WorldWideScience

Sample records for waste borosilicate glasses

  1. Using of borosilicate glass waste as a cement additive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Weiwei [State Key Laboratory of Silicate Materials for Architectures, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Sun, Tao, E-mail: sunt@whut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicate Materials for Architectures, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Key Laboratory of Roadway Bridge & Structure Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Li, Xinping [Key Laboratory of Roadway Bridge & Structure Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Sun, Mian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Lu, Yani [Urban Construction Institute, Hubei Engineering University, Xiaogan, Hubei 432000 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Borosilicate glass waste used as cement additive can improves its radiation shielding. • When content is 14.8%, the linear attenuation coefficient is 0.2457 cm{sup −1} after 28 d. • From 0 to 22.2%, linear attenuation coefficient firstly increase and then decrease. - Abstract: Borosilicate glass waste is investigated as a cement additive in this paper to improve the properties of cement and concrete, such as setting time, compressive strength and radiation shielding. The results demonstrate that borosilicate glass is an effective additive, which not only improves the radiation shielding properties of cement paste, but also shows the irradiation effect on the mechanical and optical properties: borosilicate glass can increase the compressive strength and at the same time it makes a minor impact on the setting time and main mineralogical compositions of hydrated cement mixtures; and when the natural river sand in the mortar is replaced by borosilicate glass sand (in amounts from 0% to 22.2%), the compressive strength and the linear attenuation coefficient firstly increase and then decrease. When the glass waste content is 14.8%, the compressive strength is 43.2 MPa after 28 d and the linear attenuation coefficient is 0.2457 cm{sup −1} after 28 d, which is beneficial for the preparation of radiation shielding concrete with high performances.

  2. Using of borosilicate glass waste as a cement additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Weiwei; Sun, Tao; Li, Xinping; Sun, Mian; Lu, Yani

    2016-08-01

    Borosilicate glass waste is investigated as a cement additive in this paper to improve the properties of cement and concrete, such as setting time, compressive strength and radiation shielding. The results demonstrate that borosilicate glass is an effective additive, which not only improves the radiation shielding properties of cement paste, but also shows the irradiation effect on the mechanical and optical properties: borosilicate glass can increase the compressive strength and at the same time it makes a minor impact on the setting time and main mineralogical compositions of hydrated cement mixtures; and when the natural river sand in the mortar is replaced by borosilicate glass sand (in amounts from 0% to 22.2%), the compressive strength and the linear attenuation coefficient firstly increase and then decrease. When the glass waste content is 14.8%, the compressive strength is 43.2 MPa after 28 d and the linear attenuation coefficient is 0.2457 cm-1 after 28 d, which is beneficial for the preparation of radiation shielding concrete with high performances.

  3. Modelling the sulfate capacity of simulated radioactive waste borosilicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, P. A.; Vaishnav, S.; Forder, S. D.; Scrimshire, A.; Jaganathan, B.; Rohini, J.; Marra, J. C.; Fox, K. M.; Pierce, E. M.; Workman, P.; Vienna, J. D.

    2017-02-01

    The capacity of simulated high-level radioactive waste borosilicate glasses to incorporate sulfate has been studied as a function of glass composition. Combined Raman, 57Fe Mössbauer and literature evidence supports the attribution of coordination numbers and oxidation states of constituent cations for the purposes of modelling, and results confirm the validity of correlating sulfate incorporation in multicomponent borosilicate radioactive waste glasses with different models. A strong compositional dependency is observed and this can be described by an inverse linear relationship between incorporated sulfate (mol% SO42-) and total cation field strength index of the glass, Σ(z/a2), with a high goodness-of-fit (R2 ≈ 0.950). Similar relationships are also obtained if theoretical optical basicity, Λth (R2 ≈ 0.930) or non-bridging oxygen per tetrahedron ratio, NBO/T (R2 ≈ 0.919), are used. Results support the application of these models, and in particular Σ(z/a2), as predictive tools to aid the development of new glass compositions with enhanced sulfate capacities.

  4. X-ray tomography of feed-to-glass transition of simulated borosilicate waste glasses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Harris, W.H.; Guillen, D.P.; Kloužek, Jaroslav; Pokorný, P.; Yano, T.; Lee, S.; Schweiger, M. J.; Hrma, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 9 (2017), s. 3883-3894 ISSN 0002-7820 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : borosilicate glass * computed tomography * glass melting * morphology * nuclear waste * X-ray Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 2.841, year: 2016

  5. Magnetic Glass Ceramics by Sintering of Borosilicate Glass and Inorganic Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Inès M. M. M. Ponsot; Yiannis Pontikes; Giovanni Baldi; Rama K. Chinnam; Rainer Detsch; Aldo R. Boccaccini; Enrico Bernardo

    2014-01-01

    Ceramics and glass ceramics based on industrial waste have been widely recognized as competitive products for building applications; however, there is a great potential for such materials with novel functionalities. In this paper, we discuss the development of magnetic sintered glass ceramics based on two iron-rich slags, coming from non-ferrous metallurgy and recycled borosilicate glass. The substantial viscous flow of the glass led to dense products for rapid treatments at relatively low te...

  6. Comparison of mechanical properties of glass-bonded sodalite and borosilicate glass high-level waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Holleran, T. P.; DiSanto, T.; Johnson, S. G.; Goff, K. M.

    2000-05-09

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a glass-bonded sodalite waste form to immobilize the salt waste stream from electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The waste form consists of 75 vol.% crystalline sodalite and 25 vol.% glass. Microindentation fracture toughness measurements were performed on this material and borosilicate glass from the Defense Waste Processing Facility using a Vickers indenter. Palmqvist cracking was confined for the glass-bonded sodalite waste form, while median-radial cracking occurred in the borosilicate glass. The elastic modulus was measured by an acoustic technique. Fracture toughness, microhardness, and elastic modulus values are reported for both waste forms.

  7. Magnetic Glass Ceramics by Sintering of Borosilicate Glass and Inorganic Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsot, Inès M M M; Pontikes, Yiannis; Baldi, Giovanni; Chinnam, Rama K; Detsch, Rainer; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Bernardo, Enrico

    2014-07-31

    Ceramics and glass ceramics based on industrial waste have been widely recognized as competitive products for building applications; however, there is a great potential for such materials with novel functionalities. In this paper, we discuss the development of magnetic sintered glass ceramics based on two iron-rich slags, coming from non-ferrous metallurgy and recycled borosilicate glass. The substantial viscous flow of the glass led to dense products for rapid treatments at relatively low temperatures (900-1000 °C), whereas glass/slag interactions resulted in the formation of magnetite crystals, providing ferrimagnetism. Such behavior could be exploited for applying the obtained glass ceramics as induction heating plates, according to preliminary tests (showing the rapid heating of selected samples, even above 200 °C). The chemical durability and safety of the obtained glass ceramics were assessed by both leaching tests and cytotoxicity tests.

  8. Magnetic Glass Ceramics by Sintering of Borosilicate Glass and Inorganic Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inès M. M. M. Ponsot

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ceramics and glass ceramics based on industrial waste have been widely recognized as competitive products for building applications; however, there is a great potential for such materials with novel functionalities. In this paper, we discuss the development of magnetic sintered glass ceramics based on two iron-rich slags, coming from non-ferrous metallurgy and recycled borosilicate glass. The substantial viscous flow of the glass led to dense products for rapid treatments at relatively low temperatures (900–1000 °C, whereas glass/slag interactions resulted in the formation of magnetite crystals, providing ferrimagnetism. Such behavior could be exploited for applying the obtained glass ceramics as induction heating plates, according to preliminary tests (showing the rapid heating of selected samples, even above 200 °C. The chemical durability and safety of the obtained glass ceramics were assessed by both leaching tests and cytotoxicity tests.

  9. High-level waste borosilicate glass a compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Current plans call for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to start up facilities for vitrification of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) stored in tanks at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina, in 1995; West Valley Demonstration Project, West Valley, New York, in 1996; and at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, after the year 2000. The product from these facilities will be canistered HLW borosilicate glass, which will be stored, transported, and eventually disposed of in a geologic repository. The behavior of this glass waste product, under the range of likely service conditions, is the subject of considerable scientific and public interest. Over the past few decades, a large body of scientific information on borosilicate waste glass has been generated worldwide. The intent of this document is to consolidate information pertaining to our current understanding of waste glass corrosion behavior and radionuclide release. The objective, scope, and organization of the document are discussed in Section 1.1, and an overview of borosilicate glass corrosion is provided in Section 1.2. The history of glass as a waste form and the international experience with waste glass are summarized in Sections 1.3 and 1.4, respectively.

  10. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II.

  11. Conversion of radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes into borosilicate glass using the glass material oxidation and dissolution system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.; Elam, K.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    A new vitrification process has been invented. The Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS) allows direct conversion of radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes to borosilicate glass. GMODS directly converts metals, ceramics and amorphous solids to glass, oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass, and converts halides (such as chlorides) to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium halide stream. The glass is designed to meet EPA criteria for chemically non-hazardous waste forms. Laboratory work has demonstrated the conversion of stainless steel, aluminum, cerium (a plutonium surrogate), uranium, Zircaloy, multiple oxides and other materials to glass. Equipment options have been identified for processing rates between 1 and 100,000 t/y. Significant work, including a pilot plant, is required to develop GMODS for applications at an industrial scale.

  12. Corrosion of inconel in high-temperature borosilicate glass melts containing simulant nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xianhe; Yuan, Xiaoning; Brigden, Clive T.; Tao, Jun; Hyatt, Neil C.; Miekina, Michal

    2017-10-01

    The corrosion behaviors of Inconel 601 in the borosilicate glass (MW glass) containing 25 wt.% of simulant Magnox waste, and in ZnO, Mn2O3 and Fe2O3 modified Mg/Ca borosilicate glasses (MZMF and CZMF glasses) containing 15 wt.% of simulant POCO waste, were evaluated by dimensional changes, the formation of internal defects and changes in alloy composition near corrosion surfaces. In all three kinds of glass melts, Cr at the inconel surface forms a protective Cr2O3 scale between the metal surface and the glass, and alumina precipitates penetrate from the metal surface or formed in-situ. The corrosion depths of inconel 601 in MW waste glass melt are greater than those in the other two glass melts. In MW glass, the Cr2O3 layer between inconel and glass is fragmented because of the reaction between MgO and Cr2O3, which forms the crystal phase MgCr2O4. In MZMF and CZMF waste glasses the layers are continuous and a thin (Zn, Fe, Ni, B)-containing layer forms on the surface of the chromium oxide layer and prevents Cr2O3 from reacting with MgO or other constituents. MgCr2O4 was observed in the XRD analysis of the bulk MW waste glass after the corrosion test, and ZrSiO4 in the MZMF waste glass, and ZrSiO4 and CaMoO4 in the CZMF waste glass.

  13. Rhenium solubility in borosilicate nuclear waste glass: implications for the processing and immobilization of technetium-99.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloy, John S; Riley, Brian J; Goel, Ashutosh; Liezers, Martin; Schweiger, Michael J; Rodriguez, Carmen P; Hrma, Pavel; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lukens, Wayne W; Kruger, Albert A

    2012-11-20

    The immobilization of technetium-99 ((99)Tc) in a suitable host matrix has proven to be a challenging task for researchers in the nuclear waste community around the world. In this context, the present work reports on the solubility and retention of rhenium, a nonradioactive surrogate for (99)Tc, in a sodium borosilicate glass. Glasses containing target Re concentrations from 0 to 10,000 ppm [by mass, added as KReO(4) (Re(7+))] were synthesized in vacuum-sealed quartz ampules to minimize the loss of Re from volatilization during melting at 1000 °C. The rhenium was found as Re(7+) in all of the glasses as observed by X-ray absorption near-edge structure. The solubility of Re in borosilicate glasses was determined to be ~3000 ppm (by mass) using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. At higher rhenium concentrations, additional rhenium was retained in the glasses as crystalline inclusions of alkali perrhenates detected with X-ray diffraction. Since (99)Tc concentrations in a glass waste form are predicted to be wastes, assuming Tc as Tc(7+) and similarities between Re(7+) and Tc(7+) behavior in this glass system.

  14. X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopy studies of molybdenum environments in borosilicate waste glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, David A.; Gan, Hao; Pegg, Ian L.

    2017-05-01

    Mo-containing high-level nuclear waste borosilicate glasses were investigated as part of an effort to improve Mo loading while avoiding yellow phase crystallization. Previous work showed that additions of vanadium decrease yellow phase formation and increases Mo solubility. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize Mo environments in HLW borosilicate glasses and to investigate possible structural relationships between Mo and V. Mo XAS spectra for the glasses indicate isolated tetrahedral Mo6+O4 with Mo-O distances near 1.75 Å. V XANES indicate tetrahedral V5+O4 as the dominant species. Raman spectra show composition dependent trends, where Mo-O symmetrical stretch mode frequencies (ν1) are sensitive to the mix of alkali and alkaline earth cations, decreasing by up to 10 cm-1 for glasses that change from Li+ to Na+ as the dominant network-modifying species. This indicates that MoO4 tetrahedra are isolated from the borosilicate network and are surrounded, at least partly, by Na+ and Li+. Secondary ν1 frequency effects, with changes up to 7 cm-1, were also observed with increasing V2O5 and MoO3 content. These secondary trends may indicate MoO4-MoO4 and MoO4-VO4 clustering, suggesting that V additions may stabilize Mo in the matrix with respect to yellow phase formation.

  15. High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion.This document is organized into three volumes. Volumes I and II represent a tiered set of information intended for somewhat different audiences. Volume I is intended to provide an overview of waste glass corrosion, and Volume 11 is intended to provide additional experimental details on experimental factors that influence waste glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II. Volume I is intended for managers, decision makers, and modelers, the combined set of Volumes I, II, and III is intended for scientists and engineers working in the field of high-level waste.

  16. Conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements for disposal of borosilicate glass defense high-level waste forms in salt geologic repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-06-01

    The conceptual waste package interim product specifications and data requirements presented are applicable specifically to the normal borosilicate glass product of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). They provide preliminary numerical values for the defense high-level waste form parameters and properties identified in the waste form performance specification for geologic isolation in salt repositories. Subject areas treated include containment and isolation, operational period safety, criticality control, waste form/production canister identification, and waste package performance testing requirements. This document was generated for use in the development of conceptual waste package designs in salt. It will be revised as additional data, analyses, and regulatory requirements become available.

  17. A kinetic approach of sulphur behaviour in borosilicate glasses and melts: implications for sulphate incorporation in nuclear waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenoir, Marion [Service de Confinement des Dechets et Vitrification - Laboratoire d' Etudes de Base sur les Verres, CEA Valrho, Centre de Marcoule, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Physique des Mineraux et des Magmas, UMR 7047 - CNRS, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, 7 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Grandjean, Agnes [Service de Confinement des Dechets et Vitrification - Laboratoire d' Etudes de Base sur les Verres, CEA Valrho, Centre de Marcoule, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Neuville, Daniel R. [Physique des Mineraux et des Magmas, UMR 7047 - CNRS, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, 7 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2008-07-01

    The kinetics of sulphate decomposition in a borosilicate melt were studied using in situ Raman spectroscopy. This technique permits the quantification of the amount of sulphate dissolved in a borosilicate glass as a function of heating time by comparison with measurements obtained by microprobe WDS (Wavelength Dispersive Spectrometry). In order to quantify the content of sulphate obtained by Raman spectroscopy, the integrated intensity of the sulphate band at 985 cm{sup -1} was scaled to the sum of the integrated bands between 800 and 1200 cm{sup -1}, bands that are assigned to Q{sup n} silica units on the basis of previous literature. Viscosities of some borosilicate glasses are also presented here in order to study the kinetics of sulphate decomposition as a function of the viscosity of the melt. This underlines the importance of variations in viscosity depending on the composition of the melt and thus shows that viscosity is an important parameter governing the kinetics of decomposition of sulphate in borosilicate glasses. (authors)

  18. Calcium-borosilicate glass-ceramics wasteforms to immobilize rare-earth oxide wastes from pyro-processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Miae [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Jong, E-mail: jheo@postech.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, Gyeongbuk, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Engineering, Adama Science and Technology University (ASTU), PO Box 1888, Adama (Ethiopia)

    2015-12-15

    Glass-ceramics containing calcium neodymium(cerium) oxide silicate [Ca{sub 2}Nd{sub 8-x}Ce{sub x}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2}] crystals were fabricated for the immobilization of radioactive wastes that contain large portions of rare-earth ions. Controlled crystallization of alkali borosilicate glasses by heating at T ≥ 750 °C for 3 h formed hexagonal Ca–silicate crystals. Maximum lanthanide oxide waste loading was >26.8 wt.%. Ce and Nd ions were highly partitioned inside Ca–silicate crystals compared to the glass matrix; the rare-earth wastes are efficiently immobilized inside the crystalline phases. The concentrations of Ce and Nd ions released in a material characterization center-type 1 test were below the detection limit (0.1 ppb) of inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Normalized release values performed by a product consistency test were 2.64·10{sup −6} g m{sup −2} for Ce ion and 2.19·10{sup −6} g m{sup −2} for Nd ion. Results suggest that glass-ceramics containing calcium neodymium(cerium) silicate crystals are good candidate wasteforms for immobilization of lanthanide wastes generated by pyro-processing. - Highlights: • Glass-ceramic wasteforms containing Ca{sub 2}Nd{sub 8-x}Ce{sub x}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} crystals were synthesized to immobilize lanthanide wastes. • Maximum lanthanide oxide waste loading was >26.8 wt.%. • Ce and Nd ions were highly partitioned inside Ca–Nd–silicate crystals compared to glass matrix. • Amounts of Ce and Nd ions released in the material characterization center-type 1 were below the detection limit (0.1 ppb). • Normalized release values performed by a PCT were 2.64• 10{sup −6} g m{sup −2} for Ce ions and 2.19• 10{sup −6} g m{sup −2} for Nd ions.

  19. RHENIUM SOLUBILITY IN BOROSILICATE NUCLEAR WASTE GLASS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE PROCESSING AND IMMOBILIZATION OF TECHNETIUM-99 (AND SUPPORTING INFORMATION WITH GRAPHICAL ABSTRACT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AA KRUGER; A GOEL; CP RODRIGUEZ; JS MCCLOY; MJ SCHWEIGER; WW LUKENS; JR, BJ RILEY; D KIM; M LIEZERS; P HRMA

    2012-08-13

    The immobilization of 99Tc in a suitable host matrix has proved a challenging task for researchers in the nuclear waste community around the world. At the Hanford site in Washington State in the U.S., the total amount of 99Tc in low-activity waste (LAW) is {approx} 1,300 kg and the current strategy is to immobilize the 99Tc in borosilicate glass with vitrification. In this context, the present article reports on the solubility and retention of rhenium, a nonradioactive surrogate for 99Tc, in a LAW sodium borosilicate glass. Due to the radioactive nature of technetium, rhenium was chosen as a simulant because of previously established similarities in ionic radii and other chemical aspects. The glasses containing target Re concentrations varying from 0 to10,000 ppm by mass were synthesized in vacuum-sealed quartz ampoules to minimize the loss of Re by volatilization during melting at 1000 DC. The rhenium was found to be present predominantly as Re7 + in all the glasses as observed by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). The solubility of Re in borosilicate glasses was determined to be {approx}3,000 ppm (by mass) using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). At higher rhenium concentrations, some additional material was retained in the glasses in the form of alkali perrhenate crystalline inclusions detected by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and laser ablation-ICP mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Assuming justifiably substantial similarities between Re7 + and Tc 7+ behavior in this glass system, these results implied that the processing and immobilization of 99Tc from radioactive wastes should not be limited by the solubility of 99Tc in borosilicate LAW glasses.

  20. Additive manufacturing of borosilicate glass (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Junjie; Goldstein, Jonathan T.; Urbas, Augustine M.; Bristow, Douglas A.; Landers, Robert G.; Kinzel, Edward C.

    2017-02-01

    Glasses including have significant scientific and engineering applications including optics, communications, electronics, and hermetic seals. This paper investigates a filament fed process for Additive Manufacturing (AM) of borosilicate glasses. Compared to soda-lime glasses, borosilicate glasses have improved coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and are widely used because of thermal shock resistance. In this work, borosilicate glass filaments are fed into a CO2 laser generated melt pool, smoothly depositing material onto the workpiece. Single tracks are printed to explore the effects that different process parameters have on the morphology of printed glass as well as the residual stress trapped in the glass. The transparency of glass allows residual stress to be measured using a polariscope. The effect of the substrate as well and substrate temperature are analyzed. We show that if fracture due to thermal shock can be avoided during deposition, then the residual stress can be relieved with an annealing step, removing birefringence. When combined with progress toward avoiding bubble entrapment in printed glass, we show the AM approach has the potential to produce high quality optically transparent glass for optical applications.

  1. Topological Principles of Borosilicate Glass Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, J. C.; Youngman, R. E.

    2011-01-01

    and laboratory glassware to high-tech applications such as liquid crystal displays. In this paper, we investigate the topological principles of borosilicate glass chemistry covering the extremes from pure borate to pure silicate end members. Based on NMR measurements, we present a two-state statistical...

  2. Dissimilar behavior of technetium and rhenium in borosilicate waste glass as determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Lukens, Wayne W.; McKeown, David A.; Buechele, Andrew C.; Muller, Isabelle S.; Shuh, David K.; Pegg, Ian L.

    2006-01-01

    Technetium-99 is an abundant, long-lived (t1/2 = 213,000 yr) fission product that creates challenges for the safe, long-term disposal of nuclear waste. While 99Tc receives attention largely due to its high environmental mobility, it also causes problems during its incorporation into nuclear waste glass due to the volatility of Tc(VII) compounds. This volatility decreases the amount of 99Tc stabilized in the waste glass and causes contamination of the waste glass melter and off-gas system...

  3. Topological Principles of Borosilicate Glass Chemistry - An Invited Talk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mauro, J.C.; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Youngman, R. E.

    Borosilicate glasses display a rich complexity of chemical behavior depending on the details of their composition and thermal history. We investigate the topological principles of borosilicate glass chemistry covering the extremes from pure borate to pure silicate end members. Based on NMR measur...

  4. Antagonist effects of calcium on borosilicate glass alteration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercado-Depierre, S. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Angeli, F., E-mail: frederic.angeli@cea.fr [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Frizon, F. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SECM LP2C, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Gin, S. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France)

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •Kinetic study of glass alteration is investigated in calcium-enriched solutions. •New insights into silicon–calcium interactions in glass/cement systems are proposed. •Glass alteration is controlled by pH, Ca concentration and reaction progress. •Evidence of antagonist effects according to the importance of these parameters. -- Abstract: Numerous studies have been conducted on glass and cement durability in contact with water, but very little work to date has focused directly on interactions between the two materials. These interactions are mostly controlled by silicon–calcium reactivity. However, the physical and chemical processes involved remain insufficiently understood to predict the evolution of coupled glass–cement systems used in several industrial applications. Results are reported from borosilicate glass alteration in calcium-rich solutions. Our data show that four distinct behaviors can be expected according to the relative importance of three key parameters: the pH, the reaction progress (short- or long-term alteration) and the calcium concentration. Glass alteration is thus controlled by specific mechanisms depending on the solution chemistry: calcium complexation at the glass surface, precipitation of calcium silicate hydrates (C–S–H) or calcium incorporation in the altered layer. These findings highlight the impact of silicon–calcium interactions on glass durability and open the way for a better understanding of glass–cement mixing in civil engineering applications as well as in nuclear waste storage.

  5. β-Irradiation Effects on the Formation and Stability of CaMoO4in a Soda Lime Borosilicate Glass Ceramic for Nuclear Waste Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Karishma B; Boizot, Bruno; Facq, Sébastien P; Lampronti, Giulio I; Peuget, Sylvain; Schuller, Sophie; Farnan, Ian

    2017-02-06

    Molybdenum solubility is a limiting factor to actinide loading in nuclear waste glasses, as it initiates the formation of water-soluble crystalline phases such as alkali molybdates. To increase waste loading efficiency, alternative glass ceramic structures are sought that prove resistant to internal radiation resulting from radioisotope decay. In this study, selective formation of water-durable CaMoO 4 in a soda lime borosilicate is achieved by introducing up to 10 mol % MoO 3 in a 1:1 ratio to CaO using a sintering process. The resulting homogeneously dispersed spherical CaMoO 4 nanocrystallites were analyzed using electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies prior to and post irradiation, which replicated internal β-irradiation damage on an accelerated scale. Following 0.77 to 1.34 GGy of 2.5 MeV electron radiation CaMoO 4 does not exhibit amorphization or significant transformation. Nor does irradiation induce glass-in-glass phase separation in the surrounding amorphous matrix, or the precipitation of other molybdates, thus proving that excess molybdenum can be successfully incorporated into a structure that it is resistant to β-irradiation proportional to 1000 years of storage without water-soluble byproducts. The CaMoO 4 crystallites do however exhibit a nonlinear Scherrer crystallite size pattern with dose, as determined by a Rietveld refinement of XRD patterns and an alteration in crystal quality as deduced by anisotropic peak changes in both XRD and Raman spectroscopy. Radiation-induced modifications in the CaMoO 4 tetragonal unit cell occurred primarily along the c-axis indicating relaxation of stacked calcium polyhedra. Concurrently, a strong reduction of Mo 6+ to Mo 5+ during irradiation is observed by EPR, which is believed to enhance Ca mobility. These combined results are used to hypothesize a crystallite size alteration model based on a combination of relaxation and diffusion

  6. Irradiation stability of R7T7-type borosilicate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peuget, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Rhone Valley Research Center, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France)]. E-mail: sylvain.peuget@cea.fr; Cachia, J.-N. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Rhone Valley Research Center, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France); Jegou, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Rhone Valley Research Center, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France); Deschanels, X. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Rhone Valley Research Center, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France); Roudil, D. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Rhone Valley Research Center, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France); Broudic, V. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Rhone Valley Research Center, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France); Delaye, J.M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Rhone Valley Research Center, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France); Bart, J.-M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Rhone Valley Research Center, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France)

    2006-08-01

    High-level nuclear waste containment glass is subjected to irradiation-induced stresses whose consequences must be assessed to guarantee the material behavior over time. Alpha decay from the minor actinides confined in the glass structure is responsible for most of the atom displacements. Minor actinide concentrations in the glass exceeding current levels are under consideration for future vitrification scenarios. Four R7T7-type borosilicate glass samples doped with 0.04, 0.4, 1.2 and 3.25 wt% {sup 244}CmO{sub 2} were fabricated to study not only the cumulative effect of high alpha decay doses (>10{sup 19} {alpha}/g) but also of the dose rate. The homogeneity of the materials and their chemical compositions were characterized to ensure they were suitably representative for the experimental program. The macroscopic behavior of the glasses was characterized for doses up to 3 x 10{sup 18} {alpha}/g. No significant effect on the initial alteration rate was detected which means that the chemical reactivity of the glass with pure water is not affected by such levels of alpha doses. The glass swelled slightly depending on the dose, saturating at about 0.5% after receiving a dose of about 2 x 10{sup 18} alpha disintegrations per gram of glass. The mechanical properties were observed to improve appreciably, with lower hardness but greater fracture toughness. A stabilization phenomenon comparable to that of the glass density was also observed. Comparing the experimental data with other findings obtained by atomistic modeling and external irradiation suggests that nuclear interactions caused by alpha decay recoil nuclei could be responsible for the experimental variations observed. The possible origins of the observed variations in macroscopic properties are also discussed.

  7. Effects of alpha radiation on hardness and toughness of the borosilicate glass applied to radioactive wastes immobilization; Efectos de la radiacion alfa en la dureza y tenacidad de un vidrio borosilicato utilizado para inmovilizacion de residuos nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, Miguel Oscar; Bernasconi, Norma B. Messi de; Bevilacqua, Arturo Miguel; Arribere, Maria Angelica; Heredia, Arturo D.; Sanfilippo, Miguel [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche

    1999-11-01

    Borosilicate german glass SG7 samples, obtained by frit sintering, were irradiated with different fluences of thermal neutrons in the nucleus of a nuclear reactor. The nuclear reaction {sup 10} B(n,{alpha}){sup 7} Li, where the {sup 10} B isotope is one of the natural glass components, was used to generate alpha particles throughout the glass volume. The maximum alpha disintegration per unit volume achieved was equivalent to that accumulated in a borosilicate glass with nuclear wastes after 3.8 million years. Through Vickers indentations values for microhardness, stress for 50% fracture probability (Weibull statistics) and estimation of the toughness were obtained as a function of alpha radiation dose. Two counterbalanced effects were found: that due to the disorder created by the alpha particles in the glass and that due to the annealing during irradiation (temperature below 240 deg C). Considering the alpha radiation effect, glasses tend decrease Vickers hardness, and to increase thr 50% fracture probability stress with the dose increase. (author) 11 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Monte Carlo Simulations of Coupled Diffusion and Surface Reactions during the Aqueous Corrosion of Borosilicate Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Pierce, Eric M.; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Borosilicate nuclear waste glasses develop complex altered layers as a result of coupled processes such as hydrolysis of network species, condensation of Si species, and diffusion. However, diffusion has often been overlooked in Monte Carlo models of the aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses. Therefore, three different models for dissolved Si diffusion in the altered layer were implemented in a Monte Carlo model and evaluated for glasses in the compositional range (75-x) mol% SiO2 (12.5+x/2) mol% B2O3 and (12.5+x/2) mol% Na2O, where 0 ≤ x ≤ 20%, and corroded in static conditions at a surface-to-volume ratio of 1000 m-1. The three models considered instantaneous homogenization (M1), linear concentration gradients (M2), and concentration profiles determined by solving Fick’s 2nd law using a finite difference method (M3). Model M3 revealed that concentration profiles in the altered layer are not linear and show changes in shape and magnitude as corrosion progresses, unlike those assumed in model M2. Furthermore, model M3 showed that, for borosilicate glasses with a high forward dissolution rate compared to the diffusion rate, the gradual polymerization and densification of the altered layer is significantly delayed compared to models M1 and M2. Models M1 and M2 were found to be appropriate models only for glasses with high release rates such as simple borosilicate glasses with low ZrO2 content.

  9. Page 1 -- Static and impact fatigue behaviour of borosilicate glass ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Comparison of impact fatigue lifetimes measured under liquid nitrogen and normal laboratory atmosphere (relative humidity 92%; temperature 30°C). Arrowed points indicate unbroken samples. below the threshold strength is a real phenomenon in the case of pristine borosilicate glasses. Fatigue tests under liquid nitrogen ...

  10. Effect of Zn- and Ca-oxides on the structure and chemical durability of simulant alkali borosilicate glasses for immobilisation of UK high level wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hua, E-mail: nzhangh@aliyun.com [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275-93, 102413 Beijing (China); Corkhill, Claire L.; Heath, Paul G.; Hand, Russell J.; Stennett, Martin C. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Hyatt, Neil C., E-mail: n.c.hyatt@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Spinel crystallization incorporates ZnO from base glass, displacing Mg and Ni. • Raman spectroscopy demonstrates significant impact on glass structure by addition of ZnO to base glass. • Addition of ZnO reduces glass dissolution rate at early time periods (up to 28 days). - Abstract: Compositional modification of United Kingdom high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses was investigated with the aim of understanding the impact of adopting a ZnO/CaO modified base glass on the vitrified product phase assemblage, glass structure, processing characteristics and dissolution kinetics. Crystalline spinel phases were identified in the vitrified products derived from the Na{sub 2}O/Li{sub 2}O and the ZnO/CaO modified base glass compositions; the volume fraction of the spinel crystallites increased with increasing waste loading from 15 to 20 wt%. The spinel composition was influenced by the base glass components; in the vitrified product obtained with the ZnO/CaO modified base glass, the spinel phase contained a greater proportion of Zn, with a nominal composition of (Zn{sub 0.60}Ni{sub 0.20}Mg{sub 0.20})(Cr{sub 1.37}Fe{sub 0.63})O{sub 4}. The addition of ZnO and CaO to the base glass was also found to significantly alter the glass structure, with changes identified in both borate and silicate glass networks using Raman spectroscopy. In particular, these glasses were characterised by a significantly higher Q{sup 3} species, which we attribute to Si–O–Zn linkages; addition of ZnO and CaO to the glass composition therefore enhanced glass network polymerisation. The increase in network polymerisation, and the presence of spinel crystallites, were found to increase the glass viscosity of the ZnO/CaO modified base glass; however, the viscosities were within the accepted range for nuclear waste glass processing. The ZnO/CaO modified glass compositions were observed to be significantly more durable than the Na{sub 2}O/Li{sub 2}O base glass up to 28 days, due to

  11. Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Borosilicate Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrissey, Timothy G [ORNL; Ferber, Mattison K [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Fox, Ethan E [ORNL

    2012-05-01

    This report summarizes US Army TARDEC sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Borofloat borosilicate glass, and is a follow-up to a similar study completed by the authors on Starphire soda-lime silicate glass last year. The response of the borosilicate glass to impact testing at different angles was also studied. The Borofloat glass was supplied by the US Army Research Laboratory and its tin-side was impacted or indented. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Borofloat. Seven sphere materials were used whose densities bracket that of rock: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, silicon nitride, aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide, carbon steel, and a chrome steel. A gas gun or a ball-drop test setup was used to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against the glass tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Borofloat were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the seven sphere-Borofloat-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) BS glass responded similarly to soda-lime silicate glass when spherically indented but quite differently under sphere impact conditions; (2) Frictional effects contributed to fracture initiation in BS glass when it spherically indented. This effect was also observed with soda-lime silicate glass; (3) The force necessary to initiate fracture in BS glass under spherical impact decreases with increasing elastic modulus of the sphere material. This trend is opposite to what was observed with soda-lime silicate glass. Friction cannot explain this trend and the authors do not have a legitimate explanation for it yet; (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic conditions than under quasi-static conditions. That

  12. Preliminary assessment of modified borosilicate glasses for chromium and ruthenium immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farid, Osama M. [Reactors Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority of Egypt, P.O. 13759, Inshas, Cairo (Egypt); Centre of Nuclear Engineering (CNE), Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2BP (United Kingdom); Abdel Rahman, R.O., E-mail: alaarehab@yahoo.com [Hot Laboratory Center, Atomic Energy Authority of Egypt, P.O. 13759, Inshas, Cairo (Egypt)

    2017-01-15

    The feasibility of using modified alkali borosilicate glasses for ruthenium and chromium immobilization is preliminary assessed by investigating the immobilization system structure under normal conditions. Within this context, reference alkali borosilicate, and simulated Magnox-modified glasses were prepared and studied. The results indicate that ruthenium is immobilized in the vitreous structure as encapsulated RuO{sub 2} crystallites that act as seeds for heterogeneous nucleation of other crystalline phases. The presence of Zn, as modifier, has contributed to chromium immobilization in zincochromite spinel structure, whereas Ca is accommodated in the vitreous structure. Immobilization performance was evaluated by conducting conservative static leach test and studying the leached glass. Leached glass morphology was altered, where near surface reference glass is leached over 400 nm and simulated Magnox-modified sample is altered over 300 nm. Normalized release rates are within normal range for borosilicate material. For simulated Magnox-modified sample, Ca and alkali structural element, i.e. Na and Li, are leached via ion-exchange reaction. The ion-exchanged fraction equals 1.06 × 10{sup −8} mol/m{sup 2} s and chromium has slightly lower normalized release rate value than ruthenium. - Highlights: • The presence of modifiers and waste oxides led to localized de-vitrification. • Ruthenium is encapsulated within the vitreous glass network as RuO{sub 2} crystals. • Chromium is immobilized within the zincochromite spinel structure. • Pitting and cracks induced by leaching did not affect the immobilization performance.

  13. Viscosity and Structure of Lithium Sodium Borosilicate Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Feng; Ping, Caiming; Zheng, yuanyuan

    Viscosity and structure of sodium borosilicate glass doped with Li2O were investigated by the rotating crucible viscometer and Fourier infrared spectrum. The melting temperature and activation energy for viscous flow of the studied melt were derived on the basis of Arrhenius equation, in order to reveal the effects of Li2O substitution on the behavior of sodium borosilicate glass. As expected, introduction of Li2O decreases the viscosity of elevated temperature melt, however, the results develop in the opposite direction when the concentration of Li2O is over 1.00 mol. This abnormal phenomenon can be explained in terms of the high ionic field of Li2O and the proportions of [BO3] and [BO4]. As the increase of Li2O, the boosting of the peak which is located about 1400 cm-1 due to the asymmetric stretching relaxation of B-O bond of [BO3] proves the decrease of free oxygen.

  14. Enhancement of thermal neutron shielding of cement mortar by using borosilicate glass powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Bo-Kil; Lee, Jun-Cheol; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2017-05-01

    Concrete has been used as a traditional biological shielding material. High hydrogen content in concrete also effectively attenuates high-energy fast neutrons. However, concrete does not have strong protection against thermal neutrons because of the lack of boron compound. In this research, boron was added in the form of borosilicate glass powder to increase the neutron shielding property of cement mortar. Borosilicate glass powder was chosen in order to have beneficial pozzolanic activity and to avoid deleterious expansion caused by an alkali-silica reaction. According to the experimental results, borosilicate glass powder with an average particle size of 13µm showed pozzolanic activity. The replacement of borosilicate glass powder with cement caused a slight increase in the 28-day compressive strength. However, the incorporation of borosilicate glass powder resulted in higher thermal neutron shielding capability. Thus, borosilicate glass powder can be used as a good mineral additive for various radiation shielding purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Irradiations effects on the structure of boro-silicated glasses: long term behaviour of nuclear waste glassy matrices; Effets d'irradiations sur la structure de verres borosilicates - comportement a long terme des matrices vitreuses de stockage des dechets nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfils, J. de

    2007-09-15

    This work deals with the long term behaviour of R7T7-type nuclear waste glasses and more particularly of non-active boro-silicated glasses made up of 3 or 5 oxides. Radioactivity of active glasses is simulated by multi energies ions implantations which reproduce the same defects. The damages due to the alpha particles are simulated by helium ions implantations and those corresponding to the recoil nucleus are obtained with gold ions ones. Minor actinides, stemming from the used fuel, is simulated by trivalent rare-earths (Eu{sup 3+} and Nd{sup 3+}). In a first part, we have shown by macroscopic experiments (Vickers hardness - swelling) and optical spectroscopies (Raman - ATR-IR) that the structure of the glassy matrices is modified under implantations until a dose of 2,3.10{sup 13} at.cm{sup -2}, which corresponds to a R7T7 storage time estimated at 300 years. Beyond this dose, no additional modifications have been observed. The second part concerns the local environment of the rare-earth ions in glasses. Two different environments were found and identified as follows: one is a silicate rich one and the other is attributed to a borate rich one. (author)

  16. Structural and crystallisation study of a rare earth alumino borosilicate glass designed for nuclear waste confinement; Etude de la structure et du comportement en cristallisation d'un verre nucleaire d'aluminoborosilicate de terre rare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintas, A

    2007-09-15

    This work is devoted to the study of a rare earth alumino borosilicate glass, which molar composition is 61,81 SiO{sub 2} - 3,05 Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - 8,94 B{sub 2}O{sub 3} - 14,41 Na{sub 2}O - 6,33 CaO - 1,90 ZrO{sub 2} - 3,56 Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and envisaged for the immobilization of nuclear wastes originating from the reprocessing of high discharge burn up spent fuel. From a structural viewpoint, we investigated the role of the modifier cations on the arrangement of the glass network through different modifications of the glass composition: variation of the Na/Ca ratio and modification of the nature of the alkali and alkaline earth cations. The NMR and Raman spectroscopic techniques were useful to determine the distribution of modifier cations among the glass network and also to cast light on the competition phenomena occurring between alkali and alkaline earth cations for charge compensation of [AlO{sub 4}]{sup -} and [BO{sub 4}]{sup -} species. The neodymium local environment could be probed by optical absorption and EXAFS spectroscopies which enabled to better understand the insertion mode of Nd{sup 3+} ions among the silicate domains of the glass network. Concerning the crystallization behavior we were interested in how the glass composition may influence the crystallization processes and especially the formation of the apatite phase of composition Ca{sub 2}Nd{sub 8}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2}. In particular, this work underlined the important role of both alkaline earth and rare earth cations on the crystallization of the apatite phase. (author)

  17. Effects of Optical Dopants and Laser Wavelength on Atom Probe Tomography Analyses of Borosilicate Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xiaonan; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Neeway, James J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Du, Jincheng

    2017-10-02

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is a novel analytical microscopy method that provides three dimensional elemental mapping with sub-nanometer spatial resolution and has only recently been applied to insulating glass and ceramic samples. In this paper, we have studied the influence of the optical absorption in glass samples on APT characterization by introducing different transition metal optical dopants to a model borosilicate nuclear waste glass (international simple glass). A systematic comparison is presented of the glass optical properties and the resulting APT data quality in terms of compositional accuracy and the mass spectra quality for two APT systems: one with a green laser (532 nm, LEAP 3000X HR) and one with a UV laser (355 nm, LEAP 4000X HR). These data were also compared to the study of a more complex borosilicate glass (SON68). The results show that the analysis data quality such as compositional accuracy and total ions collected, was clearly linked to optical absorption when using a green laser, while for the UV laser optical doping aided in improving data yield but did not have a significant effect on compositional accuracy. Comparisons of data between the LEAP systems suggest that the smaller laser spot size of the LEAP 4000X HR played a more critical role for optimum performance than the optical dopants themselves. The smaller spot size resulted in more accurate composition measurements due to a reduced background level independent of the material’s optical properties.

  18. Influence of processing conditions on the glass-crystal transition into borosilicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschanels, X.; Cachia, J.N.; Lopez, C.; Peuget, S. [CEA Marcoule, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    The precipitation of a crystalline phase in glass is observed when one element exceeds its loading limit (i.e.: solubility limit). In this work we have studied the solubility of different actinides and surrogates (lanthanides and hafnium) in borosilicate glass used for the immobilization of the high-level nuclear waste (HLW glasses). The results obtained show an increase of the solubility limits of these elements with the processing temperature and the redox potential of the melt. The elements at the oxidation state (III) exhibit a higher solubility than the element at oxidation state (IV). In this framework, cerium is an interesting element because its oxidation state tunes from (IV) to (III) as a function of the processing conditions. It is shown that the solubility of cerium can be multiplied by a factor of 20 at 1100 C. degrees. In order to have a better understanding of the mechanisms that underline the evolution of the solubility, XAFS and NMR investigation has been undertaken. Trivalent elements present the characteristics of network-modified cations while tetravalent elements look like network-former cations.

  19. Water leaching of borosilicate glasses: experiments, modeling and Monte Carlo simulations; Alteration par l'eau des verres borosilicates: experiences, modelisation et simulations Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledieu, A

    2004-10-15

    This work is concerned with the corrosion of borosilicate glasses with variable oxide contents. The originality of this study is the complementary use of experiments and numerical simulations. This study is expected to contribute to a better understanding of the corrosion of nuclear waste confinement glasses. First, the corrosion of glasses containing only silicon, boron and sodium oxides has been studied. The kinetics of leaching show that the rate of leaching and the final degree of corrosion sharply depend on the boron content through a percolation mechanism. For some glass contents and some conditions of leaching, the layer which appears at the glass surface stops the release of soluble species (boron and sodium). This altered layer (also called the gel layer) has been characterized with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. Second, additional elements have been included in the glass composition. It appears that calcium, zirconium or aluminum oxides strongly modify the final degree of corrosion so that the percolation properties of the boron sub-network is no more a sufficient explanation to account for the behavior of these glasses. Meanwhile, we have developed a theoretical model, based on the dissolution and the reprecipitation of the silicon. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations have been used in order to test several concepts such as the boron percolation, the local reactivity of weakly soluble elements and the restructuring of the gel layer. This model has been fully validated by comparison with the results on the three oxide glasses. Then, it has been used as a comprehensive tool to investigate the paradoxical behavior of the aluminum and zirconium glasses: although these elements slow down the corrosion kinetics, they lead to a deeper final degree of corrosion. The main contribution of this work is that the final degree of corrosion of borosilicate glasses results from the competition of two opposite mechanisms

  20. Aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses: experiments, modeling and Monte-Carlo simulations; Alteration par l'eau des verres borosilicates: experiences, modelisation et simulations Monte-Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledieu, A

    2004-10-01

    This work is concerned with the corrosion of borosilicate glasses with variable oxide contents. The originality of this study is the complementary use of experiments and numerical simulations. This study is expected to contribute to a better understanding of the corrosion of nuclear waste confinement glasses. First, the corrosion of glasses containing only silicon, boron and sodium oxides has been studied. The kinetics of leaching show that the rate of leaching and the final degree of corrosion sharply depend on the boron content through a percolation mechanism. For some glass contents and some conditions of leaching, the layer which appears at the glass surface stops the release of soluble species (boron and sodium). This altered layer (also called the gel layer) has been characterized with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. Second, additional elements have been included in the glass composition. It appears that calcium, zirconium or aluminum oxides strongly modify the final degree of corrosion so that the percolation properties of the boron sub-network is no more a sufficient explanation to account for the behavior of these glasses. Meanwhile, we have developed a theoretical model, based on the dissolution and the reprecipitation of the silicon. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations have been used in order to test several concepts such as the boron percolation, the local reactivity of weakly soluble elements and the restructuring of the gel layer. This model has been fully validated by comparison with the results on the three oxide glasses. Then, it has been used as a comprehensive tool to investigate the paradoxical behavior of the aluminum and zirconium glasses: although these elements slow down the corrosion kinetics, they lead to a deeper final degree of corrosion. The main contribution of this work is that the final degree of corrosion of borosilicate glasses results from the competition of two opposite mechanisms

  1. Behavior of sodium borosilicate glasses under compression using molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilymis, D. A.; Ispas, S., E-mail: simona.ispas@univ-montp2.fr [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb (L2C), UMR 5221 CNRS-Université de Montpellier, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Delaye, J.-M. [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France)

    2015-09-07

    We have performed classical molecular dynamics simulations in order to study the changes under compression in the local and medium range structural properties of three sodium borosilicate glasses with varying sodium content. These glasses have been isostatically compressed up to 20 GPa and then decompressed in order to analyze the different mechanisms that affect densification, alongside with the permanent modifications of the structure after a full compression/decompression cycle. The results show that the atomic packing is the prominent characteristic that governs the amount of densification in the glass, as well as the setup of the permanent densification. During compression, the bulk modulus increases linearly up to approximately 15 GPa and more rapidly for higher pressures, a behavior which is reflected on the rate of increase of the average coordination for B and Na. Radial distribution functions at different pressures during the cycle help to quantify the amount of distortions in the elementary structural units, with a pronounced shortening of the Na–Na and Na–O bond lengths during compression. A subsequent decomposition of the glassy matrix into elementary Voronoi volumes verifies the high compressibility of Na-rich regions.

  2. Investigations on LM6 Metal Matrix Composite with borosilicate Glass Reinforcement for Aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathnaraj, J. David; Sathish, S.

    2017-10-01

    The recycling of glass wastes from the industries and society holds a threat to the environment and leads to the need for new applications. While producing a metal matrix composite production cost is an important factor which decides the suitable application. So, while developing a new material with this low - cost has great importance in this competitive world. In this study, an metal-matrix composite fabricated from an aluminum alloy (LM6) and Borosilicate glass powder particles with % addition of 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, and 10% were produced by liquid Processing (stir casting) technique. The variations in the mechanical properties like toughness, compressive strength, hardness, and tensile were examined. The microstructures of the fabricated metal matrix composite have been obtained by using Metallographic microscope. The addition of the borosilicate glass indicated an improved behavior in the hardness and toughness properties. The Rockwell hardness value of fabricated metal matrix composite increases with the increase in % of reinforcement. The compressive and tensile strength of the fabricated MMC increases until reinforcement reaches a maximum of 7.5%. The microstructure of the fabricated MMC shows that the reinforcements were homogeneously distributed in the fabricated metal matrix composite.

  3. Investigation of gamma radiation induced changes in local structure of borosilicate glass by TDPAC and EXAFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashwani; Nayak, C.; Rajput, P.; Mishra, R. K.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Kaushik, C. P.; Tomar, B. S.

    2016-12-01

    Gamma radiation induced changes in local structure around the probe atom (Hafnium) were investigated in sodium barium borosilicate (NBS) glass, used for immobilization of high level liquid waste generated from the reprocessing plant at Trombay, Mumbai. The (NBS) glass was doped with 181Hf as a probe for time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) spectroscopy studies, while for studies using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, the same was doped with 0.5 and 2 % (mole %) hafnium oxide. The irradiated as well as un-irradiated glass samples were studied by TDPAC and EXAFS techniques to obtain information about the changes (if any) around the probe atom due to gamma irradiation. TDPAC spectra of unirradiated and irradiated glasses were similar and reminescent of amorphous materials, indicating negligible effect of gamma radiation on the microstructure around Hafnium probe atom, though the quaqdrupole interaction frequency ( ω Q) and asymmetry parameter ( η) did show a marginal decrease in the irradiated glass compared to that in the unirradiated glass. EXAFS measurements showed a slight decrease in the Hf-O bond distance upon gamma irradiation of Hf doped NBS glass indicating densification of the glass matrix, while the cordination number around hafnium remains unchanged.

  4. Investigation of gamma radiation induced changes in local structure of borosilicate glass by TDPAC and EXAFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Ashwani, E-mail: kashwani@barc.gov.in [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Radioanalytical Chemistry Division (India); Nayak, C.; Rajput, P. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Atomic and Molecular Physics Division (India); Mishra, R. K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Waste Management Division (India); Bhattacharyya, D. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Atomic and Molecular Physics Division (India); Kaushik, C. P. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Waste Management Division (India); Tomar, B. S. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Radioanalytical Chemistry Division (India)

    2016-12-15

    Gamma radiation induced changes in local structure around the probe atom (Hafnium) were investigated in sodium barium borosilicate (NBS) glass, used for immobilization of high level liquid waste generated from the reprocessing plant at Trombay, Mumbai. The (NBS) glass was doped with {sup 181}Hf as a probe for time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) spectroscopy studies, while for studies using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, the same was doped with 0.5 and 2 % (mole %) hafnium oxide. The irradiated as well as un-irradiated glass samples were studied by TDPAC and EXAFS techniques to obtain information about the changes (if any) around the probe atom due to gamma irradiation. TDPAC spectra of unirradiated and irradiated glasses were similar and reminescent of amorphous materials, indicating negligible effect of gamma radiation on the microstructure around Hafnium probe atom, though the quaqdrupole interaction frequency (ω{sub Q}) and asymmetry parameter (η) did show a marginal decrease in the irradiated glass compared to that in the unirradiated glass. EXAFS measurements showed a slight decrease in the Hf-O bond distance upon gamma irradiation of Hf doped NBS glass indicating densification of the glass matrix, while the cordination number around hafnium remains unchanged.

  5. Speciation of technetium in borosilicate glasses prepared in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukens, Wayne W.; Shuh, David K.; Muller, Isabelle S.; McKeown, David A.

    2003-12-19

    A series of glass samples were prepared analogous to high level waste glass using either glass frit or glass precursors combined with a high level waste surrogate containing NaTcO{sub 4}. Three different technetium species were observed in these glasses depending upon the synthesis conditions. If the glasses were prepared by reducing NaTcO{sub 4} to TcO{sub 2} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O with hydrazine or if a large amount of organic material was present, inclusions of TcO{sub 2} were observed. If no organic material was present, technetium was incorporated as TcO{sub 4}{sup -}. If only a small amount of organic material was present, isolated Tc(IV) sites were observed in the glass. The relative technetium retention of these glasses was estimated from the Tc K-edge height, and had no correlation with the oxidation state of the technetium. Pertechnetate was well retained in these glasses.

  6. The nature of the volatile technetium species formed during vitrification of borosilicate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childs, Bradley C.; Poineau, Frederic; Czerwinski, Kenneth R.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.

    2015-05-26

    Vitrification of sodium pertechnetate into borosilicate glass was performed in air at 1100 C. A glass with a composition similar to the one developed for vitrification of the low activity waste at the Hanford site was used. A red volatile species was observed above 600° C. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure results indicate the environment of the absorbing Tc atom consists of 2.9(6) O atoms at 1.73(2) A° , 2.2(4) O atoms at 2.02(2) A° , and 0.8(2) O atoms at 2.18(2) A° . The results are consistent with the presence of a mononuclear species with a structure closely related to TcO3(OH)(H2O)2.

  7. Influence of zeolite precipitation on borosilicate glass alteration under hyperalkaline conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado-Depierre, S.; Fournier, M.; Gin, S.; Angeli, F.

    2017-08-01

    This study enables a better understanding of how nucleation-growth of zeolites affects glass dissolution kinetics in hyperalkaline solutions characteristic of cement waters. A 20-oxide borosilicate glass, an inactive surrogate of a typical intermediate level waste glass, was altered in static mode at 50 °C in a hyperalkaline solution rich in Na+, K+ and Ca2+ and at an initial pH50°C of 12.6. Experiments were performed at four glass-surface-area-to-solution-volume (S/V) ratios to investigate various reaction progresses. Two types of glass alteration kinetics were obtained: (i) at low S/V, a sharp alteration resumption occurred after a rate drop regime, (ii) at high S/V, a high dissolution rate was maintained throughout the test duration with a slight progressive slow-down. In all the experiments, zeolites precipitated but the time taken to form stable zeolite nuclei varied dramatically depending on the S/V. Resulting changes in pH affected zeolite composition, morphology, solubility and growth rate. A change in a critical parameter such as S/V affected all the processes controlling glass dissolution.

  8. Dynamic fracture and fragmentation patterns of borosilicate laminate glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez del Río, T.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic behaviour of laminate borosilicate glasses (BSG with polyvinylbutiral (PVB interfaces (0,38 mm located at different distances from the impact point have been studied and compared with monolithic glass. The mechanical behaviour under impact loads have been studied using a compression split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB. In these experiments, the stress-strain curves of the materials at high loading rates and the capability of transmitting and reflecting the impact energy have been determined. The influence of the position of the interface on the fragmentation statistics of the SHPB recovered fragments has also been considered and analysed according to the published theoretical models.

    En este trabajo se ha estudiado los comportamientos dinámicos de un vidrio monolítico de borosilicato y varios laminados de cristal de borosilicato (BSG con intercaras de polyvinylbutiral (PVB (0,38 mm situados a diferentes distancias respecto del punto de impacto. Los resultados de las diferentes configuraciones de laminados se han comparado con el vidrio monolítico. El comportamiento mecánico bajo cargas de impacto se han estudiado realizando ensayos de compresión con una barra Hopkinson (SHPB. A partir de estos experimentos se obtienen las curvas tensión-deformación de los materiales a altas velocidades de carga y su capacidad de transmitir y reflejar la energía del impacto. La influencia de la posición de la interfaz en las estadísticas de la fragmentación de los fragmentos recuperados también se ha considerado y analizado de acuerdo a los modelos teóricos publicados.

  9. Mechanism of RuO2 crystallization in borosilicate glass: an original in situ ESEM approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucetta, Hassiba; Podor, Renaud; Stievano, Lorenzo; Ravaux, Johann; Carrier, Xavier; Casale, Sandra; Gossé, Stéphane; Monteiro, Amélie; Schuller, Sophie

    2012-03-19

    Ruthenium, a fission product arising from the reprocessing of spent uranium oxide (UOX) fuel, crystallizes in the form of acicular RuO(2) particles in high-level waste containment glass matrices. These particles are responsible for significant modifications in the physicochemical behavior of the glass in the liquid state, and their formation mechanisms are a subject of investigation. The chemical reactions responsible for the crystallization of RuO(2) particles with acicular or polyhedral shape in simplified radioactive waste containment glass are described. In situ high-temperature environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) is used to follow changes in morphology and composition of the ruthenium compounds formed by reactions at high temperature between a simplified RuO(2)-NaNO(3) precursor and a sodium borosilicate glass (SiO(2)-B(2)O(3)-Na(2)O). The key parameter in the formation of acicular or polyhedral RuO(2) crystals is the chemistry of the ruthenium compound under oxidized conditions (Ru(IV), Ru(V)). The precipitation of needle-shaped RuO(2) crystals in the melt might be associated with the formation of an intermediate Ru compound (Na(3)Ru(V)O(4)) before dissolution in the melt, allowing Ru concentration gradients. The formation of polyhedral crystals is the result of the direct incorporation of RuO(2) crystals in the melt followed by an Ostwald ripening mechanism. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  10. Photolumincence study of Sm3+ containing sodium borosilicate glasses and glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munishwar, S. R.; Roy, Kumar; Gedam, R. S.

    2017-10-01

    Glasses doped with Sm2O3 were prepared by conventional melt-quench technique. The glasses were characterized by XRD, density and glass transition temperature. These glasses were converted into glass-ceramic by two stage heat treatment schedule. Photoluminescence measurement was carried out for glasses and glass-ceramics. The glass samples when excited with 402 nm as an excitation wavelength, the luminescence spectra gives three bands at 562 nm, 601 nm and 647 nm due to 4G5/2  →  6H5/2, 4G5/2  →  6H7/2 and 4G5/2  →  6H9/2 transitions, respectively. The current study indicates that these sodium borosilicate glasses show apparent change in emission intensity when they are converted into glass ceramics. The overall study suggests that these glasses can be used for LED application.

  11. Modelling the evaporation of boron species. Part 1: Alkali-free borosilicate glass melts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpt, J.A.C. van; Beerkens, R.G.C.; Cook, S.; O'Connor, R.; Simon, J.

    2011-01-01

    A laboratory test facility has been used to measure the boron evaporation rates from borosilicate glass melts. The impact of furnace atmosphere composition and glass melt composition on the temperature dependent boron evaporation rates has been investigated experimentally. In Part 1 of this paper

  12. Corrosion testing of a plutonium-loaded lanthanide borosilicate glass made with Frit B.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, W. L.; Chemical Engineering

    2006-09-30

    Laboratory tests were conducted with a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass made with Frit B and added PuO2 (the glass is referred to herein as Pu LaBS-B glass) to measure the dependence of the glass dissolution rate on pH and temperature. These results are compared with the dependencies used in the Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model that was developed to account for HLW glasses in total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations for the Yucca Mountain repository to determine if that model can also be used to represent the release of radionuclides from disposed Pu LaBS glass by using either the same parameter values that are used for HLW glasses or parameter values specific for Pu LaBS glass. Tests were conducted by immersing monolithic specimens of Pu LaBS-B glass in six solutions that imposed pH values between about pH 3.5 and pH 11, and then measuring the amounts of glass components released into solution. Tests were conducted at 40, 70, and 90 C for 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 days at low glass-surface-area-to-solution volume ratios. As intended, these test conditions maintained sufficiently dilute solutions that the impacts of solution feedback effects on the dissolution rates were negligible in most tests. The glass dissolution rates were determined from the concentrations of Si and B measured in the test solutions. The dissolution rates determined from the releases of Si and B were consistent with the 'V' shaped pH dependence that is commonly seen for borosilicate glasses and is included in the Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model. The rate equation in that model (using the coefficients determined for HLW glasses) provides values that are higher than the Pu LaBS-B glass dissolution rates that were measured over the range of pH and temperature values that were studied (i.e., an upper bound). Separate coefficients for the rate expression in acidic and alkaline solutions were also determined from the test results to model Pu LaBS-B glass dissolution

  13. SEM and AFM Studies of Two-Phase Magnetic Alkali Borosilicate Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Andreeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The morphology and composition of four types of two-phase alkali borosilicate glasses with magnetic atoms prepared by inductive melting have been studied. The results of scanning electron microscopy point to uniform distribution of Na, Si, and O atoms in these samples while magnetic iron atoms form ball-shaped agglomerates. The magnetic properties of these agglomerates have been confirmed by magnetic force microscopy. Atomic force microscopy had shown that in these samples two different morphological structures, drop-like and dendrite net, are formed. The formation of dendrite-like structure is a necessary condition for production of porous magnetic glasses. The obtained results allow us to optimize the melting and heat treatment processes leading to production of porous alkali borosilicate glasses with magnetic properties. The first results for nanocomposite materials on the basis of magnetic glasses containing the embedded ferroelectrics KH2PO4 demonstrate the effect of applied magnetic field on the ferroelectric phase transition.

  14. The Role of Fe2O3 and Light Induced on Dielectric Properties of Borosilicate Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diantoro, Markus; Prastiwi, Norma Dian; Taufiq, Ahmad; Hidayat, Nurul; Mufti, Nandang; Hidayat, Arif

    2017-05-01

    Functionally glass materials have been widely applied in various technological applications remarkably due to their optoelectric properties. In this present study, the glass was prepared from leaching product of local silica sands. Bi2O3 and Na2CO3 were added to reduce the melting point of silica sand to form silica glass and Fe2O3/B2O3 was incorporated to examine its effect on the crystal structure, morphology, and light-induced dielectric properties of the borosilicate-based fuctional glass. The characterizations were conducted by means of Differential Thermal Analyses (DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and capacitance meter under the influence of light intensity. The XRD pattern shows the absence of any sharp diffraction peak indicates the amorphous state of the borosilicate glass. While the SEM image shows that the borosilicate glass exhibited amorphous characteristic. Furthermore, the increasing of Fe2O3 tends to reduce the dielectric constant. On the other hand, the increase of light intensity increase the dielectric constant with a step like properties.

  15. Fabrication of Low Noise Borosilicate Glass Nanopores for Single Molecule Sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayesh A Bafna

    Full Text Available We show low-cost fabrication and characterization of borosilicate glass nanopores for single molecule sensing. Nanopores with diameters of ~100 nm were fabricated in borosilicate glass capillaries using laser assisted glass puller. We further achieve controlled reduction and nanometer-size control in pore diameter by sculpting them under constant electron beam exposure. We successfully fabricate pore diameters down to 6 nm. We next show electrical characterization and low-noise behavior of these borosilicate nanopores and compare their taper geometries. We show, for the first time, a comprehensive characterization of glass nanopore conductance across six-orders of magnitude (1M-1μM of salt conditions, highlighting the role of buffer conditions. Finally, we demonstrate single molecule sensing capabilities of these devices with real-time translocation experiments of individual λ-DNA molecules. We observe distinct current blockage signatures of linear as well as folded DNA molecules as they undergo voltage-driven translocation through the glass nanopores. We find increased signal to noise for single molecule detection for higher trans-nanopore driving voltages. We propose these nanopores will expand the realm of applications for nanopore platform.

  16. The Impact of Na—H+ Exchange on Long-Term Borosilicate Glass Corrosion: Experiments and Field Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Icenhower, Jonathan P; Pierce, Eric M; McGrail, B Peter

    2009-05-01

    New insights from laboratory experiments coupled with field observations indicate that pore water solutions that eventually breach containment materials in disposal systems will interact with sodium-excess borosilicate waste glass in an unexpected way. Because many glass waste forms are relatively sodium-rich, they are especially vulnerable to Na+—H+ exchange (ion exchange or simply, IEX). Although the kinetics of this process has been previously investigated for early-stage glass reactions, the implications of IEX for long-term dissolution resistance have not yet been realized. Non-radioactive glass with major- and minor-element chemical compositions similar to Hanford high-Na waste glass were subjected to dissolution experiments to quantify the rates of matrix dissolution and IEX rates. Single-Pass Flow-Through (SPFT) tests quantified the IEX rate at 40°C pH = 8 and silica saturation and showed a dependence upon the fraction of excess sodium in the glass. The equation for the rate (in moles of sodium released per meter squared per second) dependence on excess sodium is: log10rate[mol/(m2∙s)] = 0.63R + (-11.0); r2 = 0.86 where R = molar Na+/(M3+). Further, rates of Na release are slower by ≥30% in D2O-based solutions compared to those in H2O. These results are the hallmark of IEX reactions. Our results are compared against those from a lysimeter field experiment consisting of glasses buried in Hanford sand and to dissolution experiments conducted with a Pressurized Unsaturated Flow (PUF) apparatus. These longer-term tests indicate an initial decrease in dissolution rate by a factor of 10×, and then a constant steady-state rate thereafter. Thus, these data show that IEX reactions are important at near-saturation conditions and effectively prevent dissolution rates from falling below a minimum value. In sum, IEX modifies the long-term behavior of glass dissolution and models cannot assume that dissolution of Na-rich borosilicate glass will decrease by a

  17. New insight into nanoparticle precipitation by electron beams in borosilicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabri, M.M.; Moebus, G. [University of Sheffield, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-15

    Nanoprecipitation in different oxide glasses by means of electron irradiation in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been compared in this study. Upon irradiation, groups or patterns of nanoparticles with various morphologies and sizes were formed in borosilicate glasses, loaded with zinc, copper, and silver. The study successfully includes loading ranges for the target metal from doping level (1%) over medium level (20%) to majority phase (60%). It is found that particle patterning resolution is affected by parallel processes of amorphous phase separation, glass ablation, and delocalised precipitation. In addition, via an in-situ study, it is confirmed that by heating alone without irradiation, no precipitate nanoparticles form. (orig.)

  18. Influence of Cu doping in borosilicate bioactive glass and the properties of its derived scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 2001804 (China); Zhao, Shichang [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200233 (China); Xiao, Wei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Center for Biomedical Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409-0340 (United States); Xue, Jingzhe [Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Shen, Youqu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Center for Biomedical Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409-0340 (United States); Zhou, Jie; Huang, Wenhai [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 2001804 (China); Rahaman, Mohamed N. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Center for Biomedical Science and Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO 65409-0340 (United States); Zhang, Changqing, E-mail: shzhangchangqing@163.com [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200233 (China); Wang, Deping, E-mail: wdpshk@tongji.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 2001804 (China)

    2016-01-01

    Copper doped borosilicate glasses (BG–Cu) were studied by means of FT-IR, Raman, UV–vis and NMR spectroscopies to investigate the changes that appeared in the structure of borosilicate glass matrix by doping copper ions. Micro-fil and immunohistochemistry analysis were applied to study the angiogenesis of its derived scaffolds in vivo. Results indicated that the Cu ions significantly increased the B–O bond of BO{sub 4} groups at 980 cm{sup −1}, while they decrease that of BO{sub 2}O{sup −} groups at 1440–1470 cm{sup −1} as shown by Raman spectra. A negative shift was observed from {sup 11}B and {sup 29}Si NMR spectra. The {sup 11}B NMR spectra exhibited a clear transformation from BO{sub 3} into BO{sub 4} groups, caused by the agglutination effect of the Cu ions and the charge balance of the agglomerate in the glass network, leading to a more stable glass network and lower ions release rate in the degradation process. Furthermore, the BG–Cu scaffolds significantly enhanced blood vessel formation in rat calvarial defects at 8 weeks post-implantation. Generally, it suggested that the introduction of Cu into borosilicate glass endowed glass and its derived scaffolds with good properties, and the cooperation of Cu with bioactive glass may pave a new way for tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Agglutination effect of Cu{sup 2+} and charge balance of agglomerate lead to more stable glass. • Lower degradability and lower ions release were found in BG-Cu scaffolds. • Excellent angiogenesis and sustain Cu{sup 2+} release were endowed by doping Cu.

  19. Ultrasonic and structural features of some borosilicate glasses ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-06-09

    Jun 9, 2017 ... Abstract. A quaternary glass system Na1.4B2.8Six Pb0.3−x O5.2+x , with 0 ≤x ≤ 0.3, was prepared and studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, density and ultrasonic techniques to debate the issue of the role of SiO2 in the structure of lead alkali borate glasses. The results indicate that SiO2 ...

  20. Effects of system size and cooling rate on the structure and properties of sodium borosilicate glasses from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lu; Du, Jincheng

    2018-01-14

    Borosilicate glasses form an important glass forming system in both glass science and technologies. The structure and property changes of borosilicate glasses as a function of thermal history in terms of cooling rate during glass formation and simulation system sizes used in classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation were investigated with recently developed composition dependent partial charge potentials. Short and medium range structural features such as boron coordination, Si and B Qn distributions, and ring size distributions were analyzed to elucidate the effects of cooling rate and simulation system size on these structure features and selected glass properties such as glass transition temperature, vibration density of states, and mechanical properties. Neutron structure factors, neutron broadened pair distribution functions, and vibrational density of states were calculated and compared with results from experiments as well as ab initio calculations to validate the structure models. The results clearly indicate that both cooling rate and system size play an important role on the structures of these glasses, mainly by affecting the 3B and 4B distributions and consequently properties of the glasses. It was also found that different structure features and properties converge at different sizes or cooling rates; thus convergence tests are needed in simulations of the borosilicate glasses depending on the targeted properties. The results also shed light on the complex thermal history dependence on structure and properties in borosilicate glasses and the protocols in MD simulations of these and other glass materials.

  1. Effects of system size and cooling rate on the structure and properties of sodium borosilicate glasses from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lu; Du, Jincheng

    2018-01-01

    Borosilicate glasses form an important glass forming system in both glass science and technologies. The structure and property changes of borosilicate glasses as a function of thermal history in terms of cooling rate during glass formation and simulation system sizes used in classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation were investigated with recently developed composition dependent partial charge potentials. Short and medium range structural features such as boron coordination, Si and B Qn distributions, and ring size distributions were analyzed to elucidate the effects of cooling rate and simulation system size on these structure features and selected glass properties such as glass transition temperature, vibration density of states, and mechanical properties. Neutron structure factors, neutron broadened pair distribution functions, and vibrational density of states were calculated and compared with results from experiments as well as ab initio calculations to validate the structure models. The results clearly indicate that both cooling rate and system size play an important role on the structures of these glasses, mainly by affecting the 3B and 4B distributions and consequently properties of the glasses. It was also found that different structure features and properties converge at different sizes or cooling rates; thus convergence tests are needed in simulations of the borosilicate glasses depending on the targeted properties. The results also shed light on the complex thermal history dependence on structure and properties in borosilicate glasses and the protocols in MD simulations of these and other glass materials.

  2. IR study of Pb–Sr titanate borosilicate glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    to study their structure systematically. IR spectrum of each glass composition shows a number of absorption bands. These bands are strongly influenced by the increasing substitution of SrO for PbO. Various bands shift with composition. Absorption peaks occur due to the vibrational mode of the borate network in these ...

  3. Ultrasonic and structural features of some borosilicate glasses ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... was prepared and studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, density and ultrasonic techniques to debate the issue of the role of SiO2 in the structureof lead alkali borate glasses. The results indicate that SiO2 generates an abundance of bridging oxygen atoms, [BO 4 ] and [SiO 4 ] structural units and changes the ...

  4. Electrical conductivity and viscosity of borosilicate glasses and melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehrt, Doris; Keding, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    by impedance measurements in a wide temperature range (250 to 1450°C). The activation energies were calculated by Arrhenius plots in various temperature regions: below the glass transition temperature, Tg, above the melting point, Tl, and between Tg and Tl. Viscosity measurements were carried out...

  5. Electron and electron-ion sequential irradiation of borosilicate glasses: Impact of the pre-existing defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Anamul H.; Monnet, I.; Boizot, B.; Jégou, C.; Peuget, S.

    2017-06-01

    A three-oxide sodium borosilicate glass was irradiated with 2.3 MeV electrons up to 0.15 GGy and 4.6 GGy, and subsequently with 96 MeV Xe ions. The irradiated samples were characterised using Raman spectroscopy, ToF-SIMS, microhardness and surface profilometry. Electron irradiation of the pristine glasses resulted in different structural modifications at the sample surface and in the bulk of the glass, whereas, ion irradiation of either the pristine or bulk of the electron pre-irradiated glasses induced same structural, physical and mechanical property changes. Furthermore, sample surfaces showed a different behaviour than that of the bulk upon subsequent ion irradiation. These results show that the radiation sensitivity of surfaces can significantly vary depending on the type of the irradiation. Therefore, detailed studies aimed at understanding the response of the surfaces to mono and electron-ion double-beam irradiations should be undertaken to address the long-term evolution of the nuclear waste glass matrix surfaces.

  6. Cytocompatibility studies of titania-doped calcium borosilicate bioactive glasses in-vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samudrala, Rajkumar; Abdul Azeem P; Penugurti, Vasudevarao; Manavathi, Bramanandam

    2017-08-01

    The present study aims to elucidate the applications of Titania (TiO2) doped calcium borosilicate glass as a biocompatible material in regenerative orthopedic applications. In this context, we have examined the bioactivity of various concentrations of TiO2 doped glasses with the help of simulated body fluid (SBF). Cytocompatibility, cell proliferation, and protein expression studies revealed the potential candidature of TiO2 doped glasses on osteoblast cell lines (MG-63). We hypothesized that TiO2 doped calcium borosilicate glasses are most cytocompatible material for bone implants. Glasses with composition 31B2O3-20SiO2-24.5Na2O-(24.5-x) CaO- x TiO2 (x=0,0.5,1,2) have been prepared by the conventional melt-quenching technique. After immersion of glasses in the SBF, formation of hydroxyapatite layer on the surface was confirmed by X-ray Diffractometer (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) analysis. Significant change in the pH of the body fluid was observed with the addition of titania. Degradation test was performed as per the ISO 10993. The results showed that partial substitution of TiO2 with CaO negatively influenced bioactivity; it decreased with increase in concentration of TiO2. Vickers hardness tester was used to measure the microhardness values of the prepared glasses. With the increasing of TiO2 content, the microhardness of the glass samples was increased from 545Hv to 576Hv. Cytocompatibility has been evaluated with MG-63 cells by using MTT assay. Further, we observed that there was no change in expressions of cyclin levels even after the incorporation of titania. The antibacterial properties were examined against E. coli and S. aureus. Strong antibacterial efficacy was observed for 2% TiO2 in the system. Hence it can be concluded that titania-doped borosilicate glasses may be used as potential materials in bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  7. Iron Phosphate Glasses: An Alternative for Vitrifying Certain Nuclear Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delbert E. Day; Chandra S. Ray; Cheol-Woon Kim

    2004-12-28

    Vitrification of nuclear waste in a glass is currently the preferred process for waste disposal. DOE currently approves only borosilicate (BS) type glasses for such purposes. However, many nuclear wastes, presently awaiting disposal, have complex and diverse chemical compositions, and often contain components that are poorly soluble or chemically incompatible in BS glasses. Such problematic wastes can be pre-processed and/or diluted to compensate for their incompatibility with a BS glass matrix, but both of these solutions increases the wasteform volume and the overall cost for vitrification. Direct vitrification using alternative glasses that utilize the major components already present in the waste is preferable, since it avoids pre-treating or diluting the waste, and, thus, minimizes the wasteform volume and overall cost.

  8. Determination of the free enthalpies of formation of borosilicate glasses; Determination des enthalpies libres de formation des verres borosilicates. Application a l'etude de l'alteration des verres de confinement de dechets radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linard, Y

    2000-07-01

    This work contributes to the study of the thermochemical properties of nuclear waste glasses. Results are used to discuss mechanisms and parameters integrated in alteration models of conditioning materials. Glass is a disordered material defined thermodynamically as a non-equilibrium state. Taking into account one order parameter to characterise its configurational state, the metastable equilibrium for the glass was considered and the main thermochemical properties were determined. Calorimetric techniques were used to measure heat capacities and formation enthalpies of borosilicate glasses (from 3 to 8 constitutive oxides). Formation Entropies were measured too, using the entropy theory of relaxation processes proposed by Adam and Gibbs (1965). The configurational entropy contribution were determined from viscosity measurements. This set of data has allowed the calculation of Gibb's free energies of dissolution of glasses in pure water. By comparison with leaching experiments, it has been demonstrated that the decreasing of the dissolution rate at high reaction progress cannot be associated to the approach of an equilibrium between the sound glass and the aqueous solution. The composition changes of the reaction area at the glass surface need to be considered too. To achieve a complete description of the thermodynamic stability, the equilibrium between hydrated de-alkalinized glass and/or the gel layer with the aqueous solution should also be evaluated. (author)

  9. Synthesis, Structural and Optical Investigations of (Pb, BiTiO3 Borosilicate Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandkiram Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new series of lead bismuth titanate borosilicate glasses with addition of one percent lanthanum oxide have been synthesized using melt-quench technique. X-ray diffraction patterns have been recorded to confirm the amorphous nature of the prepared glass samples. The synthesized glasses have been characterized by using various spectroscopic techniques such as UV-visible, infrared, and Raman spectroscopy. UV-visible measurements were recorded in the wavelength range from 200 to 1100 nm whereas IR and Raman spectroscopic measurements were recorded over a continuous wavenumber range from 400 to 5000 cm−1 and 1000 to 2000 cm−1 respectively. The different absorption peaks/bands were formed in IR spectral patterns. The spectral bands appear towards the lower wavenumber sides due to the Bi and Pb, content while the bands appear towards the higher wavenumber sides due to the formation of diborate and triborate network units.

  10. 3 and 4 oxidation state element solubilities in borosilicate glasses. Implement to actinides in nuclear glasses; Solubilite des elements aux degres d'oxydation (3) et (4) dans les verres de borosilicate. Application aux actinides dans les verres nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cachia, J.N

    2005-12-15

    In order to ensure optimal radionuclides containment, the knowledge of the actinide loading limits in nuclear waste glasses and also the comprehension of the solubilization mechanisms of these elements are essential. A first part of this manuscript deals with the study of the differences in solubility of the tri and tetravalent elements (actinides and surrogates) particularly in function of the melting temperature. The results obtained indicate that trivalent elements (La, Gd, Nd, Am, Cm) exhibit a higher solubility than tetravalent elements (Hf, Th, Pu). Consequently, it was planned to reduce plutonium at the oxidation state (III), the later being essentially tetravalent in borosilicate glasses. An innovating reduction process of multi-valent elements (cerium, plutonium) using silicon nitride has been developed in a second part of this work. Reduced plutonium-bearing glasses synthesized by Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} addition made it possible to double the plutonium solubility from 2 to 4 wt% at 1200 deg C. A structural approach to investigate the differences between tri and tetravalent elements was finally undertaken. These investigations were carried out by X-rays Absorption Spectroscopy (EXAFS) and NMR. Trivalent rare earth and actinide elements seem to behave as network modifiers while tetravalent elements rather present true intermediaries' behaviour. (author)

  11. High-temperature glasses for nuclear waste isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunnell, L.R.; Maupin, G.D.; Oma, K.H.

    1986-03-01

    As part of the effort to discover and evaluate viable second-generation waste forms, glasses with processing temperatures higher than the 1100 to 1200/sup 0/C used for reference borosilicate glasses are being examined. This approach allows the use of previously developed technology for producing nuclear waste glasses, with a few modifications. Low alkali high alumina-boron glasses processed at 1400/sup 0/C and containing 25 wt % simulated reprocessed commercial nuclear waste have been fabricated and evaluated for chemical durability. These glasses exhibited matrix dissolution rates at 90/sup 0/C in deionized water that are at least an order of magnitude lower than current reference glass compositions over a wide range of flow conditions. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Intrinsic dosimetry. Properties and mechanisms of thermoluminescence in commercial borosilicate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Richard A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Intrinsic dosimetry is the method of measuring total absorbed dose received by the walls of a container holding radioactive material. By considering the total absorbed dose received by a container in tandem with the physical characteristics of the radioactive material housed within that container, this method has the potential to provide enhanced pathway information regarding the history of the container and its radioactive contents. The latest in a series of experiments designed to validate and demonstrate this newly developed tool are reported. Thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetry was used to measure dose effects on raw stock borosilicate container glass up to 70 days after gamma ray, x-ray, beta particle or ultraviolet irradiations at doses from 0.15 to 20 Gy. The TL glow curve when irradiated with 60Co was separated into five peaks: two relatively unstable peaks centered near 120 and 165°C, and three relatively stable peaks centered near 225, 285, and 360°C. Depending on the borosilicate glass source, the minimum measurable dose using this technique is 0.15-0.5 Gy, which is roughly equivalent to a 24 hr irradiation at 1 cm from a 50-165 ng source of 60Co. Differences in TL glow curve shape and intensity were observed for the glasses from different geographical origins. These differences can be explained by changes in the intensities of the five peaks. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and multivariate statistical methods were used to relate the TL intensity and peaks to electron/hole traps and compositional variations.

  13. RETENTION OF SULFATE IN HIGH LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE GLASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.

    2010-09-07

    High level radioactive wastes are being vitrified at the Savannah River Site for long term disposal. Many of the wastes contain sulfate at concentrations that can be difficult to retain in borosilicate glass. This study involves efforts to optimize the composition of a glass frit for combination with the waste to improve sulfate retention while meeting other process and product performance constraints. The fabrication and characterization of several series of simulated waste glasses are described. The experiments are detailed chronologically, to provide insight into part of the engineering studies used in developing frit compositions for an operating high level waste vitrification facility. The results lead to the recommendation of a specific frit composition and a concentration limit for sulfate in the glass for the next batch of sludge to be processed at Savannah River.

  14. There Is Still Room for Improvement: Presentation of a Neutral Borosilicate Glass with Improved Chemical Stability for Parenteral Packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltres, Bettine; Tratzky, Stephan; Kass, Christof; Eichholz, Rainer; Naß, Peter

    2016-01-01

    For pharmaceutical parenteral packaging the glass compositions have always been either Type I borosilicate or Type III soda-lime glass. As both the compositions and certain chemical and physical properties are mandated by international standards, there has not been room for any changes. However, by applying only minor adjustments, a borosilicate glass was developed that showed improved chemical stability. The chemical composition is still in the range of currently used borosilicate glasses, which makes it a Type I glass according to all current pharmacopeia. A study was performed on glass vials comparing the new glass with the standard FIOLAX(®) and two other publicly available glasses. In an extraction study with water at 121 °C the new glass showed the highest chemical stability with the lowest amount of extractables. In an accelerated ageing study, which was done with water, phosphate, and carbonate buffer at 40 °C for 12 months, the new glass also proved to have the lowest amount of leachables. In this article the new glass and the results from the studies are presented, showing the reader how much of an effect can be attained with only minor adjustments if the scientific fundamentals are clear. The pharmaceutical market has been quite constant and risk-oriented due to the high impact on the safety of the patient. As any change necessitates a complicated change process, this has, in consequence, lead the industry to resist changing the parenteral primary packaging material for decades. The main glasses have either been Type I borosilicate or Type III soda-lime glass. On the other hand, a combination of improved inspection systems and the development of more sensitive biologically based drugs has elevated the standards for parental packaging materials. For example, the measurement of extractables and leachables from the packaging material steadily came into focus. In this article, a new glass is presented that still belongs to the group of Type I borosilicate

  15. Evolutions of Molecular Oxygen Formation and Sodium Migration in Xe Ion Irradiated Borosilicate Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Liang; Zhang, Duofei F.; Lv, Peng; Zhang, Jiandong; Du, Xing; Yuan, Wei; Nan, Shuai; Zhu, Zihua; Wang, Tieshan

    2016-07-23

    The modifications of a commercial borosilicate glass induced by Xe ion irradiation have been studied by Raman spectroscopy and ToF-SIMS depth profiling. A decrease in the average Si–O–Si angle, an increase in the population of three-membered rings and an increase of the glass polymerization are evidenced. The molecular oxygen appears in the irradiated glasses after the irradiation fluence reaches approximately 1015 ions/cm2. The O2 concentration decreaseswith the depth of irradiated glass at the ion fluence of 2 × 1016 ions/cm2. A sodiumdepleted layer at the surface and a depleted zone at around the penetration depth of 5 MeV Xe ions are observed. The thickness of the sodium depleted layer increases with the irradiation fluence. Moreover, comparing with previous results after electron and Ar ion irradiation, it can be concluded that the nuclear energy deposition can partially inhibit the formation of molecular oxygen and increase the threshold value of electron energy deposition for the molecular oxygen formation.

  16. Preparation and optical properties of sodium borosilicate glasses containing Sb nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Jiasong, E-mail: jiasongzhong@hdu.edu.cn [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Ma, Xin [College of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Lu, Hongwei; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Suling [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Xiang, Weidong, E-mail: xiangweidong001@126.com [College of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China)

    2014-09-01

    Highlights: • The Sb nanoparticles doped in Na{sub 2}O–B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–SiO{sub 2} glass were prepared by sol–gel methods. • Obtained glass was investigated by structural and optical measurements. • The glass was crystalline with a rhombohedral structure of Sb. • An absorption peak centered on 566 nm has been observed in doping glass. • The third-order optical nonlinearity was investigated by femtosecond Z-scan technique. - Abstract: Sb nanoparticles have been successfully prepared from SbCl{sub 3} in sodium borosilicate (Na{sub 2}O–B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–SiO{sub 2}) glass matrix by sol–gel method, involving metallic sodium as sodium source, boric acid as boron source and SiO{sub 2} come from hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane. The feasibility of process conditions were analyzed by using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric (TG), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). X-ray diffraction (XRD) study revealed that the rhombohedral structure of metal Sb have formed in the glass. The particle was found to be spherical shaped and highly monodispersed with an average size of about 32.63 nm as analyzed from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of Sb nanoparticle was studied from the UV–Vis absorption. The nonlinear optical properties were studied by using the Z-scan technique with a Ti:sapphire laser at 800 nm. Results showed that the third-order optical nonlinear susceptibility χ{sup (3)} of the glass was determined to be 4.85 × 10{sup −11} esu.

  17. Vanadium dioxide thin film with low phase transition temperature deposited on borosilicate glass substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Zhangli; Chen Sihai, E-mail: cshai99@mail.hust.edu.cn; Wang Boqing; Huang Ying; Liu Nengfu; Xu Jin; Lai Jianjun

    2011-04-29

    A nanostructured vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) thin film showing a low metal-insulator transition temperature of 30 {sup o}C has been fabricated through reactive ion beam sputtering followed by thermal annealing. The thin film was grown on borosilicate glass substrate at the temperature of 280 {sup o}C with a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} buffer layer. Both scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images have been taken to investigate the configuration of VO{sub 2} thin film. The average height of the crystallite is 20 nm and the grain size ranges from 40 nm to 100 nm. The transmittance measured from low to high temperatures also reveals that the film possesses excellent switching property in infrared light at critical transition temperature, with switching efficiency of 52% at 2600 nm. This experiment paves the way of VO{sub 2} thin film's application in smart windows.

  18. Structure and chemical durability of barium borosilicate glass-ceramics containing zirconolite and titanite crystalline phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huidong; Wu, Lang; Xu, Dong; Wang, Xin; Teng, Yuancheng; Li, Yuxiang

    2015-11-01

    In order to increase the solubility of actinides in the glass matrix, the effects of CaO, TiO2, and ZrSiO4 addition (abbreviated as CTZ, in the mole ratio of 2:2:1) on crystalline phases, microstructure, and chemical durability of barium borosilicate glass-ceramics were investigated. The results show that the samples possess both zirconolite-2M and titanite phase when the CTZ content is greater than or equal to 45 wt.%. For the glass-ceramics with 45 wt.% CTZ (CTZ-45), only zirconolite-2M phase is observed after annealing at 680-740 °C for 2 h. The CTZ-45 possess zirconolite-2M and titanite phases after annealing at 700 °C first, and then annealing at 900-1050 °C for 2 h. Furthermore, the zirconolite-2M and titanite grains show a strip and brick shape, respectively. The CTZ-45 annealing at 950 °C shows the lower normalized leaching rates of B, Na and Nd when compared to that of CTZ-0 and CTZ-55.

  19. Control of high-level radioactive waste-glass melters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickford, D.F.; Coleman, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will immobilize Savannah River Site High Level Waste as a durable borosilicate glass for permanent disposal in a repository. The DWPF will be controlled based on glass composition. The following discussion is a preliminary analysis of the capability of the laboratory methods that can be used to control the glass composition, and the relationships between glass durability and glass properties important to glass melting. The glass durability and processing properties will be controlled by controlling the chemical composition of the glass. The glass composition will be controlled by control of the melter feed transferred from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT). During cold runs, tests will be conducted to demonstrate the chemical equivalence of glass sampled from the pour stream and glass removed from cooled canisters. In similar tests, the compositions of glass produced from slurries sampled from the SME and MFT will be compared to final product glass to determine the statistical relationships between melter feed and glass product. The total error is the combination of those associated with homogeneity in the SME or MFT, sampling, preparation of samples for analysis, instrument calibration, analysis, and the composition/property model. This study investigated the sensitivity of estimation of property data to the combination of variations from sampling through analysis. In this or a similar manner, the need for routine glass product sampling will be minimized, and glass product characteristics will be assured before the melter feed is committed to the melter.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS MATRICES FOR HLW RADIOACTIVE WASTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.

    2010-03-18

    Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either borosilicate glass or phosphate glass. One of the primary reasons that glass has become the most widely used immobilization media is the relative simplicity of the vitrification process, e.g. melt waste plus glass forming frit additives and cast. A second reason that glass has become widely used for HLW is that the short range order (SRO) and medium range order (MRO) found in glass atomistically bonds the radionuclides and governs the melt properties such as viscosity, resistivity, sulphate solubility. The molecular structure of glass controls contaminant/radionuclide release by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. The molecular structure is flexible and hence accounts for the flexibility of glass formulations to waste variability. Nuclear waste glasses melt between 1050-1150 C which minimizes the volatility of radioactive components such as Tc{sup 99}, Cs{sup 137}, and I{sup 129}. Nuclear waste glasses have good long term stability including irradiation resistance. Process control models based on the molecular structure of glass have been mechanistically derived and have been demonstrated to be accurate enough to control the world's largest HLW Joule heated ceramic melter in the US since 1996 at 95% confidence.

  1. The influence of ZnO incorporation on the aqueous leaching characteristics of a borosilicate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, E. R.; Gregg, D. J.; Karatchevtseva, I.; Griffiths, G. J.; Olufson, K.; Rees, Gregory J.; Hanna, John V.

    2017-10-01

    With increasing ZnO content, short term aqueous durability enhancement of all elements in borosilicate glasses containing 1.0 and 3.85 wt% ZnO was evident in 7-day PCT-B tests. In 14-day MCC-1 type leach tests conducted at 90 °C, surface alteration was very clear in the undoped glass via the formation of strongly altered amorphous material which tended to spall off the surface. No sign of crystallinity was detected by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction or electron microscopy of the surface layers and the surface material was very rich in silica. For the ZnO-bearing glasses, significant growth of particles following PCT leaching for 7 days was observed, due to a build-up of surface ZnO-containing Si-rich material and possible agglomeration. This alteration layer was also observed in MCC-1 type experiments in which cross-section SEM-EDS data were obtained. Raman, infrared and 11B and 29Si MAS NMR spectroscopy showed only slight changes in boron speciation on the addition of up to 9.1 wt% ZnO. Bulk positron annihilation lifetime spectra (PALS) of glasses containing 0-3.85 wt% ZnO could be analysed with three distinct lifetimes and also showed only slight differences. These results indicate that the basic glass structure was essentially not influenced by the ZnO content and that the passivation of the alteration layer is promoted by ZnO content.

  2. Effect of Al2O3 Nano-Filler on Properties of Alkali/Alkaline-Earth Borosilicate Glass Composite Sealants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Bok; Kim, Kwang-Joong; Yoo, Gahee; Park, Sung; Lee, Jae Chun

    2015-07-01

    The effect of adding Al2O3 nano-filler (5 and 10 vol%) to two different alkali/alkaline-earth borosilicate glass sealants, particularly on the viscosity and electrical characteristics of the glass composite sealants, was investigated to improve the cyclic sealing performance. The effects of the filler and base glass composition on the viscosities, electrical conductivities, and phase transformations of the sealants were investigated. The glass viscosity was decreased by replacing 20 mol% SrO with alkali and zirconium oxide in a base alkaline-earth glass. Alumina filler increased the high-temperature electrical conductivities, as well as the viscosities, of the heat-treated glass composite sealants. The replacement of 20 mol% SrO with alkali and zirconium oxide in the base alkaline-earth glass decreased the electrical conductivity of the heat-treated glass containing Al2O3 nano-filler.

  3. Microwave Absorption of Barium Borosilicate, Zinc Borate, Fe-Doped Alumino-Phosphate Glasses and Its Raw Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashis Kumar Mandal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study presents microwave absorption of raw materials used in barium borosilicate, Fe-doped alumina phosphate and zinc borate glass. Microwave absorption was investigated for the raw materials SiO2, Na2CO3, BaCO3, BPO4, Al(PO33, Mg(PO32, Al(OH3, TiO2. The study shows that SiO2 could be heated directly above 1000 °C within 30 min at 1.5 kW microwave output (MW power and 0.8 kW MW power is necessary to initiate heating (from 260 °C. Microwave heating of material with low dielectric loss has been investigated by increasing MW power. Microwave absorption of above glass systems has also been investigated. Dielectric properties such as loss tangent of glass as a function of temperature are presented. Glass melting under direct microwave heating was demonstrated for the studied glass systems. Temperature-Microwave power-Time (T-P-t profiles for the three glasses indicate maximum MW output power ~1 kW, 0.65 kW and ~1 kW for barium borosilicate, zinc borate glass and alumino-phosphate glass for 60 g glass melting.

  4. Results of Vertical Scanning Interferometry (VSI) of Dissolved Borosilicate Glass: Evidence for Variable Surface Features and Global Surface Retreat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Luttge, Andreas; McGrail, B. Peter; Beig, Mikhala S.; Arvidson, Rolf S.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Steele, Jackie L.; Baum, Steven R.

    2003-10-29

    Two disparate reaction mechanisms have been invoked to explain the reactivity of glass in contact with aqueous solution. One model is based on arguments from Transition State Theory (TST), which postulates that glass dissolution rates are surface reaction controlled. Alternatively, the second model argues that release of elements from glass to solution is governed by diffusion through an altered layer that forms on the surface of glass. Vertical Scanning Interferometry (VSI) is a new technique that allows one to observe surface features of specimens exposed to solution and may, potentially, be used to distinguish between competing models. We performed a series of dissolution experiments with a suite of glass compositions from chemically simple (sodium borosilicate) to complex (sixteen component borosilicate). Dissolution rates were determined using single-pass flow-through (SPFT) apparatus at 90ºC and pH = 9 and over a solution saturation interval. Upon termination of the experiments, glass coupons were examined by VSI techniques. Effluent chemistry and VSI measurements indicate a nearly constant rate of 2.2 to 3.4 g m-2 d-1 over the solution interval; rates calculated from both methods are identical within experimental uncertainty. We argue that this glass is phase separated, and propose a model for dissolution based on the relative rates of dissolution of the two glass compositions. The data are consistent with a modified version of TST and indicate the potency of VSI methods to elucidate glass reaction mechanisms.

  5. Supported TiO2 on Borosilicate Glass Plates for Efficient Photocatalytic Degradation of Fenamiphos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. El Yadini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Supported titanium dioxide (TiO2 was investigated for the photodegradation of the insecticide fenamiphos in water. The photocatalyst was immobilised on borosilicate glass plates and the kinetics of degradation were studied in a stirred tank reactor under UV irradiation. Two types of TiO2, for example, Millennium PC500 (100% anatase and Degussa P25 (80% anatase, 20% rutile, were used. Their activities have been based on the rates of insecticide disappearance. Experiments were investigated to evaluate the effect of pH and initial concentrations of fenamiphos as well as catalyst doses on the photocatalytic degradation of fenamiphos. Kinetic parameters were experimentally determined and an apparent first-order kinetic was observed. For photolysis process of fenamiphos, two photoproducts were identified and characterized using high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS. The plausible mechanism of photolysis involved is the oxidation of sulfonamide group. In presence of photocatalyst TiO2, photodegradation was observed. Under identical conditions, Degussa P25 shows higher photocatalytic activity in regard to PC500 Millennium and complete degradation was observed after 180 min.

  6. Helium mobility in SON68 borosilicate nuclear glass: A nuclear reaction analysis approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bès, R., E-mail: rene.bes@cnrs-orleans.fr [CNRS, UPR3079 CEMHTI, 1D Avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orléans cedex 2 (France); Sauvage, T. [CNRS, UPR3079 CEMHTI, 1D Avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orléans cedex 2 (France); Université d’Orléans, Faculté des Sciences, Avenue du Parc Floral, BP 6749, 45067 Orléans cedex 2 (France); Peuget, S. [CEA/DEN/VRH/DTCD/SECM/LMPA Marcoule (France); Haussy, J. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Chamssedine, F. [Université Libanaise, Faculté des Sciences V, Nabatiyeh (Lebanon); Oliviero, E. [CSNSM, CNRS/IN2P3 and Université Paris-Sud, Bât. 104-108, F-91405 Orsay (France); Fares, T. [CEA/DEN/VRH/DTCD/SECM/LMPA Marcoule (France); Vincent, L. [Institut d’Electronique Fondamentale, CNRS and Université Paris-Sud, UMR 8622, F-91405 Orsay (France)

    2013-11-15

    The {sup 3}He behavior in the non active R7T7 type borosilicate glass called SON68 has been investigated using the implantation method to introduce helium in the material. Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) was performed to follow the helium concentration depth profile evolution as a function of annealing time and temperature. In addition, in situ Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has been implemented to study the formation of helium bubbles during both implantation and annealing processes. Numerical modeling with two different approaches is proposed and discussed to investigate the helium mobility mechanisms. Our study reveals for helium incorporation by implantation at low temperature the presence of several helium populations with disparate diffusivities. The most mobile helium fraction would be attributed to atomic diffusion. The corresponding activation energy value (0.61 eV) extracted from Arrhenius graphs is in good agreement with literature data. The results also highlight that the damages associated to helium sursaturation are the source of small helium clusters formation, with a reduced mobility instead of the atomic mobility measured by the infusion technique. Small cavities that support this assumption have been observed by TEM at low temperature.

  7. Lead iron phosphate glass as a containment medium for disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatner, Lynn A.; Sales, Brian C.

    1989-01-01

    Lead-iron phosphate glasses containing a high level of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 for use as a storage medium for high-level radioactive nuclear waste. By combining lead-iron phosphate glass with various types of simulated high-level nuclear waste, a highly corrosion resistant, homogeneous, easily processed glass can be formed. For corroding solutions at 90.degree. C., with solution pH values in the range between 5 and 9, the corrosion rate of the lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass is at least 10.sup.2 to 10.sup.3 times lower than the corrosion rate of a comparable borosilicate nuclear waste glass. The presence of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 in forming the lead-iron phosphate glass is critical. Lead-iron phosphate nuclear waste glass can be prepared at temperatures as low as 800.degree. C., since they exhibit very low melt viscosities in the 800.degree. to 1050.degree. C. temperature range. These waste-loaded glasses do not readily devitrify at temperatures as high as 550.degree. C. and are not adversely affected by large doses of gamma radiation in H.sub.2 O at 135.degree. C. The lead-iron phosphate waste glasses can be prepared with minimal modification of the technology developed for processing borosilicate glass nuclear wasteforms.

  8. Laser micro-machinability of borosilicate glass surface-modified by electric field-assisted ion-exchange method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsusaka, S.; Kobayakawa, T.; Hidai, H.; Morita, N.

    2012-08-01

    In order to improve the laser micro-machinability of borosilicate glass, the glass surface was doped with metal (silver or copper) ions by an electric field-assisted ion-exchange method. Doped ions drifted and diffused into the glass substrate under a DC electric field. The concentration of metal ions within the doped area was approximately constant because the ion penetration was caused by substitution between dopant metal and inherent sodium ions. Nanosecond ultraviolet laser irradiation of metal-containing regions produced flat, smooth and defect-free holes. However, the shapes of holes were degraded when the processed hole bottoms reached ion penetration depths. A numerical analysis of ionic drift-diffusion behaviour in glass material under an electric field was also carried out. The calculated results for penetration depth and ionic flux showed good agreement with the measured values.

  9. Investigating the effect of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} addition on sodium barium borosilicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halder, Rumu, E-mail: rumuhalder24feb@gmail.com; Sengupta, Pranesh; Dey, G. K. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-700 085 (India); Sudarsan, V. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-700 085 (India); Kaushik, C. P. [Waste Management Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-700 085 (India)

    2016-05-23

    V{sub 2}O{sub 5} doped sodium barium borosilicate glasses were characterized by photoluminescence spectroscopy and electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA). The glass remains homogeneous for lower concentration of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} but a phase separation is observed when V{sub 2}O{sub 5} doping is increased beyond 5 mol%. Detailed microanalysis reveals that the phase separated glass consists of a phase containing V, Ba and Si and a separate Si rich phase within the glass matrix. The luminescence study demonstrated that at low concentration the vanadium mainly interacts with the structural units of B/Si while at higher concentrations, V-O-V/ V-O{sup −} Na{sup +}/Ba{sup 2+} linkages are formed.

  10. Synthesis, electrical and magnetic properties of sodium borosilicate glasses containing Co-ferrites nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, H.A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Menoufia University, Shibin El-Kom 32511, Menoufia (Egypt); Eltabey, M.M. [Department of Basic Engineering Science, Faculty of Engineering, Menoufia University, Shibin El-Kom, Menoufia (Egypt); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Jazan University (Saudi Arabia); Ibrahim, Samia E.; El-Deen, L.M. Sharaf; Elkholy, M.M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Menoufia University, Shibin El-Kom 32511, Menoufia (Egypt)

    2017-02-01

    Co-ferrites nanoparticles that have been prepared by the co-precipitation method were added to sodium borosilicate (Na{sub 2}O–B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–SiO{sub 2}) glass matrix by the solid solution method and they were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and magnetization measurements. (XRD) revealed the formation of the Co-ferrite magnetic crystalline phase embedded in an amorphous matrix in all the samples. The investigated samples by (TEM) showed the formation of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with a spherical shape and highly monodispersed with an average size about 13 nm. IR data revealed that the BO{sub 3} and BO{sub 4} are the main structural units of these samples network. IR spectra of the investigated samples showed the characteristic vibration bands of Co-ferrite. Composition and frequency dependent dielectric properties of the prepared samples were measured at room temperature in the frequency range 100–100 kHz. The conductivity was found to increase with increasing cobalt ferrite content. The variations of conductivity and dielectric properties with frequency and composition were discussed. Magnetic hysteresis loops were traced at room temperature using VSM and values of saturation magnetization M{sub S} and coercive field H{sub C} were determined. The obtained results revealed that a ferrimagnetic behavior were observed and as Co-ferrite concentration increases the values of M{sub S} and H{sub C} increase from 2.84 to 8.79 (emu/g) and from 88.4 to 736.3 Oe, respectively.

  11. Tungsten-doped vanadium dioxide thin films on borosilicate glass for smart window application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhangli, E-mail: zligthuang@foxmail.com [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Chen, Changhong, E-mail: ch_chen@hust.edu.cn [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Lv, Chaohong; Chen, Sihai [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: ► Tungsten-doped VO{sub 2} (W–VO{sub 2}) films with different annealing conditions were fabricated. ► W-VO{sub 2} films were found to exhibit a semiconductor-metal transition at 34 °C. ► The W atoms have been successfully doped into VO{sub 2} film and exist as W{sup 6+} in the films. ► W-VO{sub 2} films possess excellent infrared switching efficiency, i.e. 33%. -- Abstract: Tungsten-doped VO{sub 2} (W–VO{sub 2}) thin films with low metal–semiconductor transition temperature (T{sub t}) of 34 °C were grown on borosilicate glass substrates by reactive ion beam sputtering at room-temperature (RT) followed by a post annealing process. In order to investigate the thermal process effect, four samples S1–S4 were annealed at different temperatures of 490, 530, 570 and 610 °C, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscope and Raman measurements demonstrate that the tungsten atoms have been successfully doped into VO{sub 2} films. Unlike VO{sub 2} thin films which should be annealed at critical temperature, well crystallized W–VO{sub 2} films can be annealed in a wide temperature range, i.e. 530–570 °C, as revealed by both electrical and optical property investigations. Besides, the infrared (IR) transmittance measured below/above T{sub t} illustrates that W–VO{sub 2} films possess excellent switching efficiency, i.e. 33% at 2500 nm for S3. Above all, the near RT phase transition, RT deposition, easy control of annealing process and high IR switching efficiency make the W–VO{sub 2} thin film a promising material for application of smart windows.

  12. Integrated Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance Measurements in a Borosilicate Glass Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Parisi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The surface plasmon resonance (SPR technique is a well-known optical method that can be used to measure the refractive index of organic nano-layers adsorbed on a thin metal film. Although there are many configurations for measuring biomolecular interactions, SPR-based techniques play a central role in many current biosensing experiments, since they are the most suited for sensitive and quantitative kinetic measurements. Here we give some results from the analysis and numerical elaboration of SPR data from integrated optics experiments in a particular borosilicate glass, chosen for its composition offering the rather low refractive index of 1.4701 at 633 nm wavelength. These data regard the flow over the sensing region (metal window of different solutions with refractive indexes in the range of interest (1.3÷1.5 for the detection of contaminants in aqueous solutions. After a discussion of the principles of SPR, of the metal window design optimization by means of optical interaction numerical modeling, and of waveguide fabrication techniques, we give a description of system setup and experimental results. Optimum gold film window thickness and width in this guided-wave configuration has been for the first time derived and implemented on an integrated optic prototype device. Its characterization is given by means of the real time waveguide output intensity measurements, which correspond to the interaction between the sensing gold thin film window and the flowing analyte. The SPR curve was subsequently inferred. Finally, a modified version of the device is reported, with channel waveguides arranged in a Y-junction optical circuit, so that laser source stability requirements are lowered by a factor of 85 dB, making possible the use of low cost sources in practical applications.

  13. A novel Bi-doped borosilicate glass as sealant for sodium sulfur battery. Part 1: Thermophysical characteristics and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shufeng; Wen, Zhaoyin; Zhang, Qunxi; Liu, Yu

    A novel Bi-doped borosilicate glass has been developed as sealant for sodium sulfur battery. The thermophysical characteristics like thermal expansion coefficient, glass transition and softening temperatures, viscosities and densities of the Bi-doped and undoped glasses are systematically studied. It is found that the thermal expansion match between the Bi-doped glasses and alpha-alumina/beta-alumina is satisfactory. The Bi-doped glass has a viscosity around 10 5 Pa s in 800-850 °C range, which is suitable to allow a good bonding with the sealed parts. The FTIR analysis indicates that the substitution of Bi 2O 3 for SiO 2 makes the glass network less rigid. Bi 2O 3 builds the glass network as [BiO 6] unit. [BO 4] unit enters the glass network and induces the overlapped vibrations of [BO 4] unit and [SiO 4] tetrahedron. The Bi-doped glass sealant exhibits superior chemical compatibility with alpha-alumina and beta-alumina.

  14. Performance Characteristics of Waste Glass Powder Substituting Portland Cement in Mortar Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, P.; Csetényi, L. J.; Borosnyói, A.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, soda-lime glass cullet (flint, amber, green) and special glass cullet (soda-alkaline earth-silicate glass coming from low pressure mercury-discharge lamp cullet and incandescent light bulb borosilicate glass waste cullet) were ground into fine powders in a laboratory planetary ball mill for 30 minutes. CEM I 42.5N Portland cement was applied in mortar mixtures, substituted with waste glass powder at levels of 20% and 30%. Characterisation and testing of waste glass powders included fineness by laser diffraction particle size analysis, specific surface area by nitrogen adsorption technique, particle density by pycnometry and chemical analysis by X-ray fluorescence spectrophotometry. Compressive strength, early age shrinkage cracking and drying shrinkage tests, heat of hydration of mortars, temperature of hydration, X-ray diffraction analysis and volume stability tests were performed to observe the influence of waste glass powder substitution for Portland cement on physical and engineering properties of mortar mixtures.

  15. In Vitro Degradation of Borosilicate Bioactive Glass and Poly(l-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone Composite Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna Tainio

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Composite scaffolds were obtained by mixing various amounts (10, 30 and 50 weight % [wt %] of borosilicate bioactive glass and poly(l-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone (PLCL copolymer. The composites were foamed using supercritical CO2. An increase in the glass content led to a decrease in the pore size and density. In vitro dissolution/reaction test was performed in simulated body fluid. As a function of immersion time, the solution pH increased due to the glass dissolution. This was further supported by the increasing amount of Ca in the immersing solution with increasing immersion time and glass content. Furthermore, the change in scaffold mass was significantly greater with increasing the glass content in the scaffold. However, only the scaffolds containing 30 and 50 wt % of glasses exhibited significant hydroxyapatite (HA formation at 72 h of immersion. The compression strength of the samples was also measured. The Young’s modulus was similar for the 10 and 30 wt % glass-containing scaffolds whereas it increased to 90 MPa for the 50 wt % glass containing scaffold. Upon immersion up to 72 h, the Young’s modulus increased and then remained constant for longer immersion times. The scaffold prepared could have great potential for bone and cartilage regeneration.

  16. Chemical analysis of simulated high level waste glasses to support stage III sulfate solubility modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms within the DOE complex. These wastes can contain relatively high concentrations of sulfate, which has low solubility in borosilicate glass. This is a significant issue for low-activity waste (LAW) glass and is projected to have a major impact on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Sulfate solubility has also been a limiting factor for recent high level waste (HLW) sludge processed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The low solubility of sulfate in glass, along with melter and off-gas corrosion constraints, dictate that the waste be blended with lower sulfate concentration waste sources or washed to remove sulfate prior to vitrification. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerate mission completion.The objective of the current scope being pursued by SHU is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DWPF and WTP, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput at these facilities. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the model and is identified as Stage III. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to SRNL for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for the Stage III, simulated HLW glasses fabricated by SHU in support of the sulfate solubility model development.

  17. Gamma Ray Shielding Study of Barium–Bismuth–Borosilicate Glasses as Transparent Shielding Materials using MCNP-4C Code, XCOM Program, and Available Experimental Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Bagheri

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, linear and mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic number and electron density, mean free paths, and half value layer and 10th value layer values of barium–bismuth–borosilicate glasses were obtained for 662 keV, 1,173 keV, and 1,332 keV gamma ray energies using MCNP-4C code and XCOM program. Then obtained data were compared with available experimental data. The MCNP-4C code and XCOM program results were in good agreement with the experimental data. Barium–bismuth–borosilicate glasses have good gamma ray shielding properties from the shielding point of view.

  18. Canonical correlation of waste glass compositions and durability, including pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeksoy, D.; Pye, L.D. [Alfred Univ., NY (United States); Bickford, D.F.; Ramsey, W.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Control of waste glass durability is a major concern in the immobilization of radioactive and mixed wastes. Leaching rate in standardized laboratory tests is being used as a demonstration of consistency of the response of waste glasses in the final disposal environment. The leaching of silicate and borosilicate glasses containing alkali or alkaline earth elements is known to be autocatalytic, in that the initial ion exchange of alkali in the glass for hydrogen ions in water results in the formation of OH and increases the pH of the leachate. The increased pH then increases the rate of silicate network attack, accelerating the leaching effect. In well formulated glasses this effect reaches a thermodynamic equilibrium when leachate saturation of a critical species, such as silica, or a dynamic equilibrium is reached when the pH shift caused by incremental leaching has negligible effect on pH. This report analyzes results of a seven leach test on waste glasses.

  19. Canonical correlation of waste glass compositions and durability, including pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeksoy, D.; Pye, L.D. (Alfred Univ., NY (United States)); Bickford, D.F.; Ramsey, W.G. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Control of waste glass durability is a major concern in the immobilization of radioactive and mixed wastes. Leaching rate in standardized laboratory tests is being used as a demonstration of consistency of the response of waste glasses in the final disposal environment. The leaching of silicate and borosilicate glasses containing alkali or alkaline earth elements is known to be autocatalytic, in that the initial ion exchange of alkali in the glass for hydrogen ions in water results in the formation of OH and increases the pH of the leachate. The increased pH then increases the rate of silicate network attack, accelerating the leaching effect. In well formulated glasses this effect reaches a thermodynamic equilibrium when leachate saturation of a critical species, such as silica, or a dynamic equilibrium is reached when the pH shift caused by incremental leaching has negligible effect on pH. This report analyzes results of a seven leach test on waste glasses.

  20. Valence state control and third-order nonlinear optical properties of copper embedded in sodium borosilicate glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Weidong; Gao, Haihong; Ma, Li; Ma, Xin; Huang, Yunyun; Pei, Lang; Liang, Xiaojuan

    2015-05-20

    The integrated and transparent sodium borosilicate glasses that contain copper exhibiting different colors, that is, red, green, and blue were synthesized by combining the sol-gel process and heat treatment in H2 gas. To reveal substantially the cause of different colors in the glass, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution TEM (HRTEM) were systematically applied to investigate and determine the microstructure of the doped matter. The results showed three different crystals had formed in the red, green and blue glass, and the sizes of these crystals were range from 9 to 34, 1 to 6, and 1 to 5 nm, respectively. The valence state of copper was further analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The third-order nonlinear optical properties of the glasses were investigated by using Z-scan technique at the wavelength of 800 nm. Interestingly, the third-order nonlinear absorption of the red, green, and blue glass can be successfully controlled from reverse saturable absorption, no absorption to saturable absorption and the optical nonlinear susceptibility χ((3)) of the red, green and blue glass were estimated to be 6.4 × 10(-14), 1.6 × 10(-14), and 2.6 × 10(-14) esu in the single-pulse energy of 0.36 μJ, respectively.

  1. Recovery of palladium, cesium, and selenium from heavy metal alkali borosilicate glass by combination of heat treatment and leaching processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhanglian; Okada, Takashi, E-mail: t-okada@u-fukui.ac.jp; Nishimura, Fumihiro; Yonezawa, Susumu

    2017-06-05

    Highlights: • A separation technique of both noble and less noble metal from glass is studied. • Via reductive heat treatment, 80% of palladium is extracted in liquid bismuth. • Sodium–potassium-rich materials with cesium and selenium are phase separated. • From the materials, over 80% of cesium and selenium are extracted in water. - Abstract: Reductive heat-treatment and leaching process were applied to a simulated lead or bismuth soda-potash-borosilicate glass with palladium, cesium, and selenium to separate these elements. In the reductive heat treatment, palladium is extracted in liquid heavy metal phase generated by the reduction of the heavy metal oxides, whereas cesium and selenium are concentrated in phase separated Na–K-rich materials on the glass surface. From the materials, cesium and selenium can be extracted in water, and the selenium extraction was higher in the treatment of the bismuth containing glass. The chemical forms of palladium in the glass affected the extraction efficiencies of cesium and selenium. Among the examined conditions, in the bismuth glass treatment, the cesium and selenium extraction efficiencies in water were over 80%, and that of palladium in liquid bismuth was over 80%.

  2. Effects of Sb2O3 on the Mechanical Properties of the Borosilicate Foam Glasses Sintered at Low Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenxi Zhai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The physical properties and microstructure of a new kind of borosilicate foam glasses with different Sb2O3 doping content are comprehensively investigated. The experimental results show that appropriate addition of Sb2O3 has positive impact on the bulk porosity and compressive strength of the foam glass. It is more suitable in this work to introduce 0.9 wt.% Sb2O3 into the Na2O-K2O-B2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 basic foam glass component and sinter at 775°C. And the obtained foam glasses present much more uniform microstructure, large pore size, and smooth cell walls, which bring them with better performance including a lower bulk density, low water absorption, and an appreciable compressive strength. The microstructure analysis indicates that, with the increase of the content of Sb2O3 additives, the cell size tends to increase at first and then decreases. Larger amounts of Sb2O3 do not change the crystalline phase of foam glass but increase its vitrification. It is meaningful to prepare the foam glass at a relatively low temperature for reducing the heat energy consumption.

  3. Acquisition of rheological and calorimetric properties of borosilicate glass to determine the free energy of formation; Determination des energies libres de formation des verres borosilicates par des mesures calorimetriques et viscosimetriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linard, Y. [CEA Valrho, (DCC/DRRV/SCD), 30 - Marcoule (France)]|[Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Dept. des Geomateriaux, 75 - Paris (France); Advocat, Th. [CEA Valrho, (DCC/DRRV/SSCD), 30 - Marcoule (France)

    2000-07-01

    No fundamental thermodynamic data, such as the entropy {delta}{sub f}S T) and enthalpy {delta}{sub f}H T) of formation are currently available for nuclear borosilicate glasses. They are necessary to assess the glass thermodynamic stability in water, one of the most important potential long-term glass alteration vectors. Three glass composition ranges were investigated: - 8 compositions ranging from a ternary B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}--Na{sub 2}O (BSN) glass to the simulated SON 68 industrial glass for containment of high active nuclear wastes after reprocessing spent uranium oxide fuel from light water reactors. The basic BSN glass was gradually modified with the additives: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO, ZrO{sub 2}, Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}O and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and non-radioactive surrogate fission product oxides. - A second using another BSN ternary glass to which Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO and a group of non-radioactive surrogate fission product oxides, representative of natural uranium GCR fuel, were added. - A third range consisting of various BSN ternary glass compositions. All the glass specimens were fabricated by melting the oxides, carbonates anal nitrates at 1273 to 1473 K in a platinum crucible. Experimental methods based on calorimetry and viscosimetry techniques were used to determine the heat capacity Cp of each glass composition, a necessary parameter in addition to the known heat capacities of the basic glass component oxides, for calculating {delta}{sub f}S T) and {delta}{sub f}S T). The heat capacity Cp was measured between 273 K and 1480 K through a combination of three experimental devices: a low-temperature adiabatic calorimeter, a differential scanning calorimeter, and an ice calorimeter. The glass configuration entropy S{sup conf}(T{sub g}) necessary to obtain the glass entropy of formation (Eqn.(3)) was determined from tile glass rheological properties. A low-temperature viscosimeter was used to measure the strain {epsilon} of a glass specimen

  4. Release of Gd-ions from peralkaline borosilicate glass in pure water for neutrino detection in Water-Cherenkov Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongol, R.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2017-09-01

    The addition of Gadolinium (Gd)-based salt, specially GdCl3, in the Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCDs) enhances the sensitivity to neutrino detection. However, the unwanted Cl-based byproducts, significantly reduces the transparency of water and sensitivity of WCDs. An alternative method, to introduce Gd-ions in the WCDs, is through Gd-release from a custom designed Gd-doped glass, when in contact with water. This can potentially eliminate the use of Gd-based salts and byproducts. In this work, we report the Gd-ions release for a Gd-doped peralkaline (Na/Al > 1) borosilicate glass, which closely represents photomultiplier tube (PMT) glass composition used in WCDs. The purpose of the paper is to show that the Gd-ion release from a custom designed glass in the form of beads or powders is feasible and could be used as a controlled Gd-source in future WCDs to enhance neutrino detection. In addition, we present our results of Gd-solubility in the base glass composition.

  5. Corrosion Behavior and Microstructure Influence of Glass-Ceramic Nuclear Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew Asmussen, R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd, Richland, WA.; Neeway, James J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd, Richland, WA.; Kaspar, Tiffany C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd, Richland, WA.; Crum, Jarrod V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd, Richland, WA.

    2017-06-16

    Glass ceramic waste forms present a potentially viable technology for the long term immobilization and disposal of liquid nuclear wastes. Through control of chemistry during fabrication, such waste forms can have designed secondary crystalline phases within a borosilicate glass matrix. In this work, a glass ceramic containing powellite and oxyapatite secondary phases was tested for its corrosion properties in dilute conditions using single pass flow through testing (SPFT). Three glass ceramic samples were prepared using different cooling rates to produce samples with varying microstructure sizes. In testing at 90 °C in buffered pH 7 and pH 9 solutions, it was found that increasing pH and decreasing microstructure size (resulting from rapid cooling during fabrication) both led to a reduction in overall corrosion rate. The phases of the glass ceramic were found, using a combination of solutions analysis, SEM and AFM, to corrode preferably in the order of powellite > bulk glass matrix > oxyapatite.

  6. Effects of adding barium-borosilicate glass to a simplified etch-and-rinse adhesive on radiopacity and selected properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Gislaine Cristine; Meier, Marcia Margarete; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Reis, Alessandra; Gomes, João Carlos; Gomes, Osnara Maria

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the radiopacity, ultimate tensile strength (UTS), microhardness (KHN), degree of conversion (DC), water sorption (WS) and solubility (SL) of experimental adhesives. Five experimental adhesives with different concentrations of barium-borosilicate oxide microfillers [0% (R0), 30% (R30), 40% (R40), 50% (R50), 60% (R60)] were formulated based on the adhesive system Ambar (FGM). The adhesive Adper Single Bond 2 (SB, 3M ESPE) was used as commercial reference. For the radiopacity (n = 5), KHN (n = 5), WS (n = 10), and SL (n = 10) tests, adhesive disks were constructed (5.0 mm in diameter and 1.0 mm thick), while for UTS (n = 5), hourglass-shaped specimens with a cross-sectional area of 0.8 mm2 were used. The FTIR spectra of unpolymerized and polymerized adhesives were used to determine the DC. Data were submitted to a one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). All experimental adhesives showed radiopacity similar to enamel, except those of R0 and SB. Filler addition did not jeopardize the UTS, KHN, or WS of the filled adhesives in comparison with the unfilled version. Except for R40, filler addition reduced the SL. The filled adhesives showed lower DC when compared with R0, but the DC was similar or higher when compared with SB. The addition of barium-borosilicate glass up to 50% did not jeopardize the mechanical properties of the adhesive layer and seems to reduce its solubility.

  7. Sol–gel synthesis and optical properties of CuGaS{sub 2} quantum dots embedded in sodium borosilicate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Jiasong [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Zhao, Haijun; Zhang, Chenglong; Ma, Xin; Pei, Lang; Liang, Xiaojuan [College of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Xiang, Weidong, E-mail: xiangweidong001@126.com [College of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The CuGaS{sub 2} quantum dots doped sodium borosilicate glass was prepared by sol–gel methods. • The obtained glass was investigated by XRD, (S)TEM and XPS. • Tetragonal crystalline phase of CuGaS{sub 2} quantum dots with spherical shape were formed uniformly in the glass matrix. • The third-order optical nonlinearity was investigated by Z-scan technique. - Abstract: I–III–VI{sub 2} ternary semiconductor CuGaS{sub 2} quantum dots embedded in sodium borosilicate glass matrix were synthesized by combining the sol–gel process and heat treatment in H{sub 2}S gas. The structure and morphology of the obtained glass were studied by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that tetragonal crystalline phase of CuGaS{sub 2} quantum dots with spherical shape were formed uniformly in the sodium borosilicate glass matrix, and the sizes ranged from 5 to 25 nm with an average particle size of 12.75 nm. The optical nonlinearity was studied using Z-scan technique employing 200 fs at the wavelength of 800 nm. The glass doped with CuGaS{sub 2} quantum dots exhibited large third-order optical nonlinear susceptibility χ{sup (3)} of 1.60 × 10{sup −9} esu.

  8. Investigation of wine glass mode resonance in 200-µm-diameter cenosphere-derived borosilicate hemispherical shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendarto, Erwin; Li, Tao; Gianchandani, Yogesh B.

    2013-05-01

    Cenospheres are lightweight, inert hollow spheres which are useful in a large number of applications, particularly as fillers. This paper describes the mechanical resonant characteristics of miniature hollow hemispheres fabricated from sodium borosilicate cenospheres for potential use as sensing elements in inertial sensors, biochemical detectors and other devices. The tested structures are approximately 200 µm, 150 µm and 1.8 µm in diameter, height and thickness, respectively, with the dome anchored and the rim free. The lowest order wine glass modes of these structures are experimentally determined (and confirmed by modeling) to be in the range of 300-600 kHz--in the range of those of planar micro-resonators that have been explored for sensing applications.

  9. Silver diffusion and coloration of soda lime and borosilicate glasses, Part 1: Effect on the transmission and coloration of stained glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDELLAH CHORFA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Using the conventional method of coloration, soda lime and borosilicate glasses have been painted. Once stained, these glasses were heat treated at temperatures close to their transition temperatures (Tg. A parametric study was carried out in order to determine at first the effect of the silver concentration in the stain spread on glass. In addition, it was studied the effect of the heat treatment duration and the chemical composition of the painted glasses on the formation and size of the silver nanoparticles, the silver diffusion depth and also the glasses coloration. The characterization was made using UV-Vis spectroscopy, Raman confocal spectroscopy, SEM, EDX Technique and Abbe Refractometer. The obtained results shows that the coloration intensity of both glass types painted by the conventional method differs and depends essentially on the proportion of alkali ions in the glass. Moreover, it was found that the effect of the silver concentration in the stain is primordial and the heat treatment duration has a limited effect.

  10. Study of optical absorption and photoluminescence of quantum dots of CdS formed in borosilicate glass matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Jitender; Verma, A; Pandey, P K; Bhatnagar, P K; Mathur, P C [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi-110021 (India); Liu, W; Tang, S H [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 119243 (Singapore)], E-mail: jitender_does@yahoo.co.in

    2009-06-15

    Optical absorption and photoluminescence (PL) measurements have been made on the quantum dots (QDs) of CdS grown in a borosilicate glass matrix using a two-step annealing technique. The absorption measurements, made in the energy range of 1.3-3.2 eV, indicate the presence of nonradiative trap centers located in the forbidden gap at an energy level near 1.5 eV. The origin of these traps is attributed to the impurities present in the glass matrix. The PL measurements have been made at an excitation energy of 2.75 eV and it is concluded that the origin of PL is not due to either direct recombination of electrons and holes or deep traps, but that it is the shallow traps which are responsible for the observed PL. The shallow traps are attributed to sulfur vacancies formed at the glass-QD interface. The reason for the observed decrease in PL peak intensity with the increase of annealing time is due to the decrease of surface to volume ratio for QDs of higher size.

  11. The effects of sulfate content on crystalline phase, microstructure, and chemical durability of zirconolite-barium borosilicate glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lang; Wang, Xin; Li, Huidong; Teng, Yuancheng; Peng, Long

    2016-09-01

    The effects of sulfate content on structure and chemical durability of barium borosilicate glass-ceramics were studied. The results show that the glass-ceramics with 0-1.10 mol% SO3 possess mainly CaZrTi2O7-2M phase along with a small amount of CaZrTi2O7-3T and ZrO2 phases. The hexagonal CaZrTi2O7-3T crystals crystallize on the surface of glass-ceramics. For the samples with 1.24-1.55 mol% SO3, the main crystalline phases are CaTiSiO5 and CaZrTi2O7-2M in the bulk, while a separate sulfate layer containing Na2SO4 and BaSO4 is observed on the surface. X-ray fluorescence analysis indicates that about 2/3 of the SO3 originally added has been lost by volatility. The normalized mass loss (NLi) for Na, B, Ca elements remains almost unchanged (∼10-2 g/m2) after 7 days for the samples with 0-1.10 mol% SO3. The NLi for both Na and B increases gradually after 7 days when the SO3 content is 1.24 mol%.

  12. Glass Formulation Development for INEEL Sodium-Bearing Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D.; Buchmiller, William C.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Graham, Dennis D.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Macisaac, Brett D.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Peeler, David K.; Edwards, Tommy B.; Reamer, Irene A.; Workman, R. J.

    2002-08-01

    Studies were performed to develop and test a glass formulation for immobilization of sodium-bearing waste (SBW). SBW is a high soda, acid high activity waste stored at the INEEL in 10 underground tanks. It was determined in previous studies that SBW?s sulfur content dictates the its loading in borosilicate glasses to be melted by currently assumed processes. If the sulfur content (which is ~4.5 mass% SO3 on a non-volatile oxide basis in SBW) of the melter feed is too high then a molten alkali sulfate containing salt phase accumulates on the melt surface. The avoidance of salt accumulation during the melter process and the maximization of sulfur incorporation into the glass melt were the main focus of this development work. A glass was developed for 20 mass% SBW (on a non-volatile oxide basis), which contained 0.91 mass% SO3, that met all the processing and product quality constraint determined for SBW vitrification at a planned INEEL treatment plant?SBW-22-20. This report summarizes the formulation efforts and presents the data developed on a series of glasses with simulated SBW. Summary

  13. Wastes based glasses and glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbieri, L.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Actually, the inertization, recovery and valorisation of the wastes coming from municipal and industrial processes are the most important goals from the environmental and economical point of view. An alternative technology capable to overcome the problem of the dishomogeneity of the raw material chemical composition is the vitrification process that is able to increase the homogeneity and the constancy of the chemical composition of the system and to modulate the properties in order to address the reutilization of the waste. Moreover, the glasses obtained subjected to different controlled thermal treatments, can be transformed in semy-cristalline material (named glass-ceramics with improved properties with respect to the parent amorphous materials. In this review the tailoring, preparation and characterization of glasses and glass-ceramics obtained starting from municipal incinerator grate ash, coal and steel fly ashes and glass cullet are described.

    Realmente la inertización, recuperación y valorización de residuos que proceden de los procesos de incineración de residuos municipales y de residuos industriales son metas importantes desde el punto de vista ambiental y económico. Una tecnología alternativa capaz de superar el problema de la heterogeneidad de la composición química de los materiales de partida es el proceso de la vitrificación que es capaz de aumentar la homogeneidad y la constancia de la composición química del sistema y modular las propiedades a fin de la reutilización del residuo. En este artículo se presentan los resultados de vitrificación en que los vidrios fueron sometidos a tratamientos térmicos controlados diferentes, de manera que se transforman en materiales semicristalinos (también denominados vitrocerámicos con mejores propiedades respecto a los materiales amorfos originales. En esta revisión se muestra el diseño, preparación y caracterización de vidrios y vitrocerámicos partiendo de

  14. White-Beam X-ray Diffraction and Radiography Studies on High-Boron Containing Borosilicate Glass at High Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Kathryn; Vohra, Yogesh; Kono, Yoshio; Wereszczak, Andrew; Patel, Parimal

    Multi-angle energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction studies and white-beam x-ray radiography were conducted with a cylindrically shaped (1 mm diameter and 0.7 mm high) high-boron content borosilicate glass sample (17.6% B2O3) to a pressure of 13.7 GPa using a Paris-Edinburgh (PE) press at Beamline 16-BM-B, HPCAT of the Advanced Photon Source. The measured structure factor S(q) to large q = 19 Å-1, is used to determine information about the internuclear bond distances between various species of atoms within the glass sample. Sample pressure was determined with gold as a pressure standard. The sample height as measured by radiography showed an overall uniaxial compression of 22.5 % at 13.7 GPa with 10.6% permanent compaction after decompression to ambient conditions. The reduced pair distribution function G(r) was extracted and Si-O, O-O, and Si-Si bond distances were measured as a function of pressure. Raman spectroscopy of pressure recovered sample as compared to starting material showed blue-shift and changes in intensity and widths of Raman bands associated with silicate and B3O6 boroxol rings. US Army Research Office under Grant No. W911NF-15-1-0614.

  15. Sol–gel synthesis of silver nanocrystals embedded in sodium borosilicate monolithic transparent glass with giant third-order optical nonlinearities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Lang [College of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035 (China); Xiang, Weidong, E-mail: xiangweidong001@126.com [College of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035 (China); Zhao, Xiuli; Liang, Xiaojuan; Yang, Xinyu; Liu, Haitao; Chen, Zhaoping [College of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035 (China); Xie, Cuiping [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 201804 (China); Ma, Xin; Zhang, Chenglong; Ma, Li [College of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035 (China); Zhao, Jialong [College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou,Zhejiang 325035 (China); State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics,Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We prepared Ag-doped sodium borosilicate monolithic glass. • The influence of temperature on the SPR absorption peak intensity was studied. • Nonlinear optical properties of the glass were investigated. • A mechanism for the formation of Ag quantum dots glass was proposed. - Abstract: We report the preparation of uniform spherical shape silver nanocrystals doped sodium borosilicate monolithic transparent glass by sol–gel method. The characterization of the resulting Ag nanocrystals was accomplished by using X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectrum. Surface plasma resonance absorption peaks of the silver nanocrystals glass at about 406 nm have been obtained from ultraviolet–visible absorption spectrometer and their intensity is changed with different heat treatment temperatures. We have investigated the nonlinear optical properties of silver quantum dots doped glass using Z-scan technique. Third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility χ{sup (3)} of the glass was estimated to be 1.01 × 10{sup −11} esu. In particular, a mechanism for the formation of Ag quantum dots glass is proposed. This work will significantly promote the obtained material applications in optical devices.

  16. Immobilization of Technetium Waste from Pyro-processing Using Tellurite Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Jong; Pyo, Jae-Young; Lee, Cheong-Won [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Jae-Hwan; Park, Hwan-Seo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Vitrification of Tc wastes has been challenging because of the low solubility in the silicate glass and high volatility in the melting process. In previous studies, the measured solubility of Tc and Re was ⁓ 3000 ppm at 1000 .deg. C in low activity waste (LAW) glass. And retention of Tc has been reported within 12 - 77% during the borosilicate vitrification process. Tellurite glasses have been studied for halide waste immobilization due to low melting temperatures (Tm= 600-800 .deg. C) and flexibility of network with foreign ions. Tellurite glasses offered higher halide retention than borosilicate glasses. The structure of pure tellurite (TeO{sub 2}) consists of TeO{sub 4} trigonal bipyramids (tbp), but TeO{sub 4} units are converted to TeO{sub 3} trigonal pyramids (tp) having non-bridging oxygen (NBO) as the modifiers added. Objectives of this study are to investigate the tellurite glasses for Tc immobilization using Re as a surrogate. Retention and waste loading of Re were analyzed during the vitrification process of tellurite glass. We investigated local structures of Re ions in glasses by Raman and X-ray absorption spectroscopies. The tellurite glass was investigated to immobilize the Ca(TcO{sub 4}){sub 2}, surrogated by Ca(ReO{sub 4}){sub 2}. The average of Re retention in tellurite glass was 86%. The 7-day PCT results were satisfied with U.S requirement up to 9 mass% of Ca(ReO{sub 4}){sub 2} content. Re in the tellurite glass exists +7 oxidation state and was coordinated with 4 oxygen.

  17. Tellurite glass as a waste form for mixed alkali-chloride waste streams: Candidate materials selection and initial testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J., E-mail: brian.riley@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Rieck, Bennett T. [Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); McCloy, John S.; Crum, Jarrod V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Sundaram, S.K. [Alfred University, Alfred, NY 14802 (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide the first standardized chemical durability test on tellurite glasses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The glasses we studied showed a wide variety of chemical durability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The best-performing glass showed good halide retention following melting and durability testing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These glasses have very high densities resulting in high volumetric waste loading ability. - Abstract: Tellurite glasses have historically been shown to host large concentrations of halides. They are here considered for the first time as a waste form for immobilizing chloride wastes, such as may be generated in the proposed molten alkali salt electrochemical separations step in nuclear fuel reprocessing. Key properties of several tellurite glasses are determined to assess acceptability as a chloride waste form. TeO{sub 2} glasses with other oxides (PbO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, WO{sub 3}, P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, or ZnO) were fabricated with and without 10 mass% of a simulated (non-radioactive) mixed alkali, alkaline-earth, and rare earth chloride waste. Measured chemical durability is compared for the glasses, as determined by the product consistency test (PCT), a common standardized chemical durability test often used to validate borosilicate glass waste forms. The glass with the most promise as a waste form is the TeO{sub 2}-PbO system, as it offers good halide retention, a low sodium release (by PCT) comparable with high-level waste silicate glass waste forms, and a high storage density.

  18. Iron Phosphate Glass as Potential Waste Matrix for High-Level Radioactive Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, T.; Ishinomori, T.; Endo, Y.; Sazarashi, M.; Ono, S.; Suzuki, K.

    2003-02-25

    Recently, Iron Phosphate Glass (IPG) is investigated as the alternative final waste form for High-Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) in U.S. This study is aimed to investigate feasibility of IPG to HLW arising from commercial reprocessing in Japan. In order to evaluate favorable preparation conditions, maximum waste loading and property of IPG, the melting tests were carried. From the results of melting tests, the favorable preparation conditions was with matrix of Fe/P 0.43 (mole ratio in products) and melting at 1200{sup o} for 4h. The products of 10-20mass% waste loading of simulated HLW were glassy and had no crystal peaks, however the product of 30mass% waste loading showed some crystal peaks by XRD analysis. IPG and Borosilicate glass (BG) had about the same thermal properties. As a result, IPG had enough potential for high waste loading and the extremely good chemical durability for consideration as a waste form for Japanese HLW.

  19. Novel Mechanism of Glass Delamination in Type 1A Borosilicate Vials Containing Frozen Protein Formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ge; Goss, Monica; Li, Guiyang; Jing, Wendy; Shen, Hong; Fujimori, Kiyoshi; Le, Linda; Wong, Lyanne; Wen, Zai-Qing; Nashed-Samuel, Yasser; Riker, Ken; Germansderfer, Abe; Tsang, Paul; Ricci, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Storing protein formulations in the frozen state typically improves stability during long-term storage as a drug substance or as a drug product. The frozen state minimizes chemical degradation and physical instability. However, the frozen state is not an optimal storage condition for the glass vial itself. A significant issue was observed when small, flake-like pieces of glass particles (lamellae) appeared in vials containing thawed protein product. The occurrence of glass particles during freeze-thaw results in product rejection and potentially, adverse events. In recent years, glass flakes due to chemical delamination have been observed in parenteral liquid formulations after long-term storage, resulting in a number of product recalls. In this study, for the first time, glass delamination is reported in pharmaceutical glass vials containing frozen protein formulation, caused by a novel mechanism involving thermally-induced mechanical stress. In this article, a monoclonal antibody drug product in glass vials and the corresponding placebo vials were studied to identify the contributing factors from the freeze-thaw process, such as freezing temperature, the presence or absence of protein, and other handling conditions. Freezing temperature was found to be the most critical factor. Glass lamellae were only observed when the products were frozen to -70 °C, while freezing only to -30 °C did not cause any lamellae formation even after multiple freeze-thaw cycles. Protein concentration and the handling of the vials were also identified as contributing factors. A concentration gradient which formed after freeze-thaw induced a higher rate of lamellae occurrence in a subsequent freeze-thaw cycle compared to vials without the concentration gradient. Analyses by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy confirmed that the flake-like lamellae were thin, flat glass particles. Defects corresponding to the glass

  20. Summary Report: Glass-Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined Fission Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Riley, Brian J.; Turo, Laura A.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna

    2011-09-23

    Glass-ceramic waste form development began in FY 2010 examining two combined waste stream options: (1) alkaline earth (CS) + lanthanide (Ln), and (2) + transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by the uranium extraction (UREX+) separations process. Glass-ceramics were successfully developed for both options however; Option 2 was selected over Option 1, at the conclusion of 2010, because Option 2 immobilized all three waste streams with only a minimal decrease in waste loading. During the first year, a series of three glass (Option 2) were fabricated that varied waste loading-WL (42, 45, and 50 mass%) at fixed molar ratios of CaO/MoO{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3}/alkali both at 1.75. These glass-ceramics were slow cooled and characterized in terms of phase assemblage and preliminary irradiation stability. This fiscal year, further characterization was performed on the FY 2010 Option 2 glass-ceramics in terms of: static leach testing, phase analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and irradiation stability (electron and ion). Also, a new series of glass-ceramics were developed for Option 2 that varied the additives: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0-6 mass%), molar ratio of CaO/MoO{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3}/alkali (1.75 to 2.25) and waste loading (50, 55, and 60 mass%). Lastly, phase pure powellite and oxyapatite were synthesized for irradiation studies. Results of this fiscal year studies showed compositional flexibility, chemical stability, and radiation stability in the current glass-ceramic system. First, the phase assemblages and microstructure of all of the FY 2010 and 2011 glass-ceramics are very similar once subjected to the slow cool heat treatment. The phases identified in these glass-ceramics were oxyapatite, powellite, cerianite, and ln-borosilicate. This shows that variations in waste loading or additives can be accommodated without drastically changing the phase assemblage of the waste form, thus making the processing and performance

  1. Comparison of radiation-induced transmission degradation of borosilicate crown optical glass from four different manufacturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusarov, Andrei; Doyle, Dominic; Glebov, Leonid; Berghmans, Francis

    2005-09-01

    Space-born optical systems must be tolerant to radiation to guarantee that the required system performance is maintained during prolonged mission times. The radiation-induced absorption in optical glasses is often related with the presence of impurities, which are, intentionally or not, introduced during the manufacturing process. Glass manufacturers use proprietary fabrication processes and one can expect that the radiation sensitivity of nominally identical optical glasses from different manufacturers is different. We studied the gamma-radiation induced absorption of several crown glasses with nd ≈ 1.516 and vd ≈ 64, i.e. NBK7 (Schott), S-BSL7 (Ohara), BSC 517642 (Pilkington) and K8 (Russia). NBK7 recently replaced the well-known BK7. We therefore also compared the radiation response of NBK7 and BK7 glass. Our results show that whereas the glasses are optically similar before irradiation, they show a different induced absorption after irradiation and also different post-radiation recovery kinetics. Taking these differences into account can help to improve the radiation tolerance of optical systems for space applications.

  2. Molecular dynamics study of structural changes versus deposited energy dose in a sodium borosilicate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bureau, G.; Delaye, J.M.; Peuget, S. [DEN/DTCD/SECM, CEA Marcoule, BP 17171, Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex, 30207 (France); Calas, G. [IMPMC, 140 rue de Lourmel, Paris, 75015 (France)

    2008-07-01

    Assessing the long-term behavior of nuclear glass implies evaluating the impact of cumulative alpha decay induced by the minor actinides it contains. When subjected to alpha decay ({sup 244}Cm-doped glass specimens) or to external ion irradiation, some macroscopic properties vary appreciably with the dose. Above a given dose level, the properties do not evolve any more. To improve our understanding of these modifications, studies are carried out on simplified glass compositions (three oxides SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O), modeled by molecular dynamics in which irradiation effects are simulated by accelerating uranium projectiles. Accumulation of displacements cascades have been performed up to 4.5*10{sup 20} keV/cm{sup 3} nuclear energy deposited in the glass. The density variations observed in actinide-doped materials is qualitatively reproduced. At high doses, the swelling tends to stabilize. Marples model is used to fit the glass swelling versus the deposited energy dose, giving the volume damaged per projectile. This volume approximates the cascade core volume, suggesting that the underlying mechanisms of volume expansion are contained in the cascade core and are thus related to the highest energy events: atom ejection and thermal quenching. On the contrary, the volumetric parameter of the Marples model applied to the other structural properties is related to a volume corresponding to the core + periphery of the cascades. (authors)

  3. Natural analogues of nuclear waste glass corrosion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrajano, T.A. Jr.; Ebert, W.L.; Luo, J.S.

    1999-01-06

    This report reviews and summarizes studies performed to characterize the products and processes involved in the corrosion of natural glasses. Studies are also reviewed and evaluated on how well the corrosion of natural glasses in natural environments serves as an analogue for the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses in an engineered geologic disposal system. A wide range of natural and experimental corrosion studies has been performed on three major groups of natural glasses: tektite, obsidian, and basalt. Studies of the corrosion of natural glass attempt to characterize both the nature of alteration products and the reaction kinetics. Information available on natural glass was then compared to corresponding information on the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses, specifically to resolve two key questions: (1) whether one or more natural glasses behave similarly to nuclear waste glasses in laboratory tests, and (2) how these similarities can be used to support projections of the long-term corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion behavior of basaltic glasses was most similar to that of nuclear waste glasses, but the corrosion of tektite and obsidian glasses involves certain processes that also occur during the corrosion of nuclear waste glasses. The reactions and processes that control basalt glass dissolution are similar to those that are important in nuclear waste glass dissolution. The key reaction of the overall corrosion mechanism is network hydrolysis, which eventually breaks down the glass network structure that remains after the initial ion-exchange and diffusion processes. This review also highlights some unresolved issues related to the application of an analogue approach to predicting long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass corrosion, such as discrepancies between experimental and field-based estimates of kinetic parameters for basaltic glasses.

  4. LOCAL STRUCTURE OF Eu^3+ IN BOROSILICATE GLASSES BY PHONON SIDEBAND SPECTRA

    OpenAIRE

    Zhidong, YAO; Yong, DING; Tokuro, NANBA; Yoshinari, MIURA; The Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University; Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Okayama University

    1998-01-01

    In xNa_2O・(40-x)B_2O_3・60SiO_2(mol%)(x=5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30)glasses with 0.25mol% Eu_2O_3 as additive, the local structure around Eu^3+ was explored by employing the phonon sideband spectra of Eu^3+ associated with the ^5D_2←^7F_0 transition. It was found that the types and fraction of the structural units around Eu^3+ varied with glass composition. Moreover, the B-O vibrational mode of BO_3 unit exists around Eu^3+ when x ≨ 15, which is not present in the same composition glasses free o...

  5. Investigation of optical, structural properties of Eu3+ by Mn2+ in barium alumino borosilicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, P. Vijaya; Rao, T. G. V. M.; Neeraja, K.; Krishna Reddy, D. V.; Rami Reddy, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Mn2+ ions doped Eu2O3sbnd BaOsbnd Al2O3sbnd B2O3sbnd SiO2 glasses are synthesized by conventional melt quenching method. The effect of Mn2+ ions on spectroscopic, structural properties of Eu3+ ions in glass networks is analysed. An analysis of XRD traces evidently suggests the glassy nature of the prepared samples. The UV-Vis absorption and the luminescence spectra have been used to study the variations in the optical character of Eu3+ ions. In luminescence spectra five bands can be observed at about 578, 590, 612, 653 and 702 nm as a result of transitions of Eu3+ ions from 5D0→7F0, 1, 2, 3, 4 respectively. By gradual increment of MnO mol% in the glass matrix, the strong variation in the intensity of emission band are observed at about 612 nm (5D0→7F2). The non-radiative energy transfer (Mn2+ ↔ Eu3+) and concentration quenching are observed in the prepared glasses. The ESR spectra exhibit a sixtet hyperfine structure centered at g = ∼2.0047 which suggests that manganese ions predominantly occupy octahedral positions.

  6. Quantification of the boron speciation in alkali borosilicate glasses by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, D.S.; Yang, G.; Zhao, Y.Q.

    2015-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and related analytical techniques have been widely used to study the microstructure of different materials. However, few research works have been performed in the field of glasses, possibly due to the electron-beam irradiation damage. In this paper, we have...

  7. Fabrication of Fresnel micro lens array in borosilicate glass by F2-laser ablation for glass interposer application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusberg, Lars; Neitz, Marcel; Schröder, Henning; Fricke-Begemann, Thomas; Ihlemann, Jürgen

    2014-03-01

    The future need for more bandwidth forces the development of optical transmission solutions for rack-to-rack, boardto- board and chip-to-chip interconnects. The goals are significant reduction of power consumption, highest density and potential for bandwidth scalability to overcome the limitations of the systems today with mostly copper based interconnects. For system integration the enabling of thin glass as a substrate material for electro-optical components with integrated micro-optics for efficient light coupling to integrated optical waveguides or fibers is becoming important. Our glass based packaging approach merges micro-system packaging and glass integrated optics. This kind of packaging consists of a thin glass substrate with integrated micro lenses providing a platform for photonic component assembly and optical fiber or waveguide interconnection. Thin glass is commercially available in panel and wafer size and characterizes excellent optical and high frequency properties. That makes it perfect for microsystem packaging. A suitable micro lens approach has to be comparable with different commercial glasses and withstand post-processing like soldering. A benefit of using laser ablated Fresnel lenses is the planar integration capability in the substrate for highest integration density. In the paper we introduce our glass based packaging concept and the Fresnel lens design for different scenarios like chip-to-fiber, chip-to-optical-printed-circuit-board coupling. Based on the design the Fresnel lenses were fabricated by using a 157 nm fluorine laser ablation system.

  8. The effects of sulfate content on crystalline phase, microstructure, and chemical durability of zirconolite−barium borosilicate glass-ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Lang, E-mail: lang.wu@163.com [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Wang, Xin; Li, Huidong; Teng, Yuancheng [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composites and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Peng, Long [Sichuan Province Key Laboratory of Information Materials and Devices Application, Chengdu University of Information Technology, Chengdu 610225 (China)

    2016-09-15

    The effects of sulfate content on structure and chemical durability of barium borosilicate glass-ceramics were studied. The results show that the glass-ceramics with 0–1.10 mol% SO{sub 3} possess mainly CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}-2M phase along with a small amount of CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}-3T and ZrO{sub 2} phases. The hexagonal CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}-3T crystals crystallize on the surface of glass-ceramics. For the samples with 1.24–1.55 mol% SO{sub 3}, the main crystalline phases are CaTiSiO{sub 5} and CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}-2M in the bulk, while a separate sulfate layer containing Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and BaSO{sub 4} is observed on the surface. X-ray fluorescence analysis indicates that about 2/3 of the SO{sub 3} originally added has been lost by volatility. The normalized mass loss (NL{sub i}) for Na, B, Ca elements remains almost unchanged (∼10{sup −2} g/m{sup 2}) after 7 days for the samples with 0–1.10 mol% SO{sub 3}. The NL{sub i} for both Na and B increases gradually after 7 days when the SO{sub 3} content is 1.24 mol%. - Highlights: • Strip-shaped CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}-2M and plate-like CaTiSiO{sub 5} crystals crystallize in the bulk. • CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}-3T crystals crystallize on the surface for samples with 0–1.10 mol% SO{sub 3}. • A separate sulfate layer crystallizes on the surface when SO{sub 3} exceeds solubility.

  9. On the Morphology of the SDS Film on the Surface of Borosilicate Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zih-Yao Shen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Surfactant films on solid surfaces have attracted much attention because of their scientific interest and applications, such as surface treatment agent, or for micro- or nano-scale templates for microfluidic devices. In this study, anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS solutions with various charged inorganic salts was spread on a glass substrate and dried to form an SDS thin film. Atomic force microscopy (AFM was employed to observe the micro-structure of the SDS thin film. The effects of inorganic salts on the morphology of the SDS film were observed and discussed. The results of experiments demonstrated that pure SDS film formed patterns of long, parallel, highly-ordered stripes. The existence of the inorganic salt disturbed the structure of the SDS film due to the interaction between the cationic ion and the anionic head groups of SDS. The divalent ion has greater electrostatic interaction with anionic head groups than that of the monovalent ion, and causes a gross change in the morphology of the SDS film. The height of the SDS bilayer measured was consistent with the theoretical value, and the addition of the large-sized monovalent ion would lead to lowering the height of the adsorbed structures.

  10. Control of high-level radioactive waste-glass melters. Part 4, Preliminary analysis of DWPF process laboratory capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickford, D.F.; Coleman, C.J.

    1990-12-31

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will immobilize Savannah River Site High Level Waste as a durable borosilicate glass for permanent disposal in a repository. The DWPF will be controlled based on glass composition. The following discussion is a preliminary analysis of the capability of the laboratory methods that can be used to control the glass composition, and the relationships between glass durability and glass properties important to glass melting. The glass durability and processing properties will be controlled by controlling the chemical composition of the glass. The glass composition will be controlled by control of the melter feed transferred from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT). During cold runs, tests will be conducted to demonstrate the chemical equivalence of glass sampled from the pour stream and glass removed from cooled canisters. In similar tests, the compositions of glass produced from slurries sampled from the SME and MFT will be compared to final product glass to determine the statistical relationships between melter feed and glass product. The total error is the combination of those associated with homogeneity in the SME or MFT, sampling, preparation of samples for analysis, instrument calibration, analysis, and the composition/property model. This study investigated the sensitivity of estimation of property data to the combination of variations from sampling through analysis. In this or a similar manner, the need for routine glass product sampling will be minimized, and glass product characteristics will be assured before the melter feed is committed to the melter.

  11. Compositional Dependence of Solubility/Retention of Molybdenum Oxides in Aluminoborosilicate-Based Model Nuclear Waste Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehault, Antoine; Patil, Deepak; Kamat, Hrishikesh; Youngman, Randall E; Thirion, Lynn M; Mauro, John C; Corkhill, Claire L; McCloy, John S; Goel, Ashutosh

    2018-02-08

    Molybdenum oxides are an integral component of the high-level waste streams being generated from the nuclear reactors in several countries. Although borosilicate glass has been chosen as the baseline waste form by most of the countries to immobilize these waste streams, molybdate oxyanions (MoO 4 2- ) exhibit very low solubility (∼1 mol %) in these glass matrices. In the past three to four decades, several studies describing the compositional and structural dependence of molybdate anions in borosilicate and aluminoborosilicate glasses have been reported in the literature, providing a basis for our understanding of fundamental science that governs the solubility and retention of these species in the nuclear waste glasses. However, there are still several open questions that need to be answered to gain an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms that control the solubility and retention of these oxyanions in glassy waste forms. This article is focused on finding answers to two such questions: (1) What are the solubility and retention limits of MoO 3 in aluminoborosilicate glasses as a function of chemical composition? (2) Why is there a considerable increase in the solubility of MoO 3 with incorporation of rare-earth oxides (for example, Nd 2 O 3 ) in aluminoborosilicate glasses? Accordingly, three different series of aluminoborosilicate glasses (compositional complexity being added in a tiered approach) with varying MoO 3 concentrations have been synthesized and characterized for their ability to accommodate molybdate ions in their structure (solubility) and as a glass-ceramic (retention). The contradictory viewpoints (between different research groups) pertaining to the impact of rare-earth cations on the structure of aluminoborosilicate glasses are discussed, and their implications on the solubility of MoO 3 in these glasses are evaluated. A novel hypothesis explaining the mechanism governing the solubility of MoO 3 in rare-earth containing aluminoborosilicate

  12. Storage and disposal of radioactive waste as glass in canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendel, J.E.

    1978-12-01

    A review of the use of waste glass for the immobilization of high-level radioactive waste glass is presented. Typical properties of the canisters used to contain the glass, and the waste glass, are described. Those properties are used to project the stability of canisterized waste glass through interim storage, transportation, and geologic disposal.

  13. Third-order nonlinear optical properties of Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanocrystals doped in sodium borosilicate glass studied with Z-scan technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xinyu [College of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China); Xiang, Weidong, E-mail: weidongxiang@yahoo.com.cn [College of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China); Zhao, Haijun [College of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Zhang, Xiyan [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China); Liang, Xiaojuan [College of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Dai, Shixun; Chen, Feifei [College of Information Science and Engineering, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Sol-gel method to realize the synthesis of Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanocrystals doped in the glass. {yields} High dispersion and narrow distribution of Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanocrystals in the glass. {yields}Z-scan technique employed for nonlinear optical properties of the glass. {yields} Observation that an obvious third-order optical nonlinear properties in the glass. -- Abstract: The third-order nonlinear optical properties of Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanocrystals doped in sodium borosilicate glass are measured by Z-scan technique. The microstructures of the glass are characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersion X-ray spectra, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanocrystals ranging from 10 to 30 nm are determined to be of the orthorhombic crystalline phase, and the third-order optical nonlinear refractive index {gamma}, absorption coefficient {beta}, and susceptibility {chi}{sup (3)} of the glass are determined to be 2.56 x 10{sup -16} m{sup 2} W{sup -1}, 4.13 x 10{sup -10} mW{sup -1}, and 1.43 x 10{sup -10} esu, respectively.

  14. Fracture toughness and leaching behavior of ion bombarded waste glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzke, Hj.; Linker, G.

    1984-02-01

    Fracture toughness Klc and fracture surface energy γ were measured on borosilicate waste glasses containing simulated fission products produced in the Institut für Nukleare Entsorgung, KFK. The Hertzian indentation technique with spherical indenters was shown to be a very powerful means with which to study mechanical and fracture properties of small highly radioactive samples. It was tested with Pu-ceramics as well as with Cm-doped glass ceramics. Radiation damage was produced by ion bombardment with Pb or Xe ions of energies up to 300 keV or with He 2+-ions (α-particles) of the cyclotron (KFK) with energies up to 77 MeV. The glasses were used either as-received or else following high-temperature, high-pressure autoclave leaching. The as-bombarded and the leached glasses were analyzed for surface composition and changes by Rutherford backscattering, RBS, with He-ions. In many cases, radiation damage caused an increase in fracture toughness, a very beneficial effect. The leached glasses that were investigated contained surface layers with thicknesses of up to ˜2 μm. RBS showed these layers to be similar in composition to thick layers analyzed by electron microprobe analysis (empa). There was no drastic influence of ion bombardment on the composition or thickness of these layers. The layers themselves caused changes of about ± 10% in the apparent fracture toughness, possibly by absorbing part of the applied energy by plastic deformation or by preventing pre-existing flaws from initiating crack formation.

  15. Silicate, borosilicate, and borate bioactive glass scaffolds with controllable degradation rate for bone tissue engineering applications. II. In vitro and in vivo biological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Bal, B Sonny; Bonewald, Lynda F; Kuroki, Keiichi; Brown, Roger F

    2010-10-01

    In Part I, the in vitro degradation of bioactivAR52115e glass scaffolds with a microstructure similar to that of human trabecular bone, but with three different compositions, was investigated as a function of immersion time in a simulated body fluid. The glasses consisted of a silicate (13-93) composition, a borosilicate composition (designated 13-93B1), and a borate composition (13-93B3), in which one-third or all of the SiO2 content of 13-93 was replaced by B2O3, respectively. This work is an extension of Part I, to investigate the effect of the glass composition on the in vitro response of osteogenic MLO-A5 cells to these scaffolds, and on the ability of the scaffolds to support tissue infiltration in a rat subcutaneous implantation model. The results of assays for cell viability and alkaline phosphatase activity showed that the slower degrading silicate 13-93 and borosilicate 13-93B1 scaffolds were far better than the borate 13-93B3 scaffolds in supporting cell proliferation and function. However, all three groups of scaffolds showed the ability to support tissue infiltration in vivo after implantation for 6 weeks. The results indicate that the required bioactivity and degradation rate may be achieved by substituting an appropriate amount of SiO2 in 13-93 glass with B2O3, and that these trabecular glass scaffolds could serve as substrates for the repair and regeneration of contained bone defects. Copyright 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A, 2010.

  16. Microstructural characterization of halite inclusion in a glass-bonded ceramic waste form.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, J. S.; Ebert, W. L.

    2000-12-14

    A glass-bonded ceramic waste form is being developed to immobilize radioactively contaminated chloride waste salts generated during the conditioning of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel for disposal. The waste salt is first mixed with zeolite A to occlude the salt into cavities in the zeolite structure. The salt-loaded zeolite is then mixed with a borosilicate glass and consolidated by hot isostatic pressing. During this process, the zeolite converts to the mineral sodalite, which retains most of the waste salt, and small amounts of halite are generated. Halite inclusions have been observed within micron- to submicron-sized pores that form within the glass phase in the vicinity of the sodalite/glass interface. These inclusions are important because they may contain small amounts of radionuclide contaminants (eg {sup 135}Cs and {sup 129}I),and may affect the corrosion behavior of the waste form. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the chemical nature and distribution of halite inclusions in the waste form.

  17. Flipping the sign of refractive index changes in ultrafast and temporally shaped laser-irradiated borosilicate crown optical glass at high repetition rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mermillod-Blondin, A.; Burakov, I. M.; Meshcheryakov, Yu. P.; Bulgakova, N. M.; Audouard, E.; Rosenfeld, A.; Husakou, A.; Hertel, I. V.; Stoian, R.

    2008-03-01

    Ultrafast subpicosecond laser exposure usually induces negative refractive index changes in optical glasses with strong thermal expansion such as borosilicate BK7 due to volume expansion and mechanical rarefaction. We show that temporally shaped laser excitation on picosecond scales and at high repetition rates can invert the regular material response resulting in a significant refractive index increase. Simulations of pulse propagation and evolution of heat and strain waves in BK7 glass exposed to different pulse durations were performed to understand mechanisms of refractive index increase. Narrow spatial distribution of energy for optimized picosecond pulses determines shock-induced plastic deformations accompanied by partial healing of the lateral strain due to preferential heat flow. The matter momentum relaxation produces directional on-axis material compaction.

  18. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 7, Waste glass technology for Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, A.A.

    1995-07-01

    This paper presents the details of the waste glass tutorial session that was held to promote knowledge of waste glass technology and how this can be used at the Hanford Reservation. Topics discussed include: glass properties; statistical approach to glass development; processing properties of nuclear waste glass; glass composition and the effects of composition on durability; model comparisons of free energy of hydration; LLW glass structure; glass crystallization; amorphous phase separation; corrosion of refractories and electrodes in waste glass melters; and glass formulation for maximum waste loading.

  19. Glasses for immobilization of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverov, N. P.; Omel'yanenko, B. I.; Yudintsev, S. V.; Stefanovsky, S. V.; Nikonov, B. S.

    2013-03-01

    Reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) for recovery of fissionable elements is a precondition of long-term development of nuclear energetics. Solution of this problem is hindered by the production of a great amount of liquid waste; 99% of its volume is low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW). The volume of high-level radioactive waste (HLW), which is characterized by high heat release, does not exceed a fraction of a percent. Solubility of glasses at an elevated temperature makes them unfit for immobilization of HLW, the insulation of which is ensured only by mineral-like matrices. At the same time, glasses are a perfect matrix for LILW, which are distinguished by low heat release. The solubility of borosilicate glass at a low temperature is so low that even a glass with relatively low resistance enables them to retain safety of under-ground LILW depositories without additional engineering barriers. The optimal technology of liquid confinement is their concentration and immobilization in borosilicate glasses, which are disposed in shallow-seated geological repositories. The vitrification of 1 m3 liquid LILW with a salt concentration of ˜300 kg/m3 leaves behind only 0.2 m3 waste, that is, 4-6 times less than by bitumen impregnation and 10 times less than by cementation. Environmental and economic advantages of LILW vitrification result from (1) low solubility of the vitrified LILW in natural water; (2) significant reduction of LILW volume; (3) possibility to dispose the vitrified waste without additional engineering barriers under shallow conditions and in diverse geological media; (4) the strength of glass makes its transportation and storage possible; and finally (5) reliable longterm safety of repositories. When the composition of the glass matrix for LILW is being chosen, attention should be paid to the factors that ensure high technological and economic efficiency of vitrification. The study of vitrified LILW from the Kursk nuclear power plant

  20. Modelling the local atomic structure of molybdenum in nuclear waste glasses with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinou, Konstantinos; Sushko, Peter V; Duffy, Dorothy M

    2016-09-21

    The nature of chemical bonding of molybdenum in high level nuclear waste glasses has been elucidated by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Two compositions, (SiO 2 ) 57.5 -(B 2 O 3 ) 10 -(Na 2 O) 15 -(CaO) 15 -(MoO 3 ) 2.5 and (SiO 2 ) 57.3 -(B 2 O 3 ) 20 -(Na 2 O) 6.8 -(Li 2 O) 13.4 -(MoO 3 ) 2.5 , were considered in order to investigate the effect of ionic and covalent components on the glass structure and the formation of the crystallisation precursors (Na 2 MoO 4 and CaMoO 4 ). The coordination environments of Mo cations and the corresponding bond lengths calculated from our model are in excellent agreement with experimental observations. The analysis of the first coordination shell reveals two different types of molybdenum host matrix bonds in the lithium sodium borosilicate glass. Based on the structural data and the bond valence model, we demonstrate that the Mo cation can be found in a redox state and the molybdate tetrahedron can be connected with the borosilicate network in a way that inhibits the formation of crystalline molybdates. These results significantly extend our understanding of bonding in Mo-containing nuclear waste glasses and demonstrate that tailoring the glass composition to specific heavy metal constituents can facilitate incorporation of heavy metals at high concentrations.

  1. Atom-Probe Tomography, TEM and ToF-SIMS study of borosilicate glass alteration rim: A multiscale approach to investigating rate-limiting mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gin, S.; Jollivet, P.; Barba Rossa, G.; Tribet, M.; Mougnaud, S.; Collin, M.; Fournier, M.; Cadel, E.; Cabie, M.; Dupuy, L.

    2017-04-01

    Significant efforts have been made into understanding the dissolution of silicate glasses and minerals, but there is still debate about the formation processes and the properties of surface layers. Here, we investigate glass coupons of ISG glass - a 6 oxide borosilicate glass of nuclear interest - altered at 90 °C in conditions close to saturation and for durations ranging from 1 to 875 days. Altered glass coupons were characterized from atomic to macroscopic levels to better understand how surface layers become protective. With this approach, it was shown that a rough interface, whose physical characteristics have been modeled, formed in a few days and then propagated into the pristine material at a rate controlled by the reactive transport of water within the growing alteration layer. Several observations such as stiff interfacial B, Na, and Ca profiles and damped profiles within the rest of the alteration layer are not consistent with the classical inter-diffusion model, or with the interfacial dissolution-precipitation model. A new paradigm is proposed to explain these features. Inter-diffusion, a process based on water ingress into the glass and ion-exchange, may only explain the formation of the rough interface in the early stage of glass corrosion. A thin layer of altered glass is formed by this process, and as the layer grows, the accessibility of water to the reactive interface becomes rate-limiting. As a consequence, only the most easily accessible species are dissolved. The others remain undissolved in the alteration layer, probably fixed in highly hydrolysis resistant clusters. A new estimation of water diffusivity in the glass when covered by the passivating layer was determined from the shift between B and H profiles, and was 10-23 m2.s-1, i.e. approximately 3 orders of magnitude lower than water diffusivity in the pristine material. Overall, in the absence of secondary crystalline phases that could consume the major components of the alteration

  2. Control of high level radioactive waste-glass melters. Part 5, Modelling of complex redox effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickford, D.F.; Choi, A.S.

    1991-12-31

    Slurry Fed Melters (SFM) are being developed in the United States, Europe and Japan for the conversion of high-level radioactive waste to borosilicate glass for permanent disposal. The high transition metal, noble metal, nitrate, organic, and sulfate contents of these wastes lead to unique melter redox control requirements. Pilot waste-glass melter operations have indicated the possibility of nickel sulfide or noble-metal fission-product accumulation on melter floors, which can lead to distortion of electric heating patterns, and decrease melter life. Sulfide formation is prevented by control of the redox chemistry of the melter feed. The redox state of waste-glass melters is determined by balance between the reducing potential of organic compounds in the feed, and the oxidizing potential of gases above the melt, and nitrates and polyvalent elements in the waste. Semiquantitative models predicting limitations of organic content have been developed based on crucible testing. Computerized thermodynamic computations are being developed to predict the sequence and products of redox reactions and is assessing process variations. Continuous melter test results have been compared to improved computer staged-thermodynamic-models of redox behavior. Feed chemistry control to prevent sulfide and moderate noble metal accumulations are discussed. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Silicate, borosilicate, and borate bioactive glass scaffolds with controllable degradation rate for bone tissue engineering applications. I. Preparation and in vitro degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Fu, Hailuo; Liu, Xin

    2010-10-01

    Bioactive glass scaffolds with a microstructure similar to that of dry human trabecular bone but with three different compositions were evaluated for potential applications in bone repair. The preparation of the scaffolds and the effect of the glass composition on the degradation and conversion of the scaffolds to a hydroxyapatite (HA)-type material in a simulated body fluid (SBF) are reported here (Part I). The in vitro response of osteogenic cells to the scaffolds and the in vivo evaluation of the scaffolds in a rat subcutaneous implantation model are described in Part II. Scaffolds (porosity = 78-82%; pore size = 100-500 microm) were prepared using a polymer foam replication technique. The glasses consisted of a silicate (13-93) composition, a borosilicate composition (designated 13-93B1), and a borate composition (13-93B3), in which one-third or all of the SiO2 content of 13-93 was replaced by B2O3, respectively. The conversion rate of the scaffolds to HA in the SBF increased markedly with the B2O3 content of the glass. Concurrently, the pH of the SBF also increased with the B2O3 content of the scaffolds. The compressive strengths of the as-prepared scaffolds (5-11 MPa) were in the upper range of values reported for trabecular bone, but they decreased markedly with immersion time in the SBF and with increasing B2O3 content of the glass. The results show that scaffolds with a wide range of bioactivity and degradation rate can be achieved by replacing varying amounts of SiO(2) in silicate bioactive glass with B2O3. Copyright 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A, 2010.

  4. Nanoporous Glasses for Nuclear Waste Containment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Woignier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Research is in progress to incorporate nuclear waste in new matrices with high structural stability, resistance to thermal shock, and high chemical durability. Interactions with water are important for materials used as a containment matrix for the radio nuclides. It is indispensable to improve their chemical durability to limit the possible release of radioactive chemical species, if the glass structure is attacked by corrosion. By associating high structural stability and high chemical durability, silica glass optimizes the properties of a suitable host matrix. According to an easy sintering stage, nanoporous glasses such as xerogels, aerogels, and composite gels are alternative ways to synthesize silica glass at relatively low temperatures (≈1,000–1,200°C. Nuclear wastes exist as aqueous salt solutions and we propose using the open pore structure of the nanoporous glass to enable migration of the solution throughout the solid volume. The loaded material is then sintered, thereby trapping the radioactive chemical species. The structure of the sintered materials (glass ceramics is that of nanocomposites: actinide phases (~100 nm embedded in a vitreous silica matrix. Our results showed a large improvement in the chemical durability of glass ceramic over conventional nuclear glass.

  5. Ceramic and glass radioactive waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Readey, D.W.; Cooley, C.R. (comps.)

    1977-01-01

    This report contains 14 individual presentations and 6 group reports on the subject of glass and polycrystalline ceramic radioactive waste forms. It was the general consensus that the information available on glass as a waste form provided a good basis for planning on the use of glass as an initial waste form, that crystalline ceramic forms could also be good waste forms if much more development work were completed, and that prediction of the chemical and physical stability of the waste form far into the future would be much improved if the basic synergistic effects of low temperature, radiation and long times were better understood. Continuing development of the polycrystalline ceramic forms was recommended. It was concluded that the leach rate of radioactive species from the waste form is an important criterion for evaluating its suitability, particularly for the time period before solidified waste is permanently placed in the geologic isolation of a Federal repository. Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the individual papers; the remaining two were previously abstracted.

  6. 76 FR 13605 - Notice of Availability of Draft Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Evaluation for the Vitrification...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... vitrified the waste (combined it at a high temperature with borosilicate glass) and transferred the molten glass-waste mixture into specially developed ] stainless steel canisters where the mixture hardened into a solid glass waste form. DOE used the vitrification melter as part of this process, specifically to...

  7. Environment and oxidation state of molybdenum in simulated high level nuclear waste glass compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, R. J.; Hand, R. J.; Hyatt, N. C.; Möbus, G.

    2005-04-01

    Alkali borosilicate glasses containing between 20 and 35 wt% of a simulated high level nuclear waste stream with varying Li2O contents were melted under neutral (air) and reducing (nitrogen/hydrogen) conditions. XRD analysis of the as-cast glasses showed a tendency for the products to remain amorphous when melted under neutral conditions and for metallic silver to develop in the reduced melts. EXAFS analysis revealed (MoO4)2- tetrahedra in all glasses regardless of the sparge applied during melting. The glasses were heat treated to simulate an interruption to the cooling system used to prevent heat build-up in the vitrified product store. Powellite-type molybdate phases were found to develop in the heat treated samples and formed at lower waste loadings in glasses sparged with a reducing gas. A reduction in the quantity of Li2O lead to a reduction in the quantity of powellite-type molybdate phases. EDS showed the primary molybdate phase to be high in Sr and rare earth elements and TEM indicated that the presence of silver metal encouraged molybdate formation.

  8. Optimization of pozzolanic reaction of ground waste glass

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, João Paulo de Castro; Santos, P.; Oliveira, Luiz António Pereira de

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the possibility of using finely ground waste glass of the three most common coloured glass bottles used in Portugal as partial cement replacement in mortar and concrete. The pozzolanic activity of ground glass was optimised as function of different particle size. The reduction of waste glass particle size was accomplished in the laboratory by crushing and grinding the waste glass using a jar mill. The particle fineness, to obtain a required reactivity, was s...

  9. Effect of intermediate oxide (Y2O3) on thermal, structural and optical properties of lithium borosilicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satwinder; Kalia, Gaurav; Singh, K.

    2015-04-01

    Glass and glass ceramic samples with composition 55SiO2-30B2O3-(x)Li2O-(15 - x)Y2O3, where x = 0, 5, 10, 15 are prepared by conventional melt-quench technique. The structural, physical, thermal, optical, mechanical and conducting properties of these glasses are studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Differential Thermal Analyzer (DTA), Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-visible spectroscopy and Impedance spectroscopy. Theoretical elastic moduli are calculated for the better understanding of the glass network strength. All samples, except with x = 0 glass, are amorphous in nature. Two broad halos are observed in x = 5 and x = 10 glasses, indicating phase separation in these glasses. Optical band gap of the samples decreases with increasing Y2O3 content. The lowest band gap is observed ∼3.60 eV for x = 15 glass. Urbach energy increased with an increase in Y2O3 concentration. Y2O3 played different roles at different concentrations and enhanced the phase separation tendency in glass. The typical conductivity was observed ∼10-6 S/cm at 620 °C for x = 10 glass.

  10. Medium-Range Structural Organization of Phosphorus-Bearing Borosilicate Glasses Revealed by Advanced Solid-State NMR Experiments and MD Simulations: Consequences of B/Si Substitutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Stevensson, Baltzar; Edén, Mattias

    2017-10-19

    The short and intermediate range structures of a large series of bioactive borophosphosilicate (BPS) glasses were probed by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Two BPS glass series were designed by gradually substituting SiO2 by B2O3 in the respective phosphosilicate base compositions 24.1Na2O-23.3CaO-48.6SiO2-4.0P2O5 ("S49") and 24.6Na2O-26.7CaO-46.1SiO2-2.6P2O5 ("S46"), the latter constituting the "45S5 Bioglass" utilized for bone grafting applications. The BPS glass networks are built by interconnected SiO4, BO4, and BO3 moieties, whereas P exists mainly as orthophosphate anions, except for a minor network-associated portion involving P-O-Si and P-O-B([4]) motifs, whose populations were estimated by heteronuclear (31)P{(11)B} NMR experimentation. The high Na(+)/Ca(2+) contents give fragmented glass networks with large amounts of nonbridging oxygen (NBO) anions. The MD-generated glass models reveal an increasing propensity for NBO accommodation among the network units according to BO4 B NMR experiments, which evidenced the presence of all three BO3-BO3, BO3-BO4, and BO4-BO4 connectivities, with B([3])-O-B([4]) bridges dominating. Notwithstanding that B([4])-O-B([4]) linkages are disfavored, both NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations established their presence in these modifier-rich BPS glasses, along with non-negligible B([4])-NBO contacts, at odds with the conventional structural view of borosilicate glasses. We discuss the relative propensities for intermixing of the Si/B/P network formers. Despite the absence of pronounced preferences for Si-O-Si bond formation, the glass models manifest subtle subnanometer-sized structural inhomogeneities, where SiO4 tetrahedra tend to self-associate into small chain/ring motifs embedded in BO3/BO4-dominated domains.

  11. Standard test method for determining liquidus temperature of immobilized waste glasses and simulated waste glasses

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 These practices cover procedures for determining the liquidus temperature (TL) of nuclear waste, mixed nuclear waste, simulated nuclear waste, or hazardous waste glass in the temperature range from 600°C to 1600°C. This method differs from Practice C829 in that it employs additional methods to determine TL. TL is useful in waste glass plant operation, glass formulation, and melter design to determine the minimum temperature that must be maintained in a waste glass melt to make sure that crystallization does not occur or is below a particular constraint, for example, 1 volume % crystallinity or T1%. As of now, many institutions studying waste and simulated waste vitrification are not in agreement regarding this constraint (1). 1.2 Three methods are included, differing in (1) the type of equipment available to the analyst (that is, type of furnace and characterization equipment), (2) the quantity of glass available to the analyst, (3) the precision and accuracy desired for the measurement, and (4) candi...

  12. DWPF waste glass Product Composition Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, K.G.; Postles, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will be used to blend aqueous radwaste (PHA) with solid radwaste (Sludge) in a waste receipt vessel (the SRAT). The resulting SRAT material is transferred to the SME an there blended with ground glass (Frit) to produce a batch of melter feed slurry. The SME material is passed to a hold tank (the MFT) which is used to continuously feed the DWPF melter. The melter. The melter produces a molten glass wasteform which is poured into stainless steel canisters for cooling and, ultimately, shipment to and storage in a geologic repository. The Product Composition Control System (PCCS) is the system intended to ensure that the melt will be processible and that the glass wasteform will be acceptable. This document provides a description of this system.

  13. DWPF waste glass Product Composition Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, K.G.; Postles, R.L.

    1992-07-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will be used to blend aqueous radwaste (PHA) with solid radwaste (Sludge) in a waste receipt vessel (the SRAT). The resulting SRAT material is transferred to the SME an there blended with ground glass (Frit) to produce a batch of melter feed slurry. The SME material is passed to a hold tank (the MFT) which is used to continuously feed the DWPF melter. The melter. The melter produces a molten glass wasteform which is poured into stainless steel canisters for cooling and, ultimately, shipment to and storage in a geologic repository. The Product Composition Control System (PCCS) is the system intended to ensure that the melt will be processible and that the glass wasteform will be acceptable. This document provides a description of this system.

  14. DM100 AND DM1200 MELTER TESTING WITH HIGH WASTE LOADING GLASS FORMULATIONS FOR HANFORD HIGH-ALUMINUM HLW STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I

    2009-12-30

    This Test Plan describes work to support the development and testing of high waste loading glass formulations that achieve high glass melting rates for Hanford high aluminum high level waste (HLW). In particular, the present testing is designed to evaluate the effect of using low activity waste (LAW) waste streams as a source of sodium in place ofchemical additives, sugar or cellulose as a reductant, boehmite as an aluminum source, and further enhancements to waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work will include preparation and characterization of crucible melts in support of subsequent DuraMelter 100 (DM 100) tests designed to examine the effects of enhanced glass formulations, glass processing temperature, incorporation of the LAW waste stream as a sodium source, type of organic reductant, and feed solids content on waste processing rate and product quality. Also included is a confirmatory test on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200) with a composition selected from those tested on the DM100. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of River Protection (ORP) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same waste composition. This Test Plan is prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is about 12,500. This estimate is based upon the inventory ofthe tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form. The WTP HLW melter design, unlike earlier DOE melter designs, incorporates an active glass bubbler system. The bubblers create active glass pool convection and thereby improve heat

  15. MELT RATE ENHANCEMENT FOR HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS FORMULATION FINAL REPORT 08R1360-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT W; PEGG IL; JOSEPH I; BARDAKCI T; GAN H; GONG W; CHAUDHURI M

    2010-01-04

    This report describes the development and testing of new glass formulations for high aluminum waste streams that achieve high waste loadings while maintaining high processing rates. The testing was based on the compositions of Hanford High Level Waste (HLW) with limiting concentrations of aluminum specified by the Office of River Protection (ORP). The testing identified glass formulations that optimize waste loading and waste processing rate while meeting all processing and product quality requirements. The work included preparation and characterization of crucible melts and small scale melt rate screening tests. The results were used to select compositions for subsequent testing in a DuraMelter 100 (DM100) system. These tests were used to determine processing rates for the selected formulations as well as to examine the effects of increased glass processing temperature, and the form of aluminum in the waste simulant. Finally, one of the formulations was selected for large-scale confirmatory testing on the HLW Pilot Melter (DM1200), which is a one third scale prototype of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW melter and off-gas treatment system. This work builds on previous work performed at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) for Department of Energy (DOE) to increase waste loading and processing rates for high-iron HLW waste streams as well as previous tests conducted for ORP on the same high-aluminum waste composition used in the present work and other Hanford HLW compositions. The scope of this study was outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to an ORP-supplied statement of work. It is currently estimated that the number of HLW canisters to be produced in the WTP is about 13,500 (equivalent to 40,500 MT glass). This estimate is based upon the inventory of the tank wastes, the anticipated performance of the sludge treatment processes, and current understanding of the capability of the borosilicate glass waste form

  16. HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW) VITRIFICATION EXPERIENCE IN THE US: APPLICATION OF GLASS PRODUCT/PROCESS CONTROL TO OTHERHLW AND HAZARDOUS WASTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C; James Marra, J

    2007-09-17

    Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. At the Savannah River Site (SRS) actual HLW tank waste has successfully been processed to stringent product and process constraints without any rework into a stable borosilicate glass waste since 1996. A unique 'feed forward' statistical process control (SPC) has been used rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the melter is controlled prior to vitrification. In SQC, the glass product is sampled after it is vitrified. Individual glass property models form the basis for the 'feed forward' SPC. The property models transform constraints on the melt and glass properties into constraints on the feed composition. The property models are mechanistic and depend on glass bonding/structure, thermodynamics, quasicrystalline melt species, and/or electron transfers. The mechanistic models have been validated over composition regions well outside of the regions for which they were developed because they are mechanistic. Mechanistic models allow accurate extension to radioactive and hazardous waste melts well outside the composition boundaries for which they were developed.

  17. Optical and structural investigation of Dy3+-Nd3+ co-doped in magnesium lead borosilicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, T G V M; Rupesh Kumar, A; Neeraja, K; Veeraiah, N; Rami Reddy, M

    2014-01-24

    MgO-PbO-B2O3-SiO2-Nd2O3-Dy2O3 glasses are prepared by melt-quenching technique. The samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical absorption, luminescence and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectral studied. XRD analysis evidently indicates that the prepared samples are fully amorphous nature. From the optical absorption spectra, the bonding environment surrounding the Dy(3+) and their energy level scheme in glass network is analyzed. Enhancement of Dy(3+) emission by non-radiative energy transfers from Nd(3+) has been observed here. The samples emits intensive bluish yellow color from the (4)F9/2→(6)H15/2, (6)H13/2 transition of Dy(3+) ions in these glasses which are nearer to white light and it is also supported by the chromaticity color coordinates. The FT-IR spectra reveal that network connectivity is increased with replacement of bonds B-O-B, Si-O-Si by more resistant B-O-Si bonds with gradually increasing the content of Dy(3+) ions in the glass network. Along with spectroscopic parameters some physical parameters like density, refractive index etc. are measured for the glasses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of surface processes on surface discharges generated on borosilicate glass barriers in high-pressure CO2 up to supercritical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, David; Stauss, Sven; Terashima, Kazuo

    2015-09-01

    Surface dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) generated in CO2from atmospheric pressure up to supercritical conditions (Tc = 304.13 K, pc = 7.4 MPa) using 10-kHz AC excitation are investigated experimentally using current-voltage and charge-voltage measurements, imaging, and optical emission spectroscopy. Surface processes are investigated to resolve unexplained phenomena from related work on the ``standard'' and ``field-emitting Townsend'' discharge regimes. Variations in the energy, residual or ``memory'' charge, and spatial homogeneity of the field-emitting Townsend regime are shown to depend on the duration that the discharge runs continuously. The memory charge is positive for the field-emitting Townsend regime but negative for the standard regime. It is demonstrated that high discharge homogeneity and low variation in the discharge energy is correlated with the maximization of positive memory charge. Charge neutralization of plasma ions and electrons by anions and cations in the borosilicate glass is proposed as the process responsible for the presence of nanosecond current pulses in the field-emitting Townsend regime. This work was supported financially in part by MEXT and JSPS.

  19. Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2009-10-05

    This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

  20. Thermal properties of simulated Hanford waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Carmen P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Chun, Jaehun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Crum, Jarrod V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Canfield, Nathan L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Rönnebro, Ewa C. E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Kruger, Albert A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland Washington

    2017-03-20

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will vitrify the mixed hazardous wastes generated from 45 years of plutonium production. The molten glasses will be poured into stainless steel containers or canisters and subsequently quenched for storage and disposal. Such highly energy-consuming processes require precise thermal properties of materials for appropriate facility design and operations. Key thermal properties (heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity) of representative high-level and low-activity waste glasses were studied as functions of temperature in the range of 200 to 800°C (relevant to the cooling process), implementing simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry-thermal gravimetry (DSC-TGA), Xe-flash diffusivity, pycnometry, and dilatometry. The study showed that simultaneous DSC-TGA would be a reliable method to obtain heat capacity of various glasses at the temperature of interest. Accurate thermal properties from this study were shown to provide a more realistic guideline for capacity and time constraint of heat removal process, in comparison to the design basis conservative engineering estimates. The estimates, though useful for design in the absence measured physical properties, can now be supplanted and the measured thermal properties can be used in design verification activities.

  1. OXYGEN BUBBLE DEVELOPMENT ON A PLATINUM ELECTRODE IN BOROSILICATE GLASS MELT BY THE EFFECT OF ALTERNATING CURRENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Matej

    2014-10-01

    or on alternating reduction and re-forming of oxidic layer on the electrode in the transition range, has been suggested. Start of bubble evolution at low alternating current density has also been observed in simple sodium-calcium-silicate glass melt. A relation between bubble release and platinum corrosion caused by reduced silicon has been suggested

  2. Characterization study of industrial waste glass as starting material ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In present study, an industrial waste glass was characterized and the potential to assess as starting material in development of bioactive materials was investigated. A waste glass collected from the two different glass industry was grounded to fine powder. The samples were characterized using X-ray fluorescence (XRF), ...

  3. SUMMARY OF FY11 SULFATE RETENTION STUDIES FOR DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

    2012-05-08

    This report describes the results of studies related to the incorporation of sulfate in high level waste (HLW) borosilicate glass produced at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). A group of simulated HLW glasses produced for earlier sulfate retention studies was selected for full chemical composition measurements to determine whether there is any clear link between composition and sulfate retention over the compositional region evaluated. In addition, the viscosity of several glasses was measured to support future efforts in modeling sulfate solubility as a function of predicted viscosity. The intent of these studies was to develop a better understanding of sulfate retention in borosilicate HLW glass to allow for higher loadings of sulfate containing waste. Based on the results of these and other studies, the ability to improve sulfate solubility in DWPF borosilicate glasses lies in reducing the connectivity of the glass network structure. This can be achieved, as an example, by increasing the concentration of alkali species in the glass. However, this must be balanced with other effects of reduced network connectivity, such as reduced viscosity, potentially lower chemical durability, and in the case of higher sodium and aluminum concentrations, the propensity for nepheline crystallization. Future DWPF processing is likely to target higher waste loadings and higher sludge sodium concentrations, meaning that alkali concentrations in the glass will already be relatively high. It is therefore unlikely that there will be the ability to target significantly higher total alkali concentrations in the glass solely to support increased sulfate solubility without the increased alkali concentration causing failure of other Product Composition Control System (PCCS) constraints, such as low viscosity and durability. No individual components were found to provide a significant improvement in sulfate retention (i.e., an increase of the magnitude

  4. Direction of CRT waste glass processing: electronics recycling industry communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Julia R; Boehm, Michael W; Drummond, Charles

    2012-08-01

    Cathode Ray Tube, CRT, waste glass recycling has plagued glass manufacturers, electronics recyclers and electronics waste policy makers for decades because the total supply of waste glass exceeds demand, and the formulations of CRT glass are ill suited for most reuse options. The solutions are to separate the undesirable components (e.g. lead oxide) in the waste and create demand for new products. Achieving this is no simple feat, however, as there are many obstacles: limited knowledge of waste glass composition; limited automation in the recycling process; transportation of recycled material; and a weak and underdeveloped market. Thus one of the main goals of this paper is to advise electronic glass recyclers on how to best manage a diverse supply of glass waste and successfully market to end users. Further, this paper offers future directions for academic and industry research. To develop the recommendations offered here, a combination of approaches were used: (1) a thorough study of historic trends in CRT glass chemistry; (2) bulk glass collection and analysis of cullet from a large-scale glass recycler; (3) conversations with industry members and a review of potential applications; and (4) evaluation of the economic viability of specific uses for recycled CRT glass. If academia and industry can solve these problems (for example by creating a database of composition organized by manufacturer and glass source) then the reuse of CRT glass can be increased. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Glass binder development for a glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Brian J.; Vienna, John D.; Frank, Steven M.; Kroll, Jared O.; Peterson, Jacob A.; Canfield, Nathan L.; Zhu, Zihua; Zhang, Jiandong; Kruska, Karen; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Crum, Jarrod V.

    2017-06-01

    This paper discusses work to develop Na2O-B2O3-SiO2 glass binders for immobilizing LiCl-KCl eutectic salt waste in a glass-bonded sodalite waste form following electrochemical reprocessing of used metallic nuclear fuel. Here, five new glasses with ∼20 mass% Na2O were designed to generate waste forms with high sodalite. The glasses were then used to produce ceramic waste forms with a surrogate salt waste. The waste forms made using these new glasses were formulated to generate more sodalite than those made with previous baseline glasses for this type of waste. The coefficients of thermal expansion for the glass phase in the glass-bonded sodalite waste forms made with the new binder glasses were closer to the sodalite phase in the critical temperature region near and below the glass transition temperature than previous binder glasses used. These improvements should result in lower probability of cracking in the full-scale monolithic ceramic waste form, leading to better long-term chemical durability.

  6. Glass matrix composite material prepared with waste foundry sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Zhao-shu

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The technology of glass matrix of the composite material manufactured through a sintering process and using waste foundry sand and waste glass as the main raw materials was studied. The effects of technological factors on the performance of this material were studied. The results showed that this composite material is formed with glass as matrix, core particulate as strengthening material, it has the performance of glass and ceramics, and could be used to substitute for stone.

  7. Defense waste processing facility (DWPF) liquids model: revisions for processing higher TIO2 containing glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Trivelpiece, C. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-05-01

    Radioactive high level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has successfully been vitrified into borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) since 1996. Vitrification requires stringent product/process (P/P) constraints since the glass cannot be reworked once it is poured into ten foot tall by two foot diameter canisters. A unique “feed forward” statistical process control (SPC) was developed for this control rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the DWPF melter is controlled prior to vitrification. In SQC, the glass product would be sampled after it is vitrified. Individual glass property-composition models form the basis for the “feed forward” SPC. The models transform constraints on the melt and glass properties into constraints on the feed composition going to the melter in order to guarantee, at the 95% confidence level, that the feed will be processable and that the durability of the resulting waste form will be acceptable to a geologic repository. This report documents the development of revised TiO2, Na2O, Li2O and Fe2O3 coefficients in the SWPF liquidus model and revised coefficients (a, b, c, and d).

  8. Thermal Predictions of the Cooling of Waste Glass Canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2014-11-01

    Radioactive liquid waste from five decades of weapons production is slated for vitrification at the Hanford site. The waste will be mixed with glass forming additives and heated to a high temperature, then poured into canisters within a pour cave where the glass will cool and solidify into a stable waste form for disposal. Computer simulations were performed to predict the heat rejected from the canisters and the temperatures within the glass during cooling. Four different waste glass compositions with different thermophysical properties were evaluated. Canister centerline temperatures and the total amount of heat transfer from the canisters to the surrounding air are reported.

  9. Glass binder development for a glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J.; Vienna, John D.; Frank, Steven M.; Kroll, Jared O.; Peterson, Jacob A.; Canfield, Nathan L.; Zhu, Zihua; Zhang, Jiandong; Kruska, Karen; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Crum, Jarrod V.

    2017-06-01

    This paper discusses work to develop Na2O-B2O3-SiO2 glass binders for immobilizing LiCl-KCl eutectic salt waste in a glass-bonded sodalite waste form following electrochemical reprocessing of used metallic nuclear fuel. Here, five new glasses with high Na2O contents were designed to generate waste forms having higher sodalite contents and fewer stress fractures. The structural, mechanical, and thermal properties of the new glasses were measured using variety of analytical techniques. The glasses were then used to produce ceramic waste forms with surrogate salt waste. The materials made using the glasses developed during this study were formulated to generate more sodalite than materials made with previous baseline glasses used. The coefficients of thermal expansion for the glass phase in the glass-bonded sodalite waste forms made with the new binder glasses were closer to the sodalite phase in the critical temperature region near and below the glass transition temperature. These improvements should result in lower probability of cracking in the full-scale monolithic ceramic waste form, leading to better long-term chemical durability. Additionally, a model generated during this study for predicting softening temperature of silicate binder glasses is presented.

  10. Inhibitory Effect of Waste Glass Powder on ASR Expansion Induced by Waste Glass Aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Detailed research is carried out to ascertain the inhibitory effect of waste glass powder (WGP on alkali-silica reaction (ASR expansion induced by waste glass aggregate in this paper. The alkali reactivity of waste glass aggregate is examined by two methods in accordance with the China Test Code SL352-2006. The potential of WGP to control the ASR expansion is determined in terms of mean diameter, specific surface area, content of WGP and curing temperature. Two mathematical models are developed to estimate the inhibitory efficiency of WGP. These studies show that there is ASR risk with an ASR expansion rate over 0.2% when the sand contains more than 30% glass aggregate. However, WGP can effectively control the ASR expansion and inhibit the expansion rate induced by the glass aggregate to be under 0.1%. The two mathematical models have good simulation results, which can be used to evaluate the inhibitory effect of WGP on ASR risk.

  11. Chemical durability of glasses obtained by vitrification of industrial wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisciella, P; Crisucci, S; Karamanov, A; Pelino, M

    2001-01-01

    The vitrification of zinc-hydrometallurgy wastes, electric arc furnace dust (EAFD), drainage mud, and granite mud was shown to immobilize the hazardous components in these wastes. Batch compositions were prepared by mixing the wastes with glass-cullet and sand to force the final glass composition into the glass forming region of the SiO2-Fe2O3-(CaO, MgO) system. The vitrification was carried out in the 1400-1450 degrees C temperature range followed by quenching in water or on stainless steel mold. The United States (US) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) toxic characterization leaching procedure (TCLP) test was used as a standard method for evaluating the leachability of the elements in the glasses and glass-ceramics samples made with different percentages of wastes. The results for EAFD glasses highlighted that the chemical stability is influenced by the glass structure formed, which, in turn, depends on the Si/O ratio in the glass. The chemical durability of jarosite glasses and glass-ceramics was evaluated by 24 h contact in NaOH, HCl and Na2CO3, at 95 degrees C. Jarosite glass-ceramics containing pyroxene (J40) are more durable than the parent glass in HCl. Jarosite glass-ceramics containing magnetite type spinels (J50) have a durability similar to the parent glass and even lower in HCl because the magnetite is soluble in HCl.

  12. Understanding of the mechanical and structural changes induced by alpha particles and heavy ions in the French simulated nuclear waste glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakurt, G.; Abdelouas, A.; Guin, J.-P.; Nivard, M.; Sauvage, T.; Paris, M.; Bardeau, J.-F.

    2016-07-01

    Borosilicate glasses are considered for the long-term confinement of high-level nuclear wastes. External irradiations with 1 MeV He+ ions and 7 MeV Au5+ ions were performed to simulate effects produced by alpha particles and by recoil nuclei in the simulated SON68 nuclear waste glass. To better understand the structural modifications, irradiations were also carried out on a 6-oxides borosilicate glass, a simplified version of the SON68 glass (ISG glass). The mechanical and macroscopic properties of the glasses were studied as function of the deposited electronic and nuclear energies. Alpha particles and gold ions induced a volume change up to -0.7% and -2.7%, respectively, depending on the glass composition. Nano-indentations tests were used to determine the mechanical properties of the irradiated glasses. A decrease of about -22% to -38% of the hardness and a decrease of the reduced Young's modulus by -8% were measured after irradiations. The evolution of the glass structure was studied by Raman spectroscopy, and also 11B and 27Al Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS-NMR) on a 20 MeV Kr irradiated ISG glass powder. A decrease of the silica network connectivity after irradiation with alpha particles and gold ions is deduced from the structural changes observations. NMR spectra revealed a partial conversion of BO4 to BO3 units but also a formation of AlO5 and AlO6 species after irradiation with Kr ions. The relationships between the mechanical and structural changes are also discussed.

  13. Crystallization in high-level waste glass: A review of glass theory and noteworthy literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-18

    There is a fundamental need to continue research aimed at understanding nepheline and spinel crystal formation in high-level waste (HLW) glass. Specifically, the formation of nepheline solids (K/NaAlSiO4) during slow cooling of HLW glass can reduce the chemical durability of the glass, which can cause a decrease in the overall durability of the glass waste form. The accumulation of spinel solids ((Fe, Ni, Mn, Zn)(Fe, Cr)2O4), while not detrimental to glass durability, can cause an array of processing problems inside HLW glass melters. In this review, the fundamental differences between glass and solid-crystals are explained using kinetic, thermodynamic, and viscosity arguments, and several highlights of glass-crystallization research, as it pertains to high-level waste vitrification, are described. In terms of mitigating spinel in the melter and both spinel and nepheline formation in the canister, the complexity of HLW glass and the intricate interplay between thermal, chemical, and kinetic factors further complicates this understanding. However, new experiments seeking to elucidate the contributing factors of crystal nucleation and growth in waste glass, and the compilation of data from older experiments, may go a long way towards helping to achieve higher waste loadings while developing more efficient processing strategies. Higher waste loadings and more efficient processing strategies will reduce the overall HLW Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vitrification facilities mission life.

  14. Recycling and Utilization of Waste Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Yan-chao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly introduced the recovery method, classification and comprehensive utilization process of waste glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP. Among the current methods of utilization, the physical method is most promising. After pre-processing of waste GFRP, the short glass fiber can be used in gypsum block to improve the anti-cracking and operation performance of the material; waste GFRP powder can be used in plastic fiber reinforced manhole covers to increase the mechanical strength, and the products conformed to JC 1009-2006. Based on these studies, we also point out some problems concerning the utilization of waste glass fiber reinforced plastics.

  15. Glass matrices for vitrification of radioactive waste - an Update on R & D Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Kanwar; Kaushik, C. P.

    2009-07-01

    Radioactive waste gets generated at different stages of nuclear fuel cycle like mining/milling, fuel fabrication, reactor operation, reprocessing of spent fuel and the production & application of radioisotopes for various industrial, medical and research purposes. High Level radioactive Waste (HLW) is generated during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel and it contains most of the radioactivity present in entire fuel cycle. Vitrification of HLW in borosilicate matrix is being practiced using induction heated metallic melters at industrial scale plants at Tarapur and Trombay [1]. The nature of HLW largely depends on off - reactor cooling of spent nuclear fuel, its type and burn - up, and reprocessing flow sheet. In view of varying characteristics, processing of HLW at Tarapur and Trombay has offered a wide spectrum of challenges in terms of development of matrices and characterization to accommodate compositional changes in waste. The present paper summarizes details of extensive R and D efforts made in the Department of Atomic Energy towards development and characterization of glass formulations for immobilization of HLW.

  16. Exploration and Modeling of Structural changes in Waste Glass Under Corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantano, Carlos; Ryan, Joseph; Strachan, Denis

    2013-11-10

    Vitrification is currently the world-wide treatment of choice for the disposition of high-level nuclear wastes. In glasses, radionuclides are atomistically bonded into the solid, resulting in a highly durable product, with borosilicate glasses exhibiting particularly excellent durability in water. Considering that waste glass is designed to retain the radionuclides within the waste form for long periods, it is important to understand the long-term stability of these materials when they react in the environment, especially in the presence of water. Based on a number of previous studies, there is general consensus regarding the mechanisms controlling the initial rate of nuclear waste glass dissolution. Agreement regarding the cause of the observed decrease in dissolution rate at extended times, however, has been elusive. Two general models have been proposed to explain this behavior, and it has been concluded that both concepts are valid and must be taken into account when considering the decrease in dissolution rate. Furthermore, other processes such as water diffusion, ion exchange, and precipitation of mineral phases onto the glass surface may occur in parallel with dissolution of the glass and can influence long-term performance. Our proposed research will address these issues through a combination of aqueous-phase dissolution/reaction experiments and probing of the resulting surface layers with state-of-the-art analytical methods. These methods include solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). The resulting datasets will then be coupled with computational chemistry and reaction-rate modeling to address the most persistent uncertainties in the understanding of glass corrosion, which indeed have limited the performance of the best corrosion models to date. With an improved understanding of corrosion mechanisms, models can be developed and improved that, while still conservative, take advantage of

  17. Reuse of ground waste glass as aggregate for mortars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corinaldesi, V; Gnappi, G; Moriconi, G; Montenero, A

    2005-01-01

    This work was aimed at studying the possibility of reusing waste glass from crushed containers and building demolition as aggregate for preparing mortars and concrete. At present, this kind of reuse is still not common due to the risk of alkali-silica reaction between the alkalis of cement and silica of the waste glass. This expansive reaction can cause great problems of cracking and, consequently, it can be extremely deleterious for the durability of mortar and concrete. However, data reported in the literature show that if the waste glass is finely ground, under 75mum, this effect does not occur and mortar durability is guaranteed. Therefore, in this work the possible reactivity of waste glass with the cement paste in mortars was verified, by varying the particle size of the finely ground waste glass. No reaction has been detected with particle size up to 100mum thus indicating the feasibility of the waste glass reuse as fine aggregate in mortars and concrete. In addition, waste glass seems to positively contribute to the mortar micro-structural properties resulting in an evident improvement of its mechanical performance.

  18. Crystallization in high-level waste glass: A review of glass theory and noteworthy literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-01

    There is a fundamental need to continue research aimed at understanding nepheline and spinel crystal formation in high-level waste (HLW) glass. Specifically, the formation of nepheline solids (K/NaAlSiO₄) during slow cooling of HLW glass can reduce the chemical durability of the glass, which can cause a decrease in the overall durability of the glass waste form. The accumulation of spinel solids ((Fe, Ni, Mn, Zn)(Fe,Cr)₂O₄), while not detrimental to glass durability, can cause an array of processing problems inside of HLW glass melters. In this review, the fundamental differences between glass and solid-crystals are explained using kinetic, thermodynamic, and viscosity arguments, and several highlights of glass-crystallization research, as it pertains to high-level waste vitrification, are described. In terms of mitigating spinel in the melter and both spinel and nepheline formation in the canister, the complexity of HLW glass and the intricate interplay between thermal, chemical, and kinetic factors further complicates this understanding. However, new experiments seeking to elucidate the contributing factors of crystal nucleation and growth in waste glass, and the compilation of data from older experiments, may go a long way towards helping to achieve higher waste loadings while developing more efficient processing strategies.

  19. Formulation and Characterization of Waste Glasses with Varying Processing Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, M. J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Lepry, William C.; Lang, Jesse B.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Vienna, John D.; Johnson, Fabienne; Marra, James C.; Peeler, David K.

    2011-10-17

    This report documents the preliminary results of glass formulation and characterization accomplished within the finished scope of the EM-31 technology development tasks for WP-4 and WP-5, including WP-4.1.2: Glass Formulation for Next Generation Melter, WP-5.1.2.3: Systematic Glass Studies, and WP-5.1.2.4: Glass Formulation for Specific Wastes. This report also presents the suggested studies for eventual restart of these tasks. The initial glass formulation efforts for the cold crucible induction melter (CCIM), operating at {approx}1200 C, with selected HLW (AZ-101) and LAW (AN-105) successfully developed glasses with significant increase of waste loading compared to that is likely to be achieved based on expected reference WTP formulations. Three glasses formulated for AZ-101HLW and one glass for AN-105 LAW were selected for the initial CCIM demonstration melter tests. Melter tests were not performed within the finished scope of the WP-4.1.2 task. Glass formulations for CCIM were expanded to cover additional HLWs that have high potential to successfully demonstrate the unique advantages of the CCIM technologies based on projected composition of Hanford wastes. However, only the preliminary scoping tests were completed with selected wastes within the finished scope. Advanced glass formulations for the reference WTP melter, operating at {approx}1200 C, were initiated with selected specific wastes to determine the estimated maximum waste loading. The incomplete results from these initial formulation efforts are summarized. For systematic glass studies, a test matrix of 32 high-aluminum glasses was completed based on a new method developed in this study.

  20. WTP Waste Feed Qualification: Glass Fabrication Unit Operation Testing Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, M. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Hanford Missions Programs; Newell, J. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Process Technology Programs; Johnson, F. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Engineering Process Development; Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL). Engineering Process Development

    2016-07-14

    The waste feed qualification program is being developed to protect the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) design, safety basis, and technical basis by assuring waste acceptance requirements are met for each staged waste feed campaign prior to transfer from the Tank Operations Contractor to the feed receipt vessels inside the Pretreatment Facility. The Waste Feed Qualification Program Plan describes the three components of waste feed qualification: 1. Demonstrate compliance with the waste acceptance criteria 2. Determine waste processability 3. Test unit operations at laboratory scale. The glass fabrication unit operation is the final step in the process demonstration portion of the waste feed qualification process. This unit operation generally consists of combining each of the waste feed streams (high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW)) with Glass Forming Chemicals (GFCs), fabricating glass coupons, performing chemical composition analysis before and after glass fabrication, measuring hydrogen generation rate either before or after glass former addition, measuring rheological properties before and after glass former addition, and visual observation of the resulting glass coupons. Critical aspects of this unit operation are mixing and sampling of the waste and melter feeds to ensure representative samples are obtained as well as ensuring the fabrication process for the glass coupon is adequate. Testing was performed using a range of simulants (LAW and HLW simulants), and these simulants were mixed with high and low bounding amounts of GFCs to evaluate the mixing, sampling, and glass preparation steps in shielded cells using laboratory techniques. The tests were performed with off-the-shelf equipment at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that is similar to equipment used in the SRNL work during qualification of waste feed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and other waste treatment facilities at the

  1. Structure, crystallization and dielectric resonances in 2-13 GHz of waste-derived glass-ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Rui; Liao, SongYi; Chen, XiaoYu; Wang, GuangRong; Zheng, Feng

    2016-12-01

    Structure, kinetics of crystallization, and dielectric resonances of waste-derived glass-ceramic prepared via quench-heating route were studied as a function of dosage of iron ore tailing (IOT) within 20-40 wt% using X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and vector network analyzer (VNA) measurements. The glass-ceramic mainly consisted of ferrite crystals embedded in borosilicate glass matrix. Crystallization kinetics and morphologies of ferrite crystals as well as coordination transformation of boron between [BO4] and [BO3] in glass network were adjustable by changing the amount of IOT. Dielectric resonances in 6-13 GHz were found to be dominated by oscillations of Ca2+ cations in glass network with [SiO4] units on their neighboring sites. Ni2+ ions made a small contribution to those resonances. Diopside formed when IOT exceeded 35 wt%, which led to weakening of the resonances.

  2. Characterization of Incorporation the Glass Waste in Adhesive Mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, D. P.; Azevedo, A. R. G.; Hespanhol, R. L.; Alexandre, J.

    Ehe search for reuse generated waste in urban centers, intending to preserve natural resources, has remained fairly constant, both in context of preventing exploitation of resources as the emplacement of waste on the environment. Glass waste glass created a serious environmental problem, mainly because of inconsistency of its flows. Ehe use of this product as a mineral additive, finely ground, cement replacement and aggregate is a promising direction for recycling. This work aims to study the influence of glass waste from cutting process in adhesive mortar, replacing part of cement. Ehe glass powder is used replacing Portland cement at 10, 15 and 20% by mass. Ehe produced mortars will be evaluated its performance in fresh and hardened states through tests performed in laboratory. Ehe selected feature is indicated by producers of additive and researchers to present good results when used as adhesive mortar.

  3. Deccan Traps-associated obsidian glass: a nuclear waste containment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nishi Rani; J. P. Shrivastava; R. K. Bajpai

    2013-01-01

    Alteration of obsidian collected from Osham Hill, Gujarat after treatment under hydrothermal-like conditions is compared with the naturally altered obsidian for its assessment as a nuclear waste glass...

  4. Development of a glass-encapsulated calcium phosphate wasteform for the immobilization of actinide and halide containing radioactive wastes from the pyrochemical reprocessing of plutonium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, S.K. [AWE, Aldermaston, Berkshire (United Kingdom)], E-mail: shirley.fong@awe.co.uk; Donald, I.W.; Metcalfe, B.L. [AWE, Aldermaston, Berkshire (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-11

    Chloride-containing radioactive wastes are generated during the pyrochemical reprocessing of Pu metal. Immobilization of these wastes in borosilicate glass or Synroc-type ceramics is not viable due to the very low solubility of chlorides in these hosts. Alternative wasteforms, including zeolites and direct vitrification in phosphate glasses, were therefore studied. However, the preferred option was to immobilize the waste in calcium phosphate ceramics, forming a number of stable mineral phases including chlorapatite, chloride-substituted fluorapatite and spodiosite. The immobilization process developed in this study involves a solid state process in which waste and host powders are reacted in air at temperatures in the range of 700-800 deg. C. The ceramic products obtained by this process are non-hygroscopic free-flowing powders that require encapsulation in glass to produce a monolithic wasteform suitable for storage and ultimate disposal. A suitable relatively low melting temperature phosphate-based glass was identified. Durability trials of both the ceramic powder and sintered glass-ceramic hybrid wasteform indicate that both the halides and actinide surrogate ions are satisfactorily immobilized.

  5. Advanced High-Level Waste Glass Research and Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, David K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schweiger, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fox, Kevin M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection (ORP) has implemented an integrated program to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product quality requirements. The integrated ORP program is focused on providing a technical, science-based foundation from which key decisions can be made regarding the successful operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facilities. The fundamental data stemming from this program will support development of advanced glass formulations, key process control models, and tactical processing strategies to ensure safe and successful operations for both the low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) vitrification facilities with an appreciation toward reducing overall mission life. The purpose of this advanced HLW glass research and development plan is to identify the near-, mid-, and longer-term research and development activities required to develop and validate advanced HLW glasses and their associated models to support facility operations at WTP, including both direct feed and full pretreatment flowsheets. This plan also integrates technical support of facility operations and waste qualification activities to show the interdependence of these activities with the advanced waste glass (AWG) program to support the full WTP mission. Figure ES-1 shows these key ORP programmatic activities and their interfaces with both WTP facility operations and qualification needs. The plan is a living document that will be updated to reflect key advancements and mission strategy changes. The research outlined here is motivated by the potential for substantial economic benefits (e.g., significant increases in waste throughput and reductions in glass volumes) that will be realized when advancements in glass formulation continue and models supporting facility operations are implemented. Developing and applying advanced

  6. Fabrication and physical characteristics of new glasses from wastes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this work, new glasses were synthesized from wastes of limestone and phosphate rocks besides com- mercial borax. The glasses were characterized by FTIR, DTA, ultrasonic techniques and UV spectroscopy. It was found that the concentration of both CaO and P2O5 increases and the concentrations of B2O3 ...

  7. Studies on the Potential of Waste Soda Lime Silica Glass in Glass Ionomer Cement Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. W. Francis Thoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glass ionomer cements (GIC are produced through acid base reaction between calcium-fluoroaluminosilicate glass powder and polyacrylic acid (PAA. Soda lime silica glasses (SLS, mainly composed of silica (SiO2, have been utilized in this study as the source of SiO2 for synthesis of Ca-fluoroaluminosilicate glass. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to investigate the potential of SLS waste glass in producing GIC. Two glasses, GWX 1 (analytical grade SiO2 and GWX 2 (replacing SiO2 with waste SLS, were synthesized and then characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX. Synthesized glasses were then used to produce GIC, in which the properties were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and compressive test (from 1 to 28 days. XRD results showed that amorphous glass was produced by using SLS waste glass (GWX 2, which is similar to glass produced using analytical grade SiO2 (GWX 1. Results from FT-IR showed that the setting reaction of GWX 2 cements is slower compared to cement GWX 1. Compressive strengths for GWX 1 cements reached up to 76 MPa at 28 days, whereas GWX 2 cements showed a slightly higher value, which is 80 MPa.

  8. INCONEL 690 CORROSION IN WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PLANT) HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE) GLASS MELTS RICH IN ALUMINUM & BISMUTH & CHROMIUM OR ALUMINUM/SODIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; FENG Z; GAN H; PEGG IL

    2009-11-05

    Metal corrosion tests were conducted with four high waste loading non-Fe-limited HLW glass compositions. The results at 1150 C (the WTP nominal melter operating temperature) show corrosion performance for all four glasses that is comparable to that of other typical borosilicate waste glasses, including HLW glass compositions that have been developed for iron-limited WTP streams. Of the four glasses tested, the Bi-limited composition shows the greatest extent of corrosion, which may be related to its higher phosphorus content. Tests at higher suggest that a moderate elevation of the melter operating temperature (up to 1200 C) should not result in any significant increase in Inconel corrosion. However, corrosion rates did increase significantly at yet higher temperatures (1230 C). Very little difference was observed with and without the presence of an electric current density of 6 A/inch{sup 2}, which is the typical upper design limit for Inconel electrodes. The data show a roughly linear relationship between the thickness of the oxide scale on the coupon and the Cr-depletion depth, which is consistent with the chromium depletion providing the material source for scale growth. Analysis of the time dependence of the Cr depletion profiles measured at 1200 C suggests that diffusion of Cr in the Ni-based Inconel alloy controls the depletion depth of Cr inside the alloy. The diffusion coefficient derived from the experimental data agrees within one order of magnitude with the published diffusion coefficient data for Cr in Ni matrices; the difference is likely due to the contribution from faster grain boundary diffusion in the tested Inconel alloy. A simple diffusion model based on these data predicts that Inconel 690 alloy will suffer Cr depletion damage to a depth of about 1 cm over a five year service life at 1200 C in these glasses.

  9. The effect of chromium oxide on the properties of simulated nuclear waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vojtech, O.; Sussmilch, J.; Urbanec, Z. [and others

    1996-02-01

    A study of the effect of chromium on the properties of selected glasses was performed in the frame of a Contract between Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories and Nuclear Research Institute, ReZ. In the period from July 1994 to June 1995 two borosilicate glasses of special composition were prepared according to the PNL procedure and their physical and structural characteristics of glasses were studied. This Final Report contains a vast documentation on the properties of all glasses studied. For the preparation of the respective technology more detailed study of physico-chemical properties and crystallinity of investigated systems would be desirable.

  10. The physical problems in the design of waste glass melters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiang

    1998-12-01

    Large quantities of radioactive and hazardous wastes are produced as by-products of industrial processes. Additional quantities of wastes are in temporary storage pending treatment and final disposal. An economical and safe method for the treatment of these kinds of wastes is by vitrification whereby radioactive or hazardous wastes are converted to durable glass products. A low cost and high throughput waste glass melter is the key component in this process. Operation and performance of waste glass melters are highly dependent on their designs. The goal of this research work was to create physical and computer models to optimize the design of these melters. The best methods to increase the melter throughput can be determined from these models. The research work included modeling of heat transfer in the glass and through the melter walls, temperature distributions in the melter, and electrical current profiles in the glass. Temperature profiles through the refractory walls have a major effect on the life of the melter. Electrical current field distribution in the glass can affect throughput and melter life. Based on the results of these models, and small scale tests, design for large melters can be determined. The throughput of waste glass melters can be increased substantially by using air bubblers to enhance mixing and heat transfer. Physical and computer models can simulate molten glass flow patterns in the melter. The electrical effects of air bubbles, conductive metal and metal sulfide layers and molten sulfide layers in the melter were studied with computer models. Cross talk between electrodes and hot spots on the electrodes are major factors that limit electrode life.

  11. Solubility of actinides and surrogates in nuclear glasses; Solubilite des actinides et de leurs simulants dans les verres nucleaires. Limites d'incorporation et comprehension des mecanismes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Ch

    2003-07-01

    The nuclear wastes are currently incorporated in borosilicate glass matrices. The resulting glass must be perfectly homogeneous. The work discussed here is a study of actinide (thorium and plutonium) solubility in borosilicate glass, undertaken to assess the extent of actinide solubility in the glass and to understand the mechanisms controlling actinide solubilization. Glass specimens containing; actinide surrogates were used to prepare and optimize the fabrication of radioactive glass samples. These preliminary studies revealed that actinide Surrogates solubility in the glass was enhanced by controlling the processing temperature, the dissolution kinetic of the surrogate precursors, the glass composition and the oxidizing versus reducing conditions. The actinide solubility was investigated in the borosilicate glass. The evolution of thorium solubility in borosilicate glass was determined for temperatures ranging from 1200 deg C to 1400 deg C.Borosilicate glass specimens containing plutonium were fabricated. The experimental result showed that the plutonium solubility limit ranged from 1 to 2.5 wt% PuO{sub 2} at 1200 deg C. A structural approach based on the determination of the local structure around actinides and their surrogates by EXAFS spectroscopy was used to determine their structural role in the glass and the nature of their bonding with the vitreous network. This approach revealed a correlation between the length of these bonds and the solubility of the actinides and their surrogates. (author)

  12. Liquid phase sintering of 20Bi(Zn0.5Ti0.5)O 3-80BaTiO3 dielectrics with bismuth-zinc-borate and bismuth borosilicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, David I.

    Dielectrics in the Bi(Zn0.5Ti0.5)O3-BaTiO 3 system (specifically 20BZT-80BT, in mol%) are promising candidates for high energy density capacitor applications due to broad temperature-dependent dielectric constant maxima and a relatively field-independent permittivity. Bulk samples require sintering temperatures of greater than 1180°C to reach useful densities. Due to incompatibility of Bi with low-pO2 processing, BZT-BT-based multilayer capacitors must utilize noble metal electrodes that resist oxidation during sintering. Sintering temperatures must be reduced to allow use of less expensive electrode materials (Cu, etc.). This work studies the reduced temperature sintering behavior and dielectric properties of BZT-BT sintered with 30Bi2O3-30ZnO-40B 2O3 and 50Bi2O3-25B2O 3-25SiO2 (mol%) liquid phase formers. Dielectrics sintered with 1v% borate additions and 5v% additions of either the borate or borosilicate achieved relative densities greater than 95% after sintering at 1000°C for four hours. All compositions retained the relaxor behavior exhibited by pure 20BZT-80BT. Increased borate additions led to greater dielectric constant reductions, while increased borosilicate additions yielded no clear trend in the dielectric constant reduction. Energy densities were estimated between 0.3-0.5 J/cm3; smaller glass additions typically led to larger energy densities. Dielectrics sintered with 1v% borate additions are of interest due to their high relative densities (approx. 96%) and energy densities of approximately 0.5 J/cm3 under 100kV/cm electric fields. Studies of BZT-BT/glass interfaces revealed the formation of crystalline interfacial layers less than 10 microns thick. The borate formed a bismuth titanate phase (likely Bi4Ti3O12) during heating to 700°C, whereas the borosilicate formed a barium silicate phase (likely BaSiO3) during processing to 800°C. Similar phases are expected to be present in the liquid phase sintered dielectrics and likely affect the BZT

  13. Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Viscosity Model: Revisions for Processing High TiO2 Containing Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-30

    Radioactive high-level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has successfully been vitrified into borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) since 1996. Vitrification requires stringent product/process (P/P) constraints since the glass cannot be reworked once it is poured into ten foot tall by two foot diameter canisters. A unique “feed forward” statistical process control (SPC) was developed for this control rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the DWPF melter is controlled prior to vitrification. In SQC, the glass product would be sampled after it is vitrified. Individual glass property-composition models form the basis for the “feed forward” SPC. The models transform constraints on the melt and glass properties into constraints on the feed composition going to the melter in order to guarantee, at the 95% confidence level, that the feed will be processable and that the durability of the resulting waste form will be acceptable to a geologic repository. The DWPF SPC system is known as the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). The DWPF will soon be receiving wastes from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) containing increased concentrations of TiO2, Na2O, and Cs2O . The SWPF is being built to pretreat the high-curie fraction of the salt waste to be removed from the HLW tanks in the F- and H-Area Tank Farms at the SRS. In order to process TiO2 concentrations >2.0 wt% in the DWPF, new viscosity data were developed over the range of 1.90 to 6.09 wt% TiO2 and evaluated against the 2005 viscosity model. An alternate viscosity model is also derived for potential future use, should the DWPF ever need to process other titanate-containing ion exchange materials. The ultimate limit on the amount of TiO2 that can be accommodated from SWPF will be determined by the three PCCS models, the waste composition of a given sludge

  14. Eco-efficient waste glass recycling: Integrated waste management and green product development through LCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blengini, Gian Andrea; Busto, Mirko; Fantoni, Moris; Fino, Debora

    2012-05-01

    As part of the EU Life + NOVEDI project, a new eco-efficient recycling route has been implemented to maximise resources and energy recovery from post-consumer waste glass, through integrated waste management and industrial production. Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used to identify engineering solutions to sustainability during the development of green building products. The new process and the related LCA are framed within a meaningful case of industrial symbiosis, where multiple waste streams are utilised in a multi-output industrial process. The input is a mix of rejected waste glass from conventional container glass recycling and waste special glass such as monitor glass, bulbs and glass fibres. The green building product is a recycled foam glass (RFG) to be used in high efficiency thermally insulating and lightweight concrete. The environmental gains have been contrasted against induced impacts and improvements have been proposed. Recovered co-products, such as glass fragments/powders, plastics and metals, correspond to environmental gains that are higher than those related to landfill avoidance, whereas the latter is cancelled due to increased transportation distances. In accordance to an eco-efficiency principle, it has been highlighted that recourse to highly energy intensive recycling should be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Waste glass powder as partial replacement of cement for sustainable concrete practice

    OpenAIRE

    Sadiqul Islam, G.M.; M.H. Rahman; Nayem Kazi

    2017-01-01

    Million tons of waste glass is being generated annually all over the world. Once the glass becomes a waste it is disposed as landfills, which is unsustainable as this does not decompose in the environment. Glass is principally composed of silica. Use of milled (ground) waste glass in concrete as partial replacement of cement could be an important step toward development of sustainable (environmentally friendly, energy-efficient and economical) infrastructure systems. When waste glass is mille...

  16. The quality study of recycled glass phosphor waste for LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chun-Chin; Chen, Guan-Hao; Yue, Cheng-Feng; Chen, Cin-Fu; Cheng, Wood-Hi

    2017-02-01

    To study the feasibility and quality of recycled glass phosphor waste for LED packaging, the experiments were conducted to compare optical characteristics between fresh color conversion layer and that made of recycled waste. The fresh color conversion layer was fabricated through sintering pristine mixture of Y.A.G. powder [yellow phosphor (Y3AlO12 : Ce3+). Those recycled waste glass phosphor re-melted to form Secondary Molten Glass Phosphor (S.M.G.P.). The experiments on such low melting temperature glass results showed that transmission rates of S.M.G.P. are 9% higher than those of first-sintered glass phosphor, corresponding to 1.25% greater average bubble size and 36% more bubble coverage area in S.M.G.P. In the recent years, high power LED modules and laser projectors have been requiring higher thermal stability by using glass phosphor materials for light mixing. Nevertheless, phosphor and related materials are too expensive to expand their markets. It seems a right trend and research goal that recycling such waste of high thermal stability and quality materials could be preferably one of feasible cost-down solutions. This technical approach could bring out brighter future for solid lighting and light source module industries.

  17. Production of a High-Level Waste Glass from Hanford Waste Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Farrara, D.M.; Ha, B.C.; Bibler, N.E.

    1998-09-01

    The HLW glass was produced from a HLW sludge slurry (Envelope D Waste), eluate waste streams containing high levels of Cs-137 and Tc-99, solids containing both Sr-90 and transuranics (TRU), and glass-forming chemicals. The eluates and Sr-90/TRU solids were obtained from ion-exchange and precipitation pretreatments, respectively, of other Hanford supernate samples (Envelopes A, B and C Waste). The glass was vitrified by mixing the different waste streams with glass-forming chemicals in platinum/gold crucibles and heating the mixture to 1150 degree C. Resulting glass analyses indicated that the HLW glass waste form composition was close to the target composition. The targeted waste loading of Envelope D sludge solids in the HLW glass was 30.7 wt percent, exclusive of Na and Si oxides. Condensate samples from the off-gas condenser and off-gas dry-ice trap indicated that very little of the radionuclides were volatilized during vitrification. Microstructure analysis of the HLW glass using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDAX) showed what appeared to be iron spinel in the HLW glass. Further X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the presence of nickel spinel trevorite (NiFe2O4). These crystals did not degrade the leaching characteristics of the glass. The HLW glass waste form passed leach tests that included a standard 90 degree C Product Consistency Test (PCT) and a modified version of the United States Environmental Protection Agency Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP).

  18. HIGH ALUMINUM HLW (HIGH LEVEL WASTE ) GLASSES FOR HANFORDS WTP (WASTE TREATMENT PROJECT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; BOWAN BW; JOSEPH I; GAN H; KOT WK; MATLACK KS; PEGG IL

    2010-01-04

    This paper presents the results of glass formulation development and melter testing to identify high waste loading glasses to treat high-Al high level waste (HLW) at Hanford. Previous glass formulations developed for this HLW had high waste loadings but their processing rates were lower that desired. The present work was aimed at improving the glass processing rate while maintaining high waste loadings. Glass formulations were designed, prepared at crucible-scale and characterized to determine their properties relevant to processing and product quality. Glass formulations that met these requirements were screened for melt rates using small-scale tests. The small-scale melt rate screening included vertical gradient furnace (VGF) and direct feed consumption (DFC) melter tests. Based on the results of these tests, modified glass formulations were developed and selected for larger scale melter tests to determine their processing rate. Melter tests were conducted on the DuraMelter 100 (DMIOO) with a melt surface area of 0.11 m{sup 2} and the DuraMelter 1200 (DMI200) HLW Pilot Melter with a melt surface area of 1.2 m{sup 2}. The newly developed glass formulations had waste loadings as high as 50 wt%, with corresponding Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration in the glass of 26.63 wt%. The new glass formulations showed glass production rates as high as 1900 kg/(m{sup 2}.day) under nominal melter operating conditions. The demonstrated glass production rates are much higher than the current requirement of 800 kg/(m{sup 2}.day) and anticipated future enhanced Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) requirement of 1000 kg/(m{sup 2}.day).

  19. Iron Phosphate Glass-Containing Hanford Waste Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Schweiger, M. J.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Riley, Brian J.

    2012-01-18

    Resolution of the nation's high-level tank waste legacy requires the design, construction, and operation of large and technically complex one-of-a-kind processing waste treatment and vitrification facilities. While the ultimate limits for waste loading and melter efficiency have yet to be defined or realized, significant reductions in glass volumes for disposal and mission life may be possible with advancements in melter technologies and/or glass formulations. This test report describes the experimental results from a small-scale test using the research-scale melter (RSM) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to demonstrate the viability of iron-phosphate-based glass with a selected waste composition that is high in sulfate (4.37 wt% SO3). The primary objective of the test was to develop data to support a cost-benefit analysis related to the implementation of phosphate-based glasses for Hanford low-activity waste (LAW) and/or other high-level waste streams within the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The testing was performed by PNNL and supported by Idaho National Laboratory, Savannah River National Laboratory, Missouri University of Science and Technology, and Mo-Sci Corporation.

  20. Iron Phosphate Glass-Containing Hanford Waste Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kim, Dong-Sang

    2011-08-01

    Resolution of the nation’s high level tank waste legacy requires the design, construction, and operation of large and technically complex one-of-a-kind processing waste treatment and vitrification facilities. While the ultimate limits for waste loading and melter efficiency have yet to be defined or realized, significant reductions in glass volumes for disposal and mission life may be possible with advancements in melter technologies and/or glass formulations. This test report describes the experimental results from a small-scale test using the research scale melter (RSM) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to demonstrate the viability of iron phosphate-based glass with a selected waste composition that is high in sulfates (4.37 wt% SO3). The primary objective of the test was to develop data to support a cost-benefit analysis as related to the implementation of phosphate-based glasses for Hanford low activity waste (LAW) and/or other high-level waste streams within the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The testing was performed by PNNL and supported by Idaho National Laboratory, Savannah River National Laboratory, and Mo-Sci Corporation.

  1. Glass Formulation Development for INEEL Sodium-Bearing Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.D. Vienna; M.J. Schweiger; D.E. Smith; H.D. Smith; J.V. Crum; D.K. Peeler; I.A. Reamer; C.A. Musick; R.D. Tillotson

    1999-08-03

    For about four decades, radioactive wastes have been collected and calcined from nuclear fuels reprocessing at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Over this time span, secondary radioactive wastes have also been collected and stored as liquid from decontamination, laboratory activities, and fuel-storage activities. These liquid wastes are collectively called sodium-bearing wastes (SBW). About 5.7 million liters of these wastes are temporarily stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Vitrification is being considered as an immobilization step for SBW with a number of treatment and disposal options. A systematic study was undertaken to develop a glass composition to demonstrate direct vitrification of INEEL's SBW. The objectives of this study were to show the feasibility of SBW vitrification, not a development of an optimum formulation. The waste composition is relatively high in sodium, aluminum, and sulfur. A specific composition and glass property restrictions, discussed in Section 2, were used as a basis for the development. Calculations based on first-order expansions of selected glass properties in composition and some general tenets of glass chemistry led to an additive (fit) composition (68.69 mass % SiO{sub 2}, 14.26 mass% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 11.31 mass% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 3.08 mass% TiO{sub 2}, and 2.67 mass % Li{sub 2}O) that meets all property restrictions when melted with 35 mass % of SBW on an oxide basis, The glass was prepared using oxides, carbonates, and boric acid and tested to confirm the acceptability of its properties. Glass was then made using waste simulant at three facilities, and limited testing was performed to test and optimize processing-related properties and confirm results of glass property testing. The measured glass properties are given in Section 4. The viscosity at 1150 C, 5 Pa{center_dot}s, is

  2. Durability Enhancement Of SCC With Waste Glass Powder

    OpenAIRE

    Matos,Ana Mafalda; Ramos, Telma; Nunes, Sandra; Sousa-Coutinho, Joana

    2016-01-01

    Self compacting concrete (SCC) requires a large quantity of fine materials compared to common concrete. In this work waste glass powder was used to replace (50%) of filler required. Two types of SCC were manufactured, a control SCC type (CTL) using cement and limestone filler and another with glass powder replacing 50% of the filler. Mechanical and durability properties, namely, compressive strength, resistivity, chloride ion penetration, carbonation, capillary water absorption and oxygen per...

  3. A glass-encapsulated calcium phosphate wasteform for the immobilization of actinide-, fluoride-, and chloride-containing radioactive wastes from the pyrochemical reprocessing of plutonium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, I. W.; Metcalfe, B. L.; Fong, S. K.; Gerrard, L. A.; Strachan, D. M.; Scheele, R. D.

    2007-03-01

    Chloride-containing radioactive wastes are generated during the pyrochemical reprocessing of Pu metal. Immobilization of these wastes in borosilicate glass or Synroc-type ceramics is not feasible due to the very low solubility of chlorides in these hosts. Alternative candidates have therefore been sought including phosphate-based glasses, crystalline ceramics and hybrid glass/ceramic systems. These studies have shown that high losses of chloride or evolution of chlorine gas from the melt make vitrification an unacceptable solution unless suitable off-gas treatment facilities capable of dealing with these corrosive by-products are available. On the other hand, both sodium aluminosilicate and calcium phosphate ceramics are capable of retaining chloride in stable mineral phases, which include sodalite, Na 8(AlSiO 4) 6Cl 2, chlorapatite, Ca 5(PO 4) 3Cl, and spodiosite, Ca 2(PO 4)Cl. The immobilization process developed in this study involves a solid state process in which waste and precursor powders are mixed and reacted in air at temperatures in the range 700-800 °C. The ceramic products are non-hygroscopic free-flowing powders that only require encapsulation in a relatively low melting temperature phosphate-based glass to produce a monolithic wasteform suitable for storage and ultimate disposal.

  4. Redox reaction and foaming in nuclear waste glass melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, J.L.

    1995-08-01

    This document was prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and is an attempt to analyze and estimate the effects of feed composition variables and reducing agent variables on the expected chemistry of reactions occurring in the cold cap and in the glass melt in the nuclear waste glass Slurry-fed, joule-heated melters as they might affect foaming during the glass-making process. Numerous redox reactions of waste glass components and potential feed additives, and the effects of other feed variables on these reactions are reviewed with regard to their potential effect on glass foaming. A major emphasis of this report is to examine the potential positive or negative aspects of adjusting feed with formic acid as opposed to other feed modification techniques including but not limited to use of other reducing agents. Feed modification techniques other than the use of reductants that should influence foaming behavior include control of glass melter feed pH through use of nitric acid. They also include partial replacement of sodium salts by lithium salts. This latter action (b) apparently lowers glass viscosity and raises surface tension. This replacement should decrease foaming by decreasing foam stability.

  5. Properties of Mortar Containing Waste Glass and Limestone Filler

    OpenAIRE

    Karamanoğlu, B; EREN, Özgür

    2008-01-01

    The building material industry has been developed due to the increasing population. This brings chronic shortage of building materials. According to this the civil engineers have been challenged to convert the industrial wastes to useful building and construction materials. The purpose of using ground waste glass is protect the environment by saving more landfills, to increase the cement plant capacity by using more beneficial additives, and to reduce CO2 emission per ton of...

  6. Consolidated waste forms: glass marbles and ceramic pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treat, R.L.; Rusin, J.M.

    1982-05-01

    Glass marbles and ceramic pellets have been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the multibarrier concept for immobilizing high-level radioactive waste. These consolidated waste forms served as substrates for the application of various inert coatings and as ideal-sized particles for encapsulation in protective matrices. Marble and pellet formulations were based on existing defense wastes at Savannah River Plant and proposed commercial wastes. To produce marbles, glass is poured from a melter in a continuous stream into a marble-making device. Marbles were produced at PNL on a vibratory marble machine at rates as high as 60 kg/h. Other marble-making concepts were also investigated. The marble process, including a lead-encapsulation step, was judged as one of the more feasible processes for immobilizing high-level wastes. To produce ceramic pellets, a series of processing steps are required, which include: spray calcining - to dry liquid wastes to a powder; disc pelletizing - to convert waste powders to spherical pellets; sintering - to densify pellets and cause desired crystal formation. These processing steps are quite complex, and thereby render the ceramic pellet process as one of the least feasible processes for immobilizing high-level wastes.

  7. Fabrication and physical characteristics of new glasses from wastes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    64

    The cheap and abundant wastes of raw materials like limestone .... the ratio of the concentrations of alkaline earth oxide such as CaO to the ..... the glass density that was attributed to the variation of the structural units as deduced from FTIR.

  8. Incorporation of tv tube glass waste in aluminous porcelain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holanda, J.N.F.; Santos, T.F.; Paes Junior, H.R. [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full test: This work analyzes the reuse of TV tube glass waste as a method to provide alternative raw material for aluminous porcelain, through of replacement of natural sodic feldspar by up to 30 wt.%. Aluminous porcelain formulations containing TV tube glass waste were pressed and fired in air at 1300 deg C using a fast-firing cycle. Ceramic pieces were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, linear shrinkage, apparent density, apparent porosity, water absorption, and electrical resistivity. XRD and SEM results indicated that all aluminous porcelain pieces are composed essentially of mullite, quartz, and ?-alumina embedded in a vitreous matrix. The results also showed that the aluminous porcelain pieces containing TV tube glass waste presented low water absorption values between 0.42 and 0.45 %, apparent density between 2.44 and 2.46 g/cm3, and volume electrical resistivity between 1.91 and 2.93 x 1011 ?.cm. Thus, the TV tube glass waste could be used into aluminous porcelain formulations, in the range up to 30 wt.%, as a replacement for traditional flux material (sodic feldspar). (author)

  9. Radiation and Thermal Ageing of Nuclear Waste Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, William J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The radioactive decay of fission products and actinides incorporated into nuclear waste glass leads to self-heating and self-radiation effects that may affect the stability, structure and performance of the glass in a closed system. Short-lived fission products cause significant self-heating for the first 600 years. Alpha decay of the actinides leads to self-radiation damage that can be significant after a few hundred years, and over the long time periods of geologic disposal, the accumulation of helium and radiation damage from alpha decay may lead to swelling, microstructural evolution and changes in mechanical properties. Four decades of research on the behavior of nuclear waste glass are reviewed.

  10. Demonstration of sulfur solubility determinations in high waste loading, low-activity waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-04-25

    A method recommended by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for sulfate solubility determinations in simulated low-activity waste glasses was demonstrated using three compositions from a recent Hanford high waste loading glass study. Sodium and sulfate concentrations in the glasses increased after each re-melting step. Visual observations of the glasses during the re-melting process reflected the changes in composition. The measured compositions showed that the glasses met the targeted values. The amount of SO3 retained in the glasses after washing was relatively high, ranging from 1.6 to 2.6 weight percent (wt %). Measured SnO2 concentrations were notably low in all of the study glasses. The composition of the wash solutions should be measured in future work to determine whether SnO2 is present with the excess sulfate washed from the glass. Increases in batch size and the amount of sodium sulfate added did not have a measureable impact on the amount of sulfate retained in the glass, although this was tested for only a single glass composition. A batch size of 250 g and a sodium sulfate addition targeting 7 wt %, as recommended by PNNL, will be used in future experiments.

  11. A glass-ceramic material for fixation of radioactive waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozadzhiev L.S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a starting mixture for the preparation of glass-ceramic material for radioactive waste (RW, consisting of 85-95 mass % basanite and 5-15 mass % oxides of elements in I-VIII group of the Periodical table of elements imitating RW, is proposed. The glass-ceramic material is obtained by melting the starting mixture in air at 1450°C for 1 hour and by further crystallization of the melts at 950°C for 30 minutes. It has been noticed that the texture of the glass-ceramic material is microgranular. The main mineral is pyroxene, while a mixture phases are magnetite, hematite and residual glass. It was shown that the RW elements are fixed in the pyroxene and partly in the admixture phases.

  12. High insulation foam glass material from waste cathode ray tube panel glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    König, Jakob; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Recycling of materials from obsolete equipment has become an important part of global waste management. With responsible collecting, dismantling and materials separation, majority of materials can be recycled. Cathode ray tube (CRT) glass represents as much as two-thirds of the weight of a TV...

  13. Recent progress to understand stress corrosion cracking in sodium borosilicate glasses: linking the chemical composition to structural, physical and fracture properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rountree, Cindy L.

    2017-08-01

    This topical review is dedicated to understanding stress corrosion cracking in oxide glasses and specifically the SiO_2{\\text-B_2O_3{\\text-}Na_2O} (SBN) ternary glass systems. Many review papers already exist on the topic of stress corrosion cracking in complex oxide glasses or overly simplified glasses (pure silica). These papers look at how systematically controlling environmental factors (pH, temperature...) alter stress corrosion cracking, while maintaining the same type of glass sample. Many questions still exist, including: What sets the environmental limit? What sets the velocity versus stress intensity factor in the slow stress corrosion regime (Region I)? Can researchers optimize these two effects to enhance a glass’ resistance to failure? To help answer these questions, this review takes a different approach. It looks at how systemically controlling the glass’ chemical composition alters the structure and physical properties. These changes are then compared and contrasted to the fracture toughness and the stress corrosion cracking properties. By taking this holistic approach, researchers can begin to understand the controlling factors in stress corrosion cracking and how to optimize glasses via the initial chemical composition.

  14. Emission analysis of Tb3+-and Sm3+-ion-doped (Li2O/Na2O/K2O) and (Li2O + Na2O/Li2O + K2O/K2O + Na2O)-modified borosilicate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveen Kumar Reddy, B; Sailaja, S; Thyagarajan, K; Jho, Young Dahl; Sudhakar Reddy, B

    2017-12-28

    Four series of borosilicate glasses modified by alkali oxides and doped with Tb 3+ and Sm 3+ ions were prepared using the conventional melt quenching technique, with the chemical composition 74.5B 2 O 3 + 10SiO 2 + 5MgO + R + 0.5(Tb 2 O 3 /Sm 2 O 3 ) [where R = 10(Li 2 O /Na 2 O/K 2 O) for series A and C, and R = 5(Li 2 O + Na 2 O/Li 2 O + K 2 O/K 2 O + Na 2 O) for series B and D]. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of all the prepared glasses indicate their amorphous nature. The spectroscopic properties of the prepared glasses were studied by optical absorption analysis, photoluminescence excitation (PLE) and photoluminescence (PL) analysis. A green emission corresponding to the 5 D 4 → 7 F 5 (543 nm) transition of the Tb 3+ ions was registered under excitation at 379 nm for series A and B glasses. The emission spectra of the Sm 3+ ions with the series C and D glasses showed strong reddish-orange emission at 600 nm ( 4 G 5/2 → 6 H 7/2 ) with an excitation wavelength λ exci = 404 nm ( 6 H 5/2 → 4 F 7/2 ). Furthermore, the change in the luminescence intensity with the addition of an alkali oxide and combinations of these alkali oxides to borosilicate glasses doped with Tb 3+ and Sm 3+ ions was studied to optimize the potential alkali-oxide-modified borosilicate glass. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Cogeneration from glass furnace waste heat recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnat, J.G.; Cutting, J.C.; Patten, J.S.

    1982-06-01

    In glass manufacturing 70% of the total energy utilized is consumed in the melting process. Three basic furnaces are in use: regenerative, recuperative, and direct fired design. The present paper focuses on secondary heat recovery from regenerative furnaces. A diagram of a typical regenerative furnace is given. Three recovery bottoming cycles were evaluated as part of a comparative systems analysis: steam Rankine Cycle (SRC), Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC), and pressurized Brayton cycle. Each cycle is defined and schematicized. The net power capabilities of the three different systems are summarized. Cost comparisons and payback period comparisons are made. Organic Rankine cycle provides the best opportunity for cogeneration for all the flue gas mass flow rates considered. With high temperatures, the Brayton cycle has the shortest payback period potential, but site-specific economics need to be considered.

  16. Why neutron guides may end up breaking down? Some results on the macroscopic behaviour of alkali-borosilicate glass support plates under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boffy, R.; Kreuz, M. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 20156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Beaucour, J., E-mail: beaucour@ill.fr [Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 20156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Köster, U. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 20156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Bermejo, F.J. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 123, E-20886 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we report on a first part of a study on the mechanisms leading to brittle fracture in neutron guides made of glass as structural element. Such devices are widely used to deliver thermal and cold neutron beams to experimental lines in most large neutron research facilities. We present results on macroscopic properties of samples of guide glass substrates which are subjected to neutron irradiation at relatively large fluences. The results show a striking dependence of some of the macroscopic properties such as density, shape or surface curvature upon the specific chemical composition of a given glass. The relevance of the present findings for the installation of either replacement guides at the existing facilities or for the deployment of instruments for ongoing projects such as the European Spallation Source is briefly discussed.

  17. Effects of waste glass and waste foundry sand additions on reclaimed tiles containing sewage sludge ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Deng-Fong; Luo, Huan-Lin; Lin, Kuo-Liang; Liu, Zhe-Kun

    2017-07-01

    Applying sewage sludge ash (SSA) to produce reclaimed tiles is a promising recycling technology in resolving the increasing sludge wastes from wastewater treatment. However, performance of such reclaimed tiles is inferior to that of original ceramic tiles. Many researchers have therefore tried adding various industrial by-products to improve reclaimed tile properties. In this study, multiple materials including waste glass and waste foundry sand (WFS) were added in an attempt to improve physical and mechanical properties of reclaimed tiles with SSA. Samples with various combinations of clay, WFS, waste glass and SSA were made with three kiln temperatures of 1000°C, 1050°C, and 1100°C. A series of tests on the samples were next conducted. Test results showed that waste glass had positive effects on bending strength, water absorption and weight loss on ignition, while WFS contributed the most in reducing shrinkage, but could decrease the tile bending strength when large amount was added at a high kiln temperature. This study suggested that a combination of WFS from 10% to 15%, waste glass from 15% to 20%, SSA at 10% at a kiln temperature between 1000°C and 1050°C could result in quality reclaimed tiles with a balanced performance.

  18. Durability of Waste Glass Flax Fiber Reinforced Mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, M.; Hashmi, M. S. J.; Olabi, A. G.; Messeiry, M.

    2011-01-01

    The main concern for natural fibre reinforced mortar composites is the durability of the fibres in the alkaline environment of cement. The composites may undergo a reduction in strength as a result of weakening of the fibres by a combination of alkali attack and fibre mineralisation. In order to enhance the durability of natural fiber reinforced cement composites several approaches have been studied including fiber impregnation, sealing of the matrix pore system and reduction of matrix alkalinity through the use of pozzolanic materials. In this study waste glass powder was used as a pozzolanic additive to improve the durability performance of flax fiber reinforced mortar (FFRM). The durability of the FFRM was studied by determining the effects of ageing in water and exposure to wetting and drying cycles; on the microstructures and flexural behaviour of the composites. The mortar tests demonstrated that the waste glass powder has significant effect on improving the durability of FFRM.

  19. Low sintering temperature glass waste forms for sequestering radioactive iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Krumhansl, James L.; Garino, Terry J.; Ockwig, Nathan W.

    2012-09-11

    Materials and methods of making low-sintering-temperature glass waste forms that sequester radioactive iodine in a strong and durable structure. First, the iodine is captured by an adsorbant, which forms an iodine-loaded material, e.g., AgI, AgI-zeolite, AgI-mordenite, Ag-silica aerogel, ZnI.sub.2, CuI, or Bi.sub.5O.sub.7I. Next, particles of the iodine-loaded material are mixed with powdered frits of low-sintering-temperature glasses (comprising various oxides of Si, B, Bi, Pb, and Zn), and then sintered at a relatively low temperature, ranging from 425.degree. C. to 550.degree. C. The sintering converts the mixed powders into a solid block of a glassy waste form, having low iodine leaching rates. The vitrified glassy waste form can contain as much as 60 wt % AgI. A preferred glass, having a sintering temperature of 500.degree. C. (below the silver iodide sublimation temperature of 500.degree. C.) was identified that contains oxides of boron, bismuth, and zinc, while containing essentially no lead or silicon.

  20. Examining the role of canister cooling conditions on the formation of nepheline from nuclear waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-01

    Nepheline (NaAlSiO₄) crystals can form during slow cooling of high-level waste (HLW) glass after it has been poured into a waste canister. Formation of these crystals can adversely affect the chemical durability of the glass. The tendency for nepheline crystallization to form in a HLW glass increases with increasing concentrations of Al₂O₃ and Na₂O.

  1. Physical Characteristics and Technology of Glass Foam from Waste Cathode Ray Tube Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Mucsi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the laboratory investigation of cathode-ray-tube- (CRT- glass-based glass foam, the so-called “Geofil-Bubbles” which can be applied in many fields, mainly in the construction industry (lightweight concrete aggregate, thermal and sound insulation, etc.. In this study, the main process engineering material properties of raw materials, such as particle size distribution, moisture content, density, and specific surface area, are shown. Then, the preparation of raw cathode ray tube glass waste is presented including the following steps: crushing, grinding, mixing, heat curing, coating, and sintering. Experiments were carried out to optimize process circumstances. Effects of sintering conditions—such as temperature, residence time, and particle size fraction of green pellet—on the mechanical stability and particle density of glass foam particles were investigated. The mechanical stability (abrasion resistance was tested by abrasion test in a Deval drum. Furthermore, the cell structure was examined with optical microscopy and SEM. We found that it was possible to produce foam glass (with proper mechanical stability and particle density from CRT glass. The material characteristics of the final product strongly depend on the sintering conditions. Optimum conditions were determined: particle size fraction was found to be 4–6 mm, temperature 800°C, and residence time 7.5 min.

  2. Using quartzofeldspathic waste to obtain foamed glass material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Kazmina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present paper proposes a method for the processing of mine refuse non-ferrous metal ore in the production of foamed glass. The subject of this research is a low-temperature frit synthesis (<900 °C, allowing for the high-temperature glass melting process to be avoided. The technology for the production of frit without complete melting of the batch and without using glass-making units offers a considerable reduction in energy consumption and air pollution. It was found that material samples obtained with a density of up to 250 kg/m3 are of rigidity (up to 1.7 MPa in comparison with the conventional foamed glass (1 MPa. This increased rigidity was due to the presence of crystalline phase particles in its interpore partition of less than 2 µm in size. Material with a density of 300 kg/cm3 is recommended for thermal insulation for the industrial and construction sectors. At densities above 300 kg/cm3 and a strength of 2.5 MPa, the purpose becomes heat-insulating construction material. The proposed method for obtaining a porous material from waste widens our choice of raw materials for foamed glass, whilst saving resources and energy.

  3. Time-resolved interferometry of femtosecond-laser-induced processes under tight focusing and close-to-optical breakdown inside borosilicate glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayasaki, Yoshio; Isaka, Mitsuhiro; Takita, Akihiro; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2011-03-28

    We use an interferometric time-resolved observation of a femtosecond-laser pulse (800 nm/45 fs) interaction with glass from 100 fs to 10 ns at spatial lateral resolution down to the wavelength of the pulse. The phase and amplitude images reveal sequence of events after the irradiation of a single ultra-short laser pulse at close-to-threshold intensity when permanent refractive index changes occur. The proposed method is applicable to characterization of the processes induced by tightly focused fs-laser pulses during three-dimensional structuring of glasses and crystals for fundamental studies and optical applications. Generation of carriers, thermal expansion, generation and propagation of shockwaves, and formation of refractive index changes are experimentally observed and resolved in time and space with the highest resolution. Quantitative estimations of the threshold energies of different processes are achieved. The threshold energy of carrier generation is found the same as that of shockwave generation while the threshold energy of refractive index changes was by 40% higher. Application potential of the method is discussed.

  4. Sinter recrystalization and properties evaluation of glass-ceramic from waste glass bottle and magnesite for extended application

    OpenAIRE

    As'mau Ibrahim Gebi; Shehu Aliyu Yaro; Malik Abdulwahab; mamuda rayyan dodo

    2016-01-01

    In a bid to address environmental challenges associated with the management of waste Coca cola glass bottle, this study set out to develop glass ceramic materials using waste coca cola glass bottles and magnesite from Sakatsimta in Adamawa state. A reagent grade chrome (coloring agent) were used to modify the composition of the coca cola glass bottle;  X-ray fluorescence(XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to characterize raw materials, four batches G...

  5. Experimental Design for Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glasses with High Waste Loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cooley, Scott K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Crum, Jarrod V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-24

    This report discusses the development of an experimental design for the initial phase of the Hanford low-activity waste (LAW) enhanced glass study. This report is based on a manuscript written for an applied statistics journal. Appendices A, B, and E include additional information relevant to the LAW enhanced glass experimental design that is not included in the journal manuscript. The glass composition experimental region is defined by single-component constraints (SCCs), linear multiple-component constraints (MCCs), and a nonlinear MCC involving 15 LAW glass components. Traditional methods and software for designing constrained mixture experiments with SCCs and linear MCCs are not directly applicable because of the nonlinear MCC. A modification of existing methodology to account for the nonlinear MCC was developed and is described in this report. One of the glass components, SO3, has a solubility limit in glass that depends on the composition of the balance of the glass. A goal was to design the experiment so that SO3 would not exceed its predicted solubility limit for any of the experimental glasses. The SO3 solubility limit had previously been modeled by a partial quadratic mixture model expressed in the relative proportions of the 14 other components. The partial quadratic mixture model was used to construct a nonlinear MCC in terms of all 15 components. In addition, there were SCCs and linear MCCs. This report describes how a layered design was generated to (i) account for the SCCs, linear MCCs, and nonlinear MCC and (ii) meet the goals of the study. A layered design consists of points on an outer layer, and inner layer, and a center point. There were 18 outer-layer glasses chosen using optimal experimental design software to augment 147 existing glass compositions that were within the LAW glass composition experimental region. Then 13 inner-layer glasses were chosen with the software to augment the existing and outer

  6. Erbium-doped borosilicate glasses containing various amounts of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}: Influence of the silica content on the structure and thermal, physical, optical and luminescence properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourhis, Kevin [Politecnico di Torino, DISAT, Istituto di Ingegneria e Fisica dei Materiali, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, I-10129 Torino (Italy); Massera, Jonathan [Department of Electronics and Communications Engineering, Tampere University of Technology, Korkeakoulunkatu 3, FI-33720 Tampere (Finland); BioMediTech, Tampere (Finland); Petit, Laeticia, E-mail: laeticia.petit@nlight.net [Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Biskopsgatan 8, FI-20500 Turku (Finland); nLIGHT Corporation, Sorronrinne 9, FI-08500 Lohja (Finland); Koponen, Joona [nLIGHT Corporation, Sorronrinne 9, FI-08500 Lohja (Finland); Fargues, Alexandre; Cardinal, Thierry [CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, ISM, 351 Cours de la Libération, F-33405 Talence (France); Hupa, Leena; Hupa, Mikko [Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Biskopsgatan 8, FI-20500 Turku (Finland); Dussauze, Marc; Rodriguez, Vincent [CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 Avenue du Dr Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac (France); Ferraris, Monica [Politecnico di Torino, DISAT, Istituto di Ingegneria e Fisica dei Materiali, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, I-10129 Torino (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Er{sup 3+} doped borosilicate glasses were processed with different compositions and characterizations. • An increase in the SiO{sub 2} content leads to a silicate-rich environment around the Er{sup 3+} site. • An increase in the SiO{sub 2} content decreases the Er{sup 3+} absorption cross-section at 980 nm. • Glasses with 60 mol% of SiO{sub 2} exhibit a stronger emission intensity at 1530 nm than glasses with x = 50. • Highest 1.5 μm emission intensity was achieved for the Al and P containing glass with 60 mol% of SiO{sub 2}. - Abstract: The influence of the silica content on several properties of Er-doped borosilicate glasses in the presence of various amounts of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been investigated. The introduction of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and/or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are responsible for structural modifications in the glass network through a charge-compensation mechanism related to the formation of negatively-charged PO{sub 4} and AlO{sub 4} groups or through the formation of AlPO{sub 4}-like structural units. In this paper, we show that an increase in the SiO{sub 2} content leads to a silicate-rich environment around the Er{sup 3+} site, resulting in an increased dependence of the Er{sup 3+} ions optical and luminescence properties on the P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and/or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration. The highest emission intensity at 1.5 μm was achieved for the glass with an equal proportion of P and Al in the glass system with 60 mol% of SiO{sub 2}.

  7. Glass former composition and method for immobilizing nuclear waste using the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadoff, Laurence H.; Smith-Magowan, David B.

    1988-01-01

    An alkoxide glass former composition has silica-containing constituents present as solid particulates of a particle size of 0.1 to 0.7 micrometers in diameter in a liquid carrier phase substantially free of dissolved silica. The glass former slurry is resistant to coagulation and may contain other glass former metal constituents. The immobilization of nuclear waste employs the described glass former by heating the same to reduce the volume, mixing the same with the waste, and melting the resultant mixture to encapsulate the waste in the resultant glass.

  8. Startup of Savannah River`s Defense Waste Processing Facility to produce radioactive glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, W.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1997-08-06

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) began production of radioactive glass in the Defense Waste Process Facility (DWPF) in 1996 following an extensive test program discussed earlier. Currently DWPF is operating in a `sludge only` mode to produce radioactive glass consisting of washed high-level waste sludge and glass frit. Future operations will produce radioactive glass consisting of washed high-level waste sludge, precipitated cesium, and glass frit. This paper provides an update of processing activities to date, operational problems encountered since entering radioactive operations, and the programs underway to solve them.

  9. INTERNATIONAL STUDIES OF ENHANCED WASTE LOADING AND IMPROVED MELT RATE FOR HIGH ALUMINA CONCENTRATION NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K; David Peeler, D; James Marra, J

    2008-09-11

    The goal of this study was to determine the impacts of glass compositions with high aluminum concentrations on melter performance, crystallization and chemical durability for Savannah River Site (SRS) and Hanford waste streams. Glass compositions for Hanford targeted both high aluminum concentrations in waste sludge and a high waste loading in the glass. Compositions for SRS targeted Sludge Batch 5, the next sludge batch to be processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), which also has a relatively high aluminum concentration. Three frits were selected for combination with the SRS waste to evaluate their impact on melt rate. The glasses were melted in two small-scale test melters at the V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute. The results showed varying degrees of spinel formation in each of the glasses. Some improvements in melt rate were made by tailoring the frit composition for the SRS feeds. All of the Hanford and SRS compositions had acceptable chemical durability.

  10. Development of Tc(IV)-Incorporated Fe Minerals to Enhance 99Tc Retention in Glass Waste Form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong; Luksic, Steven A.; Wang, Guohui; Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2015-03-17

    Iron minerals have been considered to be good hosts for Tc immobilization because the Tc(IV) ion substitutes for Fe(III) in the crystal structure of the Fe oxide due to similarities in (1) cation size [Tc(IV) = 78.5 pm ; Fe(III) = 69 or 78.5 pm], (2) metal-oxygen interatomic distance (Tc—O = 0.199 nm, Fe—O = 0.203 nm), (3) number of coordinating oxygen atoms (both 6-fold coordinated), and (4) the redox potential (Eh=ca. +20 mV at pH = 7) for a redox couple between Tc(VII)/Tc(IV) and Fe(III)/Fe(II). Magnetite, maghemite, and trevorite are iron oxide minerals and all belong to spinel mineral group. Laboratory testing shows that Tc can be removed from aqueous waste solutions by a process of Tc reduction from Tc(VII) to Tc(IV) followed by co-precipitation with iron oxide minerals during recrystallization of Fe(OH)2(s) used as an initial solid precursor. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy confirmed that Tc was in the +4 oxidation state in final Tc-Fe minerals. The Tc-incorporated Fe minerals were also tested for Tc retention in glass melts at different temperatures between 600 – 1,000 oC in a furnace. After being cooled in air, the solid glass specimens collected at different temperatures were analyzed for Tc oxidation state using XANES and Tc retention using liquid scintillation counting (LSC). Even though Tc(IV) started to reoxidize at 600 oC, Tc retention in the final glass specimen prepared with Tc-incorporated Fe mineral even at high temperatures was at least two times higher than glass prepared with KTcO4 salt. Higher Tc retention in glass is considered to result from limited and delayed Tc volatilization process due to Fe mineral encapsulation for Tc. Therefore, the results showing the presence of Tc(IV) in the Fe mineral structure indicate strong possibility to enhance Tc retention in borosilicate glass as well as to reduce the remediation costs at the Hanford Site.

  11. Effects of waste glass additions on quality of textile sludge-based bricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Ari; Urabe, Takeo; Kishimoto, Naoyuki; Mizuhara, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    This research investigated the utilization of textile sludge as a substitute for clay in brick production. The addition of textile sludge to a brick specimen enhanced its pores, thus reducing the quality of the product. However, the addition of waste glass to brick production materials improved the quality of the brick in terms of both compressive strength and water absorption. Maximum compressive strength was observed with the following composition of waste materials: 30% textile sludge, 60% clay and 10% waste glass. The melting of waste glass clogged up pores on the brick, which improved water absorption performance and compressive strength. Moreover, a leaching test on a sludge-based brick to which 10% waste glass did not detect significant heavy metal compounds in leachates, with the product being in conformance with standard regulations. The recycling of textile sludge for brick production, when combined with waste glass additions, may thus be promising in terms of both product quality and environmental aspects.

  12. Characterization of Mechanical and Bactericidal Properties of Cement Mortars Containing Waste Glass Aggregate and Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Pawel; Augustyniak, Adrian; Cendrowski, Krzysztof; Horszczaruk, Elzbieta; Rucinska, Teresa; Nawrotek, Pawel; Mijowska, Ewa

    2016-08-18

    The recycling of waste glass is a major problem for municipalities worldwide. The problem concerns especially colored waste glass which, due to its low recycling rate as result of high level of impurity, has mostly been dumped into landfills. In recent years, a new use was found for it: instead of creating waste, it can be recycled as an additive in building materials. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility of manufacturing sustainable and self-cleaning cement mortars with use of commercially available nanomaterials and brown soda-lime waste glass. Mechanical and bactericidal properties of cement mortars containing brown soda-lime waste glass and commercially available nanomaterials (amorphous nanosilica and cement containing nanocrystalline titanium dioxide) were analyzed in terms of waste glass content and the effectiveness of nanomaterials. Quartz sand is replaced with brown waste glass at ratios of 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% by weight. Study has shown that waste glass can act as a successful replacement for sand (up to 100%) to produce cement mortars while nanosilica is incorporated. Additionally, a positive effect of waste glass aggregate for bactericidal properties of cement mortars was observed.

  13. Characterization of Mechanical and Bactericidal Properties of Cement Mortars Containing Waste Glass Aggregate and Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Sikora

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The recycling of waste glass is a major problem for municipalities worldwide. The problem concerns especially colored waste glass which, due to its low recycling rate as result of high level of impurity, has mostly been dumped into landfills. In recent years, a new use was found for it: instead of creating waste, it can be recycled as an additive in building materials. The aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility of manufacturing sustainable and self-cleaning cement mortars with use of commercially available nanomaterials and brown soda-lime waste glass. Mechanical and bactericidal properties of cement mortars containing brown soda-lime waste glass and commercially available nanomaterials (amorphous nanosilica and cement containing nanocrystalline titanium dioxide were analyzed in terms of waste glass content and the effectiveness of nanomaterials. Quartz sand is replaced with brown waste glass at ratios of 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% by weight. Study has shown that waste glass can act as a successful replacement for sand (up to 100% to produce cement mortars while nanosilica is incorporated. Additionally, a positive effect of waste glass aggregate for bactericidal properties of cement mortars was observed.

  14. Fabrication and characterization of bioactive glass-ceramic using soda-lime-silica waste glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Mojtaba; Hashemi, Babak

    2014-04-01

    Soda-lime-silica waste glass was used to synthesize a bioactive glass-ceramic through solid-state reactions. In comparison with the conventional route, that is, the melt-quenching and subsequent heat treatment, the present work is an economical technique. Structural and thermal properties of the samples were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The in vitro test was utilized to assess the bioactivity level of the samples by Hanks' solution as simulated body fluid (SBF). Bioactivity assessment by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was revealed that the samples with smaller amount of crystalline phase had a higher level of bioactivity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of projected DWPF glasses heat treated to simulate canister centerline cooling. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, S.L.; Jantzen, C.M.

    1993-06-01

    Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The glass will be produced and poured into stainless steel canisters in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Eventually these canistered waste forms will be sent to a geologic repository for final disposal. In order to assure acceptability by the repository, the Department of Energy has defined requirements which DWPF canistered waste forms must meet. These requirements are the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The WAPS require DWPF to identify the crystalline phases expected to be present in the final glass product. Knowledge of the thermal history of the borosilicate glass during filling and cooldown of the canister is necessary to determine the amount and type of crystalline phases present in the final glass product. Glass samples of seven projected DWPF compositions were cooled following the same temperature profile as that of glass at the centerline of the full scale DWPF canister. The glasses were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy to identify the crystalline phases present. The volume percents of each crystalline phase present were determined by quantitative x-ray diffraction. The Product Consistency Test (PCT) was used to determine the durability of the heat treated glasses.

  16. Characterization of projected DWPF glasses heat treated to simulate canister centerline cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, S.L.; Jantzen, C.M.

    1992-05-01

    Liquid high-level nuclear waste will be immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The glass will be produced and poured into stainless steel canisters in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Eventually these canistered waste forms will be sent to a geologic repository for final disposal. In order to assure acceptability by the repository, the Department of Energy has defined requirements which DWPF canistered waste forms must meet. These requirements are the Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS). The WAPS require DWPF to identify the crystalline phases expected to be present in the final glass product. Knowledge of the thermal history of the borosilicate glass during filling and cooldown of the canister is necessary to determine the amount and type of crystalline phases present in the final glass product. Glass samples of seven projected DWPF compositions were cooled following the same temperature profile as that of glass at the centerline of the full-scale DWPF canister. The glasses were characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy to identify the crystalline phases present The volume percents of each crystalline phase present were determined by quantitative x-ray diffraction. The Product Consistency Test (PCI) was used to determine the durability of the heat-treated glasses.

  17. Melting Hanford LAW into Iron-Phosphate Glass in a CCIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nick Soelberg; Sharna Rossberg

    2011-09-01

    A vitrification test has been conducted using the cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test system at the Idaho National Laboratory. The test was conducted to demonstrate the vitrification of a Hanford low activity waste (LAW) that contains relatively large amounts of sulfate and sodium, compared to other radioactive Hanford waste streams. The high sulfate content limits the potential loading of this waste stream in conventional borosilicate glass, so this test demonstrated how this waste stream could be vitrified in an iron-phosphate glass that can tolerate higher levels of sulfate.

  18. Tellurite glass as a waste form for a simulated mixed chloride waste stream: Candidate materials selection and initial testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J.; Rieck, Bennett T.; McCloy, John S.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sundaram, S. K.; Vienna, John D.

    2012-02-02

    Tellurite glasses have been researched widely for the last 60 years since they were first introduced by Stanworth. These glasses have been primarily used in research applications as glass host materials for lasers and as non-linear optical materials, though many other uses exist in the literature. Tellurite glasses have long since been used as hosts for various, and even sometimes mixed, halogens (i.e., multiple chlorides or even chlorides and iodides). Thus, it was reasonable to expect that these types of glasses could be used as a waste form to immobilize a combination of mixed chlorides present in the electrochemical separations process involved with fuel separations and processing from nuclear reactors. Many of the properties related to waste forms (e.g., chemical durability, maximum chloride loading) for these materials are unknown and thus, in this study, several different types of tellurite glasses were made and their properties studied to determine if such a candidate waste form could be fabricated with these glasses. One of the formulations studied was a lead tellurite glass, which had a low sodium release and is on-par with high-level waste silicate glass waste forms.

  19. Glass optimization for vitrification of Hanford Site low-level tank waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, X.; Hrma, P.R.; Westsik, J.H. Jr. [and others

    1996-03-01

    The radioactive defense wastes stored in 177 underground single-shell tanks (SST) and double-shell tanks (DST) at the Hanford Site will be separated into low-level and high-level fractions. One technology activity underway at PNNL is the development of glass formulations for the immobilization of the low-level tank wastes. A glass formulation strategy has been developed that describes development approaches to optimize glass compositions prior to the projected LLW vitrification facility start-up in 2005. Implementation of this strategy requires testing of glass formulations spanning a number of waste loadings, compositions, and additives over the range of expected waste compositions. The resulting glasses will then be characterized and compared to processing and performance specifications yet to be developed. This report documents the glass formulation work conducted at PNL in fiscal years 1994 and 1995 including glass formulation optimization, minor component impacts evaluation, Phase 1 and Phase 2 melter vendor glass development, liquidus temperature and crystallization kinetics determination. This report also summarizes relevant work at PNNL on high-iron glasses for Hanford tank wastes conducted through the Mixed Waste Integrated Program and work at Savannah River Technology Center to optimize glass formulations using a Plackett-Burnam experimental design.

  20. Characteristics of waste automotive glasses as silica resource in ferrosilicon synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzana, Rifat; Rajarao, Ravindra; Sahajwalla, Veena

    2016-02-01

    This fundamental research on end-of-life automotive glasses, which are difficult to recycle, is aimed at understanding the chemical and physical characteristics of waste glasses as a resource of silica to produce ferrosilicon. Laboratory experiments at 1550°C were carried out using different automotive glasses and the results compared with those obtained with pure silica. In situ images of slag-metal separation showed similar behaviour for waste glasses and silica-bearing pellets. Though X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed different slag compositions for glass and silica-bearing pellets, formation of ferrosilicon was confirmed. Synthesized ferrosilicon alloy from waste glasses and silica were compared by Raman, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Silicon concentration in the synthesized alloys showed almost 92% silicon recovery from the silica-bearing pellet and 74-92% silicon recoveries from various waste glass pellets. The polyvinyl butyral (PVB) plastic layer in the windshield glass decomposed at low temperature and did not show any detrimental effect on ferrosilicon synthesis. This innovative approach of using waste automotive glasses as a silica source for ferrosilicon production has the potential to create sustainable pathways, which will reduce specialty glass waste in landfill. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Letter report: Minor component study for low-level radioactive waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.

    1996-03-01

    During the waste vitrification process, troublesome minor components in low-level radioactive waste streams could adversely affect either waste vitrification rate or melter life-time. Knowing the solubility limits for these minor components is important to determine pretreatment options for waste streams and glass formulation to prevent or to minimize these problems during the waste vitrification. A joint study between Pacific Northwest Laboratory and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has been conducted to determine minor component impacts in low-level nuclear waste glass.

  2. Characterization of lead, barium and strontium leachability from foam glasses elaborated using waste cathode ray-tube glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yot, Pascal G., E-mail: pascal.yot@univ-montp2.fr [Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier, UMR 5253 CNRS-UM2-ENSCM-UM1, CC 15003, Universite Montpellier 2, Place Eugene Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); Mear, Francois O., E-mail: francois.mear@univ-lille1.fr [Unite de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UMR 8181 CNRS-USTL-ENSCL, Universite Lille Nord de France, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq cedex (France)

    2011-01-15

    Foam glass manufacture is a promising mode for re-using cathode ray tube (CRT) glasses. Nevertheless, because CRTs employ glasses containing heavy metals such as lead, barium and strontium, the leaching behaviour of foam glasses fabricated from CRTs must be understood. Using the AFNOR X 31-210 leaching assessment procedure, the degree of element inertization in foam glasses synthesized from waste CRT glasses (funnel and panel glasses, containing lead and barium/strontium respectively) were determined. The amount of leached lead from foam glasses prepared from funnel glass depends on the nature and concentration of the reducing agent. The effects of the reducing agents on the generation of cellular structure in the fabrication of foam glass were studied. The fraction of lead released from foam glass was less than those extracted from funnel glass and was lower than the statutory limit. Leached concentrations of barium and strontium were found to be approximately constant in various tests and were also below regulatory limits.

  3. A Preliminary Study on Light Transmittance Properties of Translucent Concrete Panels with Coarse Waste Glass Inclusions

    OpenAIRE

    Lo Verso, Valerio Roberto Maria; Torta, Annalisa; Pagliolico, Simonetta Lucia

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the potential reuse of coarse glass wastes as insert in a high performance cement matrix to produce translucent concrete panels for architectural applications such as interior walls. The effects of the addition of glass scraps on chemical and optical properties of concrete were studied. Alkali-silica reactivity resistance tests were carried out to evaluate the reactivity between amorphous waste glass and alkaline concrete pore solution. Light transmittance LT was evalu...

  4. Standard test method for measuring waste glass or glass ceramic durability by vapor hydration test

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 The vapor hydration test method can be used to study the corrosion of a waste forms such as glasses and glass ceramics upon exposure to water vapor at elevated temperatures. In addition, the alteration phases that form can be used as indicators of those phases that may form under repository conditions. These tests; which allow altering of glass at high surface area to solution volume ratio; provide useful information regarding the alteration phases that are formed, the disposition of radioactive and hazardous components, and the alteration kinetics under the specific test conditions. This information may be used in performance assessment (McGrail et al, 2002 (1) for example). 1.2 This test method must be performed in accordance with all quality assurance requirements for acceptance of the data. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practice...

  5. High-Level Waste System Process Interface Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    d' Entremont, P.D.

    1999-01-14

    The High-Level Waste System is a set of six different processes interconnected by pipelines. These processes function as one large treatment plant that receives, stores, and treats high-level wastes from various generators at SRS and converts them into forms suitable for final disposal. The three major forms are borosilicate glass, which will be eventually disposed of in a Federal Repository, Saltstone to be buried on site, and treated water effluent that is released to the environment.

  6. Doping influence by some transition elements on the irradiation effects in nuclear waste glasses; Influence du dopage par certains elements de transition sur les effets d'irradiation dans des verres d'interet nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florent, Olivier

    2006-06-15

    High-level waste glasses are submitted to auto-irradiation. Modelling it using external irradiations on simple glasses revealed defects production and non negligible structural changes. This thesis aims at determining the impact of a more complex composition on these effects, especially the influence of adding polyvalent transition metals. Silicate, soda-lime and alumino-borosilicate glasses are doped with different iron, chromium and manganese concentrations then {beta} irradiated at different doses up to 10{sup 9} Gy. Non doped glasses show an increase of their density and polymerisation coupled with a molecular oxygen and point defects production. Adding 0.16 mol% Fe decreases the amount of defects by 85 % and all irradiation effects. A Fe{sup 3+} reduction is also observed by EPR, optical absorption and indirectly by Raman spectroscopy. A higher than 0.32 mol% Fe concentration causes complete blockage of the evolution of polymerisation, density and defect production. The same results are obtained on chromium or manganese doped glasses. An original in situ optical absorption device shows the quick decrease of Fe{sup 3+} amount to a 25 % lower level during irradiation. Stopping irradiation causes a lower decrease of 65 %, suggesting a dynamic (h{sup 0}/e-) consuming equilibrium. He{sup +} and Kr{sup 3+} ions and {gamma} irradiated glasses tend to confirm these phenomena for all kind of irradiation with electronic excitations. (author)

  7. Heat-exchanger needs for recovering waste heat in the glass-making industry. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, R.L.; Kulkarni, A.K.

    1983-02-01

    The state of the art of waste heat recovery technology in the glass-making industry is assessed. Fouling and corrosion glass furnace regenerators are reviewed. Heat recovery from the exhaust gases leaving the brick checkers regenerator of a soda lime glass furnace is addressed. Research and development needs that will advance the use of secondary heat recovery in the glass industry are identified. (LEW)

  8. Savannah River Laboratory's operating experience with glass melters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, F H; Randall, C T; Cosper, M B; Moseley, J P

    1982-01-01

    The Department of Energy, with recommendations from the Du Pont Company, is proposing that a Defense Waste Processing Facility be constructed at the Savannah River Plant to immobilize radioactive The immobilization process is designed around the solidification of waste sludge in borosilicate glass. The Savannah River Laboratory, who is responsible for the solidification process development program, has completed an experimental program with one large-scale glass melter and just started up another melter. Experimental data indicate that process requirements can easily be met with the current design. 7 figures.

  9. Sinter recrystalization and properties evaluation of glass-ceramic from waste glass bottle and magnesite for extended application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    As'mau Ibrahim Gebi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In a bid to address environmental challenges associated with the management of waste Coca cola glass bottle, this study set out to develop glass ceramic materials using waste coca cola glass bottles and magnesite from Sakatsimta in Adamawa state. A reagent grade chrome (coloring agent were used to modify the composition of the coca cola glass bottle;  X-ray fluorescence(XRF, X-ray diffraction (XRD and Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA were used to characterize raw materials, four batches GC-1= Coca cola glass frit +1%Cr2O3, GC-2=97% Coca cola glass frit+ 2% magnesite+1%Cr2O3, GC-3=95% Coca cola glass frit+ 4%magnesite+1%Cr2O3, GC-4=93%Coca cola glass frit+ 6%magnesite+ 1%Cr2O3 were formulated and prepared. Thermal Gradient Analysis (TGA results were used as a guide in selection of three temperatures (7000C, 7500C and 8000C used for the study, three particle sizes -106+75, -75+53, -53µm and 2 hr sintering time were also used, the sinter crystallization route of glass ceramic production was adopted. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM, the density, porosity, hardness and flexural strength of the resulting glass ceramics were also measured. The resulting glass ceramic materials composed mainly of wollastonite, diopside and anorthite phases depending on composition as indicated by XRD and SEM, the density of the samples increased with increasing sintering temperature and decreasing particle size. The porosity is minimal and it decreases with increasing sintering temperature and decreasing particle size. The obtained glass ceramic materials possess appreciable hardness and flexural strength with GC-3 and GC-4 having the best combination of both properties.

  10. Ion-Exchange Interdiffusion Model with Potential Application to Long-Term Nuclear Waste Glass Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neeway, James J.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Jiandong; Zhu, Zihua; Riley, Brian J.; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2016-05-05

    Abstract: Ion exchange is an integral mechanism influencing the corrosion of glasses. Due to the formation of alteration layers in aqueous conditions, it is difficult to conclusively deconvolute the process of ion exchange from other processes, principally dissolution of the glass matrix. Therefore, we have developed a method to isolate alkali diffusion that involves contacting glass coupons with a solution of 6LiCl dissolved in functionally inert dimethyl sulfoxide. We employ the method at temperatures ranging from 25 to 150 °C with various glass formulations. Glass compositions include simulant nuclear waste glasses, such as SON68 and the international simple glass (ISG), glasses in which the nature of the alkali element was varied, and glasses that contained more than one alkali element. An interdiffusion model based on Fick’s second law was developed and applied to all experiments to extract diffusion coefficients. The model expands established models of interdiffusion to the case where multiple types of alkali sites are present in the glass. Activation energies for alkali ion exchange were calculated and the results are in agreement with those obtained in glass strengthening experiments but are nearly five times higher than values reported for diffusion-controlled processes in nuclear waste glass corrosion experiments. A discussion of the root causes for this apparent discrepancy is provided. The interdiffusion model derived from laboratory experiments is expected to be useful for modeling glass corrosion in a geological repository when the silicon concentration is high.

  11. Lead recovery and high silica glass powder synthesis from waste CRT funnel glasses through carbon thermal reduction enhanced glass phase separation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Mingfei; Fu, Zegang; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Jingyu; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2017-01-15

    In this study, a novel process for the removal of toxic lead from the CRT funnel glass and synchronous preparation of high silica glass powder was developed by a carbon-thermal reduction enhanced glass phase separation process. CRT funnel glass was remelted with B2O3 in reducing atmosphere. In the thermal process, a part of PbO contained in the funnel glass was reduced into metallic Pb and detached from the glass phase. The rest of PbO and other metal oxides (including Na2O, K2O, Al2O3, BaO and CaO) were mainly concentrated in the boric oxide phase. The metallic Pb phase and boric oxide phase were completely leached out by 5mol/L HNO3. The lead removal rate was 99.80% and high silica glass powder (SiO2 purity >95wt%) was obtained by setting the temperature, B2O3 added amount and holding time at 1000°C, 20% and 30mins, respectively. The prepared high silicate glass powders can be used as catalyst carrier, semipermeable membranes, adsorbents or be remelted into high silicate glass as an ideal substitute for quartz glass. Thus this study proposed an eco-friendly and economical process for recycling Pb-rich electronic glass waste. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Waste glass powder as partial replacement of cement for sustainable concrete practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Sadiqul Islam

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Million tons of waste glass is being generated annually all over the world. Once the glass becomes a waste it is disposed as landfills, which is unsustainable as this does not decompose in the environment. Glass is principally composed of silica. Use of milled (ground waste glass in concrete as partial replacement of cement could be an important step toward development of sustainable (environmentally friendly, energy-efficient and economical infrastructure systems. When waste glass is milled down to micro size particles, it is expected to undergo pozzolanic reactions with cement hydrates, forming secondary Calcium Silicate Hydrate (C–S–H. In this research chemical properties of both clear and colored glass were evaluated. Chemical analysis of glass and cement samples was determined using X-ray fluorescence (XRF technique and found minor differences in composition between clear and colored glasses. Flow and compressive strength tests on mortar and concrete were carried out by adding 0–25% ground glass in which water to binder (cement + glass ratio is kept the same for all replacement levels. With increase in glass addition mortar flow was slightly increased while a minor effect on concrete workability was noted. To evaluate the packing and pozzolanic effects, further tests were also conducted with same mix details and 1% super plasticizing admixture dose (by weight of cement and generally found an increase in compressive strength of mortars with admixture. As with mortar, concrete cube samples were prepared and tested for strength (until 1 year curing. The compressive strength test results indicated that recycled glass mortar and concrete gave better strength compared to control samples. A 20% replacement of cement with waste glass was found convincing considering cost and the environment.

  13. Pourbaix diagram for the prediction of waste glass durability in geologic environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C M

    1987-01-01

    Dissolution of nuclear waste glass occurs by corrosion mechanisms similar to those of metallurgical and mineralogic systems albeit on different time scales. The effects of imposed pH and oxidation potential (Eh) conditions existing in natural environments on metals and minerals have been quantitatively and phenomenologically described in compendiums of Pourbaix (pH-potential) diagrams. Construction of Pourbaix diagrams to quantify the response of nuclear waste glasses to repository specific pH and Eh conditions is demonstrated. The expected long-term effects of groundwater contact on the durability of nuclear waste glasses can then be unified. 40 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests to support Enhanced Hanford Waste Glass Models. Results for the Augusta and October 2014 LAW Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Best, D. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-07-07

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for several simulated low activity waste (LAW) glasses (designated as the August and October 2014 LAW glasses) fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation regions of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions.

  15. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests to support enhanced Hanford waste glass models: Results for the January, March, and April 2015 LAW glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Riley, W. T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Best, D. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-03

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for several simulated low activity waste (LAW) glasses (designated as the January, March, and April 2015 LAW glasses) fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation regions of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions.

  16. PNL vitrification technology development project high-waste loaded high-level waste glasses for high-temperature melter: Letter report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D.; Hrma, P.R.

    1996-02-01

    For vitrification of high-level wastes (HLW) at the Hanford Site, a Joule-heated overflow type melter with bottom draining capability and capable of operating at temperatures up to 1500{degrees}C is being developed. The original proposed Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) melter used a 1150{degrees}C processing temperature and was tested using glasses with up to 28 wt% waste oxide loading for NCAW (Neutralized Current Acid Waste). The goal of the high-temperature melter (HTM) is the volume reduction of the final product and increase of the waste processing rate by processing high-waste loaded glasses at higher temperatures. This would dramatically decrease waste disposal and processing costs. The aim of glass development for the HTM is to determine compositions and melting temperatures for processible and acceptable glasses with a high waste loading. Glass property/composition models for viscosity and liquidus temperature developed in the Glass Envelope Definition (GED) study were used. The results of glass formulation and experimental testing are presented for NCAW and DST/SST (Double-Shell Tank/Single-Shell Tank) Blend waste. Although the purpose of this report was to summarize the glass development study with Blend waste only, the results with NCAW were needed because glass development with Blend waste was based on the results from the glass development study with NCAW.

  17. Ensuring Longevity: Ancient Glasses Help Predict Durability of Vitrified Nuclear Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Jamie L.; McCloy, John S.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2016-05-01

    How does glass alter with time? For the last hundred years this has been an important question to the fields of object conservation and archeology to ensure the preservation of glass artifacts. This same question is part of the development and assessment of durable glass waste forms for the immobilization of nuclear wastes. Researchers have developed experiments ranging from simple to highly sophisticated to answer this question, and, as a result, have gained significant insight into the mechanisms that drive glass alteration. However, the gathered data have been predominately applicable to only short-term alteration times, i.e. over the course of decades. What has remained elusive is the long-term mechanisms of glass alteration[1]. These mechanisms are of particular interest to the international nuclear waste glass community as they strive to ensure that vitrified products will be durable for thousands to tens of thousands of years. For the last thirty years this community has been working to fill this research gap by partnering with archeologists, museum curators, and geologists to identify hundred to million-year old glass analogues that have altered in environments representative of those expected at potential nuclear waste disposal sites. The process of identifying a waste glass relevant analogue is challenging as it requires scientists to relate data collected from short-term laboratory experiments to observations made from long-term analogues and extensive geochemical modeling.

  18. Methods of vitrifying waste with low melting high lithia glass compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  19. Effect of Na2O on aqueous dissolution of nuclear waste glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, Rahmat Ullah; Hrma, Pavel

    2017-04-01

    Sodium oxide is present in the majority of commercial and waste glasses as a viscosity-reducing component. In some nuclear waste glasses, its source is the waste itself. As such, it can limit the waste loading because of its deleterious effect on the resistance of the glass to attack by aqueous media. The maximum tolerable content of Na2O in glass depends on the presence and concentration of components that interact with it. To assess the acceptability limits of Na2O in the composition region of nuclear waste glasses, we formulated 11 baseline compositions by varying the content of oxides of Si, B, Al, Ca, Zr, and Li. In each of these compositions, we varied the Na2O fraction from 8-16 mass% to 23-30 mass%. To each of 146 glasses thus formulated, we applied the seven-day Product Consistency Test (PCT) to determine normalized B and Na releases (ri, where i ≡ B or Na). Fitting approximation functions ln(ri/gm-2) = Σbijgj to ri data (gj is the j-th component mass fraction and bij the corresponding component coefficient), we showed that the rB (and, consequently, the initial glass alteration rate) was proportional to the glass component mass fractions in the order Al2O3glass structure would fall apart or beyond which a continuous nondurable phase would be separated. Specific examples are given to demonstrate restrictions imposed on the boundary of the composition region of acceptable glasses by the maximum allowable rB and by the melt viscosity required for glass melter operation. Finally, the role that PCT data may play in understanding the evolution of the glass alteration process is discussed.

  20. Performance of a large-scale melter off-gas system utilizing simulated SRP DWPF waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, J L; Randall, C T

    1984-03-01

    The Department of Energy and the DuPont Company have begun construction of a Defense Waste Processing Facility to immobilize radioactive waste now stored as liquids at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant. The immobilization process solidifies waste sludge by vitrification into a leach-resistant borosilicate glass. Development of the process has been the responsibility of the Savannah River Laboratory. As part of the development, two large-scale glass melter systems have been designed and operated with simulated waste. Experimental data from these operations show that process requirements will be met. 6 references, 8 figures, 4 tables.

  1. Characterization of Mechanical and Bactericidal Properties of Cement Mortars Containing Waste Glass Aggregate and Nanomaterials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sikora, Pawel; Augustyniak, Adrian; Cendrowski, Krzysztof; Horszczaruk, Elzbieta; Rucinska, Teresa; Nawrotek, Pawel; Mijowska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    .... The aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility of manufacturing sustainable and self-cleaning cement mortars with use of commercially available nanomaterials and brown soda-lime waste glass...

  2. Elaboration of new ceramic composites containing glass fibre production wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozenstrauha, I.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Two main by-products or waste from the production of glass fibre are following: sewage sludge containing montmorillonite clay as sorbent material and ca 50% of organic matter as well as waste glass from aluminiumborosilicate glass fibre with relatively high softening temperature (> 600 ºC. In order to elaborate different new ceramic products (porous or dense composites the mentioned by-products and illitic clay from two different layers of Apriki deposit (Latvia with illite content in clay fraction up to 80-90% was used as a matrix. The raw materials were investigated by differential-thermal (DTA and XRD analysis. Ternary compositions were prepared from mixtures of 15–35 wt % of sludge, 20 wt % of waste glass and 45–65 wt % of clay and the pressed green bodies were thermally treated in sintering temperature range from 1080 to 1120 ºC in different treatment conditions. Materials produced in temperature range 1090–1100 ºC with the most optimal properties - porosity 38-52%, water absorption 39–47% and bulk density 1.35–1.67 g/cm3 were selected for production of porous ceramics and materials showing porosity 0.35–1.1%, water absorption 0.7–2.6 % and bulk density 2.1–2.3 g/cm3 - for dense ceramic composites. Obtained results indicated that incorporation up to 25 wt % of sewage sludge is beneficial for production of both ceramic products and glass-ceramic composites according to the technological properties. Structural analysis of elaborated composite materials was performed by scanning electron microscopy(SEM. By X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD the quartz, diopside and anorthite crystalline phases were detected.Durante la obtención de ciertas fibras de vidrio se generan dos subproductos o residuos principalmente: Lodo de arcilla montmorillonítica capaz de adsorber el 50 % de materia orgánica y un vidrio silicato alumínico con temperatura de reblandecimiento relativamente alta (> 600 ºC. Con el fin de elaborar nuevos

  3. Development of Vitrification Process and Glass Formulation for Nuclear Waste Conditioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petitjean, V.; Fillet, C.; Boen, R.; Veyer, C.; Flament, T.

    2002-02-26

    The vitrification of high-level waste is the internationally recognized standard to minimize the impact to the environment resulting from waste disposal as well as to minimize the volume of conditioned waste to be disposed of. COGEMA has been vitrifying high-level waste industrially for over 20 years and is currently operating three commercial vitrification facilities based on a hot metal crucible technology, with outstanding records of safety, reliability and product quality. To further increase the performance of vitrification facilities, CEA and COGEMA have been developing the cold crucible melter technology since the beginning of the 1980s. This type of melter is characterized by a virtually unlimited equipment service life and a great flexibility in dealing with various types of waste and allowing development of high temperature matrices. In complement of and in parallel with the vitrification process, a glass formulation methodology has been developed by the CEA in order to tailor matrices for the wastes to be conditioned while providing the best adaptation to the processing technology. The development of a glass formulation is a trade-off between material properties and qualities, technical feasibility, and disposal safety criteria. It involves non-radioactive and radioactive laboratories in order to achieve a comprehensive matrix qualification. Several glasses and glass ceramics have thus been studied by the CEA to be compliant with industrial needs and waste characteristics: glasses or other matrices for a large spectrum of fission products, or for high contents of specifics elements such as sodium, phosphate, iron, molybdenum, or actinides. New glasses or glass-ceramics designed to minimize the final wasteform volume for solutions produced during the reprocessing of high burnup fuels or to treat legacy wastes are now under development and take benefit from the latest CEA hot-laboratories and technology development. The paper presents the CEA state

  4. Hanford enhanced waste glass characterization. Influence of composition on chemical durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-06-01

    This report provides a review of the complete high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) data sets for the glasses recently fabricated at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and characterized at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The review is from the perspective of relating the chemical durability performance to the compositions of these study glasses, since the characterization work at SRNL focused on chemical analysis and ASTM Product Consistency Test (PCT) performance.

  5. Laboratory-Scale Melter for Determination of Melting Rate of Waste Glass Feeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Buchmiller, William C.; Matyas, Josef

    2012-01-09

    The purpose of this study was to develop the laboratory-scale melter (LSM) as a quick and inexpensive method to determine the processing rate of various waste glass slurry feeds. The LSM uses a 3 or 4 in. diameter-fused quartz crucible with feed and off-gas ports on top. This LSM setup allows cold-cap formation above the molten glass to be directly monitored to obtain a steady-state melting rate of the waste glass feeds. The melting rate data from extensive scaled-melter tests with Hanford Site high-level wastes performed for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant have been compiled. Preliminary empirical model that expresses the melting rate as a function of bubbling rate and glass yield were developed from the compiled database. The two waste glass feeds with most melter run data were selected for detailed evaluation and model development and for the LSM tests so the melting rates obtained from LSM tests can be compared with those from scaled-melter tests. The present LSM results suggest the LSM setup can be used to determine the glass production rates for the development of new glass compositions or feed makeups that are designed to increase the processing rate of the slurry feeds.

  6. PERFORMANCE OF A BURIED RADIOACTIVE HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASS AFTER 24 YEARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C; Daniel Kaplan, D; Ned Bibler, N; David Peeler, D; John Plodinec, J

    2008-05-05

    A radioactive high level waste glass was made in 1980 with Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 15 waste. This glass was buried in the SRS burial ground for 24 years but lysimeter data was only available for the first 8 years. The glass was exhumed and analyzed in 2004. The glass was predicted to be very durable and laboratory tests confirmed the durability response. The laboratory results indicated that the glass was very durable as did analysis of the lysimeter data. Scanning electron microscopy of the glass burial surface showed no significant glass alteration consistent with the results of the laboratory and field tests. No detectable Pu, Am, Cm, Np, or Ru leached from the glass into the surrounding sediment. Leaching of {beta}/{delta} from {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs in the glass was diffusion controlled. Less than 0.5% of the Cs and Sr in the glass leached into the surrounding sediment, with >99% of the leached radionuclides remaining within 8 centimeters of the glass pellet.

  7. GLASS FORMULATION FOR THE HANFORD TANK WASTE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION PLANT (WTP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; VIENNA JD; KIM DS; JAIN V

    2009-05-27

    A computational method for formulating Hanford HLW glasses was developed that is based on empirical glass composition-property models, accounts for all associated uncertainties, and can be solved in Excel{sup R} in minutes. Calculations for all waste form processing and compliance requirements included. Limited experimental validation performed.

  8. Office of River Protection Advanced Low-Activity Waste Glass Research and Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, A. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Peeler, D. K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kim, D. S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, J. D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Piepel, G. F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schweiger, M. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection (ORP) has initiated and leads an integrated Advanced Waste Glass (AWG) program to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product performance requirements. The integrated ORP program is focused on providing a technical, science-based foundation for making key decisions regarding the successful operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facilities in the context of an optimized River Protection Project (RPP) flowsheet. The fundamental data stemming from this program will support development of advanced glass formulations, key product performance and process control models, and tactical processing strategies to ensure safe and successful operations for both the low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste vitrification facilities. These activities will be conducted with the objective of improving the overall RPP mission by enhancing flexibility and reducing cost and schedule.

  9. Effects of Clear and Amber Cullet on Physical and Mechanical Properties of Glass-Ceramics Containing Zinc Hydrometallurgy Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanpongpun, Wilasinee; Jiemsirilers, Sirithan; Thavorniti, Parjaree

    The effect of glass cullet on physical and mechanical properties of glass-ceramics developed from zinc hydrometallurgy waste and glass cullet was investigated. The glass-ceramics were prepared by mixing zinc hydrometallurgy waste with glass cullet through vitrification process. Two difference types of glass cullet (clear and amber cullet) were used. The parent glasses were ground and pressed into bars and sintered at low temperature (850°C) for 2 hours. The obtained glass-ceramics had low porosity. The glass-ceramics with clear cullet exhibited higher density and strength, comparing with the glass-ceramics with amber cullet. The type and the amount of the glass cullet present in the glass-ceramics have strong effect on their properties.

  10. Redox-Dependent Solubility of Technetium in Low Activity Waste Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Lukens, Wayne W.; Mccloy, John S.

    2014-03-01

    The solubility of technetium was measured in a Hanford low activity waste glass simulant. The simulant glass was melted, quenched and pulverized to make a stock of powdered glass. A series of glass samples were prepared using the powdered glass and varying amounts of solid potassium pertechnetate. Samples were melted at 1000°C in sealed fused quartz ampoules. After cooling, the bulk glass and the salt phase above the glass (when present) were sampled for physical and chemical characterization. Technetium was found in the bulk glass up to 2000 ppm (using the glass as prepared) and 3000 ppm (using slightly reducing conditions). The chemical form of technetium obtained by x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy can be mainly assigned to isolated Tc(IV), with a minority of Tc(VII) in some glasses and TcO2 in two glasses. The concentration and speciation of technetium depends on glass redox and amount of technetium added. Solid crystals of pertechnetate salts were found in the salt cake layer that formed at the top of some glasses during the melt.

  11. Development of Models to Predict the Redox State of Nuclear Waste Containment Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinet, O.; Guirat, R.; Advocat, T. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), Departement de Traitement et de Conditionnement des Dechets, Marcoule, BP 71171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Phalippou, J. [Universite de Montpellier II, Laboratoire des Colloides, Verres et Nanomateriaux, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2008-07-01

    Vitrification is one of the recommended immobilization routes for nuclear waste, and is currently implemented at industrial scale in several countries, notably for high-level waste. To optimize nuclear waste vitrification, research is conducted to specify suitable glass formulations and develop more effective processes. This research is based not only on experiments at laboratory or technological scale, but also on computer models. Vitrified nuclear waste often contains several multi-valent species whose oxidation state can impact the properties of the melt and of the final glass; these include iron, cerium, ruthenium, manganese, chromium and nickel. Cea is therefore also developing models to predict the final glass redox state. Given the raw materials and production conditions, the model predicts the oxygen fugacity at equilibrium in the melt. It can also estimate the ratios between the oxidation states of the multi-valent species contained in the molten glass. The oxidizing or reductive nature of the atmosphere above the glass melt is also taken into account. Unlike the models used in the conventional glass industry based on empirical methods with a limited range of application, the models proposed are based on the thermodynamic properties of the redox species contained in the waste vitrification feed stream. The thermodynamic data on which the model is based concern the relationship between the glass redox state and the oxygen fugacity in the molten glass. The model predictions were compared with oxygen fugacity measurements for some fifty glasses. The experiments carried out at laboratory and industrial scale with a cold crucible melter. The oxygen fugacity of the glass samples was measured by electrochemical methods and compared with the predicted value. The differences between the predicted and measured oxygen fugacity values were generally less than 0.5 Log unit. (authors)

  12. Waste water purification using new porous ceramics prepared by recycling waste glass and bamboo charcoal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Tetsuaki; Morimoto, Akane; Yamamoto, Yoshito; Kubuki, Shiro

    2017-12-01

    New porous ceramics (PC) prepared by recycling waste glass bottle of soft drinks (80 mass%) and bamboo charcoal (20 mass%) without any binder was applied to the waste water purification under aeration at 25 °C. Artificial waste water (15 L) containing 10 mL of milk was examined by combining 15 mL of activated sludge and 750 g of PC. Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) showed a marked decrease from 178 to 4.0 (±0.1) mg L-1 in 5 days and to 2.0 (±0.1) mg L-1 in 7 days, which was equal to the Environmental Standard for the river water (class A) in Japan. Similarly, chemical oxygen demand (COD) decreased from 158 to 3.6 (±0.1) mg L-1 in 5 days and to 2.2 (±0.1) mg L-1 in 9 days, which was less than the Environmental Standard for the Seawater (class B) in Japan: 3.0 mg L-1. These results prove the high water purification ability of the PC, which will be effectively utilized for the purification of drinking water, fish preserve water, fish farm water, etc.

  13. Waste water purification using new porous ceramics prepared by recycling waste glass and bamboo charcoal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Tetsuaki; Morimoto, Akane; Yamamoto, Yoshito; Kubuki, Shiro

    2017-04-01

    New porous ceramics (PC) prepared by recycling waste glass bottle of soft drinks (80 mass%) and bamboo charcoal (20 mass%) without any binder was applied to the waste water purification under aeration at 25 °C. Artificial waste water (15 L) containing 10 mL of milk was examined by combining 15 mL of activated sludge and 750 g of PC. Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) showed a marked decrease from 178 to 4.0 (±0.1) mg L-1 in 5 days and to 2.0 (±0.1) mg L-1 in 7 days, which was equal to the Environmental Standard for the river water (class A) in Japan. Similarly, chemical oxygen demand (COD) decreased from 158 to 3.6 (±0.1) mg L-1 in 5 days and to 2.2 (±0.1) mg L-1 in 9 days, which was less than the Environmental Standard for the Seawater (class B) in Japan: 3.0 mg L-1. These results prove the high water purification ability of the PC, which will be effectively utilized for the purification of drinking water, fish preserve water, fish farm water, etc.

  14. Initial demonstration of DWPF process and product control strategy using actual radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, M.K.; Bibler, N.E.; Jantzen, C.M.; Beam, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will vitrify high-level nuclear waste into borosilicate glass. The waste will be mixed with properly formulated glass-making frit and fed to a melter at 1150{degrees}C. Process control and product quality are ensured by proper control of the melter feed composition. Algorithms have been developed to predict the processability of the melt and the durability of the final glass based on this feed composition. To test these algorithms, an actual radioactive waste contained in a shielded facility at SRS was analyzed and a frit composition formulated using a simple computer spreadsheet which contained the algorithms. This frit was then mixed with the waste and the resulting slurry fed to a research scale joule-heated melter operated remotely. Approximately 24 kg of glass were successfully prepared. This paper will describe the frit formulation, the vitrification process, and the glass durability.

  15. Initial demonstration of DWPF process and product control strategy using actual radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, M.K.; Bibler, N.E.; Jantzen, C.M.; Beam, D.C.

    1991-12-31

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will vitrify high-level nuclear waste into borosilicate glass. The waste will be mixed with properly formulated glass-making frit and fed to a melter at 1150{degrees}C. Process control and product quality are ensured by proper control of the melter feed composition. Algorithms have been developed to predict the processability of the melt and the durability of the final glass based on this feed composition. To test these algorithms, an actual radioactive waste contained in a shielded facility at SRS was analyzed and a frit composition formulated using a simple computer spreadsheet which contained the algorithms. This frit was then mixed with the waste and the resulting slurry fed to a research scale joule-heated melter operated remotely. Approximately 24 kg of glass were successfully prepared. This paper will describe the frit formulation, the vitrification process, and the glass durability.

  16. A novel low cost polyvinyl alcohol-Nafion-borosilicate membrane separator for microbial fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, B.R. [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302 (India); Noori, Md.T. [Department of Agriculture and Food Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302 (India); Ghangrekar, M.M., E-mail: ghangrekar@civil.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302 (India)

    2016-10-01

    Composite membranes were developed from PVA-borosilicate (MP) and PVA-Nafion-borosilicate (MPN) for application in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The membranes were characterized in terms of water uptake, PBS uptake, oxygen diffusion and proton conductivity. Proton conductivity for MPN (0.07 Scm{sup −1}) was found to be higher as compared to that of MP (0.03 Scm{sup −1}). Oxygen diffusion coefficient for MPN was 1.47 fold lower than that for MP. As a result, MFC with PVA-Nafion-borosilicate membrane exhibited maximum power density of 6.8 Wm{sup −3}, which was 151% higher than the power produced by MFC having PVA-borosilicate membrane and it was comparable with MFC using Nafion 117 (7.1 Wm{sup −3}) membrane separator. This study demonstrates that borosilicate glass membrane incorporated with PVA-Nafion matrix can be a suitable alternative to costly polymeric membrane to increase power output of MFC. Using such membranes MFC can be fabricated at around 11 fold reduced cost as compared to Nafion 117. - Highlights: • Novel membranes using PVA and borosilicate composite were fabricated. • Proton diffusion for MPN was comparable with Nafion117. • MFC-PN produced power density comparable to MFC with Nafion 117 membrane. • MPN was fabricated at almost 11 times reduced cost than Nafion 117 membranes.

  17. Formulation of portland composite cement using waste glass as a supplementary cementitious material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manullang, Ria Julyana; Samadhi, Tjokorde Walmiki; Purbasari, Aprilina

    2017-09-01

    Utilization of waste glass in cement is an attractive options because of its pozzolanic behaviour and the market of glass-composite cement is potentially available. The objective of this research is to evaluate the formulation of waste glass as supplementary cementitious material (SCM) by an extreme vertices mixture experiment, in which clinker, waste glass and gypsum proportions are chosen as experimental variables. The composite cements were synthesized by mixing all of powder materials in jar mill. The compressive strength of the composite cement mortars after being cured for 28 days ranges between 229 to 268 kg/cm2. Composite cement mortars exhibit lower compressive strength than ordinary Portland cement (OPC) mortars but is still capable of meeting the SNI 15-7064-2004 standards. The highest compressive strength is obtained by shifting the cement blend composition to the direction of increasing clinker and gypsum proportions as well as reducing glass proportion. The lower compressive strength of composite cement is caused by expansion due to ettringite and ASR gel. Based on the experimental result, the composite cement containing 80% clinker, 15% glass and 5% gypsum has the highest compressive strength. As such, the preliminary technical feasibility of reuse of waste glass as SCM has been confirmed.

  18. Vitrified hillforts as anthropogenic analogues for nuclear waste glasses - project planning and initiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoblom, Rolf; Weaver, Jamie L.; Peeler, David K.; Mccloy, John S.; Kruger, Albert A.; Ogenhall, E.; Hjarthner-Jolder, E.

    2016-09-27

    Nuclear waste must be deposited in such a manner that it does not cause significant impact on the environment or human health. In some cases, the integrity of the repositories will need to sustain for tens to hundreds of thousands of years. In order to ensure such containment, nuclear waste is frequently converted into a very durable glass. It is fundamentally difficult, however, to assure the validity of such containment based on short-term tests alone. To date, some anthropogenic and natural volcanic glasses have been investigated for this purpose. However, glasses produced by ancient cultures for the purpose of joining rocks in stonewalls have not yet been utilized in spite of the fact that they might offer significant insight into the long-term durability of glasses in natural environments. Therefore, a project is being initiated with the scope of obtaining samples and characterizing their environment, as well as to investigate them using a suite of advanced materials characterization techniques. It will be analysed how the hillfort glasses may have been prepared, and to what extent they have altered under in-situ conditions. The ultimate goals are to obtain a better understanding of the alteration behaviour of nuclear waste glasses and its compositional dependence, and thus to improve and validate models for nuclear waste glass corrosion. The paper deals with project planning and initiation, and also presents some early findings on fusion of amphibolite and on the process for joining the granite stones in the hillfort walls.

  19. Experimental design and process analysis for acidic leaching of metal-rich glass wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncuk, A; Ciftci, H; Akcil, A; Ognyanova, A; Vegliò, F

    2010-05-01

    The removal of iron, titanium and aluminium from colourless and green waste glasses has been studied under various experimental conditions in order to optimize the process parameters and to decrease the metal content in the waste glass by acidic leaching. Statistical design of experiments and ANOVA (analysis of variance) were performed in order to determine the main effects and interactions between the investigated factors (sample ratio, acid concentration, temperature and leaching time). A full factorial experiment was performed by sulphuric acid leaching of glass for metal removal. After treating, the iron content was 530 ppm, corresponding to 1880 ppm initial concentration of Fe(2)O(3) in the original colourless sample. This result is achieved using 1M H(2)SO( 4) and 30% sample ratio at 90(o)C leaching temperature for 2 hours. The iron content in the green waste glass sample was reduced from 3350 ppm initial concentration to 2470 ppm after treating.

  20. Evaluation the microwave heating of spinel crystals in high-level waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, J. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab. (SREL); Washington, A. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab. (SREL)

    2015-08-18

    In this report, the microwave heating of a crystal-free and a partially (24 wt%) trevorite-crystallized waste glass simulant were evaluated. The results show that a 500 mg piece of partially crystallized waste glass can be heated from room-temperature to above 1600 °C (as measured by infrared radiometry) within 2 minutes using a single mode, highly focused, 2.45 GHz microwave, operating at 300 W. X-ray diffraction measurements show that the partially crystallized glass experiences an 87 % reduction in trevorite following irradiation and thermal quenching. When a crystal-free analogue of the same waste glass simulant composition is exposed to the same microwave radiation it could not be heated above 450 °C regardless of the heating time.

  1. Technetium Incorporation in Glass for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Kim, Dong Sang

    2015-01-14

    A priority of the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) is to dispose of nuclear wastes accumulated in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in eastern Washington State. These nuclear wastes date from the Manhattan Project of World War II and from plutonium production during the Cold War. The DOE plans to separate high-level radioactive wastes from low activity wastes and to treat each of the waste streams by vitrification (immobilization of the nuclides in glass) for disposal. The immobilized low-activity waste will be disposed of here at Hanford and the immobilized high-level waste at the national geologic repository. Included in the inventory of highly radioactive wastes is large volumes of 99Tc (~9 × 10E2 TBq or ~2.5 × 104 Ci or ~1500 kg). A problem facing safe disposal of Tc-bearing wastes is the processing of waste feed into in a chemically durable waste form. Technetium incorporates poorly into silicate glass in traditional glass melting. It readily evaporates during melting of glass feeds and out of the molten glass, leading to a spectrum of high-to-low retention (ca. 20 to 80%) in the cooled glass product. DOE-ORP currently has a program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Rutgers University and in the School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering at Washington State University that seeks to understand aspects of Tc retention by means of studying Tc partitioning, molten salt formation, volatilization pathways, and cold cap chemistry. Another problem involves the stability of Tc in glass in both the national geologic repository and on-site disposal after it has been immobilized. The major environmental concern with 99Tc is its high mobility in addition to a long half-life (2.1×105 yrs). The pertechnetate ion (TcO4-) is highly soluble in water and does not adsorb well onto the surface of minerals and so migrates nearly at the same velocity as groundwater

  2. Long-term modeling of glass waste in portland cement- and clay-based matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockman, H.W.; Nagy, K.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Morris, C.E. [Wollongong Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Civil and Mining Engineering

    1995-12-01

    A set of ``templates`` was developed for modeling waste glass interactions with cement-based and clay-based matrices. The templates consist of a modified thermodynamic database, and input files for the EQ3/6 reaction path code, containing embedded rate models and compositions for waste glass, cement, and several pozzolanic materials. Significant modifications were made in the thermodynamic data for Th, Pb, Ra, Ba, cement phases, and aqueous silica species. It was found that the cement-containing matrices could increase glass corrosion rates by several orders of magnitude (over matrixless or clay matrix systems), but they also offered the lowest overall solubility for Pb, Ra, Th and U. Addition of pozzolans to cement decreased calculated glass corrosion rates by up to a factor of 30. It is shown that with current modeling capabilities, the ``affinity effect`` cannot be trusted to passivate glass if nuclei are available for precipitation of secondary phases that reduce silica activity.

  3. XRF and leaching characterization of waste glasses derived from wastewater treatment sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragsdale, Jr, Robert G. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Purpose of this study was to investigate use of XRF (x-ray fluorescence spectrometry) as a near real-time method to determine melter glass compositions. A range of glasses derived from wastewater treatment sludges associated with DOE sites was prepared. They were analyzed by XRF and wet chemistry digestion with atomic absorption/inductively coupled emission spectrometry. Results indicated good correlation between these two methods. A rapid sample preparation and analysis technique was developed and demonstrated by acquiring a sample from a pilot-scale simulated waste glass melter and analyzing it by XRF within one hour. From the results, XRF shows excellent potential as a process control tool for waste glass vitrification. Glasses prepared for this study were further analyzed for durability by toxicity characteristic leaching procedure and product consistency test and results are presented.

  4. Office of River Protection Advanced Low-Activity Waste Glass Research and Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, David K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kim, Dong-Sang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schweiger, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Piepel, Gregory F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection (ORP) has initiated and leads an integrated Advanced Waste Glass (AWG) program to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product performance requirements. The integrated ORP program is focused on providing a technical, science-based foundation for making key decisions regarding the successful operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facilities in the context of an optimized River Protection Project (RPP) flowsheet. The fundamental data stemming from this program will support development of advanced glass formulations, key product performance and process control models, and tactical processing strategies to ensure safe and successful operations for both the low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste vitrification facilities. These activities will be conducted with the objective of improving the overall RPP mission by enhancing flexibility and reducing cost and schedule. The purpose of this advanced LAW glass research and development plan is to identify the near-term, mid-term, and longer-term research and development activities required to develop and validate advanced LAW glasses, property-composition models and their uncertainties, and an advanced glass algorithm to support WTP facility operations, including both Direct Feed LAW and full pretreatment flowsheets. Data are needed to develop, validate, and implement 1) new glass property-composition models and 2) a new glass formulation algorithm. Hence, this plan integrates specific studies associated with increasing the Na2O and SO3/halide concentrations in glass, because these components will ultimately dictate waste loadings for LAW vitrification. Of equal importance is the development of an efficient and economic strategy for 99Tc management. Specific and detailed studies are being implemented to understand the fate of Tc throughout

  5. Glasses obtained from industrial wastes; Vidros obtidos a partir de residuos industriais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bortoluzzi, D.; Oliveira Fillho, J.; Uggioni, E. [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense (UNESC), Criciuma, SC (Brazil). Curso de Engenharia de Materiais; Bernardin, A.M., E-mail: amb@unesc.ne [Servico Nacional de Aprendizagem Industrial (SENAI), Tijucas, SC (Brazil). Tecnologia em Ceramica

    2009-07-01

    This paper deals with the study of the vitrification mechanism as an inertization method for industrial wastes contaminated with heavy metals. Ashes from coal (thermoelectric), wastes from mining (fluorite and feldspar) and plating residue were used to compose vitreous systems planed by mixture design. The chemical composition of the wastes was determined by XRF and the formulations were melted at 1450 deg C for 2h using 10%wt of CaCO{sub 3} (fluxing agent). The glasses were poured into a mold and annealed (600 deg C). The characteristic temperatures were determined by thermal analysis (DTA, air, 20 deg C/min) and the mechanical behavior by Vickers microhardness. As a result, the melting temperature is strongly dependent on silica content of each glass, and the fluorite residue, being composed mainly by silica, strongly affects Tm. The microhardness of all glasses is mainly affected by the plating residue due to the high iron and zinc content of this waste. (author)

  6. Final Report. LAW Glass Formulation to Support AP-101 Actual Waste Testing, VSL-03R3470-2, Rev. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, I. S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Pegg, I. L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Rielley, Elizabeth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Carranza, Isidro [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Hight, Kenneth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Lai, Shan-Tao T. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Mooers, Cavin [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Bazemore, Gina [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Cecil, Richard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kruger, Albert A. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-06-22

    The main objective of the work was to develop and select a glass formulation for vitrification testing of the actual waste sample of LAW AP-101 at Battelle - Pacific Northwest Division (PNWD). Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses to demonstrate compliance with contract and processing requirements, evaluation of the ability to achieve waste loading requirements, testing to demonstrate compatibility of the glass melts with melter materials of construction, comparison of the properties of simulant and actual waste glasses, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  7. THE IMPACT OF KINETICS ON NEPHELINE FORMATION IN NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J.

    2011-03-07

    Sixteen glass compositions were selected to study the potential impacts of the kinetics of nepheline formation in high-level nuclear waste (HLW) glass. The chosen compositions encompassed a relatively large nepheline discriminator (ND) range, 0.40-0.66, and included a relatively broad range, and amount of, constituents including high aluminum and high boron concentrations. All glasses were fabricated in the laboratory and subsequently exposed to six different cooling treatments. The cooling treatments consisted of three 'stepped' profiles and their corresponding 'smooth' profiles. Included in the cooling treatment was the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister centerline cooling (CCC) profile in addition to a 'faster' and a 'slower' total cooling line. After quenching and heat treating, x-ray diffraction confirmed the type and amount of any resultant crystallization. The target compositions were shown to be consistent with the measured compositions. Two quenched glasses and several treated glasses exhibited minor amounts of spinel and spinel-like phases. Nepheline was not observed in any of the quenched glasses but was observed in many of the treated glasses. The amount of nepheline ranged from approximately 2wt% to 30wt% for samples cooled over shorter times and longer times respectively. Differences were observed in the amount of nepheline crystallization after smooth and stepped cooling and increased with total cooling time. In some glasses, nepheline crystallization appeared to be directly proportional to total cooling time while the total amount of nepheline crystallization varied, suggesting that the nepheline crystallization rate was independent of (or at least faster than) cooling rate but, varied depending on the glass composition. On the contrary, in another glass, nepheline crystallization appeared to be inversely proportional to cooling rate. The high alumina glasses, predicted to form nepheline

  8. Preliminary assessment of blending Hanford tank wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geeting, J.G.H.; Kurath, D.E.

    1993-03-01

    A parametric study of blending Hanford tank wastes identified possible benefits from blending wastes prior to immobilization as a high level or low level waste form. Track Radioactive Components data were used as the basis for the single-shell tank (SST) waste composition, while analytical data were used for the double-shell tank (DST) composition. Limiting components were determined using the existing feed criteria for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) and the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF). Results have shown that blending can significantly increase waste loading and that the baseline quantities of immobilized waste projected for the sludge-wash pretreatment case may have been drastically underestimated, because critical components were not considered. Alternatively, the results suggest further review of the grout feed specifications and the solubility of minor components in HWVP borosilicate glass. Future immobilized waste estimates might be decreased substantially upon a thorough review of the appropriate feed specifications.

  9. Evaluation of defense-waste glass produced by full-scale vitrification equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukacs, J.M.; Petkus, L.L.; Mellinger, G.B.

    1981-09-01

    Three full-scale vitrification processes at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory produced over 67,000 kg of simulated nuclear-waste glass from March 1979 to August 1980. Samples were analyzed to monitor process operation and evaluate the resulting glass product. These processes are: Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter (SC/ICM); Spray Calciner/Calcine-Fed Ceramic Melter (SC/CFCM); and Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter (LFCM). Waste components in the process feed varied less than +- 10%. The SC/ICM and SC/CFCM which use separate waste and frit feed systems showed larger glass compositional variation than the LFCM, which processed only premixed feed during this period. The SC/ICM and SC/CFCM product contained significant amounts of acmite crystals, while the LFCM product was largely amorphous. In addition, the lower portion of all SC/ICM-filled canisters contained a zone rich in waste components. A product chemical durability as determined by pH4 and soxhlet leach tests varied considerably. Aside from increased durability under pH4 conditions with decreasing waste content, glass composition, microstructure and melting process did not correlate with glass durability. For all samples analyzed, the weight loss under pH4 conditions ranged from 17.7 to 85.2 wt %. Soxhlet conditions produced weight losses from 1.78 to 3.56 wt %.

  10. Laboratory stabilization/solidification of surrogate and actual mixed-waste sludge in glass and grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, R.D.; Gilliam, T.M.; Mattus, C.H.; Mattus, A.J.

    1998-03-03

    Grouting and vitrification are currently the most likely stabilization/solidification technologies for mixed wastes. Grouting has been used to stabilize and solidify hazardous and low-level waste for decades. Vitrification has long been developed as a high-level-waste alternative and has been under development recently as an alternative treatment technology for low-level mixed waste. Laboratory testing has been performed to develop grout and vitrification formulas for mixed-waste sludges currently stored in underground tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and to compare these waste forms. Envelopes, or operating windows, for both grout and soda-lime-silica glass formulations for a surrogate sludge were developed. One formulation within each envelope was selected for testing the sensitivity of performance to variations ({+-}10 wt%) in the waste form composition and variations in the surrogate sludge composition over the range previously characterized in the sludges. In addition, one sludge sample of an actual mixed-waste tank was obtained, a surrogate was developed for this sludge sample, and grout and glass samples were prepared and tested in the laboratory using both surrogate and the actual sludge. The sensitivity testing of a surrogate tank sludge in selected glass and grout formulations is discussed in this paper, along with the hot-cell testing of an actual tank sludge sample.

  11. A Review of Iron Phosphate Glasses and Recommendations for Vitrifying Hanford Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delbert E. Ray; Chandra S. Ray

    2013-11-01

    This report contains a comprehensive review of the research conducted, world-wide, on iron phosphate glass over the past ~30 years. Special attention is devoted to those iron phosphate glass compositions which have been formulated for the purpose of vitrifying numerous types of nuclear waste, with special emphasis on the wastes stored in the underground tanks at Hanford WA. Data for the structural, chemical, and physical properties of iron phosphate waste forms are reviewed for the purpose of understanding their (a) outstanding chemical durability which meets all current DOE requirements, (b) high waste loadings which can exceed 40 wt% (up to 75 wt%) for several Hanford wastes, (c) low melting temperatures, can be as low as 900°C for certain wastes, and (d) high tolerance for “problem” waste components such as sulfates, halides, and heavy metals (chromium, actinides, noble metals, etc.). Several recommendations are given for actions that are necessary to smoothly integrate iron phosphate glass technology into the present waste treatment plans and vitrification facilities at Hanford.

  12. Lead recovery and high silica glass powder synthesis from waste CRT funnel glasses through carbon thermal reduction enhanced glass phase separation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Mingfei [Henan Key Laboratory Cultivation Base of Mine Environmental Protection and Ecological Remediation, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 Henan China (China); Institute of Resource and Environment, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 Henan China (China); Fu, Zegang [Institute of Resource and Environment, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 Henan China (China); Wang, Yaping, E-mail: wangyp326@163.com [School of Surveying and Land Information Engineering, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000, Henan China (China); Wang, Jingyu [Institute of Resource and Environment, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 Henan China (China); Zhang, Zhiyuan [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • CRT funnel glass was remelted with B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in reducing atmosphere. • A part of PbO was reduced into Pb and detached from the glass phase. • The rest of PbO and other metal oxides were mainly concentrated in the B{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase. • PbO enriched in the interconnected B{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase can be completely leached out by HNO{sub 3}. • High silica glass powder(SiO{sub 2} purity >95%) was obtained after the leaching process. - Abstract: In this study, a novel process for the removal of toxic lead from the CRT funnel glass and synchronous preparation of high silica glass powder was developed by a carbon-thermal reduction enhanced glass phase separation process. CRT funnel glass was remelted with B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in reducing atmosphere. In the thermal process, a part of PbO contained in the funnel glass was reduced into metallic Pb and detached from the glass phase. The rest of PbO and other metal oxides (including Na{sub 2}O, K{sub 2}O, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3,} BaO and CaO) were mainly concentrated in the boric oxide phase. The metallic Pb phase and boric oxide phase were completely leached out by 5 mol/L HNO{sub 3}. The lead removal rate was 99.80% and high silica glass powder (SiO{sub 2} purity >95 wt%) was obtained by setting the temperature, B{sub 2}O{sub 3} added amount and holding time at 1000 °C, 20% and 30 mins, respectively. The prepared high silicate glass powders can be used as catalyst carrier, semipermeable membranes, adsorbents or be remelted into high silicate glass as an ideal substitute for quartz glass. Thus this study proposed an eco-friendly and economical process for recycling Pb-rich electronic glass waste.

  13. Preliminary Investigation of Sulfur Loading in Hanford LAW Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Buchmiller, William C.; Ricklefs, Joel S.

    2004-04-01

    A preliminary estimate was developed for loading limits for high-sulfur low-activity waste (LAW) feeds that will be vitrified into borosilicate glass at the Hanford Site in the waste-cleanup effort. Previous studies reported in the literature were consulted to provide a basis for the estimate. The examination of previous studies led to questions about sulfur loading in Hanford LAW glass, and scoping tests were performed to help answer these questions. These results of these tests indicated that a formulation approach developed by Vienna and colleagues shows promise for maximizing LAW loading in glass. However, there is a clear need for follow-on work. The potential for significantly lowering the amount of LAW glass produced at Hanford (after the initial phase of processing) because of higher sulfur tolerances may outweigh the cost and effort required to perform the necessary testing.

  14. The effect of colouring agent on the physical properties of glass ceramic produced from waste glass for antimicrobial coating deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juoi, J. M.; Ayoob, N. F.; Rosli, Z. M.; Rosli, N. R.; Husain, K.

    2016-07-01

    Domestic waste glass is utilized as raw material for the production of glass ceramic material (GCM) via sinter crystallisation route. The glass ceramic material in a form of tiles is to be utilized for the deposition of Ag-TiO2 antimicrobial coating. Two types of soda lime glass (SLG) that are non-coloured and green SLG are utilised as main raw materials during the batch formulation in order to study the effect of colouring agent (Fe2O3) on the physical and mechanical properties of glass ceramic produced. Glass powder were prepared by crushing bottles using hammer milled with milling machine and sieved until they passed through 75 µm sieve. The process continues by mixing glass powder with ball clay with ratio of 95:5 wt. %, 90:10 wt. % and 85:15 wt. %. Each batch mixture was then uniaxial pressed and sintered at 800°C, 825 °C and 850 °C. The physical and mechanical properties were then determined and compared between those produced from non-coloured and green coloured SLG in order to evaluate the effect of colouring agent (Fe2O3) on the GCM produced. The optimum properties of non-coloured SLG is produced with smaller ball clay content (10 wt. %) compared to green SLG (15 wt. %). The physical properties (determined thru ASTM C373) of the optimized GCM produced from non-coloured SLG and green SLG are 0.69 % of porosity, 1.92 g/cm3 of bulk density, 0.36 % of water absorption; and 1.96 % of porosity, 2.69 g/cm3 of bulk density, 0.73 % of water absorption; respectively. Results also indicate that the most suitable temperature in producing GCM from both glasses with optimized physical and mechanical properties is at 850 °C.

  15. The use of positrons to survey alteration layers on synthetic nuclear waste glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Joelle T.; Parruzot, Benjamin; Weber, Marc H.; Ryan, Joseph V.; McCloy, John S.; Wall, Nathalie A.

    2017-07-01

    In order to safeguard society and the environment, understanding radioactive waste glass alteration mechanisms in interactions with solutions and near-field materials, such as Fe, is essential to nuclear waste repository performance assessments. Alteration products are formed at the surface of glasses after reaction with solution. In this study, glass altered in the presence of Fe0 in aqueous solution formed two alteration layers: one embedded with Fe closer to the surface and one without Fe found deeper in the sample. Both layers were found to be thinner than the alteration layer found in glass altered in aqueous solution only. For the first time, Doppler Broadening Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (DB-PAS) is used to non-destructively characterize the pore structures of glass altered in the presence of Fe0. Advantages and disadvantages of DB-PAS compared to other techniques used to analyze pore structures for altered glass samples are discussed. Ultimately, DB-PAS has shown to be an excellent choice for pore structure characterization for glasses with multiple alteration layers. Monte Carlo modeling predicted positron trajectories through the layers, and helped explain DB-PAS data, which showed that the deeper alteration layer without Fe had a similar composition and pore structure to layers on glass altered in water only.

  16. Assessment of lead tellurite glass for immobilizing electrochemical salt wastes from used nuclear fuel reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J.; Kroll, Jared O.; Peterson, Jacob A.; Pierce, David A.; Ebert, William L.; Williams, Benjamin D.; Snyder, Michelle M. V.; Frank, Steven M.; George, Jaime L.; Kruska, Karen

    2017-11-01

    This paper provides an overview of research evaluating the use of lead tellurite glass as a waste form for salt wastes from electrochemical reprocessing of used nuclear fuel. The efficacy of using lead tellurite glass to immobilize three different salt compositions was evaluated: a LiCl-Li2O oxide reduction salt containing fission products from oxide fuel, a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt containing fission products from metallic fuel, and SrCl2. Physical and chemical properties of glasses made with these salts were characterized with X-ray diffraction, bulk density measurements, differential thermal analysis, chemical durability tests, scanning and transmission electron microscopies, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. These glasses were found to accommodate high salt concentrations and have high densities, but further development is needed to improve chemical durability. (C) 2017 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Preparation of low water-sorption lightweight aggregates from harbor sediment added with waste glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yu-Ling; Lin, Chang-Yuan; Ko, Kuan-Wei; Wang, H Paul

    2011-01-01

    A harbor sediment is successfully recycled at 1150 °C as low water-absorption lightweight aggregate via addition of waste glass powder. Sodium content in the waste glass is responsible for the formation of low-viscosity viscous phases during firing process to encapsulate the gases generated for bloating pellet samples. Water sorption capacity of the lightweight products can be considerably reduced from 5.6% to 1.5% with the addition of waste glass powder. Low water-absorption property of lightweight products is beneficial for preparing lightweight concrete because the water required for curing the cement would not be seized by lightweight aggregate filler, thus preventing the failure of long-term concrete strength. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of Using Windows Waste Glass as Fine Aggregate on Some Properties of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmaseeh Bakos Keryou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this study is to investigate the effect of using waste glass (WG on some mechanical properties of concrete at both fresh and hardened stages. In our study, we used local windows waste glass (WG as partial replacement of fine aggregates with 0, 20, 25, and 30% percentages (by weight. The experimental results obtained from testing specimens prepared from concrete mixes with water/cement ratio equal to 0.5, showed that the optimum percentage of fine waste glass to be used within the concrete mix was 20%. At this percentage of replacement the compressive strength obtained at 28-days age was 39 MPa compared with 30.32 MPa for reference concrete mix.

  19. SUCCESSES AND EMERGING ISSUES IN SIMULATING THE MIXING BEHAVIOR OF LIQUID-PARTICLE NUCLEAR WASTE SLURRIES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE - 211B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D.; Pickenheim, B.; Lambert, D.; Stone, M.

    2009-09-02

    Aqueous radioactive high-level waste slurries are combined during processing steps that ultimately produce a stable borosilicate glass waste form. Chemically treated waste slurries are combined with each other and with glass frit-water slurries to produce the melter feed. Understanding the evolution of the rheological properties of the slurries is an important aspect of removing and treating the stored waste. To a first approximation, combinations of colloidal waste slurry with {approx}0.1-mm mean diameter glass frit or glass beads act in an analogous matter to slurries of spherical beads in Newtonian liquids. The non-Newtonian rheological properties of the waste slurries without frit, however, add complexity to the hydrodynamic analysis. The use of shear rate dependent apparent viscosities with the modified Einstein equation was used to model the rheological properties of aqueous frit-waste slurries.

  20. Energy Saving Method of Manufacturing Ceramic Products from Fiber Glass Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael J. Haun

    2005-07-15

    The U.S. fiber glass industry disposes of more than 260,000 tons of industrial fiber glass waste in landfills annually. New technology is needed to reprocess this industrial waste into useful products. A low-cost energy-saving method of manufacturing ceramic tile from fiber glass waste was developed. The technology is based on sintering fiber glass waste at 700-900 degrees C to produce products which traditionally require firing temperatures of >1200 degrees C, or glass-melting temperatures >1500 degrees C. The process also eliminates other energy intensive processing steps, including mining and transportation of raw materials, spray-drying to produce granulated powder, drying pressed tile, and glazing. The technology completely transforms fiber glass waste into a dense ceramic product, so that all future environmental problems in the handling and disposal of the fibers is eliminated. The processing steps were developed and optimized to produce glossy and matte surface finishes for wall and floor tile applications. High-quality prototype tile samples were processed for demonstration and tile standards testing. A Market Assessment confirmed the market potential for tile products produced by the technology. Manufacturing equipment trials were successfully conducted for each step of the process. An industrial demonstration plant was designed, including equipment and operating cost analysis. A fiber glass manufacturer was selected as an industrial partner to commercialize the technology. A technology development and licensing agreement was completed with the industrial partner. Haun labs will continue working to transfer the technology and assist the industrial partner with commercialization beyond the DOE project.

  1. Redox-dependent solubility of technetium in low activity waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kim, Dong-Sang [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Lukens, Wayne W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); McCloy, John S., E-mail: john.mccloy@wsu.edu [Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Hanford low activity waste glass spiked with KTcO{sub 4} 500–6000 ppm Tc by mass. • Tc solubility varied with glass redox, 2000– 2800 ppm, higher when slightly reduced. • Tc mostly present as Tc(IV) with some Tc(VII) and rarely TcO{sub 2} inclusions. • Small amounts of WC from ball mills can be strongly reducing for Fe and Tc. - Abstract: The solubility of technetium was measured in a Hanford low activity waste (LAW) glass simulant, to investigate the extent that technetium solubility controls the incorporation of technetium into LAW glass. A series of LAW glass samples, spiked with 500–6000 ppm of Tc as potassium pertechnetate, were melted at 1000 °C in sealed fused quartz ampoules. Technetium solubility was determined in the quenched bulk glass to be 2000–2800 ppm, with slightly reducing conditions due to choice of milling media resulting in reductant contamination and higher solubility. The chemical form of technetium obtained by X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy is mainly isolated, octahedrally-coordinated Tc(IV), with a minority of Tc(VII) in some glasses and TcO{sub 2} in two glasses. The concentration and speciation of technetium depends on glass redox and amount of technetium added. Salts formed at the top of higher technetium loaded glasses during the melt. The results of this study show that technetium solubility should not be a factor in technetium retention during melting of Hanford LAW glass.

  2. Performance Characteristics of Waste Glass Powder Substituting Portland Cement in Mortar Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Kara, P.; Csetényi, L; Borosnyói, A

    2014-01-01

    In several countries, waste glass causes environmental concerns as quantities stockpiled exceed recycling in the packaging stream. Being amorphous and having relatively high silicium and calcium contents, glass is pozzolanic or even cementitious, when finely ground. Reducing particle sizes typically to less than 100 µm may give control over the alkali-silica reaction in concrete, therefore making this material a possible substitute to Portland cement. Such use may moderate the problem of dump...

  3. Development and testing of matrices for the encapsulation of glass and ceramic nuclear waste forms.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wald, J.W.; Brite, D.W.; Gurwell, W.E.; Buckwalter, C.Q.; Bunnell, L.R.; Gray, W.J.; Blair, H.T.; Rusin, J.M.

    1982-02-01

    This report details the results of research on the matrix encapsulation of high level wastes at PML over the past few years. The demonstrations and tests described were designed to illustrate how the waste materials are effected when encapsulated in an inert matrix. Candidate materials evaluated for potential use as matrices for encapslation of pelletized ceramics or glass marbles were categorized into four groups: metals, glasses, ceramics, and graphite. Two processing techniques, casting and hot pressing, were investigated as the most promising methods of formation or densification of the matrices. The major results reported deal with the development aspects. However, chemical durability tests (leach tests) of the matrix materials themselves and matrix-waste form composites are also reported. Matrix waste forms can provide a low porosity, waste-free barrier resulting in increased leach protection, higher impact strength and improved thermal conductivity compared to unencapsulated glass or ceramic waste materials. Glass marbles encapsulated in a lead matrix offer the most significant improvement in waste form stability of all combinations evaluated. This form represents a readily demonstrable process that provides high thermal conductivity, mechanical shock resistance, radiation shielding and increased chemical durability through both a chemical passivation mechanism and as a physical barrier. Other durable matrix waste forms evaluated, applicable primarily to ceramic pellets, involved hot-pressed titanium or TiO/sub 2/ materials. In the processing of these forms, near 100% dense matrices were obtained. The matrix materials had excellent compatibility with the waste materials and superior potential chemical durability. Cracking of the hot-pressed ceramic matrix forms, in general, prevented the realization of their optimum properties.

  4. Waste glass from end-of-life fluorescent lamps as raw material in geopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novais, Rui M; Ascensão, G; Seabra, M P; Labrincha, J A

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays the stunning volume of generated wastes, the exhaustion of raw materials, and the disturbing greenhouse gases emission levels show that a paradigm shift is mandatory. In this context, the possibility of using wastes instead of virgin raw materials can mitigate the environmental problems related to wastes, while reducing the consumption of the Earth's natural resources. This innovative work reports the incorporation of unexplored waste glass coming from end-of-life fluorescent lamps into geopolymers. The influence of the waste glass incorporation level, NaOH molarity and curing conditions on the microstructure, physical and mechanical properties of the geopolymers was evaluated. Results demonstrate that curing conditions are the most influential factor on the geopolymer characteristics, while the NaOH molarity is less important. Geopolymers containing 37.5% (wt) waste glass were successfully produced, showing compressive strength of 14MPa (after 28days of curing), suggesting the possibility of their use in non-structural applications. Porous waste-based geopolymers for novel applications were also fabricated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Treatment of copper industry waste and production of sintered glass-ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coruh, Semra; Ergun, Osman Nuri; Cheng, Ta-Wui

    2006-06-01

    Copper waste is iron-rich hazardous waste containing heavy metals such as Cu, Zn, Co, Pb. The results of leaching tests show that the concentration of these elements exceeds the Turkish and EPA regulatory limits. Consequently, this waste cannot be disposed of in its present form and therefore requires treatment to stabilize it or make it inert prior to disposal. Vitrification was selected as the technology for the treatment of the toxic waste under investigation. During the vitrification process significant amounts of the toxic organic and inorganic chemical compounds could be destroyed, and at the same time, the metal species are immobilized as they become an integral part of the glass matrix. The copper flotation waste samples used in this research were obtained from the Black Sea Copper Works of Samsun, Turkey. The samples were vitrified after being mixed with other inorganic waste and materials. The copper flotation waste and their glass-ceramic products were characterized by X-ray analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy and by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure test. The products showed very good chemical durability. The glass-ceramics fabricated at 850 degrees C/2 h have a large application potential especially as construction and building materials.

  6. Advances in the Glass Formulations for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Vienna, John D.; Kim, Dong Sang

    2015-01-14

    The Department of Energy-Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) is constructing the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to treat radioactive waste currently stored in underground tanks at the Hanford site in Washington. The WTP that is being designed and constructed by a team led by Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) will separate the tank waste into High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) fractions with the majority of the mass (~90%) directed to LAW and most of the activity (>95%) directed to HLW. The pretreatment process, envisioned in the baseline, involves the dissolution of aluminum-bearing solids so as to allow the aluminum salts to be processed through the cesium ion exchange and report to the LAW Facility. There is an oxidative leaching process to affect a similar outcome for chromium-bearing wastes. Both of these unit operations were advanced to accommodate shortcomings in glass formulation for HLW inventories. A by-product of this are a series of technical challenges placed upon materials selected for the processing vessels. The advances in glass formulation play a role in revisiting the flow sheet for the WTP and hence, the unit operations that were being imposed by minimal waste loading requirements set forth in the contract for the design and construction of the plant. Another significant consideration to the most recent revision of the glass models are the impacts on resolution of technical questions associated with current efforts for design completion.

  7. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND PCT DATA FOR THE INITIAL SET OF HANFORD ENHANCED WASTE LOADING GLASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

    2014-06-02

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test results for 20 simulated high level waste glasses fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation ranges of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions. The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component for each glass. Two components of the study glasses, fluorine and silver, were not measured since each of these species would have required the use of an additional preparation method and their measured values were likely to be near or below analytical detection limits. Some of the glasses were difficult to prepare for chemical analysis. A sodium peroxide fusion dissolution method was successful in completely dissolving the glasses. Components present in the glasses in minor concentrations can be difficult to measure using this dissolution method due to dilution requirements. The use of a lithium metaborate preparation method for the minor components (planned for use since it is typically successful in digesting Defense Waste Processing Facility HLW glasses) resulted in an unacceptable amount of undissolved solids remaining in the sample solutions. An acid dissolution method was used instead, which provided more thorough dissolution of the glasses, although a small amount of undissolved material remained for some of the study glasses. The undissolved material was analyzed to determine those components of the glasses that did not fully dissolve. These components (e.g., calcium and chromium) were present in sufficient quantities to be reported from the measurements resulting from the sodium peroxide fusion preparation method, which did not leave undissolved material. Overall, the analyses resulted in sums of

  8. A hazardous waste from secondary aluminium metallurgy as a new raw material for calcium aluminate glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Delgado, Aurora; Tayibi, Hanan; Pérez, Carlos; Alguacil, Francisco José; López, Félix Antonio

    2009-06-15

    A solid waste coming from the secondary aluminium industry was successfully vitrified in the ternary CaO-Al(2)O(3)-SiO(2) system at 1500 degrees C. This waste is a complex material which is considered hazardous because of its behaviour in the presence of water or moisture. In these conditions, the dust can generate gases such as H(2), NH(3), CH(4), H(2)S, along with heat and potential aluminothermy. Only silica sand and calcium carbonate were added as external raw materials to complete the glasses formula. Different nominal compositions of glasses, with Al(2)O(3) ranging between 20% and 54%, were studied to determine the glass forming area. The glasses obtained allow the immobilisation of up to 75% of waste in a multicomponent oxide system in which all the components of the waste are incorporated. The microhardness Hv values varied between 6.05 and 6.62GPa and the linear thermal expansion coefficient, alpha, varied between (62 and 139)x10(-7)K(-1). Several glasses showed a high hydrolytic resistance in deionised water at 98 degrees C.

  9. Round-robin testing of a reference glass for low-activity waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, W. L.; Wolf, S. F.

    1999-12-06

    A round robin test program was conducted with a glass that was developed for use as a standard test material for acceptance testing of low-activity waste glasses made with Hanford tank wastes. The glass is referred to as the low-activity test reference material (LRM). The program was conducted to measure the interlaboratory reproducibility of composition analysis and durability test results. Participants were allowed to select the methods used to analyze the glass composition. The durability tests closely followed the Product Consistency Test (PCT) Method A, except that tests were conducted at both 40 and 90 C and that parallel tests with a reference glass were not required. Samples of LRM glass that had been crushed, sieved, and washed to remove fines were provided to participants for tests and analyses. The reproducibility of both the composition and PCT results compare favorably with the results of interlaboratory studies conducted with other glasses. From the perspective of reproducibility of analysis results, this glass is acceptable for use as a composition standard for nonradioactive components of low-activity waste forms present at >0.1 elemental mass % and as a test standard for PCTS at 40 and 90 C. For PCT with LRM glass, the expected test results at the 95% confidence level are as follows: (1) at 40 C: pH = 9.86 {+-} 0.96; [B] = 2.30 {+-} 1.25 mg/L; [Na] = 19.7 {+-} 7.3 mg/L; [Si] = 13.7 {+-} 4.2 mg/L; and (2) at 90 C: pH = 10.92 {+-} 0.43; [B] = 26.7 {+-} 7.2 mg/L; [Na] = 160 {+-} 13 mg/L; [Si] = 82.0 {+-} 12.7 mg/L. These ranges can be used to evaluate the accuracy of PCTS conducted at other laboratories.

  10. Plutonium immobilization in glass and ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knecht, D.A. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies, Idaho Falls (United States); Murphy, W.M. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Materials Research Society Nineteenth Annual Symposium on the Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management was held in Boston on November 27 to December 1, 1995. Over 150 papers were presented at the Symposium dealing with all aspects of nuclear waste management and disposal. Fourteen oral sessions and on poster session included a Plenary session on surplus plutonium dispositioning and waste forms. The proceedings, to be published in April, 1996, will provide a highly respected, referred compilation of the state of scientific development in the field of nuclear waste management. This paper provides a brief overview of the selected Symposium papers that are applicable to plutonium immobilization and plutonium waste form performance. Waste forms that were described at the Symposium cover most of the candidate Pu immobilization options under consideration, including borosilicate glass with a melting temperature of 1150 {degrees}C, a higher temperature (1450 {degrees}C) lanthanide glass, single phase ceramics, multi-phase ceramics, and multi-phase crystal-glass composites (glass-ceramics or slags). These Symposium papers selected for this overview provide the current status of the technology in these areas and give references to the relevant literature.

  11. Determination of the Structure of Vitrified Hydroceramic/CBC Waste Form Glasses Manufactured from DOE Reprocessing Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheetz, B.E.; White, W. B.; Chesleigh, M.; Portanova, A.; Olanrewaju, J.

    2005-05-31

    The selection of a glass-making option for the solidification of nuclear waste has dominated DOE waste form programs since the early 1980's. Both West Valley and Savannah River are routinely manufacturing glass logs from the high level waste inventory in tank sludges. However, for some wastes, direct conversion to glass is clearly not the optimum strategy for immobilization. INEEL, for example, has approximately 4400 m{sup 3} of calcined high level waste with an activity that produces approximately 45 watts/m{sup 3}, a rather low concentration of radioactive constituents. For these wastes, there is value in seeking alternatives to glass. An alternative approach has been developed and the efficacy of the process demonstrated that offers a significant savings in both human health and safety exposures and also a lower cost relative to the vitrification option. The alternative approach utilizes the intrinsic chemical reactivity of the highly alkaline waste with the addition of aluminosilicate admixtures in the appropriate proportions to form zeolites. The process is one in which a chemically bonded ceramic is produced. The driving force for reaction is derived from the chemical system itself at very modest temperatures and yet forms predominantly crystalline phases. Because the chemically bonded ceramic requires an aqueous medium to serve as a vehicle for the chemical reaction, the proposed zeolite-containing waste form can more adequately be described as a hydroceramic. The hydrated crystalline materials are then subject to hot isostatic pressing (HIP) which partially melts the material to form a glass ceramic. The scientific advantages of the hydroceramic/CBC approach are: (1) Low temperature processing; (2) High waste loading and thus only modest volumetric bulking from the addition of admixtures; (3) Ability to immobilize sodium; (4) Ability to handle low levels of nitrate (2-3% NO{sub 3}{sup -}); (5) The flexibility of a vitrifiable waste; and (6) A process

  12. Incorporation of Lead Containing TV Tube Glass Waste in Aluminous Porcelain

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Talita Faria; Paes Junior,Herval Ramos; Holanda,José Nilson França de

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the incorporation of lead containing TV tube glass waste as a method to provide alternative raw material for aluminous electrical porcelain. For this purpose, aluminous porcelain formulations containing up to 30 wt.% of TV tube glass waste as a replacement for traditional flux material (sodium feldspar) were pressed and fired in air at 1300 ºC using a fast-firing cycle (< 60 min). X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), linear shrinkage, ...

  13. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program description for high-level waste form development and qualification. Revision 3, Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project has been established to convert the high-level radioactive waste associated with nuclear defense production at the Hanford Site into a waste form suitable for disposal in a deep geologic repository. The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant will mix processed radioactive waste with borosilicate material, then heat the mixture to its melting point (vitrification) to forin a glass-like substance that traps the radionuclides in the glass matrix upon cooling. The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program has been established to support the mission of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant. This Quality Assurance Program Description has been written to document the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program.

  14. Chemical composition measurements of the low activity waste (LAW) EPA-Series glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analysis results for a series of simulated low activity waste glasses provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as part of an ongoing development task. The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component for each glass. A detailed review showed no indications of errors in the preparation or measurement of the study glasses. All of the measured sums of oxides for the study glasses fell within the interval of 100.2 to 100.8 wt %, indicating recovery of all components. Comparisons of the targeted and measured chemical compositions showed that the measured values for the glasses met the targeted concentrations within 10% for those components present at more than 5 wt %.

  15. Elucidating the effects of solar panel waste glass substitution on the physical and mechanical characteristics of clay bricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kae-Long; Huang, Long-Sheng; Shie, Je-Lueng; Cheng, Ching-Jung; Lee, Ching-Hwa; Chang, Tien-Chin

    2013-01-01

    This study deals with the effect of solar panel waste glass on fired clay bricks. Brick samples were heated to temperatures which varied from 700-1000 degrees C for 6 h, with a heating rate of 10 degrees C min(-1). The material properties of the resultant material were then determined, including speciation variation, loss on ignition, shrinkage, bulk density, 24-h absorption rate, compressive strength and salt crystallization. The results indicate that increasing the amount of solar panel waste glass resulted in a decrease in the water absorption rate and an increase in the compressive strength of the solar panel waste glass bricks. The 24-h absorption rate and compressive strength of the solar panel waste glass brick made from samples containing 30% solar panel waste glass sintered at 1000 degrees C all met the Chinese National Standard (CNS) building requirements for first-class brick (compressive strengths and water absorption of the bricks were 300 kg cm(-2) and 10% of the brick, respectively). The addition of solar panel waste glass to the mixture reduced the degree of firing shrinkage. The salt crystallization test and wet-dry tests showed that the addition of solar panel waste glass had highly beneficial effects in that it increased the durability of the bricks. This indicates that solar panel waste glass is indeed suitable for the partial replacement of clay in bricks.

  16. Metallurgical use of glass fractions from waste electric and electronic equipment (WEEE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaghel, Sina; Samuelsson, Caisa

    2010-01-01

    Within the European Union, it is estimated that between 8 and 9 million tons of waste electric and electronic equipment (WEEE) arises annually, of which television sets and computers account for an important part. Traditionally, Cathode Ray Tubes (CRT) have been used for TVs and computer monitors, but are rapidly being replaced by flat-screen technology. Only part of the discarded CRT glass is being recycled. Primary smelters use large amounts of silica flux to form iron-silicate slag, and can, in most cases, tolerate lead input. Use of discarded CRT glass in copper smelting is a potential alternative for utilization of the glass. The mineralogical composition of a slag sampled during ordinary slag praxis has been compared with that of a mixture of slag and CRT glass when re-melted and slowly cooled. Slag (iron-silicate slag) from Boliden Mineral AB, Sweden, was used for the experiments. Slag and glass have been mixed in various proportions: pure slag, pure glass, 90% slag-10% glass and 65% slag-35% glass, and heated in an inert atmosphere up to 1400 degrees C in a Netzsch Thermal Analysis (TA) instrument. The re-melted material has been analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine changes in mineralogical composition after mixing with glass. The results show that the main mineralogical component of the slag is fayalite; the CRT glass is amorphous. The main crystalline phases of the slag do not change with addition of glass. An amorphous phase appears when the addition of glass is increased, which gives the sample a different structure.

  17. Survey of glass plutonium contents and poison selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Ramsey, W.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Ellison, A.J.G.; Shaw, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    If plutonium and other actinides are to be immobilized in glass, then achieving high concentrations in the glass is desirable. This will lead to reduced costs and more rapid immobilization. However, glasses with high actinide concentrations also bring with them undersirable characteristics, especially a greater concern about nuclear criticality, particularly in a geologic repository. The key to achieving a high concentration of actinide elements in a glass is to formulate the glass so that the solubility of actinides is high. At the same time, the glass must be formulated so that the glass also contains neutron poisons, which will prevent criticality during processing and in a geologic repository. In this paper, the solubility of actinides, particularly plutonium, in three types of glasses are discussed. Plutonium solubilities are in the 2-4 wt% range for borosilicate high-level waste (HLW) glasses of the type which will be produced in the US. This type of glass is generally melted at relatively low temperatures, ca. 1150{degrees}C. For this melting temperature, the glass can be reformulated to achieve plutonium solubilities of at least 7 wt%. This low melting temperature is desirable if one must retain volatile cesium-137 in the glass. If one is not concerned about cesium volatility, then glasses can be formulated which can contain much larger amounts of plutonium and other actinides. Plutonium concentrations of at least 15 wt% have been achieved. Thus, there is confidence that high ({ge}5 wt%) concentrations of actinides can be achieved under a variety of conditions.

  18. The long-term acceleration of waste glass corrosion: A preliminary review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kielpinski, A.L.

    1995-07-01

    Whereas a prior conception of glass dissolution assumed a relatively rapid initial dissolution which then slowed to a smaller, fairly constant longer-term rate, some recent work suggests that these two stages are followed by a third phase of dissolution, in which the dissolution rate is accelerated with respect to what had previously been thought of as the final long-term rate. The goals of the present study are to compile experimental data which may have a bearing on this phenomena, and to provide an initial assessment of these data. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is contracted to develop glass formulation models for vitrification of Hanford low-level waste (LLW), in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System Technology Development Program. The phenomenon of an increase in corrosion rate, following a period characterized by a low corrosion rate, has been observed by a number of researchers on a number of waste glass compositions. Despite inherent ambiguities arising from SA/V (glass surface area to solution volume ratio) and other effects, valid comparisons can be made in which accelerated corrosion was observed in one test, but not in another. Some glass compositions do not appear to attain a plateau region; it may be that the observation of continued, non-negligible corrosion in these glasses represents a passage from the initial rate to the accelerated rate. The long-term corrosion is a function of the interaction between the glass and its environment, including the leaching solution and the surrounding materials. Reaction path modeling and stability field considerations have been used with some success to predict the changes in corrosion rate over time, due to these interactions. The accelerated corrosion phenomenon highlights the need for such integrated corrosion modeling and the scenario-specific nature of a particular glass composition`s durability.

  19. Heat Transfer Model of a Small-Scale Waste Glass Melter with Cold Cap Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abboud, Alexander; Guillen, Donna Post; Pokorny, Richard

    2016-09-01

    At the Hanford site in the state of Washington, more than 56 million gallons of radioactive waste is stored in underground tanks. The cleanup plan for this waste is vitrification at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), currently under construction. At the WTP, the waste will be blended with glass-forming materials and heated to 1423K, then poured into stainless steel canisters to cool and solidify. A fundamental understanding of the glass batch melting process is needed to optimize the process to reduce cost and decrease the life cycle of the cleanup effort. The cold cap layer that floats on the surface of the glass melt is the primary reaction zone for the feed-to-glass conversion. The conversion reactions include water release, melting of salts, evolution of batch gases, dissolution of quartz and the formation of molten glass. Obtaining efficient heat transfer to this region is crucial to achieving high rates of glass conversion. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is being used to understand the heat transfer dynamics of the system and provide insight to optimize the process. A CFD model was developed to simulate the DM1200, a pilot-scale melter that has been extensively tested by the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL). Electrodes are built into the melter to provide Joule heating to the molten glass. To promote heat transfer from the molten glass into the reactive cold cap layer, bubbling of the molten glass is used to stimulate forced convection within the melt pool. A three-phase volume of fluid approach is utilized to model the system, wherein the molten glass and cold cap regions are modeled as separate liquid phases, and the bubbling gas and plenum regions are modeled as one lumped gas phase. The modeling of the entire system with a volume of fluid model allows for the prescription of physical properties on a per-phase basis. The molten glass phase and the gas phase physical properties are obtained from previous experimental work. Finding representative

  20. Fabrication and physical characteristics of new glasses from wastes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The density and the refractive index of the glasses decrease as the CaO and P 2 O 5 contents increase, which was attributed to the increase of [BO 3 ] structural units. On the other hand, the physical parameterssuch as the ultrasonic velocity, the elastic moduli, the optical bandgap and the optical polarizability increased, ...

  1. Evaluation of final waste forms and recommendations for baseline alternatives to group and glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleier, A.

    1997-09-01

    An assessment of final waste forms was made as part of the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement/Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (FFCA/DDT&E) Program because supplemental waste-form technologies are needed for the hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes of concern to the Department of Energy and the problematic wastes on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The principal objective was to identify a primary waste-form candidate as an alternative to grout (cement) and glass. The effort principally comprised a literature search, the goal of which was to establish a knowledge base regarding four areas: (1) the waste-form technologies based on grout and glass, (2) candidate alternatives, (3) the wastes that need to be immobilized, and (4) the technical and regulatory constraints on the waste-from technologies. This report serves, in part, to meet this goal. Six families of materials emerged as relevant; inorganic, organic, vitrified, devitrified, ceramic, and metallic matrices. Multiple members of each family were assessed, emphasizing the materials-oriented factors and accounting for the fact that the two most prevalent types of wastes for the FFCA/DDT&E Program are aqueous liquids and inorganic sludges and solids. Presently, no individual matrix is sufficiently developed to permit its immediate implementation as a baseline alternative. Three thermoplastic materials, sulfur-polymer cement (inorganic), bitumen (organic), and polyethylene (organic), are the most technologically developed candidates. Each warrants further study, emphasizing the engineering and economic factors, but each also has limitations that regulate it to a status of short-term alternative. The crystallinity and flexible processing of sulfur provide sulfur-polymer cement with the highest potential for short-term success via encapsulation. Long-term immobilization demands chemical stabilization, which the thermoplastic matrices do not offer. Among the properties of the remaining

  2. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant full-scale feed preparation testing with water and process simulant slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaskill, J.R.; Larson, D.E.; Abrigo, G.P. [and others

    1996-03-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant was intended to convert selected, pretreated defense high-level waste and transuranic waste from the Hanford Site into a borosilicate glass. A full-scale testing program was conducted with nonradioactive waste simulants to develop information for process and equipment design of the feed-preparation system. The equipment systems tested included the Slurry Receipt and Adjustment Tank, Slurry Mix Evaporator, and Melter-Feed Tank. The areas of data generation included heat transfer (boiling, heating, and cooling), slurry mixing, slurry pumping and transport, slurry sampling, and process chemistry. 13 refs., 129 figs., 68 tabs.

  3. Standard test methods for determining chemical durability of nuclear, hazardous, and mixed waste glasses and multiphase glass ceramics: The product consistency test (PCT)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 These product consistency test methods A and B evaluate the chemical durability of homogeneous glasses, phase separated glasses, devitrified glasses, glass ceramics, and/or multiphase glass ceramic waste forms hereafter collectively referred to as “glass waste forms” by measuring the concentrations of the chemical species released to a test solution. 1.1.1 Test Method A is a seven-day chemical durability test performed at 90 ± 2°C in a leachant of ASTM-Type I water. The test method is static and conducted in stainless steel vessels. Test Method A can specifically be used to evaluate whether the chemical durability and elemental release characteristics of nuclear, hazardous, and mixed glass waste forms have been consistently controlled during production. This test method is applicable to radioactive and simulated glass waste forms as defined above. 1.1.2 Test Method B is a durability test that allows testing at various test durations, test temperatures, mesh size, mass of sample, leachant volume, a...

  4. Study of Wettability of Clayey Ceramic and Fluorescent Lamp Glass Waste Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Alline Sardinha Cordeiro; Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Ribeiro, Sebastião; Sardinha, Leonardo Carneiro; Vieira, Carlos Maurício Fontes

    The glass tube of spent fluorescent lamps is contaminated with mercury, which might be a serious hazard in the case of conventional recycling by melting with other glasses. A possible solution could be its incorporation into a clay body to fabricate common fired ceramics such as bricks and tiles. The objective of this work is to characterize a type of fluorescent lamp glass waste to be incorporated into a clayey ceramic. The characterization was performed in terms of wettability tests to evaluate the interaction between the surface of the clayey ceramic and glass waste as a function of the firing temperature. The results showed that the contact angle decreased with increasing temperature, reaching a value of 79°, at a temperature of 1100°C, but not sufficient to completely wet the ceramic. However, compatible chemical composition and reduction of porosity by the flow of soft glass waste between the clay particles favor the consolidation of the ceramics structure above 900°C.

  5. An investigation of waste glass-based geopolymers supplemented with alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Mary U.

    An increased consideration of sustainability throughout society has resulted in a surge of research investigating sustainable alternatives to existing construction materials. A new binder system, called a geopolymer, is being investigated to supplement ordinary portland cement (OPC) concrete, which has come under scrutiny because of the CO2 emissions inherent in its production. Geopolymers are produced from the alkali activation of a powdered aluminosilicate source by an alkaline solution, which results in a dense three-dimensional matrix of tetrahedrally linked aluminosilicates. Geopolymers have shown great potential as a building construction material, offering similar mechanical and durability properties to OPC. Additionally, geopolymers have the added value of a considerably smaller carbon footprint than OPC. This research considered the compressive strength, microstructure and composition of geopolymers made from two types of waste glass with varying aluminum contents. Waste glass shows great potential for mainstream use in geopolymers due to its chemical and physical homogeneity as well as its high content of amorphous silica, which could eliminate the need for sodium silicate. However, the lack of aluminum is thought to negatively affect the mechanical performance and alkali stability of the geopolymer system. 39 Mortars were designed using various combinations of glass and metakaolin or fly ash to supplement the aluminum in the system. Mortar made from the high-Al glass (12% Al2O3) reached over 10,000 psi at six months. Mortar made from the low-Al glass (mortars made with either type of glass. Though the microstructure of the mortar was quite indicative of mechanical performance, composition was also found to be important. The initial stoichiometry of the bulk mixture was maintained fairly closely, especially in mixtures made with fine glass. This research has shown that glass has great potential for use in geopolymers, when care is given to consider the

  6. Matt waste from glass separated collection: an eco-sustainable addition for new building materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignozzi, M C; Saccani, A; Sandrolini, F

    2009-01-01

    Matt waste (MW), a by-product of purification processes of cullet derived from separated glass waste collection, has been studied as filler for self-compacting concrete and as an addition for newly blended cement. Properties of self-compacting concrete compared to reference samples are reported. They include characteristics at the fresh and hardened states, and the compressive strength and porosity of mortar samples that were formulated with increasing amounts of MW to be used as cement replacement (up to 50wt.%). The effects of matt waste are discussed with respect to the mechanical and microstructural characteristics of the resulting new materials.

  7. Mix proportions and properties of CLSC made from thin film transition liquid crystal display optical waste glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Her-Yung; Chen, Jyun-Sheng

    2010-01-01

    In this study, controlled low-strength concrete (CLSC) is mixed using different water-to-binder (W/B) ratios (1.1, 1.3 and 1.5) and various percentages of sand substituted by waste LCD glass sand (0%, 10%, 20% and 30%). The properties of the fresh concrete, including compressive strength, electrical resistivity, ultrasonic pulse velocity, permeability ratio and shrinking of the CLSC, are examined. Results show that increases in amount of waste glass added result in better slump and slump flow, longer initial setting time and smaller unit weight. Compressive strength decreases with increasing W/B ratio and greater amounts of waste glass added. Both electrical resistivity and ultrasonic pulse velocity increase with increases in amount of waste glass and decreases in W/B ratio. On the contrary, the permeability ratio increases with increases in W/B ratio, but decreases with greater amounts of waste glass added. CLSC specimens cured for different durations show little changes in length with shrinkage below 0.025%. Our findings reveal that CLSC mixed using waste LCD glass in place of sand can meet design requirements. Recycling of waste LCD glass not only offers an economical substitute for aggregates, but also an ecological alternative for waste management. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Impacts of Process and Prediction Uncertainties on Projected Hanford Waste Glass Amount

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gervasio, Vivianaluxa; Vienna, John D.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Kruger, Albert A.

    2018-02-19

    Analyses were performed to evaluate the impacts of using the advanced glass models, constraints (Vienna et al. 2016), and uncertainty descriptions on projected Hanford glass mass. The maximum allowable WOL was estimated for waste compositions while simultaneously satisfying all applicable glass property and composition constraints with sufficient confidence. Different components of prediction and composition/process uncertainties were systematically included in the calculations to evaluate their impacts on glass mass. The analyses estimated the production of 23,360 MT of IHLW glass when no uncertainties were taken into accound. Accounting for prediction and composition/process uncertainties resulted in 5.01 relative percent increase in estimated glass mass 24,531 MT. Roughly equal impacts were found for prediction uncertainties (2.58 RPD) and composition/process uncertainties (2.43 RPD). ILAW mass was predicted to be 282,350 MT without uncertainty and with weaste loading “line” rules in place. Accounting for prediction and composition/process uncertainties resulted in only 0.08 relative percent increase in estimated glass mass of 282,562 MTG. Without application of line rules the glass mass decreases by 10.6 relative percent (252,490 MT) for the case with no uncertainties. Addition of prediction uncertainties increases glass mass by 1.32 relative percent and the addition of composition/process uncertainties increase glass mass by an additional 7.73 relative percent (9.06 relative percent increase combined). The glass mass estimate without line rules (275,359 MT) was 2.55 relative percent lower than that with the line rules (282,562 MT), after accounting for all applicable uncertainties.

  9. Assessment of lead tellurite glass for immobilizing electrochemical salt wastes from used nuclear fuel reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J.; Kroll, Jared O.; Peterson, Jacob A.; Pierce, David A.; Ebert, William L.; Williams, Benjamin D.; Snyder, Michelle M. V.; Frank, Steven M.; George, Jaime L.; Kruska, Karen

    2017-11-01

    This paper provides an overview of research evaluating the use of tellurite glass as a waste form for salt wastes from electrochemical processing. The capacities to immobilize different salts were evaluated including: a LiCl-Li2O oxide reduction salt (for oxide fuel) containing fission products, a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt (for metallic fuel) containing fission products, and SrCl2. Physical and chemical properties of the glasses were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, bulk density measurements, chemical durability tests, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy. These glasses were found to accommodate high concentrations of halide salts and have high densities. However, improvements are needed to meet chemical durability requirements.

  10. Glass Formulation Development for INEEL Sodium -Bearing Waste (FY2001 WM-180)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, D.K.

    2001-09-21

    A systematic study was undertaken to develop a glass composition to demonstrate the vitrification flowsheet of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's sodium bearing waste (SBW) using the latest WM-180 tank composition. Although the previous study did not restrict waste loadings (WLs) based on the potential to form a segregated salt layer, avoiding its development in a melter is beneficial and was the primary focus from the glass-formulation perspective. The testing results described in this report were aimed at providing a candidate glass composition for use in a scaled melter demonstration of direct vitrification of WM-180 in the Research Scale Melter (RSM) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the EV-16 melter at the Clemson Environmental Technology Laboratory.

  11. Chemical composition analysis and product consistency tests to support enhanced Hanford waste glass models. Results for the third set of high alumina outer layer matrix glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-12-01

    In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analyses and Product Consistency Test (PCT) results for 14 simulated high level waste glasses fabricated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of these analyses will be used as part of efforts to revise or extend the validation regions of the current Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant glass property models to cover a broader span of waste compositions. The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component for each glass. All of the measured sums of oxides for the study glasses fell within the interval of 96.9 to 100.8 wt %, indicating recovery of all components. Comparisons of the targeted and measured chemical compositions showed that the measured values for the glasses met the targeted concentrations within 10% for those components present at more than 5 wt %. The PCT results were normalized to both the targeted and measured compositions of the study glasses. Several of the glasses exhibited increases in normalized concentrations (NCi) after the canister centerline cooled (CCC) heat treatment. Five of the glasses, after the CCC heat treatment, had NCB values that exceeded that of the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass. These results can be combined with additional characterization, including X-ray diffraction, to determine the cause of the higher release rates.

  12. SUMMARY OF 2010 DOE EM INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM STUDIES OF WASTE GLASS STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.; Choi, A.; Marra, J.; Billings, A.

    2011-02-07

    Collaborative work between the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and SIA Radon in Russia was divided among three tasks for calendar year 2010. The first task focused on the study of simplified high level waste glass compositions with the objective of identifying the compositional drivers that lead to crystallization and poor chemical durability. The second task focused on detailed characterization of more complex waste glass compositions with unexpectedly poor chemical durabilities. The third task focused on determining the structure of select high level waste glasses made with varying frit compositions in order to improve models under development for predicting the melt rate of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glasses. The majority of these tasks were carried out at SIA Radon. Selection and fabrication of the glass compositions, along with chemical composition measurements and evaluations of durability were carried out at SRNL and are described in this report. SIA Radon provided three summary reports based on the outcome of the three tasks. These reports are included as appendices to this document. Briefly, the result of characterization of the Task 1 glasses may indicate that glass compositions where iron is predominantly tetrahedrally coordinated have more of a tendency to crystallize nepheline or nepheline-like phases. For the Task 2 glasses, the results suggested that the relatively low fraction of tetrahedrally coordinated boron and the relatively low concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} available to form [BO{sub 4/2}]{sup -}Me{sup +} and [AlO{sub 4/2}]{sup -}Me{sup +} tetrahedral units are not sufficient to consume all of the alkali ions, and thus these alkali ions are easily leached from the glasses. All of the twelve Task 3 glass compositions were determined to be mainly amorphous, with some minor spinel phases. Several key structural units such as metasilicate chains and rings were identified, which confirms the current modeling

  13. Chemical and mechanical performance properties for various final waste forms -- PSPI scoping study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Larsen, E.D.; Sears, J.W.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

    1996-09-01

    The US DOE is obtaining data on the performance properties of the various final waste forms that may be chosen as primary treatment products for the alpha-contaminated low-level and transuranic waste at the INEL`s Transuranic Storage Area. This report collects and compares selected properties that are key indicators of mechanical and chemical durability for Portland cement concrete, concrete formed under elevated temperature and pressure, sulfur polymer cement, borosilicate glass, and various forms of alumino-silicate glass, including in situ vitrification glass and various compositions of iron-enriched basalt (IEB) and iron-enriched basalt IV (IEB4). Compressive strength and impact resistance properties were used as performance indicators in comparative evaluation of the mechanical durability of each waste form, while various leachability data were used in comparative evaluation of each waste form`s chemical durability. The vitrified waste forms were generally more durable than the non-vitrified waste forms, with the iron-enriched alumino-silicate glasses and glass/ceramics exhibiting the most favorable chemical and mechanical durabilities. It appears that the addition of zirconia and titania to IEB (forming IEB4) increases the leach resistance of the lanthanides. The large compositional ranges for IEB and IEB4 more easily accommodate the compositions of the waste stored at the INEL than does the composition of borosilicate glass. It appears, however, that the large potential variation in IEB and IEB4 compositions resulting from differing waste feed compositions can impact waste form durability. Further work is needed to determine the range of waste stream feed compositions and rates of waste form cooling that will result in acceptable and optimized IEB or IEB4 waste form performance. 43 refs.

  14. Chemical Composition Measurements of LAWA44 Glass Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Riley, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-11-15

    DOE is building the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site in Washington to remediate 55 million gallons of radioactive waste that is temporarily stored in 177 underground tanks. Both low-activity and high-level wastes will then be vitrified into borosilicate glass using Joule-heated ceramic melters. Efforts are being made to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in the glass. One area of work is enhancing waste glass composition/property models and broadening the compositional regions over which those models are applicable. In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analysis results for several samples of a simulated low-activity waste glass, LAWA44, provided by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as part of an ongoing development task. The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component for each glass. A detailed review showed no indications of errors in the preparation or measurement of the study glasses. All of the measured sums of oxides for the study glasses fell within the interval of 97.9 to 102.6 wt %, indicating acceptable recovery of the glass components. Comparisons of the targeted and measured chemical compositions showed that the measured values for the glasses met the targeted concentrations within 10% for those components present at more than 5 wt %. It was noted that the measured B2O3 concentrations are somewhat above the targeted values for the study glasses. No obvious trends were observed with regard to the multiple melting steps used to prepare the study glasses, indicating that any potential effects of volatility were below measurable thresholds.

  15. Numerical simulation of high-level radioactive nuclear waste glass production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, I.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Ungan, A. [Purdue Univ., Indianapolis, IN (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1991-12-31

    Vitrification of radioactive waste has become an international approach for converting highly radioactive wastes into a durable solid prior to placing them in a permanent disposal repository. The technology for the process is not new. The conversion melter is a direct descendant of all electric melters used for manufacturing of some commercial glass types. Therefore, the vitrification process of radioactive wastes inherits typical problems of all electric furnaces and creates some other specific problems such as noble metal sedimentation. The noble metals and nickel sulfides in the melter are heavier than molten glass and have a low solubility. In a reducing condition, these metals amalgamate and tend to settle on the melter floor. The metal deposit resulting from this settling has a potential to short circuit the melter. The objective of this paper is to identify the typical problems that have been encountered in the waste melter operations and to address how these problems can be tackled using state-of-the-art numerical simulation techniques. It is believed that the large amount of pilot-scale melter experience throughout the world, combined with the knowledge gained from state-of-the-art computer modeling techniques would give assurance that the existing and future radioactive wastes can be effectively converted into a durable glass material and safely placed in a permanent repository.

  16. Nucleation and crystal growth behavior of nepheline in simulated high-level waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Amoroso, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Mcclane, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-26

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been tasked with supporting glass formulation development and process control strategies in key technical areas, relevant to the Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) and related to high-level waste (HLW) vitrification at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Of specific interest is the development of predictive models for crystallization of nepheline (NaAlSiO4) in HLW glasses formulated at high alumina concentrations. This report summarizes recent progress by researchers at SRNL towards developing a predicative tool for quantifying nepheline crystallization in HLW glass canisters using laboratory experiments. In this work, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to obtain the temperature regions over which nucleation and growth of nepheline occur in three simulated HLW glasses - two glasses representative of WTP projections and one glass representative of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) product. The DWPF glass, which has been studied previously, was chosen as a reference composition and for comparison purposes. Complementary quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical microscopy confirmed the validity of the methodology to determine nucleation and growth behavior as a function of temperature. The nepheline crystallization growth region was determined to generally extend from ~ 500 to >850 °C, with the maximum growth rates occurring between 600 and 700 °C. For select WTP glass compositions (high Al2O3 and B2O3), the nucleation range extended from ~ 450 to 600 °C, with the maximum nucleation rates occurring at ~ 530 °C. For the DWPF glass composition, the nucleation range extended from ~ 450 to 750 °C with the maximum nucleation rate occurring at ~ 640 °C. The nepheline growth at the peak temperature, as determined by XRD, was between 35 - 75 wt.% /hour. A maximum nepheline growth rate of ~ 0.1 mm/hour at 700 °C was measured for the DWPF

  17. Woven glass fabric reinforced laminates based on polyolefin wastes: Thermal, mechanical and dynamic-mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Pietro; Acierno, Domenico; Simeoli, Giorgio; Lopresto, Valentina

    2014-05-01

    Potentialities of polyolefin wastes in place of virgin polypropylene to produce composite laminates have been investigated. Plaques reinforced with a woven glass fabric were prepared by film-stacking technique and systematically analyzed in terms of thermal, mechanical and dynamic-mechanical properties. In case of PP matrices, the use of a typical compatibilizer to improve the adhesion at the interface has been considered. Thermal properties emphasized the chemical nature of plastic wastes. About mechanical properties, static tests showed an increase of flexural parameters for compatibilized systems due to the coupling effect between grafted maleic anhydride and silane groups on the surface of the glass fabric. These effects, maximized for composites based on car bumper wastes, is perfectly reflected in terms of storage modulus and damping ability of products as determined by single-cantilever bending dynamic tests.

  18. Progress toward bridging from atomistic to continuum modeling to predict nuclear waste glass dissolution.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapol, Peter (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Bourg, Ian (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley, CA); Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Steefel, Carl I. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley, CA); Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes research performed for the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Subcontinuum and Upscaling Task. The work conducted focused on developing a roadmap to include molecular scale, mechanistic information in continuum-scale models of nuclear waste glass dissolution. This information is derived from molecular-scale modeling efforts that are validated through comparison with experimental data. In addition to developing a master plan to incorporate a subcontinuum mechanistic understanding of glass dissolution into continuum models, methods were developed to generate constitutive dissolution rate expressions from quantum calculations, force field models were selected to generate multicomponent glass structures and gel layers, classical molecular modeling was used to study diffusion through nanopores analogous to those in the interfacial gel layer, and a micro-continuum model (K{mu}C) was developed to study coupled diffusion and reaction at the glass-gel-solution interface.

  19. Extraction of lead from waste CRT funnel glass by generating lead sulfide - An approach for electronic waste management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Biao; Hui, Wenlong

    2017-09-01

    Waste cathode ray tube (CRT) funnel glass is the key and difficult points in waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) disposal. In this paper, a novel and effective process for the detoxification and reutilization of waste CRT funnel glass was developed by generating lead sulfide precipitate via a high-temperature melting process. The central function in this process was the generation of lead sulfide, which gathered at the bottom of the crucible and was then separated from the slag. Sodium carbonate was used as a flux and reaction agent, and sodium sulfide was used as a precipitating agent. The experimental results revealed that the lead sulfide recovery rate initially increased with an increase in the amount of added sodium carbonate, the amount of sodium sulfide, the temperature, and the holding time and then reached an equilibrium value. The maximum lead sulfide recovery rate was approximately 93%, at the optimum sodium carbonate level, sodium sulfide level, temperature, and holding time of 25%, 8%, 1200°C, and 2h, respectively. The glass slag can be made into sodium and potassium silicate by hydrolysis in an environmental and economical process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Low-temperature lithium diffusion in simulated high-level boroaluminosilicate nuclear waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neeway, James J.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gin, Stephane; Wang, Zhaoying; Zhu, Zihua; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2014-12-01

    Ion exchange is recognized as an integral, if underrepresented, mechanism influencing glass corrosion. However, due to the formation of various alteration layers in the presence of water, it is difficult to conclusively deconvolute the mechanisms of ion exchange from other processes occurring simultaneously during corrosion. In this work, an operationally inert non-aqueous solution was used as an alkali source material to isolate ion exchange and study the solid-state diffusion of lithium. Specifically, the experiments involved contacting glass coupons relevant to the immobilization of high-level nuclear waste, SON68 and CJ-6, which contained Li in natural isotope abundance, with a non-aqueous solution of 6LiCl dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide at 90 °C for various time periods. The depth profiles of major elements in the glass coupons were measured using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Lithium interdiffusion coefficients, DLi, were then calculated based on the measured depth profiles. The results indicate that the penetration of 6Li is rapid in both glasses with the simplified CJ-6 glass (D6Li ≈ 4.0-8.0 × 10-21 m2/s) exhibiting faster exchange than the more complex SON68 glass (DLi ≈ 2.0-4.0 × 10-21 m2/s). Additionally, sodium ions present in the glass were observed to participate in ion exchange reactions; however, different diffusion coefficients were necessary to fit the diffusion profiles of the two alkali ions. Implications of the diffusion coefficients obtained in the absence of alteration layers to the long-term performance of nuclear waste glasses in a geological repository system are also discussed.

  1. Process for Converting Waste Glass Fiber into Value Added Products, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmings, Raymond T.

    2005-12-31

    Nature of the Event: Technology demonstration. The project successfully met all of its technical objectives. Albacem has signed an exclusive licensing agreement with Vitro Minerals Inc., a specialty minerals company, to commercialize the Albacem technology (website: www.vitrominerals.com). Location: The basic research for the project was conducted in Peoria, Illinois, and Atlanta, Georgia, with third-party laboratory verification carried out in Ontario, Canada. Pilot-scale trials (multi-ton) were conducted at a facility in South Carolina. Full-scale manufacturing facilities have been designed and are scheduled for construction by Vitro Minerals during 2006 at a location in the Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina tri-state area. The Technology: This technology consists of a process to eliminate solid wastes generated at glass fiber manufacturing facilities by converting them to value-added materials (VCAS Pozzolans) suitable for use in cement and concrete applications. This technology will help divert up to 250,000 tpy of discarded glass fiber manufacturing wastes into beneficial use applications in the concrete construction industry. This technology can also be used for processing glass fiber waste materials reclaimed from monofills at manufacturing facilities. The addition of take-back materials and reclamation from landfills can help supply over 500,000 tpy of glass fiber waste for processing into value added products. In the Albacem process, waste glass fiber is ground to a fine powder that effectively functions as a reactive pozzolanic admixture for use in portland ce¬ment-based building materials and products, such as concrete, mortars, terrazzo, tile, and grouts. Because the waste fiber from the glass manufacturing industry is vitreous, clean, and low in iron and alkalis, the resulting pozzolan is white in color and highly consistent in chemical composition. This white pozzolan, termed VCAS Pozzolan (for Vitreous Calcium-Alumino-Silicate). is

  2. Predictive modeling of crystal accumulation in high-level waste glass melters processing radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyáš, Josef; Gervasio, Vivianaluxa; Sannoh, Sulaiman E.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2017-11-01

    The effectiveness of HLW vitrification is limited by precipitation/accumulation of spinel crystals [(Fe, Ni, Mn, Zn)(Fe, Cr)2O4] in the glass discharge riser of Joule-heated ceramic melters during idling. These crystals do not affect glass durability; however, if accumulated in thick layer, they can clog the melter and prevent discharge of molten glass into canisters. To address this problem, an empirical model was developed that can predict thicknesses of accumulated layers as a function of glass composition. This model predicts well the accumulation of single crystals and/or small-scale agglomerates, but, excessive agglomeration observed in high-Ni-Fe glass resulted in an under-prediction of accumulated layers, which gradually worsen over time as an increased number of agglomerates formed. Accumulation rate of ~53.8 ± 3.7 µm/h determined for this glass will result in ~26 mm thick layer in 20 days of melter idling.

  3. Ancient Glass: A Literature Search and its Role in Waste Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2010-07-01

    When developing a performance assessment model for the long-term disposal of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glass, it is desirable to determine the durability of glass forms over very long periods of time. However, testing is limited to short time spans, so experiments are performed under conditions that accelerate the key geochemical processes that control weathering. Verification that models currently being used can reliably calculate the long term behavior ILAW glass is a key component of the overall PA strategy. Therefore, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC to evaluate alternative strategies that can be used for PA source term model validation. One viable alternative strategy is the use of independent experimental data from archaeological studies of ancient or natural glass contained in the literature. These results represent a potential independent experiment that date back to approximately 3600 years ago or 1600 before the current era (bce) in the case of ancient glass and 106 years or older in the case of natural glass. The results of this literature review suggest that additional experimental data may be needed before the result from archaeological studies can be used as a tool for model validation of glass weathering and more specifically disposal facility performance. This is largely because none of the existing data set contains all of the information required to conduct PA source term calculations. For example, in many cases the sediments surrounding the glass was not collected and analyzed; therefore having the data required to compare computer simulations of concentration flux is not possible. This type of information is important to understanding the element release profile from the glass to the surrounding environment and provides a metric that can be used to calibrate source term models. Although useful, the available literature sources do not contain the required information

  4. Uncertainty analysis of the SWEPP PAN assay system for glass waste (content codes 440, 441 and 442)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackwood, L.G.; Harker, Y.D.; Meachum, T.R.; Yoon, W.Y.

    1996-10-01

    INEL is being used as a temporary storage facility for transuranic waste generated by the Nuclear Weapons program at the Rocky Flats Plant. Currently, there is a large effort in progress to prepare to ship this waste to WIPP. In order to meet the TRU Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan nondestructive assay compliance requirements and quality assurance objectives, it is necessary to determine the total uncertainty of the radioassay results produced by the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) Passive Action Neutron (PAN) radioassay system. This paper discusses a modified statistical sampling and verification approach used to determine the total uncertainty of SWEPP PAN measurements for glass waste (content codes 440, 441, and 442) contained in 208 liter drums. In the modified statistical sampling and verification approach, the total performance of the SWEPP PAN nondestructive assay system for specifically selected waste conditions is simulated using computer models. A set of 100 cases covering the known conditions exhibited in glass waste was compiled using a combined statistical sampling and factorial experimental design approach. Parameter values assigned in each simulation were derived from reviews of approximately 100 real-time radiography video tapes of RFP glass waste drums, results from previous SWEPP PAN measurements on glass waste drums, and shipping data from RFP where the glass waste was generated. The data in the 100 selected cases form the multi-parameter input to the simulation model. The reported plutonium masses from the simulation model are compared with corresponding input masses. From these comparisons, the bias and total uncertainty associated with SWEPP PAN measurements on glass waste drums are estimated. The validity of the simulation approach is verified by comparing simulated output against results from calibration measurements using known plutonium sources and two glass waste calibration drums.

  5. Platinoids and molybdenum in nuclear waste containment glasses: a structural study; Les platinoides et le molybdene dans des verres d'interet nucleaires: etude structurale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Grand, M. [CEA/VALRHO - site de Marcoule, Dept. de Recherche en Retraitement et en Vitrification (DRRV), 30 - Marcoule (France)]|[Paris-7 Univ., 75 (France)

    2000-07-01

    This work deals with the structure of borosilicate nuclear glasses and with some relationships between structure and macroscopic properties. Two types of elements which may disturb the industrial process - platinoids (Ru and Pd) and molybdenum - are central to this work. Platinoids induce weak modifications on the structure of the glass, causing a depolymerization of the glassy network, an increase of the {sup [3]}B/{sup [4]}B ratio and a modification of the medium range order around Si between 3.3 and 4.5 angstrom. The modifications of viscosity and density induced by platinoids in the glass are not due to the structural effect of the platinoids. The increase of viscosity is attributed to needle shaped RuO{sub 2}. It can be moderated by imposing reducing conditions during the elaboration of the glass. The slight difference between experimental and calculated densities is due to the increase of the volume percentage of bubbles in the glass with increasing platinoid content. Mo is either present in the glass as molybdic groupings, or mobilized in chemically complex molybdic crystalline phases. The chemical composition and mineralogy of these phases has been obtained using electronic microprobe data and XRD with Rietveld analysis. The distribution of the different elements between the crystalline phases and the glass is strongly influenced by the structural role of the various cations in the glass. The Mo present in the glass appears as MoO{sub 4} tetrahedra, independent of the borosilicate network. The formation of the crystalline phases can be explained by the existence of a precursor in which the MoO{sub 4} tetrahedra are concentrated in rich alkali and earth-alkali bearing areas of the glass. (author)

  6. Cold-cap reactions in vitrification of nuclear waste glass: Experiments and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Jaehun; Pierce, David A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Pokorný, Richard [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Hrma, Pavel, E-mail: pavelhrma@postech.ac.kr [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: ► We measured enthalpy-based conversion degree of overlapping reactions using DSC. ► We employed the run/rerun technique to obtain heat flow associated with reactions. ► Batch-to-glass conversion advances via multiple overlapping reactions. ► The kinetic model is intended for the source term in the energy transfer equation. ► The results are relevant for industrial glass making and nuclear waste vitrification. - Abstract: Cold-cap reactions are multiple overlapping reactions that occur in the waste-glass melter during the vitrification process when the melter feed is being converted to molten glass. In this study, we used simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry–thermogravimetry (DSC–TGA) to investigate cold-cap reactions in a high-alumina high-level waste melter feed. To separate the reaction heat from both the heat associated with the heat capacity of the feed and experimental artifacts, we employed the run/rerun method, which enabled us to define the degree of conversion based on the reaction heat and to estimate the heat capacity of the reacting feed. Assuming that the reactions are nearly independent and can be approximated by an nth order kinetic model, we obtained the kinetic parameters using the Kissinger method combined with least squares analysis. The resulting mathematical simulation of the cold-cap reactions provides a key element for the development of an advanced cold-cap model.

  7. Materials for Tc Capture to Increase Tc Retention in Glass Waste Form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luksic, Steven A.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2016-04-01

    99Technetium is a long-lived fission product found in the tank waste at the Hanford site in Washington State. In its heptavalent species, it is volatile at the temperatures used in Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant vitrification melters, and thus is challenging to incorporate into waste glass. In order to decrease volatility and thereby increase retention, technetium can be converted into more thermally stable species. Several mineral phases, such as spinel, are able to incorporate tetravalent technetium in a chemically durable and thermally stable lattice, and these hosts may promote the decreased volatility that is desired. In order to be usefully implemented, there must be a synthetic rout to these phases that is compatible with both technetium chemistry and current Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant design. Synthetic routes for spinel and other potential host phases are examined.

  8. Characterization of high level nuclear waste glass samples following extended melter idling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Kevin M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Peeler, David K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-06-16

    The Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter was recently idled with glass remaining in the melt pool and riser for approximately three months. This situation presented a unique opportunity to collect and analyze glass samples since outages of this duration are uncommon. The objective of this study was to obtain insight into the potential for crystal formation in the glass resulting from an extended idling period. The results will be used to support development of a crystal-tolerant approach for operation of the high-level waste melter at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Two glass pour stream samples were collected from DWPF when the melter was restarted after idling for three months. The samples did not contain crystallization that was detectible by X-ray diffraction. Electron microscopy identified occasional spinel and noble metal crystals of no practical significance. Occasional platinum particles were observed by microscopy as an artifact of the sample collection method. Reduction/oxidation measurements showed that the pour stream glasses were fully oxidized, which was expected after the extended idling period. Chemical analysis of the pour stream glasses revealed slight differences in the concentrations of some oxides relative to analyses of the melter feed composition prior to the idling period. While these differences may be within the analytical error of the laboratories, the trends indicate that there may have been some amount of volatility associated with some of the glass components, and that there may have been interaction of the glass with the refractory components of the melter. These changes in composition, although small, can be attributed to the idling of the melter for an extended period. The changes in glass composition resulted in a 70-100 °C increase in the predicted spinel liquidus temperature (TL) for the pour stream glass samples relative to the analysis of the melter feed prior to

  9. Standard practices for dissolving glass containing radioactive and mixed waste for chemical and radiochemical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 These practices cover techniques suitable for dissolving glass samples that may contain nuclear wastes. These techniques used together or independently will produce solutions that can be analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), radiochemical methods and wet chemical techniques for major components, minor components and radionuclides. 1.2 One of the fusion practices and the microwave practice can be used in hot cells and shielded hoods after modification to meet local operational requirements. 1.3 The user of these practices must follow radiation protection guidelines in place for their specific laboratories. 1.4 Additional information relating to safety is included in the text. 1.5 The dissolution techniques described in these practices can be used for quality control of the feed materials and the product of plants vitrifying nuclear waste materials in glass. 1.6 These pr...

  10. Radiation damage of a glass-bonded zeolite waste form using ion irradiation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, T. R.; Storey, B. G.

    1997-12-05

    Glass-bonded zeolite is being considered as a candidate ceramic waste form for storing radioactive isotopes separated from spent nuclear fuel in the electrorefining process. To determine the stability of glass-bonded zeolite under irradiation, transmission electron microscope samples were irradiated using high energy helium, lead, and krypton. The major crystalline phase of the waste form, which retains alkaline and alkaline earth fission products, loses its long range order under both helium and krypton irradiation. The dose at which the long range crystalline structure is lost is about 0.4 dpa for helium and 0.1 dpa for krypton. Because the damage from lead is localized in such a small region of the sample, damage could not be recognized even at a peak damage of 50 dpa. Because the crystalline phase loses its long range structure due to irradiation, the effect on retention capacity needs to be further evaluated.

  11. Cold-cap reactions in vitrification of nuclear waste glass: experiments and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Jaehun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pierce, David A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pokorny, Richard [Inst. of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Hrma, Pavel R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pohang Univ. of Science and Techology (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-01

    Cold-cap reactions are multiple overlapping reactions that occur in the waste-glass melter during the vitrification process when the melter feed is being converted to molten glass. In this study, we used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to investigate cold-cap reactions in a high-alumina high-level waste melter feed. To separate the reaction heat from both sensible heat and experimental instability, we employed the run/rerun method, which enabled us to define the degree of conversion based on the reaction heat and to estimate the heat capacity of the reacting feed. Assuming that the reactions are nearly independent and can be approximated by the nth order kinetics, we obtained the kinetic parameters using the Kissinger method combined with least squares analysis. The resulting mathematical simulation of the cold-cap reactions provides a key element for the development of an advanced cold-cap model.

  12. Silicate Based Glass Formulations for Immobilization of U.S. Defense Wastes Using Cold Crucible Induction Melters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Gary L.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Marra, James C.; Lang, Jesse B.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Crawford, Charles L.; Vienna, John D.

    2014-05-22

    The cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) is an alternative technology to the currently deployed liquid-fed, ceramic-lined, Joule-heated melter for immobilizing of U.S. tank waste generated from defense related reprocessing. In order to accurately evaluate the potential benefits of deploying a CCIM, glasses must be developed specifically for that melting technology. Related glass formulation efforts have been conducted since the 1990s including a recent study that is first documented in this report. The purpose of this report is to summarize the silicate base glass formulation efforts for CCIM testing of U.S. tank wastes. Summaries of phosphate based glass formulation and phosphate and silicate based CCIM demonstration tests are reported separately (Day and Ray 2013 and Marra 2013, respectively). Combined these three reports summarize the current state of knowledge related to waste form development and process testing of CCIM technology for U.S. tank wastes.

  13. Fluorescent Lamp Glass Waste Incorporation into Clay Ceramic: A Perfect Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Alline Sardinha Cordeiro; Vieira, Carlos Maurício Fontes; Rodriguez, Rubén Jesus Sanchez; Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Candido, Veronica Scarpini; Ferreira, Carlos Luiz

    2016-09-01

    The mandatory use of fluorescent lamps as part of a Brazilian energy-saving program generates a huge number of spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs). After operational life, SFLs cannot be disposed as common garbage owing to mercury and lead contamination. Recycling methods separate contaminated glass tubes and promote cleaning for reuse. In this work, glass from decontaminated SFLs was incorporated into clay ceramics, not only as an environmental solution for such glass wastes and clay mining reduction but also due to technical and economical advantages. Up to 30 wt.% of incorporation, a significant improvement in fired ceramic flexural strength and a decrease in water absorption was observed. A prospective analysis showed clay ceramic incorporation as an environmentally correct and technical alternative for recycling the enormous amount of SFLs disposed of in Brazil. This could also be a solution for other world clay ceramic producers, such as US, China and some European countries.

  14. The effect of high-level waste glass composition on spinel liquidus temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Matyas, Josef

    2014-01-15

    Spinel crystals precipitate in high-level waste glasses containing Fe, Cr, Ni , Mn, Zn, and Ru. The liquidus temperature (TL) of spinel as the primary crystallization phase is a function of glass composition and the spinel solubility (c0) is a function of both glass composition and temperature (T). Previously reported models of TL as a function of composition are based on TL measured directly, which requires laborious experimental procedures. Viewing the curve of c0 versus T as the liquidus line allows a significant broadening of the composition region for model fitting. This paper estimates TL as a function of composition based on c0 data obtained with the X-ray diffraction technique.

  15. Heterogeneities in nuclear waste glass; Heterogeneites dans le verre de confinement industriel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladirat, Ch. [CEA Valrho, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire, DEN, 30 - Marcoule (France)

    1997-07-01

    The industrial vitrification of high level radioactive wastes is a 2 stage process. During the first stage, the concentrated solution is heated in a spinning resistance oven at the temperature of 400 Celsius degrees till evaporation and calcination. The second stage begins when the dry residue falls into a melting pot that is maintained at a temperature of 1100-1150 Celsius degrees. Glass fretting is added and the glass is elaborated through the fusion of the different elements present in the melting pot. Heterogeneities in the glass may be associated to: - the presence in the solution to vitrify of insoluble elements from the dissolution of the fuel (RuO{sub 2}, Rh, Pd), - the presence of minuscule metal scraps (Zr) that have been produced during the cutting of the fuel element, - the failures to conform to the technical specifications of the vitrification process, for instance, temperatures or flow rates when introducing the different elements in the melting pot. (A.C.)

  16. The effect of high-level waste glass composition on spinel liquidus temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, A. A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Crum, Jarrod V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hrma, Pavel [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Matyas, Josef [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Spinel crystals precipitate in high-level waste glasses containing Fe, Cr, Ni, Mn, Zn, and Ru. The liquidus temperature (T{sub L}d) of spinel as the primary crystallization phase is a function of glass composition, and the spinel solubility (c{sub o}) is a function of both glass composition and temperature (T). Previously reported models of T{sub L} as a function of composition are based on T{sub L} measured directly, which requires laborious experimental procedures. Viewing the curve of c{sub o} versus T as the liquidus line allows a significant broadening of the composition region for model fitting. This paper estimates T{sub L} as a function of composition based on c{sub o} data obtained with the X-ray diffraction technique.

  17. A new Energy Saving method of manufacturing ceramic products from waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haun Labs

    2002-07-05

    This final report summarizes the activities of the DOE Inventions and Innovations sponsored project, ''A New Energy Saving Method of Manufacturing Ceramic Products from Waste Glass.'' The project involved an innovative method of lowering energy costs of manufacturing ceramic products by substituting traditional raw materials with waste glass. The processing method is based on sintering of glass powder at {approx}750 C to produce products which traditionally require firing temperatures of >1200 C, or glass-melting temperatures >1500 C. The key to the new method is the elimination of previous processing problems, which have greatly limited the use of recycled glass as a ceramic raw material. The technology is aligned with the DOE-OIT Glass Industry Vision and Roadmap, and offers significant energy savings and environmental benefits compared to current technologies. A U.S. patent (No. 6,340,650) covering the technology was issued on January 22, 2002. An international PCT Patent Application is pending with designations made for all PCT regions and countries. The goal of the project was to provide the basis for the design and construction of an energy-efficient manufacturing plant that can convert large volumes of waste glass into high-quality ceramic tile. The main objectives of the project were to complete process development and optimization; construct and test prototype samples; and conduct market analysis and commercialization planning. Two types of ceramic tile products were targeted by the project. The first type was developed during the first year (Phase I) to have a glazed-like finish for applications where slip resistance is not critical, such as wall tile. The processing method optimized in Phase I produces a glossy surface with a translucent appearance, without the extra glazing steps required in traditional tile manufacturing. The second type of product was developed during the second year (Phase II). This product was designed to have an

  18. An autostereoscopic display (3D without glasses) suitable for telerobotic radioactive waste remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichenlaub, J.B. [Dimension Technologies, Inc., Rochester, NY (United States)

    1995-11-01

    An autostereoscopic video display ideal for telerobotic operations is described. The display creates stereoscopic images using input from two cameras in such a way that the observer does not have to wear special glasses or other headgear to see the images, and can also see the images f rom across a wide area. The display is being used in nuclear waste remediation and other telerobotic applications.

  19. Performance assessment of the direct disposal in unsaturated tuff or spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste owned by USDOE: Volume 2, Methodology and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechard, R.P. [ed.

    1995-03-01

    This assessment studied the performance of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in a hypothetical repository in unsaturated tuff. The results of this 10-month study are intended to help guide the Office of Environment Management of the US Department of Energy (DOE) on how to prepare its wastes for eventual permanent disposal. The waste forms comprised spent fuel and high-level waste currently stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the Hanford reservations. About 700 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM) of the waste under study is stored at INEL, including graphite spent nuclear fuel, highly enriched uranium spent fuel, low enriched uranium spent fuel, and calcined high-level waste. About 2100 MTHM of weapons production fuel, currently stored on the Hanford reservation, was also included. The behavior of the waste was analyzed by waste form and also as a group of waste forms in the hypothetical tuff repository. When the waste forms were studied together, the repository was assumed also to contain about 9200 MTHM high-level waste in borosilicate glass from three DOE sites. The addition of the borosilicate glass, which has already been proposed as a final waste form, brought the total to about 12,000 MTHM.

  20. Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Joseph P.; Marek, James C.

    1989-01-01

    A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper (II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the orginal organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge and transferred to a virtrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage.

  1. Influence of phosphate glass recrystallization on the stability of a waste matrix to leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudintsev, S. V.; Pervukhina, A. M.; Mokhov, A. V.; Malkovsky, V. I.; Stefanovsky, S. V.

    2017-04-01

    In Russia, highly radioactive liquid wastes from recycling of spent fuel of nuclear reactors are solidified into Na-Al-P glass for underground storage. The properties of the matrix including the radionuclide fixation will change with time due to crystallization. This is supported by the results of study of the interaction between glassy matrices, products of their crystallization, and water. The concentration of Cs in a solution at the contact of a recrystallized sample increased by three orders of magnitude in comparison with an experiment with glass. This difference is nearly one order of magnitude for Sr, Ce, and Nd (simulators of actinides) and U due to their incorporation into phases with low solubility in water. Based on data on the compositional change of solutions after passing through filters of various diameters, it is concluded that Cs occurs in the dissolved state in runs with a glass and recrystallized matrix. At the same time, Sr, lanthanides, and U occur in the dissolved state and in the composition of colloids in runs with glass, and mostly in colloid particles after contact with the recrystallized sample. These results should be regarded for substantiation of safety for geological waste storage.

  2. Kinetic and thermodynamic controls on silica reactivity: an analog for waste disposal media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dove, P.M.; Icenhower, J. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Silicate glasses are currently being proposed as the disposal media for radioactive and other toxic wastes. The dissolution behaviour of borosilicate glass is incompletely understood. One approach is to simplify the chemistry and first develop a better understanding of vitreous silica (v-SiO{sub 2}) as a simple analog of waste glass. This article reviews all the knowledge that is known about the dissolution of silica. Studies quantifying the effects of temperature, solution pH, and single salts on dissolution rates of quartz suggest that pH and cation-dependent dissolution trends hold for all of the silica polymorphs. The purpose of this review is to develop a consistent picture of glass reactivity by understanding how the molecular arrangement of constituents within glass, beginning with the Si-O bond, affects the dissolution processes. (A.C.)

  3. Preliminary assessment of candidate immobilization technologies for retrieved single-shell tank wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiemers, K.D.; Mendel, J.E.; Kruger, A.A.; Bunnell, L.R.; Mellinger, G.B.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the initial work that has been performed to select technologies for immobilization of wastes that may be retrieved from Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs). Two classes of waste will require immobilization. One is the combined high-level waste/transuranic (HLW/TRU) fraction, the other the low-level waste (LLW) fraction. A number of potential immobilization technologies are identified for each class of waste. Immobilization technologies were initially selected based on a number of considerations, including (1) the waste loading that could likely be achieved within the constraint of producing acceptable waste forms, (2) process flexibility (primarily compatibility with anticipated waste variability), (3) process complexity, and (4) state of development. Immobilization technologies selected for further development include the following: for HLW/TRU waste -- borosilicate glass, lead-iron phosphate glass, glass-calcine composites, glass-ceramics, and cement based forms; for non-denitrated LLW -- grout, laxtex-modified concrete, and polyethylene; and for denitrated LLW -- silicate glass, phosphate glass, and clay calcination or tailored ceramic in various matrices.

  4. Natural glass from Deccan volcanic province: an analogue for radioactive waste form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Nishi; Shrivastava, J. P.; Bajpai, R. K.

    2015-11-01

    Deccan basaltic glass is associated with the differentiation centres of the vast basaltic magmas erupted in a short time span. Its suitability as a radioactive waste containment chiefly depends on alteration behaviour; however, detailed work is needed on this glass. Therefore, the basaltic glass was treated under hydrothermal-like conditions and then studied to understand its alteration. Moreover, comparison of these results with the naturally altered glass is also documented in this paper. Solutions as well as residue obtained after glass alteration experiments were analysed. Treated glass specimens show partial to complete release of all the ions during alteration; however, abundant release of Si and Na ions is noticed in case of almost all the specimens and the ionic release is of the order of Na > Si > K > Ca > Al = Mg > Fe > Mn > Ti. Scanning electron images of the altered residue show morphologies of smectite, montmorillonite and illite inside as well as outside of the secondary layers, and represent paragenesis of alteration minerals. It has been noticed that the octahedral cation occupancies of smectite are consistent with the dioctahedral smectite. The secondary layer composition indicates retention for Si, Al, and Mg ions, indicating their fixation in the alteration products, but remarkably high retention of Ti, Mn and Fe ions suggests release of very small amount of these elements into the solution. By evolution of the secondary layer and retention of less soluble ions, the obstructive effect of the secondary layer increases and the initial constant release rate begins slowly to diminish with the proceeding time. It has been found that devitrification of glass along the cracks, formation of spherulite-like structures and formation of yellowish brown palagonite, chlorite, calcite, zeolite and finally white coloured clays yielded after experiments that largely correspond to altered obsidian that existed in the natural environment since inception ~66 Ma ago.

  5. Noble metal behavior during melting of simulated high-level nuclear waste glass feeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, L.D.; Dennis, T.; Elliott, M.L.; Hrma, P.

    1993-04-01

    Noble metals and their oxides can settle in waste glass melters and cause electrical shorting. Simulated waste feeds from Hanford, Savannah River, and Germany were heat treated for 1 hour in a gradient furnace at temperatures ranging from approximately 600{degrees}C--1000{degrees}C and examined by electron microscopy to determine shapes, sizes, and distribution of noble metal particles as a function of temperature. Individual noble metal particles and agglomerates of rhodium (Rh), ruthenium (RuO{sub 2}), and palladium (Pd), as well as their alloys, were seen. the majority of particles and agglomerates were generally less than 10 microns; however, large agglomerations (up to 1 mm) were found in the German feed. Detailed particle distribution and characterization was performed for a Hanford waste to provide input to computer modeling of particle settling in the melter.

  6. Achievement report for fiscal 2000 on research and development of high level waste glass utilization system of CO2 emission suppression type; 2000 nendo CO2 haishutsu yokuseigata hai glass kodo riyo system no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho (kokaiyo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    With an objective to establish a waste glass recycling system of low cost and requiring less CO2 emission amount and energy consumption, research and development has been made on classification of waste glasses into particle composition that is required in regenerated commercial products. This paper summarizes the achievements in fiscal 2000. In the research of a waste glass reusing and supplying system designed by using LCA, discussions were given on items required in circulating and recycling waste glass resources, and quality control on raw materials and products. Evaluations of product quality control items were made on crystallized glass, sintered glasswool, automotive window glass, electric bulbs, fluorescent lamp glass, and quartz glass. Utilization tests were carried out for Mashiko porcelain china clay with an intention of expanding the application of waste glass, whereas the relationship between waste glass addition amount and optimal sintering temperature range was verified, disclosing that the limit of the waste glass addition is 10%. In the research on multi-functional hybrid materials, discussions were given on light-weight tiles and water permeating blocks with regard to the manufacturing technology, facility specifications, product quality, effects of the functions, and durability. (NEDO)

  7. The effects of the glass surface area/solution volume ratio on glass corrosion: A critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, W.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1995-03-01

    This report reviews and summarizes the present state of knowledge regarding the effects of the glass surface area/solution volume (SA/V) ratio on the corrosion behavior of borosilicate waste glasses. The SA/V ratio affects the rate of glass corrosion through the extent of dilution of corrosion products released from the glass into the leachate solution: glass corrosion products are diluted more in tests conducted at low SA/V ratios than they are in tests conducted at high SA/V ratios. Differences in the solution chemistries generated in tests conducted at different SA/V ratios then affect the observed glass corrosion behavior. Therefore, any testing parameter that affects the solution chemistry will also affect the glass corrosion rate. The results of static leach tests conducted to assess the effects of the SA/V are discussed with regard to the effects of SA/V on the solution chemistry. Test results show several remaining issues with regard to the long-term glass corrosion behavior: can the SA/V ratio be used as an accelerating parameter to characterize the advanced stages of glass corrosion relevant to long disposal times; is the alteration of the glass surface the same in tests conducted at different SA/V, and in tests conducted with monolithic and crushed glass samples; what are the effects of the SA/V and the extent of glass corrosion on the disposition of released radionuclides? These issues will bear on the prediction of the long-term performance of waste glasses during storage. The results of an experimental program conducted at ANL to address these and other remaining issues regarding the effects of SA/V on glass corrosion are described. 288 refs., 59 figs., 16 tabs.

  8. Characteristics of high-level radioactive waste forms for their disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Chun, Kwan Sik; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2000-12-01

    In order to develop a deep geological repository for a high-level radioactive waste coming from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels discharged from our domestic nuclear power plants, the the required characteristics of waste form are dependent upon a solidifying medium and the amount of waste loading in the medium. And so, by the comparative analysis of the characteristics of various waste forms developed up to the present, a suitable medium is recommended.The overall characteristics of the latter is much better than those of the former, but the change of the properties due to an amorphysation by radiation exposure and its thermal expansion has not been clearly identified yet. And its process has not been commercialized. However, the overall properties of the borosilicate glass waste forms are acceptable for their disposal, their production cost is reasonable and their processes have already been commercialized. And plenty informations of their characteristics and operational experiences have been accumulated. Consequently, it is recommended that a suitable medium solidifying the HLW is a borosilicate glass and its composition for the identification of a reference waste form would be based on the glass frit of R7T7.

  9. Combined Waste Form Cost Trade Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirk Gombert; Steve Piet; Timothy Trickel; Joe Carter; John Vienna; Bill Ebert; Gretchen Matthern

    2008-11-01

    A new generation of aqueous nuclear fuel reprocessing, now in development under the auspices of the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), separates fuel into several fractions, thereby partitioning the wastes into groups of common chemistry. This technology advance enables development of waste management strategies that were not conceivable with simple PUREX reprocessing. Conventional wisdom suggests minimizing high level waste (HLW) volume is desirable, but logical extrapolation of this concept suggests that at some point the cost of reducing volume further will reach a point of diminishing return and may cease to be cost-effective. This report summarizes an evaluation considering three groupings of wastes in terms of cost-benefit for the reprocessing system. Internationally, the typical waste form for HLW from the PUREX process is borosilicate glass containing waste elements as oxides. Unfortunately several fission products (primarily Mo and the noble metals Ru, Rh, Pd) have limited solubility in glass, yielding relatively low waste loading, producing more glass, and greater disposal costs. Advanced separations allow matching the waste form to waste stream chemistry, allowing the disposal system to achieve more optimum waste loading with improved performance. Metals can be segregated from oxides and each can be stabilized in forms to minimize the HLW volume for repository disposal. Thus, a more efficient waste management system making the most effective use of advanced waste forms and disposal design for each waste is enabled by advanced separations and how the waste streams are combined. This trade-study was designed to juxtapose a combined waste form baseline waste treatment scheme with two options and to evaluate the cost-benefit using available data from the conceptual design studies supported by DOE-NE.

  10. Recycling of waste automotive laminated glass and valorization of polyvinyl butyral through mechanochemical separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Basudev; Ryang Park, Jae; Yoon Shin, Dong; Park, Kyung-Soo; Hwan Hong, Myung; Gi Lee, Chan

    2015-10-01

    Due to strong binding, optical clarity, adhesion to many surfaces, toughness and flexibility polyvinyl butyral (PVB) resin films are commonly used in the automotive and architectural application as a protective interlayer in the laminated glass. Worldwide million tons of PVB waste generated from end-of-life automotive associated with various environmental issues. Stringent environmental directive, higher land cost eliminates land filling option, needs a study, we have developed a mechanochemical separation process to separate PVB resins from glass and characterized the separated PVB through various techniques, i.e., scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Commercial nonionic surfactants D201 used for the mechanochemical separation purpose. Through parameter optimization following conditions are considered to be the optimum condition; 30v ol% D201, stirring speed of 400 rpm, 35 °C temperature, operation time 1h, and dilute D201 volume to waste automotive laminated glass weight ratio of ≈25. The technology developed in our laboratory is sustainable, environmentally friendly, techno-economical feasible process, capable of mass production (recycling). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Melter Glass Removal and Dismantlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, BS

    2000-10-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been using vitrification processes to convert high-level radioactive waste forms into a stable glass for disposal in waste repositories. Vitrification facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) are converting liquid high-level waste (HLW) by combining it with a glass-forming media to form a borosilicate glass, which will ensure safe long-term storage. Large, slurry fed melters, which are used for this process, were anticipated to have a finite life (on the order of two to three years) at which time they would have to be replaced using remote methods because of the high radiation fields. In actuality the melters useable life spans have, to date, exceeded original life-span estimates. Initial plans called for the removal of failed melters by placing the melter assembly into a container and storing the assembly in a concrete vault on the vitrification plant site pending size-reduction, segregation, containerization, and shipment to appropriate storage facilities. Separate facilities for the processing of the failed melters currently do not exist. Options for handling these melters include (1) locating a facility to conduct the size-reduction, characterization, and containerization as originally planned; (2) long-term storing or disposing of the complete melter assembly; and (3) attempting to refurbish the melter and to reuse the melter assembly. The focus of this report is to look at methods and issues pertinent to size-reduction and/or melter refurbishment in particular, removing the glass as a part of a refurbishment or to reduce contamination levels (thus allowing for disposal of a greater proportion of the melter as low level waste).

  12. Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Durability-Composition Models and the Applicability of the Associated Reduction of Constraints (ROC) Criteria for High TiO2 Containing Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Trivelpiece, C. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-30

    Radioactive high-level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has successfully been vitrified into borosilicate glass in the DWPF since 1996. Vitrification requires stringent product/process (P/P) constraints since the glass cannot be reworked once it has been poured into ten foot tall by two foot diameter canisters. A unique “feed forward” statistical process control (SPC) was developed for this control rather than relying on statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the DWPF melter is controlled prior to vitrification. In SQC, the glass product would be sampled after it is vitrified. Individual glass property-composition models form the basis for the “feed forward” SPC. The models transform constraints on the melt and glass properties into constraints on the feed composition going to the melter in order to determine, at the 95% confidence level, that the feed will be processable and that the durability of the resulting waste form will be acceptable to a geologic repository. The DWPF SPC system is known as the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). One of the process models within PCCS is known as the Thermodynamic Hydration Energy Reaction MOdel (THERMO™). The DWPF will soon be receiving increased concentrations of TiO2-, Na2O-, and Cs2O-enriched wastes from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The SWPF has been built to pretreat the high-curie fraction of the salt waste to be removed from the HLW tanks in the F- and H-Area Tank Farms at the SRS. In order to validate the existing TiO2 term in THERMO™ beyond 2.0 wt% in the DWPF, new durability data were developed over the target range of 2.00 to 6.00 wt% TiO2 and evaluated against the 1995 durability model. The durability was measured by the 7-day Product Consistency Test. This study documents the adequacy of the existing THERMO™ terms. It is recommended that the modified THERMO™ durability models and

  13. Candidate Low-Temperature Glass Waste Forms for Technetium-99 Recovered from Hanford Effluent Management Facility Evaporator Concentrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Mei [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tang, Ming [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rim, Jung Ho [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chamberlin, Rebecca M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-24

    Alternative treatment and disposition options may exist for technetium-99 (99Tc) in secondary liquid waste from the Hanford Direct-Feed Low-Activity Waste (DFLAW) process. One approach includes development of an alternate glass waste form that is suitable for on-site disposition of technetium, including salts and other species recovered by ion exchange or precipitation from the EMF evaporator concentrate. By recovering the Tc content from the stream, and not recycling the treated concentrate, the DFLAW process can potentially be operated in a more efficient manner that lowers the cost to the Department of Energy. This report provides a survey of candidate glass formulations and glass-making processes that can potentially incorporate technetium at temperatures <700 °C to avoid volatilization. Three candidate technetium feed streams are considered: (1) dilute sodium pertechnetate loaded on a non-elutable ion exchange resin; (2) dilute sodium-bearing aqueous eluent from ion exchange recovery of pertechnetate, or (3) technetium(IV) oxide precipitate containing Sn and Cr solids in an aqueous slurry. From the technical literature, promising candidate glasses are identified based on their processing temperatures and chemical durability data. The suitability and technical risk of three low-temperature glass processing routes (vitrification, encapsulation by sintering into a glass composite material, and sol-gel chemical condensation) for the three waste streams was assessed, based on available low-temperature glass data. For a subset of candidate glasses, their long-term thermodynamic behavior with exposure to water and oxygen was modeled using Geochemist’s Workbench, with and without addition of reducing stannous ion. For further evaluation and development, encapsulation of precipitated TcO2/Sn/Cr in a glass composite material based on lead-free sealing glasses is recommended as a high priority. Vitrification of pertechnetate in aqueous anion exchange eluent solution

  14. Enhanced 99 Tc retention in glass waste form using Tc(IV)-incorporated Fe minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong; Luksic, Steven A.; Wang, Guohui; Saslow, Sarah; Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Bowden, Mark E.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2017-11-01

    Technetium (99Tc) immobilization by doping into iron oxide mineral phases may alleviate the problems with Tc volatility during vitrification of nuclear waste. Reduced Tc, Tc(IV), substitutes for Fe(III) in the crystal structure by a process of Tc reduction from Tc(VII) to Tc(IV) followed by co-precipitation of Fe oxide minerals. Two Tc-incorporated Fe minerals (Tc-goethite and Tc-magnetite/maghemite) were prepared and tested for Tc retention in glass melt samples at temperatures between 600 – 1,000 oC. After being cooled, the solid glass specimens prepared at different temperatures were analyzed for Tc oxidation state using Tc K-edge XANES. In most samples, Tc was partially oxidized from Tc(IV) to Tc(VII) as the melt temperature increased. However, Tc retention in glass melt samples prepared using Tc-incorporated Fe minerals were moderately higher than in glass prepared using KTcO4 because of limited and delayed Tc volatilization.

  15. Crystallization In High Level Waste (HLW) Glass Melters: Operational Experience From The Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-02-27

    processing strategy for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The basis of this alternative approach is an empirical model predicting the crystal accumulation in the WTP glass discharge riser and melter bottom as a function of glass composition, time, and temperature. When coupled with an associated operating limit (e.g., the maximum tolerable thickness of an accumulated layer of crystals), this model could then be integrated into the process control algorithms to formulate crystal tolerant high level waste (HLW) glasses targeting higher waste loadings while still meeting process related limits and melter lifetime expectancies. This report provides a review of the scaled melter testing that was completed in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. Testing with scaled melters provided the data to define the DWPF operating limits to avoid bulk (volume) crystallization in the un-agitated DWPF melter and provided the data to distinguish between spinels generated by K-3 refractory corrosion versus spinels that precipitated from the HLW glass melt pool. This report includes a review of the crystallization observed with the scaled melters and the full scale DWPF melters (DWPF Melter 1 and DWPF Melter 2). Examples of actual DWPF melter attainment with Melter 2 are given. The intent is to provide an overview of lessons learned, including some example data, that can be used to advance the development and implementation of an empirical model and operating limit for crystal accumulation for WTP. Operation of the first and second (current) DWPF melters has demonstrated that the strategy of using a liquidus temperature predictive model combined with a 100 °C offset from the normal melter operating temperature of 1150 °C (i.e., the predicted liquidus temperature (TL) of the glass must be 1050 °C or less) has been successful in preventing any detrimental accumulation of spinel in the DWPF melt pool, and spinel has not been

  16. Properties Improvement of Cast Stone Produced Using Recycled Glass Waste and Lightweight Aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Abd AL-Majeed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cast stone (CS is a form of pre-cast concrete widely, used in architectural applications for decorating and building face in place of natural stone due its superior features. The present study was an attempt in using of local lightweight aggregate materials (LWAM as an alternative to percentage of coarse aggregate, and glass wastes as alternatives to percentages of fine aggregate in cast stone normal mixtures with white cement and plasticizer admixture. The CS products were cured after 24 hrs using of two different processes: water curing (at 23 C° for 3 days and steam curing (at 60 C° for 14 hrs. Then the products were characterized by tests of compressive strength, design, absorption, flexure strength and liner drying shrinkage. The addition of alternative materials was done by trial mixes (M0-M3 through 3 groups (A, B, and C according to standards. Group A: design of reference mixtures of CS with compressive strength of 46.3 MPa and the absorption of 6.19%, Group B: design of mixtures containing 50% LWA were 16% lighter than those of Group A with compressive strength of 43.6 MPa and 11% improvement in the absorption, Group C: design of mixtures containing (50 and 75% glass waste with compressive strength of (47.5-44.3 MPa and the absorption of (5.3-4.7%, respectively. The modified steam curing process (curing after 24 hrs casting done in this study could prove its effectiveness in the achievement of the required compressive strength in comparison with the normal process (direct curing after casting due to the effect of such new process in providing the more uniform distribution of the cement gel with good physical properties. Results from the flexural strength test could prove the achievement of the required levels (6.9 – 6.3 at 50 – 75% glass waste addition recorded in the standard.

  17. Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  18. Influence of low concentration V and Co oxide doping on the dissolution behaviors of simplified nuclear waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xiaonan; Neeway, James J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Du, Jincheng

    2016-11-01

    Transition metal oxides are commonly present in nuclear waste and they can alter the structure, property and especially dissolution behaviors of the glasses used for waste immobilization. In this paper, we investigated vanadium and cobalt oxide induced structural and properties changes, especially dissolution behaviors, of International Simple Glass (ISG), a model nuclear waste glass system. Static chemical durability tests were performed at 90 °C with a pH value of 7 and a surface-area-to-solution-volume of 200 m-1 for 112 days on three glasses: ISG, ISG doped with 0.5 mol% Co2O3, and ISG doped with 2.0 mol% V2O5. ICP-MS was used to analyze the dissolved ion concentrations. It was found that doping with vanadium and cobalt oxide, even at the low doping concentration, significantly reduced the extent of the ISG glass dissolution. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) analysis showed that vanadium oxide doping reduced the glass transition temperature (Tg) while cobalt oxide did not significantly change the Tg of ISG. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to analyze the glass samples before and after corrosion to understand the phase and microstructure changes.

  19. Effect of aluminum and silicon reactants and hip soak time on characteristics of glass-ceramic waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinjamuri, K. [Idaho National Engineering Labs., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The effects of aluminum and silicon reactants and process soak time on total and normalized elemental leach rates and microstructure of glass-ceramic waste forms are investigated. Glass-ceramic waste forms were prepared by hot isostatically pressing (HIPing) a pre-compacted mixture of pilot plant fluorinel-sodium calcine, Al, and Si metal powders at 1050{degrees}C, 138 MPa for 4 hours. The formulation with 2 wt% Al was HIPed for 4, 8, 16 and 24 hours at 1050{degrees}C and 138 MPa. The leach rates remained essentially constant for the 2 wt% Al waste form that was HIPed for 4, 8, 16 and 24 hours at the same temperature and pressure. However, the leach rates increased in the waste forms where the Si content was increased. The 2 wt% Al waste form appears to be the potential candidate for immobilization of the fluorinel-sodium calcine stored onsite at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant.

  20. Crystallization in high level waste (HLW) glass melters: Savannah River Site operational experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Kevin M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Peeler, David K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-06-12

    This paper provides a review of the scaled melter testing that was completed for design input to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter. Testing with prototype melters provided the data to define the DWPF operating limits to avoid bulk (volume) crystallization in the un-agitated DWPF melter and provided the data to distinguish between spinels generated by refractory corrosion versus spinels that precipitated from the HLW glass melt pool. A review of the crystallization observed with the prototype melters and the full-scale DWPF melters (DWPF Melter 1 and DWPF Melter 2) is included. Examples of actual DWPF melter attainment with Melter 2 are given. The intent is to provide an overview of lessons learned, including some example data, that can be used to advance the development and implementation of an empirical model and operating limit for crystal accumulation for a waste treatment and immobilization plant.

  1. Cement plate slab production with the incorporation of glass wool waste ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathany Angélica dos Santos

    Full Text Available Abstract One of the characteristics of Civil Construction is its ability to absorb a wide range of wastes to produce new products. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the behavior of cement plates produced with the addition of ground glass wool waste and in natura, in shredded form. The tensile strength tests in bending and permeability were performed, according to ABNT NBR 15498: 2007 as well as environmental ones according to ABNT NBR 10004: 2004. The plates produced in this study were characterized as being impermeable, with a satisfactory tensile strength in bending and being classified as plates for indoor and outdoor use, and as products that do not offer immediate risk to health and to the environment; however, it should be discarded in landfill.

  2. Preliminary Technology Maturation Plan for Immobilization of High-Level Waste in Glass Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Smith, G L.

    2012-09-30

    A technology maturation plan (TMP) was developed for immobilization of high-level waste (HLW) raffinate in a glass ceramics waste form using a cold-crucible induction melter (CCIM). The TMP was prepared by the following process: 1) define the reference process and boundaries of the technology being matured, 2) evaluate the technology elements and identify the critical technology elements (CTE), 3) identify the technology readiness level (TRL) of each of the CTE’s using the DOE G 413.3-4, 4) describe the development and demonstration activities required to advance the TRLs to 4 and 6 in order, and 5) prepare a preliminary plan to conduct the development and demonstration. Results of the technology readiness assessment identified five CTE’s and found relatively low TRL’s for each of them: • Mixing, sampling, and analysis of waste slurry and melter feed: TRL-1 • Feeding, melting, and pouring: TRL-1 • Glass ceramic formulation: TRL-1 • Canister cooling and crystallization: TRL-1 • Canister decontamination: TRL-4 Although the TRL’s are low for most of these CTE’s (TRL-1), the effort required to advance them to higher values. The activities required to advance the TRL’s are listed below: • Complete this TMP • Perform a preliminary engineering study • Characterize, estimate, and simulate waste to be treated • Laboratory scale glass ceramic testing • Melter and off-gas testing with simulants • Test the mixing, sampling, and analyses • Canister testing • Decontamination system testing • Issue a requirements document • Issue a risk management document • Complete preliminary design • Integrated pilot testing • Issue a waste compliance plan A preliminary schedule and budget were developed to complete these activities as summarized in the following table (assuming 2012 dollars). TRL Budget Year MSA FMP GCF CCC CD Overall $M 2012 1 1 1 1 4 1 0.3 2013 2 2 1 1 4 1 1.3 2014 2 3 1 1 4 1 1.8 2015 2 3 2 2 4 2 2.6 2016 2 3 2 2 4 2 4

  3. Glass ceramics containment matrix for insoluble residues coming from spent fuel reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinet, O., E-mail: olivier.pinet@cea.fr; Boën, R.

    2014-04-01

    Spent fuel reprocessing by hydrometallurgical process generates insoluble residues waste streams called fines solution. Considering their radioactivity, fines solution could be considered as Intermediate Level Waste. This waste stream is usually mixed with fission products stream before vitrification. Thus fines are incorporated in glass matrix designed for High Level Waste. The withdrawal of fines from high level glass could decrease the volume of high level waste after conditioning. It could also decrease the reaction time between high level waste and additives to obtain a homogeneous melt and then increase the vitrification process capacity. Separated conditioning of fines in glass matrices has been tested. The fines content targeted value is 16 wt%. To achieve this objective, two types of glass ceramic formulations have been tested. 700 g of the two selected glass ceramics have been prepared using simulated fines. Additives used were ground glass. Melting is achieved at 1100 °C. According to the type of glass ceramic, reducing or oxidizing conditions have been performed during melting. Due to their composition and the melting redox conditions, different phases have been observed. These crystalline phases are typically RuO{sub 2}, metallic Ru, metallic Pd, MoO{sub 2} and CaMoO{sub 4}. In view of melting these matrices in an in can process the corrosiveness of one of the most oxidizing borosilicate glass ceramic formulation has been tested. This one has been remelted at 1100 °C in inconel 601 pot for 3 days. The oxygen fugacity measurement performed in the remelted glass leads to an oxidizing value, indicating that no significant reaction occurred between the inconel pot and the glass melt had occurred.

  4. A Strategy for Maintenance of the Long-Term Performance Assessment of Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Joseph V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Freedman, Vicky L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-28

    Approximately 50 million gallons of high-level radioactive mixed waste has accumulated in 177 buried single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State as a result of the past production of nuclear materials, primarily for defense uses. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is proceeding with plans to permanently dispose of this waste. Plans call for separating the tank waste into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, which will be vitrified at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Principal radionuclides of concern in LAW are 99Tc, 129I, and U, while non-radioactive contaminants of concern are Cr and nitrate/nitrite. HLW glass will be sent off-site to an undetermined federal site for deep geological disposal while the much larger volume of immobilized low-activity waste will be placed in the on-site, near-surface Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF).

  5. Behavior of technetium in nuclear waste vitrification processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegg, Ian L

    Nearly 100 tests were performed with prototypical melters and off-gas system components to investigate the extents to which technetium is incorporated into the glass melt, partitioned to the off-gas stream, and captured by the off-gas treatment system components during waste vitrification. The tests employed several simulants, spiked with 99m Tc and Re (a potential surrogate), of the low activity waste separated from nuclear wastes in storage in the Hanford tanks, which is planned for immobilization in borosilicate glass. Single-pass technetium retention averaged about 35 % and increased significantly with recycle of the off-gas treatment fluids. The fraction escaping the recycle loop was very small.

  6. Technical Status Report: Preliminary Glass Formulation Report for INEEL HAW. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Reamer, I.; Vienna, J.; Crum, J.A.

    1998-03-01

    Preliminary glass formulation work has been initiated at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) to support immobilization efforts of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) high activity waste (HAW). Based on current pretreatment flow sheet assumptions, several glasses were fabricated and tested using an average `All Blend` waste stream composition which is dominated by the presence of ZrO{sub 2} (i.e., approximately 80 wt percent). The results of this initial work show that immobilization via vitrification is a viable option for a specific INEEL HAW waste stream. Waste loadings of at least 19 wt percent can be achieved for the `All Blend` stream while maintaining targeted processing and product performance criteria. This waste loading translates into a ZrO{sub 2} content in excess of 15 wt percent in the final glass waste form. Frits developed for this work are based in the alkali borosilicate system. Although the results indicate that vitrification can be used to immobilize the `All Blend` waste stream, the glass compositions are by no means optimized.

  7. The Production of Advanced Glass Ceramic HLW Forms using Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronica J Rutledge; Vince Maio

    2013-10-01

    Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIMs) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in the 21st century. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHMs) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIMs offer unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. This paper discusses advantageous features of the CCIM, with emphasis on features that overcome the historical issues with the JHMs presently utilized, as well as the benefits of glass ceramic waste forms over borosilicate glass waste forms. These advantages are then validated based on recent INL testing to demonstrate a first-of-a-kind formulation of a non-radioactive ceramic-based waste form utilizing a CCIM.

  8. A review on immobilization of phosphate containing high level nuclear wastes within glass matrix--present status and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Pranesh

    2012-10-15

    Immobilization of phosphate containing high level nuclear wastes within commonly used silicate glasses is difficult due to restricted solubility of P(2)O(5) within such melts and its tendency to promote crystallization. The situation becomes more adverse when sulfate, chromate, etc. are also present within the waste. To solve this problem waste developers have carried out significant laboratory scale research works in various phosphate based glass systems and successfully identified few formulations which apparently look very promising as they are chemically durable, thermally stable and can be processed at moderate temperatures. However, in the absence of required plant scale manufacturing experiences it is not possible to replace existing silicate based vitrification processes by the phosphate based ones. A review on phosphate glass based wasteforms is presented here. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Remediation on off-gas system deposits in a radioactive waste glass melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Choi, A.S.; Randall, C.T.

    1991-12-31

    Since the early 1980`s, research glass melters have been used at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to develop the reference vitrification process for immobilization of high level radioactive waste. One of the operating concerns for these melters has been the pluggage of the off-gas system with solid deposits. Samples of these deposits were analyzed to be mixture of alkali-rich chlorides, sulfates, borates, and fluorides with entrained Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} spinel, and frit particles. The spatial distribution of these deposits throughout the off-gas system indicates that they form by vapor-phase transport and subsequently condensation. Condensation of the alkali-rich phases cements entrained particulates causing the off-gas line to plug. It is concluded that off-gas system pluggage can be effectively controlled by maintaining the off-gas velocity above 16 m/s, while maintaining the off-gas temperature as high as practical below the glass softening point. This paper summarizes the results of chemical and physical analyses of off-gas deposit samples from various melters at SRL. Recent design changes made to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to alleviate the pluggage problem are also discussed.

  10. Remediation on off-gas system deposits in a radioactive waste glass melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Choi, A.S.; Randall, C.T.

    1991-01-01

    Since the early 1980's, research glass melters have been used at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to develop the reference vitrification process for immobilization of high level radioactive waste. One of the operating concerns for these melters has been the pluggage of the off-gas system with solid deposits. Samples of these deposits were analyzed to be mixture of alkali-rich chlorides, sulfates, borates, and fluorides with entrained Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} spinel, and frit particles. The spatial distribution of these deposits throughout the off-gas system indicates that they form by vapor-phase transport and subsequently condensation. Condensation of the alkali-rich phases cements entrained particulates causing the off-gas line to plug. It is concluded that off-gas system pluggage can be effectively controlled by maintaining the off-gas velocity above 16 m/s, while maintaining the off-gas temperature as high as practical below the glass softening point. This paper summarizes the results of chemical and physical analyses of off-gas deposit samples from various melters at SRL. Recent design changes made to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to alleviate the pluggage problem are also discussed.

  11. Augite-anorthite glass-ceramics from residues of basalt quarry and ceramic wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal A. Khater

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dark brown glasses were prepared from residues of basalt quarries and wastes of ceramic factories. Addition of CaF2, Cr2O3 and their mixture CaF2-Cr2O3 were used as nucleation catalysts. Generally, structures with augite and anorthite as major phases and small amount of magnetite and olivine phases were developed through the crystallization process. In the samples heat treated at 900 °C the dominant phase is augite, whereas the content of anorthite usually overcomes the augite at higher temperature (1100 °C. Fine to medium homogenous microstructures were detected in the prepared glass-ceramic samples. The coefficient of thermal expansion and microhardness measurements of the glass-ceramic samples were from 6.16×10-6 to 8.96×10-6 °C-1 (in the 20–500 °C and 5.58 to 7.16 GP, respectively.

  12. Radiation effects in moist-air systems and the influence of radiolytic product formation on nuclear waste glass corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Wang, L.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Geology

    1997-07-01

    Ionizing radiation may affect the performance of glass in an unsaturated repository site by interacting with air, water vapor, or liquid water to produce a variety of radiolytic products. Tests were conducted to examine the effects of radiolysis under high gas/liquid ratios. Results indicate that nitrate is the predominant radiolytic product produced following both gamma and alpha radiation exposure, with lesser amounts of nitrite and carboxylic acids. The formation of nitrogen acids during exposure to long-lived, alpha-particle-emitting transuranic elements indicates that these acids may play a role in influencing nuclear waste form reactions in a long-term unsaturated disposal scenario. Experiments were also conducted with samples that simulate the composition of Savannah River Plant nuclear waste glasses. Radiolytic product formation in batch tests (340 m{sup {minus}1}, 90 C) resulted in a small increase in the release rates of many glass components, such as alkali and alkaline earth elements, although silicon and uranium release rates were slightly reduced indicating an overall beneficial effect of radiation on waste form stability. The radiolytic acids increased the rate of ion exchange between the glass and the thin film of condensate, resulting in accelerated corrosion rates for the glass. The paragenetic sequence of alteration phases formed on both the irradiated and nonirradiated glass samples reacted in the vapor hydration tests matches closely with those developed during volcanic glass alteration in naturally occurring saline-alkaline lake systems. This correspondence suggests that the high temperatures used in these tests have not changed the underlying glass reaction mechanism relate to that which controls glass reactions under ambient surficial conditions.

  13. Radioactive Waste Conditioning, Immobilisation, And Encapsulation Processes And Technologies: Overview And Advances (Chapter 7)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, Carol M. [Savannah River National Lab., Aiken SC (United States); Lee, William E. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials; Ojovan, Michael I. [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2012-10-19

    The main immobilization technologies that are available commercially and have been demonstrated to be viable are cementation, bituminization, and vitrification. Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. Most of the nations that have generated HLW are immobilizing in either alkali borosilicate glass or alkali aluminophosphate glass. The exact compositions of nuclear waste glasses are tailored for easy preparation and melting, avoidance of glass-in-glass phase separation, avoidance of uncontrolled crystallization, and acceptable chemical durability, e.g., leach resistance. Glass has also been used to stabilize a variety of low level wastes (LLW) and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) low level wastes (MLLW) from other sources such as fuel rod cladding/decladding processes, chemical separations, radioactive sources, radioactive mill tailings, contaminated soils, medical research applications, and other commercial processes. The sources of radioactive waste generation are captured in other chapters in this book regarding the individual practices in various countries (legacy wastes, currently generated wastes, and future waste generation). Future waste generation is primarily driven by interest in sources of clean energy and this has led to an increased interest in advanced nuclear power production. The development of advanced wasteforms is a necessary component of the new nuclear power plant (NPP) flowsheets. Therefore, advanced nuclear wasteforms are being designed for robust disposal strategies. A brief summary is given of existing and advanced wasteforms: glass, glass-ceramics, glass composite materials (GCM’s), and crystalline ceramic (mineral) wasteforms that chemically incorporate radionuclides and hazardous species atomically in their structure. Cementitious, geopolymer, bitumen, and other encapsulant wasteforms and composites that atomically bond and encapsulate

  14. A Study of the Closed-Loop Supply Chain Coordination on Waste Glass Bottles Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxue Ran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The recycling of waste products can sharply save manufacturing cost and improve the economic efficiency and corporate-reputation. It also has a great effect on the environment and resources protection. In the management of the closed-loop supply chain, the recycling of waste products and decision-making on pricing often directly affect the supply and demand of products and the operation efficiency of supply chain. Therefore, first we take waste glass bottles as an example and establish a mathematical model to solve the profit of manufacturers and retailers solely. Then, we analyzed whole supply chain profit under a dual-channel recycling condition which is directly recycled by consumers or by retailers. Finally, we concluded that no matter what product’s price, quality, profit, or operational efficiency of supply chain is, the overall recycling is better than the single node recycling model. Based on the analysis, we developed a new model to coordinate the profit of manufacturers and retailers in the supply chain with revenue-sharing contract. A numerical study shows that this approach is applicable and effective.

  15. Chemical interaction between a simulated nuclear waste glass and different backfill materials under a thermal gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poinssot, C. [CEA-Saclay-DCC/DESD/SESD/Laboratory for Migration and Solid Geochemistry, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Toulhoat, P.; Goffe, B. [Ecole Normale Superieure, Laboratory for Geology, URA-1316 du CNRS 24, rue Lhomand, 75231 Paris (France)

    1998-08-01

    The initial stage of a HLW disposal will be dominated by a strong thermal gradient that will exist between the hot canister and the 'cold' geological medium. In the case of hot wastes (MOX, direct disposal of used spent fuel, short interim storage), nuclear glass can begin to dissolve in groundwater and to interact with other materials in the presence of a thermal gradient. Moreover, it has already been demonstrated that thermal gradients strongly influence the hydrothermal corrosion of nuclear glass by creating large elemental segregation and subsequent mass transport processes. The aim of this article is to experimentally test whether the presence of a simulated engineered clay barrier affects these mass transport processes. In parallel, experiments were performed with different clays of various Si/Al ratios (smectite, kaolinite and allophane) as Si and Al are often invoked as possible rate limiting species for nuclear glass aging. A simulated nuclear glass was disposed between two layers of various clays, enclosed in a sealed gold tube filled with deionised water. The gold tube was put in a cold-seal vessel and submitted to a thermal field under high temperatures (300-200C, 140 bars, 100 days). High temperatures were used in order to enhance transformation kinetics as mass transport is supposed to be independent of the temperature. At the end of the experiments, the newly formed phases along the tube as well as the mineralogical transformations of the reactants were studied by integrated in-situ analyses (SEM, TEM, EDS and XRD). Precise descriptions of the mineralogical transformations are presented. The major result is a systematic re-crystallization of the initial clay under the influence of the leached elements from the glass (in particular Si and alkalies). The nuclear glass aging is strongly affected by the composition of the surrounding clay and consumes Al from the clay. The aluminous-rich medium seems to limit the glass corrosion and the

  16. glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    several applications. Some of the possible applications are optical amplifiers in telecommunication,7 phosphorescence materials and electrochemical batteries.8 Rare earth metal ions when added to borate act as network modifiers and change the properties of glasses .... where R is the universal gas constant. 3.3 Electrical ...

  17. Influence of carbon steel and its corrosion productson the leaching of elements from a simulated waste glass

    OpenAIRE

    佐竹 憲治; 亀井 玄人

    2002-01-01

    The influence of carbon steel and its corrosion products on leaching of elements from simulated high level radioactive waste glass (P0798) has been investigated in batch-type experiments of up to one year at 25pm3circC under argon atmosphere (

  18. FY-97 operations of the pilot-scale glass melter to vitrify simulated ICPP high activity sodium-bearing waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musick, C.A.

    1997-11-01

    A 3.5 liter refractory-lined joule-heated glass melter was built to test the applicability of electric melting to vitrify simulated high activity waste (HAW). The HAW streams result from dissolution and separation of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) calcines and/or radioactive liquid waste. Pilot scale melter operations will establish selection criteria needed to evaluate the application of joule heating to immobilize ICPP high activity waste streams. The melter was fabricated with K-3 refractory walls and Inconel 690 electrodes. It is designed to be continuously operated at 1,150 C with a maximum glass output rate of 10 lbs/hr. The first set of tests were completed using surrogate HAW-sodium bearing waste (SBW). The melter operated for 57 hours and was shut down due to excessive melt temperatures resulting in low glass viscosity (< 30 Poise). Due to the high melt temperature and low viscosity the molten glass breached the melt chamber. The melter has been dismantled and examined to identify required process improvement areas and successes of the first melter run. The melter has been redesigned and is currently being fabricated for the second run, which is scheduled to begin in December 1997.

  19. Glass packages in interim storage; Les verres dans les stockages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet-Francillon, N.

    1994-10-01

    This report summarize the current state of knowledge concerning the behavior of type C waste packages consisting of vitrified high-level solutions produced by reprocessing spent fuel. The composition and the physical and chemical properties of the feed solutions are reviewed, and the vitrification process is described. Sodium alumino-borosilicate glass compositions are generally employed - the glass used at la Hague for LWR fuel solutions, for example, contains 45 % SiO{sub 2}. The major physical, chemical, mechanical and thermal properties of the glass are reviewed. In order to allow their thermal power to diminish, the 3630 glass packages produced (as of January 1993) in the vitrification facilities at Marcoule and La Hague are placed in interim storage for several decades. The actual interim storage period has not been defined, as it is closely related to the concept and organization selected for the final destination of the packages: a geological repository. The glass behavior under irradiation is described. Considerable basic and applied research has been conducted to assess the aqueous leaching behavior of nuclear containment glass. The effects of various repository parameters (temperature, flow rate, nature of the environmental materials) have been investigated. The experimental findings have been used to specify a model describing the kinetics of aqueous corrosion of the glass. More generally all the ``source term`` models developed in France by the CEA or by ANDRA are summarized. (author). 152 refs., 33 figs.

  20. Effect of sintering temperature on the microstructure and properties of foamed glass-ceramics prepared from high-titanium blast furnace slag and waste glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-hong; Feng, Ke-qin; Zhou, Yu; Zhou, Hong-ling

    2017-08-01

    Foamed glass-ceramics were prepared via a single-step sintering method using high-titanium blast furnace slag and waste glass as the main raw materials The influence of sintering temperature (900-1060°C) on the microstructure and properties of foamed glass-ceramics was studied. The results show that the crystal shape changed from grainy to rod-shaped and finally turned to multiple shapes as the sintering temperature was increased from 900 to 1060°C. With increasing sintering temperature, the average pore size of the foamed glass-ceramics increased and subsequently decreased. By contrast, the compressive strength and the bulk density decreased and subsequently increased. An excessively high temperature, however, induced the coalescence of pores and decreased the compressive strength. The optimal properties, including the highest compressive strength (16.64 MPa) among the investigated samples and a relatively low bulk density (0.83 g/cm3), were attained in the case of the foamed glass-ceramics sintered at 1000°C.

  1. Effect of particle size of starting materials on the structure and properties of biogenic hydroxyapatite/glass composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oleksandr Parkhomey; Nataliia Pinchuk; Olena Sych; Tamara Tomila; Oleksiy Kuda; Hanna Tovstonoh; Viktor Gorban; Valeriy Kolesnichenko; Yan Evych

    2016-01-01

    The work is devoted to investigation of porous glass-ceramic composite materials on the basis of biogenic hydroxyapatite and sodium borosilicate glass prepared from starting powders with different particle sizes (<50 µm and <160 µm...

  2. Effect of particle size of starting materials on the structure and properties of biogenic hydroxyapatite/glass composites

    OpenAIRE

    Oleksandr Parkhomey; Nataliia Pinchuk; Olena Sych; Tamara Tomila; Oleksiy Kuda; Hanna Tovstonoh; Viktor Gorban’; Valeriy Kolesnichenko; Yan Evych

    2016-01-01

    The work is devoted to investigation of porous glass-ceramic composite materials on the basis of biogenic hydroxyapatite and sodium borosilicate glass prepared from starting powders with different particle sizes (

  3. Optimizing High Level Waste Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirk Gombert

    2005-09-01

    If society is ever to reap the potential benefits of nuclear energy, technologists must close the fuel-cycle completely. A closed cycle equates to a continued supply of fuel and safe reactors, but also reliable and comprehensive closure of waste issues. High level waste (HLW) disposal in borosilicate glass (BSG) is based on 1970s era evaluations. This host matrix is very adaptable to sequestering a wide variety of radionuclides found in raffinates from spent fuel reprocessing. However, it is now known that the current system is far from optimal for disposal of the diverse HLW streams, and proven alternatives are available to reduce costs by billions of dollars. The basis for HLW disposal should be reassessed to consider extensive waste form and process technology research and development efforts, which have been conducted by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), international agencies and the private sector. Matching the waste form to the waste chemistry and using currently available technology could increase the waste content in waste forms to 50% or more and double processing rates. Optimization of the HLW disposal system would accelerate HLW disposition and increase repository capacity. This does not necessarily require developing new waste forms, the emphasis should be on qualifying existing matrices to demonstrate protection equal to or better than the baseline glass performance. Also, this proposed effort does not necessarily require developing new technology concepts. The emphasis is on demonstrating existing technology that is clearly better (reliability, productivity, cost) than current technology, and justifying its use in future facilities or retrofitted facilities. Higher waste processing and disposal efficiency can be realized by performing the engineering analyses and trade-studies necessary to select the most efficient methods for processing the full spectrum of wastes across the nuclear complex. This paper will describe technologies being

  4. Stability of High-Level Radioactive Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, T.M.

    2001-06-22

    High-level waste (HLW) glass compositions, processing schemes, limits on waste content, and corrosion/dissolution release models are dependent on an accurate knowledge of melting temperatures and thermochemical values. Unfortunately, existing models for predicting these temperatures are empirically-based, depending on extrapolations of experimental information. In addition, present models of leaching behavior of glass waste forms use simplistic assumptions or experimentally measured values obtained under non-realistic conditions. There is thus a critical need for both more accurate and more widely applicable models for HLW glass behavior, which this project addressed. Significant progress was made in this project on modeling HLW glass. Borosilicate glass was accurately represented along with the additional important components that contain iron, lithium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium. The formation of crystalline inclusions in the glass, an issue in Hanford HLW formulations, was modeled and shown to be predictive. Thus the results of this work have already demonstrated practical benefits with the ability to map compositional regions where crystalline material forms, and therefore avoid that detrimental effect. With regard to a fundamental understanding, added insights on the behavior of the components of glass have been obtained, including the potential formation of molecular clusters. The EMSP project had very significant effects beyond the confines of Environmental Management. The models developed for glass have been used to solve a very costly problem in the corrosion of refractories for glass production. The effort resulted in another laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories-Livermore, to become conversant in the techniques and to apply those through a DOE Office of Industrial Technologies project joint with PPG Industries. The glass industry as a whole is now cognizant of these capabilities, and there is a Glass Manufacturer's Research Institute

  5. Strengths and Failure Characteristics of Self-Compacting Concrete Containing Recycled Waste Glass Aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Khaleel AL-Bawi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of different proportions of green-colored waste glass (WG cullet on the mechanical and fracture properties of self-compacting concrete (SCC were experimentally investigated. Waste bottles were collected, washed, crushed, and sieved to prepare the cullet used in this study. Cullet was incorporated at different percentages (0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100% by weight instead of natural fine aggregate (NFA and/or natural coarse aggregate (NCA. Three SCC series were designed with a constant slump flow of 700±30 mm, total binder content of 570 kg/m3 and at water-to-binder (w/b ratio of 0.35. Moreover, fly ash (FA was used in concrete mixtures at 20% of total binder content. Mechanical aspects such as compressive, splitting tensile, and net flexural strengths and modulus of elasticity of SCC were investigated and experimentally computed at 28 days of age. Moreover, failure characteristics of the concretes were also monitored via three-point bending test on the notched beams. The findings revealed that the mechanical properties as well as fracture parameters were adversely influenced by incorporating of WG cullet. However, highest reduction of compressive strength did not exceed 43% recorded at 100% WG replacement level. Concretes containing WG showed less brittle behavior than reference concrete at any content.

  6. Quasicrystalline Approach to Prediting the Spinel-Nepheline Liquidus: Application to Nuclear Waste Glass Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, Carol

    2005-10-10

    The crystal-melt equilibria in complex fifteen component melts are modeled based on quasicrystalline concepts. A pseudobinary phase diagram between acmite (which melts incongruently to a transition metal ferrite spinel) and nepheline is defined. The pseudobinary lies within the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2} quaternary system that defines the crystallization of basalt glass melts. The pseudobinary provides the partitioning of species between the melt and the primary liquidus phases. The medium range order of the melt and the melt-crystal exchange equilibria are defined based on a constrained mathematical treatment that considers the crystallochemical coordination of the elemental species in acmite and nepheline. The liquidus phases that form are shown to be governed by the melt polymerization and the octahedral site preference energies. This quasicrystalline liquidus model has been used to prevent unwanted crystallization in the world's largest high level waste (HLW) melter for the past three years while allowing >10 wt% higher waste loadings to be processed.

  7. ALPHN: A computer program for calculating ({alpha}, n) neutron production in canisters of high-level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmon, R.; Hermann, O.W.

    1992-10-01

    The rate of neutron production from ({alpha}, n) reactions in canisters of immobilized high-level waste containing borosilicate glass or glass-ceramic compositions is significant and must be considered when estimating neutron shielding requirements. The personal computer program ALPHA calculates the ({alpha}, n) neutron production rate of a canister of vitrified high-level waste. The user supplies the chemical composition of the glass or glass-ceramic and the curies of the alpha-emitting actinides present. The output of the program gives the ({alpha}, n) neutron production of each actinide in neutrons per second and the total for the canister. The ({alpha}, n) neutron production rates are source terms only; that is, they are production rates within the glass and do not take into account the shielding effect of the glass. For a given glass composition, the user can calculate up to eight cases simultaneously; these cases are based on the same glass composition but contain different quantities of actinides per canister. In a typical application, these cases might represent the same canister of vitrified high-level waste at eight different decay times. Run time for a typical problem containing 20 chemical species, 24 actinides, and 8 decay times was 35 s on an IBM AT personal computer. Results of an example based on an expected canister composition at the Defense Waste Processing Facility are shown.

  8. ALPHN: A computer program for calculating ([alpha], n) neutron production in canisters of high-level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmon, R.; Hermann, O.W.

    1992-10-01

    The rate of neutron production from ([alpha], n) reactions in canisters of immobilized high-level waste containing borosilicate glass or glass-ceramic compositions is significant and must be considered when estimating neutron shielding requirements. The personal computer program ALPHA calculates the ([alpha], n) neutron production rate of a canister of vitrified high-level waste. The user supplies the chemical composition of the glass or glass-ceramic and the curies of the alpha-emitting actinides present. The output of the program gives the ([alpha], n) neutron production of each actinide in neutrons per second and the total for the canister. The ([alpha], n) neutron production rates are source terms only; that is, they are production rates within the glass and do not take into account the shielding effect of the glass. For a given glass composition, the user can calculate up to eight cases simultaneously; these cases are based on the same glass composition but contain different quantities of actinides per canister. In a typical application, these cases might represent the same canister of vitrified high-level waste at eight different decay times. Run time for a typical problem containing 20 chemical species, 24 actinides, and 8 decay times was 35 s on an IBM AT personal computer. Results of an example based on an expected canister composition at the Defense Waste Processing Facility are shown.

  9. Effects of soda-lime-silica waste glass on mullite formation kinetics and micro-structures development in vitreous ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinoni, Nicoletta; D'Alessio, Daniela; Diella, Valeria; Pavese, Alessandro; Francescon, Ferdinando

    2013-07-30

    The effects of soda-lime waste glass, from the recovery of bottle glass cullet, in partial replacement of Na-feldspar for sanitary-ware ceramic production are discussed. Attention is paid to the mullite growth kinetics and to the macroscopic properties of the final output, the latter ones depending on the developed micro-structures and vitrification grade. Measurements have been performed by in situ high temperature X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermal dilatometry, water absorption and mechanical testing. Glass substituting feldspar from 30 to 50 wt% allows one (i) to accelerate the mullite growth reaction kinetics, and (ii) to achieve macroscopic features of the ceramic output that comply with the latest technical requirements. The introduction of waste glass leads to (i) a general saving of fuel and reduction of the CO2-emissions during the firing stage, (ii) a preservation of mineral resources in terms of feldspars, and (iii) an efficient management of the bottle glass refuse by readdressing a part of it in the sanitary-ware manufacturing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Demonstrating compliance with WAPS 1.3 in the Hanford waste vitrification plant process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, M.F.; Piepel, G.F.; Simpson, D.B.

    1996-03-01

    The high-level waste (HLW) vitrification plant at the Hanford Site was being designed to immobilize transuranic and high-level radioactive waste in borosilicate glass. This document describes the statistical procedure to be used in verifying compliance with requirements imposed by Section 1.3 of the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS, USDOE 1993). WAPS 1.3 is a specification for ``product consistency,`` as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT, Jantzen 1992b), for each of three elements: lithium, sodium, and boron. Properties of a process batch and the resulting glass are largely determined by the composition of the feed material. Empirical models are being developed to estimate some property values, including PCT results, from data on feed composition. These models will be used in conjunction with measurements of feed composition to control the HLW vitrification process and product.

  11. Joule-Heated Ceramic-Lined Melter to Vitrify Liquid Radioactive Wastes Containing Am241 Generated From MOX Fuel Fabrication in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, E C; Bowan II, B W; Pegg, I; Jardine, L J

    2004-11-16

    The governments of the United Stated of America and the Russian Federation (RF) signed an Agreement September 1, 2000 to dispose of weapons plutonium that has been designated as no longer required for defense purposes. The Agreement declares that each country will disposition 34MT of excess weapons grade plutonium from their stockpiles. The preferred disposition technology is the fabrication of mixed oxide (MOx) fuel for use or burning in pressurized water reactors to destroy the plutonium. Implementation of this Agreement will require the conversion of plutonium metal to oxide and the fabrication of MOx fuel within the Russian Federation. The MOx fuel fabrication and metal to oxide conversion processes will generate solid and liquid radioactive wastes containing trace amounts of plutonium, neptunium, americium, and uranium requiring treatment, storage, and disposal. Unique to the Russian MOx fuel fabrication facility's flow-sheet is a liquid waste stream with high concentrations ({approx}1 g/l) of {sup 241}Am and non radioactive silver. The silver is used to dissolve PuO{sub 2} feed materials to the MOx fabrication facility. Technical solutions are needed to treat and solidify this liquid waste stream. Alternative treatment technologies for this liquid waste stream are being evaluated by a Russian engineering team. The technologies being evaluated include borosilicate and phosphate vitrification alternatives. The evaluations are being performed at a conceptual design level of detail under a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) contract with the Russian organization TVEL using DOE NA-26 funding. As part of this contract, the RF team is evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of the US borosilicate glass vitrification technology based on a Duratek melter to solidify this waste stream into a form acceptable for storage and geologic disposal. The composition of the glass formed from treating the waste is dictated by the concentration of silver

  12. Sulphate in Liquid Nuclear Waste: from Production to Containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenoir, M.; Grandjean, A.; Ledieu, A.; Dussossoy, J.L.; Cau Dit Coumes, C.; Barre, Y.; Tronche, E. [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTCD/SECM/LDMC, Batiment 208 BP17171, Bagnols sur Ceze, 30207 (France)

    2009-06-15

    Nuclear industry produces a wide range of low and intermediate level liquid radioactive wastes which can include different radionuclides such as {sup 90}Sr. In La Hague reprocessing plant and in the nuclear research centers of CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique), the coprecipitation of strontium with barium sulphate is the technique used to treat selectively these contaminated streams with the best efficiency. After the decontamination process, low and intermediate level activity wastes incorporating significant quantities of sulphate are obtained. The challenge is to find a matrix easy to form and with a good chemical durability which is able to confine this kind of nuclear waste. The current process used to contain sulphate-rich nuclear wastes is bituminization. However, in order to improve properties of containment matrices and simplify the process, CEA has chosen to supervise researches on other materials such as cements or glasses. Indeed, cements are widely used for the immobilization of a variety of wastes (low and intermediate level wastes) and they may be an alternative matrix to bitumen. Even if Portland cement, which is extensively used in the nuclear industry, presents some disadvantages for the containment of sulphate-rich nuclear wastes (risk of swelling and cracking due to delayed ettringite formation), other cement systems, such as calcium sulfo-aluminate binders, may be valuable candidates. Another matrix to confine sulphate-rich waste could be the glass. One of the advantages of this material is that it could also immobilize sulphate containing high level nuclear waste which is present in some countries. This waste comes from the use of ferrous sulfamate as a reducing agent for the conversion of Pu{sup 4+} to Pu{sup 3+} in the partitioning stage of the actinides during reprocessing. Sulphate solubility in borosilicate glasses has already been studied in CEA at laboratory and pilot scales. At a pilot scale, low level liquid waste has been

  13. Effect of sintering temperature on physical, structural and optical properties of wollastonite based glass-ceramic derived from waste soda lime silica glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almasri, Karima Amer; Sidek, Hj. Ab Aziz; Matori, Khamirul Amin; Zaid, Mohd Hafiz Mohd

    The impact of different sintering temperatures on physical, optical and structural properties of wollastonite (CaSiO3) based glass-ceramics were investigated for its potential application as a building material. Wollastonite based glass-ceramics was provided by a conventional melt-quenching method and followed by a controlled sintering process. In this work, soda lime silica glass waste was utilized as a source of silicon. The chemical composition and physical properties of glass were characterized by using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) and Archimedes principle. The Archimedes measurement results show that the density increased with the increasing of sintering temperature. The generation of CaSiO3, morphology, size and crystal phase with increasing the heat-treatment temperature were examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Fourier transforms infrared reflection spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The average calculated crystal size gained from XRD was found to be in the range 60 nm. The FESEM results show a uniform distribution of particles and the morphology of the wollastonite crystal is in relict shapes. The appearance of CaO, SiO2, and Ca-O-Si bands disclosed from FTIR which showed the formation of CaSiO3 crystal phase. In addition to the calculation of the energy band gap which found to be increased with increasing sintering temperature.

  14. Investigating in vitro bioactivity and magnetic properties of the ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic fabricated using soda-lime-silica waste glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, M.; Hashemi, B.; Shokrollahi, H.

    2014-04-01

    The main purpose of the current research is the production and characterization of a ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic prepared through the solid-state reaction method using soda-lime-silica waste glass as the main raw material. In comparison with the conventional route, that is, the melt-quenching and subsequent heat treatment, the present work is an economical technique. Structural, thermal and magnetic properties of the samples were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The in vitro test was utilized to assess the bioactivity level of the samples by Hanks' solution as simulated body fluid (SBF). The apatite surface layer formation was examined by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The calcium ion concentration in the solutions was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). VSM results revealed that with the addition of 5-20 wt% strontium hexaferrite to bioactive glass-ceramics, the ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramics with hysteresis losses between 7024 and 75,852 erg/g were obtained. The in vitro test showed that the onset formation time of hydroxyapatite layer on the surface of the samples was 14 days and after 30 days, this layer was completed.

  15. Recycling of typical difficult-to-treat e-waste: Synthesize zeolites from waste cathode-ray-tube funnel glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhitong; Wu, Daidai; Liu, Jie; Wu, Weihong; Zhao, Hongting; Tang, Junhong

    2017-02-15

    The disposal of waste cathode ray-tubes (CRTs) from old televisions and discarded computer monitors has become a major environmental concern worldwide. In this work, an open-loop recycling method was developed to synthesize zeolites using CRT funnel glass as the raw material. The effects of hydrothermal temperatures and pressure, n(SiO2/Al2O3) molar ratios and hydrothermal time on the resulting products were investigated. The results indicated that hydrothermal temperatures and pressure played critical roles in zeolite synthesis. Amorphous phases were detected at lower temperatures (80-100°C) and pressure (0.47-1.01bar) with n(SiO2/Al2O3)=2.0. At the temperature of 110°C (pressure 1.43bar), NaA formed with a mixture of NaP1 and Faujasite. With further increase in the temperature and pressure, the unstable NaA and Faujasite disappeared, and Hydroxysodalite developed. The influence of n(SiO2/Al2O3) ratios on resulting products revealed a single phase of NaA was formed at the ratio of 1.5 and a mixture of NaA and Faujasite at the ratio of 2.0. Prolonging hydrothermal time, however, could promote zeolite crystallization, and NaA gradually developed with an increase in the time from 2 to 6h at n(SiO2/Al2O3)=1.5. By comparison, crystallization phases were observed only when the time was longer than 8h at n(SiO2/Al2O3)=2.0. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Corrosion Testing of Monofrax K-3 Refractory in Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Alternate Reductant Feeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jantzen, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-04-06

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) uses a combination of reductants and oxidants while converting high level waste (HLW) to a borosilicate waste form. A reducing flowsheet is maintained to retain radionuclides in their reduced oxidation states which promotes their incorporation into borosilicate glass. For the last 20 years of processing, the DWPF has used formic acid as the main reductant and nitric acid as the main oxidant. During reaction in the Chemical Process Cell (CPC), formate and formic acid release measurably significant H2 gas which requires monitoring of certain vessel’s vapor spaces. A switch to a nitric acid-glycolic acid (NG) flowsheet from the nitric-formic (NF) flowsheet is desired as the NG flowsheet releases considerably less H2 gas upon decomposition. This would greatly simplify DWPF processing from a safety standpoint as close monitoring of the H2 gas concentration could become less critical. In terms of the waste glass melter vapor space flammability, the switch from the NF flowsheet to the NG flowsheet showed a reduction of H2 gas production from the vitrification process as well. Due to the positive impact of the switch to glycolic acid determined on the flammability issues, evaluation of the other impacts of glycolic acid on the facility must be examined.

  17. Quantification of the Partitioning Ratio of Minor Actinide Surrogates between Zirconolite and Glass in Glass-Ceramic for Nuclear Waste Disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chang-Zhong; Liu, Chengshuai; Su, Minhua; Shih, Kaimin

    2017-08-21

    Zirconolite-based glass-ceramic is considered a promising wasteform for conditioning minor actinide-rich nuclear wastes. Recent studies on this wasteform have sought to enhance the partitioning ratio (PR) of minor actinides in zirconolite crystal. To optimize the PR in the SiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 -CaO-TiO 2 -ZrO 2 system, a novel conceptual approach, which can be derived from the chemical composition and quantity of zirconolite crystal in glass-ceramic, was introduced based on the results of Rietveld quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. To verify this new conceptual approach, the influences of the crystallization temperature, the concentration of additives, and ionic radii on the PR of various surrogates (Ce, Nd, Gd, and Yb) in zirconolite were examined. The results reveal that the PR of Nd 3+ in zirconolite can be as high as 41%, but it decreases as the crystallization temperature increases. The quantities of all phases (including crystalline and amorphous) remained nearly constant when increasing the loading of Nd 2 O 3 in glass-ceramic products crystallized at 1050 °C for 2 h. Correspondingly, the PR of Nd 3+ decreases in a linear fashion with the loading contents of Nd 2 O 3 . The radius of ions also has a great influence on the PR, and an increase in the ionic radius leads to a decrease in the PR. This new approach will be an important tool to facilitate the exploration of a glass-ceramic matrix for the disposal of minor actinide-rich nuclear wastes.

  18. Monazite as a suitable actinide waste form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlenz, Hartmut; Heuser, Julia; Schmitz, Stephan; Bosbach, Dirk [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Energie und Klimaforschung (IEK), Nukleare Entsorgung und Reaktorsicherheit (IEK-6); Neumann, Andreas [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Energie und Klimaforschung (IEK), Nukleare Entsorgung und Reaktorsicherheit (IEK-6); RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Crystallography

    2013-03-01

    The conditioning of radioactive waste from nuclear power plants and in some countries even of weapons plutonium is an important issue for science and society. Therefore the research on appropriate matrices for the immobilization of fission products and actinides is of great interest. Beyond the widely used borosilicate glasses, ceramics are promising materials for the conditioning of actinides like U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm. Monazite-type ceramics with general composition LnPO{sub 4} (Ln = La to Gd) and solid solutions of monazite with cheralite or huttonite represent important materials in this field. Monazite appears to be a promising candidate material, especially because of its outstanding properties regarding radiation resistance and chemical durability. This article summarizes the most recent results concerning the characterization of monazite and respective solid solutions and the study of their chemical, thermal, physical and structural properties. The aim is to demonstrate the suitability of monazite as a secure and reliable waste form for actinides. (orig.)

  19. Development Of High Waste-Loading HLW Glasses For High Bismuth Phosphate Wastes, VSL-12R2550-1, Rev 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, A. A. [Department of Energy, Office of River Protection, Richland, Washington (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Kot, Wing K. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-12-13

    This report presents results from tests with new glass formulations that have been developed for several high Bi-P HLW compositions that are expected to be processed at the WTP that have not been tested previously. WTP HLW feed compositions were reviewed to select waste batches that are high in Bi-P and that are reasonably distinct from the Bi-limited waste that has been tested previously. Three such high Bi-P HLW compositions were selected for this work. The focus of the present work was to determine whether the same type of issues as seen in previous work with high-Bi HLW will be seen in HLW with different concentrations of Bi, P and Cr and also whether similar glass formulation development approaches would be successful in mitigating these issues. New glass compositions were developed for each of the three representative Bi-P HLW wastes and characterized with respect to key processing and product quality properties and, in particular, those relating to crystallization and foaming tendency.

  20. Confinement matrices for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverov, N. P.; Omel'Yanenko, B. I.; Yudintsev, S. V.; Stefanovsky, S. V.

    2012-02-01

    Mining of uranium for nuclear fuel production inevitably leads to the exhaustion of natural uranium resources and an increase in market price of uranium. As an alternative, it is possible to provide nuclear power plants with reprocessed spent nuclear fuel (SNF), which retains 90% of its energy resource. The main obstacle to this solution is related to the formation in the course of the reprocessing of SNF of a large volume of liquid waste, and the necessity to concentrate, solidify, and dispose of this waste. Radioactive waste is classified into three categories: low-, intermediate-, and high-level (LLW, ILW, and HLW); 95, 4.4, and 0.6% of the total waste are LLW, ILW, and HLW, respectively. Despite its small relative volume, the radioactivity of HLW is approximately equal to the combined radioactivity of LLW + ILW (LILW). The main hazard of HLW is related to its extremely high radioactivity, the occurrence of long-living radionuclides, heat release, and the necessity to confine HLW for an effectively unlimited time period. The problems of handling LILW are caused by the enormous volume of such waste. The available technology for LILW confinement is considered, and conclusion is drawn that its concentration, vitrification, and disposal in shallow-seated repositories is a necessary condition of large-scale reprocessing of SNF derived from VVER-1000 reactors. The significantly reduced volume of the vitrified LILW and its very low dissolution rate at low temperatures makes borosilicate glass an ideal confinement matrix for immobilization of LILW. At the same time, the high corrosion rate of the glass matrix at elevated temperatures casts doubt on its efficient use for immobilization of heat-releasing HLW. The higher cost of LILW vitrification compared to cementation and bitumen impregnation is compensated for by reduced expenditure for construction of additional engineering barriers, as well as by substantial decrease in LLW and ILW volume, localization of shallow

  1. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Dental Core Ceramics with Borosilicate Veneering material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wananuruksawong, R.; Jinawath, S.; Padipatvuthikul, P.; Wasanapiarnpong, T.

    2011-10-01

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramic is a great candidate for clinical applications due to its high fracture toughness, strength, hardness and bio-inertness. This study has focused on the Si3N4 ceramic as a dental core material. The white Si3N4 was prepared by pressureless sintering at relative low sintering temperature of 1650 °C in nitrogen atmosphere. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Si3N4 ceramic is lower than that of Zirconia and Alumina ceramic which are popular in this field. The borosilicate glass veneering was employed due to its compatibility in thermal expansion. The sintered Si3N4 specimens represented the synthetic dental core were paintbrush coated by a veneer paste composed of borosilicate glass powder (veneer on the Si3N4 specimens, the firing was performed in electric tube furnace between 1000-1200°C. The veneered specimens fired at 1100°C for 15 mins show good bonding, smooth and glossy without defect and crazing. The veneer has thermal expansion coefficient as 3.98×10-6 °C-1, rather white and semi opaque, due to zirconia addition, the Vickers hardness as 4.0 GPa which is closely to the human teeth.

  2. Application of EQ3/6 to modeling of nuclear waste glass behavior in a tuff repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, R.D.

    1986-05-01

    Modeling of glass degradation based on sound geochemical principles appears to be possible with revisions to EQ3/6. Realistic source terms for several repository scenarios may be generated with such a model. One scenario which appears very likely and which is also amenable to modeling using EQ3/6 is that in which an intact but perforated canister holds water in contact with waste glass. The water overflows continuously or periodically, allowing radionuclides to come in contact with repository rock. This isolated-type scenario will be the first realistic modeling effort because it limits complex interactions between rock and glass. However, EQ3/6 modeling should be possible even for very complicated scenarios if sufficient experimental data are available on rates and thermodynamics. This will be the limiting factor in progress toward modeling the complete system.

  3. Determination of heat conductivity of waste glass feed and its applicability for modeling the batch-to-glass conversion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hujová, Miroslava; Pokorný, R.; Kloužek, Jaroslav; Dixon, D.R.; Cutforth, D.A.; Lee, S.; McCarthy, B.P.; Schweiger, M. J.; Kruger, A.A.; Hrma, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 11 (2017), s. 5096-5106 ISSN 0002-7820 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : foams * glassmelting * modelling/model * thermal conductivity Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 2.841, year: 2016

  4. Investigation of possibility for stabilization and valorization of electric ARC furnace dust and glass from electronic waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranitović M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents investigation of possibility for electric arc furnace dust (EAFD and electronic waste (e-waste valorization trough stabilization process, in order to achieve concurrent management of these two serious ecological problems. EAFD is an ineviTab. waste material coming from the electric arc furnace steel production process, classified as a hazardous waste. Furthermore, it is well known that residual materials generated in the ewaste recycling process, like LCD (Liquid crystal displays waste glass, are not suiTab. for landfill or incineration. In this study, these two materials were used for investigation of possibility for their valorization in ceramic industry. Thus, an innovative synergy of waste streams from metallurgical and e-waste recycling industry is presented. Investigation included a complex characterization of raw materials and their mixtures, using chemical methods, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, as well as methods for determining the physical and mechanical properties. Based on these results, it was found that material suiTab. for use in ceramics industry as a partial substituent of quartzite and fluxing components can be produced. Besides solving the environmental problem related to EAFD and LCD disposal, by replacement of raw materials certain economic effects can be achieved. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 34033

  5. Water purification using porous ceramics prepared by recycling volcanic ash and waste glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Tomohiro; Fujita, Yuki; Kakinaga, Mayu; Oka, Nobuto; Nishida, Tetsuaki

    2017-11-01

    Water purification was examined using porous ceramics prepared by sintering a powder mixture of volcanic ash, waste glass and a small amount of wood charcoal. The porous ceramics had cross-linked 3D-channels of which the diameter ranged from several nm to several μm. Three kilograms of porous ceramics placed in 90 L of circulating artificial seawater, in which several tropical fishes were actually living under aeration, caused a decrease in COD from 23.8 to 13.1 mg L-1 in a week. The number of coliform bacteria was almost constant in a range of 52-65 mL-1 despite that a lot of excrements were discharged frequently. The number of the coliform bacteria in the seawater examined "without the tropical fishes" decreased from 900 to 1 mL-1 in 2 weeks, and COD decreased from 37.9 to 7.9 mg L-1. It proved that several aerobic bacteria proliferating in the macropores inside the porous ceramics could effectively decompose several organic materials.

  6. The Role of Waste Glass Powder During the Hydration Process of Composite Cementitious Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua LIU

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of waste glass powder (GP during the hydration process of composite cementitious materials was investigated by using mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP, X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques. The compressive strength was also tested. The results indicate that the chemical activity of GP is low. But the pozzolanic reactivity of GP greatly improves with its fineness and the elevated curing temperature, which contributes to improving the mechanical strength. The hydration process of composite cementitious material containing GP is similar to that of pure cement. With the increase of GP content in the composite cement, the occurring time of second exothermic improves, but the value of second exothermic peak and the cumulative hydration heat reduce. The characteristic pore size of pastes containing GP decreases over curing age, which significantly improves their strength. GP does not modify the type of hydration products of composite cementitious material. The microstructure of hardened pastes containing GP is dense due to the generation of C-S-H gel with a low Ca/Si ratio. There is a reaction ring along GP with high fineness, which can enhance the interfacial transition zone to avoid ASR.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.4.13210

  7. Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter high-level waste solidification technical manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, D.E. (ed.)

    1980-09-01

    This technical manual summarizes process and equipment technology developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory over the last 20 years for vitrification of high-level liquid waste by the Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter process. Pacific Northwest Laboratory experience includes process development and demonstration in laboratory-, pilot-, and full-scale equipment using nonradioactive synthetic wastes. Also, laboratory- and pilot-scale process demonstrations have been conducted using actual high-level radioactive wastes. In the course of process development, more than 26 tonnes of borosilicate glass have been produced in 75 canisters. Four of these canisters contained radioactive waste glass. The associated process and glass chemistry is discussed. Technology areas described include calciner feed treatment and techniques, calcination, vitrification, off-gas treatment, glass containment (the canister), and waste glass chemistry. Areas of optimization and site-specific development that would be needed to adapt this base technology for specific plant application are indicated. A conceptual Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter system design and analyses are provided in the manual to assist prospective users in evaluating the process for plant application, to provide equipment design information, and to supply information for safety analyses and environmental reports. The base (generic) technology for the Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter process has been developed to a point at which it is ready for plant application.

  8. Evaluation of the Effects of Crushed and Expanded Waste Glass Aggregates on the Material Properties of Lightweight Concrete Using Image-Based Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Yeop Chung

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the recycling of waste glass has become a worldwide issue in the reduction of waste and energy consumption. Waste glass can be utilized in construction materials, and understanding its effects on material properties is crucial in developing advanced materials. In this study, recycled crushed and expanded glasses are used as lightweight aggregates for concrete, and their relation to the material characteristics and properties is investigated using several approaches. Lightweight concrete specimens containing only crushed and expanded waste glass as fine aggregates are produced, and their pore and structural characteristics are examined using image-based methods, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray computed tomography (CT, and automated image analysis (RapidAir. The thermal properties of the materials are measured using both Hot Disk and ISOMET devices to enhance measurement accuracy. Mechanical properties are also evaluated, and the correlation between material characteristics and properties is evaluated. As a control group, a concrete specimen with natural fine sand is prepared, and its characteristics are compared with those of the specimens containing crushed and expanded waste glass aggregates. The obtained results support the usability of crushed and expanded waste glass aggregates as alternative lightweight aggregates.

  9. Evaluation of the Effects of Crushed and Expanded Waste Glass Aggregates on the Material Properties of Lightweight Concrete Using Image-Based Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sang-Yeop; Abd Elrahman, Mohamed; Sikora, Pawel; Rucinska, Teresa; Horszczaruk, Elzbieta; Stephan, Dietmar

    2017-11-25

    Recently, the recycling of waste glass has become a worldwide issue in the reduction of waste and energy consumption. Waste glass can be utilized in construction materials, and understanding its effects on material properties is crucial in developing advanced materials. In this study, recycled crushed and expanded glasses are used as lightweight aggregates for concrete, and their relation to the material characteristics and properties is investigated using several approaches. Lightweight concrete specimens containing only crushed and expanded waste glass as fine aggregates are produced, and their pore and structural characteristics are examined using image-based methods, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray computed tomography (CT), and automated image analysis (RapidAir). The thermal properties of the materials are measured using both Hot Disk and ISOMET devices to enhance measurement accuracy. Mechanical properties are also evaluated, and the correlation between material characteristics and properties is evaluated. As a control group, a concrete specimen with natural fine sand is prepared, and its characteristics are compared with those of the specimens containing crushed and expanded waste glass aggregates. The obtained results support the usability of crushed and expanded waste glass aggregates as alternative lightweight aggregates.

  10. Glass fabrication and analysis literature review and method selection for WTP waste feed qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, D. K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2013-06-01

    The waste feed qualification program is being developed to protect the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) safety basis, technical basis, and design by assuring waste acceptance requirements are met for each staged waste feed Campaign prior to transfer from the Hanford Tank Farm to the WTP.

  11. Glass Dissolution Parameters: Update for Entsorgungsnachweis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curti, E

    2003-11-01

    This document provides updated long-term corrosion rates for borosilicate glasses used in Switzerland as a matrix for high-level radioactive waste. The new rates are based on long-term leaching experiments conducted at PSI and are corroborated by recent investigations. The asymptotic rates have been determined through weighted linear regressions of the normalised mass losses, directly calculated from B and Li concentrations in the leaching solutions. Special attention was given to the determination of the analytical uncertainty of the mass losses. The sensitivity of the corrosion rates to analytical uncertainties and to other criteria (e.g. the choice of data points for the regressions) was also studied. A major finding was that the uncertainty of the corrosion rate mainly depends on the uncertainty of the specific glass surface area. The reference rates proposed for safety assessment calculations are 1.5 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} for BNFL glasses and 0.2 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} for Cogema glasses. The relevance of the proposed corrosion rates for repository conditions is shown based on the analysis of processes and parameters currently known to affect the long-term kinetics of silicate glasses. Specifically, recent studies indicate that potentially detrimental effects, notably the removal of silica from solution through adsorption on clay minerals, are transitory and will not affect the long-term corrosion rate of the Swiss reference glasses. Iron corrosion products are also known to bind silica, but present data are not sufficient to quantify their influence on the long-term rate. (author)

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Bubbling in a Viscous Fluid for Validation of Waste Glass Melter Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abboud, Alexander William [Idaho National Laboratory; Guillen, Donna Post [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-01-01

    At the Hanford site, radioactive waste stored in underground tanks is slated for vitrification for final disposal. A comprehensive knowledge of the glass batch melting process will be useful in optimizing the process, which could potentially reduce the cost and duration of this multi-billion dollar cleanup effort. We are developing a high-fidelity heat transfer model of a Joule-heated ceramic lined melter to improve the understanding of the complex, inter-related processes occurring with the melter. The glass conversion rates in the cold cap layer are dependent on promoting efficient heat transfer. In practice, heat transfer is augmented by inserting air bubblers into the molten glass. However, the computational simulations must be validated to provide confidence in the solutions. As part of a larger validation procedure, it is beneficial to split the physics of the melter into smaller systems to validate individually. The substitution of molten glass for a simulant liquid with similar density and viscosity at room temperature provides a way to study mixing through bubbling as an isolated effect without considering the heat transfer dynamics. The simulation results are compared to experimental data obtained by the Vitreous State Laboratory at the Catholic University of America using bubblers placed within a large acrylic tank that is similar in scale to a pilot glass waste melter. Comparisons are made for surface area of the rising air bubbles between experiments and CFD simulations for a variety of air flow rates and bubble injection depths. Also, computed bubble rise velocity is compared to a well-accepted expression for bubble terminal velocity.

  13. Glass-ceramic waste forms for immobilization of the fluorinel-sodium, alumina, and zirconia calcines stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinjamuri, K. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Glass-ceramics appear to be very good candidate waste forms for immobilization of the calcined high level solid wastes, fluorinel-sodium (Fl/Na), alumina and zirconia that are stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Candidate experimental glass-ceramics were synthesized at ICPP by hot isostatically pressing (HIPing) a mixture of precompacted pilot plant calcine and additives. The glass-ceramic waste forms for immobilization of the Fl/Na, alumina, and zirconia calcines consist of 70 wt% Fl/Na calcine, 23.9 wt% SiO{sub 2}, 5 wt% Ti, 1.1 wt% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}; 70 wt% alumina calcine, 30 wt% SiO{sub 2}; and 70 wt% zirconia calcine, 20.25 wt% SiO{sub 2}, 5 wt% Ti, 2.25 wt% Na{sub 2}O, 1.75 wt% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.75 wt% Li{sub 2}O, respectively. The characteristics of the waste forms including density, chemical durability, glass and crystalline phases, and the microstructure are investigated. The 14-day MCC-1 total mass loss rates and the normalized elemental leach rates for aluminum, boron, calcium, cadmium, chromium, cesium, potassium, silicon, sodium, strontium, titanium, and zirconium are all less than 1 g/m{sup 2}-day. The crystalline phases for the Fl/Na and zirconia waste forms include zirconia, zircon, calcium fluoride, and titanates. In addition, cadmium sulphide in Fl/Na, and cadmium metal in zirconia waste form were also identified. The crystalline phases for the alumina waste form are alpha, gamma, and delta alumina, cristobalite, albite, and mullite. Glass phase separation was not observed in alumina and zirconia waste forms. The observed glass phase separation in Fl/Na waste form appears to be chemically durable.

  14. Kinetics of Cold-Cap Reactions for Vitrification of Nuclear Waste Glass Based on Simultaneous Differential Scanning Calorimetry - Thermogravimetry (DSC-TGA) and Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Pierce, David A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kruger, Albert A.; Chun, Jaehun; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-12-03

    For vitrifying nuclear waste glass, the feed, a mixture of waste with glass-forming and modifying additives, is charged onto the cold cap that covers 90-100% of the melt surface. The cold cap consists of a layer of reacting molten glass floating on the surface of the melt in an all-electric, continuous glass melter. As the feed moves through the cold cap, it undergoes chemical reactions and phase transitions through which it is converted to molten glass that moves from the cold cap into the melt pool. The process involves a series of reactions that generate multiple gases and subsequent mass loss and foaming significantly influence the mass and heat transfers. The rate of glass melting, which is greatly influenced by mass and heat transfers, affects the vitrification process and the efficiency of the immobilization of nuclear waste. We studied the cold-cap reactions of a representative waste glass feed using both the simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry thermogravimetry (DSC-TGA) and the thermogravimetry coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (TGA-GC-MS) as complementary tools to perform evolved gas analysis (EGA). Analyses from DSC-TGA and EGA on the cold-cap reactions provide a key element for the development of an advanced cold-cap model. It also helps to formulate melter feeds for higher production rate.

  15. Characterization of waste of soda-lime glass generated from lapping process to reuse as filler in composite materials as thermal insulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. P. Galvão

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe beneficiation plate process by soda-lime glass lapping in the glass industry generates, an untapped residue (waste. The waste of this material is sent to landfills, causing impact on the environment. This work aimed to characterize and evaluate the waste of soda-lime glass (GP lapping. After its acquisition, the GP was processed by grinding and sieving and further characterized by the chemical/mineralogical analysis (XRF, EDS and XRD, SEM morphology, particle size by laser diffraction, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA and DSC and thermophysical analyses. It was observed that the GP particles are irregular and micrometric with the predominant presence of Na, Si and Ca elements characteristic of amorphous soda-lime glass. The assessment of the chemical/mineralogical, morphological, thermophysical and thermal gravimetric characteristics of GP suggest its reuse as reinforcing fillers or filler in composite materials to obtain thermal insulation.

  16. Effect of Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock on the dissolution rate of the SON68 simulated nuclear waste glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeway, James J.; Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Ribet, Solange; El Mendili, Yassine; Schumacher, Stéphan; Grambow, Bernd

    2015-04-01

    Long-term storage of high-level nuclear waste glass in France is expected to occur in an engineered barrier system (EBS) located in a subsurface Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay rock formation in the Paris Basin in northeastern France. Understanding the behavior of glass dissolution in the complex system is critical to be able to reliably model the performance of the glass in this complex environment. To simulate this multi-barrier repository scenario in the laboratory, several tests have been performed to measure glass dissolution rates of the simulated high-level nuclear waste glass, SON68, in the presence of COx claystone at 90 °C. Experiments utilized a High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) pump to pass simulated Bure site COx pore water through a reaction cell containing SON68 placed between two COx claystone cores for durations up to 200 days. Silicon concentrations at the outlet were similar in all experiments, even the blank experiment with only the COx claystone (∼4 mg/L at 25 °C and ∼15 mg/L at 90 °C). The steady-state pH of the effluent, measured at room temperature, was roughly 7.1 for the blank and 7.3-7.6 for the glass-containing experiments demonstrating the pH buffering capacity of the COx claystone. Dissolution rates for SON68 in the presence of the claystone were elevated compared to those obtained from flow-through experiments conducted with SON68 without claystone in silica-saturated solutions at the same temperature and similar pH values. Additionally, through surface examination of the monoliths, the side of the monolith in direct contact with the claystone was seen to have a corrosion thickness 2.5× greater than the side in contact with the bulk glass powder. Results from one experiment containing 32Si-doped SON68 also suggest that the movement of Si through the claystone is controlled by a chemically coupled transport with a Si retention factor, Kd, of 900 mL/g.

  17. Recycling of Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Damgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Glass is used for many purposes, but in the waste system glass is predominantly found in terms of beverage and food containers with a relatively short lifetime before ending up in the waste. Furthermore there is a large amount of flat glass used in building materials which also ends up in the waste...... system; this glass though has a long lifetime before ending up in the waste. Altogether these product types add up to 82% of the production of the European glass industry (IPCC, 2001). Recycling of glass in terms of cleaning and refilling of bottles as well as the use of broken glass in the production...... of new glass containers is well established in the glass industry. This chapter describes briefly howglass is produced and howwaste glass is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of glass recycling....

  18. Storing Waste in Ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourcier, W L; Sickafus, K

    2004-07-20

    result of waste processing. A number of ceramic waste forms have been developed that minimize these problems and provide a potentially useful host for radionuclides. For ceramics, the mineralogy can be tailored to the waste stream by selecting solid mineral phases with structural sites that can accommodate the waste elements, as well as newly formed radioactive decay elements. Radiation damage can be minimized by selecting mineral phases that allow atoms to renew or regain their original crystalline structure, a process known as annealing. For example, actinide phosphate minerals anneal more readily than actinide silicate minerals. Despite the superior thermodynamic stability of crystalline materials, borosilicate glasses have become the preferred waste forms. One reason is that the processing technologies associated with this glass are believed to be easier to adapt to handling highly radioactive material.

  19. A mechanistic model for long-term nuclear waste glass dissolution integrating chemical affinity and interfacial diffusion barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Teqi; Jivkov, Andrey P.; Li, Weiping; Liang, Wei; Wang, Yu; Xu, Hui; Han, Xiaoyuan

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the alteration of nuclear waste glass in geological repository conditions is critical element of the analysis of repository retention function. Experimental observations of glass alterations provide a general agreement on the following regimes: inter-diffusion, hydrolysis process, rate drop, residual rate and, under very particular conditions, resumption of alteration. Of these, the mechanisms controlling the rate drop and the residual rate remain a subject of dispute. This paper offers a critical review of the two most competitive models related to these regimes: affinity-limited dissolution and diffusion barrier. The limitations of these models are highlighted by comparison of their predictions with available experimental evidence. Based on the comprehensive discussion of the existing models, a new mechanistic model is proposed as a combination of the chemical affinity and diffusion barrier concepts. It is demonstrated how the model can explain experimental phenomena and data, for which the existing models are shown to be not fully adequate.

  20. WASTE LOADING ENHANCEMENTS FOR HANFORD LAW GLASSES VLS-10R1790-1 FINAL REPORT REV 0 12/1/2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRUGER AA; MULLER IS; JOSEPH I; MATLACK KS; GAN H; PEGG IL

    2010-12-28

    About 50 million gallons of high-level mixed waste is currently stored in underground tanks at The United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site in the State of Washington. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will provide DOE's Office of River Protection (ORP) with a means of treating this waste by vitrification for subsequent disposal. The tank waste will be separated into low- and high-activity waste fractions, which will then be vitrified respectively into Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) and Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) products. The ILAW product will be disposed in an engineered facility on the Hanford site while the IHLW product will likely be directed to a national deep geological disposal facility for high-level nuclear waste. The ILAW and IHLW products must meet a variety of requirements with respect to protection of the environment before they can be accepted for disposal. The Office of River Protection is currently examining options to optimize the Low Activity Waste (LAW) Facility and LAW glass waste form. One option under evaluation is to enhance the waste processing rate of the vitrification plant currently under construction. It is likely that the capacity of the LAW vitrification plant can be increased incrementally by implementation of a variety of low-risk, high-probability changes, either separately or in combination. These changes include: (1) Operating at the higher processing rates demonstrated at the LAW pilot melter; (2) Increasing the glass pool surface area within the existing external melter envelope; (3) Increasing the glass waste loading; and (4) Operating the melter at a slightly higher temperature. The Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of The Catholic University of America (CUA) and Energy Solutions, Inc. have evaluated several of these potential incremental improvements for ORP in support of its evaluation of WTP LAW facility optimization. Some of these incremental

  1. Balance of oxygen throughout the conversion of a high-level waste melter feed to glass

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lee, S.M.; Hrma, P.; Kloužek, Jaroslav; Pokorný, R.; Hujová, Miroslava; Dixon, D.R.; Schweiger, M. J.; Kruger, A.A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 16 (2017), s. 13113-13118 ISSN 0272-8842 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : oxygen mass balance * feed-to- glass conversion * evolved gas * oxygen partial pressure * Fe redox ratio Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 2.986, year: 2016

  2. Americium and trivalent Lanthanides incorporation in high-level waste glass-ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardez-Giboire, Isabelle; Kidari, Abdessamad; Magnin, Magali; Dussossoy, Jean-Luc; Peuget, Sylvain; Caraballo, Richard; Tribet, Magaly; Doreau, Franck; Jégou, Christophe

    2017-08-01

    The incorporation and partitioning of americium and trivalent lanthanides were investigated in aluminoborosilicate glass-ceramics with apatite-like silicate crystals of general formula Ca2(Ln,Am)8(SiO4)6O2. A microstructural and structural study of two glass-ceramics containing Am2O3 - La2O3 or Nd2O3 - La2O3, respectively, was carried out by XRD, SEM/EDS and EMPA so as to assess a comparison of Lanthanides and Actinides partitioning into apatite crystals and residual glass. Moreover, Raman analyses of residual glasses were performed to compare the role of Am and Nd on the glassy structure. Results put forward that shape, composition, Ln/Am stoichiometry and cell parameters of apatite crystals of both (Am-La) and (Nd-La) glass-ceramics are very close. This paper thus shows similar results for (Am-La) and (Nd-La) glass-ceramics in terms of apatite/glass partitioning and in terms of structural role on glassy structure. It can be therefore put forward that Nd3+ and Am3+ behaviors are close, either in the glass or in the crystalline structure.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED SODIUM TITANATE FOR THE PRETREATMENT OF NUCLEAR WASTE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D

    2008-01-22

    High-level nuclear waste produced from fuel reprocessing operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) requires pretreatment to remove Cs-137, Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radionuclides (i.e., actinides) prior to disposal onsite as low level waste. Separation processes planned at SRS include sorption of Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radionuclides onto monosodium titanate (MST) and caustic side solvent extraction, for Cs-137 removal. The MST and separated Cs-137 will be encapsulated into a borosilicate glass waste form for eventual entombment at the federal repository. The predominant alpha-emitting radionuclides in the highly alkaline waste solutions include plutonium isotopes Pu-238, Pu-239 and Pu-240. This paper describes recent results to produce an improved sodium titanate material that exhibits increased removal kinetics and capacity for Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radionuclides compared to the baseline MST material.

  4. Design and construction innovations of the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKibben, J.M.; Pair, C.R.; Bethmann, H.K.

    1990-01-01

    Construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is essentially complete. The facility is designed to convert high level radioactive waste, now contained in large steel tanks as aqueous salts and sludge, into borosilicate glass which will solidify in stainless steel canisters. All processing of the radioactive material and operations in a radioactive environment will be done remotely. The stringent requirements dictated by remote operation and new approaches to the glassification process led to the development of a number of first-of-a-kind pieces of equipment, new construction fabrication and erection techniques, and new applications of old techniques. The design features and construction methods used in the vitrification building and its equipment were to accomplish the objective of providing a state-of-the-art vitrification facility. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Reuse of waste of glass wool in the production of mortar; Reaproveitamento do residuo de la de vidro na producao de argamassa