container

    OpenAIRE

    José Eduardo Galve; Daniel Elduque; Carmelo Pina; Carlos Javierre

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes the influence of the supply chain management on the environmental impact of a 2400 L waste disposal container used in most cities of Spain. The studied functional unit, a waste disposal container, made up mostly of plastic materials and a metallic structure, and manufactured in Madrid (Spain), is distributed to several cities at an average distance of 392 km. A life cycle assessment of four different scenarios (SC) has been calculated with the software EcoTool v4.0 (versio...

  8. Literature review of the potential impact of glycolic acid on the technetium chemistry of srs tank waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Charles A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-10-09

    This document presents a literature study of the impact of glycolate on technetium chemistry in the Savannah River Site (SRS) waste system and specifically Saltstone. A predominant portion of the Tc at SRS will be sent to the Saltstone Facility where it will be immobilized. The Tc in the tank waste is in the highly soluble chemical form of pertechnetate ion (TcO4 -) which is reduced by blast furnace slag (BFS) in Saltstone, rendering it highly insoluble and resistant to leaching.

  9. Numerical and experimental study of the influence of the operational parameters on the formation mechanisms of oxides of nitrogen during the combustion of mixtures of cellulosic and plastic materials; Etude experimentale et numerique de l'influence des parametres operatoires sur les mecanismes de formation des oxydes d'azote lors de la combustion de melanges de materiaux cellulosiques et plastiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andzi Barhe, T.

    2004-10-15

    The current thesis was performed within a collaboration between the Laboratoire de Combustion et de Detonique (LCD of the University of Poitiers) and the Laboratoire de Physique et de Chimie d'Environnement (LPCE) of the University of Ouagadougou. It was financed by Agency for Environment and Energy Management (ADEME). The principle object of this study is the optimisation of the combustion process during the incineration of waste. This optimisation is aimed at the reduction of the polluting emissions, principally CO and NO, during the incineration of cellulosic and plastic materials. It involves the analysis of the influence of the operational parameters on the polluting emissions and the control of reaction mechanisms of formation and reduction of these pollutants during the combustion process. Consequently, the study was performed in two parts: an experimental part and a numerical part. The experimental part was realised using a fixed bed counterflow reactor. This setup simulates the combustion within an industrial waste incinerator. The reactor allows the combustion of a vertical layer of waste mixture (wood, cardboard, PET, polyamide) to be followed. Three model mixtures representative of the makeup of household waste were studied in order to determine the influence of the composition of the waste on the emission of pollutants (CO and NO). The obtained results show that this parameter has a practically negligible influence within the tested parameter range. Consequently the formation of pollutants depends on the operating parameters - the equivalence ratio and the temperature. A numerical study of the influence of these parameters in order to show their impact on the mechanisms of pollutant formation and to determine the chemical mechanisms involved in the formation of oxides of nitrogen. The numerical study was performed with software developed at the LCD. This programme based on a detailed chemical model coupled to a simple physical model. It uses the

  10. Evaluation of the radioactive impact of the phosphogypsum wastes used as amendment in agriculture soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Mrabet, R. [Centre National de l' Energie, des Sciences, et des Techniques Nucleaires (CNESTEN), Rabat (Morocco); Abril, J.M.; Perianez, R. [Seville Univ., Dept. Fisica Aplicada I, EUITA (Spain); Delgado, A. [Seville Univ., Dept. Ciencias Agroforestales, EUITA (Spain); Manjon, G. [Seville Univ., Dept. Fisica Aplicada II, ETSA (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Some 3x10{sup 9} kg of phosphogypsum (PG) wastes are annually generated by two fertiliser production factories in Huelva (south-western Spain). PG has relatively high concentrations of {sup 226}Ra and other radionuclides, with an special concern due to the {sup 222}Rn emissions. These wastes could be used to improve the fertility of agriculture soils in a large former marsh area of the Guadalquivir river. Thus, it is interesting to study the levels and behaviour of natural radionuclides within this system to evaluate the radioactive impact of this amendment. An agronomical test is being conducted by one of the authors in an experimental farm in Lebrija (Seville). The soils are treated with 13 and 26 t ha{sup -1} of PG, 30 t ha{sup -1} of manure. Each treatment was repeated twice and continued for two years with beetroot and cotton plant production. We are measuring {sup 226}Ra (by alpha counting and gamma spectrometry) and U isotopes (by alpha spectrometry and ICP-MS analysis) in drainage waters, soils and vegetal-tissues samples. The PG used in the treatment has 620 {+-}70 Bq kg{sup -1} of {sup 226}Ra. The drainage waters have {sup 226}Ra contents similar to those from non-contaminated natural waters, but the uranium concentrations are one order of magnitude higher. Our results are suggesting that the major uranium input comes from the application of phosphate-fertiliser. No significant levels of radionuclides were found in the vegetal tissues. (author)

  11. IMPACTS OF ANTIFOAM ADDITIONS AND ARGON BUBBLING ON DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY REDUCTION/OXIDATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.; Johnson, F.

    2012-06-05

    During melting of HLW glass, the REDOX of the melt pool cannot be measured. Therefore, the Fe{sup +2}/{Sigma}Fe ratio in the glass poured from the melter must be related to melter feed organic and oxidant concentrations to ensure production of a high quality glass without impacting production rate (e.g., foaming) or melter life (e.g., metal formation and accumulation). A production facility such as the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are possible. therefore, the acceptability decision is made on the upstream process, rather than on the downstream melt or glass product. That is, it is based on 'feed foward' statistical process control (SPC) rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the melter is controlled prior to vitrification. Use of the DWPF REDOX model has controlled the balanjce of feed reductants and oxidants in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). Once the alkali/alkaline earth salts (both reduced and oxidized) are formed during reflux in the SRAT, the REDOX can only change if (1) additional reductants or oxidants are added to the SRAT, the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), or the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) or (2) if the melt pool is bubble dwith an oxidizing gas or sparging gas that imposes a different REDOX target than the chemical balance set during reflux in the SRAT.

  12. Proposed Model For Industrial Waste Management Practices and Its Impact on Organisational Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzy Noviyanti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to environment protection issue, waste management becomes one of important factors in maintaining organization sustainability. In developed country, a growing number of companies began to integrate the pro environment practices, such as waste management practices, into their business strategy. In contrast, the implementation of waste management practices by business organizations in developing country, like Indonesia, is still rare. Waste generated by industries is greater than the capacity to manage this volume of waste. This poses a problem that leads to improper disposal of waste and pollution. This study aims to design a research model which investigates the relation of institutional environment including cognitive, regulatory, and normative element; manager environmental attitudes, worker environmental attitudes, environmental policy, strategic waste management practices, and financial performance.

  13. Impact of intervention on healthcare waste management practices in a tertiary care governmental hospital of Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, Binaya; Gupta, Gopal Kumar; Mainali, Dhiraj

    2014-09-26

    Healthcare waste is produced from various therapeutic procedures performed in hospitals, such as chemotherapy, dialysis, surgery, delivery, resection of gangrenous organs, autopsy, biopsy, injections, etc. These result in the production of non-hazardous waste (75-95%) and hazardous waste (10-25%), such as sharps, infectious, chemical, pharmaceutical, radioactive waste, and pressurized containers (e.g., inhaler cans). Improper healthcare waste management may lead to the transmission of hepatitis B, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This evaluation of waste management practices was carried out at gynaecology, obstetrics, paediatrics, medicine and orthopaedics wards at Government of Nepal Civil Service Hospital, Kathmandu from February 12 to October 15, 2013, with the permission from healthcare waste management committee at the hospital. The Individualized Rapid Assessment tool (IRAT), developed by the United Nations Development Program Global Environment Facility project, was used to collect pre-interventional and post-interventional performance scores concerning waste management. The healthcare waste management committee was formed of representing various departments. The study included responses from focal nurses and physicians from the gynaecology, obstetrics, paediatrics, medicine and orthopaedics wards, and waste handlers during the study period. Data included average scores from 40 responders. Scores were based on compliance with the IRAT. The waste management policy and standard operating procedure were developed after interventions, and they were consistent with the national and international laws and regulations. The committee developed a plan for recycling or waste minimization. Health professionals, such as doctors, nurses and waste handlers, were trained on waste management practices. The programs included segregation, collection, handling, transportation, treatment and disposal of waste, as well as occupational health and safety issues

  14. Impacts of Process and Prediction Uncertainties on Projected Hanford Waste Glass Amount

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gervasio, Vivianaluxa; Vienna, John D.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Kruger, Albert A.

    2018-02-19

    Analyses were performed to evaluate the impacts of using the advanced glass models, constraints (Vienna et al. 2016), and uncertainty descriptions on projected Hanford glass mass. The maximum allowable WOL was estimated for waste compositions while simultaneously satisfying all applicable glass property and composition constraints with sufficient confidence. Different components of prediction and composition/process uncertainties were systematically included in the calculations to evaluate their impacts on glass mass. The analyses estimated the production of 23,360 MT of IHLW glass when no uncertainties were taken into accound. Accounting for prediction and composition/process uncertainties resulted in 5.01 relative percent increase in estimated glass mass 24,531 MT. Roughly equal impacts were found for prediction uncertainties (2.58 RPD) and composition/process uncertainties (2.43 RPD). ILAW mass was predicted to be 282,350 MT without uncertainty and with weaste loading “line” rules in place. Accounting for prediction and composition/process uncertainties resulted in only 0.08 relative percent increase in estimated glass mass of 282,562 MTG. Without application of line rules the glass mass decreases by 10.6 relative percent (252,490 MT) for the case with no uncertainties. Addition of prediction uncertainties increases glass mass by 1.32 relative percent and the addition of composition/process uncertainties increase glass mass by an additional 7.73 relative percent (9.06 relative percent increase combined). The glass mass estimate without line rules (275,359 MT) was 2.55 relative percent lower than that with the line rules (282,562 MT), after accounting for all applicable uncertainties.

  15. Potential environmental and human health impacts of rechargeable lithium batteries in electronic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Daniel Hsing Po; Chen, Mengjun; Ogunseitan, Oladele A

    2013-05-21

    Rechargeable lithium-ion (Li-ion) and lithium-polymer (Li-poly) batteries have recently become dominant in consumer electronic products because of advantages associated with energy density and product longevity. However, the small size of these batteries, the high rate of disposal of consumer products in which they are used, and the lack of uniform regulatory policy on their disposal means that lithium batteries may contribute substantially to environmental pollution and adverse human health impacts due to potentially toxic materials. In this research, we used standardized leaching tests, life-cycle impact assessment (LCIA), and hazard assessment models to evaluate hazardous waste classification, resource depletion potential, and toxicity potentials of lithium batteries used in cellphones. Our results demonstrate that according to U.S. federal regulations, defunct Li-ion batteries are classified hazardous due to their lead (Pb) content (average 6.29 mg/L; σ = 11.1; limit 5). However, according to California regulations, all lithium batteries tested are classified hazardous due to excessive levels of cobalt (average 163,544 mg/kg; σ = 62,897; limit 8000), copper (average 98,694 mg/kg; σ = 28,734; limit 2500), and nickel (average 9525 mg/kg; σ = 11,438; limit 2000). In some of the Li-ion batteries, the leached concentrations of chromium, lead, and thallium exceeded the California regulation limits. The environmental impact associated with resource depletion and human toxicity is mainly associated with cobalt, copper, nickel, thallium, and silver, whereas the ecotoxicity potential is primarily associated with cobalt, copper, nickel, thallium, and silver. However, the relative contribution of aluminum and lithium to human toxicity and ecotoxicity could not be estimated due to insufficient toxicity data in the models. These findings support the need for stronger government policy at the local, national, and international levels to encourage recovery, recycling, and

  16. Assessing the impacts of changes in treatment technology on energy and greenhouse gas balances for organic waste and wastewater treatment using historical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Tjalfe G; Hansen, Jens Aage

    2009-11-01

    Historical data on organic waste and wastewater treatment during the period of 1970-2020 were used to assess the impact of treatment on energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) balances. The assessment included the waste fractions: Sewage sludge, food waste, yard waste and other organic waste (paper, plastic, etc.). Data were collected from Aalborg, a municipality located in Northern Denmark. During the period from 1970-2005, Aalborg Municipality has changed its waste treatment strategy from landfilling of all wastes toward composting of yard waste and incineration with combined heat and power production from the remaining organic municipal waste. Wastewater treatment has changed from direct discharge of untreated wastewater to full organic matter and nutrient (N, P) removal combined with anaerobic digestion of the sludge for biogas production with power and heat generation. These changes in treatment technology have resulted in the waste and wastewater treatment systems in Aalborg progressing from being net consumers of energy and net emitters of GHG, to becoming net producers of energy and net savers of GHG emissions (due to substitution of fossil fuels elsewhere). If it is assumed that the organic waste quantity and composition is the same in 1970 and 2005, the technology change over this time period has resulted in a progression from a net annual GHG emission of 200 kg CO( 2)-eq. capita(-1) in 1970 to a net saving of 170 kg CO(2)-eq. capita(-1) in 2005 for management of urban organic wastes.

  17. THE IMPACT OF KINETICS ON NEPHELINE FORMATION IN NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J.

    2011-03-07

    Sixteen glass compositions were selected to study the potential impacts of the kinetics of nepheline formation in high-level nuclear waste (HLW) glass. The chosen compositions encompassed a relatively large nepheline discriminator (ND) range, 0.40-0.66, and included a relatively broad range, and amount of, constituents including high aluminum and high boron concentrations. All glasses were fabricated in the laboratory and subsequently exposed to six different cooling treatments. The cooling treatments consisted of three 'stepped' profiles and their corresponding 'smooth' profiles. Included in the cooling treatment was the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister centerline cooling (CCC) profile in addition to a 'faster' and a 'slower' total cooling line. After quenching and heat treating, x-ray diffraction confirmed the type and amount of any resultant crystallization. The target compositions were shown to be consistent with the measured compositions. Two quenched glasses and several treated glasses exhibited minor amounts of spinel and spinel-like phases. Nepheline was not observed in any of the quenched glasses but was observed in many of the treated glasses. The amount of nepheline ranged from approximately 2wt% to 30wt% for samples cooled over shorter times and longer times respectively. Differences were observed in the amount of nepheline crystallization after smooth and stepped cooling and increased with total cooling time. In some glasses, nepheline crystallization appeared to be directly proportional to total cooling time while the total amount of nepheline crystallization varied, suggesting that the nepheline crystallization rate was independent of (or at least faster than) cooling rate but, varied depending on the glass composition. On the contrary, in another glass, nepheline crystallization appeared to be inversely proportional to cooling rate. The high alumina glasses, predicted to form nepheline

  18. Combustion Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Combustion Research Laboratory facilitates the development of new combustion systems or improves the operation of existing systems to meet the Army's mission for...

  19. Semivolatile POA and parameterized total combustion SOA in CMAQv5.2: impacts on source strength and partitioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. N. Murphy

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence from field and laboratory observations coupled with atmospheric model analyses shows that primary combustion emissions of organic compounds dynamically partition between the vapor and particulate phases, especially as near-source emissions dilute and cool to ambient conditions. The most recent version of the Community Multiscale Air Quality model version 5.2 (CMAQv5.2 accounts for the semivolatile partitioning and gas-phase aging of these primary organic aerosol (POA compounds consistent with experimentally derived parameterizations. We also include a new surrogate species, potential secondary organic aerosol from combustion emissions (pcSOA, which provides a representation of the secondary organic aerosol (SOA from anthropogenic combustion sources that could be missing from current chemical transport model predictions. The reasons for this missing mass likely include the following: (1 unspeciated semivolatile and intermediate volatility organic compound (SVOC and IVOC, respectively emissions missing from current inventories, (2 multigenerational aging of organic vapor products from known SOA precursors (e.g., toluene, alkanes, (3 underestimation of SOA yields due to vapor wall losses in smog chamber experiments, and (4 reversible organic compounds–water interactions and/or aqueous-phase processing of known organic vapor emissions. CMAQ predicts the spatially averaged contribution of pcSOA to OA surface concentrations in the continental United States to be 38.6 and 23.6 % in the 2011 winter and summer, respectively. Whereas many past modeling studies focused on a particular measurement campaign, season, location, or model configuration, we endeavor to evaluate the model and important uncertain parameters with a comprehensive set of United States-based model runs using multiple horizontal scales (4 and 12 km, gas-phase chemical mechanisms, and seasons and years. The model with representation of semivolatile POA

  20. Semivolatile POA and parameterized total combustion SOA in CMAQv5.2: impacts on source strength and partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Benjamin N.; Woody, Matthew C.; Jimenez, J. L.; Carlton, A. G.; Hayes, Patrick; Liu, Shang; Ng, Nga L.; Russell, Lynn M.; Setyan, Ari; Xu, Lu; Young, Jeff; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Zhang, Qi; Pye, Havala O.

    2017-09-20

    Mounting evidence from field and laboratory observations coupled with atmospheric model analyses show that primary combustion emissions of organic compounds dynamically partition between the vapor and particulate phases, espe-cially as near-source emissions dilute and cool to ambient conditions. The most recent version of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Model v5.2 accounts for the semivolatile partitioning and gas-phase aging of these primary organic aerosol (POA) compounds consistent with experimentally derived parameterizations. We also include a new surrogate species, potential secondary organic aerosol from combustion emissions (pcSOA), which provides a representation of the SOA from an-thropogenic combustion sources that could be missing from current chemical transport model predictions. The reasons for this missing mass likely include the following: 1) unspeciated semivolatile and intermediate volatility organic compound (SVOC and IVOC, respectively) emissions missing from current inventories, 2) multigenerational aging of organic vapor products from known SOA precursors (e.g. toluene, alkanes, etc), 3) underestimation of SOA yields due to vapor wall losses in smog chamber experiments, and 4) reversible organic-water interactions and/or aqueous-phase processing of known organic vapor emissions. CMAQ predicts the spatially-averaged contribution of pcSOA to OA surface concentrations in the continental United States to be 38.6% and 23.6% in the 2011 winter and summer, respectively. Whereas many past modeling studies focused on a particular measurement campaign, season, location, or model configuration, we endeavor to evaluate the model and important uncertain parameters with a comprehensive set of United States-based model runs using multiple horizontal scales (4 km and 12 km), gas-phase chemical mechanisms, seasons and years. The model with representation of semivolatile POA improves predictions of hourly OA observations over the traditional

  1. Assessing the impacts of changes in treatment technology on energy and greenhouse gas balances for organic waste and wastewater treatment using historical data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Aage; Poulsen, Tjalfe

    2009-01-01

    production from the remaining organic municipal waste. Wastewater treatment has changed from direct discharge of untreated wastewater to full organic matter and nutrient (N, P) removal combined with anaerobic digestion of the sludge for biogas production with power and heat generation. These changes......Historical data on organic waste and wastewater treatment during the period of 1970ĝ€"2020 were used to assess the impact of treatment on energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) balances. The assessment included the waste fractions: Sewage sludge, food waste, yard waste and other organic waste (paper...... in treatment technology have resulted in the waste and wastewater treatment systems in Aalborg progressing from being net consumers of energy and net emitters of GHG, to becoming net producers of energy and net savers of GHG emissions (due to substitution of fossil fuels elsewhere). If it is assumed...

  2. Environmental impact assessment and socio political issues of nuclear waste management; Ydinjaetehuollon ympaeristoevaikutusten arviointi ja sosiopoliittiset kysymykset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmaajaervi, I.; Tolsa, H. [VTT Communities and Infrastructure, Espoo (Finland). Urban Planning; Vuori, S. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Nuclear Energy; Litmanen, T. [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland)

    1997-09-01

    The study is a part of the Publicly Administrated Nuclear Waste Management Research Programme (JYT2) which was carried out in 1994-1996. The principal goal of the research programme has been to provide the authorities with information and research results relevant for the safety of nuclear waste management in order to support the various activities of the authorities. The main emphasis of the research programme focuses on the disposal of spent fuel. In addition to nuclear waste research in the field of natural sciences and technology, the research program- me has focused mostly on societal issues associated with nuclear waste disposal facilities and on the non-radiological environmental effects in the environs of the disposal site. Some of the local effects are already revealed in the research phase, before any final decisions are made as to the selection of the disposal site. The study has focused primarily on local and regional issues. The statutory requirement to conduct environ- mental impact assessment (EIA) chiefly concerns those who are responsible for waste management, but the authorities also need to acquire systematic information in the field to support developing requirements for the content and scope of EIA procedure and preparedness to check the assessments made. This is a report of the first parts of the study in 1994-1995. The report deals with the subject matter generally based on earlier studies in Finland and other countries. Th