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Sample records for washington photometric system

  1. System for clinical photometric stereo endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durr, Nicholas J.; González, Germán.; Lim, Daryl; Traverso, Giovanni; Nishioka, Norman S.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Parot, Vicente

    2014-02-01

    Photometric stereo endoscopy is a technique that captures information about the high-spatial-frequency topography of the field of view simultaneously with a conventional color image. Here we describe a system that will enable photometric stereo endoscopy to be clinically evaluated in the large intestine of human patients. The clinical photometric stereo endoscopy system consists of a commercial gastroscope, a commercial video processor, an image capturing and processing unit, custom synchronization electronics, white light LEDs, a set of four fibers with diffusing tips, and an alignment cap. The custom pieces that come into contact with the patient are composed of biocompatible materials that can be sterilized before use. The components can then be assembled in the endoscopy suite before use. The resulting endoscope has the same outer diameter as a conventional colonoscope (14 mm), plugs into a commercial video processor, captures topography and color images at 15 Hz, and displays the conventional color image to the gastroenterologist in real-time. We show that this system can capture a color and topographical video in a tubular colon phantom, demonstrating robustness to complex geometries and motion. The reported system is suitable for in vivo evaluation of photometric stereo endoscopy in the human large intestine.

  2. Photometric Observation and Light Curve Analysis of Binary System ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Photometric observations of the over-contact binary ER ORI were performed during November 2007 and February to April 2008 with the 51 cm telescope of Biruni Observatory of Shiraz University in U, B and V filters (Johnson system) and an RCA 4509 photomultiplier. We used these data to obtain the light curves and ...

  3. Miniature photometric stereo system for textile surface structure reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Kampouris, Christos; Malassiotis, Sotiris

    2013-04-01

    In this work a miniature photometric stereo system is presented, targeting the three-dimensional structural reconstruction of various fabric types. This is a supportive module to a robot system, attempting to solve the well known "laundry problem". The miniature device has been designed for mounting onto the robot gripper. It is composed of a low-cost off-the-shelf camera, operating in macro mode, and eight light emitting diodes. The synchronization between image acquisition and lighting direction is controlled by an Arduino Nano board and software triggering. The ambient light has been addressed by a cylindrical enclosure. The direction of illumination is recovered by locating the reflection or the brightest point on a mirror sphere, while a flatfielding process compensates for the non-uniform illumination. For the evaluation of this prototype, the classical photometric stereo methodology has been used. The preliminary results on a large number of textiles are very promising for the successful integration of the miniature module to the robot system. The required interaction with the robot is implemented through the estimation of the Brenner's focus measure. This metric successfully assesses the focus quality with reduced time requirements in comparison to other well accepted focus metrics. Besides the targeting application, the small size of the developed system makes it a very promising candidate for applications with space restrictions, like the quality control in industrial production lines or object recognition based on structural information and in applications where easiness in operation and light-weight are required, like those in the Biomedical field, and especially in dermatology.

  4. The walraven VBLUW photometric system : 32 years of 5-channel photometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pel, Jan Willem; Lub, Jan; Sterken, C

    2007-01-01

    An overview is given of the Walraven V BLUW photometric system. We concentrate on the aspects of stability, internal and external precison of the standard system, flux calibration and theoretical model grids.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Metallicities in the Geneva photometric system (Netopil, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netopil, M.

    2017-06-01

    The tables include metallicities for some thousands of field stars based on new calibrations for the Geneva photometric system. Table 1 includes mean photometric metallicities by combining new results with data of the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey (Casagrande et al., 2011A&A...530A.138C). Table 2 lists photometric metallicities for early A- and F-type stars. The new metallicity calibrations are almost unaffected by the reddening in this spectral type range. Finally, we provide open cluster metallicities based on Geneva data in table 3. These results are combined with other photometric estimates to derive weighted mean metallicities, an update of the list by Netopil et al., 2016, Cat. J/A+A/585/150. (3 data files).

  6. Improving photometric calibration of meteor video camera systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Steven; Kingery, Aaron; Suggs, Robert

    2017-09-01

    We present the results of new calibration tests performed by the NASA Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) designed to help quantify and minimize systematic uncertainties in meteor photometry from video camera observations. These systematic uncertainties can be categorized by two main sources: an imperfect understanding of the linearity correction for the MEO's Watec 902H2 Ultimate video cameras and uncertainties in meteor magnitudes arising from transformations between the Watec camera's Sony EX-View HAD bandpass and the bandpasses used to determine reference star magnitudes. To address the first point, we have measured the linearity response of the MEO's standard meteor video cameras using two independent laboratory tests on eight cameras. Our empirically determined linearity correction is critical for performing accurate photometry at low camera intensity levels. With regards to the second point, we have calculated synthetic magnitudes in the EX bandpass for reference stars. These synthetic magnitudes enable direct calculations of the meteor's photometric flux within the camera bandpass without requiring any assumptions of its spectral energy distribution. Systematic uncertainties in the synthetic magnitudes of individual reference stars are estimated at ∼ 0.20 mag , and are limited by the available spectral information in the reference catalogs. These two improvements allow for zero-points accurate to ∼ 0.05 - 0.10 mag in both filtered and unfiltered camera observations with no evidence for lingering systematics. These improvements are essential to accurately measuring photometric masses of individual meteors and source mass indexes.

  7. Photometrics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose:The Photometrics Laboratory provides the capability to measure, analyze and characterize radiometric and photometric properties of light sources and filters,...

  8. CCD photometric study of the misclassified binary system V380 Cas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, A.; Christopoulou, E.

    2012-01-01

    A photometric study of the eclipsing binary V380 Cas is presented for the first time with the 35.5cm Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope at the University of Patras, Observatory from June 2009 to July 2010. The BVRI light curves were observed and 7 new minima were calculated. No secondary minimum has been detected, indicating that its original period was wrong. The complete light curves are analyzed with the Wilson-Devinney code (PHOEBE) and the first photometric solution is derived. The system is probably a detached one with equal components and double period, contrary to its previous classification as Algol type. The first O-C analysis of the system based on all timings of minima is presented and the first precision ephemeris is estimated. Also the probability of third light is examined from both O-C and photometric solution.

  9. Improving Photometric Calibration of Meteor Video Camera Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Steven; Kingery, Aaron; Suggs, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of new calibration tests performed by the NASA Meteoroid Environment Oce (MEO) designed to help quantify and minimize systematic uncertainties in meteor photometry from video camera observations. These systematic uncertainties can be categorized by two main sources: an imperfect understanding of the linearity correction for the MEO's Watec 902H2 Ultimate video cameras and uncertainties in meteor magnitudes arising from transformations between the Watec camera's Sony EX-View HAD bandpass and the bandpasses used to determine reference star magnitudes. To address the rst point, we have measured the linearity response of the MEO's standard meteor video cameras using two independent laboratory tests on eight cameras. Our empirically determined linearity correction is critical for performing accurate photometry at low camera intensity levels. With regards to the second point, we have calculated synthetic magnitudes in the EX bandpass for reference stars. These synthetic magnitudes enable direct calculations of the meteor's photometric ux within the camera band-pass without requiring any assumptions of its spectral energy distribution. Systematic uncertainties in the synthetic magnitudes of individual reference stars are estimated at 0:20 mag, and are limited by the available spectral information in the reference catalogs. These two improvements allow for zero-points accurate to 0:05 ?? 0:10 mag in both ltered and un ltered camera observations with no evidence for lingering systematics.

  10. BVRI Standardization of the CCD Photometric System of Sobaeksan Optical Astronomy Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Hae Jeong

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A total of 792 CCD images of V523 Cas were obtained on four nights of Jan. 2003 with the BVRI CCD photometric system attached to a 61cm reflector of Sobaeksan Optical Astronomy Observatory (SOAO. The 17 standard stars in the images were used to establish transformation relations between our BVRI system and the standard Johnson-Cousins BVRI system. We derived the tentative equations of transformation between two photometric systems as follows; V = v-0.0689(B-V+0.0063 B-V = 1.3197(b-v-0.1733 V-R = 0.9210(v-r-0.1309 R-I = 0.8892(r-i-0.1055. Using these equations standard V magnitudes and their color indexes (B-V, V-R, R-I for 57 stars in the field of the image were determined.

  11. Reliability of a commercial photometric system for analysis of heavy metals in sewage sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwedt, G.; Hoeckendorf, A.

    1986-04-01

    Comparisons of methods for the analysis of lead, cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, and zinc in sewage sludges are presented. The results of photometric determinations by means of a complete commercial system are compared to those of instrumental analysis by AAS and OES-ICP. In three sewage sludge samples and one sludge sample certificated by EG, similar values were obtained for metal contents between 8 ppm (cadmium) and 3300 ppm (zinc).

  12. Photometric Study of the W UMa System U Pegasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.S. Lee

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available A total of 842 observations (277 in B, 282 in V, and 283 in R for U Pegasi were made in October of 1996 at Mt. Sobaek Observatory. With our data we constructed the BVR light curves and determined 5 times of minimum light. We also obtained physical parameters of the system by combined analysis of both light and radial velocity curves using the Wilson-Devinney code.

  13. Photometric Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xiao-Duan; Li, Jian-Yang; Clark, Beth Ellen; Golish, Dathon

    2018-01-01

    The OSIRIS-REx spacecraft, launched in September, 2016, will study the asteroid Bennu and return a sample from its surface to Earth in 2023. Bennu is a near-Earth carbonaceous asteroid which will provide insight into the formation and evolution of the solar system. OSIRIS-REx will first approach Bennu in August 2018 and will study the asteroid for approximately two years before sampling. OSIRIS-REx will develop its photometric model (including Lommel-Seelinger, ROLO, McEwen, Minnaert and Akimov) of Bennu with OCAM and OVIRS during the Detailed Survey mission phase. The model developed during this phase will be used to photometrically correct the OCAM and OVIRS data.Here we present the analysis of the error for the photometric corrections. Based on our testing data sets, we find:1. The model uncertainties is only correct when we use the covariance matrix to calculate, because the parameters are highly correlated.2. No evidence of domination of any parameter in each model.3. And both model error and the data error contribute to the final correction error comparably.4. We tested the uncertainty module on fake and real data sets, and find that model performance depends on the data coverage and data quality. These tests gave us a better understanding of how different model behave in different case.5. L-S model is more reliable than others. Maybe because the simulated data are based on L-S model. However, the test on real data (SPDIF) does show slight advantage of L-S, too. ROLO is not reliable to use when calculating bond albedo. The uncertainty of McEwen model is big in most cases. Akimov performs unphysical on SOPIE 1 data.6. Better use L-S as our default choice, this conclusion is based mainly on our test on SOPIE data and IPDIF.

  14. Photometric Observations of the Contact Binary System V523 Cassiopeiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Hae Jeong

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A total of 583 observations (193 in Δb, 190 in Δv, 200 in Δr for V523 Cas was made on 9 nights from September to December in 2008 using the 100 cm telescope with 2K CCD camera of the Chungbuk National University Observatory. With our data BVR light curves were constructed and 9 times of minimum light were determined. We also obtained physical parameters of the V523 Cas system by analysis of the BVR light curves using the Wilson-Devinney code.

  15. Adjustable and automated system to obtain 2-D photometric patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecpoyotl-Torres, M.; Vera-Dimas, J. G.; Martínez-Fabián, S. E.; Mendoza-Zúñiga, J. L.; Escobedo-Alatorre, J.; Ibarra-Manzano, O. G.; Grimalsky, V. V.

    2013-09-01

    A complete adjustable and automated system has been developed on the base of three blocks: the first one is the mechanical and adjustable structure, which is composed by a mobile base and a rectangular arc, where the photodetector is located. The structure describes semi-spherical trajectories by means of two servomotors. Its lightweight and robustness constitutes two advantages which make it portable. The second stage corresponds to the automation of the structure movements. For controlling the motors and data acquisition, a microcontroller is employed that in turns helps keeping the cost of the overall system low. One of the servomotors is located on the lateral axis of the device; that displaces the sensor along a semi-circular trajectory of 160°, almost half meridians; the other one is located at the base of the illumination source, which enables it to realize an almost complete rotation around its axis. Finally, the last stage is formed by the graphical interface. The communication protocol between the data acquisition stage and the computer is USART. The graphical user interface (GUI) is developed using Visual C#. In the same window the data acquisition deployment and the data graph generator are given; the graphs can be shown in a polar or Cartesian formats showing more than one curve, if necessary, avoiding the use of additional software. The GUI keeps the low cost of the device, obtaining a comprehensive solution to generate the irradiance patterns of light sources.

  16. Photometric Observations of the Contact Binary System V523 Cassiopeiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Hae Jeong

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A total of 920 observations (230 in Delta B, 230 in Delta V, 230 in Delta R, 230 in Delta I for V523 Cas were made on 5 nights from January 6 to 24 in 2003 using the 61cm telescope with 2K CCD camera of the Sobaeksan Optical Astronomy Observatory of KASI. From our observations 9 times of minimum light were newly determined. Combined analysis of our new BVRI light curves with the double-lined radial velocity curves of the Rucinski et al.'s (2003 were made with the 2004 Wilson-Devinney (WD binary model to yield new physical parameters of the V523 system. Small asymmetries in light curves were explained with the adoption of a cool spot on the hot primary and a hot spot on the cool secondary.

  17. Open-Source Photometric System for Enzymatic Nitrate Quantification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B T Wittbrodt

    Full Text Available Nitrate, the most oxidized form of nitrogen, is regulated to protect people and animals from harmful levels as there is a large over abundance due to anthropogenic factors. Widespread field testing for nitrate could begin to address the nitrate pollution problem, however, the Cadmium Reduction Method, the leading certified method to detect and quantify nitrate, demands the use of a toxic heavy metal. An alternative, the recently proposed Environmental Protection Agency Nitrate Reductase Nitrate-Nitrogen Analysis Method, eliminates this problem but requires an expensive proprietary spectrophotometer. The development of an inexpensive portable, handheld photometer will greatly expedite field nitrate analysis to combat pollution. To accomplish this goal, a methodology for the design, development, and technical validation of an improved open-source water testing platform capable of performing Nitrate Reductase Nitrate-Nitrogen Analysis Method. This approach is evaluated for its potential to i eliminate the need for toxic chemicals in water testing for nitrate and nitrite, ii reduce the cost of equipment to perform this method for measurement for water quality, and iii make the method easier to carryout in the field. The device is able to perform as well as commercial proprietary systems for less than 15% of the cost for materials. This allows for greater access to the technology and the new, safer nitrate testing technique.

  18. The First Comprehensive Photometric Study of the Neglected Binary System V345 Cassiopeiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Ji Jeong

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the first BVRI CCD photometric observations of V345 Cas made on 22 nights during the observing seasons in 2007-2008. Our light curves, resembling those of EB-type binary stars, are analyzed with the 2003 version of the Wilson- Devinney binary code. The photometric study shows that V345 Cas is a typical semi-detached binary system with the primary star being about ΔT = 2400 K hotter, two times more massive, but only 17% larger than the secondary star being filled with it's Roche-lobe. The orbit has a relatively large inclination of about 88°. A cool spot on the secondary component is modeled to explain a small light curve asymmetry. Absolute dimensions and related radiometric parameters of the eclipsing pair are calculated and their evolutionary states are discussed with the HR diagrams of mass-radius and temperature-luminosity. A period analysis of all available times of minima, including our measurements, indicates that the orbital period may vary in a cyclical way, unfortunately the secondary period for the variation can not be uniquely determined because of lack of present timing data.

  19. Metallicity calibrations for dwarf stars and giants in the Geneva photometric system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netopil, Martin

    2017-08-01

    We use the most homogeneous Geneva seven-colour photometric system to derive new metallicity calibrations for early A- to K-type stars that cover both, dwarf stars and giants. The calibrations are based on several spectroscopic data sets that were merged to a common scale, and we applied them to open cluster data to obtain an additional proof of the metallicity scale and accuracy. In total, metallicities of 54 open clusters are presented. The accuracy of the calibrations for single stars is in general below 0.1 dex, but for the open cluster sample with mean values based on several stars we find a much better precision, a scatter as low as about 0.03 dex. Furthermore, we combine the new results with another comprehensive photometric data set to present a catalogue of mean metallicities for more than 3000 F- and G-type dwarf stars with σ ∼ 0.06 dex. The list was extended by more than 1200 hotter stars up to about 8500 K (or spectral type A3) by taking advantage of their almost reddening free characteristic in the new Geneva metallicity calibrations. These two large samples are well suited as primary or secondary calibrators of other data, and we already identified about 20 spectroscopic data sets that show offsets up to about 0.4 dex.

  20. A study of B-type supergiants with the uvby,beta photometric system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, E.-H.

    1983-06-01

    The applicability of the uvby,beta photometric system to the classification and study of B-type supergiants (BTS) is investigated using published data on 157 BTS and observations of 17 BTS made with the 36-in. reflector at McDonald Observatory. The results are presented in tabular form and analyzed to produce preliminary calibrations of luminosity class vs. beta index and of absolute magnitude (Mv) vs. beta (or delta Mv vs. delta beta) for four associations of stars. The effectiveness of various color indices as temperature indicators is discussed. It is shown that there is good correspondence between MK and uvby,beta classifications of B-type main-sequence stars, giants, and BTS, confirming the usefulness of the uvby,beta system in further research on BTS.

  1. The H,G_1,G_2 photometric system with scarce observational data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penttilä, A.; Granvik, M.; Muinonen, K.; Wilkman, O.

    2014-07-01

    The H,G_1,G_2 photometric system was officially adopted at the IAU General Assembly in Beijing, 2012. The system replaced the H,G system from 1985. The 'photometric system' is a parametrized model V(α; params) for the magnitude-phase relation of small Solar System bodies, and the main purpose is to predict the magnitude at backscattering, H := V(0°), i.e., the (absolute) magnitude of the object. The original H,G system was designed using the best available data in 1985, but since then new observations have been made showing certain features, especially near backscattering, to which the H,G function has troubles adjusting to. The H,G_1,G_2 system was developed especially to address these issues [1]. With a sufficient number of high-accuracy observations and with a wide phase-angle coverage, the H,G_1,G_2 system performs well. However, with scarce low-accuracy data the system has troubles producing a reliable fit, as would any other three-parameter nonlinear function. Therefore, simultaneously with the H,G_1,G_2 system, a two-parameter version of the model, the H,G_{12} system, was introduced [1]. The two-parameter version ties the parameters G_1,G_2 into a single parameter G_{12} by a linear relation, and still uses the H,G_1,G_2 system in the background. This version dramatically improves the possibility to receive a reliable phase-curve fit to scarce data. The amount of observed small bodies is increasing all the time, and so is the need to produce estimates for the absolute magnitude/diameter/albedo and other size/composition related parameters. The lack of small-phase-angle observations is especially topical for near-Earth objects (NEOs). With these, even the two- parameter version faces problems. The previous procedure with the H,G system in such circumstances has been that the G-parameter has been fixed to some constant value, thus only fitting a single-parameter function. In conclusion, there is a definitive need for a reliable procedure to produce

  2. Geology and photometric variation of solar system bodies with minor atmospheres: implications for solid exoplanets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yuka; Kimura, Jun; Dohm, James; Ohtake, Makiko

    2014-09-01

    A reasonable basis for future astronomical investigations of exoplanets lies in our best knowledge of the planets and satellites in the Solar System. Solar System bodies exhibit a wide variety of surface environments, even including potential habitable conditions beyond Earth, and it is essential to know how they can be characterized from outside the Solar System. In this study, we provide an overview of geological features of major Solar System solid bodies with minor atmospheres (i.e., the terrestrial Moon, Mercury, the Galilean moons, and Mars) that affect surface albedo at local to global scale, and we survey how they influence point-source photometry in the UV/visible/near IR (i.e., the reflection-dominant range). We simulate them based on recent mapping products and also compile observed light curves where available. We show a 5-50% peak-to-trough variation amplitude in one spin rotation associated with various geological processes including heterogeneous surface compositions due to igneous activities, interaction with surrounding energetic particles, and distribution of grained materials. Some indications of these processes are provided by the amplitude and wavelength dependence of variation in combinations of the time-averaged spectra. We also estimate the photometric precision needed to detect their spin rotation rates through periodogram analysis. Our survey illustrates realistic possibilities for inferring the detailed properties of solid exoplanets with future direct imaging observations. Key Words: Planetary environments-Planetary geology-Solar System-Extrasolar terrestrial planets.

  3. Photometric Calibration and Image Stitching for a Large Field of View Multi-Camera System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A new compact large field of view (FOV multi-camera system is introduced. The camera is based on seven tiny complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor sensor modules covering over 160° × 160° FOV. Although image stitching has been studied extensively, sensor and lens differences have not been considered in previous multi-camera devices. In this study, we have calibrated the photometric characteristics of the multi-camera device. Lenses were not mounted on the sensor in the process of radiometric response calibration to eliminate the influence of the focusing effect of uniform light from an integrating sphere. Linearity range of the radiometric response, non-linearity response characteristics, sensitivity, and dark current of the camera response function are presented. The R, G, and B channels have different responses for the same illuminance. Vignetting artifact patterns have been tested. The actual luminance of the object is retrieved by sensor calibration results, and is used to blend images to make panoramas reflect the objective luminance more objectively. This compensates for the limitation of stitching images that are more realistic only through the smoothing method. The dynamic range limitation of can be resolved by using multiple cameras that cover a large field of view instead of a single image sensor with a wide-angle lens. The dynamic range is expanded by 48-fold in this system. We can obtain seven images in one shot with this multi-camera system, at 13 frames per second.

  4. Realization of the Vilnius photometric system for CCD-observations of selected sky areas at the Andrushivka Astronomical Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andruk, V.; Butenko, G.; Gerashchenko, O.; Ivashchenko, Yu.; Kovalchuk, G.; Lokot', V.; Samoylov, V.

    2005-06-01

    We describe a set of glass UPXYZVS filters of the Vilnius photometric system of the Andrushivka Astronomical Observatory in Zhytomyr Region (Ukraine) [7]. They are installed at the Zeiss-600 Cassegrain reflector together with the 15-bit 1024×1024 CCD-camera S1C-017. The response curves of instrumental photometric systems are presented and a comparison of them with a standard system are analysed. Test observations in the Vilnius system of the star cluster IC 4665 with the Andrushivka filters were carried out in May--June 2003. The MIDAS/ROMAFOT and ASTROIMAGE software is adapted for digital processing of CCD-images of stellar fields. Comprehensive ground-based observations are being planned to design a catalogue of primary UPXYZVS CCD-standards in selected areas of the sky where are with radio sources, globular and open clusters, etc.

  5. A Photometric Stereo Using Re-Projected Images for Active Stereo Vision System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keonhwa Jung

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In optical 3D shape measurement, stereo vision with structured light can measure 3D scan data with high accuracy and is used in many applications, but fine surface detail is difficult to obtain. On the other hand, photometric stereo can capture surface details but has disadvantages, in that its 3D data accuracy drops and it requires multiple light sources. When the two measurement methods are combined, more accurate 3D scan data and detailed surface features can be obtained at the same time. In this paper, we present a 3D optical measurement technique that uses re-projection of images to implement photometric stereo without an external light source. 3D scan data is enhanced by combining normal vector from this photometric stereo method, and the result is evaluated with the ground truth.

  6. Realization of Vilnius UPXYZVS photometric system for AltaU42 CCD camera at the MAO NAS of Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vid'Machenko, A. P.; Andruk, V. M.; Samoylov, V. S.; Delets, O. S.; Nevodovsky, P. V.; Ivashchenko, Yu. M.; Kovalchuk, G. U.

    2005-06-01

    The description of two-inch glass filters of the Vilnius UPXYZVS photometric system, which are made at the Main Astronomical Observatory of NAS of Ukraine for AltaU42 CCD camera with format of 2048×2048 pixels, is presented in the paper. Reaction curves of instrumental system are shown. Estimations of minimal star's magnitudes for each filter's band in comparison with the visual V one are obtained. New software for automation of CCD frames processing is developed in program shell of LINUX/MIDAS/ROMAFOT. It is planned to carry out observations with the purpose to create the catalogue of primary UPXYZVS CCD standards in selected field of the sky for some radio-sources, globular and open clusters, etc. Numerical estimations of astrometric and photometric accuracy are obtained.

  7. Photometric and spectroscopic evidence for a dense ring system around Centaur Chariklo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffard, R.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Ortiz, J. L.; Alvarez-Candal, A.; Sicardy, B.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Morales, N.; Colazo, C.; Fernández-Valenzuela, E.; Braga-Ribas, F.

    2014-08-01

    Context. A stellar occultation observed on 3rd June 2013 revealed the presence of two dense and narrow rings separated by a small gap around the Centaur object (10 199) Chariklo. The composition of these rings is not known. We suspect that water ice is present in the rings, as is the case for Saturn and other rings around the giant planets. Aims: In this work, we aim to determine if the variability in the absolute magnitude of Chariklo and the temporal variation of the spectral ice feature, even when it disappeared in 2007, can be explained by an icy ring system whose aspect angle changes with time. Methods: We explained the variations on the absolute magnitude of Chariklo and its ring by modeling the light reflected by a system as the one described above. Using X-shooter at VLT, we obtained a new reflectance spectra. We compared this new set of data with the ones available in the literature. We showed how the water ice feature is visible in 2013 in accordance with the ring configuration, which had an opening angle of nearly 34° in 2013. Finally, we also used models of light scattering to fit the visible and near-infrared spectra that shows different characteristics to obtain information on the composition of Chariklo and its rings. Results: We showed that absolute photometry of Chariklo from the literature and new photometric data that we obtained in 2013 can be explained by a ring of particles whose opening angle changes as a function of time. We used the two possible pole solutions for the ring system and found that only one of them, α = 151.30 ± 0.5, δ = 41.48 ± 0.2° (λ = 137.9 ± 0.5, β = 27.7 ± 0.2°), provides the right variation of the aspect angle with time to explain the photometry, whereas the other possible pole solution fails to explain the photometry. From spectral modeling, we derived the composition of the Chariklo surface and that of the rings using the result on the pole solution. Chariklo surface is composed with about 60% of amorphous

  8. Pharmacist prescribing within an integrated health system in Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Roger; Locke, Amanda; Potts, Catherine

    2016-09-15

    Pharmacist prescribing as part of a collaborative drug therapy agreement (CDTA) within an integrated health system in Washington is described. Virginia Mason Medical Center (VMMC) in Seattle, Washington, uses a team-based care model with broad-based CDTAs to provide quality patient care. The majority of patients are referred to the pharmacist after a diagnosis has been made and a clinical care plan has been started. The pharmacist manages the patient's care within his or her scope of practice as defined by state laws and further detailed by VMMC internal protocols. The pharmacist then documents in the electronic medical record the medication plan of care and other standard elements based on provider note templates. Medication prescribing and laboratory test ordering are the responsibilities of the pharmacist, as are any dosage adjustments or interpretations of laboratory test results. For some chronic diseases, the pharmacist may continue to see the patient indefinitely, replacing physician visits (e.g., for warfarin management). In more episodic care, the pharmacist may see the patient, optimize drug therapy, and then transition the patient back to the referring provider (e.g., for hypertension management). Integrating the pharmacist into the team has helped achieve optimal medication outcomes and increased patient satisfaction scores. The addition of the pharmacist into a team-based care model using a CDTA helped achieve optimal medication outcomes and increased patient satisfaction scores in an integrated health system. Integration was successful due to the collaborative support from physician leadership and ongoing physician involvement. Hands-on leadership by the pharmacy department and clinic directors and the health system's adoption of Lean methodology fostered an environment for developing innovative care models. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. THE FIRST PHOTOMETRIC STUDY AND ORBITAL SOLUTION/PERIOD ANALYSIS OF THE MISCLASSIFIED BINARY SYSTEM V380 CAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopoulou, P.-E.; Papageorgiou, A. [Department of Physics, University of Patras, 26500 Patra (Greece); Kleidis, S. [Helliniki Astronomiki Enosi, Athens (Greece); Tsantilas, S. [Department of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, Faculty of Physics, Athens University, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos 15784, Athens (Greece)

    2012-02-15

    We present the first multicolor CCD photometry for the eclipsing binary V380 Cassiopeia (V380 Cas) observed on 34 nights in 2009 and 2010 at the University of Patras Observatory. The PHOEBE program based on the Wilson-Devinney algorithm was used to analyze the first complete BVR{sub c} I{sub c} light curves. It was found that V380 Cas was misclassified and it is a well-detached system consisting of two main-sequence stars. A range of solutions found to give satisfactory fits to the observations is also investigated. The first orbital solution based on the photometric mass ratio q = 1.08 of almost equal temperatures and masses and orbital inclination of i = 86.{sup 0}57 was obtained. In addition, based on all available times of light minima, including 12 new ones, a new orbital period of P = 2.714539884 days is given.

  10. The First Photometric Study and Orbital Solution/Period Analysis of the Misclassified Binary System V380 Cas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopoulou, P.-E.; Papageorgiou, A.; Kleidis, S.; Tsantilas, S.

    2012-02-01

    We present the first multicolor CCD photometry for the eclipsing binary V380 Cassiopeia (V380 Cas) observed on 34 nights in 2009 and 2010 at the University of Patras Observatory. The PHOEBE program based on the Wilson-Devinney algorithm was used to analyze the first complete BVRc Ic light curves. It was found that V380 Cas was misclassified and it is a well-detached system consisting of two main-sequence stars. A range of solutions found to give satisfactory fits to the observations is also investigated. The first orbital solution based on the photometric mass ratio q = 1.08 of almost equal temperatures and masses and orbital inclination of i = 86fdg57 was obtained. In addition, based on all available times of light minima, including 12 new ones, a new orbital period of P = 2.714539884 days is given.

  11. 77 FR 41247 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Abolishment of the Washington, DC, Special Wage Schedule for Printing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... Printing Positions AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Interim rule with request for... Washington, DC, Federal Wage System (FWS) special wage schedule for printing and lithographic positions. Printing and lithographic employees in the Washington, DC, wage area will now be paid from the regular...

  12. CORS Baade-Wesselink method in the Walraven photometric system: the period-radius and the period-luminosity relation of classical Cepheids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molinaro, R.; Ripepi, V.; Marconi, M.; Bono, G.; Lub, J.; Pedicelli, S.; Pel, J. W.

    We present a new derivation of the CORS Baade-Wesselink method in the Walraven photometric system. We solved the complete Baade-Wesselink equation by calibrating the surface brightness function with a recent grid of atmosphere models. The new approach was adopted to estimate the mean radii of a

  13. 36 CFR 223.203 - Indirect substitution exception for National Forest System timber from within Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... exception for National Forest System timber from within Washington State. 223.203 Section 223.203 Parks... Indirect substitution exception for National Forest System timber from within Washington State. (a... Washington State could have been acquired by a person otherwise covered by the prohibition against indirect...

  14. 78 FR 1 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Abolishment of the Washington, DC, Special Wage Schedule for Printing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... Printing Positions AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Correcting amendment. SUMMARY: The..., 2012, abolishing the Washington, DC, Federal Wage System special wage schedule for printing and...

  15. A Full Automatic Device for Sampling Small Solution Volumes in Photometric Titration Procedure Based on Multicommuted Flow System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Sivanildo S.; Vieira, Gláucia P.; Reis, Boaventura F.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, an automatic device to deliver titrant solution into a titration chamber with the ability to determine the dispensed volume of solution, with good precision independent of both elapsed time and flow rate, is proposed. A glass tube maintained at the vertical position was employed as a container for the titrant solution. Electronic devices were coupled to the glass tube in order to control its filling with titrant solution, as well as the stepwise solution delivering into the titration chamber. The detection of the titration end point was performed employing a photometer designed using a green LED (λ=545 nm) and a phototransistor. The titration flow system comprised three-way solenoid valves, which were assembled to allow that the steps comprising the solution container loading and the titration run were carried out automatically. The device for the solution volume determination was designed employing an infrared LED (λ=930 nm) and a photodiode. When solution volume delivered from proposed device was within the range of 5 to 105 μl, a linear relationship (R = 0.999) between the delivered volumes and the generated potential difference was achieved. The usefulness of the proposed device was proved performing photometric titration of hydrochloric acid solution with a standardized sodium hydroxide solution and using phenolphthalein as an external indicator. The achieved results presented relative standard deviation of 1.5%. PMID:18317510

  16. BVR Standardization of the CCD Photometric System of Chungbuk National University Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Hae Jeong

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available BVR observations for 52 standard stars were performed using the 1-m reflecter with 2K CCD System of Chungbuk National University Observatory(CBNUO in 2008. We obtained 1,322 CCD images to establish a correlation between our bvr system and the standard Johnson-Cousins BVR system. We derived the tentative equations of transformation between then as follows; V = v-0.0303(B-V+0.0466 B-V = 1.3475(b-v-0.0251 V-R = 1.0641(v-r-0.0125 Using these equations the magnitudes in V, B-V, and V-R for 197 stars were obtained.

  17. Photometric study of selected cataclysmic variables II. Time-series photometry of nine systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadaki, C.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Stanishev, V.; Boumis, P.; Akras, S.; Sterken, C.

    2009-05-01

    We present time-series photometry of nine cataclysmic variables: EI UMa, V844 Her, V751 Cyg, V516 Cyg, GZ Cnc, TY Psc, V1315 Aql, ASAS J002511+1217.2, V1315 Aql and LN UMa. The observations were conducted at various observatories, covering 170 hours and comprising 7,850 data points in total. For the majority of targets we confirm previously reported periodicities and for some of them we give, for the first time through photometry, their underlying spectroscopic orbital period. For those dwarf-nova systems which we observed during both quiescence and outburst, the increase in brightness was accompanied by a decrease in the level of flickering. For the eclipsing system V1315 Aql we have covered 9 eclipses, and obtained a refined orbital ephemeris. We find that, during this long baseline of observations, no change in the orbital period of this system has occurred. V1315 Aql also shows eclipses of variable depth.

  18. CCD photometry in the Vilnius photometric systems. II. Analysis of a region in Lyra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smriglio, F.; Dasgupta, A.K. (Rome Univ. (IT). Ist. Astronomico); Nandy, K. (Royal Observatory, Edinburgh (UK)); Boyle, R.P. (Vatican Observatory, Rome (IT)); Straizys, V.; Janulis, R. (AN Litovskoj SSR, Vilnius (SU). Inst. Fiziki)

    1991-04-01

    Two-dimensional classification of 216 stars down to 17 mag based on their seven color photoelectric and CCD photometry in the Vilnius system is presented. Except for normal stars, several subdwarfs, metal-deficient giants, and stars of other peculiarities are suspected. Interstellar extinction is determined for normal stars in two areas north and south of globular cluster M56, as well as for a 1 square degree area around M56. The mean value of A{sub v} outside the galactic dust layer is {similar to} 0.75 mag.

  19. Multi-Agent System Supporting Automated Large-Scale Photometric Computations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Sȩdziwy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The technologies related to green energy, smart cities and similar areas being dynamically developed in recent years, face frequently problems of a computational nature rather than a technological one. The example is the ability of accurately predicting the weather conditions for PV farms or wind turbines. Another group of issues is related to the complexity of the computations required to obtain an optimal setup of a solution being designed. In this article, we present the case representing the latter group of problems, namely designing large-scale power-saving lighting installations. The term “large-scale” refers to an entire city area, containing tens of thousands of luminaires. Although a simple power reduction for a single street, giving limited savings, is relatively easy, it becomes infeasible for tasks covering thousands of luminaires described by precise coordinates (instead of simplified layouts. To overcome this critical issue, we propose introducing a formal representation of a computing problem and applying a multi-agent system to perform design-related computations in parallel. The important measure introduced in the article indicating optimization progress is entropy. It also allows for terminating optimization when the solution is satisfying. The article contains the results of real-life calculations being made with the help of the presented approach.

  20. 77 FR 26275 - Bonneville Power Administration; Montana-to-Washington Transmission System Upgrade Project EIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    ... Bonneville Power Administration; Montana-to-Washington Transmission System Upgrade Project EIS AGENCY... (including wind generators and power marketers) requested the use of BPA's transmission system to transmit their power. To determine if BPA could offer the service requested, BPA studied the transmission system...

  1. Photometrics at Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWilliams, J.Y.; Hill, R.A.; Hughes, R.L. (eds.)

    1990-07-01

    This report highlights Sandia National Laboratories' work in the following areas: photometrics and optical development; still and time-lapse photography; real-time motion photography; high-speed photography; image-motion photography; schlieren photography; ultra-high-speed photography; electronic imaging; shuttered video and high-speed video; infrared imaging radiometry; exoatmospheric photography and videography; microdensitometry and image analysis; and optical system design and development.

  2. Photometric and spectroscopic investigation of TW Draconis

    OpenAIRE

    Zejda, M.; Wolf, M.; Slechta, M.; Mikulasek, Z.; Zverko, J.; Svoboda, P.; Krticka, J.; Janik, J.; Bozic, H.

    2010-01-01

    Context. TW Draconis is one of the best studied Algol-type eclipsing binaries. There is significant evidence for miscellaneous physical processes between interacting binary components manifesting themselves by period and light curve changes. Aims. Obtaining new set of photometric and spectroscopic observations, we analysed them together with the older spectroscopic and photometric data to build model of this eclipsing system with respect to observed changes of O-C diagram and light curve. Met...

  3. Cooperative photometric redshift estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavuoti, S.; Tortora, C.; Brescia, M.; Longo, G.; Radovich, M.; Napolitano, N. R.; Amaro, V.; Vellucci, C.

    2017-06-01

    In the modern galaxy surveys photometric redshifts play a central role in a broad range of studies, from gravitational lensing and dark matter distribution to galaxy evolution. Using a dataset of ~ 25,000 galaxies from the second data release of the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) we obtain photometric redshifts with five different methods: (i) Random forest, (ii) Multi Layer Perceptron with Quasi Newton Algorithm, (iii) Multi Layer Perceptron with an optimization network based on the Levenberg-Marquardt learning rule, (iv) the Bayesian Photometric Redshift model (or BPZ) and (v) a classical SED template fitting procedure (Le Phare). We show how SED fitting techniques could provide useful information on the galaxy spectral type which can be used to improve the capability of machine learning methods constraining systematic errors and reduce the occurrence of catastrophic outliers. We use such classification to train specialized regression estimators, by demonstrating that such hybrid approach, involving SED fitting and machine learning in a single collaborative framework, is capable to improve the overall prediction accuracy of photometric redshifts.

  4. Photometric study of two eclipsing binary stars: Light curve analysis and system parameters for GU CMa and SWASP J011732.10+525204.9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokry, A.; Saad, S. M.; Hamdy, M. A.; Beheary, M. M.; Abolazm, M. S.; Gadallah, K. A.; El-Depsey, M. H.; Al-Gazzar, M. S.

    2018-02-01

    A new photometric study of two eclipsing binary systems (GU CMa and SWASP J011732.10+525204.9) is presented. The accepted solutions of analyzing the light curves revealed that GU CMa is a semi-detached system consisting of two early spectral type components, (B2 and B2.5) while SWASP J011732.10+525204.9 is a contact binary with two late type components (K2 and M1). The primary component of each system is the massive one. The geometric configuration indicates that SWASP J011732.10+525204.9 passes through a very critical phase in which each component exactly fills its limited lobe with zero fill out ratio. New times of minimum and the absolute physical parameters for each system are determined. The evolution status for each system has been investigated.

  5. Photometric, Spectroscopic, and Orbital Period Study of Three Early-type Semi-detached Systems: XZ Aql, UX Her, and AT Peg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zola, S.; Baştürk, Ö.; Liakos, A.; Gazeas, K.; Şenavcı, H. V.; Nelson, R. H.; Özavcı, İ.; Zakrzewski, B.; Yılmaz, M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a combined photometric, spectroscopic, and orbital period study of three early-type eclipsing binary systems: XZ Aql, UX Her, and AT Peg. As a result, we have derived the absolute parameters of their components and, on that basis, we discuss their evolutionary states. Furthermore, we compare their parameters with those of other binary systems and with theoretical models. An analysis of all available up-to-date times of minima indicated that all three systems studied here show cyclic orbital changes; their origin is discussed in detail. Finally, we performed a frequency analysis for possible pulsational behavior, and as a result we suggest that XZ Aql hosts a δ Scuti component.

  6. A web-based decision support system to enhance IPM programs in Washington tree fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Vincent P; Brunner, Jay F; Grove, Gary G; Petit, Brad; Tangren, Gerald V; Jones, Wendy E

    2010-06-01

    Integrated pest management (IPM) decision-making has become more information intensive in Washington State tree crops in response to changes in pesticide availability, the development of new control tactics (such as mating disruption) and the development of new information on pest and natural enemy biology. The time-sensitive nature of the information means that growers must have constant access to a single source of verified information to guide management decisions. The authors developed a decision support system for Washington tree fruit growers that integrates environmental data [140 Washington State University (WSU) stations plus weather forecasts from NOAA], model predictions (ten insects, four diseases and a horticultural model), management recommendations triggered by model status and a pesticide database that provides information on non-target impacts on other pests and natural enemies. A user survey in 2008 found that the user base was providing recommendations for most of the orchards and acreage in the state, and that users estimated the value at $ 16 million per year. The design of the system facilitates education on a range of time-sensitive topics and will make it possible easily to incorporate other models, new management recommendations or information from new sensors as they are developed.

  7. Home energy rating system business plan feasibility study in Washington state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lineham, T.

    1995-03-01

    In the Fall of 1993, the Washington State Energy Office funded the Washington Home Energy Rating System project to investigate the benefits of a Washington state HERS. WSEO established a HERS and EEM Advisory Group. Composed of mortgage lenders/brokers, realtors, builders, utility staff, remodelers, and other state agency representatives, the Advisory Group met for the first time on November 17, 1993. The Advisory Group established several subcommittees to identify issues and options. During its March 1994 meeting, the Advisory Group formed a consensus directing WSEO to develop a HERS business plan for consideration. The Advisory Group also established a business plan subcommittee to help draft the plan. Under the guidance of the business plan subcommittee, WSEO conducted research on how customers value energy efficiency in the housing market. This plan represents WSEO`s effort to comply with the Advisory Group`s request. Why is a HERS Business Plan necessary? Strictly speaking this plan is more of a feasibility plan than a business plan since it is designed to help determine the feasibility of a new business venture: a statewide home energy rating system. To make this determination decision makers or possible investors require strategic information about the proposed enterprise. Ideally, the plan should anticipate the significant questions parties may want to know. Among other things, this document should establish decision points for action.

  8. Operations and Maintenance Manual for Expanded Bioventing System at Buildings 2034/2035, Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1996-01-01

    This Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Manual has been created as a guide for monitoring and maintaining the performance of the full-scale bioventing blower system and vent well plumbing at Fairchild Air Force Base (AFB), Washington...

  9. Numerical simulation of groundwater flow in the Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, D. Matthew; Burns, Erick R.; Morgan, David S.; Vaccaro, John J.

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model of groundwater flow was constructed for the Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System (CPRAS), Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, to evaluate and test the conceptual model of the system and to evaluate groundwater availability. The model described in this report can be used as a tool by water-resource managers and other stakeholders to quantitatively evaluate proposed alternative management strategies and assess the long‑term availability of groundwater. The numerical simulation of groundwater flow in the CPRAS was completed with support from the Groundwater Resources Program of the U.S. Geological Survey Office of Groundwater.

  10. Hydrological Forecasting in Mexico: Extending the University of Washington West-wide Seasonal Hydrologic Forecast System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Arriola, F.; Thomas, G.; Wood, A.; Wagner-Gomez, A.; Lobato-Sanchez, R.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2007-12-01

    Hydrologic forecasting in areas constrained by the availability of hydrometeorological records is a notable challenge in water resource management. Techniques from the University of Washington West-wide Seasonal Hydrologic Forecast system www.hydro.washington.edu/forecast/westwide) for generating daily nowcasts in areas with sparse and time-varying station coverage have been extended from the western U.S. into Mexico. The primary forecasting approaches consist of ensembles based on the NWS ensemble streamflow prediction method (ESP; essentially resampling of climatology) and on NCEP Coupled Forecast System (CFS) outputs. These in turn are used to force the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) macroscale hydrology model to produce streamflow ensembles. The initial hydrologic state utilized in the seasonal forecasting is generated by VIC using daily real-time hydrologic nowcasts, produced using forcings derived via an 'index-station percentile' approach from meteorological station data accessed in real time from Servicio Meteorológico Nacional (SMN). One-year lead time streamflow forecasts at monthly time step are produced at a set of major river locations in Mexico. As a case study, the streamflow forecasts, along with forecasts of reservoir evaporation, are used as input to the Simulation-Optimization (SIMOP) model of the Rio Yaqui system, one of the major agricultural production centers of Mexico. This is the first step in an eventual planned water management implementation over all of Mexico.

  11. Mise en pratique for the definition of the candela and associated derived units for photometric and radiometric quantities in the International System of Units (SI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwinkels, Joanne; Sperling, Armin; Goodman, Teresa; Campos Acosta, Joaquin; Ohno, Yoshi; Rastello, Maria Luisa; Stock, Michael; Woolliams, Emma

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this mise en pratique, prepared by the Consultative Committee for Photometry and Radiometry (CCPR) of the International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) and formally adopted by the CIPM, is to provide guidance on how the candela and related units used in photometry and radiometry can be realized in practice. The scope of the mise en pratique recognizes the fact that the two fields of photometry and radiometry and their units are closely related through the current definition of the SI base unit for the photometric quantity, luminous intensity: the candela. The previous version of the mise en pratique was applied only to the candela whereas this updated version covers the realization of the candela and other related units used for photometric and radiometric quantities. Recent advances in the generation and manipulation of individual photons show great promise of producing radiant fluxes with a well-established number of photons. Thus, this mise en pratique also includes information on the practical realization of units for photometric and radiometric quantities using photon-number-based techniques. In the following, for units used for photometric and radiometric quantities, the shorter term, photometric and radiometric units, is generally used. Section 1 describes the definition of the candela which introduces a close relationship between photometric and radiometric units. Sections 2 and 3 describe the practical realization of radiometric and photon-number-based units, respectively. Section 4.1 explains how, in general, photometric units are derived from radiometric units. Sections 4.2-4.5 deal with the particular geometric conditions for the specific photometric units. Section 5 deals very briefly with the topic of determination of measurement uncertainties in photometry.

  12. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Washington Consumer's Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-08-01

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Washington Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  13. Photometric flow injection determination of phosphate on a PDMS microchip using an optical detection system assembled with an organic light emitting diode and an organic photodiode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Ishimatsu, Ryoichi; Yahiro, Masayuki; Adachi, Chihaya; Nakano, Koji; Imato, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    A compact photometric detector was constructed from an organic light emitting diode (OLED) based on a europium complex, europium(diben-zoylmethanato)3(bathophenanthroline) (Eu(DBM)3bath), as the light source and an organic photodiode (OPD) fabricated from a hetero-junction of two layers of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/fullerene (C60) as the photo-detector on a microchip prepared from poly(dimethylsiloxan) (PDMS) and was applied to the determination of phosphate. The OLED and the OPD were fabricated by a vapor deposition method on an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate with the following layered structure; Glass (0.7 mm)/ITO (110 nm)/4,4'-bis[N-(1-naphthyl)-N-phenyl amino]-biphenyl (α-NPD) (30 nm)/4,4'-di(N-carbazolyl)biphenyl (CBP): Eu(3+) (8 wt%, 30 nm)/bathocuproine (BCP) (30 nm)/aluminum tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) (Alq3) (25 nm)/magnesium and silver (MgAg) (100 nm)/Ag (10nm) and Glass (0.7 mm)/ITO (110 nm)/CuPc (35 nm)/C60 (50 nm)/BCP (10 nm)/Ag (50 nm), respectively. The OLED based on the europium complex emitted a sharp light at the wavelength of 612 nm with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 8 nm. The performance of the photometric detector assembled was evaluated based on measurements of the absorbance of different concentrations of malachite green (MG) solutions for a batch system with 1cm long path length. The molar absorptive coefficient of the MG solution, calculated from the photocurrent of the OPD, was in good agreement with the value reported in the literature. A microchip with two inlets and one outlet U-shaped channel was prepared by a conventional photolithograph method. The OLED and the OPD were configured so as to face each other through the PDMS microchip in parallel in order to align the light axis of the OLED and the OPD with the flow cell (optical path length of 5mm), which was located at the end of outlet. For the determination of phosphate, an ion-association reaction between MG and a molybdenum-phosphate complex was utilized

  14. Simultaneous photometric determination of albumin and total protein in animal blood plasma employing a multicommutated flow system to carried out on line dilution and reagents solutions handling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Gilmara C.; Reis, Boaventura F.

    2004-02-01

    An automatic flow procedure for the simultaneous determination of albumin and total protein in blood plasma samples is proposed. The flow network comprised a set of three-way solenoid valves assembled to implement the multicommutation. The flow set up was controlled by means of a computer equipped with an electronic interface card which running a software wrote in QUICKBASIC 4.5 performed on line programmed dilution to allow the determination of both albumin and total protein in blood plasma. The photometric methods based on Bromocresol Green and Biuret reagents were selected for determination of albumin and total protein, respectively. Two LEDs based photometers coupled together the flow cells were employed as detector. After the adjustment of the operational parameters the proposed system presented the following features: an analytical throughput of 45 sample processing per hour for two analytes; relative standard deviations of 1.5 and 0.8% ( n=10) for a typical sample presenting 34 g l -1 albumin and 90 g l -1 total protein, respectively; linear responses ranging from 0 to 15 g l -1 albumin ( r=0.998) and total protein ( r=0.999); sample and reagents consumption, 140 μl serum solution, 0.015 mg VBC and 0.432 mg CuSO 4 per determination, respectively. Applying the paired t-test between results obtained using the proposed system and reference methods no significant difference at 95 and 90% confidence level for albumin and total protein, respectively, were observed.

  15. A CCD Photometric Study of Close Binary V445 Cep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu-Dong Oh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We present new BVR CCD photometric light curves for the close binary star V445 Cep. A new photometric solution and absolute physical dimensions of the system were derived by applying the Wilson-Devinney program to our observed light curves and radial velocity curves published by Pych et al. The evolutional status of V445 Cep was found to coincide with those of the general low mass ratio contact binary systems.

  16. Extending MESSENGER's Mercury dual imager's eight-color photometric standardization to cover all eleven filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingue, Deborah L.; Hash, Christopher D.; Denevi, Brett W.; Murchie, Scott L.

    2017-11-01

    The photometric standardization model derived from the Mercury Dual Imaging System's (MDIS) eight-color photometric observations has been extrapolated to provide photometric parameters for the remaining three colors, such that images acquired through each of the eleven narrow-band filters can be photometrically standardized using a consistent model. The resulting photometric standardization parameters for the three filters not included in the original eight-color analysis display spectral variations commensurate with those observed within the original eight-color photometry. Some caution should be exercised on spectral interpretations based strongly on the behavior in the 698.8-nm filter.

  17. Photometric invariant stereo matching method

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gu, Feifei; Zhao, Hong; Zhou, Xiang; Li, Jinjun; Bu, Penghui; Zhao, Zixin

    2015-01-01

    A robust stereo matching method based on a comprehensive mathematical model for color formation process is proposed to estimate the disparity map of stereo images with noise and photometric variations...

  18. THE APPARATUS FOR ALIGNMENT OF THE PHOTOMETRIC LAMP FILAMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Dlugunovich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During photometric measurements involving the use of photometric lamps it is necessary that the filament of lamp takes a strictly predetermined position with respect to the photodetector and the optical axis of the photometric setup. The errors in positioning of alignment filament with respect to the optical axis of the measuring system lead to increase the uncertainty of measurement of the photometric characteristics of the light sources. A typical method for alignment of filament of photometric lamps is based on the use a diopter tubes (telescopes. Using this method, the mounting of filament to the required position is carried out by successive approximations, which requires special concentration and a lot of time. The aim of this work is to develop an apparatus for alignment which allows simultaneous alignment of the filament of lamps in two mutually perpendicular planes. The method and apparatus for alignment of the photometric lamp filament during measurements of the photometric characteristics of light sources based on two digital video cameras is described in this paper. The apparatus allows to simultaneously displaying the image of lamps filament on the computer screen in two mutually perpendicular planes. The apparatus eliminates a large number of functional units requiring elementwise alignment and reduces the time required to carry out the alignment. The apparatus also provides the imaging of lamps filament with opaque coated on the bulb. The apparatus is used at the National standard of light intensity and illuminance units of the Republic of Belarus. 

  19. Development and testing of a photometric method to identify non-operating solar hot water systems in field settings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Hongbo (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Vorobieff, Peter V. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Menicucci, David (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Mammoli, Andrea A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2012-06-01

    This report presents the results of experimental tests of a concept for using infrared (IR) photos to identify non-operational systems based on their glazing temperatures; operating systems have lower glazing temperatures than those in stagnation. In recent years thousands of new solar hot water (SHW) systems have been installed in some utility districts. As these numbers increase, concern is growing about the systems dependability because installation rebates are often based on the assumption that all of the SHW systems will perform flawlessly for a 20-year period. If SHW systems routinely fail prematurely, then the utilities will have overpaid for grid-energy reduction performance that is unrealized. Moreover, utilities are responsible for replacing energy for loads that failed SHW system were supplying. Thus, utilities are seeking data to quantify the reliability of SHW systems. The work described herein is intended to help meet this need. The details of the experiment are presented, including a description of the SHW collectors that were examined, the testbed that was used to control the system and record data, the IR camera that was employed, and the conditions in which testing was completed. The details of the associated analysis are presented, including direct examination of the video records of operational and stagnant collectors, as well as the development of a model to predict glazing temperatures and an analysis of temporal intermittency of the images, both of which are critical to properly adjusting the IR camera for optimal performance. Many IR images and a video are presented to show the contrast between operating and stagnant collectors. The major conclusion is that the technique has potential to be applied by using an aircraft fitted with an IR camera that can fly over an area with installed SHW systems, thus recording the images. Subsequent analysis of the images can determine the operational condition of the fielded collectors. Specific

  20. THE FIRST PHOTOMETRIC ANALYSES OF THE ALGOL BINARY SYSTEMS GSC 04328-02164 AND GSC 03164-01558

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essam, A.; Hamed, Amal S.; Mohamadien, Ghada F. [National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics, 11421 Helwan, Cairo (Egypt); Youssef, Shahenaz M., E-mail: essam60@yahoo.com [Astronomy Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-01-15

    The CCD observations for the eclipsing Algol type binary systems GSC 04328-02164 in wideband BVR{sub c}I{sub c} filters and GSC 03164-01558 in B and I filters have been analyzed using the PHOEBE package (v 0.31a) to determine their orbital and physical parameters. The absolute parameters and evolutionary tracks of the two systems have been determined. The results show that the mass ratio, inclination, distance, and age for the system GSC 04328-02164 are equal to q = 0.674 ± 0.002, i = 75.997 ± 0.022, d = 375.477 ± 4.299 pc, and τ = 26.76 ± 15.65 ∗ 10{sup 8} years, respectively. For the other system, GSC 03164-01558, q = 0.941 ± 0.006, i = 88.0484 ± 0.030, d = 444.651 ± 9.444 pc, and τ = 53.63 ± 9.16 ∗ 10{sup 8} years.

  1. The First Photometric Analyses of the Algol Binary Systems GSC 04328-02164 and GSC 03164-01558

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essam, A.; Hamed, Amal S.; Youssef, Shahenaz M.; Mohamadien, Ghada F.

    2016-01-01

    The CCD observations for the eclipsing Algol type binary systems GSC 04328-02164 in wideband BVRcIc filters and GSC 03164-01558 in B and I filters have been analyzed using the PHOEBE package (v 0.31a) to determine their orbital and physical parameters. The absolute parameters and evolutionary tracks of the two systems have been determined. The results show that the mass ratio, inclination, distance, and age for the system GSC 04328-02164 are equal to q = 0.674 ± 0.002, I = 75.997 ± 0.022, d = 375.477 ± 4.299 pc, and τ = 26.76 ± 15.65 ∗ 108 years, respectively. For the other system, GSC 03164-01558, q = 0.941 ± 0.006, I = 88.0484 ± 0.030, d = 444.651 ± 9.444 pc, and τ = 53.63 ± 9.16 ∗ 108 years.

  2. Photometric Studies of GEO Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Cowardin, Heather M.; Barker, Edwin; Abercromby, Kira J.; Foreman, Gary; Horstman, Matt

    2009-01-01

    The photometric signature of a debris object can be useful in determining what the physical characteristics of a piece of debris are. We report on optical observations in multiple filters of debris at geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Our sample is taken from GEO objects discovered in a survey with the University of Michigan's 0.6-m aperture Schmidt telescope MODEST (for Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), and then followed up in real-time with the SMARTS (Small and Medium Aperture Research Telescope System) 0.9-m at CTIO for orbits and photometry. Our goal is to determine 6 parameter orbits and measure colors for all objects fainter than R = 15 th magnitude that are discovered in the MODEST survey. At this magnitude the distribution of observed angular rates changes significantly from that of brighter objects. There are two objectives: 1. Estimate the orbital distribution of objects selected on the basis of two observational criteria: brightness (magnitude) and angular rates. 2. Obtain magnitudes and colors in standard astronomical filters (BVRI) for comparison with reflectance spectra of likely spacecraft materials. What is the faint debris likely to be? In this paper we report on the photometric results. For a sample of 50 objects, more than 90 calibrated sequences of R-B-V-I-R magnitudes have been obtained with the CTIO 0.9-m. For objects that do not show large brightness variations, the colors are largely redder than solar in both B-R and R-I. The width of the color distribution may be intrinsic to the nature of the surfaces, but also could be that we are seeing irregularly shaped objects and measuring the colors at different times with just one telescope. For a smaller sample of objects we have observed with synchronized CCD cameras on the two telescopes. The CTIO 0.9-m observes in B, and MODEST in R. The CCD cameras are electronically linked together so that the start time and duration of observations are the same to better than 50 milliseconds. Thus

  3. Geologic Setting and Hydrogeologic Units of the Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System, Washington, Oregon, and Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Sue C.; Olsen, Theresa D.; Morgan, David S.

    2009-01-01

    The Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System (CPRAS) covers approximately 44,000 square miles of northeastern Oregon, southeastern Washington, and western Idaho. The area supports a $6 billion per year agricultural industry, leading the Nation in production of apples and nine other commodities (State of Washington Office of Financial Management, 2007; U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2007). Groundwater availability in the aquifers of the area is a critical water-resource management issue because the water demand for agriculture, economic development, and ecological needs is high. The primary aquifers of the CPRAS are basalts of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) and overlying basin-fill sediments. Water-resources issues that have implications for future groundwater availability in the region include (1) widespread water-level declines associated with development of groundwater resources for irrigation and other uses, (2) reduction in base flow to rivers and associated effects on temperature and water quality, and (3) current and anticipated effects of global climate change on recharge, base flow, and ultimately, groundwater availability. As part of a National Groundwater Resources Program, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study of the CPRAS in 2007 with the broad goals of (1) characterizing the hydrologic status of the system, (2) identifying trends in groundwater storage and use, and (3) quantifying groundwater availability. The study approach includes documenting changes in the status of the system, quantifying the hydrologic budget for the system, updating the regional hydrogeologic framework, and developing a groundwater-flow simulation model for the system. The simulation model will be used to evaluate and test the conceptual model of the system and later to evaluate groundwater availability under alternative development and climate scenarios. The objectives of this study were to update the hydrogeologic framework for the CPRAS using the available

  4. Landscape permeability for large carnivores in Washington: a geographic information system weighted-distance and least-cost corridor assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter H. Singleton; William L. Gaines; John F. Lehmkuhl

    2002-01-01

    We conducted a regional-scale evaluation of landscape permeability for large carnivores in Washington and adjacent portions of British Columbia and Idaho. We developed geographic information system based landscape permeability models for wolves (Canis lupus), wolverine (Gulo gulo), lynx (Lynx canadensis),...

  5. CORS Baade-Wesselink method in the Walraven photometric system: the period-radius and the period-luminosity relation of classical Cepheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinaro, R.; Ripepi, V.; Marconi, M.; Bono, G.; Lub, J.; Pedicelli, S.; Pel, J. W.

    2011-05-01

    We present a new derivation of the CORS Baade-Wesselink method in the Walraven photometric system. We solved the complete Baade-Wesselink equation by calibrating the surface brightness function with a recent grid of atmosphere models. The new approach was adopted to estimate the mean radii of a sample of Galactic Cepheids for which are available precise light curves in the Walraven bands. Current radii agree, within the errors, quite well with Cepheid radii based on recent optical and near-infrared interferometric measurements. We also tested the impact of the projection factor on the period-radius relation using two different values (p= 1.36, 1.27) that bracket the estimates available in the literature. We found that the agreement of our period-radius relation with similar empirical and theoretical period-radius relations in the recent literature improves by changing the projection factor from p= 1.36 to 1.27. Our period-radius relation is log R= (0.75 ± 0.03)log P+ (1.10 ± 0.03), with an rms = 0.03 dex. Thanks to accurate estimates of the effective temperature of the selected Cepheids, we also derived the period-luminosity relation in the V band and we found MV= (-2.78 ± 0.11)log P+ (-1.42 ± 0.11) with rms = 0.13 mag, for p= 1.27. It agrees quite well with recent results in the literature, while the relation for p= 1.36 deviates by more than 2σ. We conclude that, even taking into account the intrinsic dispersion of the obtained period-luminosity relations that is roughly of the same order of magnitude as the effect of the projection factor, the results of this paper seem to favour the value p= 1.27.

  6. LED-based Photometric Stereo: Modeling, Calibration and Numerical Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quéau, Yvain; Durix, Bastien; Wu, Tao

    2018-01-01

    We conduct a thorough study of photometric stereo under nearby point light source illumination, from modeling to numerical solution, through calibration. In the classical formulation of photometric stereo, the luminous fluxes are assumed to be directional, which is very difficult to achieve...... in practice. Rather, we use light-emitting diodes to illuminate the scene to be reconstructed. Such point light sources are very convenient to use, yet they yield a more complex photometric stereo model which is arduous to solve. We first derive in a physically sound manner this model, and show how...... approach is not established. The second one directly recovers the depth, by formulating photometric stereo as a system of nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs), which are linearized using image ratios. Although the sequential approach is avoided, initialization matters a lot and convergence...

  7. Groundwater availability of the Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System, Washington, Oregon, and Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, J.J.; Kahle, S.C.; Ely, D.M.; Burns, E.R.; Snyder, D.T.; Haynes, J.V.; Olsen, T.D.; Welch, W.B.; Morgan, D.S.

    2015-09-22

    The Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System (CPRAS) covers about 44,000 square miles of southeastern Washington, northeastern Oregon, and western Idaho. The area supports a $6-billion per year agricultural industry, leading the Nation in production of apples, hops, and eight other commodities. Groundwater pumpage and surface-water diversions supply water to croplands that account for about 5 percent of the Nation’s irrigated lands. Groundwater also is the primary source of drinking water for the more than 1.3 million people in the study area. Increasing competitive demands for water for municipal, fisheries/ecosystems, agricultural, domestic, hydropower, and recreational uses must be met by additional groundwater withdrawals and (or) by changes in the way water resources are allocated and used throughout the hydrologic system. As of 2014, most surface-water resources in the study area were either over allocated or fully appropriated, especially during the dry summer season. In response to continued competition for water, numerous water-management activities and concerns have gained prominence: water conservation, conjunctive use, artificial recharge, hydrologic implications of land-use change, pumpage effects on streamflow, and effects of climate variability and change. An integrated understanding of the hydrologic system is important in order to implement effective water-resource management strategies that address these concerns.

  8. Oregon Washington Coastal Ocean Forecast System: Real-time Modeling and Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erofeeva, S.; Kurapov, A. L.; Pasmans, I.

    2016-02-01

    Three-day forecasts of ocean currents, temperature and salinity along the Oregon and Washington coasts are produced daily by a numerical ROMS-based ocean circulation model. NAM is used to derive atmospheric forcing for the model. Fresh water discharge from Columbia River, Fraser River, and small rivers in Puget Sound are included. The forecast is constrained by open boundary conditions derived from the global Navy HYCOM model and once in 3 days assimilation of recent data, including HF radar surface currents, sea surface temperature from the GOES satellite, and SSH from several satellite altimetry missions. 4-dimensional variational data assimilation is implemented in 3-day time windows using the tangent linear and adjoint codes developed at OSU. The system is semi-autonomous - all the data, including NAM and HYCOM fields are automatically updated, and daily operational forecast is automatically initiated. The pre-assimilation data quality control and post-assimilation forecast quality control require the operator's involvement. The daily forecast and 60 days of hindcast fields are available for public on opendap. As part of the system model validation plots to various satellites and SEAGLIDER are also automatically updated and available on the web (http://ingria.coas.oregonstate.edu/rtdavow/). Lessons learned in this pilot real-time coastal ocean forecasting project help develop and test metrics for forecast skill assessment for the West Coast Operational Forecast System (WCOFS), currently at testing and development phase at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  9. Masters Thesis- Criticality Alarm System Design Guide with Accompanying Alarm System Development for the Radioisotope Production Laboratory in Richland, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenfield, Bryce A. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2009-12-01

    A detailed instructional manual was created to guide criticality safety engineers through the process of designing a criticality alarm system (CAS) for Department of Energy (DOE) hazard class 1 and 2 facilities. Regulatory and technical requirements were both addressed. A list of design tasks and technical subtasks are thoroughly analyzed to provide concise direction for how to complete the analysis. An example of the application of the design methodology, the Criticality Alarm System developed for the Radioisotope Production Laboratory (RPL) of Richland, Washington is also included. The analysis for RPL utilizes the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 for establishing detector coverage in the facility. Significant improvements to the existing CAS were made that increase the reliability, transparency, and coverage of the system.

  10. Solar heating, cooling, and hot water systems installed at Richland, Washington. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    Project Sunburst is a demonstration system for solar space heating and cooling and solar hot water heating for a 14,400 square foot office building in Richland, Washington. The project is part of the US Department of Energy's solar demonstration program, and became operational in April 1978. The solar system uses 6,000 square feet of flat-plate liquid collectors in a closed loop to deliver solar energy through a liquid--liquid heat exchanger to the building heat-pump duct work or 9,000-gallon thermal energy storage tank. A 25-ton Arkla solar-driven absorption chiller provides the cooling, in conjunction with a 2,000 gallon chilled water storage tank and reflective ponds on three sides of the building to reject surplus heat. A near-by building is essentially identical except for having conventional heat-pump heating and cooling, and can serve as an experimental control. An on-going public relations program has been provided from the beginning of the program and has resulted in numerous visitors and tour groups.

  11. Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Forty-nine. Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    A detailed description is presented of the laws and programs of the State of Washington governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  12. Acoustic backscatter from 2013 interferometric swath bathymetry systems survey of Columbia River Mouth, Oregon and Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the USGS data release presents acoustic backscatter data for the Columbia River Mouth, Oregon and Washington. The acoustic backscatter data of the...

  13. DES Science Portal: Computing Photometric Redshifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gschwend, Julia [LIneA, Rio de Janeiro

    2016-01-01

    An important challenge facing photometric surveys for cosmological purposes, such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES), is the need to produce reliable photometric redshifts (photo-z). The choice of adequate algorithms and configurations and the maintenance of an up-to-date spectroscopic database to build training sets, for example, are challenging tasks when dealing with large amounts of data that are regularly updated and constantly growing. In this paper, we present the first of a series of tools developed by DES, provided as part of the DES Science Portal, an integrated web-based data portal developed to facilitate the scientific analysis of the data, while ensuring the reproducibility of the analysis. We present the DES Science Portal photometric redshift tools, starting from the creation of a spectroscopic sample to training the neural network photo-z codes, to the final estimation of photo-zs for a large photometric catalog. We illustrate this operation by calculating well calibrated photo-zs for a galaxy sample extracted from the DES first year (Y1A1) data. The series of processes mentioned above is run entirely within the Portal environment, which automatically produces validation metrics, and maintains the provenance between the different steps. This system allows us to fine tune the many steps involved in the process of calculating photo-zs, making sure that we do not lose the information on the configurations and inputs of the previous processes. By matching the DES Y1A1 photometry to a spectroscopic sample, we define different training sets that we use to feed the photo-z algorithms already installed at the Portal. Finally, we validate the results under several conditions, including the case of a sample limited to i<22.5 with the color properties close to the full DES Y1A1 photometric data. This way we compare the performance of multiple methods and training configurations. The infrastructure presented here is an effcient way to test several methods of

  14. Photometric Observations of 1969 Alain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes-Gehrke, Melissa N.; Leffler, Taylor; Hampton, Karley; Chavis, Jacob; Fong, Josef; Wang, Yu; Hung, Andrew; Mahoney, James; Rizal, Muhammad Haziq Aiman Saiful Rizal

    2018-01-01

    CCD photometric observations of minor planet 1969 Alain by the T17 Telescope in Siding Spring, Australia in March and April 2017 were combined for lightcurve analysis. The combined data set led to a rotation period of P = 32.4 ± 0.4 h.

  15. Photometric Modelling of Close Binary Star CN And

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The light curves of the system are obviously asymmetric, with the primary maximum brighter than the secondary maximum, which is known as the O'Conell effect. ... Absolute parameters of the system were obtained from combining the photometric solution with spectroscopic data obtained from radial velocity curve analysis.

  16. Planck 2013 results. VIII. HFI photometric calibration and mapmaking

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bertincourt, B; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chen, X; Chiang, L -Y; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Filliard, C; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Lellouch, E; Leonardi, R; Leroy, C; Lesgourgues, J; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Maurin, L; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Moreno, R; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rusholme, B; Santos, D; Savini, G; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Techene, S; Terenzi, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the processing applied to the HFI cleaned time-ordered data to produce photometrically calibrated maps. HFI observes the sky over a broad range of frequencies, from 100 to 857 GHz. To get the best accuracy on the calibration on such a large range, two different photometric calibration schemes have to be used. The 545 and 857 \\GHz\\ data are calibrated using Uranus and Neptune flux density measurements, compared with models of their atmospheric emissions to calibrate the data. The lower frequencies (below 353 GHz) are calibrated using the cosmological microwave background dipole.One of the components of this anisotropy results from the orbital motion of the satellite in the Solar System, and is therefore time-variable. Photometric calibration is thus tightly linked to mapmaking, which also addresses low frequency noise removal. The 2013 released HFI data show some evidence for apparent gain variations of the HFI bolometers' detection chain. These variations were identified by comparing obse...

  17. MCNP6 model of the University of Washington clinical neutron therapy system (CNTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Gregory B.; Stewart, Robert D.; Sandison, George A.; Goorley, John T.; Argento, David C.; Jevremovic, Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    A MCNP6 dosimetry model is presented for the Clinical Neutron Therapy System (CNTS) at the University of Washington. In the CNTS, fast neutrons are generated by a 50.5 MeV proton beam incident on a 10.5 mm thick Be target. The production, scattering and absorption of neutrons, photons, and other particles are explicitly tracked throughout the key components of the CNTS, including the target, primary collimator, flattening filter, monitor unit ionization chamber, and multi-leaf collimator. Simulations of the open field tissue maximum ratio (TMR), percentage depth dose profiles, and lateral dose profiles in a 40 cm  ×  40 cm  ×  40 cm water phantom are in good agreement with ionization chamber measurements. For a nominal 10  ×  10 field, the measured and calculated TMR values for depths of 1.5 cm, 5 cm, 10 cm, and 20 cm (compared to the dose at 1.7 cm) are within 0.22%, 2.23%, 4.30%, and 6.27%, respectively. For the three field sizes studied, 2.8 cm  ×  2.8 cm, 10.4 cm  ×  10.3 cm, and 28.8 cm  ×  28.8 cm, a gamma test comparing the measured and simulated percent depth dose curves have pass rates of 96.4%, 100.0%, and 78.6% (depth from 1.5 to 15 cm), respectively, using a 3% or 3 mm agreement criterion. At a representative depth of 10 cm, simulated lateral dose profiles have in-field (⩾10% of central axis dose) pass rates of 89.7% (2.8 cm  ×  2.8 cm), 89.6% (10.4 cm  ×  10.3 cm), and 100.0% (28.8 cm  ×  28.8 cm) using a 3% and 3 mm criterion. The MCNP6 model of the CNTS meets the minimum requirements for use as a quality assurance tool for treatment planning and provides useful insights and information to aid in the advancement of fast neutron therapy.

  18. Photometric observations of the brightest Jupiter Greeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, Joseph P.; Henry, Todd J.; Pewett, Tiffany D.; French, Linda M.; Stephens, Robert D.

    2013-02-01

    We propose to finish BVRI photometric observations of the 113 brightest Jupiter Trojans from both the L4 (Greek) and the L5 (Trojan) Lagrange points using the CTIO 0.9m, in conjunction with data gathered at Lowell Observatory. With these data we will investigate any color trends and/or differences between the largest members of the two camps as well as reveal any unusual outliers worthy of extensive followup. A comprehensive database of uniform photometry does not exist for this effectively complete sample, so robust comparisons are virtually impossible at this time. These data will also enable comparisons between the Greek and Trojan swarms and other Solar System populations to discover the possible origins of the two camps, which remain surprisingly obscure. In non-photometric conditions, we will measure light curves that yield information about albedo and color changes, shapes, and rotation periods. These data will also lead to important phase curves that can be used to determine surface features and composition. Here we propose for the last southern run for this ongoing photometry program. emphThe proposed observations will comprise a significant portion of the PI's PhD thesis.

  19. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriner, John; /Fermilab

    2012-06-29

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  20. Astrometric and Photometric Measurements of WDS 20210+1028

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Sebastien; Calanog, Jae; Stojimirovic, Irena; Hilburn, Jerry; Blanco, Philip; Fitzgerald, Brodney

    2017-07-01

    We report CCD astrometric and photometric measurements of the components of the double star system WDS20210+1028 (J 838) using the iTelescope network. Combined with historical observations, our measurements suggest that the existing fitted orbital solution may need to be modified.

  1. Numerical simulation of the groundwater-flow system of the Kitsap Peninsula, west-central Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frans, Lonna M.; Olsen, Theresa D.

    2016-05-05

    A groundwater-flow model was developed to improve understanding of water resources on the Kitsap Peninsula. The Kitsap Peninsula is in the Puget Sound lowland of west-central Washington, is bounded by Puget Sound on the east and by Hood Canal on the west, and covers an area of about 575 square miles. The peninsula encompasses all of Kitsap County, Mason County north of Hood Canal, and part of Pierce County west of Puget Sound. The peninsula is surrounded by saltwater, and the hydrologic setting is similar to that of an island. The study area is underlain by a thick sequence of unconsolidated glacial and interglacial deposits that overlie sedimentary and volcanic bedrock units that crop out in the central part of the study area. Twelve hydrogeologic units consisting of aquifers, confining units, and an underlying bedrock unit form the basis of the groundwater-flow model.Groundwater flow on the Kitsap Peninsula was simulated using the groundwater-flow model, MODFLOW‑NWT. The finite difference model grid comprises 536 rows, 362 columns, and 14 layers. Each model cell has a horizontal dimension of 500 by 500 feet, and the model contains a total of 1,227,772 active cells. Groundwater flow was simulated for transient conditions. Transient conditions were simulated for January 1985–December 2012 using annual stress periods for 1985–2004 and monthly stress periods for 2005–2012. During model calibration, variables were adjusted within probable ranges to minimize differences between measured and simulated groundwater levels and stream baseflows. As calibrated to transient conditions, the model has a standard deviation for heads and flows of 47.04 feet and 2.46 cubic feet per second, respectively.Simulated inflow to the model area for the 2005–2012 period from precipitation and secondary recharge was 585,323 acre-feet per year (acre-ft/yr) (93 percent of total simulated inflow ignoring changes in storage), and simulated inflow from stream and lake leakage was 43

  2. Environmental assessment of SP-100 ground engineering system test site: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to modify an existing reactor containment building (decommissioned Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) 309 Building) to provide ground test capability for the prototype SP-100 reactor. The 309 Building (Figure 1.1) is located in the 300 Area on the Hanford Site in Washington State. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires that Federal agencies assess the potential impacts that their actions may have on the environment. This Environmental Assessment describes the consideration given to environmental impacts during reactor concept and test site selection, examines the environmental effects of the DOE proposal to ground test the nuclear subsystem, describes alternatives to the proposed action, and examines radiological risks of potential SP-100 use in space. 73 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. An Integrated, Observation-based System to Monitor Aboveground Forest Carbon Dynamics in Washington, Oregon, and California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, R. E.; Hughes, J.; Neeti, N.; Yang, Z.; Gregory, M.; Roberts, H.; Kane, V. R.; Powell, S. L.; Ohmann, J.

    2016-12-01

    Because carbon pools and fluxes on wooded landscapes are constrained by their type, age and health, understanding the causes and consequences of carbon change requires frequent observation of forest condition and of disturbance, mortality, and growth processes. As part of USDA and NASA funded efforts, we built empirical monitoring system that integrates time-series Landsat imagery, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plot data, small-footprint lidar data, and aerial photos to characterize key carbon dynamics in forested ecosystems of Washington, Oregon and California. Here we report yearly biomass estimates for every forested 30 by 30m pixel in the states of Washington, Oregon, and California from 1990 to 2010, including spatially explicit estimates of uncertainty in our yearly predictions. Total biomass at the ecoregion scale agrees well with estimates from FIA plot data alone, currently the only method for reliable monitoring in the forests of the region. Comparisons with estimates of biomass modeled from four small-footprint lidar acquisitions in overlapping portions of our study area show general patterns of agreement between the two types of estimation, but also reveal some disparities in spatial pattern potentially attributable to age and vegetation condition. Using machine-learning techniques based on both Landsat image time series and high resolution aerial photos, we then modeled the agent causing change in biomass for every change event in the region, and report the relative distribution of carbon loss attributable to natural disturbances (primarily fire and insect-related mortality) versus anthropogenic causes (forest management and development).

  4. Photometric and kinematic DISKFIT models of four nearby spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Wesley; Kuzio de Naray, Rachel

    2017-08-01

    We present optical BVRI photometry, H α integrated field unit velocity fields and H α long-slit rotation curves for a sample of four nearby spiral galaxies having a range of morphologies and inclinations. We show that the DISKFIT code can be used to model the photometric and kinematic data of these four galaxies and explore how well the photometric data can be decomposed into structures like bars and bulges and to look for non-circular motions in the kinematic data. In general, we find good agreement between our photometric and kinematic models for most parameters. We find the best consistency between our photometric and kinematic models for NGC 6674, a relatively face-on spiral with clear and distinct bulge and bar components. We also find excellent consistency for NGC 2841, and find a bar ˜10° south of the disc major axis in the inner 20 arcsec. Due to geometric effects caused by its high inclination, we find the kinematic model for NGC 2654 to be less accurate than its photometry. We find the bar in NGC 2654 to be roughly parallel to the major axis of the galaxy. We are unable to photometrically model our most highly inclined galaxy, NGC 5746, with DISKFIT and instead use the galaxy isophotes to determine that the system contains a bar ˜5° to ˜10° east of the disc major axis. The high inclination and extinction in this galaxy also prevent our kinematic model from accurately determining parameters about the bar, though the data are better modelled when a bar is included.

  5. Uncovering multiple populations with washington photometry. I. The globular cluster NGC 1851

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummings, Jeffrey D.; Geisler, D.; Villanova, S. [Departamento de Astronomía, Casilla 160-C, Universidad de Concepción (Chile); Carraro, G. [ESO, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19001, Santiago de Chile (Chile)

    2014-08-01

    The analysis of multiple populations (MPs) in globular clusters (GCs) has become a forefront area of research in astronomy. Multiple red giant branches (RGBs), subgiant branches (SGBs), and even main sequences (MSs) have now been observed photometrically in many GCs, while broad abundance distributions of certain elements have been detected spectroscopically in most, if not all, GCs. UV photometry has been crucial in discovering and analyzing these MPs, but the Johnson U and the Stromgren and Sloan u filters that have generally been used are relatively inefficient and very sensitive to reddening and atmospheric extinction. In contrast, the Washington C filter is much broader and redder than these competing UV filters, making it far more efficient at detecting MPs and much less sensitive to reddening and extinction. Here, we investigate the use of the Washington system to uncover MPs using only a 1 m telescope. Our analysis of the well-studied GC NGC 1851 finds that the C filter is both very efficient and effective at detecting its previously discovered MPs in the RGB and SGB. Remarkably, we have also detected an intrinsically broad MS best characterized by two distinct but heavily overlapping populations that cannot be explained by binaries, field stars, or photometric errors. The MS distribution is in very good agreement with that seen on the RGB, with ∼30% of the stars belonging to the second population. There is also evidence for two sequences in the red horizontal branch, but this appears to be unrelated to the MPs in this cluster. Neither of these latter phenomena have been observed previously in this cluster. The redder MS stars are also more centrally concentrated than the blue MS. This is the first time MPs in an MS have been discovered from the ground, and using only a 1 m telescope. The Washington system thus proves to be a very powerful tool for investigating MPs, and holds particular promise for extragalactic objects where photons are limited.

  6. Conversion of Hanford site well locations to Washington coordinate system of 1983, South Zone 1991 (WCS83S)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, R.A.; Tzemos, S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Dietz, L.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Past construction and survey practices have resulted in the use of multiple local coordinate systems for measuring and reporting the horizontal position of wells and other facilities and locations on the Hanford Site. This report describes the development of a coordinate transformation process and algorithm and its application to the conversion of the horizontal coordinates of Hanford site wells from the various local coordinate systems and datums to a single standard coordinate system, the Washington Coordinate system of 1983, South Zone 1991 (WCS83S). The coordinate transformation algorithm, implemented as a computer program called CTRANS, uses standard two-dimensional translation, rotation, and scaling transformation equations and can be applied to any set of horizontal point locations. For each point to be transformed, the coefficients of the transformation equations are calculated locally, using the coordinates of the three nearest registration points (points with known locations in both coordinate systems). The report contains a discussion of efforts to verify and validate both the software and the well location data, a description of the methods used to estimate transformation and registration point accuracy, instructions for using the computer program, and a summary of the Hanford well conversion results for each local coordinate system and datum. Also included are the results of using recent U.S. Army Corps of Engineers survey data to obtain estimated measures of location errors in wells for which the local coordinate data source is undocumented, unverified, and therefore of unknown accuracy.

  7. ASTEROID PHOTOMETRIC CATALOG V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Asteroid Photometric Catalog (3rd update), Lagerkvist, et.al., 1993 [LAGERKVISTETAL1993], is a compilation of all asteroid lightcurve photometry published up to...

  8. Novel Methods for Predicting Photometric Redshifts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We calculate photometric redshifts from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Main Galaxy Sample, The Galaxy Evolution Explorer All Sky Survey, and The Two Micron All Sky...

  9. ASTEROID PHOTOMETRIC CATALOG V1.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Asteroid Photometric Catalog (3rd update), Lagerkvist, et.al., 1993 [LAGERKVISTETAL1993], is a compilation of all asteroid lightcurve photometry published up to...

  10. Photometric Observations and Light Curve Analysis of BL Eridani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonyong Han

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We present light curves of a short period binary system BL Eridani. The light curves were observed with {it VRI} filters by a 50cm wide field robotic telescope at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO, equipped with a 2K CCD camera, which was developed by Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI, and Yonsei University Observatory (YUO. The photometric observations were made on 6 nights by automatic operation mode and remote observation mode at SSO and KASI in Korea, respectively. We obtained new {it VRI} CCD light curves and new 5 times of minima, and analyzed the light curves with the Wilson & Deviney (1971 binary 2005 version and derived the new photometric solutions. The mass ratio q = 0.48 in this study shows different value with earlier investigators. According to the model analysis, it is considered that the BL Eri system is currently undergoing contact stage of the two binary components, rather than near-contact stage.

  11. Calibration of LSST Instrumental and Atmospheric Photometric Passbands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, David L.; /SLAC; Axelrod, T.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.; Barrau, Aurelien; Baumont, Sylvain; /LPSC, Grenoble; Blondin, Stephane; /Marseille, CPPM; Claver, Chuck; /NOAO, Tucson; Gorecki, Alexia; /LPSC, Grenoble; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jones, Lynne; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Krabbendam, Victor; Liang, Ming; Saha, Abhijit; /NOAO, Tucson; Smith, Allyn; /Austin Peay State U.; Smith, R.Chris; /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.; Stubbs, Christopher W.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2011-07-06

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will continuously image the entire sky visible from Cerro Pachon in northern Chile every 3-4 nights throughout the year. The LSST will provide data for a broad range of science investigations that require better than 1% photometric precision across the sky (repeatability and uniformity) and a similar accuracy of measured broadband color. The fast and persistent cadence of the LSST survey will significantly improve the temporal sampling rate with which celestial events and motions are tracked. To achieve these goals, and to optimally utilize the observing calendar, it will be necessary to obtain excellent photometric calibration of data taken over a wide range of observing conditions - even those not normally considered 'photometric'. To achieve this it will be necessary to routinely and accurately measure the full optical passband that includes the atmosphere as well as the instrumental telescope and camera system. The LSST mountain facility will include a new monochromatic dome illumination projector system to measure the detailed wavelength dependence of the instrumental passband for each channel in the system. The facility will also include an auxiliary spectroscopic telescope dedicated to measurement of atmospheric transparency at all locations in the sky during LSST observing. In this paper, we describe these systems and present laboratory and observational data that illustrate their performance.

  12. Expanding veterinary biosurveillance in Washington, DC: The creation and utilization of an electronic-based online veterinary surveillance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennenfent, Andrew; DelVento, Vito; Davies-Cole, John; Johnson-Clarke, Fern

    2017-03-01

    To enhance the early detection of emerging infectious diseases and bioterrorism events using companion animal-based surveillance. Washington, DC, small animal veterinary facilities (n=17) were surveyed to determine interest in conducting infectious disease surveillance. Using these results, an electronic-based online reporting system was developed and launched in August 2015 to monitor rates of canine influenza, canine leptospirosis, antibiotic resistant infections, canine parvovirus, and syndromic disease trends. Nine of the 10 facilities that responded expressed interest conducting surveillance. In September 2015, 17 canine parvovirus cases were reported. In response, a campaign encouraging regular veterinary preventative care was launched and featured on local media platforms. Additionally, during the system's first year of operation it detected 5 canine leptospirosis cases and 2 antibiotic resistant infections. No canine influenza cases were reported and syndromic surveillance compliance varied, peaking during National Special Security Events. Small animal veterinarians and the general public are interested in companion animal disease surveillance. The system described can serve as a model for establishing similar systems to monitor disease trends of public health importance in pet populations and enhance biosurveillance capabilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Photometric observations of Mercury from Mariner 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, B.; Danielson, G. E., Jr.; Klaasen, K.; Wilson, L.

    1975-01-01

    The elimination of the residual image problem which plagued previous Mariner imaging systems allowed photometry of moderately high quality to be carried out on Mercury by Mariner 10. The conclusions from the photometric analysis are as follows. To a surface resolution of 20 km, Mercury is covered with a dark fine-grained soil similar to the lunar regolith. No regions having anomalous polarization or color were discovered, which might have implied large amounts of metallic Fe or exposed bare rock. Photoclinometry suggests that the center of the Caloris Basin may be about 9 km below the outside rim. The heavily cratered plains have albedos of about 0.17, somewhat brighter than the lunar highlands. The albedos of the darker smooth plains and the interiors of bright fresh craters are systematically higher than their lunar counterparts. One consistent interpretation of the color and albedo relationships is that the dark smooth plains resemble the low-Ti, low-Fe lunar maria and that the crust is generally low in Ti, metallic Fe, and Fe(3+).

  14. 78 FR 74163 - Harrison Medical Center, a Subsidiary of Franciscan Health System Bremerton, Washington; Notice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Harrison Medical Center, a Subsidiary of Franciscan Health System... Adjustment Assistance (TAA), applicable to workers and former workers of Harrison Medical Center, a...

  15. National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project - Eastern Oregon-Washington Province (005) Total Petroleum Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Total Petroleum System is used in the National Assessment Project and incorporates the Assessment Unit, which is the fundamental geologic unit used for the...

  16. National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project - Western Oregon-Washington Province (004) Total Petroleum Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Total Petroleum System is used in the National Assessment Project and incorporates the Assessment Unit, which is the fundamental geologic unit used for the...

  17. Hydrogeologic framework of the Willamette Lowland aquifer system, Oregon and Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, D.G.; Gannett, Marshall W.; Vaccaro, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the hydraulic characteristics of the materials that make up the Willamette Lowland aquifer system, ground-water movement in the aquifer system, estimates of ground-water recharge, ground-water quality characteristics, construction and use of cross-sectional numerical ground-water flow models, hydrologic controls on ground-water movement, water budgets and flow paths, and a description and application of a conceptual model.

  18. Numerical simulation of groundwater flow for the Yakima River basin aquifer system, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, D.M.; Bachmann, M.P.; Vaccaro, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    A regional, three-dimensional, transient numerical model of groundwater flow was constructed for the Yakima River basin aquifer system to better understand the groundwater-flow system and its relation to surface-water resources. The model described in this report can be used as a tool by water-management agencies and other stakeholders to quantitatively evaluate proposed alternative management strategies that consider the interrelation between groundwater availability and surface-water resources.

  19. Latino residential segregation and self-rated health among Latinos: Washington State Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2012–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascak, Jesse J.; Molina, Yamile; Wu-Georges, Samantha; Idris, Ayah; Thompson, Beti

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between Latino residential segregation and self-rated health (SRH) is unclear, but might be partially affected by social capital. We investigated the association between Latino residential segregation and SRH while also examining the roles of various social capital measures. Washington State Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (2012–2014) and U.S. Census data were linked by zip code and zip code tabulation area. Multilevel logistic regression models were used to estimate odds of good or better SRH by Latino residential segregation, measured by the Gini coefficient, and controlling for sociodemographic, acculturation and social capital measures of neighborhood ties, collective socialization of children, and social control. The Latino residential segregation – SRH relationship was convex, or ‘U’-shaped, such that increases in segregation among Latinos residing in lower segregation areas was associated with lower SRH while increases in segregation among Latinos residing in higher segregation areas was associated with higher SRH. The social capital measures were independently associated with SRH but had little effect on the relationship between Latino residential segregation and SRH. A convex relationship between Latino residential segregation and SRH could explain mixed findings of previous studies. Although important for SRH, social capital measures of neighborhood ties, collective socialization of children, and social control might not account for the relationship between Latino residential segregation and SRH. PMID:27173739

  20. Adult informal caregivers reporting financial burden in Hawaii, Kansas, and Washington: Results from the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Claudia T; Bouldin, Erin D; Anderson, Lynda A; McGuire, Lisa C; Salvail, Florentina R; Simmons, Katrina Wynkoop; Andresen, Elena M

    2011-10-01

    Given the unpaid nature of the work, informal caregiving can create a financial burden for caregivers. Little has been done to identify specific predictors of experiencing financial burden. This study investigated demographic and health factors comparing caregivers who reported having or not having financial burden. Data are derived from adult caregivers (N = 3,317) as part of the 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System in Hawaii, Kansas, and Washington. The adjusted odds ratios for reporting a financial burden were estimated for demographic and other risk factors. Caregivers who reported a financial burden were younger, had lower incomes, were more likely to be current smokers, have had a stroke, and rate their health as fair or poor compared to caregivers who did not report a financial burden. Caregivers who were younger (ages 18-34), resided with care recipients, spent 20-39 hours per week providing care, and reported having a disability were at a statistically significantly higher odds of reporting a financial burden. Given the current economic difficulties faced by many Americans, further insights into the perceived financial burdens experienced by informal caregivers as well as linkages to policy and programs designed to support caregivers are critical for public health professionals to address the expanding needs in states and communities. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Finding Common Ground in Pension Reform: Lessons from the Washington State Pension System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber, Dan; Grout, Cyrus

    2014-01-01

    As states and localities across the nation consider the tradeoffs between defined benefit (DB) and defined contribution (DC) pension systems, it is important to gain insight into what implications pension reforms might have on workforce composition and teachers' retirement savings behavior. Moreover, it is also important to consider that…

  2. Conceptual model and numerical simulation of the groundwater-flow system of Bainbridge Island, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frans, Lonna M.; Bachmann, Matthew P.; Sumioka, Steve S.; Olsen, Theresa D.

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater is the sole source of drinking water for the population of Bainbridge Island. Increased use of groundwater supplies on Bainbridge Island as the population has grown over time has created concern about the quantity of water available and whether saltwater intrusion will occur as groundwater usage increases. A groundwater-flow model was developed to aid in the understanding of the groundwater system and the effects of groundwater development alternatives on the water resources of Bainbridge Island. Bainbridge Island is underlain by unconsolidated deposits of glacial and nonglacial origin. The surficial geologic units and the deposits at depth were differentiated into aquifers and confining units on the basis of areal extent and general water-bearing characteristics. Eleven principal hydrogeologic units are recognized in the study area and form the basis of the groundwater-flow model. A transient variable-density groundwater-flow model of Bainbridge Island and the surrounding area was developed to simulate current (2008) groundwater conditions. The model was calibrated to water levels measured during 2007 and 2008 using parameter estimation (PEST) to minimize the weighted differences or residuals between simulated and measured hydraulic head. The calibrated model was used to make some general observations of the groundwater system in 2008. Total flow through the groundwater system was about 31,000 acre-ft/ yr. The recharge to the groundwater system was from precipitation and septic-system returns. Groundwater flow to Bainbridge Island accounted for about 1,000 acre-ft/ yr or slightly more than 5 percent of the recharge amounts. Groundwater discharge was predominately to streams, lakes, springs, and seepage faces (16,000 acre-ft/yr) and directly to marine waters (10,000 acre-ft/yr). Total groundwater withdrawals in 2008 were slightly more than 6 percent (2,000 acre-ft/yr) of the total flow. The calibrated model was used to simulate predevelopment conditions

  3. Surficial extent and conceptual model of hydrothermal system at Mount Rainier, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, David

    1995-04-01

    A once massive hydrothermal system was disgorged from the summit of Mount Rainier in a highly destructive manner about 5000 years ago. Today, hydrothermal processes are depositing clayey alteration products that have the potential to reset the stage for similar events in the future. Areas of active hydrothermal alteration occur in three representative settings: (1) An extensive area (greater than 12,000 m 2) of heated ground and slightly acidic boiling-point fumaroles at 76-82 °C at East and West Craters on the volcano's summit, where alteration products include smectite, halloysite and disordered kaolinite, cristobalite, tridymite, opal, alunite, gibbsite, and calcite. (2) A small area (less than 500 m 2) of heated ground and sub-boiling-point fumaroles at 55-60 °C on the upper flank at Disappointment Cleaver with smectite alteration and chalcedony, tridymite, and opal-A encrustations. Similar areas probably occur at Willis Wall, Sunset Amphitheater, and the South Tahoma and Kautz headwalls. (3) Sulfate- and carbon dioxide-enriched thermal springs at 9-24 °C on the lower flank of the volcano in valley walls beside the Winthrop and Paradise Glaciers, where calcite, opal-A, and gypsum are being deposited. In addition, chloride- and carbon dioxide-enriched thermal springs issue from thin sediments that overlie Tertiary rocks at, or somewhat beyond, the base of the volcanic edifice in valley bottoms of the Nisqually and Ohanapecosh Rivers. Maximum spring temperatures of 19-25 °C and 38-50 °C, respectively, and extensive travertine deposits have developed in these more distant localities. The heat flow, distribution of thermal activity, and nature of alteration minerals and fluids suggest a conceptual model of a narrow, central hydrothermal system within Mount Rainier, with steam-heated snowmelt at the summit craters and localized leakage of steam-heated fluids within 2 km of the summit. The lateral extent of the hydrothermal system is marked by discharge of

  4. Solar heating, cooling, and hot water systems installed at Richland, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The project described is part of the U. S. Department of Energy's solar demonstration program, and became operational in April 1978. The solar system uses 6,000 square feet of flat-plate liquid collectors in a closed loop to deliver solar energy through a liquid-liquid heat exchanger to the building heat-pump duct work or 9,000-gallon thermal energy storage tank. A 25-ton Arkla solar-driven absorption chiller provides the cooling, in conjunction with a 2,000 gallon chilled water storage tank and reflective ponds on three sides of the building surplus heat. A near-by building is essentially identical except for having conventional heat-pump heating and cooling, and can serve as an experimental control. An on-going public relations program was provided from the beginning of the program, and resulted in numerous visitors and tour groups.

  5. Uncovering multiple populations in NGC 7099 (M 30) using Washington photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frelijj, H.; Geisler, D.; Cummings, J.; Cohen, R. E.; Mauro, F.; Munoz, C.; Villanova, S.; Tang, B.

    2017-12-01

    Over the last decade, the classical definition of globular clusters (GCs) as simple stellar populations was revolutionized due to the discovery of 'multiple populations' (MPs). However, our knowledge of this phenomenon and its characteristics is still lacking greatly observationally, and there is currently no scenario which adequately explains its origin. It is therefore important to study as many GCs as possible to characterize whether or not they have MPs, and determine their detailed behaviour to enlighten formation scenarios, using a wide range of techniques. The Washington photometric system has proved to be useful to find MPs, thanks mainly to the ultraviolet (UV)-sensitivity and high efficiency of the C filter. We search for MPs in the Galactic GC NGC 7099 (M30), the second GC being searched for MPs using this system. We obtained photometric data using the Swope 1-m telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, as well as the 4-m SOAR facility. Our reduction procedure included Addstar experiments to properly assess photometric errors. We find a clear signal of MPs based on an intrinsically wide colour spread on the RGB, in particular due to a relatively small fraction of stars significantly bluer than the main RGB locus. These stars should correspond to so-called first-generation stars, which we estimate to be roughly 15 per cent of the total. However, we find these first-generation stars to be more spatially concentrated than their second-generation counterparts, which is the opposite to the general trend found in other clusters. We briefly discuss possible explanations for this phenomenon.

  6. On the realistic validation of photometric redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, R.; Lin, C.-A.; Ishida, E. E. O.; Gieseke, F.; de Souza, R. S.; Costa-Duarte, M. V.; Hattab, M. W.; Krone-Martins, A.

    2017-07-01

    Two of the main problems encountered in the development and accurate validation of photometric redshift (photo-z) techniques are the lack of spectroscopic coverage in the feature space (e.g. colours and magnitudes) and the mismatch between the photometric error distributions associated with the spectroscopic and photometric samples. Although these issues are well known, there is currently no standard benchmark allowing a quantitative analysis of their impact on the final photo-z estimation. In this work, we present two galaxy catalogues, Teddy and Happy, built to enable a more demanding and realistic test of photo-z methods. Using photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and spectroscopy from a collection of sources, we constructed data sets that mimic the biases between the underlying probability distribution of the real spectroscopic and photometric sample. We demonstrate the potential of these catalogues by submitting them to the scrutiny of different photo-z methods, including machine learning (ML) and template fitting approaches. Beyond the expected bad results from most ML algorithms for cases with missing coverage in the feature space, we were able to recognize the superiority of global models in the same situation and the general failure across all types of methods when incomplete coverage is convoluted with the presence of photometric errors - a data situation which photo-z methods were not trained to deal with up to now and which must be addressed by future large-scale surveys. Our catalogues represent the first controlled environment allowing a straightforward implementation of such tests. The data are publicly available within the COINtoolbox (https://github.com/COINtoolbox/photoz_catalogues).

  7. Photometric modeling of viscous overstability in Saturn's rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo, H.

    2011-10-01

    The viscous overstability of dense planetary rings offers a plausible mechanism for the generation of observed ˜ 150 m radial density variations in the B and the inner A ring of Saturn (Colwell et al. 2007, Thomson et al. 2007). Viscous overstability, in the form of spontaneous growth of axisymmetric oscillations, arises naturally in N-body simulations, in the limit of high impact frequency and moderately weak selfgravity (Salo et al. 2001, Schmidt et al. 2001; see also Schmidt et al. 2009). For example, a selfgravitating system of identical particles with internal density ˜ half of solid ice, and following the Bridges et al. (1984) elasticity formula, becomes overstable for optical depths ? > 1, forming oscillations in about 100 meter scale. Like self-gravity wakes, with their typical ˜ 20° trailing pitch angle, overstable oscillations lead to a longitude-dependent brightness of the rings. Due to their axisymmetric nature, the expected longitude of minimum brightness is shifted to ring ansae. However, according to simulations, the axisymmetric oscillations may coexist with the inclined selfgravity wake structures, which can lead to complicated photometric behavior, depending on properties of the simulated system. The overstable systems may also exhibit amplitude modulations (in km-scales), arising from the mutual beating patterns of the basics overstable oscillations. New results of photometric modeling of viscously overstable dynamical simulations systems are reported, related to the above mentioned topics. The Monte Carlo method of Salo and Karjalainen (2003) is used, previously applied to modeling of photometric signatures of selfgravity wakes (Salo et al. 2004, French et al. 2007), scattering properties of propeller stuctures (Sremcevic et al., 2007), and to the intepretation of elevation-angle dependent opposition effect seen in HST data (Salo and French 2010). For example, the possible observable signatures of amplitude modulations are explored.

  8. Long photometric cycles in hot algols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mennickent R.E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We summarize the development of the field of Double Periodic Variables (DPVs, Mennickent et al. 2003 during the last fourteen years, placing these objects in the context of intermediate-mass close interacting binaries similar to β Persei (Algol and β Lyrae (Sheliak which are generally called Algols. DPVs show enigmatic long photometric cycles lasting on average about 33 times the orbital period, and have physical properties resembling, in some aspects, β Lyrae. About 200 of these objects have been found in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. Light curve models and orbitally resolved spectroscopy indicate that DPVs are semi-detached interacting binaries consisting of a near main-sequence B-type star accreting matter from a cooler giant and surrounded by an optically thick disc. This disc contributes a significant fraction of the system luminosity and its luminosity is larger than expected from the phenomenon of mass accretion alone. In some systems, an optically thin disc component is observed in well developed Balmer emission lines. The optically thick disc shows bright zones up to tens percent hotter than the disc, probably indicating shocks resulting from the gas and disc stream dynamics. We conjecture that a hotspot wind might be one of the channels for a mild systemic mass loss, since evidence for jets, winds or general mass loss has been found in β Lyrae, AUMon, HD170582, OGLE05155332-6925581 and V393 Sco. Also, theoretical work by Van Rensbergen et al. (2008 and Deschamps et al. (2013 suggests that hotspot could drive mass loss from Algols. We give special consideration to the recently published hypothesis for the long-cycle, consisting of variable mass transfer driven by a magnetic dynamo (Schleicher and Mennickent 2017. The Applegate (1992 mechanism should modify cyclically the equatorial radius of the chromospherically active donor producing cycles of enhanced mass loss through the inner Lagrangian point. Chromospheric emission in

  9. 1975 Washington timber harvest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.D. Jr. Lloyd

    1977-01-01

    In 1975, the Washington timber harvest declined for the 2d year to 6.2 billion board feet, 10 percent below 1974, and the lowest level in 8 years. The decrease, which occurred on almost all ownerships, amounted to 561 million board feet in western Washington and 130 million board feet in eastern Washington.

  10. Kepler Mission Design, Realized Photometric Performance, and Early Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, David G.; Borucki, William J.; Basri, Gibor

    2010-01-01

    The Kepler Mission, launched on 2009 March 6, was designed with the explicit capability to detect Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of solar-like stars using the transit photometry method. Results from just 43 days of data along with ground-based follow-up observations have identified five...... show great promise. To fully understand the methodology, processes, and eventually the results from the mission, we present the underlying rationale that ultimately led to the flight and ground system designs used to achieve the exquisite photometric performance. As an example of the initial...

  11. Development and Application of a Decision Support System for Water Management Investigations in the Upper Yakima River, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovee, Ken D.; Waddle, Terry J.; Talbert, Colin; Hatten, James R.; Batt, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    The Yakima River Decision Support System (YRDSS) was designed to quantify and display the consequences of different water management scenarios for a variety of state variables in the upper Yakima River Basin, located in central Washington. The impetus for the YRDSS was the Yakima River Basin Water Storage Feasibility Study, which investigated alternatives for providing additional water in the basin for threatened and endangered fish, irrigated agriculture, and municipal water supply. The additional water supplies would be provided by combinations of water exchanges, pumping stations, and off-channel storage facilities, each of which could affect the operations of the Bureau of Reclamation's (BOR) five headwaters reservoirs in the basin. The driver for the YRDSS is RiverWare, a systems-operations model used by BOR to calculate reservoir storage, irrigation deliveries, and streamflow at downstream locations resulting from changes in water supply and reservoir operations. The YRDSS uses output from RiverWare to calculate and summarize changes at 5 important flood plain reaches in the basin to 14 state variables: (1) habitat availability for selected life stages of four salmonid species, (2) spawning-incubation habitat persistence, (3) potential redd scour, (4) maximum water temperatures, (5) outmigration for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) from headwaters reservoirs, (6) outmigration of salmon smolts from Cle Elum Reservoir, (7) frequency of beneficial overbank flooding, (8) frequency of damaging flood events, (9) total deliverable water supply, (10) total water supply deliverable to junior water rights holders, (11) end-of-year reservoir carryover, (12) potential fine sediment transport rates, (13) frequency of events capable of armor layer disruption, and (14) geomorphic work performed during each water year. Output of the YRDSS consists of a series of conditionally formatted scoring tables, wherein the changes to a state variable resulting from an operational

  12. Uncertain Photometric Redshifts with Deep Learning Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Isanto, A.

    2017-06-01

    The need for accurate photometric redshifts estimation is a topic that has fundamental importance in Astronomy, due to the necessity of efficiently obtaining redshift information without the need of spectroscopic analysis. We propose a method for determining accurate multi-modal photo-z probability density functions (PDFs) using Mixture Density Networks (MDN) and Deep Convolutional Networks (DCN). A comparison with a Random Forest (RF) is performed.

  13. Photometric study and light curve analysis of eclipsing binary V2480 Cyg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsollahi, H.; Jahan, A.; Heidarnia, R.

    2017-05-01

    We present the photometric analysis of the detached eclipsing binary V2480 Cyg. After taking the photometric data, the light curve was analyzed in PHOEBE software, which uses the Wilson-Devinney code. Due to the observed O'Connell (1951) effect in light curve, we introduce a spotted model with 3 spots on the components, and the exact parameters of the system have been achieved. The main parameters of the system were calculated as about qptm = 1.7, Teff1 = 8075°K and Teff2 = 3829°K.

  14. Photometric Repeatability of Scanned Imagery: UVIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Clare E.; McCullough, Peter; Baggett, Sylvia

    2017-08-01

    We provide the preliminary results of a study on the photometric repeatability of spatial scans of bright, isolated white dwarf stars with the UVIS channel of the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We analyze straight-line scans from the first pair of identical orbits of HST program 14878 to assess if sub 0.1% repeatability can be attained with WFC3/UVIS. This study is motivated by the desire to achieve better signal-to-noise in the UVIS contamination and stability monitor, in which observations of standard stars in staring mode have been taken from the installation of WFC3 in 2009 to the present to assess temporal photometric stability. Higher signal to noise in this program would greatly benefit the sensitivity to detect contamination, and to better characterize the observed small throughput drifts over time. We find excellent repeatability between identical visits of program 14878, with sub 0.1% repeatability achieved in most filters. These! results support the initiative to transition the staring mode UVIS contamination and photometric stability monitor from staring mode images to spatial scans.

  15. Can Selforganizing Maps Accurately Predict Photometric Redshifts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Way, Michael J.; Klose, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We present an unsupervised machine-learning approach that can be employed for estimating photometric redshifts. The proposed method is based on a vector quantization called the self-organizing-map (SOM) approach. A variety of photometrically derived input values were utilized from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey's main galaxy sample, luminous red galaxy, and quasar samples, along with the PHAT0 data set from the Photo-z Accuracy Testing project. Regression results obtained with this new approach were evaluated in terms of root-mean-square error (RMSE) to estimate the accuracy of the photometric redshift estimates. The results demonstrate competitive RMSE and outlier percentages when compared with several other popular approaches, such as artificial neural networks and Gaussian process regression. SOM RMSE results (using delta(z) = z(sub phot) - z(sub spec)) are 0.023 for the main galaxy sample, 0.027 for the luminous red galaxy sample, 0.418 for quasars, and 0.022 for PHAT0 synthetic data. The results demonstrate that there are nonunique solutions for estimating SOM RMSEs. Further research is needed in order to find more robust estimation techniques using SOMs, but the results herein are a positive indication of their capabilities when compared with other well-known methods

  16. Photometric characterization of the Dark Energy Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, G. M. [Pennsylvania U.; Abbott, T. M.C. [Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.; Armstrong, R. [Princeton U., Astrophys. Sci. Dept.; Burke, D. L. [SLAC; Diehl, H. T. [Fermilab; Gruendl, R. A. [NCSA, Urbana; Johnson, M. D. [NCSA, Urbana; Li, T. S. [Fermilab; Rykoff, E. S. [SLAC; Walker, A. R. [Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.; Wester, W. [Fermilab; Yanny, B. [Fermilab

    2017-10-30

    We characterize the variation in photometric response of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) across its 520~Mpix science array during 4 years of operation. These variations are measured using high signal-to-noise aperture photometry of $>10^7$ stellar images in thousands of exposures of a few selected fields, with the telescope dithered to move the sources around the array. A calibration procedure based on these results brings the RMS variation in aperture magnitudes of bright stars on cloudless nights down to 2--3 mmag, with <1 mmag of correlated photometric errors for stars separated by $\\ge20$". On cloudless nights, any departures of the exposure zeropoints from a secant airmass law exceeding >1 mmag are plausibly attributable to spatial/temporal variations in aperture corrections. These variations can be inferred and corrected by measuring the fraction of stellar light in an annulus between 6" and 8" diameter. Key elements of this calibration include: correction of amplifier nonlinearities; distinguishing pixel-area variations and stray light from quantum-efficiency variations in the flat fields; field-dependent color corrections; and the use of an aperture-correction proxy. The DECam response pattern across the 2-degree field drifts over months by up to $\\pm7$ mmag, in a nearly-wavelength-independent low-order pattern. We find no fundamental barriers to pushing global photometric calibrations toward mmag accuracy.

  17. Photometric Defocus Observations of Transiting Extrasolar Planets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias C. Hinse

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We have carried out photometric follow-up observations of bright transiting extrasolar planets using the CbNUOJ 0.6 m telescope. We have tested the possibility of obtaining high photometric precision by applying the telescope defocus technique, allowing the use of several hundred seconds in exposure time for a single measurement. We demonstrate that this technique is capable of obtaining a root-mean-square scatter of sub-millimagnitude order over several hours for a V ~10 host star, typical for transiting planets detected from ground-based survey facilities. We compared our results with transit observations from a telescope operated in in-focus mode. High photometric precision was obtained due to the collection of a larger amount of photons, resulting in a higher signal compared to other random and systematic noise sources. Accurate telescope tracking is likely to further contribute to lowering systematic noise by exposing the same pixels on the CCD. Furthermore, a longer exposure time helps reduce the effect of scintillation noise which otherwise has a significant effect for small-aperture telescopes operated in in-focus mode. Finally we present the results of modelling four light-curves in which a root-mean-square scatter of 0.70 to 2.3 milli-magnitudes was achieved.

  18. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-27

    Energy used by Washington single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  19. Understanding Climate Policy Data Needs. NASA Carbon Monitoring System Briefing: Characterizing Flux Uncertainty, Washington D.C., 11 January 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Molly E.; Macauley, Molly

    2012-01-01

    Climate policy in the United States is currently guided by public-private partnerships and actions at the local and state levels. This mitigation strategy is made up of programs that focus on energy efficiency, renewable energy, agricultural practices and implementation of technologies to reduce greenhouse gases. How will policy makers know if these strategies are working, particularly at the scales at which they are being implemented? The NASA Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) will provide information on carbon dioxide fluxes derived from observations of earth's land, ocean and atmosphere used in state of the art models describing their interactions. This new modeling system could be used to assess the impact of specific policy interventions on CO2 reductions, enabling an iterative, results-oriented policy process. In January of 2012, the CMS team held a meeting with carbon policy and decision makers in Washington DC to describe the developing modeling system to policy makers. The NASA CMS will develop pilot studies to provide information across a range of spatial scales, consider carbon storage in biomass, and improve measures of the atmospheric distribution of carbon dioxide. The pilot involves multiple institutions (four NASA centers as well as several universities) and over 20 scientists in its work. This pilot study will generate CO2 flux maps for two years using observational constraints in NASA's state-of -the-art models. Bottom-up surface flux estimates will be computed using data-constrained land and ocean models; comparison of the different techniques will provide some knowledge of uncertainty in these estimates. Ensembles of atmospheric carbon distributions will be computed using an atmospheric general circulation model (GEOS-5), with perturbations to the surface fluxes and to transport. Top-down flux estimates will be computed from observed atmospheric CO2 distributions (ACOS/GOSAT retrievals) alongside the forward-model fields, in conjunction with an

  20. Measuring the color and brightness of artificial sky glow from cities using an all-sky imaging system calibrated with astronomical methods in the Johnson-Cousins B and V photometric systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipkin, Ashley; Duriscoe, Dan M.; Lughinbuhl, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Artificial light at night, when observed at some distance from a city, results in a dome of sky glow, brightest at the horizon. The spectral power distribution of electric light utilized will determine its color of the light dome and the amount of light will determine its brightness. Recent outdoor lighting technologies have included blue-rich light emitting diode (LED) sources that may increase the relative amount of blue to green light in sky glow compared to typical high pressure sodium (HPS) sources with warmer spectra. Measuring and monitoring this effect is important to the preservation of night sky visual quality as seen from undeveloped areas outside the city, such as parks or other protected areas, since the dark-adapted human eye is more sensitive to blue and green. We present a method using a wide field CCD camera which images the entire sky in both Johnson V and B photometric bands. Standard stars within the images are used for calibration. The resulting all-sky brightness maps, and a derived B-V color index map, provide a means to assess and track the impact of specific outdoor lighting practices. We also present example data from several cities, including Las Vegas, Nevada, Flagstaff, Arizona, and Cheyenne, Wyoming.

  1. Photometric Calibration of the Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Sarah Anne; Rodrigo Carrasco Damele, Eleazar; Thomas-Osip, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    The Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager (GSAOI) is an instrument available on the Gemini South telescope at Cerro Pachon, Chile, utilizing the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS). In order to allow users to easily perform photometry with this instrument and to monitor any changes in the instrument in the future, we seek to set up a process for performing photometric calibration with standard star observations taken across the time of the instrument’s operation. We construct a Python-based pipeline that includes IRAF wrappers for reduction and combines the AstroPy photutils package and original Python scripts with the IRAF apphot and photcal packages to carry out photometry and linear regression fitting. Using the pipeline, we examine standard star observations made with GSAOI on 68 nights between 2013 and 2015 in order to determine the nightly photometric zero points in the J, H, Kshort, and K bands. This work is based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, processed using the Gemini IRAF and gemini_python packages, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina), and Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil).

  2. Process evaluation of a regional public health model to reduce chronic disease through policy and systems changes, Washington State, 2010-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkinshaw, Lina P; Mason, Caitlin; Allen, Claire L; Vu, Thuy; Nandi, Paj; Santiago, Patti Migliore; Hannon, Peggy A

    2015-03-19

    Although the regionalization of public health systems has been well documented in the case of emergency preparedness, there is little literature on the application of regional approaches to other aspects of public health. From 2011 through 2014 the Washington State Department of Health implemented a Community Transformation Grant to support community-level policy and systems changes to decrease chronic disease risk factors and increase access to clinical preventive services. The Department of Health implemented the grant through a regional model, grouping 32 of the state's 35 local health jurisdictions into 5 regions. Our process evaluation identifies the challenges and facilitators to Community Transformation Grant planning and implementation. We conducted 34 key informant interviews with people directly involved in the implementation of the Community Transformation Grant. We interviewed state and local partners, including representatives from each region, the Department of Health, external consultants, and regional partners. We collected data from October 2013 through July 2014. Challenges for planning, building, and implementing a regional model for chronic disease prevention included stakeholder buy-in, regional geography, and communication; facilitators included shared regional history and infrastructure, strong leadership, collaborative relationships, shared vision and goals, sufficient funding, and direct technical assistance and training. Lessons learned in Washington State provide a foundation for other states interested in using a regional approach to reduce chronic disease risk. Policy and systems changes require adequate time, funding, and staffing. States and funders should work closely with local leaders to address these challenges and facilitators.

  3. University of Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The theme of the University of Washington based Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research (CHC) is understanding the biochemical, molecular and exposure...

  4. Hydrogeologic framework and hydrologic budget components of the Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System, Washington, Oregon, and Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, S.C.; Morgan, D.S.; Welch, W.B.; Ely, D.M.; Hinkle, S.R.; Vaccaro, J.J.; Orzol, L.L.

    2011-01-01

    The Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System (CPRAS) covers an area of about 44,000 square miles in a structural and topographic basin within the drainage of the Columbia River in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. The primary aquifers are basalts of the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) and overlying sediment. Eighty percent of the groundwater use in the study area is for irrigation, in support of a $6 billion per year agricultural economy. Water-resources issues in the Columbia Plateau include competing agricultural, domestic, and environmental demands. Groundwater levels were measured in 470 wells in 1984 and 2009; water levels declined in 83 percent of the wells, and declines greater than 25 feet were measured in 29 percent of the wells. Conceptually, the system is a series of productive basalt aquifers consisting of permeable interflow zones separated by less permeable flow interiors; in places, sedimentary aquifers overly the basalts. The aquifer system of the CPRAS includes seven hydrogeologic units-the overburden aquifer, three aquifer units in the permeable basalt rock, two confining units, and a basement confining unit. The overburden aquifer includes alluvial and colluvial valley-fill deposits; the three basalt units are the Saddle Mountains, Wanapum, and Grande Ronde Basalts and their intercalated sediments. The confining units are equivalent to the Saddle Mountains-Wanapum and Wanapum-Grande Ronde interbeds, referred to in this study as the Mabton and Vantage Interbeds, respectively. The basement confining unit, referred to as Older Bedrock, consists of pre-CRBG rocks that generally have much lower permeabilities than the basalts and are considered the base of the regional flow system. Based on specific-capacity data, median horizontal hydraulic conductivity (Kh) values for the overburden, basalt units, and bedrock are 161, 70, and 6 feet per day, respectively. Analysis of oxygen isotopes in water and carbon isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon from

  5. A photometric study of Saturn's F Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, Mark R.; Pollack, James B.; Ockert, Maureen E.; Doyle, Laurance R.; Dalton, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    The Saturn F Ring's radially integrated brightness has been measured over a wide range of phase angles from Voyager images; in order to model the resultant phase curve, the ring population has been divided into a dust regime and one of larger bodies, and while single scattering properties of small particles are modeled by semiempirical nonspherical/randomly oriented particles, those of large bodies are based on the photometric behavior of satellites. It is suggested that the dust in the envelope arises from micrometeoroid impacts into the large core particles, and then migrates inward.

  6. A Precision Photometric Comparison between SDSS-II and CSP Type Ia Supernova Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosher, J.; Sako, M.; Corlies, L.

    2012-01-01

    were transformed into the SDSS photometric system. Sources of systematic uncertainty have been identified, quantified, and shown to be at or below the 0.023 mag level in all bands. When all photometry for a given band is combined, we find average magnitude differences of equal to or less than 0.011 mag...

  7. A visible and near-infrared photometric correction for Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, S.; Sunshine, J.; Staid, M.; Boardman, J.; Pieters, C.; Guasqui, P.; Malaret, E.; McLaughlin, S.; Yokota, Y.; Li, J.-Y.

    2013-01-01

    Observations of the Moon obtained by the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) instrument were acquired at various local viewing geometries. To compensate for this, a visible near-infrared photometric correction for the M3 observations of the lunar surface has been derived. Images are corrected to the standard geometry of 30° phase angle with an incidence of 30° and an emission of 0°. The photometric correction is optimized for highland materials but is also a good approximation for mare deposits. The results are compared with ground-based observations of the lunar surface to validate the absolute reflectance of the M3 observations. This photometric model has been used to produce the v1.0 Level 2 delivery of the entire set of M3 data to the Planetary Data System (PDS). The photometric correction uses local topography, in this case derived from an early version of the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter data, to more accurately determine viewing geometry. As desired, this photometric correction removes most of the topography of the M3 measurements. In this paper, two additional improvements of the photometric modeling are discussed: (1) an extrapolated phase function long ward of 2500 nm to avoid possible misinterpretation of spectra in the wavelength region that includes possible OH/H2O absorptions and (2) an empirical correction to remove a residual cross-track gradient in the data that likely is an uncorrected instrumental effect. New files for these two effects have been delivered to PDS and can be applied to the M3 observations.

  8. 1974 Washington timber harvest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.D. Jr. Lloyd

    1976-01-01

    The 1974 timber harvest of 6.88 billion board feet declined 933 million board feet (11.9 percent) below the record 1973 harvest. Decreases occurred in almost all owner groups. In western Washington the decline was 856 million board feet (13.0 percent). In eastern Washington the decline was 76 million board feet (6.3 percent).

  9. How Can Improvements Be Made to the United States Metrorail System (With a Focus on the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority Metrorail System) to Enhance Safety for Its Riders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    due to special events in the area to include Washington Redskins football , Washington National baseball, and other events held in the Washington, D.C...The technological 15 Ibid. 16 Ibid. 17 Ibid. 17 methods involved using television and video

  10. Ceres photometric properties from VIR on Dawn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarniello, M.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Capaccioni, F.; Capria, M. T.; Carrozzo, F. G.; Fonte, S.; Frigeri, A.; Giardino, M.; Longobardo, A.; Magni, G.; Palomba, E.; Raponi, A.; Tosi, F.; Zambon, F.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.; Li, J.-Y.

    2015-10-01

    Dawn spacecraft [1] entered orbit around Ceres on 6 March 2015. During the approach phase to this dwarf planet and later, through the Survey, High Altitude Mapping (HAMO) and Low Altitude Mapping Orbits (LAMO), the Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIR) will perform detailed observations of the surface of the body. VIR [2] is an imaging spectrometer onboard the Dawn mission and it is composed of two spectral channels: the visible (VIS) covering the 0.25 μm - 1.0 μm wavelength range and the infrared (IR) for the 0.95 μm - 5.0 μm interval. During the various phases of the mission, the surface of Ceres will be observed under different observation geometries. The measured signal is then affected by photometric issues that need to be minimized in order to exploit the intrinsic spectral variability of the surface, thus allowing the direct comparison between acquisitions taken under different observation conditions. In order to accomplish this task we perform a photometric reduction of the dataset by means of a simplified Hapke model, following the approach of [3].

  11. PHOTOMETRIC STEREO SHAPE-AND-ALBEDO-FROM-SHADING FOR PIXEL-LEVEL RESOLUTION LUNAR SURFACE RECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. C. Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Shape and Albedo from Shading (SAfS techniques recover pixel-wise surface details based on the relationship between terrain slopes, illumination and imaging geometry, and the energy response (i.e., image intensity captured by the sensing system. Multiple images with different illumination geometries (i.e., photometric stereo can provide better SAfS surface reconstruction due to the increase in observations. Photometric stereo SAfS is suitable for detailed surface reconstruction of the Moon and other extra-terrestrial bodies due to the availability of photometric stereo and the less complex surface reflecting properties (i.e., albedo of the target bodies as compared to the Earth. Considering only one photometric stereo pair (i.e., two images, pixel-variant albedo is still a major obstacle to satisfactory reconstruction and it needs to be regulated by the SAfS algorithm. The illumination directional difference between the two images also becomes an important factor affecting the reconstruction quality. This paper presents a photometric stereo SAfS algorithm for pixel-level resolution lunar surface reconstruction. The algorithm includes a hierarchical optimization architecture for handling pixel-variant albedo and improving performance. With the use of Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera - Narrow Angle Camera (LROC NAC photometric stereo images, the reconstructed topography (i.e., the DEM is compared with the DEM produced independently by photogrammetric methods. This paper also addresses the effect of illumination directional difference in between one photometric stereo pair on the reconstruction quality of the proposed algorithm by both mathematical and experimental analysis. In this case, LROC NAC images under multiple illumination directions are utilized by the proposed algorithm for experimental comparison. The mathematical derivation suggests an illumination azimuthal difference of 90 degrees between two images is recommended to achieve

  12. Photometric Stereo Shape-And for Pixel-Level Resolution Lunar Surface Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. C.; Wu, B.

    2017-07-01

    Shape and Albedo from Shading (SAfS) techniques recover pixel-wise surface details based on the relationship between terrain slopes, illumination and imaging geometry, and the energy response (i.e., image intensity) captured by the sensing system. Multiple images with different illumination geometries (i.e., photometric stereo) can provide better SAfS surface reconstruction due to the increase in observations. Photometric stereo SAfS is suitable for detailed surface reconstruction of the Moon and other extra-terrestrial bodies due to the availability of photometric stereo and the less complex surface reflecting properties (i.e., albedo) of the target bodies as compared to the Earth. Considering only one photometric stereo pair (i.e., two images), pixel-variant albedo is still a major obstacle to satisfactory reconstruction and it needs to be regulated by the SAfS algorithm. The illumination directional difference between the two images also becomes an important factor affecting the reconstruction quality. This paper presents a photometric stereo SAfS algorithm for pixel-level resolution lunar surface reconstruction. The algorithm includes a hierarchical optimization architecture for handling pixel-variant albedo and improving performance. With the use of Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera - Narrow Angle Camera (LROC NAC) photometric stereo images, the reconstructed topography (i.e., the DEM) is compared with the DEM produced independently by photogrammetric methods. This paper also addresses the effect of illumination directional difference in between one photometric stereo pair on the reconstruction quality of the proposed algorithm by both mathematical and experimental analysis. In this case, LROC NAC images under multiple illumination directions are utilized by the proposed algorithm for experimental comparison. The mathematical derivation suggests an illumination azimuthal difference of 90 degrees between two images is recommended to achieve minimal error in

  13. Bibliography of groundwater resources of the glacial aquifer systems in Washington, Idaho, and northwestern Montana, 1905-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Sue C.; Futornick, Zoe O.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Groundwater Resources Program is undertaking a series of regional groundwater availability studies to improve our understanding of groundwater availability in major aquifers across the Nation. One of the objectives of the Glacial Principal Aquifers study (proposed) is to provide information on the occurrence of groundwater in glacial aquifers in the United States, an area that includes parts of the northern continental States and much of Alaska. Toward this effort, a literature search was conducted to identify readily available documents that describe the occurrence of groundwater in glacial aquifers in the United States. This bibliography provides citations for documents, as well as codes indicating types of information available in each, for Washington, Idaho, and northwestern Montana—an area corresponding approximately to the southern extent of the Cordilleran ice sheet.

  14. Forward Global Photometric Calibration of the Dark Energy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, D. L.; Rykoff, E. S.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Bechtol, K.; Bernstein, G. M.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Finley, D. A.; Gruendl, R. A.; James, D. J.; Kent, S.; Kessler, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Lasker, J.; Li, T. S.; Scolnic, D.; Smith, J.; Tucker, D. L.; Wester, W.; Yanny, B.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gruen, D.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Melchior, P.; Menanteau, F.; Miquel, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Walker, A. R.; DES Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Many scientific goals for the Dark Energy Survey (DES) require the calibration of optical/NIR broadband b = grizY photometry that is stable in time and uniform over the celestial sky to one percent or better. It is also necessary to limit to similar accuracy systematic uncertainty in the calibrated broadband magnitudes due to uncertainty in the spectrum of the source. Here we present a “Forward Global Calibration Method (FGCM)” for photometric calibration of the DES, and we present results of its application to the first three years of the survey (Y3A1). The FGCM combines data taken with auxiliary instrumentation at the observatory with data from the broadband survey imaging itself and models of the instrument and atmosphere to estimate the spatial and time dependences of the passbands of individual DES survey exposures. “Standard” passbands that are typical of the passbands encountered during the survey are chosen. The passband of any individual observation is combined with an estimate of the source spectral shape to yield a magnitude {m}b{std} in the standard system. This “chromatic correction” to the standard system is necessary to achieve subpercent calibrations and in particular, to resolve ambiguity between the broadband brightness of a source and the shape of its SED. The FGCM achieves a reproducible and stable photometric calibration of standard magnitudes {m}b{std} of stellar sources over the multiyear Y3A1 data sample with residual random calibration errors of σ =6{--}7 {mmag} per exposure. The accuracy of the calibration is uniform across the 5000 {\\deg }2 DES footprint to within σ =7 {mmag}. The systematic uncertainties of magnitudes in the standard system due to the spectra of sources are less than 5 {mmag} for main-sequence stars with 0.5< g-i< 3.0.

  15. Forward Global Photometric Calibration of the Dark Energy Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, D.L.; et al.

    2017-06-05

    Many scientific goals for the Dark Energy Survey (DES) require calibration of optical/NIR broadband $b = grizY$ photometry that is stable in time and uniform over the celestial sky to one percent or better. It is also necessary to limit to similar accuracy systematic uncertainty in the calibrated broadband magnitudes due to uncertainty in the spectrum of the source. Here we present a "Forward Global Calibration Method (FGCM)" for photometric calibration of the DES, and we present results of its application to the first three years of the survey (Y3A1). The FGCM combines data taken with auxiliary instrumentation at the observatory with data from the broad-band survey imaging itself and models of the instrument and atmosphere to estimate the spatial- and time-dependence of the passbands of individual DES survey exposures. "Standard" passbands are chosen that are typical of the passbands encountered during the survey. The passband of any individual observation is combined with an estimate of the source spectral shape to yield a magnitude $m_b^{\\mathrm{std}}$ in the standard system. This "chromatic correction" to the standard system is necessary to achieve sub-percent calibrations. The FGCM achieves reproducible and stable photometric calibration of standard magnitudes $m_b^{\\mathrm{std}}$ of stellar sources over the multi-year Y3A1 data sample with residual random calibration errors of $\\sigma=5-6\\,\\mathrm{mmag}$ per exposure. The accuracy of the calibration is uniform across the $5000\\,\\mathrm{deg}^2$ DES footprint to within $\\sigma=7\\,\\mathrm{mmag}$. The systematic uncertainties of magnitudes in the standard system due to the spectra of sources are less than $5\\,\\mathrm{mmag}$ for main sequence stars with $0.5

  16. Optical Photometric and Radio Monitoring of Gamma-ray Loud ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    from 2002–2010 in radio and optical wave bands revealed the presence of an apparent periodical component in the flux ... displays unusually high amplitude of intra-day variability. 2. Photometric observations. The photometric ... tures were measured using modulation radiometers. Depending on the strength of the source ...

  17. Planck 2013 results. VIII. HFI photometric calibration and mapmaking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Planck Collaboration,; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the processing applied to the HFI cleaned time-ordered data to produce photometrically calibrated maps. HFI observes the sky over a broad range of frequencies, from 100 to 857 GHz. To get the best accuracy on the calibration on such a large range, two different photometric ca...

  18. A photometric and spectroscopic study of BX Andromedae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, S. A.; Rainger, P. P.; Hilditch, R. W.; Hill, G.

    1990-05-01

    A spectroscopic and photometric study of the late-type contact binary BX And is presented. Three V light curves have been obtained between 1985 and 1988 as well as the first radial-velocity data for this system during 1987. The first IR light curves in the J and K pass-bands are also presented. A full analysis of these data and two other light curves obtained in 1976 and 1981/1982 are given which suggest that BX And is a marginal-contact binary with a hot spot on the secondary component which is approximately 1200 K hotter than the surrounding photosphere and approximately 72 deg in diameter covering 20 percent of the star.

  19. A photometric and spectroscopic study of BX Andromedae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, S.A.; Rainger, P.P.; Hilditch, R.W. (Saint Andrews Univ. (UK). Observatory); Hill, G. (Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Victoria, BC (Canada))

    1990-05-15

    We present a spectroscopic and photometric study of the late-type contact binary BX And. Three V light curves have been obtained between 1985 and 1988 as well as the first radial-velocity data for this system during 1987. The first infrared light curves in the J and K pass-bands are also presented. A full analysis of these data and two other light curves obtained in 1976 and 1981/1982 are given which suggest that BX And is a marginal-contact binary with a hot spot on the secondary component which is approximately 1200 K hotter than the surrounding photosphere and approximately 72deg in diameter covering 20 per cent of the star. (author).

  20. Photometric techniques, performance and PSF characterization of GeMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turri, Paolo; McConnachie, Alan W.; Stetson, Peter B.; Andersen, David R.; Véran, Jean-Pierre; Fiorentino, Giuliana; Massari, Davide

    2016-07-01

    GeMS is the multi-conjugate adaptive optics instrument at the Gemini South telescope in Chile, the first facility-class MCAO system and the first to use laser guide stars. During its science verification period we have observed the Galactic globular cluster NGC 1851 and here we discuss the optimization of the analysis techniques that we adopt to extract science-ready photometric measurements. We use the large number of stars in the field of view to determine with high accuracy the PSF model for the profile fitting photometry. Understanding the correct techniques not only has proven useful with GeMS data but will be valuable on the next generation of Extremely Large Telescopes, where MCAO will be a central technology.

  1. Photometric Supernova Classification with Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, Michelle; McEwen, Jason D.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Lahav, Ofer; Winter, Max K.

    2016-08-01

    Automated photometric supernova classification has become an active area of research in recent years in light of current and upcoming imaging surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, given that spectroscopic confirmation of type for all supernovae discovered will be impossible. Here, we develop a multi-faceted classification pipeline, combining existing and new approaches. Our pipeline consists of two stages: extracting descriptive features from the light curves and classification using a machine learning algorithm. Our feature extraction methods vary from model-dependent techniques, namely SALT2 fits, to more independent techniques that fit parametric models to curves, to a completely model-independent wavelet approach. We cover a range of representative machine learning algorithms, including naive Bayes, k-nearest neighbors, support vector machines, artificial neural networks, and boosted decision trees (BDTs). We test the pipeline on simulated multi-band DES light curves from the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. Using the commonly used area under the curve (AUC) of the Receiver Operating Characteristic as a metric, we find that the SALT2 fits and the wavelet approach, with the BDTs algorithm, each achieve an AUC of 0.98, where 1 represents perfect classification. We find that a representative training set is essential for good classification, whatever the feature set or algorithm, with implications for spectroscopic follow-up. Importantly, we find that by using either the SALT2 or the wavelet feature sets with a BDT algorithm, accurate classification is possible purely from light curve data, without the need for any redshift information.

  2. Washington County Crash Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Contains locations and information about every crash incident reported to the police in Washington County from 2011 to 2015. Fields include injury severity,...

  3. Photometric immersion refractometry of bacterial spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, P; Beaman, T C; Corner, T R; Greenamyre, J T; Tisa, L S

    1982-01-01

    Photometric immersion refractometry was used to determine the average apparent refractive index (n) of five types of dormant Bacillus spores representing a 600-fold range in moist-heat resistance determined as a D100 value. The n of a spore type increased as the molecular size of various immersion solutes decreased. For comparison of the spore types, the n of the entire spore and of the isolated integument was determined by use of bovine serum albumin, which is excluded from permeating into them. The n of the sporoplast (the structures bounded by the outer pericortex membrane) was determined by use of glucose, which was shown to permeate into the spore only as deeply as the pericortex membrane. Among the various spore types, an exponential increase in the heat resistance correlated with the n of the entire spore and of the sporoplast, but not of the isolated perisporoplast integument. Correlation of the n with the solids content of the entire spore provided a method of experimentally obtaining the refractive index increment (dn/dc), which was constant for the various spore types and enables the calculation of solids and water content from an n. Altogether, the results showed that the total water content is distributed unequally within the dormant spore, with less water in the sporoplast than in the perisporoplast integument, and that the sporoplast becomes more refractile and therefore more dehydrated as the heat resistance becomes greater among the various spore types. PMID:6802796

  4. Theoretical consideration on polarized photometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, K; Yamamoto, A; Matsunaga, A; Mizukami, E; Nishimura, M; Miyazaki, M

    1994-01-01

    Previously, we developed a novel detector, a polarized photometric detector for optically active compounds, where two polarizers are set on either side of the UV-visible absorbance detector flow cell. In this paper, we present theoretical considerations on this method with several equations. If the inclined angle of the second polarizer is defined as alpha (left when alpha > 0 degree), the following equation is obtained: delta Abs = 2 log e.tan alpha.beta, where delta Abs is the change in absorbance and beta (magnitude of beta laevorotatory compounds are detected as positive and negative absorbance changes, respectively. The theoretical maximum signal to noise (S/N) ratio is obtained when alpha = 45 degrees (= 0.8 rad) and the smallest detection limit is 5 x 10(-5) degrees (S/N = 3) when the path length of the flow cell is 10 mm. This detector was successfully used in flow injection analysis (FIA) as well as HPLC for optically active compounds.

  5. Photometric functions for photoclinometry and other applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    Least-squared fits to the brightness profiles across a disk or "limb darkening" described by Hapke's photometric function are found for the simpler Minnaert and lunar-Lambert functions. The simpler functions are needed to reduce the number of unknown parameters in photoclinometry, especially to distinguish the brightness variations of the surface materials from that due to the resolved topography. The limb darkening varies with the Hapke parameters for macroscopic roughness (??), the single-scattering albedo (w), and the asymmetry factor of the particle phase function (g). Both of the simpler functions generally provide good matches to the limb darkening described by Hapke's function, but the lunar-Lambert function is superior when viewing angles are high and when (??) is less than 30??. Although a nonunique solution for the Minnaert function at high phase angles has been described for smooth surfaces, the discrepancy decreases with increasing (??) and virtually disappears when (??) reaches 30?? to 40??. The variation in limb darkening with w and g, pronounced for smooth surfaces, is reduced or eliminated when the Hapke parameters are in the range typical of most planetary surfaces; this result simplifies the problem of photoclinometry across terrains with variable surface materials. The Minnaert or lunar-Lambert fits to published Hapke models will give photoclinometric solutions that are very similar (>1?? slope discrepancy) to the Hapke-function solutions for nearly all of the bodies and terrains thus far modeled by Hapke's function. ?? 1991.

  6. MULTIBAND PHOTOMETRIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF HV Cnc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gökay, G.; Gürol, B.; Derman, E., E-mail: ggokay@science.ankara.edu.tr [Astronomy and Space Sciences Department, Faculty of Science, Ankara University, 06100 Tandoğan, Ankara (Turkey)

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, radial velocity and VI- and JHK{sub S} - (Two Micron All Sky Survey) band photometric data of the detached system HV Cnc have been analyzed. The primary component of HV Cnc, which is a member of the M67 cluster, is suspected to be either a blue straggler or turn-off star. The system is a single-lined spectroscopic binary and its light curve shows a total eclipse. Spectroscopic observations of the system revealed the third component, which shows contribution to the total light of the system. Light curve and radial velocity data have been analyzed using the Wilson-Devinney (W-D) code and JHK{sub S} filter definitions computed for the W-D code in this work. Our analysis shows that the mass and radius of the primary and secondary components are 1.31 M {sub ☉}, 0.52 M {sub ☉}, 1.87 R {sub ☉}, and 0.48 R {sub ☉}, respectively. All results are compared with previously published literature values and discussed.

  7. IHW COMET HALLEY PHOTOMETRIC MAGNITUDES, V2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set presents the photometric magnitude measurements of 1P/Halley submitted to the International Halley Watch (IHW) Photometry and Polarimetry Network...

  8. Photometric correction of VIR spectra of Ceres: empirical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longobardo, A.; Palomba, E.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ciarniello, M.; Tosi, F.; Li, J.-Y.; Carrozzo, F. G.; Zambon, F.; Raponi, A.; Ammannito, E.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-10-01

    The application of the photometric empirical model, already tested for the Vesta asteroid and for the 67P/CG comet, is extended for the first data of Ceres provided by the Dawn/VIR imaging spectrometer

  9. Photometric Redshifts Applied to WFPC2 and NICMOS HDF Data

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Rodger I.; Weymann, Ray J.; Storrie-Lombardi, Lisa J.

    1999-01-01

    A photometric redshift analysis of optical and infrared images of the Northern Hubble Deep Field indicate a constant star formation rate for redshifts between 1 and 6. The small size of the field and small number of high redshift objects limits this finding to just the area of the NICMOS image. The photometric redshift technique is a modified version of chi square fits to observed and calculated galaxy spectral energy distribution templates.

  10. Photometric properties of resolved and unresolved magnetic elements

    OpenAIRE

    Criscuoli, Serena; Rast, Mark

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the photometric signature of magnetic flux tubes in the solar photosphere. We developed two dimensional, static numerical models of isolated and clustered magnetic flux tubes. We investigated the emergent intensity profiles at different lines-of-sight for various spatial resolutions and opacity models. We found that both geometric and photometric properties of bright magnetic features are determined not only by the physical properties of the tube and its surroundings, but also ...

  11. Probabilistic Photometric Redshifts in the Era of Petascale Astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco Kind, Matias [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2014-01-01

    With the growth of large photometric surveys, accurately estimating photometric redshifts, preferably as a probability density function (PDF), and fully understanding the implicit systematic uncertainties in this process has become increasingly important. These surveys are expected to obtain images of billions of distinct galaxies. As a result, storing and analyzing all of these photometric redshift PDFs will be non-trivial, and this challenge becomes even more severe if a survey plans to compute and store multiple different PDFs. In this thesis, we have developed an end-to-end framework that will compute accurate and robust photometric redshift PDFs for massive data sets by using two new, state-of-the-art machine learning techniques that are based on a random forest and a random atlas, respectively. By using data from several photometric surveys, we demonstrate the applicability of these new techniques, and we demonstrate that our new approach is among the best techniques currently available. We also show how different techniques can be combined by using novel Bayesian techniques to improve the photometric redshift precision to unprecedented levels while also presenting new approaches to better identify outliers. In addition, our framework provides supplementary information regarding the data being analyzed, including unbiased estimates of the accuracy of the technique without resorting to a validation data set, identification of poor photometric redshift areas within the parameter space occupied by the spectroscopic training data, and a quantification of the relative importance of the variables used during the estimation process. Furthermore, we present a new approach to represent and store photometric redshift PDFs by using a sparse representation with outstanding compression and reconstruction capabilities. We also demonstrate how this framework can also be directly incorporated into cosmological analyses. The new techniques presented in this thesis are crucial

  12. Summary Proceedings of the Future Navigation Systems Planning Conference, held 3-4 August 1982, Washington, DC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    System Planning Director of Aviation Policy and Plans, FAA 4:45 Adjourn Wednesday. August 4. 1982 9:00 Department of Transportation David C. Scull ...even across the U.S. in the en route system. It is widely used internationally, often in conjunc- tion with inertial navigation systems. It requires an...services if the signal sources were to be disabled. Inertial navigation systems are now authorized as a sole means of navigation in over-ocean areas. INS

  13. Two Suns in the Sky: Stellar Multiplicity in Exoplanet Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raghavan, Deepar; Henry, Todd J; Mason, Brian D; Hambly, Nigel C

    2006-01-01

    ... distances estimated photometrically.We also attempt to confirm or refute companions listed in the Washington Double Star Catalog, in the Catalogs of Nearby Stars Series by Gliese and Jahrei , in Hipparcos results, and in Duquennoy...

  14. Numerical simulation of the groundwater-flow system in Chimacum Creek Basin and vicinity, Jefferson County, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Joseph L.; Johnson, Kenneth H.; Frans, Lonna M.

    2013-01-01

    A groundwater-flow model was developed to evaluate potential future effects of growth and of water-management strategies on water resources in the Chimacum Creek Basin. The model covers an area of about 64 square miles (mi2) on the Olympic Peninsula in northeastern Jefferson County, Washington. The Chimacum Creek Basin drains an area of about 53 mi2 and consists of Chimacum Creek and its tributary East Fork Chimacum Creek, which converge near the town of Chimacum and discharge to Port Townsend Bay near the town of Irondale. The topography of the model area consists of north-south oriented, narrow, regularly spaced parallel ridges and valleys that are characteristic of fluted glaciated surfaces. Thick accumulations of peat occur along the axis of East Fork Chimacum Creek and provide rich soils for agricultural use. The study area is underlain by a north-thickening sequence of unconsolidated glacial (till and outwash) and interglacial (fluvial and lacustrine) deposits, and sedimentary and igneous bedrock units that crop out along the margins and the western interior of the model area. Six hydrogeologic units in the model area form the basis of the groundwater-flow model. They are represented by model layers UC (upper confining), UA (upper aquifer), MC (middle confining), LA (lower aquifer), LC (lower confining), and OE (bedrock). Groundwater flow in the Chimacum Creek Basin and vicinity was simulated using the groundwater-flow model, MODFLOW-2005. The finite-difference model grid comprises 245 columns, 313 rows, and 6 layers. Each model cell has a horizontal dimension of 200 × 200 feet (ft). The thickness of model layers varies throughout the model area and ranges from 5 ft in the non-bedrock units to more than 2,400 ft in the bedrock. Groundwater flow was simulated for steady-state conditions, which were simulated for calibration of the model using average recharge, discharge, and water levels for the 180-month period October 1994–September 2009. The model as

  15. Realization of photometric base unit of candela traceable to cryogenic radiometer at UME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samedov, F.; Bazkır, Ö.

    2005-06-01

    At National Metrology Institute of Turkey (UME, Ulusal Metroloji Enstitüsü), luminous intensity unit of candela was realized using detector-based approach and photometric scale was re-established depending on this new realization. Candela was measured on photometric bench using interferometric distance measurement system and filter-radiometer traceable to UME primary level electrical-substitution cryogenic radiometer. Thermally stabilized filter radiometer, which has been designed for spectral irradiance measurements, is consists of trap detector, filter housing and precision aperture. Different measurement techniques were used to fully characterize each parameter of filter-radiometer; like effective aperture area, spectral transmittance of V(λ) filter and responsivity of trap detector.

  16. Information technology feasibility study for the Washington State commercial vehicle information systems and networks (CVISN) pilot project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-08

    The CVISN Pilot Project will prototype the use of a comprehensive interface to state and federal motor carrier data systems and will deliver real-time, decision-making information to weigh stations and commercial vehicle enforcement officers. In addi...

  17. Forest industries of eastern Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian R. Wall; Donald R. Gedney; Robert B. Forster

    1966-01-01

    A sawmill, built in 1872, marked the beginning of the forest industry in eastern Washington -- almost half a century after the emergence of the lumber industry in western Washington. Since then, this industry has increased in importance to eastern Washington's economy, now furnishing about one-fifth of the total manufacturing employment and wages paid—in...

  18. Photometric Strömgren-Hβ Quantification for O and B Stars of Luminosity Class V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltcheva, Nadia; Golev, Valeri; Paunzen, Ernst

    2017-11-01

    In any photometric system, the relationship between the spectral type and the intrinsic colors is fundamental for the photometric stellar classification and for a reliable derivation of stellar parameters. Such relationships are being constantly verified and improved based on larger and better samples. The capability of the Strömgren-Hβ photometry to provide reddening-free quantities allows the classification of reddened stars over the entire spectral sequence. However, a detailed consistent tabulation of the uvbyβ quantities for the O-B9 part of the main sequence is currently warranted. We combine spectral types and photometry from the literature to provide a new empirical tabulation of the intrinsic color b - y, color differences c 1, m 1, [c 1] and [m 1] and the Hβ index for main-sequence (luminosity class V) stars of spectral types O4.5 through B9.5 in terms of spectral sub-types. Our survey is based on more than 1400 stars. We use the established c 1 versus b - y intrinsic line and the accepted reddening slopes to obtain dereddened quantities and then calculate their median values as a function of the spectral sub-type. The classification ability of the system in this spectral range is reliable and the photometric quantities are not affected by the stellar rotation.

  19. A photometric model for asteroid (21) Lutetia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselmann, P.; Leyrat, C.; Fornasier, S.; Barucci, M.; Lazzaro, D.

    2014-07-01

    (21) Lutetia has been successfully observed (July 10, 2010) by the ESA Rosetta spacecraft during its journey toward the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (Sierks et al. 2011, Coradini et al. 2011). All the available data show intriguing characteristics with a complex surface composition interpretation (Barucci et al. 2012). The quite high mean density estimation (3.4±0.3, Pätzold et al. 2011) together with the unmatching density derived from the most probable surface compositions raise a hypothesis of (21) Lutetia having a metal core (Weiss et al 2012). The surface geology of (21) Lutetia is also highly complex with significant interactions between ancient and more recent structures (Thomas et al; 2012). The large craters and lineaments show that the object was heavily battered in the past, probably losing almost all of its crust in the process (Massironi et al 2012). If (21) Lutetia is a partially differentiated asteroid with an impact-stripped crust, a complete study of variegations might help in elucidating this event. Regions or strips of different albedo might indicate heavier- or lighter-battered surface histories. Albedo variations have been detected by Leyrat et al. (2012) in the visible wavelengths. In this work, we present a deeper analysis of the Lutetia photometric properties. For such analysis, a full set of pipelines was developed in the Python 2.7.6 language. Images obtained by the OSIRIS cameras, NAC and WAC, were used alongside the shape model provided by L. Jorda to derive for each facet the luminance angles and the correct I/F. The pipeline takes image pixels and matches with facets on different observational conditions. Facets are iteratively fitted by a phase function and a disk function. Several phase functions were tested as Akimov (1976), Kaasalainen (Kaasalainen et al. 2003), Schroder (Schroder et al; 2013) and polynomial and were implemented; for disk function, McEwen (1991), Akimov and Minnaert (1941) were used. The method can be also

  20. Optical Photometric Observations of GEO Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Rodriquez-Cowardin, Heather M.; Barker, Edwin S.; Abercromby, Kira J.; Kelecy, Thomas M.; Horstman, Matt

    2010-01-01

    We report on a continuing program of optical photometric measurements of faint orbital debris at geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). These observations can be compared with laboratory studies of actual spacecraft materials in an effort to determine what the faint debris at GEO may be. We have optical observations from Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile of two samples of debris: 1. GEO objects discovered in a survey with the University of Michigan's 0.6-m aperture Curtis-Schmidt telescope MODEST (for Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), and then followed up in real-time with the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9-m for orbits and photometry. Our goal is to determine 6 parameter orbits and measure colors for all objects fainter than R = 15 t11 magnitude that are discovered in the MODEST survey. 2. A smaller sample of high area to mass ratio (AMR) objects discovered independently, and acquired using predictions from orbits derived from independent tracking data collected days prior to the observations. Our optical observations in standard astronomical BVRI filters are done with either telescope, and with the telescope tracking the debris object at the object's angular rate. Observations in different filters are obtained sequentially. We have obtained 71 calibrated sequences of R-B-V-I-R magnitudes. A total of 66 of these sequences have 3 or more good measurements in all filters (not contaminated by star streaks or in Earth's shadow). Most of these sequences show brightness variations, but a small subset has observed brightness variations consistent with that expected from observational errors alone. The majority of these stable objects are redder than a solar color in both B-R and R-I. There is no dependence on color with brightness. For a smaller sample of objects we have observed with synchronized CCD cameras on the two telescopes. The CTIO 0.9-m observes in B, and MODEST in R. The CCD cameras are electronically linked together so that the start time and

  1. Photometric Studies of GEO Orbital Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Rodriquez-Cowardin, Heather M.; Barker, Ed; Abercromby, Kira J.; Foreman, Gary; Horstman, Matt

    2009-01-01

    The photometric signature of a debris object can be useful in determining what the physical characteristics of a piece of debris are. We report on optical observations in multiple filters of debris at geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). Our sample is taken from GEO objects discovered in a survey with the University of Michigan's 0.6-m aperture Schmidt telescope MODEST (for Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope), and then followed up in real-time with the Cerro Tololo Inter- American Observatory (CTIO) 0.9-m for orbits and photometry. Our goal is to determine 6 parameter orbits and measure colors for all objects fainter than R=15th magnitude that are discovered in the MODEST survey. At this magnitude the distribution of observed angular rates changes significantly from that of brighter objects. There are two objectives: 1. Estimate the orbital distribution of objects selected on the basis of two observational criteria: brightness (magnitude) and angular rates. 2. Obtain magnitudes and colors in standard astronomical filters (BVRI) for comparison with reflectance spectra of likely spacecraft materials. What is the faint debris likely to be? More than 90 calibrated sequences of R-B-V-I-R magnitudes for a sample of 50 objects have been obtained with the CTIO 0.9-m. For objects that do not show large brightness variations, the colors are largely redder than solar in both B-R and R-I. The width of the color distribution may be intrinsic to the nature of the surfaces, but also could be that we are seeing irregularly shaped objects and measuring the colors at different times with just one telescope. For a smaller sample of objects we have observed with synchronized CCD cameras on the two telescopes. The CTIO 0.9-m observes in B, and MODEST in R. The CCD cameras are electronically linked together so that the start time and duration of observations are the same to better than 50 milliseconds. Thus the B-R color is a true measure of the surface of the debris piece facing the

  2. Apparent rotation properties of space debris extracted from photometric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šilha, Jiří; Pittet, Jean-Noël; Hamara, Michal; Schildknecht, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Knowledge about the rotation properties of space debris objects is essential for the active debris removal missions, accurate re-entry predictions and to investigate the long-term effects of the space environment on the attitude motion change. Different orbital regions and object's physical properties lead to different attitude states and their change over time. Since 2007 the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB) performs photometric measurements of space debris objects. To June 2016 almost 2000 light curves of more than 400 individual objects have been acquired and processed. These objects are situated in all orbital regions, from low Earth orbit (LEO), via global navigation systems orbits and high eccentricity orbit (HEO), to geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). All types of objects were observed including the non-functional spacecraft, rocket bodies, fragmentation debris and uncorrelated objects discovered during dedicated surveys. For data acquisition, we used the 1-meter Zimmerwald Laser and Astrometry Telescope (ZIMLAT) at the Swiss Optical Ground Station and Geodynamics Observatory Zimmerwald, Switzerland. We applied our own method of phase-diagram reconstruction to extract the apparent rotation period from the light curve. Presented is the AIUB's light curve database and the obtained rotation properties of space debris as a function of object type and orbit.

  3. Positive-feedback photometric drift in the PDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornett, R. H.; Bohlin, R. C.; Hill, J. K.; Stecher, T. P.

    1984-01-01

    Digitizing flatfield images produces conditions in the Photometric Data System PDS which cause the measured density to drift by as much as .1 DN during a 10 minute interval. The drift occurs when the PDS, set up in equilibrium at fog level, subsequently scans a reasonably dense region for periods of longer than a few minutes. The drift is manifested primarily as a positive shift in density that is approximately the same for all densities. If the fog level is assumed to be in fact constant and is monitored during scans of flat fields, the PDS drift may be removed by subtracting the difference between the observed fog level and its assumed constant value for each pixel. This function is then smoothed and subtracted, as a function of scan line, from the measured density. The fog level is then adjusted to a standard value by adding a constant. The result is a flattened scan with PDS drift removed to the accuracy within which the fog level drift matches the drift at other levels.

  4. The first photometric study of semi-detached eclipsing binary V504 Cyg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidarnia, R.; Shamsollahi, H.; Jahan, A.; Ebadi, H.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze photometry of V504 Cyg semi-detached binary system. For this purpose, after taking the photometric data, primary and secondary minimum and new epoch were calculated. The period of system is found to be 0.3516916 day. Analysis of light curve was performed by PHOEBE software which uses last version of Wilson-Devinney code. 3D model of the system is worked out using Binary Maker software. The O'Connell effect in the light curve is observed and an accurate model of this system is presented by introducing four spots on the components.

  5. Range image registration using a photometric metric under unknown lighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Diego; Sugimoto, Akihiro

    2013-09-01

    Based on the spherical harmonics representation of image formation, we derive a new photometric metric for evaluating the correctness of a given rigid transformation aligning two overlapping range images captured under unknown, distant, and general illumination. We estimate the surrounding illumination and albedo values of points of the two range images from the point correspondences induced by the input transformation. We then synthesize the color of both range images using albedo values transferred using the point correspondences to compute the photometric reprojection error. This way allows us to accurately register two range images by finding the transformation that minimizes the photometric reprojection error. We also propose a practical method using the proposed photometric metric to register pairs of range images devoid of salient geometric features, captured under unknown lighting. Our method uses a hypothesize-and-test strategy to search for the transformation that minimizes our photometric metric. Transformation candidates are efficiently generated by employing the spherical representation of each range image. Experimental results using both synthetic and real data demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed metric.

  6. Implementation of a Multimodal Mobile System for Point-of-Sale Surveillance: Lessons Learned From Case Studies in Washington, DC, and New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Jennifer; Ganz, Ollie; Ilakkuvan, Vinu; Tacelosky, Michael; Kreslake, Jennifer; Moon-Howard, Joyce; Aidala, Angela; Vallone, Donna; Anesetti-Rothermel, Andrew; Kirchner, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    In tobacco control and other fields, point-of-sale surveillance of the retail environment is critical for understanding industry marketing of products and informing public health practice. Innovations in mobile technology can improve existing, paper-based surveillance methods, yet few studies describe in detail how to operationalize the use of technology in public health surveillance. The aims of this paper are to share implementation strategies and lessons learned from 2 tobacco, point-of-sale surveillance projects to inform and prepare public health researchers and practitioners to implement new mobile technologies in retail point-of-sale surveillance systems. From 2011 to 2013, 2 point-of-sale surveillance pilot projects were conducted in Washington, DC, and New York, New York, to capture information about the tobacco retail environment and test the feasibility of a multimodal mobile data collection system, which included capabilities for audio or video recording data, electronic photographs, electronic location data, and a centralized back-end server and dashboard. We established a preimplementation field testing process for both projects, which involved a series of rapid and iterative tests to inform decisions and establish protocols around key components of the project. Important components of field testing included choosing a mobile phone that met project criteria, establishing an efficient workflow and accessible user interfaces for each component of the system, training and providing technical support to fieldworkers, and developing processes to integrate data from multiple sources into back-end systems that can be utilized in real-time. A well-planned implementation process is critical for successful use and performance of multimodal mobile surveillance systems. Guidelines for implementation include (1) the need to establish and allow time for an iterative testing framework for resolving technical and logistical challenges; (2) developing a streamlined

  7. Shapes of binary asteroid primaries from photometric observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheirich, Peter

    2016-10-01

    I will present results from a method which combine lightcurve inversion for single bodies and the method for inversion of lightcurves of occulting/eclipsing binary systems. A code developed by M. Kaasalainen and J. Durech for inversion of lightcurves of single bodies is adapted to fit our purposes. The original code uses a slightly elongated ellipsoid as an initial shape for optimization. We substituted this ellipsoid with a variety of shapes using Gaussian random spheres. This allowed the optimization algorithm to iterate to a range of final shapes.For each binary system, the short-period (rotational) component of its lightcurve is inverted using this code and a set of possible shapes of the primary are obtained. In the next step these shape models of the primary are, one by one, incorporated into the full model of the binary system and complete photometric data including the mutual events are fitted. Comparing synthetic lightcurves of the best-fit solutions with the observed data enables another narrowing of the selection of the possible shapes of the primary. This process is based on the times of phases of mutual events occurring on different geometries (i.e. the secondary passing in front of/behind the primary not only equator-on).We will also test a hypothesis that most of the primaries of the binary systems are similar in shape to each other. A figure resembling the shape of the primary of 1999 KW4, i.e., the top-shaped object with an equatorial ridge, will be used for the primary's shape. Its main characteristics - a polar flattening and width and height of the equatorial ridge, will be used as independent parameters. A variety of the shapes generated by a combination of these parameters will be used as an initial shapes for the optimization using the code described above.The work is supported by the Grant Agency of the Czech Republic, Grant 15-07193S.

  8. Empirical photometric calibration of the Gaia red clump: Colours, effective temperature, and absolute magnitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Dern, L.; Babusiaux, C.; Arenou, F.; Turon, C.; Lallement, R.

    2018-01-01

    Context. Gaia Data Release 1 allows the recalibration of standard candles such as the red clump stars. To use those stars, they first need to be accurately characterised. In particular, colours are needed to derive interstellar extinction. As no filter is available for the first Gaia data release and to avoid the atmosphere model mismatch, an empirical calibration is unavoidable. Aims: The purpose of this work is to provide the first complete and robust photometric empirical calibration of the Gaia red clump stars of the solar neighbourhood through colour-colour, effective temperature-colour, and absolute magnitude-colour relations from the Gaia, Johnson, 2MASS, HIPPARCOS, Tycho-2, APASS-SLOAN, and WISE photometric systems, and the APOGEE DR13 spectroscopic temperatures. Methods: We used a 3D extinction map to select low reddening red giants. To calibrate the colour-colour and the effective temperature-colour relations, we developed a MCMC method that accounts for all variable uncertainties and selects the best model for each photometric relation. We estimated the red clump absolute magnitude through the mode of a kernel-based distribution function. Results: We provide 20 colour versus G-Ks relations and the first Teff versus G-Ks calibration. We obtained the red clump absolute magnitudes for 15 photometric bands with, in particular, MKs = (-1.606 ± 0.009) and MG = (0.495 ± 0.009) + (1.121 ± 0.128)(G-Ks-2.1). We present a dereddened Gaia-TGAS HR diagram and use the calibrations to compare its red clump and its red giant branch bump with Padova isochrones. Full Table A.1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/609/A116

  9. Searching Minor Planets and Photometric Quality of 60cm Reflector in Gimhae Astronomical Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Hyun Lee

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have presented the observational result for the photometric quality of main telescopes in Gimhae Astronomical Observatory. Also we performed the observation of searching new minor planets as competitive work in public observatories. The observation was carried out using 60cm telescope of Gimhae Astronomical Observatory on 2007 January 13. And, Schüler BVI filters and 1K CCD camera (AP8p were used. To define the quality of CCD photometry, we observed the region of well-known standard stars in the open cluster M67. From observed data, The transformation coefficients and airmass coefficients were obtained, and the accuracy of CCD photometry was investigated. From PSF photometry, we obtained the color-magnitude diagram of M67, and considered the useful magnitude limit and the physical properties of M67. This method can be successfully used to confirm the photometric quality of main telescope in public observatories. To investigate the detection possibility of unknown object as astroid, we observed the near area of the opposition in the ecliptic plane. And we discussed the result. Our result show that it can be possible to detect minor planets in solar system brighter than V ˜18.3mag. and it can carry out photometric study brighter than V~16mag. in Gimhae Astronomical Observatory. These results imply that the public observatories can make the research work.

  10. METAPHOR: Probability density estimation for machine learning based photometric redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, V.; Cavuoti, S.; Brescia, M.; Vellucci, C.; Tortora, C.; Longo, G.

    2017-06-01

    We present METAPHOR (Machine-learning Estimation Tool for Accurate PHOtometric Redshifts), a method able to provide a reliable PDF for photometric galaxy redshifts estimated through empirical techniques. METAPHOR is a modular workflow, mainly based on the MLPQNA neural network as internal engine to derive photometric galaxy redshifts, but giving the possibility to easily replace MLPQNA with any other method to predict photo-z's and their PDF. We present here the results about a validation test of the workflow on the galaxies from SDSS-DR9, showing also the universality of the method by replacing MLPQNA with KNN and Random Forest models. The validation test include also a comparison with the PDF's derived from a traditional SED template fitting method (Le Phare).

  11. ELM-KNN for photometric redshift estimation of quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanxia; Tu, Yang; Zhao, Yongheng; Tian, Haijun

    2017-06-01

    We explore photometric redshift estimation of quasars with the SDSS DR12 quasar sample. Firstly the quasar sample is separated into three parts according to different redshift ranges. Then three classifiers based on Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) are created in the three redshift ranges. Finally k-Nearest Neighbor (kNN) approach is applied on the three samples to predict photometric redshifts of quasars with multiwavelength photometric data. We compare the performance with different input patterns by ELM-KNN with that only by kNN. The experimental results show that ELM-KNN is feasible and superior to kNN (e.g. rms is 0.0751 vs. 0.2626 for SDSS sample), in other words, the ensemble method has the potential to increase regressor performance beyond the level reached by an individual regressor alone and will be a good choice when facing much more complex data.

  12. Natural phenomena hazards, Hanford Site, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrads, T.J.

    1998-09-29

    This document presents the natural phenomena hazard loads for use in implementing DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation, and supports development of double-shell tank systems specifications at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. The natural phenomena covered are seismic, flood, wind, volcanic ash, lightning, snow, temperature, solar radiation, suspended sediment, and relative humidity.

  13. Photometric Redshifts with the LSST: Evaluating Survey Observing Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Melissa L.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Ivezić, Željko; Schmidt, Samuel J.; Jones, R. Lynne; Jurić, Mario; Daniel, Scott F.; Yoachim, Peter

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we present and characterize a nearest-neighbors color-matching photometric redshift estimator that features a direct relationship between the precision and accuracy of the input magnitudes and the output photometric redshifts. This aspect makes our estimator an ideal tool for evaluating the impact of changes to LSST survey parameters that affect the measurement errors of the photometry, which is the main motivation of our work (i.e., it is not intended to provide the “best” photometric redshifts for LSST data). We show how the photometric redshifts will improve with time over the 10 year LSST survey and confirm that the nominal distribution of visits per filter provides the most accurate photo-z results. The LSST survey strategy naturally produces observations over a range of airmass, which offers the opportunity of using an SED- and z-dependent atmospheric affect on the observed photometry as a color-independent redshift indicator. We show that measuring this airmass effect and including it as a prior has the potential to improve the photometric redshifts and can ameliorate extreme outliers, but that it will only be adequately measured for the brightest galaxies, which limits its overall impact on LSST photometric redshifts. We furthermore demonstrate how this airmass effect can induce a bias in the photo-z results, and caution against survey strategies that prioritize high-airmass observations for the purpose of improving this prior. Ultimately, we intend for this work to serve as a guide for the expectations and preparations of the LSST science community with regard to the minimum quality of photo-z as the survey progresses.

  14. Photometric and Spectroscopic studies of Ap star Cyg V1584

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Z Jassur

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available   UBV photometric observations of Ap star Cyg V1584 have been presented. To find the rotational period of the star, a sinusoidal wave function has been fitted to the noramal points of UBV filters. Assuming that a circular hot spot located at the magnetic pole of the star is responsible for the observed light variations, both physical an geometrical parameters of the spot have been determined. Finally, the angle between the magnetic and the rotational axis has been calculated from combining the spectroscopic and photometric data and the magnetic structure of the star has been discussed.

  15. Application and evaluation of the WRF-CMAQ modeling system to the 2011 DISCOVER-AQ Baltimore-Washington D.C. study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, W.; Gilliam, R. C.; Pouliot, G. A.; Godowitch, J. M.; Pleim, J.; Hogrefe, C.; Kang, D.; Roselle, S. J.; Mathur, R.

    2013-12-01

    The DISCOVER-AQ project (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality), is a joint collaboration between NASA, U.S. EPA and a number of other local organizations with the goal of characterizing air quality in urban areas using satellite, aircraft, vertical profiler and ground based measurements (http://discover-aq.larc.nasa.gov). In July 2011, the DISCOVER-AQ project conducted intensive air quality measurements in the Baltimore, MD and Washington, D.C. area in the eastern U.S. To take advantage of these unique data, the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used to simulate the meteorology and air quality in the same region using 12-km, 4-km and 1-km horizontal grid spacings. The goal of the modeling exercise is to demonstrate the capability of the coupled WRF-CMAQ modeling system to simulate air quality at fine grid spacings in an urban area. Development of new data assimilation techniques and the use of higher resolution input data for the WRF model have been implemented to improve the meteorological results, particularly at the 4-km and 1-km grid resolutions. In addition, a number of updates to the CMAQ model were made to enhance the capability of the modeling system to accurately represent the magnitude and spatial distribution of pollutants at fine model resolutions. Data collected during the 2011 DISCOVER-AQ campaign, which include aircraft transects and spirals, ship measurements in the Chesapeake Bay, ozonesondes, tethered balloon measurements, DRAGON aerosol optical depth measurements, LIDAR measurements, and intensive ground-based site measurements, are used to evaluate results from the WRF-CMAQ modeling system for July 2011 at the three model grid resolutions. The results of the comparisons of the model results to these measurements will be presented, along with results from the various sensitivity simulations

  16. Predictive validity of the Washington State Juvenile Court Pre-Screen Assessment in the Netherlands: the development of a new scoring system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Put, C.E.; Stams, G.J.J.M.; Deković, M.; van der Laan, P.H.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the predictive validity of the Washington State Juvenile Pre-Screen Assessment (WSJCA pre-screen) in the Netherlands. Previous research conducted in the United States showed the predictive validity of the WSJCA pre-screen to be modest, as is the case with the predictive validity

  17. Predictive Validity of the Washington State Juvenile Court Pre-Screen Assessment in the Netherlands : The Development of a New Scoring System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Put, Claudia E.; Stams, Geert Jan J. M.; Dekovic, Maja; van der Laan, Peter H.

    This study examined the predictive validity of the Washington State Juvenile Pre-Screen Assessment (WSJCA pre-screen) in the Netherlands. Previous research conducted in the United States showed the predictive validity of the WSJCA pre-screen to be modest, as is the case with the predictive validity

  18. Metrics, Dollars, and Systems Change: Learning from Washington State's Student Achievement Initiative to Design Effective Postsecondary Performance Funding Policies. A State Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Davis; Shulock, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The Student Achievement Initiative (SAI), adopted by the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges in 2007, is one of a growing number of performance funding programs that have been dubbed "performance funding 2.0." Unlike previous performance funding models, the SAI rewards colleges for students' intermediate…

  19. A CCD Photometric Study and Search for Pulsations in RZ Dra and EG Cep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazhouhesh, R.; Liakos, A.; Niarchos, P.

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents CCD observations of the Algol-type eclipsing binaries RZ Dra and EG Cep. The light curves have been analyzed with the PHOEBE software and Wilson-Devinney code (2003 version). A detailed photometric analysis, based on these observations, is presented for both binarity and pulsation. The results indicate semidetached systems where the secondary component fills its Roche lobe. After the subtraction of the theoretical light curve, a frequency analysis was performed in order to check for pulsations of the primary component of each system. Moreover, a period analysis was performed for each case in order to search for additional components around the eclipsing pairs.

  20. Shadow edge detection using geometric and photometric features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsenij, A.; Gevers, T.

    2009-01-01

    The detection of shadow and shading edges is a first step towards reducing the imaging effects that are caused by interactions of the light source with surfaces that are in the scene. As most of the algorithms for shadow edge detection use photometric information, geometric information have been

  1. The photometric evolution of dissolving star clusters. I. First predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, H.J.G.L.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072834870; Anders, P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833967; Grijs, R.

    2006-01-01

    The broad-band photometric evolution of unresolved star clusters is calculated in a simplified way, including the preferential loss of low-mass stars due to mass segregation. The stellar mass function of a cluster evolves due to three effects: (a) the evolution of the massive stars reduces their

  2. Classical variables in the era of space photometric missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molnár L.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The space photometric missions like CoRoT and Kepler transformed our view of pulsating stars, including the well-known RR Lyrae and Cepheid classes. The K2, TESS and PLATO missions will expand these investigations to larger sample sizes and to specific stellar populations.

  3. Submegaparsec individual photometric redshift estimation from cosmic web constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aragon-Calvo, M. A.; Weygaert, Rien van de; Jones, Bernard J. T.; Mobasher, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    We present a method, PhotoWeb, for estimating photometric redshifts of individual galaxies, and their equivalent distance, with megaparsec and even submegaparsec accuracy using the cosmic web as a constraint over photo-z estimates. PhotoWeb redshift errors of individual galaxies are of the order of

  4. Photometric Variability of Four Coronally Active Stars J. C. Pandey ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    S. A. Drake. 4. 1State Observatory, Naini Tal 263 129, India. 2Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, India. 3Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore, India. 4Code 668, LHEA, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA. Abstract. We present photometric observations of four stars that are.

  5. The ALHAMBRA survey: Accurate photometric merger fractions from PDF analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Sanjuan, C.; Cenarro, A. J..; Varela, J.; Viironen, K.; ALHAMBRA Team

    2015-05-01

    The estimation of the merger fraction in photometric surveys is limited by the large uncertainty in the photometric redshift compared with the velocity difference in kinematical close pairs (less than 500 km s^{-1}). Several efforts have conducted to deal with this limitation and we present the latest improvements. Our new method (i) provides a robust estimation of the merger fraction by using full probability distribution functions (PDFs) instead of Gaussian distributions, as in previous work; (ii) takes into account the dependence of the luminosity on redshift in both the selection of the samples and the definition of major/minor mergers; and (iii) deals with partial PDFs to define ``red" (E/S0 templates) and ``blue" (spiral/starburst templates) samples without apply any colour selection. We highlight our new method with the estimation of the merger fraction at z < 1 in the ALHAMBRA photometric survey. We find that our merger fractions and rates nicely agree with those from previous spectroscopic work. This new method will be capital for current and future large photometric surveys such as DES, SHARDS, J-PAS, or LSST.

  6. Reaction and photometric determination of ruthenium with dithizone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roebisch, G.; Dietel, R. (Paedagogische Hochschule Karl Liebknecht, Potsdam (German Democratic Republic). Sektion Chemie/Biologie)

    1984-01-01

    Dithizone reacts with ruthenium(VIII or VI) at 20deg C, with inert ruthenium(IV)-complexes at 85deg C, to form a primary 1 : 3-dithizonate, which can by concentrated (20 fould) by extraction into chloroform. Based on this reaction, three variants of a reproducible and selective photometric determination of ruthenium traces (5 ppb) with dithizone has been developed.

  7. The photometric calibration of the ISO Short Wavelength Spectrometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaeidt, S. G.; Morris, P. W.; Salama, A.; Vandenbussche, B.; Beintema, D. A.; Boxhoorn, D. R.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Heras, A. M.; Lahuis, F.; Leech, K.; Roelfsema, P. R.; Valentijn, E. A.; Bauer, O. H.; van der Bliek, N. S.; Cohen, M.; de Graauw, T.; Haser, L. N.; van der Hucht, K. A.; Huygen, E.; Katterloher, R. O.; Kessler, M. F.; Koornneef, J.; Luinge, W.; Lutz, D.; Planck, M.; Spoon, H.; Waelkens, C.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Wieprecht, E.; Wildeman, K. J.; Young, E.; Zaal, P.

    1996-01-01

    We give an overview of the photometric calibration of the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) through the Performance Verification phase. The basic strategy for deriving absolute flux densities from detector output for the grating and Fabry-Perot sections of SWS is reviewed, and the results are

  8. Type II Supernova Spectral Diversity. II. Spectroscopic and Photometric Correlations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez, Claudia P.; Anderson, Joseph P.; Hamuy, Mario

    2017-01-01

    We present an analysis of observed trends and correlations between a large range of spectral and photometric parameters of more than 100 type II supernovae (SNe II), during the photospheric phase. We define a common epoch for all SNe of 50 days post-explosion, where the majority of the sample is ...

  9. Morphological and photometric properties of active and non-active ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: We found that in the green valley, active galaxies are dominated by earlier morphological types (elliptical and lenticular galaxies), are more massive, have higher photometric redshifts and redder colours than non-active galaxies. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the non-active galaxies in the green valley are ...

  10. Solving the uncalibrated photometric stereo problem using total variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quéau, Yvain; Lauze, Francois Bernard; Durou, Jean-Denis

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we propose a new method to solve the problem of uncalibrated photometric stereo, making very weak assumptions on the properties of the scene to be reconstructed. Our goal is to solve the generalized bas-relief ambiguity (GBR) by performing a total variation regularization of both th...

  11. Photometric Analysis and Period Investigation of the EW Type ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Photometric Analysis and Period Investigation of the EW Type Eclipsing Binary V441 Lac ... of V441 Lac is possibly formed by a contact configuration destroyed shallow contact binary due to mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one predicted by the thermal relaxation oscillation theory.

  12. On the Photometric Error Calibration for the Differential Light Curves ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; Volume 34; Issue 3. On the Photometric Error Calibration for the Differential Light Curves of Point-like Active Galactic Nuclei. Arti Goyal Mukul Mhaskey Gopal-Krishna Paul J. Wiita C. S. Stalin Ram Sagar. Volume 34 Issue 3 September 2013 pp 273- ...

  13. Submegaparsec individual photometric redshift estimation from cosmic web constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon-Calvo, M. A.; van de Weygaert, Rien; Jones, Bernard J. T.; Mobasher, Bahram

    2015-11-01

    We present a method, PhotoWeb, for estimating photometric redshifts of individual galaxies, and their equivalent distance, with megaparsec and even submegaparsec accuracy using the cosmic web as a constraint over photo-z estimates. PhotoWeb redshift errors of individual galaxies are of the order of Δz ≃ 0.0007, compared to errors of Δz ≃ 0.02 for current photo-z techniques. The mean redshift error is of the order of Δz ≃ 5 × 10-5-5 × 10-4 compared to mean errors in the range Δz ≃ 0.001-0.01 for the best available photo-z estimates in the literature. Current photo-z techniques produce redshift estimates with large errors due to the poor constraining power the galaxy's spectral energy distribution and projected clustering can provide. The cosmic web, on the other hand, provides the strongest constraints on the position of galaxies. The network of walls, filaments and voids occupy ˜ 10 per centof the volume of the Universe, yet they contain ˜ 95 per centof galaxies. The cosmic web, being a cellular system with well-defined boundaries, defines a restricted set of intermittent positions a galaxy can occupy along a given line of sight. Using the information in the density field computed from spectroscopic redshifts, we can narrow the possible locations of a given galaxy along the line of sight from a single broad probability distribution (from photo-z) to one or a few narrow peaks. Our first results improve previous photo-z errors by more than one order of magnitude allowing submegaparsec errors in some cases. Such accurate estimates for tens of millions of galaxies will allow unprecedented galaxy-Large Scale Structure (LSS) studies. In this work, we apply our technique to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photo-z galaxy sample and discuss its performance and future improvements.

  14. Updating flood maps efficiently using existing hydraulic models, very-high-accuracy elevation data, and a geographic information system; a pilot study on the Nisqually River, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Joseph L.; Haluska, Tana L.; Kresch, David L.

    2001-01-01

    A method of updating flood inundation maps at a fraction of the expense of using traditional methods was piloted in Washington State as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Urban Geologic and Hydrologic Hazards Initiative. Large savings in expense may be achieved by building upon previous Flood Insurance Studies and automating the process of flood delineation with a Geographic Information System (GIS); increases in accuracy and detail result from the use of very-high-accuracy elevation data and automated delineation; and the resulting digital data sets contain valuable ancillary information such as flood depth, as well as greatly facilitating map storage and utility. The method consists of creating stage-discharge relations from the archived output of the existing hydraulic model, using these relations to create updated flood stages for recalculated flood discharges, and using a GIS to automate the map generation process. Many of the effective flood maps were created in the late 1970?s and early 1980?s, and suffer from a number of well recognized deficiencies such as out-of-date or inaccurate estimates of discharges for selected recurrence intervals, changes in basin characteristics, and relatively low quality elevation data used for flood delineation. FEMA estimates that 45 percent of effective maps are over 10 years old (FEMA, 1997). Consequently, Congress has mandated the updating and periodic review of existing maps, which have cost the Nation almost 3 billion (1997) dollars. The need to update maps and the cost of doing so were the primary motivations for piloting a more cost-effective and efficient updating method. New technologies such as Geographic Information Systems and LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) elevation mapping are key to improving the efficiency of flood map updating, but they also improve the accuracy, detail, and usefulness of the resulting digital flood maps. GISs produce digital maps without manual estimation of inundated areas between

  15. Final Report: Feasibility Study of Biomass in Snohomish County, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daryl Williams (Tulalip Tribes); Ray Clark (Clark Group)

    2005-01-31

    This report and its attachments summarizes the results of a unique tribal-farmer cooperative study to evaluate the feasibility of building one or more regional anaerobic digestion systems in Snohomish County, Washington.

  16. The Blanco Cosmology Survey: Data Reduction, Calibration and Photometric Redshift Estimation to Four Distant Galaxy Clusters Discovered by the South Pole Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngeow, Chow Choong; Mohr, J.; Zenteno, A.; Data Management, DES; BCS; SPT Collaborations

    2009-01-01

    The Blanco Cosmology Survey (BCS) is designed to enable a study of the cosmic acceleration using multiple techniques. To date, BCS has acquired Sloan griz band imaging data from 60 nights (15 nights per year from 2005 to 2008) using the Blanco 4m Telescope located at CTIO. The astronomical imaging data taken from this survey have been processed on high performance computer TeraGrid platforms at NCSA, using the automated Dark Energy Survey (DES) data management (DM) system. The DES DM system includes (1) middlewares for controlling and managing the processing jobs, and serve as an application container encapsulating the scientific codes; and (2) DES archive, which includes filesystem nodes, a relational database and a data access framework, to support the pipeline processing, data storage and scientific analyzes. Photometric solution module (PSM) were run on photometric nights to determine the zeropoints (ZP) and other photometric solutions. We remapped and coadded the images that lie within the pre-defined coadd tiles in the sky. When running the coaddition pipeline, we determined the ZP for each images using the photometric ZP from PSM, the magnitude offsets between overlapping images, and the sky brightness ratio for CCDs within a given exposure. We also applied aperture correction and color-term correction to the coadded catalogs. Satisfactory photometric and astrometric precision were achieved. These enabled initial estimation of photometric redshifts using ANNz codes, trained from 5000 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts. RMS in the photometric redshifts ranges from 0.05 to 0.1 in sigma_z/(1+z) for redshift extended to z=1. We used the BCS data to optically confirm and estimate redshifts for four of the highest S/N galaxy clusters discovered with the South Pole Telescope using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect.

  17. OMC/INTEGRAL photometric observations of pulsating components in eclipsing binaries and characterization of DY Aqr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso-Garzón, J.; Montesinos, B.; Moya, A.; Mas-Hesse, J. M.; Martín-Ruiz, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present the search for eclipsing binaries with a pulsating component in the first catalogue of optically variable sources observed by Optical Monitoring Camera (OMC)/INTEGRAL, which contains photometric data for more than 1000 eclipsing binaries. Five objects were found and a detailed analysis of one of them, DY Aqr, has been performed. Photometric and spectroscopic observations of DY Aqr were obtained to analyse the binary system and the pulsational characteristics of the primary component. By applying the binary modelling software PHOEBE to the OMC and ground-based photometric light curves, and to the radial velocity curve obtained using echelle high-resolution spectroscopy, the physical parameters of the system have been determined. Frequency analysis of the residual data has been performed using Fourier techniques to identify pulsational frequencies. We have built a grid of theoretical models to classify spectroscopically the primary component as an A7.5V star (plus or minus one spectral subtype). The best orbital fit was obtained for a semidetached system configuration. According to the binary modelling, the primary component has Teff = 7625 ± 125 K and log g = 4.1 ± 0.1 and the secondary component has Teff = 3800 ± 200 K and log g = 3.3 ± 0.1, although it is too faint to isolate its spectral features. From the analysis of the residuals, we have found a main pulsation frequency at 23.37 d-1, which is typical of a δ Scuti star. In the O-C diagram, no evidence of orbital period changes over the last 8 yr has been found.

  18. Radial velocity variations of photometrically quiet, chromospherically inactive Kepler stars: A link between RV jitter and photometric flicker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua [Physics and Astronomy Department, Vanderbilt University, 1807 Station B, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Wright, Jason T. [Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16803 (United States); Aigrain, Suzanne [Sub-department of Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Basri, Gibor [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Johnson, John A. [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Howard, Andrew W. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Walkowicz, Lucianne M. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    We compare stellar photometric variability, as measured from Kepler light curves by Basri et al., with measurements of radial velocity (RV) rms variations of all California Planet Search overlap stars. We newly derive rotation periods from the Kepler light curves for all of the stars in our study sample. The RV variations reported herein range from less than 4 to 135 m s{sup –1}, yet the stars all have amplitudes of photometric variability less than 3 mmag, reflecting the preference of the RV program for chromospherically 'quiet' stars. Despite the small size of our sample, we find with high statistical significance that the RV rms manifests strongly in the Fourier power spectrum of the light curve: stars that are noisier in RV have a greater number of frequency components in the light curve. We also find that spot models of the observed light curves systematically underpredict the observed RV variations by factors of ∼2-1000, likely because the low-level photometric variations in our sample are driven by processes not included in simple spot models. The stars best fit by these models tend to have simpler light curves, dominated by a single relatively high-amplitude component of variability. Finally, we demonstrate that the RV rms behavior of our sample can be explained in the context of the photometric variability evolutionary diagram introduced by Bastien et al. We use this diagram to derive the surface gravities of the stars in our sample, revealing many of them to have moved off the main sequence. More generally, we find that the stars with the largest RV rms are those that have evolved onto the 'flicker floor' sequence in that diagram, characterized by relatively low amplitude but highly complex photometric variations which grow as the stars evolve to become subgiants.

  19. George Washington: A Grounded Leader

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-08

    Highway, Suite 1204·, Arlington, VA 22202-4302, and to the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork Reduction Project (0704-0188) Washington, DC......a broad array of experiences, enabled him to become a leader who profoundly affected those around him. George Washington reflected a man of the

  20. Washington State Biofuels Industry Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafson, Richard [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2017-04-09

    The funding from this research grant enabled us to design, renovate, and equip laboratories to support University of Washington biofuels research program. The research that is being done with the equipment from this grant will facilitate the establishment of a biofuels industry in the Pacific Northwest and enable the University of Washington to launch a substantial biofuels and bio-based product research program.

  1. Constraining Ice Advance and Linkages to Paleoclimate of Two Glacial Systems in the Olympic Mountains, Washington and the Southern Alps, New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Wyshnytzky, Cianna E.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis investigated marine isotope stage {MIS) 3-2 glacial sequences in the South Fork Hoh River Valley, Washington and the Lake Hawea Valley, New Zealand. Research objectives were to reconstruct the style and timing of ice advance in both areas and to assess the viability of luminescence dating of glacial sediments in various depositional facies and distances from the ice front. This thesis focused on the sedimentology and stratigraphy of surficial and older glacial sequences in the Sou...

  2. Photometric Study on the Spot-Double Star XY Ursae Majoris (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo-Baik Lee

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available The photometric behaviour of XY UMa, an eclipsing binary showing photospheric and chromospheric activity, has been described by spot hypothesis. They are based on the all the available UBV light curves, which were carried out by Geyer since 1955. A "spherical rectangular" spot model shows very pronounced spot activities during the last 30 years. On the average, the spot covered about 16% of the visible hemisphere. Observational evidence for photospheric and chromospheric activities on the XY UMa and related systems are also discussed.

  3. The first photometric study of W UMa eclipsing binary OQ Dra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidarnia, R.; Ebadi, H.; Rooydargard, H.

    2016-11-01

    The present study is an analysis of V-band CCD observations of new W UMa contact binary OQ Dra. To carry out the analysis, Primary and secondary minimum were obtained and new epoch was calculated. The computed period of system was 0.33967 day. Light curve analysis was performed using Binary Maker 3 and PHOEBE that uses the latest Wilson-Devinney code. We obtained photometric mass ratio of qptm = 0.55. O'Connell effect also was seen in the fitted model. Finally, the best model was achieved by introducing 2 spots on each component.

  4. An optrode for photometric detection of ammonia in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzanovskii, V. A.

    2017-10-01

    A scheme of constructing an LED optrode for photometric detection of ammonia in air is considered. The components of the device are (1) a glass plate coated with a film of polydimethylsiloxane with an ion-coupled cation of brilliant-green dye, (2) an LED emitting at a wavelength of 655 nm, and (3) a metal housing. The nominal static conversion function, sensitivity, and relative measurement error of the device are analyzed on the basis of mathematical modeling. The obtained results allow one to design an LED optrode capable of carrying out control for automated technological processes, solving problems in the area of security, etc. The device provides the ability to create photometric gas analyzers of ammonia with small overall dimensions, power consumption, and cost.

  5. Cross-correlating spectroscopic and photometric galaxy surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Martin B.; Gaztañaga, Enrique

    2014-05-01

    Does photometric and spectroscopic survey benefit from overlapping areas? The photometric survey measures 2D Weak Lensing (WL) information from galaxy shape distortions. On the other hand, the higher redshift precision of an spectroscopic survey allows measurements of redshift space distortions (RSD) and baryonic accustic oscillations (BAO) from 3D galaxy counts. The two surveys are combined using 2D-correlations, using sufficiently narrow bins to capture the radial information. This poster present effects of RSD and intrinsic correlations between narrow redshift bins. In understanding how the effects affects cosmological constrains, we first define two stage-IV and then present forecast for various configurations. When surveys overlap, they benefit from additional cross-correlations and sample variance cancellations from overlapping volumes. For a combined dark energy and growth history figure of merit, the result increase 50% for overlapping surveys, corresponding to 30% larger area.

  6. A Photometric Machine-Learning Method to Infer Stellar Metallicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Adam A.

    2015-01-01

    Following its formation, a star's metal content is one of the few factors that can significantly alter its evolution. Measurements of stellar metallicity ([Fe/H]) typically require a spectrum, but spectroscopic surveys are limited to a few x 10(exp 6) targets; photometric surveys, on the other hand, have detected > 10(exp 9) stars. I present a new machine-learning method to predict [Fe/H] from photometric colors measured by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The training set consists of approx. 120,000 stars with SDSS photometry and reliable [Fe/H] measurements from the SEGUE Stellar Parameters Pipeline (SSPP). For bright stars (g' learning method is similar to the scatter in [Fe/H] measurements from low-resolution spectra..

  7. A Photometric Machine-Learning Method to Infer Stellar Metallicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Adam A.

    2015-01-01

    Following its formation, a star's metal content is one of the few factors that can significantly alter its evolution. Measurements of stellar metallicity ([Fe/H]) typically require a spectrum, but spectroscopic surveys are limited to a few x 10(exp 6) targets; photometric surveys, on the other hand, have detected > 10(exp 9) stars. I present a new machine-learning method to predict [Fe/H] from photometric colors measured by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The training set consists of approx. 120,000 stars with SDSS photometry and reliable [Fe/H] measurements from the SEGUE Stellar Parameters Pipeline (SSPP). For bright stars (g' machine-learning method is similar to the scatter in [Fe/H] measurements from low-resolution spectra..

  8. MYRaf: A new Approach with IRAF for Astronomical Photometric Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Y.; Shameoni Niaei, M.; Özeren, F. F.; Yesilyaprak, C.

    2016-12-01

    In this study, the design and some developments of MYRaf software for astronomical photometric reduction are presented. MYRaf software is an easy to use, reliable, and has a fast IRAF aperture photometry GUI tools. MYRaf software is an important step for the automated software process of robotic telescopes, and uses IRAF, PyRAF, matplotlib, ginga, alipy, and Sextractor with the general-purpose and high-level programming language Python and uses the QT framework.

  9. Improving catalogue matching by supplementing astrometry with additional photometric information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Tom J.; Naylor, Tim

    2018-02-01

    The matching of sources between photometric catalogues can lead to cases where objects of differing brightness are incorrectly assumed to be detections of the same source. The rejection of unphysical matches can be achieved through the inclusion of information about the sources' magnitudes. The method described here uses the additional photometric information from both catalogues in the process of accepting or rejecting counterparts, providing approximately a factor of 10 improvement in Bayes' factor with its inclusion. When folding in the photometric information we avoid using prior astrophysical knowledge. Additionally, the method allows for the possibility of no counterparts to sources and the possibility that sources overlap multiple potential counterparts. We formally describe the probability of two sources being the same astrometric object, allowing systematic effects of astrometric perturbation (by e.g. contaminant objects) to be accounted for. We apply the method to two cases. First, we test INT Photometric Hα Survey of the Northern Galactic Plane (IPHAS)-Gaia matches to compare the resulting matches in two catalogues of similar wavelength coverage but differing dynamical ranges. Second, we apply the method to matches between IPHAS and Two Micron All Sky Survey and show that the method holds when considering two catalogues with approximately equal astrometric precision. We discuss the importance of including the magnitude information in each case. Additionally, we discuss extending the method to multiple catalogue matches through an iterative matching process. The method allows for the selection of high-quality matches by providing an overall probability for each pairing, giving the flexibility to choose stars known to be good matches.

  10. An ECC Based Iterative Algorithm For Photometric Invariant Projective Registration

    OpenAIRE

    Evangelidis, Georgios; Psarakis, Emmanouil

    2009-01-01

    International audience; The ability of an algorithm to accurately estimate the parameters of the geometric trans- formation which aligns two image profiles even in the presence of photometric distortions can be considered as a basic requirement in many computer vision applications. Projec- tive transformations constitute a general class which includes as special cases the affine, as well as the metric subclasses of transformations. In this paper the applicability of a recently proposed iterat...

  11. Asteroid phase curves from Lowell observatory photometric database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Oszkiewicz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present results obtained from processing large photometric data base. We make use of low-precision (generally rounded to 0.1 mag and low-accuracy (rms magnitude uncertainties of ±0.2 to 0.3 mag data obtained from the Minor Planet Center and modified at Lowell Observatory. We explore first correlations between slope parameter(s and albedo, and second distributions of slope parameter(s in asteroid families and taxa.

  12. Photometric Analysis and Period Investigation of the EW Type ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Photometric Analysis and Period Investigation of the EW Type. Eclipsing Binary V441 Lac. K. Li1,2,∗, S.-M. ..... method was used to determine the mass ratio, meaning that we calculated a series of models with assumed values of ... is found at q = 0.10 of mode 5, meaning that solutions with mode 5 can achieve the best fit to ...

  13. Photometric Detection of Multiple Populations in Globular Clusters Using Integrated Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, William P.; Pilachowski, Catherine A.; van Zee, Liese; Winans, Amanda; Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the multiple stellar populations of the globular clusters (GCs) M3, M5, M13, and M71 using {g}{\\prime } and intermediate-band CN-λ 3883 photometry obtained with the WIYN 0.9 m telescope on Kitt Peak. We find a strong correlation between red giant stars’ CN-{g}{\\prime } colors and their spectroscopic sodium abundances, thus demonstrating the efficacy of the two-filter system for stellar population studies. In all four clusters, the observed spread in red giant branch CN-{g}{\\prime } colors is wider than that expected from photometric uncertainty, confirming the well-known chemical inhomogeneity of these systems. M3 and M13 show clear evidence for a radial dependence in the CN-band strengths of its red giants, while the evidence for such a radial dependence of CN strengths in M5 is ambiguous. Our data suggest that the dynamically old, relatively metal-rich M71 system is well mixed, as it shows no evidence for chemical segregation. Finally, we measure the radial gradients in the integrated CN-{g}{\\prime } color of the clusters and find that such gradients are easily detectable in the integrated light. We suggest that photometric observations of color gradients within GCs throughout the Local Group can be used to characterize their multiple populations, and thereby constrain the formation history of GCs in different galactic environments.

  14. The Photometric Brightness Variation of Geostationary Orbit Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haingja Seo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Photometric observation is one of the most effective techniques for determining the physical characteristics of unknown space objects and space debris. In this research, we examine the change in brightness of the Communication, Ocean, Meteorological Satellite-1 (COMS-1 Geostationary Orbit Satellite (GEO, and compare it to our estimate model. First, we calculate the maximum brightness time using our calculation method and then derive the light curve shape using our rendering model. The maximum brightness is then calculated using the induced equation from Pogson's formula. For a comparison with our estimation, we carried out photometric observation using an optical telescope. The variation in brightness and the shape of the light curve are similar to the calculations achieved using our model, but the maximum brightness shows a slightly different value from our calculation result depending on the input parameters. This paper examines the photometric phenomenon of the variation in brightness of a GEO satellite, and the implementation of our approach to understanding the characteristics of space objects.

  15. Computer-aided photometric analysis of dynamic digital bioluminescent images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Zbigniew; Bembnista, T.; Floryszak-Wieczorek, J.; Domanski, Marek; Slawinski, Janusz

    2003-04-01

    The paper deals with photometric and morphologic analysis of bioluminescent images obtained by registration of light radiated directly from some plant objects. Registration of images obtained from ultra-weak light sources by the single photon counting (SPC) technique is the subject of this work. The radiation is registered by use of a 16-bit charge coupled device (CCD) camera "Night Owl" together with WinLight EG&G Berthold software. Additional application-specific software has been developed in order to deal with objects that are changing during the exposition time. Advantages of the elaborated set of easy configurable tools named FCT for a computer-aided photometric and morphologic analysis of numerous series of quantitatively imperfect chemiluminescent images are described. Instructions are given how to use these tools and exemplified with several algorithms for the transformation of images library. Using the proposed FCT set, automatic photometric and morphologic analysis of the information hidden within series of chemiluminescent images reflecting defensive processes in poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd) leaves affected by a pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea is revealed.

  16. Satellite Type Estination from Ground-based Photometric Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, T.; Ono, H.; Suzuki, J.; Ando, T.; Takanezawa, T.

    2016-09-01

    The optical photometric observation is potentially a powerful tool for understanding of the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) objects. At first, we measured in laboratory the surface reflectance of common satellite materials, for example, Multi-layer Insulation (MLI), mono-crystalline silicon cells, and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP). Next, we calculated visual magnitude of a satellite by simplified shape and albedo. In this calculation model, solar panels have dimensions of 2 by 8 meters, and the bus area is 2 meters squared with measured optical properties described above. Under these conditions, it clarified the brightness can change the range between 3 and 4 magnitudes in one night, but color index changes only from 1 to 2 magnitudes. Finally, we observed the color photometric data of several GEO satellites visible from Japan multiple times in August and September 2014. We obtained that light curves of GEO satellites recorded in the B and V bands (using Johnson filters) by a ground-base optical telescope. As a result, color index changed approximately from 0.5 to 1 magnitude in one night, and the order of magnitude was not changed in all cases. In this paper, we briefly discuss about satellite type estimation using the relation between brightness and color index obtained from the photometric observation.

  17. Study of LED modulation effect on the photometric quantities and beam homogeneity of automotive lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudelka, Petr; Hanulak, Patrik; Jaros, Jakub; Papes, Martin; Latal, Jan; Siska, Petr; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2015-07-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of a light emitting diode based visible light communication system for optical vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications in road safety applications. The widespread use of LEDs as light sources has reached into automotive fields. For example, LEDs are used for taillights, daytime running lights, brake lights, headlights, and traffic signals. Future in the optical vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications will be based on an optical wireless communication technology that using LED transmitter and a camera receiver (OCI; optical communication image sensor). Utilization of optical V2V communication systems in automotive industry naturally brings a lot of problems. Among them belongs necessity of circuit implementation into the current concepts of electronic LED lights control that allows LED modulation. These circuits are quite complicated especially in case of luxury cars. Other problem is correct design of modulation circuits so that final vehicle lightning using optical vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication meets standard requirements on Photometric Quantities and Beam Homogeneity. Authors of this article performed research on optical vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication possibilities of headlight (Jaguar) and taillight (Skoda) in terms of modulation circuits (M-PSK, M-QAM) implementation into the lamp concepts and final fulfilment of mandatory standards on Photometric Quantities and Beam Homogeneity.

  18. Forest statistics for northeast Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. Hazard

    1963-01-01

    This publication summarizes the results of the third inventory of six northeast Washington counties: Ferry, Lincoln, Pend Oreille, Spokane, Stevens, and Whitman. The collection of field data was made during the years 1957 to 1961 in three separate inventory projects.

  19. 12 CFR 4.4 - Washington office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Washington office. 4.4 Section 4.4 Banks and... EXAMINERS Organization and Functions § 4.4 Washington office. The Washington office of the OCC is the main office and headquarters of the OCC. The Washington office directs OCC policy, oversees OCC operations...

  20. The Washington Large Area Time Coincidence Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gran, R.; Berns, H.G.; Buchli, M.; Burnett, T.H.; Edmon, P.; Gran, R.; Haff, T.; Lemagie; Muhs, E.; Wheel, G.; Wilkes, R.J.

    2003-07-01

    WALTA (WAshington Large-area Time-coincidence Array) aims to study ultra-high energy (> 1018 eV) cosmic rays (UHECR) by placing detector elements in Seattle area secondary scho ols, and linking their data acquisition systems to the University of Washington via a computer network. The goal of WALTA is to have teachers and students become active participants in forefront scientific project, while building a long term partnership between the scho ols and the university-based physics research community. Considerable progress has been made in recruiting and training teachers and equipping scho ol sites since the last ICRC, including development of a low-cost data acquisition card in collab oration with Fermilab and the University of Nebraska.

  1. Application of a Geographic Information System for regridding a ground-water flow model of the Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System, Walla Walla River basin, Oregon-Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, M.E.; Hubbard, L.E.

    1994-01-01

    Computerized Geographic Information Systems (GIS) have become viable and valuable tools for managing,analyzing, creating, and displaying data for three-dimensional finite-difference ground-water flow models. Three GIS applications demonstrated in this study are: (1) regridding of data arrays from an existing large-area, low resolution ground-water model to a smaller, high resolution grid; (2) use of GIS techniques for assembly of data-input arrays for a ground-water model; and (3) use of GIS for rapid display of data for verification, for checking of ground-water model output, and for the cre.ation of customized maps for use in reports. The Walla Walla River Basin was selected as the location for the demonstration because (1) data from a low resolution ground-water model (Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System Analysis [RASA]) were available and (2) concern for long-term use of water resources for irrigation in the basin. The principal advantage of regridding is that it may provide the ability to more precisely calibrate a model, assuming chat a more detailed coverage of data is available, and to evaluate the numerical errors associated with a particular grid design.Regridding gave about an 8-fold increase in grid-node density.Several FORTRAN programs were developed to load the regridded ground-water data into a finite-difference modular model as model-compatible input files for use in a steady-state model run.To facilitate the checking and validating of the GIS regridding process, maps and tabular reports were produced for each of eight ground-water parameters by model layer. Also, an automated subroutine that was developed to view the model-calculated water levels in cross-section will aid in the synthesis and interpretation of model results.

  2. Photometric Study on the Spot-Double Star XY Urase Majoris (I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo-Baik Lee

    1988-06-01

    Full Text Available The long-term observational properties of the photometric behaviours of the short period (p=0.48 day eclipsing binary system XY UMa are discussed. They are based on the UBV observations, which were carried out by Geyer in the years 1955-1961, 1968, 1975-1984. Light curves of XY UMa revealed very large changes not only between consecutive observing nights, but also from season to season. Between 1955 and 1984, the mean system brightness increased about 30% during this time intervals, meanwhile, the orbital period of this system was constant whithin 1.6% of its period. The colour index curve shows similar variations like the light curve but with a phase offset oscillation around the time instants of the primary minima. Observational evidence for photospheric and chromospheric activities on the XY UMa are also discussed.

  3. Seeing SPOTS with SOFIA: Starspot Photometric Observations of Transiting Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampapa, Mark

    2015-10-01

    We propose to utilize the unique capabilities provided by HIPO/FLITECAM (FLIPO) and the FPI to obtain simultaneous, time-resolved multi-color photometry extending from the visible to the near infrared of magnetically active dwarf stars that are also the hosts of transiting exoplanets. In this way, we can measure the fundamental properties of starspots that are eclipsed by the transiting planet and thereby provide much improved constraints for starspot models than has been possible with the single-band data from Kepler and CoRoT. Since starspots are the strongest concentrations of magnetic flux on the Sun and stars, an understanding of their properties can yield critical constraints for stellar dynamo models and influence our views of the role of stellar magnetic activity in star-planet interactions.

  4. Photometric Observation and Light Curve Analysis of Binary System ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... was calculated according to the ephemeris given by Florja. (1931):. Min. I = HJD 2426386.184 + 0d.4233994 × E,. Min. II = HJD 2426386.396 + 0d.4233994 × E. The results can be seen in Table 1. Also for all the observed times of primary and secondary from 1930 to 2007 (according to Czech O–C gateway website) the ...

  5. Probing dark energy with lensing magnification in photometric surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Michael D

    2014-02-14

    I present an estimator for the angular cross correlation of two tracers of the cosmological large-scale structure that utilizes redshift information to isolate separate physical contributions. The estimator is derived by solving the Limber equation for a reweighting of the foreground tracer that nulls either clustering or lensing contributions to the cross correlation function. Applied to future photometric surveys, the estimator can enhance the measurement of gravitational lensing magnification effects to provide a competitive independent constraint on the dark energy equation of state.

  6. Photometric correction of VIR high space resolution data of Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longobardo, Andrea; Palomba, Ernesto; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Ciarniello, Mauro; Tosi, Federico; Giacomo Carrozzo, Filippo; Capria, Maria Teresa; Zambon, Francesca; Raponi, Andrea; Ammannito, Eleonora; Zinzi, Angelo; Raymond, Carol; Russell, Christopher T.; VIR-Dawn Team

    2016-10-01

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft [1] has been orbiting Ceres since early 2015. The mission is divided into five stages, characterized by different spacecraft altitudes corresponding to different space resolutions, i.e. Approach (CSA), Rotational Characterization (CSR), Survey (CSS), High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO), and Low Altitude Mapping Orbit (LAMO).Ceres is a dark body (i.e. average albedo at 1.2 um is 0.08 [2]), hence photometric correction is much more important than for brighter asteroids (e.g. S-type and achondritric). Indeed, the negligible role of multiple scattering increases the reflectance dependence on phase angle.A photometric correction of VIR data at low spatial resolution (i.e. CSA, CSR, CSS) has already been applied with different methodologies (e.g. [2], [3]), These techniques highlight a reflectance and band depths dependency on the phase angle which is homogeneous on the entire surface in agreement with C-type taxonomy.However, with increasing spatial resolution (i.e. HAMO and LAMO data), the retrieval of a unique set of parameters for the photometric correction is no longer sufficient to obtain reliable albedo/band depth maps. In this work, a new photometric correction is obtained and applied to all the high resolution VIR data of Ceres, taking into account the reflectance variations observed at small scales. The developed algorithm will be implemented on the MATISSE tool [4] in order to be visualized on the Ceres shape model.Finally, an interpretation of the obtained phase functions is given in terms of optical and physical properties of the Ceres regolith.AcknowledgementsVIR was funded and coordinated by the Italian Space Agency, and built by SELEX ES, with the scientific leadership of IAPS-INAF, Rome, Italy, and is operated by IAPS-INAF, Rome, Italy. Support of the Dawn Science, Instrument, and Operation Teams is gratefully acknowledged.References[1] Russell, C. T. et al., 2012, Science 336, 686[2] Longobardo A., et al., 2016, LPSC, 2239

  7. Photometric and emission-spectrometric determination of boron in steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thierig, D.

    1982-01-01

    A method for the photometric determination of boron in unalloyed and alloyed steels is described, in which Curcumine is used as reagent. A separation of boron is not necessary. Limit of detection: 0.0003% B. The decomposition of boron nitride in the steel is achieved by heating the whole sample in fuming sulphuric acid/phosphoric acid. For the emission spectrometric investigation of solid steel samples and for the spectrochemical analysis of solutions with plasma excitation working parameters are given and possibilities of interferences are demonstrated.

  8. Determination of methylmercuric ions by photometric titration with dithizone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingman, F

    1971-07-01

    A rapid photometric titration titration technique, which makes it possible to determine methylmercuric ions with a sensitivity of 15mug, is described. The titration takes place in 80% aqueous ethanol, which is capable of dissolving the titrant, a chloroform solution of dithizone. It has thus been possible to avoid the difficulties arising from co-extraction phenomena that occur when the extractive titration procedures developed for mercury(II) are applied to the determination of methylmercuric ions. A formate buffer is used to keep the pH in the range 2.5-3.0. The attainable precision is considerably better than 1 %.

  9. A photometric function for diffuse reflection by particulate materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, W. E.; Weaver, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    A photometric function is proposed to describe the diffuse reflection of radiation by particulate materials. Both multiple scattering and the dominant effects of particle shadowing are included and the function is verified by comparisons with the photometries of laboratory surfaces. Brightness measurements of planetary and other diffusely scattering surfaces can be used to calculate the brightness for geometries other than those used in the measurements and for which the Minnaert function does not apply. The measurements also can be directly related to such surface characteristics as particle size, single-particle albedo, and compactness.

  10. The photometric and kinematic structure and asymmetry of disk galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, David Roger

    2001-09-01

    We establish a sample of 39 nearby, nearly face-on disk galaxies for a detailed study of their photometric and kinematic structure and asymmetries. For this sample we collected two-dimensional Halpha velocity-fields at echelle resolutions with the DensePak integral field unit on the WIYN 3.5m telescope, HI line widths taken with the Nancay radio telescope, and deep R and I-band imaging from the WIYN telescope, the 2.1m telescope at KPNO, and the Harlan J. Smith 2.7m telescope at McDonald Observatory. These data put constraints on the shape of disk galaxies and their halos and are used to study the fundamental disk galaxy scaling relationship between rotation speed and luminosity, i.e., the Tully-Fisher relation. To study the shapes of galaxy disks, we measured both photometric and kinematic asymmetries. From studies of the asymmetry, we were able to show that the now commonly used photometric rotational asymmetry index does not measure disk flocculence as previously suggested; instead it is shown to be equivalent to low order, odd Fourier amplitudes, i.e., lopsidedness. In addition to studying disk lopsidedness, a set of kinematic and photometric indices are used to present the first measurements of disk ellipticity for galaxies outside the Milky Way. These measurements are decoupled from a phase angle which plagues previous estimates of disk ellipticity. Nonetheless, our disk ellipticity measurement of 0.083 +/- 0.054 is consistent with these previous estimates. This measurement allows us to put a limit of 0.15 mag on Tully-Fisher scatter due to the intrinsic ellipticity of disk galaxies. Kinematic inclination angles, one of the primary kinematic indices used to measure disk ellipticity, were derived from model velocity-field fits to our Halpha velocity fields. These inclinations are both accurate and precise and allowed us to create the first Tully-Fisher relation for nearly face-on disk galaxies. We demonstrate that our face-on Tully-Fisher sample is well fit by

  11. Astrometric and photometric study of the open cluster NGC 2323

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin M.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of the open cluster NGC 2323 using astrometric and photometric data. In our study we used two methods that are able to separate open cluster’s stars from those that belong to the stellar background. Our results of calculations by these two methods indicate that: 1 according to the membership probability, NGC 2323 should contain 497 stars, 2 the cluster center should be at 07h 02m 48.s02 and -08° 20' 17''74,3 the limiting radius of NGC 2323 is 2.31 ± 0.04 pc, the surface number density at this radius is 98.16 stars pc −2, 4 the magnitude function has a maximum at about mv = 14 mag, 5 the total mass of NGC 2323 is estimated dynamically by using astrometric data to be 890 M_, and statistically by using photometric data to be 900 M_, and 6 the distance and age of the cluster are found to be equal to 900 ± 100 pc, and 140 ± 20 Myr, respectively. Finally the dynamical evolution parameter τ of the cluster is about 436.2.

  12. Rotation periods and photometric variability of rapidly rotating ultracool dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles-Páez, P. A.; Pallé, E.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.

    2017-12-01

    We used the optical and near-infrared imagers located on the Liverpool, the IAC80, and the William Herschel telescopes to monitor 18 M7-L9.5 dwarfs with the objective of measuring their rotation periods. We achieved accuracies typically in the range ±1.5-28 mmag by means of differential photometry, which allowed us to detect photometric variability at the 2σ level in the 50 per cent of the sample. We also detected periodic modulation with periods in the interval 1.5-4.4 h in 9 out of 18 dwarfs that we attribute to rotation. Our variability detections were combined with data from the literature; we found that 65 ± 18 per cent of M7-L3.5 dwarfs with v sin I ≥ 30 km s-1 exhibit photometric variability with typical amplitudes ≤20 mmag in the I band. For those targets and field ultracool dwarfs with measurements of v sin I and rotation period we derived the expected inclination angle of their rotation axis, and found that those with v sin I ≥ 30 km s-1 are more likely to have inclinations ≳40 deg. In addition, we used these rotation periods and others from the literature to study the likely relationship between rotation and linear polarization in dusty ultracool dwarfs. We found a correlation between short rotation periods and large values of linear polarization at optical and near-infrared wavelengths.

  13. AMICO: optimized detection of galaxy clusters in photometric surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellagamba, Fabio; Roncarelli, Mauro; Maturi, Matteo; Moscardini, Lauro

    2018-02-01

    We present Adaptive Matched Identifier of Clustered Objects (AMICO), a new algorithm for the detection of galaxy clusters in photometric surveys. AMICO is based on the Optimal Filtering technique, which allows to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the clusters. In this work, we focus on the new iterative approach to the extraction of cluster candidates from the map produced by the filter. In particular, we provide a definition of membership probability for the galaxies close to any cluster candidate, which allows us to remove its imprint from the map, allowing the detection of smaller structures. As demonstrated in our tests, this method allows the deblending of close-by and aligned structures in more than 50 per cent of the cases for objects at radial distance equal to 0.5 × R200 or redshift distance equal to 2 × σz, being σz the typical uncertainty of photometric redshifts. Running AMICO on mocks derived from N-body simulations and semi-analytical modelling of the galaxy evolution, we obtain a consistent mass-amplitude relation through the redshift range of 0.3 slope of ∼0.55 and a logarithmic scatter of ∼0.14. The fraction of false detections is steeply decreasing with S/N and negligible at S/N > 5.

  14. Measuring Cosmological Parameters with Photometrically Classified Pan-STARRS Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David; Scolnic, Daniel; Riess, Adam; Rest, Armin; Kirshner, Robert; Berger, Edo; Kessler, Rick; Pan, Yen-Chen; Foley, Ryan; Chornock, Ryan; Ortega, Carolyn; Challis, Peter; Burgett, William; Chambers, Kenneth; Draper, Peter; Flewelling, Heather; Huber, Mark; Kaiser, Nick; Kudritzki, Rolf; Metcalfe, Nigel; Tonry, John; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Waters, Chris; Gall, E. E. E.; Kotak, Rubina; McCrum, Matt; Smartt, Stephen; Smith, Ken

    2018-01-01

    We use nearly 1,200 supernovae (SNe) from Pan-STARRS and ~200 low-z (z satellite, we measure the dark energy equation of state parameter w to be -0.986±0.058 (stat+sys). If we allow w to evolve with redshift as w(a) = w0 + wa(1-a), we find w0 = -0.923±0.148 and wa = -0.404±0.797. These results are consistent with measurements of cosmological parameters from the JLA and from a new analysis of 1049 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia (Scolnic et al. 2017). We try four different photometric classification priors for Pan-STARRS SNe and two alternate ways of modeling the CC SN contamination, finding that none of these variants gives a w that differs by more than 1% from the baseline measurement. The systematic uncertainty on w due to marginalizing over the CC SN contamination, σwCC = 0.019, is approximately equal to the photometric calibration uncertainty and is lower than the systematic uncertainty in the SN\\,Ia dispersion model (σwdisp = 0.024). Our data provide one of the best current constraints on w, demonstrating that samples with ~5% CC SN contamination can give competitive cosmological constraints when the contaminating distribution is marginalized over in a Bayesian framework.

  15. Towards surface analysis on diabetic feet soles to predict ulcerations using photometric stereo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chanjuan; van der Heijden, Ferdi; van Netten, Jaap J.

    2012-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a major complication for patients with diabetes mellitus. Approximately 15% to 25% of patients with Type I and Type II diabetes eventually develop feet ulcers. If not adequately treated, these ulcers may lead to foot infection, and ultimately to total (or partial) lower extremity amputation, which means a great loss in health-related quality of life. The incidence of foot ulcers may be prevented by early identification and subsequent treatment of pre-signs of ulceration, such as callus formation, redness, fissures, and blisters. Therefore, frequent examination of the feet is necessary, preferably on a daily basis. However, self-examination is difficult or impossible due to consequences of the diabetes. Moreover, frequent examination by health care professionals is costly and not feasible. The objective of our project is to develop an intelligent telemedicine monitoring system that can be deployed at the patients' home environment for frequent examination of patients feet, to timely detect pre-signs of ulceration. The current paper reports the preliminary results of an implementation of a photometric stereo imaging system to detect 3D geometric abnormalities of the skin surfaces of foot soles. Using a flexible experimental setup, the system parameters such as number and positions of the illuminators have been selected so as to optimize the performance with respect to reconstructed surface. The system has been applied to a dummy foot sole. Finally, the curvature on the resulting 3D topography of the foot sole is implemented to show the feasibility of detecting the pre-signs of ulceration using photometric stereo imaging. The obtained results indicate clinical potential of this technology for detecting the pre-signs of ulceration on diabetic feet soles.

  16. CCD photometric analysis of the W UMa-type binary V376 Andromeda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çiçek, C.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the absolute parameters of the contact binary system V376 And. CCD photometric observations were made at the Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University Observatory in 2004. The instrumental magnitudes of all observed stars were converted into standard magnitudes. New BV light curves of the system were analysed using the Wilson-Devinney method supplemented with a Monte Carlo type algorithm. Since there are large asymmetries between maxima (i.e., O'Connell effect) in these light curves, two different models (one with a cool spot and one with a hot spot) were applied to the photometric data. The best fit, which was obtained with a large hot spot on the secondary component, gives V376 And as an A sub-type contact binary in poor thermal contact and a small value of the filling factor ( f ≈ 0.07). Combining the solutions of our light curves and Rucinski et al. (2001)'s radial velocity curves, the following absolute parameters of the components were determined: M1 = 2.44 ± 0.04 M ⊙, M2 = 0.74 ± 0.03 M ⊙, R1 = 2.60 ± 0.03 R ⊙, R2 = 1.51 ± 0.02 R ⊙, L1 = 40 ± 4 L ⊙ and L2 = 5 ± 1 L ⊙. We also discuss the evolution of the system, which appears to have an age of 1.6 Gyr. The distance to V376 And was calculated as 230 ± 20 pc from this analysis, taking into account interstellar extinction.

  17. Libraries in Washington: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/washington.html Libraries in Washington To use the sharing features on ... enable JavaScript. Bellingham PeaceHealth St. Joseph Medical Center Library 2901 Squalicum Parkway Bellingham, WA 98225 360-788- ...

  18. A non-convex variational approach to photometric stereo under inaccurate lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quéau, Yvain; Wu, Tao; Lauze, Francois Bernard

    2017-01-01

    This paper tackles the photometric stereo problem in the presence of inaccurate lighting, obtained either by calibration or by an uncalibrated photometric stereo method. Based on a precise modeling of noise and outliers, a robust variational approach is introduced. It explicitly accounts for self...... refine both the intensities and the directions of the lighting....

  19. A non-convex variational approach to photometric stereo under inaccurate lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quéau, Yvain; Wu, Tao; Lauze, Francois Bernard

    2017-01-01

    This paper tackles the photometric stereo problem in the presence of inaccurate lighting, obtained either by calibration or by an uncalibrated photometric stereo method. Based on a precise modeling of noise and outliers, a robust variational approach is introduced. It explicitly accounts for self...

  20. Bayesian Single-Epoch Photometric Classification of Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poznanski, Dovi; Maoz, Dan; Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2007-09-01

    Ongoing supernova (SN) surveys find hundreds of candidates that require confirmation for their various uses. Traditional classification based on follow-up spectroscopy of all candidates is virtually impossible for these large samples. The use of Type Ia SNe as standard candles is at an evolved stage that requires pure, uncontaminated samples. However, other SN survey applications, such as measuring cosmic SN rates, could benefit from a classification of SNe on a statistical basis, rather than case by case. With this objective in mind, we have developed the SN-ABC, an automatic Bayesian classifying algorithm for supernovae. We rely solely on single-epoch multiband photometry and host-galaxy (photometric) redshift information to sort SN candidates into the two major types, Ia and core-collapse supernovae. We test the SN-ABC performance on published samples of SNe from the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) and GOODS projects that have both broadband photometry and spectroscopic classification (so the true type is known). The SN-ABC correctly classifies up to 97% (85%) of the Type Ia (II-P) SNe in SNLS, and similar fractions of the GOODS SNe, depending on photometric redshift quality. Using simulations with large artificial samples, we find similarly high success fractions for Types Ia and II-P, and reasonable (~75%) success rates in classifying Type Ibc SNe as core-collapse. Type IIn SNe, however, are often misclassified as Type Ia. In deep surveys, SNe Ia are best classified at redshifts z gtrsim 0.6 or when near maximum. Core-collapse SNe (other than Type IIn) are best recognized several weeks after maximum, or at z lesssim 0.6. Assuming the SNe are young, as would be the case for rolling surveys, the success fractions improve by a degree dependent on the type and redshift. The fractional contamination of a single-epoch photometrically selected sample of SNe Ia by core-collapse SNe varies between less than 10% and as much as 30%, depending on the intrinsic fraction and

  1. Photometric classification of quasars from RCS-2 using Random Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, D.; Barrientos, L. F.; Pichara, K.; Anguita, T.; Murphy, D. N. A.; Gilbank, D. G.; Gladders, M. D.; Yee, H. K. C.; Hsieh, B. C.; López, S.

    2015-12-01

    The classification and identification of quasars is fundamental to many astronomical research areas. Given the large volume of photometric survey data available in the near future, automated methods for doing so are required. In this article, we present a new quasar candidate catalog from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey 2 (RCS-2), identified solely from photometric information using an automated algorithm suitable for large surveys. The algorithm performance is tested using a well-defined SDSS spectroscopic sample of quasars and stars. The Random Forest algorithm constructs the catalog from RCS-2 point sources using SDSS spectroscopically-confirmed stars and quasars. The algorithm identifies putative quasars from broadband magnitudes (g, r, i, z) and colors. Exploiting NUV GALEX measurements for a subset of the objects, we refine the classifier by adding new information. An additional subset of the data with WISE W1 and W2 bands is also studied. Upon analyzing 542 897 RCS-2 point sources, the algorithm identified 21 501 quasar candidates with a training-set-derived precision (the fraction of true positives within the group assigned quasar status) of 89.5% and recall (the fraction of true positives relative to all sources that actually are quasars) of 88.4%. These performance metrics improve for the GALEX subset: 6529 quasar candidates are identified from 16 898 sources, with a precision and recall of 97.0% and 97.5%, respectively. Algorithm performance is further improved when WISE data are included, with precision and recall increasing to 99.3% and 99.1%, respectively, for 21 834 quasar candidates from 242 902 sources. We compiled our final catalog (38 257) by merging these samples and removing duplicates. An observational follow up of 17 bright (r classification of point sources with Random Forest algorithms to search for quasars within current and future large-area photometric surveys. Full Tables 1-3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  2. Real-time three-dimensional fingerprint acquisition via a new photometric stereo means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wuyuan; Song, Zhan; Chung, Ronald

    2013-10-01

    A real-time means for three-dimensional (3-D) fingerprint acquisition is presented. The system is configured with only one camera and some white light-emitting diode lamps. The reconstruction is performed based on the principle of photometric stereo. In the algorithm, a two-layer Hanrahan-Krueger model is proposed to represent the finger surface reflectance property instead of the traditional Lambert model. By the proposed lighting direction calibration and the nonuniform lighting correction methods, surface normal at each image point can be accurately estimated by solving a nonlinear optimization problem. Finally, a linear normal transformation is implemented for the enhancement of 3-D models. The experiments are implemented with real finger and palm prints, and the results are also compared with traditional means to show its feasibility and improvement in the reconstruction accuracy.

  3. Integrated solid waste management of Seattle, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the City of Seattle, Washington, integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. Actual data from records kept by participants is reported in this document. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for MSW management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption for a one-year period, of an operating IMSWM systems.

  4. Washington's public and private forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles L. Bolsinger; Neil McKay; Donald FL Gedney; Carol. Alerich

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes and analyzes 1988-91 timber inventories of western and eastern Washington. These inventories were conducted on all private and public lands except National Forests. Timber resource statistics from National Forest inventories also are presented. Detailed tables provide estimates of forest area, timber volume, growth, mortality, and harvest. Data...

  5. How Accurately Can We Measure Galaxy Environment at High Redshift Using Only Photometric Redshifts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, Jonathan; Jogee, Shardha; Sherman, Sydney; Papovich, Casey J.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Stevans, Matthew L.; Kawinwanichakij, Lalitwadee; Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl; SHELA/HETDEX

    2017-06-01

    We use a powerful synergy of six deep photometric surveys (Herschel SPIRE, Spitzer IRAC, NEWFIRM K-band, DECam ugriz, and XMM X-ray) and a future optical spectroscopic survey (HETDEX) in the Stripe 82 field to study galaxy evolution during the 1.9 environment using only our photometric redshifts. We compare both local and large-scale measures of environment (e.g., projected two-point correlation function, projected nearest neighbor densities, and galaxy counts within some projected aperture) at different photometric redshifts to cosmological simulations in order to quantify the uncertainty in our estimates of environment. We also explore how robustly one can recover the variation of galaxy properties with environment, when using only photometric redshifts. In the era of large photometric surveys, this work has broad implications for studies addressing the impact of environment on galaxy evolution at early cosmic epochs. We acknowledge support from NSF grants AST-1614798, AST-1413652 and NSF GRFP grant DGE-1610403.

  6. Spectroscopic and photometric study of the eclipsing interacting binary V495 Centauri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, JA; Mennickent, RE; Djurašević, G.; Araya, I.; Curé, M.

    2018-01-01

    Double Periodic Variables (DPV) are among the new enigmas of semi-detached eclipsing binaries. These are intermediate-mass binaries characterized by a long photometric period lasting on average 33 times the orbital period. We present a spectroscopic and photometric study of the DPV V495 Cen based on new high-resolution spectra and the ASAS V-band light curve. We have determined an improved orbital period of 33.492 ± 0.002 d and a long period of 1283 d. We find a cool evolved star of M2 = 0.91 ± 0.2M⊙, T2 = 6000 ± 250K and R2 = 19.3 ± 0.5R⊙ and a hot companion of M1 = 5.76 ± 0.3M⊙, T1 = 16960 ± 400K and R = 4.5 ± 0.2R⊙. The mid-type B dwarf is surrounded by a concave and geometrically thick disc, of radial extension Rd = 40.2 ± 1.3R⊙ contributing ˜ 11 percent to the total luminosity of the system at the V band. The system is seen under inclination 84.°8 ± 0.°6 and it is at a distance d = 2092 ± 104.6 pc. The light curve analysis suggests that the mass transfer stream impacts the external edge of the disc forming a hot region 11% hotter than the surrounding disc material. The persistent V < R asymmetry of the Hα emission suggests the presence of a wind and the detection of a secondary absorption component in He I lines indicates a possible wind origin in the hotspot region.

  7. Developing a user-friendly photometric software for exoplanets to increase participation in Citizen Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokori, A.; Tsiaras, A.

    2017-09-01

    online software. Also the project "planet hunters" asked people to discover planets in other solar systems using data from large telescopes. HOPS, being in the same direction, could be an effective way of participating in research whether as an amateur astronomer or as a person of the general public that wants to engage with exoplanetary research and data analysis. The software is free of charge under the scope of astronomical research and education. We plan to create an online platform, inspired by HOPS, in the near future. In this platform, everyone will have access by creating an account as a user. Amateur astronomers, who have obtained their own exoplanet observations, will be able to upload and analyse their data. For people who are not familiar with photometric analysis - amateurs or general public users - data, as well as educational video and audio material will be provided.

  8. Washington Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, T. J.; Schelling, J.

    2012-12-01

    Washington State has participated in the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) since its inception in 1995. We have participated in the tsunami inundation hazard mapping, evacuation planning, education, and outreach efforts that generally characterize the NTHMP efforts. We have also investigated hazards of significant interest to the Pacific Northwest. The hazard from locally generated earthquakes on the Cascadia subduction zone, which threatens tsunami inundation in less than hour following a magnitude 9 earthquake, creates special problems for low-lying accretionary shoreforms in Washington, such as the spits of Long Beach and Ocean Shores, where high ground is not accessible within the limited time available for evacuation. To ameliorate this problem, we convened a panel of the Applied Technology Council to develop guidelines for construction of facilities for vertical evacuation from tsunamis, published as FEMA 646, now incorporated in the International Building Code as Appendix M. We followed this with a program called Project Safe Haven (http://www.facebook.com/ProjectSafeHaven) to site such facilities along the Washington coast in appropriate locations and appropriate designs to blend with the local communities, as chosen by the citizens. This has now been completed for the entire outer coast of Washington. In conjunction with this effort, we have evaluated the potential for earthquake-induced ground failures in and near tsunami hazard zones to help develop cost estimates for these structures and to establish appropriate tsunami evacuation routes and evacuation assembly areas that are likely to to be available after a major subduction zone earthquake. We intend to continue these geotechnical evaluations for all tsunami hazard zones in Washington.

  9. Washington State University Algae Biofuels Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    chen, Shulin [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Biological Systems Engineering; McCormick, Margaret [Targeted Growth, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Sutterlin, Rusty [Inventure Renewables, Inc., Gig Harbor, WA (United States)

    2012-12-29

    The goal of this project was to advance algal technologies for the production of biofuels and biochemicals by establishing the Washington State Algae Alliance, a collaboration partnership among two private companies (Targeted Growth, Inc. (TGI), Inventure Chemicals (Inventure) Inc (now Inventure Renewables Inc) and Washington State University (WSU). This project included three major components. The first one was strain development at TGI by genetically engineering cyanobacteria to yield high levels of lipid and other specialty chemicals. The second component was developing an algal culture system at WSU to produce algal biomass as biofuel feedstock year-round in the northern states of the United States. This system included two cultivation modes, the first one was a phototrophic process and the second a heterotrophic process. The phototrophic process would be used for algae production in open ponds during warm seasons; the heterotrophic process would be used in cold seasons so that year-round production of algal lipid would be possible. In warm seasons the heterotrophic process would also produce algal seeds to be used in the phototrophic culture process. Selected strains of green algae and cyanobacteria developed by TGI were tested in the system. The third component was downstream algal biomass processing by Inventure that included efficiently harvesting the usable fuel fractions from the algae mass and effectively isolating and separating the usable components into specific fractions, and converting isolated fractions into green chemicals.

  10. Photometric observations of nine Transneptunian objects and Centaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hromakina, T.; Perna, D.; Belskaya, I.; Dotto, E.; Rossi, A.; Bisi, F.

    2018-02-01

    We present the results of photometric observations of six Transneptunian objects and three Centaurs, estimations of their rotational periods and corresponding amplitudes. For six of them we present also lower limits of density values. All observations were made using 3.6-m TNG telescope (La Palma, Spain). For four objects - (148975) 2001 XA255, (281371) 2008 FC76, (315898) 2008 QD4, and 2008 CT190 - the estimation of short-term variability was made for the first time. We confirm rotation period values for two objects: (55636) 2002 TX300 and (202421) 2005 UQ513, and improve the precision of previously reported rotational period values for other three - (120178) 2003 OP32, (145452) 2005 RN43, (444030) 2004 NT33 - by using both our and literature data. We also discuss here that small distant bodies, similar to asteroids in the Main belt, tend to have double-peaked rotational periods caused by the elongated shape rather than surface albedo variations.

  11. Cepheids with the eyes of photometric space telescopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molnár László

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Space photometric missions have been steadily accumulating observations of Cepheids in recent years, leading to a flow of new discoveries. In this short review we summarize the findings provided by the early missions such as WIRE, MOST, and CoRoT, and the recent results of the Kepler and K2 missions. The surprising and fascinating results from the high-precision, quasi-continuous data include the detection of the amplitude increase of Polaris, and exquisite details about V1154 Cyg within the original Kepler field of view. We also briefly discuss the current opportunities with the K2 mission, and the prospects of the TESS space telescope regarding Cepheids.

  12. A Probabilistic Approach to Classifying Supernovae UsingPhotometric Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsova, Natalia V.; Connolly, Brian M.

    2006-12-14

    This paper presents a novel method for determining the probability that a supernova candidate belongs to a known supernova type (such as Ia, Ibc, IIL, etc.), using its photometric information alone. It is validated with Monte Carlo, and both space- and ground-based data. We examine the application of the method to well-sampled as well as poorly sampled supernova light curves and investigate to what extent the best currently available supernova models can be used for typing supernova candidates. Central to the method is the assumption that a supernova candidate belongs to a group of objects that can be modeled; we therefore discuss possible ways of removing anomalous or less well understood events from the sample. This method is particularly advantageous for analyses where the purity of the supernova sample is of the essence, or for those where it is important to know the number of the supernova candidates of a certain type (e.g., in supernova rate studies).

  13. Characterization of Orbital Debris Photometric Properties Derived from Laboratory-Based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowardin, H.; Abercromby, K.; Barker, E.; Seitzer, P.; Schildknecht, T.

    2010-01-01

    To better characterize and model optical data acquired from ground-based telescopes, the Optical Measurements Center (OMC) at NASA/JSC attempts to emulate illumination conditions seen in space using equipment and techniques that parallel telescopic observations and source-target-sensor orientations. The OMC uses a 75 Watt Xenon arc lamp as a solar simulator, an SBIG CCD camera with standard Johnson/Bessel filters, and a robotic arm to simulate an object's position and rotation. The laboratory uses known shapes, materials suspected to be consistent with the orbital debris population, and three phase angles to best match the lighting conditions of the telescope based data. The fourteen objects studied in the laboratory are fragments or materials acquired through ground-tests of scaled-model satellites/rocket bodies as well as material samples in more/less "flight-ready" condition. All fragments were measured at 10 increments in a full 360 rotation at 6 , 36 , and 60 phase angles. This paper will investigate published color photometric data for a series of orbital debris targets and compare it to the empirical photometric measurements generated in the OMC. Using the data acquired over specific rotational angles through different filters (B, V, R, I), a color index is acquired (B-R, R-I). Using these values and their associated lightcurves, this laboratory data is compared to observational data obtained on the 1 m telescope of the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AUIB), the 0.9 m operated by the Small- and Medium-Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) Consortium and the Curtis-Schmidt 0.6 m Michigan Orbital Debris Space Debris Telescope both located at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). An empirical based optical characterization model will be presented to provide preliminary correlations between laboratory based and telescope-based data in the context of classification of GEO debris objects.

  14. MagAl: A new tool to analyse galaxies photometric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenell, W.; Benítez, N.; Cid Fernandes, R.

    2014-10-01

    On galaxy spectra, one can find mainly two features: emission lines, which tell us about the ionised gas content, and the continuum plus absorption lines, which tell us about the stellar content. They thus allow us to derive gas-phase abundances, the main radiation sources, chemical enrichment and star formation histories. Braad-band photometry, on the other hand, is much more limited and hinders our ability to recover a galaxy's physical properties to such a degree of detail. However, with the recent development of redshift surveys using the technology of ultra-narrow filters (≍ 100 Å), such as ALHAMBRA, J-PAS and DES, it will be invaluable to be able to retrieve information on physical properties of galaxies from photometric data. Motivated by this data avalanche (which goes up to the petabyte scale), we decided to build our own SED-fitting code: Magnitudes Analyser (MagAl), which has three modules. 1) A template library generation module: generates empirical and theoretical template libraries. 2) Bayesian fitting module: calculates probability distribution functions (PDFs) for given observed and library template data. This is similar to the method to measure photometric redshifts by Benitez (2000). 3) A result-analyser module: streamlines data analysis from the large output PDFs files. A fourth module to manage 3D data is being developed and a few preliminary tests are also shown. To investigate the reliability of results obtained by MagAl, we have created a mock galaxy sample for the ALHAMBRA survey filter system (http://alhambrasurvey.com) and tried to recover their physical properties. We show that for our sample of simulated galaxies we can measure stellar ages, metallicities and extinctions with a precision of less than 0.3 dex. Also, we apply the code to the ALHAMBRA survey catalog and show that we can measure stellar masses with an accuracy of 0.2 dex when comparing to previous results like COSMOS masses measured by Bundy et al. (2006).

  15. The overlooked potential of Generalized Linear Models in astronomy-II: Gamma regression and photometric redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, J.; de Souza, R. S.; Krone-Martins, A.; Cameron, E.; Ishida, E. E. O.; Hilbe, J.

    2015-04-01

    Machine learning techniques offer a precious tool box for use within astronomy to solve problems involving so-called big data. They provide a means to make accurate predictions about a particular system without prior knowledge of the underlying physical processes of the data. In this article, and the companion papers of this series, we present the set of Generalized Linear Models (GLMs) as a fast alternative method for tackling general astronomical problems, including the ones related to the machine learning paradigm. To demonstrate the applicability of GLMs to inherently positive and continuous physical observables, we explore their use in estimating the photometric redshifts of galaxies from their multi-wavelength photometry. Using the gamma family with a log link function we predict redshifts from the PHoto-z Accuracy Testing simulated catalogue and a subset of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey from Data Release 10. We obtain fits that result in catastrophic outlier rates as low as ∼1% for simulated and ∼2% for real data. Moreover, we can easily obtain such levels of precision within a matter of seconds on a normal desktop computer and with training sets that contain merely thousands of galaxies. Our software is made publicly available as a user-friendly package developed in Python, R and via an interactive web application. This software allows users to apply a set of GLMs to their own photometric catalogues and generates publication quality plots with minimum effort. By facilitating their ease of use to the astronomical community, this paper series aims to make GLMs widely known and to encourage their implementation in future large-scale projects, such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  16. Three-dimensional surface reconstruction for cartridge cases using photometric stereo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakarya, Ufuk; Leloğlu, Uğur Murat; Tunali, Erol

    2008-03-05

    In forensic science, automated firearms identification is an important and yet unsolved problem. On the way to the solution, one of the most important phases is data acquisition. To be able to identify firearms in a reliable way, all the striated and impressed marks on metallic surfaces of cartridge cases should be visible. But two-dimensional images of cartridge cases are very sensitive to the type and direction of the light source(s). Depending on illumination conditions, the images of marks change drastically and sometimes they simply disappear. But, if the three-dimensional (3D) topography of the surface is obtained, the geometry of the marks, which is independent of the illumination, is available. Thus, by providing illumination independent features that can be used for automated matching, 3D data have the potential to make automated matching much reliable. In the literature on data acquisition for automated firearms identification, a few different ways of three-dimensional surface extraction are described, like laser interferometry or laser profilometry. This study presents a real life application of another method, photometric stereo, for the acquisition of 3D topographic data for cartridge cases, which is the one used in BALISTIKA Ballistics Image Analysis and Recognition System. In order to construct 3D topographic data, first of all, two-dimensional images were acquired using a specially designed set-up. After the images were calibrated radiometrically, photometric stereo method was applied. In order to minimize the low-frequency errors in the final surface, a surface-fitting algorithm was used. The method uses low-cost equipment and image acquisition is not time-consuming. Results were compared to interferometric measurement values for error assessment.

  17. Photometric Properties of the HW Vir-type Binary OGLE-GD-ECL-11388

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kyeongsoo; Lee, Jae Woo; Lee, Dong-Joo; Kim, Seung-Lee; Koo, Jae-Rim; Park, Jang-Ho; Lee, Chung-Uk; Kim, Dong-Jin; Cha, Sang-Mok; Lee, Yongseok

    2017-01-01

    We present the first extensive photometric results for the eclipsing binary OGLE-GD-ECL-11388 with a period of about 3.5 hours located in the Galactic disk. For the photometric solutions, we obtained the BVI light curves from both the KMTNet observations in 2015 and the OGLE-III survey data from 2001-2009, which show striking reflection effects and very sharp eclipses. The light curve synthesis indicates that the eclipsing system is a HW Vir-type binary with a mass ratio of q = 0.289, an orbital inclination of i = 81.9 deg, and a temperature ratio between both components of T 2/T 1 = 0.091. A frequency analysis was applied to the light residuals from our binary model; however, no pulsating periodicity from the subdwarf B-type primary component was detected under signal-to-noise amplitude ratios larger than 4.0. A total of 27 minimum epochs spanning 15 yr were used to analyze the eclipse timing variations of OGLE-GD-ECL-11388. It was found that the orbital period has varied due to a continuous period decrease at a rate of dP/dt = -1.1 × 10-8 day yr-1 or a sinusoidal oscillation with a semiamplitude of K = 35 s and a cycle of P 3 = 8.9 yr. The period decrease may be explained by an angular momentum loss via magnetic stellar wind braking or may be only a part of the sinusoidal variation. We think the most likely interpretation of the orbital period change, at present, is the light-time effect via the presence of a third body with a mass of {M}3\\sin {i}3=12.5 M Jup, putting it in the boundary zone between planets and brown dwarfs.

  18. Continuous photometric observations at ENEA base in Lampedusa to estimate precipitable water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Teggi

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Water vapour is a variable component of the atmosphere both in space and time. It is one of the most important components because of its effects in many fi elds: Meteorology, Climatology, Remote Sensing, Energy-Budget, Hydrology, etc. This work compares radiometric (sun photometer readings, Global Positioning System (GPS data and a meteorological model forecasted data. The aim is to understand if GPS measurements may help Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP models. It is well known that GPS measurements are affected by the so-called tropospheric delay. Part of it, the so-called wet delay is related mainly to the amount of water vapour along the path of the GPS signal through the troposphere. Precise knowledge of the abundance of water vapour, in space and time, is important for NWP model because water vapour is the predecessor of precipitation. Despite the high variability of water vapour compared to other meteorological fi elds, like pressure and wind, water vapour observations are scarce, so that additional measurements of water vapour are expected to benefi t meteorology. A new sun photometer, which is part of the AERONET (AErosol and RObotic NETwork program, has been installed at the ENEA (Ente per le Nuove tecnologie, l'Energia e l'Ambiente base of Lampedusa Island. The sun photometer is quite close (less then 4 km to an ASI (Agenzia Spaziale Italiana GPS permanent receiver. A long record (summer period of the year 2000 of sun photometric measurements is available for the station at Lampedusa. We found that the GPS and sun photometric data are better correlated (std. dev. about 10 mm for the wet delay than are the GPS measurements with the NWP model predictions. This is an indication that GPS delay data may contain information useful for weather prediction.

  19. Assessment of Systematic Chromatic Errors that Impact Sub-1% Photometric Precision in Large-area Sky Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T. S.; DePoy, D. L.; Marshall, J. L.; Tucker, D.; Kessler, R.; Annis, J.; Bernstein, G. M.; Boada, S.; Burke, D. L.; Finley, D. A.; James, D. J.; Kent, S.; Lin, H.; Marriner, J.; Mondrik, N.; Nagasawa, D.; Rykoff, E. S.; Scolnic, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Maia, M. A. G.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; DES Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Meeting the science goals for many current and future ground-based optical large-area sky surveys requires that the calibrated broadband photometry is both stable in time and uniform over the sky to 1% precision or better. Past and current surveys have achieved photometric precision of 1%-2% by calibrating the survey’s stellar photometry with repeated measurements of a large number of stars observed in multiple epochs. The calibration techniques employed by these surveys only consider the relative frame-by-frame photometric zeropoint offset and the focal plane position-dependent illumination corrections, which are independent of the source color. However, variations in the wavelength dependence of the atmospheric transmission and the instrumental throughput induce source color-dependent systematic errors. These systematic errors must also be considered to achieve the most precise photometric measurements. In this paper, we examine such systematic chromatic errors (SCEs) using photometry from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) as an example. We first define a natural magnitude system for DES and calculate the systematic errors on stellar magnitudes when the atmospheric transmission and instrumental throughput deviate from the natural system. We conclude that the SCEs caused by the change of airmass in each exposure, the change of the precipitable water vapor and aerosol in the atmosphere over time, and the non-uniformity of instrumental throughput over the focal plane can be up to 2% in some bandpasses. We then compare the calculated SCEs with the observed DES data. For the test sample data, we correct these errors using measurements of the atmospheric transmission and instrumental throughput from auxiliary calibration systems. The residual after correction is less than 0.3%. Moreover, we calculate such SCEs for Type Ia supernovae and elliptical galaxies and find that the chromatic errors for non-stellar objects are redshift-dependent and can be larger than those for

  20. Tsunami Preparedness in Washington (video)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, Kurt; Gesell, Justine

    2010-01-01

    Tsunamis are a constant threat to the coasts of our world. Although tsunamis are infrequent along the West coast of the United States, it is possible and necessary to prepare for potential tsunami hazards to minimize loss of life and property. Community awareness programs are important, as they strive to create an informed society by providing education and training. This video about tsunami preparedness in Washington distinguishes between a local tsunami and a distant event and focus on the specific needs of this region. It offers guidelines for correct tsunami response and community preparedness from local emergency managers, first-responders, and leading experts on tsunami hazards and warnings, who have been working on ways of making the tsunami affected regions safer for the people and communities on a long-term basis. This video was produced by the US Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with Washington Emergency Management Division (EMD) and with funding by the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program.

  1. A Photometric redshift galaxy catalog from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Bau-Ching; /Taiwan, Natl. Central U. /Taipei, Inst. Astron. Astrophys.; Yee, H.K.C.; /Toronto U., Astron. Dept.; Lin, H.; /Fermilab; Gladders, M.D.; /Carnegie Inst.

    2005-02-01

    The Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS) provides a large and deep photometric catalog of galaxies in the z' and R{sub c} bands for 90 square degrees of sky, and supplemental V and B data have been obtained for 33.6 deg{sup 2}. They compile a photometric redshift catalog from these 4-band data by utilizing the empirical quadratic polynomial photometric redshift fitting technique in combination with CNOC2 and GOODS/HDF-N redshift data. The training set includes 4924 spectral redshifts. The resulting catalog contains more than one million galaxies with photometric redshifts < 1.5 and R{sub c} < 24, giving an rms scatter {delta}({Delta}z) < 0.06 within the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.5 and {sigma}({Delta}z) < 0.11 for galaxies at 0.0 < z < 1.5. They describe the empirical quadratic polynomial photometric redshift fitting technique which they use to determine the relation between red-shift and photometry. A kd-tree algorithm is used to divide up the sample to improve the accuracy of the catalog. They also present a method for estimating the photometric redshift error for individual galaxies. They show that the redshift distribution of the sample is in excellent agreement with smaller and much deeper photometric and spectroscopic redshift surveys.

  2. Galaxy structure searches by photometric redshifts in the CFHTLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, C.; Durret, F.; Benoist, C.; Coupon, J.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Ilbert, O.; Blaizot, J.; Arnouts, S.; Cappi, A.; Garilli, B.; Guennou, L.; Lebrun, V.; Lefèvre, O.; Maurogordato, S.; McCracken, H. J.; Mellier, Y.; Slezak, E.; Tresse, L.; Ulmer, M. P.

    2010-01-01

    Context. Counting clusters is one of the methods to constrain cosmological parameters, but has been limited up to now both by the redshift range and by the relatively small sizes of the homogeneously surveyed areas. Aims: In order to enlarge publicly available optical cluster catalogs, in particular at high redshift, we have performed a systematic search for clusters of galaxies in the Canada France Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS). Methods: We considered the deep 2, 3 and 4 CFHTLS Deep fields (each 1 × 1 deg2), as well as the wide 1, 3 and 4 CFHTLS Wide fields. We used the Le Phare photometric redshifts for the galaxies detected in these fields with magnitude limits of i'=25 and 23 for the Deep and Wide fields respectively. We then constructed galaxy density maps in photometric redshift bins of 0.1 based on an adaptive kernel technique and detected structures with SExtractor at various detection levels. In order to assess the validity of our cluster detection rates, we applied a similar procedure to galaxies in Millennium simulations. We measured the correlation function of our cluster candidates. We analyzed large scale properties and substructures, including filaments, by applying a minimal spanning tree algorithm both to our data and to the Millennium simulations. Results: We detected 1200 candidate clusters with various masses (minimal masses between 1.0 × 1013 and 5.5 × 1013 and mean masses between 1.3 × 1014 and 12.6 × 1014~M_⊙) in the CFHTLS Deep and Wide fields, thus notably increasing the number of known high redshift cluster candidates. We found a correlation function for these objects comparable to that obtained for high redshift cluster surveys. We also show that the CFHTLS deep survey is able to trace the large scale structure of the universe up to z ≥ 1. Our detections are fully consistent with those made in various CFHTLS analyses with other methods. We now need accurate mass determinations of these structures to constrain

  3. 1986 Nuclear Science Symposium, 33rd, and 1986 Symposium on Nuclear Power Systems, 18th, Washington, DC, Oct. 29-31, 1986, Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubblefield, F. W. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Papers are presented on space, low-energy physics, and general nuclear science instrumentations. Topics discussed include data acquisition systems and circuits, nuclear medicine imaging and tomography, and nuclear radiation detectors. Consideration is given to high-energy physics instrumentation, reactor systems and safeguards, health physics instrumentation, and nuclear power systems.

  4. Washington State Juvenile Justice Code: An Experiment in Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Univ., Champaign. Community Research Center.

    In the Washington State juvenile justice system, serious or repeat offenders receive the full panoply of due process rights and procedures, with the exception of jury trials; minor offenders are diverted to community boards that require community service or victim restitution; and status offenders are removed from the courts' jurisdiction and…

  5. Numerical simulation of the groundwater-flow system in tributary subbasins and vicinity, lower Skagit River basin, Skagit and Snohomish Counties, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth H.; Savoca, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    A groundwater-flow model was developed to evaluate the effects of potential groundwater withdrawals and consumptive use on streamflows in tributary subbasins of the lower portion of the Skagit River basin. The study area covers about 155 square miles along the Skagit River and its tributary subbasins (East Fork Nookachamps Creek, Nookachamps Creek, Carpenter Creek, Fisher Creek) in southwestern Skagit County and northwestern Snohomish County, Washington. The Skagit River occupies a large, relatively flat alluvial valley that extends across the northern and western margins of the study area, and is bounded to the south and east by upland and mountainous terrain. The alluvial valley and upland are underlain by unconsolidated deposits of glacial and inter- glacial origin. Bedrock underlies the alluvial valley and upland areas, and crops out throughout the mountainous terrain. Nine hydrogeologic units are recognized in the study area and form the basis of the groundwater-flow model. Groundwater flow in tributary subbasins of the lower Skagit River and vicinity was simulated using the groundwater-flow model, MODFLOW-2000. The finite-difference model grid consists of 174 rows, 156 columns, and 15 layers. Each model cell has a horizontal dimension of 500 by 500 feet. The thickness of model layers varies throughout the model area. Groundwater flow was simulated for both steady-state and transient conditions. The steady-state condition simulated average recharge, discharge, and water levels for the period, August 2006-September 2008. The transient simulation period, September 2006-September 2008, was divided into 24 monthly stress periods. Initial conditions for the transient model were developed from a 6-year ?lead-in? period that used recorded precipitation and Skagit River levels, and extrapolations of other boundary conditions. During model calibration, variables were adjusted within probable ranges to minimize differences between measured and simulated groundwater

  6. The Near-IR Photometric and Optical Spectroscopic Study of V582 Aurigae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seog Yoon, Tae; Oh, Hyung-Il

    2015-08-01

    We present the near-IR photometric and optical spectroscopic observational results of the FU Orionis object V582 Aurigae. The near-IR photometric observations with KASINICS and the high resolution optical spectroscopic observations with BOES attached to the 1.8-m reflector have been carried out from February 2013 to March 2015 at Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory in Korea. The periodic photometric variations of a night time scale and a year time scale in J, H, Ks bands and some typical spectroscopic features of FU Orionis objects are examined and discussed.

  7. Assessment of Systematic Chromatic Errors that Impact Sub-1% Photometric Precision in Large-Area Sky Surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, T. S. [et al.

    2016-05-27

    Meeting the science goals for many current and future ground-based optical large-area sky surveys requires that the calibrated broadband photometry is stable in time and uniform over the sky to 1% precision or better. Past surveys have achieved photometric precision of 1-2% by calibrating the survey's stellar photometry with repeated measurements of a large number of stars observed in multiple epochs. The calibration techniques employed by these surveys only consider the relative frame-by-frame photometric zeropoint offset and the focal plane position-dependent illumination corrections, which are independent of the source color. However, variations in the wavelength dependence of the atmospheric transmission and the instrumental throughput induce source color-dependent systematic errors. These systematic errors must also be considered to achieve the most precise photometric measurements. In this paper, we examine such systematic chromatic errors using photometry from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) as an example. We define a natural magnitude system for DES and calculate the systematic errors on stellar magnitudes, when the atmospheric transmission and instrumental throughput deviate from the natural system. We conclude that the systematic chromatic errors caused by the change of airmass in each exposure, the change of the precipitable water vapor and aerosol in the atmosphere over time, and the non-uniformity of instrumental throughput over the focal plane, can be up to 2% in some bandpasses. We compare the calculated systematic chromatic errors with the observed DES data. For the test sample data, we correct these errors using measurements of the atmospheric transmission and instrumental throughput. The residual after correction is less than 0.3%. We also find that the errors for non-stellar objects are redshift-dependent and can be larger than those for stars at certain redshifts.

  8. Photometric Asymmetry Between Clockwise and Counterclockwise Spiral Galaxies in SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamir, Lior

    2017-02-01

    While galaxies with clockwise and counterclockwise handedness are visually different, they are expected to be symmetric in all of their other characteristics. Previous experiments using both manual analysis and machine vision have shown that the handedness of Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies can be predicted with accuracy significantly higher than mere chance using its photometric data alone. However, some of these previous experiments were based on manually classified galaxies, and the results may therefore be subjected to bias originated from the human perception. This paper describes an experiment based on a set of 162,514 galaxies classified automatically to clockwise and counterclockwise spiral galaxies, showing that the source of the asymmetry in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database is not the human perception bias. The results are compared to two smaller datasets, and confirm the observation that the handedness of SDSS galaxies can be predicted by their photometry. The experiment also shows statistically significant differences in the measured magnitude of SDSS galaxies, according which galaxies with clockwise patterns are brighter than galaxies with counterclockwise patterns. The magnitude of that difference changes across RA ranges, and exhibits a strong correlation with the cosine of the right ascension.

  9. Photometric characteristics of paired E and S0 galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demin, V. V.

    1984-12-01

    The properties of type EE and ES double galaxies are studied, using Tomov's UBV photoelectric photometry. Paired early-type galaxies have different color/absolute-magnitude diagrams from those belonging to groups. Since the (U-V)t0 colors of paired E, S0 galaxies are wholly uncorrelated with their absolute magnitude M(v), pair members evolve differently from group and cluster members. The same conclusion is drawn from comparison of the integrated photometric properties of the E, S0 galaxies in EE and in ES pairs: their color dispersion is greater than for group and cluster members, while the Holmberg color match and the M(v) correlation between pair components depend on morphological type, dynamical and kinematic behavior, and whether interaction is present. Thus the evolution of paired galaxies is controlled less by their intrinsic properties than by external factors. Star-formation bursts may alternate in the two pair components, accompanying active mass-exchange processes, but the evolution of the pairs in the sample studied will not be significantly affected by dynamical friction.

  10. The SDSS Coadd: A Galaxy Photometric Redshift Catalog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Ribamar R.R.; /Fermilab /Rio de Janeiro Federal U.; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; /Fermilab /Inst. Geo. Astron., Havana /Sao Paulo U.; Annis, James; /Fermilab; Dodelson, Scott; /Fermilab /Chicago U. /Chicago U., KICP; Hao, Jiangang; /Fermilab; Johnston, David; /Fermilab; Kubo, Jeffrey; /Fermilab; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab; Seo, Hee-Jong; /UC, Berkeley; Simet, Melanie; /Chicago U.

    2011-11-01

    We present and describe a catalog of galaxy photometric redshifts (photo-z's) for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Coadd Data. We use the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) technique to calculate photo-z's and the Nearest Neighbor Error (NNE) method to estimate photo-z errors for {approx} 13 million objects classified as galaxies in the coadd with r < 24.5. The photo-z and photo-z error estimators are trained and validated on a sample of {approx} 89, 000 galaxies that have SDSS photometry and spectroscopic redshifts measured by the SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7), the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology Field Galaxy Survey (CNOC2), the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe Data Release 3(DEEP2 DR3), the SDSS-III's Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), the Visible imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph - Very Large Telescope Deep Survey (VVDS) and the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. For the best ANN methods we have tried, we find that 68% of the galaxies in the validation set have a photo-z error smaller than {sigma}{sub 68} = 0.036. After presenting our results and quality tests, we provide a short guide for users accessing the public data.

  11. Hibernating black holes revealed by photometric mass functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casares, Jorge

    2018-02-01

    We present a novel strategy to uncover the Galactic population of quiescent black holes (BHs). This is based on a new concept, the photometric mass function (PMF), which opens up the possibility of an efficient identification of dynamical BHs in large fields-of-view. This exploits the width of the disc H α emission line, combined with orbital period information. We here show that H α widths can be recovered using a combination of customized H α filters. By setting a width cut-off at 2200 km s-1 we are able to cleanly remove other Galactic populations of H α emitters, including ∼99.9 per cent of cataclysmic variables (CVs). Only short-period (Porb strategy of a deep (r = 22) Galactic plane survey based on the concept of PMFs: HAWKs, the HAlpha-Width Kilo-deg Survey. We estimate that ∼800 deg2 are required to unveil ∼50 new dynamical BHs, a three-fold improvement over the known population. For comparison, a century would be needed to produce an enlarged sample of 50 dynamical BHs from X-ray transients at the current discovery rate.

  12. Getting leverage on inflation with a large photometric redshift survey

    CERN Document Server

    Basse, Tobias; Hannestad, Steen; Wong, Yvonne Y Y

    2015-01-01

    We assess the potential of a future large-volume photometric redshift survey to constrain observational inflationary parameters using three large-scale structure observables: the angular shear and galaxy power spectra, and the cluster mass function measured through weak lensing. When used in combination with Planck-like CMB measurements, we find that the spectral index n_s can be constrained to a 1 sigma precision of up to 0.0025. The sensitivity to the running of the spectral index can potentially improve to 0.0017, roughly a factor of five better than the present 1 sigma~constraint from Planck and auxiliary CMB data, allowing us to test the assumptions of the slow-roll scenario with unprecedented accuracy. Interestingly, neither CMB+shear nor CMB+galaxy nor CMB+clusters alone can achieve this level of sensitivity; it is the combined power of all three probes that conspires to break the different parameter degeneracies inherent in each type of observations. We make our forecast software publicly available vi...

  13. Large-Scale Photometric Asymmetry in Galaxy Spin Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamir, Lior

    2017-09-01

    Spin patterns of spiral galaxies can be broadly separated into galaxies with clockwise (Z-wise) patterns and galaxies with counterclockwise (S-wise) spin patterns. While the differences between these patterns are visually noticeable, they are a matter of the perspective of the observer, and therefore in a sufficiently large universe no other differences are expected between galaxies with Z-wise and S-wise patterns. Here, large datasets of spiral galaxies separated by their spin patterns are used to show that spiral galaxies with Z-wise spin patterns are photometrically different from spiral galaxies with S-wise patterns. That asymmetry changes based on the direction of observation, such that the observed asymmetry in one hemisphere is aligned with the inverse observed asymmetry in the opposite hemisphere. The results are consistent across different sky surveys (SDSS and PanSTARRS) and analysis methods. The proximity of the most probable asymmetry axis to the galactic pole suggests that the asymmetry might be driven by relativistic beaming. Annotated data from SDSS and PanSTARRS are publicly available.

  14. Bifurcations in two-image photometric stereo for orthogonal illuminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozera, R.; Prokopenya, A.; Noakes, L.; Śluzek, A.

    2017-07-01

    This paper discusses the ambiguous shape recovery in two-image photometric stereo for a Lambertian surface. The current uniqueness analysis refers to linearly independent light-source directions p = (0, 0, -1) and q arbitrary. For this case necessary and sufficient condition determining ambiguous reconstruction is governed by a second-order linear partial differential equation with constant coefficients. In contrast, a general position of both non-colinear illumination directions p and q leads to a highly non-linear PDE which raises a number of technical difficulties. As recently shown, the latter can also be handled for another family of orthogonal illuminations parallel to the OXZ-plane. For the special case of p = (0, 0, -1) a potential ambiguity stems also from the possible bifurcations of sub-local solutions glued together along a curve defined by an algebraic equation in terms of the data. This paper discusses the occurrence of similar bifurcations for such configurations of orthogonal light-source directions. The discussion to follow is supplemented with examples based on continuous reflectance map model and generated synthetic images.

  15. The "Cool Algol" BD+05 706 : Photometric observations of a new eclipsing double-lined spectroscopic binary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschall, L. A.; Torres, G.; Neuhauser, R.

    1998-05-01

    BVRI Observations of the star BD+05 706, carried out between January, 1997, and April 1998 using the 0.4m reflector and Photometrics CCD camera at the Gettysburg College Observatory, show that the star is an eclipsing binary system with a light curve characteristic of a class of semi-detached binaries known as the "cool Algols". These results are in good agreement with the previous report of BD+05 706 as a cool Algol by Torres, Neuhauser, and Wichmann,(Astron. J., 115, May 1998) who based their classification on the strong X-ray emission detected by Rosat and on a series of spectroscopic observations of the radial velocities of both components of the system obtained at the Oak Ridge Observatory, the Fred L. Whipple Observatory, and the Multiple Mirror Telescope. Only 10 other examples of cool Algols are known, and the current photometric light curve, together with the radial velocity curves obtained previously, allows us to derive a complete solution for the physical parameters of each component, providing important constraints on models for these interesting systems.

  16. Standard Test Method for Solar Photometric Transmittance of Sheet Materials Using Sunlight

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1996-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of solar photometric transmittance of materials in sheet form. Solar photometric transmittance is measured using a photometer (illuminance meter) in an enclosure with the sun and sky as the source of radiation. The enclosure and method of test is specified in Test Method E 1175 (or Test Method E 1084). 1.2 The purpose of this test method is to specify a photometric sensor to be used with the procedure for measuring the solar photometric transmittance of sheet materials containing inhomogeneities in their optical properties. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  17. Nuclear Science Symposium, 25th, and Symposium on Nuclear Power Systems, 10th, Washington, D.C., October 18-20, 1978, Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Detectors of various types are discussed, taking into account drift chambers, calorimetry, multiwire proportional chambers, signal processing, the use of semiconductors, and photo/optical applications. Circuits are considered along with instrumentation for space, nuclear medicine instrumentation, data acquisition and systems, environmental instrumentation, reactor instrumentation, and nuclear power systems. Attention is given to a new approach to high accuracy gaseous detectors, the current status of electron mobility and free-ion yield in high mobility liquids, a digital drift chamber digitizer system, the stability of oxides in high purity germanium, the quadrant photomultiplier, and the theory of imaging with a very limited number of projections.

  18. Difference Image Analysis: Extension to a Spatially Varying Photometric Scale Factor and Other Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Bramich, D. M.; Horne, Keith; Albrow, M. D.; Tsapras, Y; Snodgrass, C.; Street, R. A.; Hundertmark, M; Kains, Noe; Ferro, A. Arellano; Jaimes, R. Figuera; Giridhar, Sunetra

    2012-01-01

    We present a general framework for matching the point-spread function (PSF), photometric scaling, and sky background between two images, a subject which is commonly referred to as difference image analysis (DIA). We introduce the new concept of a spatially varying photometric scale factor which will be important for DIA applied to wide-field imaging data in order to adapt to transparency and airmass variations across the field-of-view. Furthermore, we demonstrate how to separately control the...

  19. Height from photometric ratio with model-based light source selection

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, William Alfred Peter; Fang, Fufu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a photometric stereo algorithm for estimating surface height. We follow recent work that uses photometric ratios to obtain a linear formulation relating surface gradients and image intensity. Using smoothed finite difference approximations for the surface gradient, we are able to express surface height recovery as a linear least squares problem that is large but sparse. In order to make the method practically useful, we combine it with a model-based approach that exc...

  20. The FUor Candidate V582 Aurigae: First Photometric and Spectroscopic Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Semkov, Evgeni; Peneva, Stoyanka; Dennefeld, Michel

    2010-01-01

    One of the most attractive events in the pre-main sequence evolution is the FU Orionis (FUor) outburst. Because only a small number of FUor stars have been detected to date, photometric and spectral studies of every new object are of great interest. Recently, a new FUor candidate was discovered by Anton Khruslov - V582 Aur. To confirm the FUors nature of this object we started regular photometric observations with the telescopes of the National Astronomical Observatory Rozhen (Bulgaria). A hi...

  1. GPz: Non-stationary sparse Gaussian processes for heteroscedastic uncertainty estimation in photometric redshifts

    OpenAIRE

    Almosallam, Ibrahim A.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Roberts, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of cosmology experiments will be required to use photometric redshifts rather than spectroscopic redshifts. Obtaining accurate and well-characterized photometric redshift distributions is therefore critical for Euclid, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and the Square Kilometre Array. However, determining accurate variance predictions alongside single point estimates is crucial, as they can be used to optimize the sample of galaxies for the specific experiment (e.g. weak ...

  2. Metro de Washington EE.UU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weese, Harry

    1979-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the works involved in the first stage of the Washington Underground (Subway system which was begun in 1969 and scheduled for completion in 1983 and is the most modern metropolitan railway in North America. Lines have double track and will carry three million passengers daily. Different construction methods have been used throughout: tunnel formed try digging a trench then roofed and covered, excavated tunnel and elevated structures. Stations features answer to the strictest demands, provided with closed circuit television, air conditioning, noise dampening Systems, special access ways, fire protection Systems and automatic traffic control. Special attention is given to the two bridges over the Pentagon and over the Anacostia, pointing out their differences and the elevated structure at the National Airport.

    Se describen en este articulo los trabajos de la primera fase del Metro de Washington que, iniciado en el año 1969 será, a su terminación en el año 1983, el más moderno sistema de ferrocarril metropolitano de Norte América. Es de doble carril y servirá para tres millones de usuarios. Se han empleado distintos sistemas de obra en su realización: túnel artificial realizado mediante una zanja que después se cubre; túnel perforado, y estructuras aéreas. Las características de las estaciones responden a las mayores exigencias, pues tienen circuito cerrado de televisión, aire acondicionado, sistemas para atenuar el ruido, accesos especiales, sistema de protección contra el fuego y control automático del Metro. Se estudian de un modo particular: los dos puentes sobre el Pentágono y el Anacostia, señalando sus diferencias y la estructura aérea del Aeropuerto Nacional.

  3. Washington: a guide to geothermal energy development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloomquist, R.G.; Basescu, N.; Higbee, C.; Justus, D.; Simpson, S.

    1980-06-01

    Washington's geothermal potential is discussed. The following topics are covered: exploration, drilling, utilization, legal and institutional setting, and economic factors of direct use projects. (MHR)

  4. An Improved Technique for Increasing the Accuracy of Photometrically Determined Redshifts for ___Blended___ Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Ashley Marie; /Marietta Coll. /SLAC

    2012-08-24

    The redshift of a galaxy can be determined by one of two methods; photometric or spectroscopic. Photometric is a term for any redshift determination made using the magnitudes of light in different filters. Spectroscopic redshifts are determined by measuring the absorption spectra of the object then determining the difference in wavelength between the 'standard' absorption lines and the measured ones, making it the most accurate of the two methods. The data for this research was collected from SDSS DR8 and then separated into blended and non-blended galaxy sets; the definition of 'blended' is discussed in the Introduction section. The current SDSS photometric redshift determination method does not discriminate between blended and non-blended data when it determines the photometric redshift of a given galaxy. The focus of this research was to utilize machine learning techniques to determine if a considerably more accurate photometric redshift determination method could be found, for the case of the blended and non-blended data being treated separately. The results show a reduction of 0.00496 in the RMS error of photometric redshift determinations for blended galaxies and a more significant reduction of 0.00827 for non-blended galaxies, illustrated in Table 2.

  5. An automatic flow injection analysis procedure for photometric determination of ethanol in red wine without using a chromogenic reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Sivanildo S; Frizzarin, Rejane M; Reis, Boaventura F

    2006-05-01

    An automatic reagentless photometric procedure for the determination of ethanol in red wine is described. The procedure was based on a falling drop system that was implemented by employing a flow injection analysis manifold. The detection system comprised an infrared LED and a phototransistor. The experimental arrangement was designed to ensure that the wine drop grew between these devices, thus causing a decrease in the intensity of the radiation beam coming from the LED. Since ethanol content affected the size of the wine drop this feature was exploited to develop an analytical procedure for the photometric determination of ethanol in red wine without using a chromogenic reagent. In an attempt to prove the usefulness of the proposed procedure, a set of red wines were analysed. No significant difference between our results and those obtained with a reference method was observed at the 95% confidence level. Other advantages of our method were a linear response ranging from 0.17 up to 5.14 mol L(-1) (1.0 up to 30.0%) ethanol (R = 0.999); a limit of detection of 0.05 mol L(-1) (0.3%) ethanol; a relative standard deviation of 2.5% (n = 10) using typical wine sample containing 2.14 mol L(-1) (12.5%) ethanol; and a sampling rate of 50 determinations per hour.

  6. Selected geothermal resources data: hydrothermal convection systems in the states of Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renner, J.L.

    1976-02-01

    Data collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's research and land classification programs, from professional publications, and industry sources has been compiled in computer format. Location, surface manifestations, chemistry, physical properties, exploratory and development work, and references pertinent to 290 hydrothermal convection systems comprise the data base.

  7. A photometric study of the structure of pure disk galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockett, Timothy

    2014-05-01

    Pure disk galaxies are galaxies that form and evolve without a central bulge region. This morphology of galaxy is relatively unexplained and has yet to be successfully simulated using Lambda-Cold Dark Matter (ΛCDM) model parameters. The ΛCDM model is the standard framework from which astronomers and physicists understand and predict the Universe due to confirmed predictions such as the cosmic microwave background and the large scale structure of galaxy clusters. However, ΛCDM has yet to have a benchmark, observationally confirmed prediction on the galactic scale. This thesis is a study of eleven pure disk galaxies. Understanding this type of galaxy is very important in rectifying the incompatibility with the ΛCDM model. The method of analysis includes obtaining, cleaning and sky subtracting images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, deprojecting the images for a face on perspective, using g- and i-bands to construct color-index maps, using Fourier decompositions to create mode-dependent intensity ratio plots, surface density maps, mass-to-light ratio maps and surface brightness profiles, from which the radial scale length is derived. The future of this area of study is vital to understand a common feature of our Universe. Future studies can include looking for early supernova remnants or evidence of recent active galactic nuclei activity in young pure disk galaxies. Surveys and photometric analysis of edge-on pure disk galaxies may also reveal vital information to the origin and evolution of this class of galaxy.

  8. SIDRA: a blind algorithm for signal detection in photometric surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mislis, D.; Bachelet, E.; Alsubai, K. A.; Bramich, D. M.; Parley, N.

    2016-01-01

    We present the Signal Detection using Random-Forest Algorithm (SIDRA). SIDRA is a detection and classification algorithm based on the Machine Learning technique (Random Forest). The goal of this paper is to show the power of SIDRA for quick and accurate signal detection and classification. We first diagnose the power of the method with simulated light curves and try it on a subset of the Kepler space mission catalogue. We use five classes of simulated light curves (CONSTANT, TRANSIT, VARIABLE, MLENS and EB for constant light curves, transiting exoplanet, variable, microlensing events and eclipsing binaries, respectively) to analyse the power of the method. The algorithm uses four features in order to classify the light curves. The training sample contains 5000 light curves (1000 from each class) and 50 000 random light curves for testing. The total SIDRA success ratio is ≥90 per cent. Furthermore, the success ratio reaches 95-100 per cent for the CONSTANT, VARIABLE, EB and MLENS classes and 92 per cent for the TRANSIT class with a decision probability of 60 per cent. Because the TRANSIT class is the one which fails the most, we run a simultaneous fit using SIDRA and a Box Least Square (BLS)-based algorithm for searching for transiting exoplanets. As a result, our algorithm detects 7.5 per cent more planets than a classic BLS algorithm, with better results for lower signal-to-noise light curves. SIDRA succeeds to catch 98 per cent of the planet candidates in the Kepler sample and fails for 7 per cent of the false alarms subset. SIDRA promises to be useful for developing a detection algorithm and/or classifier for large photometric surveys such as TESS and PLATO exoplanet future space missions.

  9. Type II Supernova Spectral Diversity. II. Spectroscopic and Photometric Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Anderson, Joseph P.; Hamuy, Mario; González-Gaitan, Santiago; Galbany, Lluis; Dessart, Luc; Stritzinger, Maximilian D.; Phillips, Mark M.; Morrell, Nidia; Folatelli, Gastón

    2017-11-01

    We present an analysis of observed trends and correlations between a large range of spectral and photometric parameters of more than 100 type II supernovae (SNe II), during the photospheric phase. We define a common epoch for all SNe of 50 days post-explosion, where the majority of the sample is likely to be under similar physical conditions. Several correlation matrices are produced to search for interesting trends between more than 30 distinct light-curve and spectral properties that characterize the diversity of SNe II. Overall, SNe with higher expansion velocities are brighter, have more rapidly declining light curves, shorter plateau durations, and higher 56Ni masses. Using a larger sample than previous studies, we argue that “Pd”—the plateau duration from the transition of the initial to “plateau” decline rates to the end of the “plateau”—is a better indicator of the hydrogen envelope mass than the traditionally used optically thick phase duration (OPTd: explosion epoch to end of plateau). This argument is supported by the fact that Pd also correlates with s 3, the light-curve decline rate at late times: lower Pd values correlate with larger s 3 decline rates. Large s 3 decline rates are likely related to lower envelope masses, which enables gamma-ray escape. We also find a significant anticorrelation between Pd and s 2 (the plateau decline rate), confirming the long standing hypothesis that faster declining SNe II (SNe IIL) are the result of explosions with lower hydrogen envelope masses and therefore have shorter Pd values. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile; and the Gemini Observatory, Cerro Pachon, Chile (Gemini Program GS- 2008B-Q-56). Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (ESO Programs 076.A-0156, 078.D-0048, 080.A-0516, and 082.A-0526).

  10. GQ Lup Ab Visible & Near-Infrared Photometric Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marois, C; Macintosh, B; Barman, T

    2006-08-07

    We have re-analyzed archival HST R and I band images and Subaru CH{sub 4}, H, Ks and L{prime} data of the recently discovered planetary mass companion (PMC) GQ Lup Ab. With these we produce the first R and I band photometry of the companion and fit a radius and effective temperature using detailed model atmospheres. We find an effective temperature of 2338 {+-} 100K, and a radius of 0.37 {+-} 0.05R{sub {circle_dot}} and luminosity of log(L/L{sub {circle_dot}}) = -2.43 {+-} 0.07 (at 140pc). Since we fit wavelengths that span most of the emitted radiation from GQ Lup this luminosity estimate is robust, with uncertainty dominated by the distance uncertainty. The radius obtained for 140pc (0.37R{sub {circle_dot}}) is significantly larger than the one originally derived. The mass of the object is much more model-dependent than the radiative properties, but for the GAIA dusty models we find a mass between 9-20 M{sub Jup}, in the range of the brown dwarf and PMC deuterium burning boundary. Assuming a distance of 140pc, observations fit to 1{sigma} the Baraffe evolution model for a {approx} 15 M{sub Jup} brown dwarf. Additionally, the F606W photometric band is significantly overluminous compared to model predictions. Such overluminosity could be explained by a bright H{alpha} emission from chromospheric activity, interaction with another undetected companion, or accretion. Assuming that GQ Lup Ab has a bright H{alpha} emission line, its H{alpha} emission strength is 10{sup -1.71 {+-} 0.10} L{sub bol}, significantly larger than field late-type dwarfs. GQ Lup Ab might be strongly accreting and still be in its formation phase.

  11. A Photometric Method for Discovering Extremely Metal Poor Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Adam

    2015-01-01

    I present a new non-parametric machine-learning method for predicting stellar metallicity ([Fe/H]) based on photometric colors from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The method is trained using a large sample of ~150k stars with SDSS spectra and atmospheric parameter estimates (Teff, log g, and [Fe/H]) from the SEGUE Stellar Parameters Pipeline (SSPP). For bright stars (g 2, corresponding to the stars for which the SSPP estimates are most reliable, the method is capable of predicting [Fe/H] with a typical scatter of ~0.16 dex. This scatter is smaller than the typical uncertainty associated with [Fe/H] measurements from a low-resolution spectrum. The method is suitable for the discovery of extremely metal poor (EMP) stars ([Fe/H] 50%), but low efficiency (E ~ 10%), samples of EMP star candidates can be generated from the sources with the lowest predicted [Fe/H]. To improve the efficiency of EMP star discovery, an alternative machine-learning model is constructed where the number of non-EMP stars is down-sampled in the training set, and a new regression model is fit. This alternate model improves the efficiency of EMP candidate selection by a factor of ~2. To test the efficacy of the model, I have obtained low-resolution spectra of 56 candidate EMP stars. I measure [Fe/H] for these stars using the well calibrated Ca II K line method, and compare our spectroscopic measurements to those from the machine learning model. Once applied to wide-field surveys, such as SDSS, Pan-STARRS, and LSST, the model will identify thousands of previously unknown EMP stars.

  12. Photometric Search of Protoplanetary Disks in Young Stellar Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Carmen, Azucena; Perez-Rendon, B.; Contreras, M. E.

    2009-12-01

    Approximately half of the young stars with ages of about 1 million years are still embedded in its parent molecular cloud showing strong emission in the infrared region. This emission is believed to be produced in the dusty optically-thick disk surrounding the star. However, the optically-thick disk emission disappears at ages of about 30 Myr. The explanation for this is that dust grains agglomerate in larger bodies, forming planetesimals and ultimately planets, which sweep up much of the remaining gas and dust. To characterize the evolution of protoplanetary disk it is necessary to study samples of stars in the appropiate age range. However, the lack of suitable samples has been a problem to carry out such studies. In this work, one of our goals is to determine the age of various young clusters by means of UBVRI photometric observations. Once we have derived ages for the clusters in the sample, we will select the best stellar candidates whose age ranges between 3 and 10 million years. We present preliminary results of the UBVRI photometry for one of our young clusters in the sample, NGC 6823. Observations were taken at the 1.5 m at the San Pedro Martir Observatory, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico in 2009 March 27 to April 1. Data reduction was performed using IRAF standard procedures. We have obtained a color-magnitude diagram for NGC 6823 and we have compared it with the Girardi et al. (2000) isochrones in order to derive stellar ages. This work was supported by grants CONACYT 103914 and Programa de Colaboracion Academica y Cultural UNISON-UNAM U38P167.

  13. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS FOR QUASARS IN MULTI-BAND SURVEYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brescia, M.; Mercurio, A. [INAF-Astronomical Observatory of Capodimonte, via Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Cavuoti, S.; Longo, G. [Department of Physics, University Federico II, via Cinthia 6, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); D' Abrusco, R., E-mail: brescia@oacn.inaf.it [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    The Multi Layer Perceptron with Quasi Newton Algorithm (MLPQNA) is a machine learning method that can be used to cope with regression and classification problems on complex and massive data sets. In this paper, we give a formal description of the method and present the results of its application to the evaluation of photometric redshifts for quasars. The data set used for the experiment was obtained by merging four different surveys (Sloan Digital Sky Survey, GALEX, UKIDSS, and WISE), thus covering a wide range of wavelengths from the UV to the mid-infrared. The method is able (1) to achieve a very high accuracy, (2) to drastically reduce the number of outliers and catastrophic objects, and (3) to discriminate among parameters (or features) on the basis of their significance, so that the number of features used for training and analysis can be optimized in order to reduce both the computational demands and the effects of degeneracy. The best experiment, which makes use of a selected combination of parameters drawn from the four surveys, leads, in terms of {Delta}z{sub norm} (i.e., (z{sub spec} - z{sub phot})/(1 + z{sub spec})), to an average of {Delta}z{sub norm} = 0.004, a standard deviation of {sigma} = 0.069, and a median absolute deviation, MAD = 0.02, over the whole redshift range (i.e., z{sub spec} {<=} 3.6), defined by the four-survey cross-matched spectroscopic sample. The fraction of catastrophic outliers, i.e., of objects with photo-z deviating more than 2{sigma} from the spectroscopic value, is <3%, leading to {sigma} = 0.035 after their removal, over the same redshift range. The method is made available to the community through the DAMEWARE Web application.

  14. Water resources of King County, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Donald; Bingham, J.W.; Madison, R.J.; Williams, R.

    1968-01-01

    sediment are transported by most streams in the county, except during short periods of heavy rain in the winter. The temperature and chemical quality of surface waters are well suited to the requirements of fisheries and for municipal, industrial, and domestic supplies. Little treatment is needed for most uses of surface water, except where the water is subject to pollution. Most recoverable ground water in the county occurs in the Puget Sound Lowland, where great volumes of unconsolidated sedimentary deposits were left by the continental glaciers of the Pleistocene Epoch. Bedrock, most of which is in the Cascade Range, contains very little ground water. Numerous springs, largely undeveloped, occur in several parts of the county. Most of the ground water is of good to excellent quality except for excessive iron, which in some places may require treatment of the water before it is suitable for domestic or industrial use. Excluding water used for hydroelectric-power, recreation, and fisheries, more than 80 percent of the water used in the county is provided by municipal-supply systems. Each of the major river basins includes municipal watersheds that provide large supplies of excellent water. By the 1980's, more than 90 percent of the county's population will probably be served by the Seattle municipal supply. With full development, Seattle's water system would have a capacity sufficient to supply more than 2 million people with 300 gallons per person per day. Most industrial and commercial establishments in the county obtain water from public supply systems. The most .serious water problem in the county at present (1965) is the threat of pollution in the densely populated areas. The immediate threat in the Seattle area is being reduced by the sewage-treatment program of the Municipality of Metropolitan Seattle, which will eliminate the discharge of waste into Lake Washington. Expected increases in population and industry will introd

  15. Multi-color photometric investigation of the totally eclipsing binary NO Camelopardalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao; Qian, Shengbang; Zhang, Bin

    2017-04-01

    Multi-color photometric light curves of NO Camelopardalis in V, RC, and IC bands are obtained and analyzed simultaneously using the Wilson-Devinney program. The solutions suggest that NO Cam is an A-subtype overcontact binary with a mass ratio of q = 0.439 and a contact degree of f = 55.5%. The small temperature difference (ΔT = 44 K) between its two components indicates that the system is under thermal contact. The high orbital inclination (i = 84.5°) strengthens our confidence in the parameters determined from the light curves. All available times of minimum light are collected and period variations are analyzed for the first time. The O - C curve reveals that its period is increasing continuously at a rate of dP/dt = +1.46 × 10-9, which can be explained by mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one. After the upward parabolic variation is subtracted, the residuals suggest that there may be a cyclic variation with a period of 2.23 yr and an amplitude of A3 = 0.00153 d, which may due to the light-travel-time effect arising from the gravitational influence of a close-in tertiary component. The close-in companion reveals that early dynamic interaction among a triple system may have played a very important role in the formation of the W UMa-type binaries.

  16. 76 FR 366 - Public Water Supply Supervision Program; Program Revision for the State of Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... Program. Washington has adopted a definition for public water system that is analogous to EPA's definition... ``Indian country'' as defined by 18 U.S.C. 1151, nor does it intend to limit existing rights of the State...

  17. Corrections Education. Washington's Community and Technical Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The Washington State Department of Corrections contracts with community colleges to provide basic education and job training at each of the state's 12 adult prisons so upon release, individuals are more likely to get jobs and less likely to return. Washington State community colleges build a bridge for offenders to successfully re-enter…

  18. Aerospace Training. Washington's Community and Technical Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Aerospace is an economic powerhouse that generates jobs and fuels our economy. Washington's community and technical colleges produce the world-class employees needed to keep it that way. With about 1,250 aerospace-related firms employing more than 94,000 workers, Washington has the largest concentration of aerospace expertise in the nation. To…

  19. Financial Reporting at the Washington Headquarters Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-15

    FINANCIAL REPORTING AT THE WASHINGTON HEADQUARTERS SERVICES Report No. D-2001-081 March 15, 2001...to) ("DD MON YYYY") Title and Subtitle Financial Reporting at the Washington Headquarters Services Contract or Grant Number Program Element Number...underlying financial reporting processes that cause abnormal balances on the trial balances of Other Defense Organizations. An account balance is abnormal

  20. INDIAN HEAVEN ROADLESS AREA, WASHINGTON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, S.E.; Barnes, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of geologic, geochemical, and mining activity surveys the Indian Heaven Roadless Area, Washington offers little promise for the occurrence of metallic or nonmetallic mineral resources. Preliminary investigations of the geothermal potential of the area are inconclusive; however, a hot spring is located approximately 10 mi south of the roadless area, and the data indicate an aquifer of unknown extent at a temperature of less than 212 degree F. Geothermal lease applications were filed on about 23. 5 sq mi of the roadless area indicating potential interest in the development of a geothermal resource. In addition, about 39 sq mi of the roadless area have been leased for oil and gas exploration.

  1. Washington State biomass data book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

    1991-07-01

    This is the first edition of the Washington State Biomass Databook. It assess sources and approximate costs of biomass fuels, presents a view of current users, identifies potential users in the public and private sectors, and lists prices of competing energy resources. The summary describes key from data from the categories listed above. Part 1, Biomass Supply, presents data increasing levels of detail on agricultural residues, biogas, municipal solid waste, and wood waste. Part 2, Current Industrial and Commercial Use, demonstrates how biomass is successfully being used in existing facilities as an alternative fuel source. Part 3, Potential Demand, describes potential energy-intensive public and private sector facilities. Part 4, Prices of Competing Energy Resources, shows current suppliers of electricity and natural gas and compares utility company rates. 49 refs., 43 figs., 72 tabs.

  2. Magmatic-hydrothermal fluids and volatile metals in the Spirit Lake pluton and Margaret Cu-Mo porphyry system, SW Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iveson, Alexander A.; Webster, James D.; Rowe, Michael C.; Neill, Owen K.

    2016-03-01

    metasomatism by halogen-bearing exsolved fluid(s) is provided by the high Mg# (>70) secondary amphiboles and biotites from within the Spirit Lake pluton, where the amphiboles are clear replacement products of primary pyroxenes. Fluid halogen fugacity ratios calculated from the biotite compositions overlap with other global mineralised porphyry systems, despite not being immediately associated with sulphide ores. The evidence suggests complex fluid processes and the coincidental development of the mineralised porphyry system within the pluton. Heat, fluids, and metals were therefore likely supplied by a later phase of magmatism, unrelated to the consolidation of the main Spirit Lake granitoid. These new constraints on magmatic-hydrothermal fluid signatures have wider applicability to potentially tracing proximal barren and mineralised processes, and for distinguishing between formation mechanisms for primary and secondary halogen-bearing minerals.

  3. Versatile combustion-amalgamation technique for the photometric determination of mercury in fish and environmental samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willford, Wayne A.; Hesselberg, Robert J.; Bergman, Harold L.

    1973-01-01

    Total mercury in a variety of substances is determined rapidly and precisely by direct sample combustion, collection of released mercury by amalgamation, and photometric measurement of mercury volatilized from the heated amalgam. Up to 0.2 g fish tissue is heated in a stream of O2 (1.2 L/min) for 3.5 min in 1 tube of a 2-tube induction furnace. The released mercury vapor and combustion products are carried by the stream of O2 through a series of traps (6% NaOH scrubber, water condenser, and Mg(CIO4)2 drying tube) and the mercury is collected in a 10 mm diameter column of 24 gauge gold wire (8 g) cut into 3 mm lengths. The resulting amalgam is heated in the second tube of the induction furnace and the volatilized mercury is measured with a mercury vapor meter equipped with a recorder-integrator. Total analysis time is approximately 8 min/sample. The detection limit is less than 0.002 μg and the system is easily converted for use with other biological materials, water, and sediments.

  4. Ajisai spin-axis precession and rotation-period variations from photometric observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshkin, N.; Shakun, L.; Burlak, N.; Korobeynikova, E.; Strakhova, S.; Melikyants, S.; Terpan, S.; Ryabov, A.

    2017-10-01

    This paper investigates the evolution of the spin parameters of Japanese Geodetic Satellite Ajisai. The satellite is spherical and equipped with 318 solar reflecting mirrors on its outer surface, which enables to use photometry for our purpose. In the present study, we have improved the method of the determination of all spin parameters of the satellite by fast photometry discussed in our earlier papers. Using a tracking telescope at the Astronomical Observatory of Odessa National University and a dedicated high-speed recording system, 279 Ajisai light curves were obtained over seven years (2009-2015). The temporal resolution is 20 msec and time measurement error no greater than 0.1 μ sec. The analysis of a sequence of multiple specular glints enabled us to update the model of the arrangement and orientation of the mirrors and to apply this model to determine the inertial rotation period and spin-axis orientation for each pass of the satellite. The secular decrease and periodic variation in the spinning rate, as well as the spin-axis precession pattern known from the SLR-observations (Kucharski et al., 2010a, 2013) have been obtained independently. New spin-axis nutation-precession parameters obtained in this study adequately confirm the empirical model by Kucharski et al. (2016). The method for photometric determination of the Ajisai spin parameters discussed here has the same level of accuracy as the SLR method, and thus, it can be widely used by observatories not fitted out with sophisticated laser ranging equipment.

  5. Short report: evaluation of a simple and inexpensive photometric device for the measurement of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrmann, Steffen; Oyakhirome, Sunny; Esser, Gilbert; Trinkle, Cordula; Issifou, Saadou; Grobusch, Martin P; Krishna, Sanjeev; Kremsner, Peter G

    2004-11-01

    We have evaluated the accuracy of a simple and inexpensive photometric device (DHT) for the estimation of the blood concentration of hemoglobin by comparison with an automated, high-resolution, flow cytometry-based hematology analyzer (CellDyn 3000) and a centrifugal quantitative buffy coat hematology system (QBC I). We have analyzed the hemoglobin values of 163 individual blood samples. Bland-Altman analysis showed that the methods agreed only poorly: mean differences were 1.0 g/dL with limits of agreement (LOA) of -1.2 g/dL to 3.2 g/dL for the comparison of DHT and CellDyn measurements, 0.5 g/dL with LOA of -2.0 g/dL to 3.0 g/dL for the comparison of DHT with QBC measurements, and 0.5 g/dL with LOA of -1.1 g/dL to 2.1 g/dL for the comparison of QBC with CellDyn measurements. We conclude that the poor agreement of the DHT with the CellDyn does not permit the use of the DHT for critical hemoglobin measurements, particularly in transfusion services.

  6. DuOCam: A Two-Channel Camera for Simultaneous Photometric Observations of Stellar Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Erin R.; Witt, Emily; Depoy, Darren L.; Schmidt, Luke M.

    2017-01-01

    We have designed the Dual Observation Camera (DuOCam), which uses commercial, off-the-shelf optics to perform simultaneous photometric observations of astronomical objects at red and blue wavelengths. Collected light enters DuOCam’s optical assembly, where it is collimated by a negative doublet lens. It is then separated by a 45 degree blue dichroic filter (transmission bandpass: 530 - 800 nm, reflection bandpass: 400 - 475 nm). Finally, the separated light is focused by two identical positive doublet lenses onto two independent charge-coupled devices (CCDs), the SBIG ST-8300M and the SBIG STF-8300M. This optical assembly converts the observing telescope to an f/11 system, which balances maximum field of view with optimum focus. DuOCam was commissioned on the McDonald Observatory 0.9m, f/13.5 telescope from July 21st - 24th, 2016. Observations of three globular and three open stellar clusters were carried out. The resulting data were used to construct R vs. B-R color magnitude diagrams for a selection of the observed clusters. The diagrams display the characteristic evolutionary track for a stellar cluster, including the main sequence and main sequence turn-off.

  7. Spectroscopic failures in photometric redshift calibration: cosmological biases and survey requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Carlos E. [KIPAC, Menlo Park; Huterer, Dragan [Michigan U.; Lin, Huan [Fermilab; Busha, Michael T. [Zurich U.; Wechsler, Risa H. [SLAC

    2014-10-11

    We use N-body-spectro-photometric simulations to investigate the impact of incompleteness and incorrect redshifts in spectroscopic surveys to photometric redshift training and calibration and the resulting effects on cosmological parameter estimation from weak lensing shear-shear correlations. The photometry of the simulations is modeled after the upcoming Dark Energy Survey and the spectroscopy is based on a low/intermediate resolution spectrograph with wavelength coverage of 5500{\\AA} < {\\lambda} < 9500{\\AA}. The principal systematic errors that such a spectroscopic follow-up encounters are incompleteness (inability to obtain spectroscopic redshifts for certain galaxies) and wrong redshifts. Encouragingly, we find that a neural network-based approach can effectively describe the spectroscopic incompleteness in terms of the galaxies' colors, so that the spectroscopic selection can be applied to the photometric sample. Hence, we find that spectroscopic incompleteness yields no appreciable biases to cosmology, although the statistical constraints degrade somewhat because the photometric survey has to be culled to match the spectroscopic selection. Unfortunately, wrong redshifts have a more severe impact: the cosmological biases are intolerable if more than a percent of the spectroscopic redshifts are incorrect. Moreover, we find that incorrect redshifts can also substantially degrade the accuracy of training set based photo-z estimators. The main problem is the difficulty of obtaining redshifts, either spectroscopically or photometrically, for objects at z > 1.3. We discuss several approaches for reducing the cosmological biases, in particular finding that photo-z error estimators can reduce biases appreciably.

  8. A HUBBLE DIAGRAM FROM TYPE II SUPERNOVAE BASED SOLELY ON PHOTOMETRY: THE PHOTOMETRIC COLOR METHOD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Jaeger, T.; González-Gaitán, S.; Galbany, L.; Hamuy, M.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Kuncarayakti, H. [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Santiago (Chile); Anderson, J. P. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Casilla 19, Santiago (Chile); Phillips, M. M.; Campillay, A.; Castellón, S.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Morrell, N. [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Stritzinger, M. D.; Contreras, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Bolt, L. [Argelander Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, Auf dem Hgel 71, D-53111 Bonn (Germany); Burns, C. R. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Folatelli, G. [Instituto de Astrofísica de La Plata, CONICET, Paseo del Bosque S/N, B1900FWA, La Plata (Argentina); Freedman, W. L. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Krisciunas, K. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Krzeminski, W., E-mail: dthomas@das.uchile.cl [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warszawa (Poland); and others

    2015-12-20

    We present a Hubble diagram of SNe II using corrected magnitudes derived only from photometry, with no input of spectral information. We use a data set from the Carnegie Supernovae Project I for which optical and near-infrared light curves were obtained. The apparent magnitude is corrected by two observables, one corresponding to the slope of the plateau in the V band and the second a color term. We obtain a dispersion of 0.44 mag using a combination of the (V − i) color and the r band and we are able to reduce the dispersion to 0.39 mag using our golden sample. A comparison of our photometric color method (PCM) with the standardized candle method (SCM) is also performed. The dispersion obtained for the SCM (which uses both photometric and spectroscopic information) is 0.29 mag, which compares with 0.43 mag from the PCM for the same SN sample. The construction of a photometric Hubble diagram is of high importance in the coming era of large photometric wide-field surveys, which will increase the detection rate of supernovae by orders of magnitude. Such numbers will prohibit spectroscopic follow up in the vast majority of cases, and hence methods must be deployed which can proceed using solely photometric data.

  9. Light-emitting device test systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCord, Mark; Brodie, Alan; George, James; Guan, Yu; Nyffenegger, Ralph

    2018-01-23

    Light-emitting devices, such as LEDs, are tested using a photometric unit. The photometric unit, which may be an integrating sphere, can measure flux, color, or other properties of the devices. The photometric unit may have a single port or both an inlet and outlet. Light loss through the port, inlet, or outlet can be reduced or calibrated for. These testing systems can provide increased reliability, improved throughput, and/or improved measurement accuracy.

  10. 75 FR 13088 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-18

    ..., Washington Headquarters Services, 1155 Defense Pentagon, Washington DC 20301-1155. The proposed system report..., 2010 to the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, the Senate Committee on Governmental... LOCATION: Washington Headquarters Services, Defense Facilities Directorate, Federal Facilities Division...

  11. Automatized Photometric Monitoring of Active Galactic Nuclei with the 46cm Telescope of the Wise Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo Nuñez, Francisco; Chelouche, Doron; Kaspi, Shai; Niv, Saar

    2017-09-01

    We present the first results of an ongoing variability monitoring program of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using the 46 cm telescope of the Wise Observatory in Israel. The telescope has a field of view of 1.25^\\circ × 0.84^\\circ and is specially equipped with five narrowband filters at 4300, 5200, 5700, 6200, and 7000 Å to perform photometric reverberation mapping studies of the central engine of AGNs. The program aims to observe a sample of 27 AGNs (V time delay measurements obtained in previous works. We describe the autonomous operation of the telescope together with the fully automatic pipeline used to achieve high-performance unassisted observations, data reduction, and light curves extraction using different photometric methods. The science verification data presented here demonstrates the performance of the monitoring program in particular for efficiently photometric reverberation mapping of AGNs with additional capabilities to carry out complementary studies of other transient and variable phenomena such as variable stars studies.

  12. Photometric Lambert Correction for Global Mosaicking of HRSC Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Sebastian; Michael, Greg; van Gasselt, Stephan; Kneissl, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) is a push-broom image sensor onboard Mars Express recording the Martian surface in 3D and color. Being in orbit since 2004, the camera has obtained over 3,600 panchromatic image sequences covering about 70% of the planet's surface at 10-20 m/pixel. The composition of an homogenous global mosaic is a major challenge due to the strong elliptical and highly irregular orbit of the spacecraft, which often results in large variations of illumination and atmospheric conditions between individual images. For the purpose of a global mosaic in the full Nadir resolution of 12.5 m per pixel we present a first-order systematic photometric correction for the individual image sequences based on a Lambertian reflection model. During the radiometric calibration of the HRSC data, values for the reflectance scaling factor and the reflectance offset are added to the individual image labels. These parameters can be used for a linear transformation from the original DN values into spectral reflectance values. The spectral reflectance varies with the solar incidence angle, topography (changing the local incidence angle and therefore adding an exta geometry factor for each ground pixel), the bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of the surface, and atmospheric effects. Mosaicking the spectral values together as images sometimes shows large brightness differences. One major contributor to the brightness differences between two images is the differing solar geometry due to the varying time of day when the individual images were obtained. This variation causes two images of the same or adjacent areas to have different image brightnesses. As a first-order correction for the varying illumination conditions and resulting brightness variations, the images are corrected for the solar incidence angle by assuming an ideal diffusely reflecting behaviour of the surface. This correction requires the calculation of the solar geometry for each

  13. THE NEXT GENERATION VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY. XV. THE PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT ESTIMATION FOR BACKGROUND SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raichoor, A.; Mei, S.; Huertas-Company, M.; Licitra, R. [GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, Université Paris Diderot, 61 Avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Erben, T.; Hildebrandt, H. [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, University of Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Ilbert, O.; Boissier, S.; Boselli, A. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Ball, N. M.; Côté, P.; Ferrarese, L.; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Kavelaars, J. J. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Chen, Y.-T. [Insitute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Cuillandre, J.-C. [Canada-France-Hawaïi Telescope Corporation, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Duc, P. A. [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU/SAp, CNRS/INSU, Université Paris Diderot, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Durrell, P. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Guhathakurta, P. [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Lançon, A., E-mail: anand.raichoor@obspm.fr [Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); and others

    2014-12-20

    The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) is an optical imaging survey covering 104 deg{sup 2} centered on the Virgo cluster. Currently, the complete survey area has been observed in the u*giz bands and one third in the r band. We present the photometric redshift estimation for the NGVS background sources. After a dedicated data reduction, we perform accurate photometry, with special attention to precise color measurements through point-spread function homogenization. We then estimate the photometric redshifts with the Le Phare and BPZ codes. We add a new prior that extends to i {sub AB} = 12.5 mag. When using the u* griz bands, our photometric redshifts for 15.5 mag ≤ i ≲ 23 mag or z {sub phot} ≲ 1 galaxies have a bias |Δz| < 0.02, less than 5% outliers, a scatter σ{sub outl.rej.}, and an individual error on z {sub phot} that increases with magnitude (from 0.02 to 0.05 and from 0.03 to 0.10, respectively). When using the u*giz bands over the same magnitude and redshift range, the lack of the r band increases the uncertainties in the 0.3 ≲ z {sub phot} ≲ 0.8 range (–0.05 < Δz < –0.02, σ{sub outl.rej} ∼ 0.06, 10%-15% outliers, and z {sub phot.err.} ∼ 0.15). We also present a joint analysis of the photometric redshift accuracy as a function of redshift and magnitude. We assess the quality of our photometric redshifts by comparison to spectroscopic samples and by verifying that the angular auto- and cross-correlation function w(θ) of the entire NGVS photometric redshift sample across redshift bins is in agreement with the expectations.

  14. METAPHOR: a machine-learning-based method for the probability density estimation of photometric redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavuoti, S.; Amaro, V.; Brescia, M.; Vellucci, C.; Tortora, C.; Longo, G.

    2017-02-01

    A variety of fundamental astrophysical science topics require the determination of very accurate photometric redshifts (photo-z). A wide plethora of methods have been developed, based either on template models fitting or on empirical explorations of the photometric parameter space. Machine-learning-based techniques are not explicitly dependent on the physical priors and able to produce accurate photo-z estimations within the photometric ranges derived from the spectroscopic training set. These estimates, however, are not easy to characterize in terms of a photo-z probability density function (PDF), due to the fact that the analytical relation mapping the photometric parameters on to the redshift space is virtually unknown. We present METAPHOR (Machine-learning Estimation Tool for Accurate PHOtometric Redshifts), a method designed to provide a reliable PDF of the error distribution for empirical techniques. The method is implemented as a modular workflow, whose internal engine for photo-z estimation makes use of the MLPQNA neural network (Multi Layer Perceptron with Quasi Newton learning rule), with the possibility to easily replace the specific machine-learning model chosen to predict photo-z. We present a summary of results on SDSS-DR9 galaxy data, used also to perform a direct comparison with PDFs obtained by the LE PHARE spectral energy distribution template fitting. We show that METAPHOR is capable to estimate the precision and reliability of photometric redshifts obtained with three different self-adaptive techniques, i.e. MLPQNA, Random Forest and the standard K-Nearest Neighbors models.

  15. Photometric variability of 14 PMS stars in the NGC 7000/IC 5070 complex

    OpenAIRE

    Ibryamov, Sunay I.; Semkov, Evgeni H.

    2015-01-01

    New photometric data from CCD multicolour BVRI observations of 14 pre-main sequence stars during the period from 2013 April to 2015 September are presented. The studied objects are located in the field of 'Gulf of Mexico' in the NGC 7000/IC 5070 star-forming complex. The stars from our study exhibit different types of photometric variability in all optical passbands. Using our long-term observations and data published by other authors, we tried to define the reasons for the observed brightnes...

  16. A long-term photometric study of the FU Orionis star V 733 Cep

    OpenAIRE

    Peneva, S. P.; Semkov, E. H.; Munari, U.; Birkle, K.

    2010-01-01

    The FU Orionis candidate V733 Cep was discovered by Roger Persson in 2004. The star is located in the dark cloud L1216 close to the Cepheus OB3 association. Because only a small number of FU Orionis stars have been detected to date, photometric and spectral studies of V733 Cep are of great interest. The studies of the photometrical variability of PMS stars are very important to the understanding of stellar evolution. The main purpose of our study is to construct a long-time light curve of V73...

  17. Mental, social, and physical well-being in New Hampshire, Oregon, and Washington, 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System: implications for public health research and practice related to Healthy People 2020 foundation health measures on well-being

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Well-being is now accepted as one of four cross-cutting measures in gauging progress for Healthy People 2020. This shift to population indicators of well-being redresses notions of health that have focused on absence of illness (negative health) as a primary or sufficient indicator of positive functioning. The purpose of this study was to estimate mental, social, and physical well-being in three US states using new measures piloted on the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey System (BRFSS). Baseline estimates were provided for states overall, and within states for demographic subgroups, those with chronic health conditions or disabilities, and those with behavioral risk factors. Methods Ten validated questions designed to assess mental (e.g., satisfaction with life, satisfaction with life domains, happiness), physical (e.g., satisfaction with energy level), and social dimensions (e.g., frequency of social support) of well-being were selected with state input for inclusion on BRFSS. 18,622 individuals responded to the BRFSS surveys administered by New Hampshire (N = 3,139), Oregon (N = 2,289), and Washington (N = 13,194). Multivariate adjusted proportions of positive responses to well-being items were examined. Results After adjustment for confounders, about 67% of adults in these states had high levels of well-being, including >80% reporting experiencing happiness. Most adults were satisfied with their work, neighborhood, and education, but significant differences were seen in subgroups. Well-being differed by demographic characteristics such as marital status, health behaviors, chronic conditions, and disability status, with those who reported a disability and smokers consistently experiencing the worst well-being. Conclusions Well-being is accepted as one of four cross-cutting measures in gauging progress for Healthy People 2020. Well-being differs by important sociodemographic factors and health conditions (e.g., age, employment

  18. Southwestern Washington 36 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 36-second Southwest Washington Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 36-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  19. Willapa Bay, Washington Benthic Habitats 1995 Biotic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In June 1995, the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) acquired 295 true color aerial photographs (1:12,000) of Willapa Bay, Washington, from the State of...

  20. Willapa Bay, Washington Benthic Habitats 1995 Geoform

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In June 1995, the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) acquired 295 true color aerial photographs (1:12,000) of Willapa Bay, Washington, from the State of...

  1. Willapa Bay, Washington Benthic Habitats 1995 Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In June 1995, the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) acquired 295 true color aerial photographs (1:12,000) of Willapa Bay, Washington, from the State of...

  2. EAARL Topography George Washington Birthplace National Monument

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A bare earth elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model or DEM) of George Washington Birthplace National Monument was produced from remotely-sensed,...

  3. Willapa Bay, Washington Benthic Habitats 1995 Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In June 1995, the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) acquired 295 true color aerial photographs (1:12,000) of Willapa Bay, Washington, from the State of...

  4. Report : public transportation in Washington State, 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-01

    This report is an update of the Public Transportation in Washington State publication, dated December 1981. In order to reflect the changes that have occurred since that time, this report contains the most current data obtainable. Chapter One of this...

  5. Routine environmental audit of the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    This report documents the results of the routine environmental audit of the Hanford Site (Hanford), Richland, Washington. During this audit, the activities conducted by the audit team included reviews of internal documents an reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE), State of Washington regulatory, and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted May 2--13, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, State, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements.

  6. The First Results of the Photometric Observation of Selected Asteroids on KT-50 Telescope of Mobitel Complex of RI MAO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pomazan, A.V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The first results of the photometric observations of asteroids performed on the telescope KT-50 of Mobitel complex (SRI MAO during 2016 are presented in the paper. Asteroids were selected based on the infrared survey NEOWISE, moving objects catalog SDSS MOC-3 and MPC database. Selected asteroids have a relatively high albedo (pV>0.2 and are located in the Outer Main Belt (semi-major axis a>0.28a.u.. The observations were made using filter close to the Rc standard band of Cousins system. Standard deviations of the instrumental differential magnitude measurements were in the range of 0.01m-0.03m for a 10m-15.5m reference stars. The light curve based on the results of the differential aperture photometry was obtained from long series of observations of the asteroid (2144 Marietta.

  7. The Washington University Central Neuroimaging Data Archive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurney, Jenny; Olsen, Timothy; Flavin, John; Ramaratnam, Mohana; Archie, Kevin; Ransford, James; Herrick, Rick; Wallace, Lauren; Cline, Jeanette; Horton, Will; Marcus, Daniel S

    2017-01-01

    Since the early 2000's, much of the neuroimaging work at Washington University (WU) has been facilitated by the Central Neuroimaging Data Archive (CNDA), an XNAT-based imaging informatics system. The CNDA is uniquely related to XNAT, as it served as the original codebase for the XNAT open source platform. The CNDA hosts data acquired in over 1000 research studies, encompassing 36,000 subjects and more than 60,000 imaging sessions. Most imaging modalities used in modern human research are represented in the CNDA, including magnetic resonance (MR), positron emission tomography (PET), computed tomography (CT), nuclear medicine (NM), computed radiography (CR), digital radiography (DX), and ultrasound (US). However, the majority of the imaging data in the CNDA are MR and PET of the human brain. Currently, about 20% of the total imaging data in the CNDA is available by request to external researchers. CNDA's available data includes large sets of imaging sessions and in some cases clinical, psychometric, tissue, or genetic data acquired in the study of Alzheimer's disease, brain metabolism, cancer, HIV, sickle cell anemia, and Tourette syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Tests of Catastrophic Outlier Prediction in Empirical Photometric Redshift Estimation with Redshift Probability Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Evan; Singal, Jack

    2018-01-01

    We present results of using individual galaxies' redshift probability information derived from a photometric redshift (photo-z) algorithm, SPIDERz, to identify potential catastrophic outliers in photometric redshift determinations. By using test data comprised of COSMOS multi-band photometry and known spectroscopic redshifts from the 3D-HST survey spanning a wide redshift range (0method to flag potential catastrophic outliers in an analysis which relies on accurate photometric redshifts. SPIDERz is a custom support vector machine classification algorithm for photo-z analysis that naturally outputs a distribution of redshift probability information for each galaxy in addition to a discrete most probable photo-z value. By applying an analytic technique with flagging criteria to identify the presence of probability distribution features characteristic of catastrophic outlier photo-z estimates, such as multiple redshift probability peaks separated by substantial redshift distances, we can flag potential catastrophic outliers in photo-z determinations. We find that our proposed method can correctly flag large fractions of the outliers and catastrophic outlier galaxies, while only flagging a small fraction of the total non-outlier galaxies. We examine the performance of this strategy in photo-z determinations using a range of flagging parameter values. These results could potentially be useful for utilization of photometric redshifts in future large scale surveys where catastrophic outliers are particularly detrimental to the science goals.

  9. Multi-colour photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of the WN5 star EZ Canis Majoris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijsens, MFJ; vanderHucht, KA; vanGenderen, AM; Schwarz, HE; Linders, HPJ; Kolkman, OM

    1996-01-01

    We present and analyse photometric and spectroscopic observations of the WN5 star EZ Canis Majoris obtained over a period of 7 years. We discuss the changing light curve, the shift in phase of the maxima and point to flare type variability seen in one night. Small amplitude variations are reported

  10. Photometric Modelling of Close Binary Star CN And DMZ Jassur & A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Photometric Modelling of Close Binary Star CN And. D. M. Z. Jassur. 1,2,∗. & A. Khodadadi. 2. 1Faculty of Physics, Tabriz University, Tabriz, Iran. ∗ e-mail: Jassur@tabrizu.ac.ir. 2Center for Applied Physics and Astronomical Research, Khadjeh Nassir Addin Observatory,. Tabriz, Iran. Received 2004 April 15; accepted 2006 ...

  11. Photometric evaluation of YAG-induced polymethylmethacrylate damage in a keratoprosthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bath, P.E.; Fridge, D.L.; Robinson, K.; McCord, R.C.

    1985-05-01

    The use of the Nd:YAG laser in the photodiscission of retroprosthetic membranes represents a new clinical application. However, the potential adverse ophthalmic effects of YAG-induced PMMA damage to the keratoprosthesis are unknown. Consequently, precise photometric studies were conducted to evaluate image quality of the keratoprosthesis following YAG laser irradiation.

  12. Short report: evaluation of a simple and inexpensive photometric device for the measurement of hemoglobin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borrmann, Steffen; Oyakhirome, Sunny; Esser, Gilbert; Trinkle, Cordula; Issifou, Saadou; Grobusch, Martin P.; Krishna, Sanjeev; Kremsner, Peter G.

    2004-01-01

    We have evaluated the accuracy of a simple and inexpensive photometric device (DHT) for the estimation of the blood concentration of hemoglobin by comparison with an automated, high-resolution, flow cytometry-based hematology analyzer (CellDyn 3000) and a centrifugal quantitative buffy coat

  13. The Detection and Photometric Redshift Determination of Distant Galaxies using SIRTF's Infrared Array Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, C.; Eisenhardt, P.

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the ability of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility's Infrared Array Camera to detect distant (z3) galaxies and measure their photometric redshifts. Our analysis shows that changing the original long wavelength filter specifications provides significant improvements in performance in this and other areas.

  14. The detection and photometric redshift determination of distant galaxies using SIRTF's Infrared Array Camera

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Chris; Eisenhardt, Peter

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the ability of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility's Infrared Array Camera to detect distant (z ~ 3)galaxies and measure their photometric redshifts. Our analysis shows that changing the original long wavelength filter specifications provides significant improvements in performance in this and other areas.

  15. CALiPER Report 23: Photometric Testing of White Tunable LED Luminaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-01-01

    This report documents an initial investigation of photometric testing procedures for white-tunable LED luminaires and summarizes the key features of those products. Goals of the study include understanding the amount of testing required to characterize a white-tunable product, and documenting the performance of available color-tunable luminaires that are intended for architectural lighting.

  16. Photo-z-SQL: Integrated, flexible photometric redshift computation in a database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, R.; Dobos, L.; Budavári, T.; Szalay, A. S.; Csabai, I.

    2017-04-01

    We present a flexible template-based photometric redshift estimation framework, implemented in C#, that can be seamlessly integrated into a SQL database (or DB) server and executed on-demand in SQL. The DB integration eliminates the need to move large photometric datasets outside a database for redshift estimation, and utilizes the computational capabilities of DB hardware. The code is able to perform both maximum likelihood and Bayesian estimation, and can handle inputs of variable photometric filter sets and corresponding broad-band magnitudes. It is possible to take into account the full covariance matrix between filters, and filter zero points can be empirically calibrated using measurements with given redshifts. The list of spectral templates and the prior can be specified flexibly, and the expensive synthetic magnitude computations are done via lazy evaluation, coupled with a caching of results. Parallel execution is fully supported. For large upcoming photometric surveys such as the LSST, the ability to perform in-place photo-z calculation would be a significant advantage. Also, the efficient handling of variable filter sets is a necessity for heterogeneous databases, for example the Hubble Source Catalog, and for cross-match services such as SkyQuery. We illustrate the performance of our code on two reference photo-z estimation testing datasets, and provide an analysis of execution time and scalability with respect to different configurations. The code is available for download at https://github.com/beckrob/Photo-z-SQL.

  17. A> L1-TV algorithm for robust perspective photometric stereo with spatially-varying lightings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quéau, Yvain; Lauze, Francois Bernard; Durou, Jean-Denis

    2015-01-01

    We tackle the problem of perspective 3D-reconstruction of Lambertian surfaces through photometric stereo, in the presence of outliers to Lambert's law, depth discontinuities, and unknown spatially-varying lightings. To this purpose, we introduce a robust $L^1$-TV variational formulation of the re...

  18. The SOAR Gravitational Arc Survey – I. Survey overview and photometric catalogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furlanetto, Cristina; Santiago, Basílio X.; Makler, Martín; Cypriano, Eduardo S.; Caminha, Gabriel B.; Pereira, Maria E. S.; Neto, Angelo Fausti; Estrada, Juan; Lin, Huan; Hao, Jiangang; McKay, Timothy A.; da Costa, Luiz N.; Maia, Marcio A. G.

    2013-04-11

    We present the first results of the SOAR (Southern Astrophysical Research) Gravitational Arc Survey (SOGRAS). The survey imaged 47 clusters in two redshift intervals centered at $z=0.27$ and $z=0.55$, targeting the richest clusters in each interval. Images were obtained in the $g'$, $r'$ and $i'$ bands using the SOAR Optical Imager (SOI), with a median seeing of 0.83, 0.76 and 0.71 arcsec, respectively, in these filters. Most of the survey clusters are located within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 region and all of them are in the SDSS footprint. Photometric calibration was therefore performed using SDSS stars located in our SOI fields. We reached for galaxies in all fields the detection limits of $g \\sim 23.5$, $r \\sim 23$ and $i \\sim 22.5$ for a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) = 3. As a by-product of the image processing, we generated a source catalogue with 19760 entries, the vast majority of which are galaxies, where we list their positions, magnitudes and shape parameters. We compared our galaxy shape measurements to those of local galaxies and concluded that they were not strongly affected by seeing. From the catalogue data, we are able to identify a red sequence of galaxies in most clusters in the lower $z$ range. We found 16 gravitational arc candidates around 8 clusters in our sample. They tend to be bluer than the central galaxies in the lensing cluster. A preliminary analysis indicates that $\\sim 10%$ of the clusters have arcs around them, with a possible indication of a larger efficiency associated to the high-$z$ systems when compared to the low-$z$ ones. Deeper follow-up images with Gemini strengthen the case for the strong lensing nature of the candidates found in this survey.

  19. A method for the analysis of tabun in multisol using gas chromatographic flame photometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Thomas P; Allen, Edward D; Way, Mark R; Swift, Austin T; Soni, Sunil-Datta; Koplovitz, Irwin

    2006-01-01

    Preparation and analysis of tabun (GA) solutions are necessary for the continued development of countermeasures to this nerve agent. GA solutions must be stable and compatible for use in the test systems chosen for study; however, GA is very unstable in saline solutions. In the past we have found GA in saline at 2 mg/mL to be stable for a month or less at -70 degrees C, whereas saline solutions of sarin (GB), soman (GD), and cyclosarin (GF) were stable for many months. Previous studies have shown that Multisol (48.5% H(2)O, 40% propylene glycol, 10% ethanol, and 1.5% benzyl alcohol) provides stable solutions of GA. We confirmed the stability of GA in Multisol with phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance (P horizontal line NMR) and developed a method for the analysis of GA in Multisol using gas chromatographic flame photometric detection (GCFPD) in the phosphorus mode. The GC method used acetonitrile (CH(3)CN) for a dilution solvent because of its miscibility with GA in chloroform (CHCl(3)) standards and GA in Multisol samples at 1% (v/v). Furthermore, the dilutions with CH(3)CN made the phosphorus mode interference peak present in CHCl(3) analytically manageable, reduced the interferences of Multisol in the GC separation, and contributed to a safe and reliable analysis of GA at 20 mug/mL. We demonstrated the stability of GA in Multisol stored for more than a year at 70 degrees C. This method contributes a suitable technique for the preparation and analysis of reliable solutions of GA in nerve agent medical research and demonstrates the extended stability of GA in Multisol.

  20. Type Ibn Supernovae Show Photometric Homogeneity and Spectral Diversity at Maximum Light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Arcavi, Iair; McCully, Curtis; Howell, D. Andrew [Las Cumbres Observatory, 6740 Cortona Dr Ste 102, Goleta, CA 93117-5575 (United States); Valenti, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1 Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616-5270 (United States); Johansson, Joel [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Sollerman, Jesper; Fremling, Christoffer; Karamehmetoglu, Emir [Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, Albanova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Pastorello, Andrea; Benetti, Stefano; Elias-Rosa, Nancy [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Cao, Yi; Duggan, Gina; Horesh, Assaf [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cenko, S. Bradley [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Clubb, Kelsey I.; Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Corsi, Alessandra [Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Box 41051, Lubbock, TX 79409-1051 (United States); Fox, Ori D., E-mail: griffin@lco.global [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); and others

    2017-02-20

    Type Ibn supernovae (SNe) are a small yet intriguing class of explosions whose spectra are characterized by low-velocity helium emission lines with little to no evidence for hydrogen. The prevailing theory has been that these are the core-collapse explosions of very massive stars embedded in helium-rich circumstellar material (CSM). We report optical observations of six new SNe Ibn: PTF11rfh, PTF12ldy, iPTF14aki, iPTF15ul, SN 2015G, and iPTF15akq. This brings the sample size of such objects in the literature to 22. We also report new data, including a near-infrared spectrum, on the Type Ibn SN 2015U. In order to characterize the class as a whole, we analyze the photometric and spectroscopic properties of the full Type Ibn sample. We find that, despite the expectation that CSM interaction would generate a heterogeneous set of light curves, as seen in SNe IIn, most Type Ibn light curves are quite similar in shape, declining at rates around 0.1 mag day{sup −1} during the first month after maximum light, with a few significant exceptions. Early spectra of SNe Ibn come in at least two varieties, one that shows narrow P Cygni lines and another dominated by broader emission lines, both around maximum light, which may be an indication of differences in the state of the progenitor system at the time of explosion. Alternatively, the spectral diversity could arise from viewing-angle effects or merely from a lack of early spectroscopic coverage. Together, the relative light curve homogeneity and narrow spectral features suggest that the CSM consists of a spatially confined shell of helium surrounded by a less dense extended wind.

  1. Automated external defibrillators in Washington State high schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothmier, Justin D; Drezner, Jonathan A; Harmon, Kimberly G

    2007-05-01

    The placement of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in schools and public sporting venues is a growing national trend. To determine the prevalence and use of AEDs in Washington State high schools and to examine the existing emergency preparedness for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Cross-sectional survey. High schools in Washington State. The principal at each high school in the Washington Interscholastic Activities Association (n = 407) was invited to complete a web-based questionnaire using the National Registry for AED Use in Sports (http://www.AEDSPORTS.com). The primary outcome measures studied included AED prevalence and location, funding for AEDs, AED training of school personnel, coordination of AED placement with local emergency response agencies, and prior AED use. 118 schools completed the survey (29% response rate). 64 (54%) of the schools have at least one AED on school grounds (mean 1.6, range 1-4). The likelihood of AED placement increased with larger school size (p = 0.044). 60% of AEDs were funded by donations, 27% by the school district and 11% by the school or athletic department itself. Coaches (78%) were the most likely to receive AED training, followed by administrators (72%), school nurses (70%) and teachers (48%). Only 25% of schools coordinated the implementation of AEDs with an outside medical agency and only 6% of schools coordinated with the local emergency medical system. One school reported having used an AED previously to treat SCA in a basketball official who survived after a single shock. The estimated probability of AED use to treat SCA was 1 in 154 schools per year. Over half of Washington State high schools have an AED on school grounds. AED use occurred in schools annually and was effective in the treatment of SCA. Funding of AED programmes was mostly through private donations, with little coordination with local emergency response teams. Significant improvement is needed in structuring emergency response plans and training

  2. A Hubble Diagram from Type II Supernovae Based Solely on Photometry: The Photometric Color Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jaeger, T.; González-Gaitán, S.; Anderson, J. P.; Galbany, L.; Hamuy, M.; Phillips, M. M.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Bolt, L.; Burns, C. R.; Campillay, A.; Castellón, S.; Contreras, C.; Folatelli, G.; Freedman, W. L.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Krisciunas, K.; Krzeminski, W.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Morrell, N.; Olivares E., F.; Persson, S. E.; Suntzeff, N.

    2015-12-01

    We present a Hubble diagram of SNe II using corrected magnitudes derived only from photometry, with no input of spectral information. We use a data set from the Carnegie Supernovae Project I for which optical and near-infrared light curves were obtained. The apparent magnitude is corrected by two observables, one corresponding to the slope of the plateau in the V band and the second a color term. We obtain a dispersion of 0.44 mag using a combination of the (V - i) color and the r band and we are able to reduce the dispersion to 0.39 mag using our golden sample. A comparison of our photometric color method (PCM) with the standardized candle method (SCM) is also performed. The dispersion obtained for the SCM (which uses both photometric and spectroscopic information) is 0.29 mag, which compares with 0.43 mag from the PCM for the same SN sample. The construction of a photometric Hubble diagram is of high importance in the coming era of large photometric wide-field surveys, which will increase the detection rate of supernovae by orders of magnitude. Such numbers will prohibit spectroscopic follow up in the vast majority of cases, and hence methods must be deployed which can proceed using solely photometric data. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes, with the du Pont and Swope telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, and the Gemini Observatory, Cerro Pachon, Chile (Gemini Program GS-2008B-Q-56). Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (ESO Programmes 076.A-0156,078.D-0048, 080.A-0516, and 082.A-0526).

  3. Photometric properties of the nucleus of Comet 103P/Hartley 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Besse, Sébastien; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Belton, Michael J. S.; Bodewits, Dennis; Farnham, Tony L.; Klaasen, Kenneth P.; Lisse, Carey M.; Meech, Karen J.; Sunshine, Jessica M.; Thomas, Peter C.

    2013-02-01

    We have studied the photometric properties of the nucleus of a hyperactive comet, 103P/Hartley 2, at visible wavelengths using the DIXI flyby images with both disk-integrated and disk-resolved analyses. The disk-integrated phase function of the nucleus has a linear slope of 0.046 ± 0.002 mag/deg and an absolute magnitude of 18.4 ± 0.1 at V-band. The nucleus displays an overall linear, featureless spectrum between 400 nm and 850 nm. The linear spectral slope is 7.6 ± 3.6% per 100 nm, corresponding to broadband solar-illuminated color indices B-V of 0.75 ± 0.05 and V-R of 0.43 ± 0.04. Disk-resolved photometric analysis with a Hapke model returns a best-fit single-scattering albedo of 0.036 ± 0.006, an asymmetry factor of the Henyey-Greenstein single-particle phase function of -0.46 ± 0.06, and a photometric roughness of 15 ± 10°. The model yields a geometric albedo of 0.045 ± 0.009 and a Bond albedo of 0.012 ± 0.002. The overall photometric variations of the nucleus are small, with an equivalent albedo variation of 15% FWHM, and a color variation of 12% FWHM. Some areas near the terminator visible in the inbound images show an albedo of more than twice the global average value, and a much bluer color than the average nucleus. The overall photometric properties and variations of the nucleus of Hartley 2 are similar to those of the nuclei of Comets Wild 2 and Tempel 1 as studied from previous spacecraft flyby missions at similar resolutions.

  4. A Machine-learning Method to Infer Fundamental Stellar Parameters from Photometric Light Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A. A.; Bloom, J. S.; Richards, J. W.; Lee, Y. S.; Starr, D. L.; Butler, N. R.; Tokarz, S.; Smith, N.; Eisner, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental challenge for wide-field imaging surveys is obtaining follow-up spectroscopic observations: there are >109 photometrically cataloged sources, yet modern spectroscopic surveys are limited to ~few× 106 targets. As we approach the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope era, new algorithmic solutions are required to cope with the data deluge. Here we report the development of a machine-learning framework capable of inferring fundamental stellar parameters (T eff, log g, and [Fe/H]) using photometric-brightness variations and color alone. A training set is constructed from a systematic spectroscopic survey of variables with Hectospec/Multi-Mirror Telescope. In sum, the training set includes ~9000 spectra, for which stellar parameters are measured using the SEGUE Stellar Parameters Pipeline (SSPP). We employed the random forest algorithm to perform a non-parametric regression that predicts T eff, log g, and [Fe/H] from photometric time-domain observations. Our final optimized model produces a cross-validated rms error (RMSE) of 165 K, 0.39 dex, and 0.33 dex for T eff, log g, and [Fe/H], respectively. Examining the subset of sources for which the SSPP measurements are most reliable, the RMSE reduces to 125 K, 0.37 dex, and 0.27 dex, respectively, comparable to what is achievable via low-resolution spectroscopy. For variable stars this represents a ≈12%-20% improvement in RMSE relative to models trained with single-epoch photometric colors. As an application of our method, we estimate stellar parameters for ~54,000 known variables. We argue that this method may convert photometric time-domain surveys into pseudo-spectrographic engines, enabling the construction of extremely detailed maps of the Milky Way, its structure, and history.

  5. Characterization and photometric performance of the Hyper Suprime-Cam Software Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Song; Leauthaud, Alexie; Murata, Ryoma; Bosch, James; Price, Paul; Lupton, Robert; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Lackner, Claire; Bickerton, Steven; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Coupon, Jean; Tanaka, Masayuki

    2018-01-01

    The Subaru Strategic Program (SSP) is an ambitious multi-band survey using the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) on the Subaru telescope. The Wide layer of the SSP is both wide and deep, reaching a detection limit of i ˜ 26.0 mag. At these depths, it is challenging to achieve accurate, unbiased, and consistent photometry across all five bands. The HSC data are reduced using a pipeline that builds on the prototype pipeline for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. We have developed a Python-based, flexible framework to inject synthetic galaxies into real HSC images, called SynPipe. Here we explain the design and implementation of SynPipe and generate a sample of synthetic galaxies to examine the photometric performance of the HSC pipeline. For stars, we achieve 1% photometric precision at i ˜ 19.0 mag and 6% precision at i ˜ 25.0 in the i band (corresponding to statistical scatters of ˜0.01 and ˜0.06 mag respectively). For synthetic galaxies with single-Sérsic profiles, forced CModel photometry achieves 13% photometric precision at i ˜ 20.0 mag and 18% precision at i ˜ 25.0 in the i band (corresponding to statistical scatters of ˜0.15 and ˜0.22 mag respectively). We show that both forced point spread function and CModel photometry yield unbiased color estimates that are robust to seeing conditions. We identify several caveats that apply to the version of HSC pipeline used for the first public HSC data release (DR1) that need to be taking into consideration. First, the degree to which an object is blended with other objects impacts the overall photometric performance. This is especially true for point sources. Highly blended objects tend to have larger photometric uncertainties, systematically underestimated fluxes, and slightly biased colors. Secondly, >20% of stars at 22.5 21.5 mag.

  6. Characterization and photometric performance of the Hyper Suprime-Cam Software Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Song; Leauthaud, Alexie; Murata, Ryoma; Bosch, James; Price, Paul; Lupton, Robert; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Lackner, Claire; Bickerton, Steven; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Coupon, Jean; Tanaka, Masayuki

    2017-12-01

    The Subaru Strategic Program (SSP) is an ambitious multi-band survey using the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) on the Subaru telescope. The Wide layer of the SSP is both wide and deep, reaching a detection limit of i ˜ 26.0 mag. At these depths, it is challenging to achieve accurate, unbiased, and consistent photometry across all five bands. The HSC data are reduced using a pipeline that builds on the prototype pipeline for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. We have developed a Python-based, flexible framework to inject synthetic galaxies into real HSC images, called SynPipe. Here we explain the design and implementation of SynPipe and generate a sample of synthetic galaxies to examine the photometric performance of the HSC pipeline. For stars, we achieve 1% photometric precision at i ˜ 19.0 mag and 6% precision at i ˜ 25.0 in the i band (corresponding to statistical scatters of ˜0.01 and ˜0.06 mag respectively). For synthetic galaxies with single-Sérsic profiles, forced CModel photometry achieves 13% photometric precision at i ˜ 20.0 mag and 18% precision at i ˜ 25.0 in the i band (corresponding to statistical scatters of ˜0.15 and ˜0.22 mag respectively). We show that both forced point spread function and CModel photometry yield unbiased color estimates that are robust to seeing conditions. We identify several caveats that apply to the version of HSC pipeline used for the first public HSC data release (DR1) that need to be taking into consideration. First, the degree to which an object is blended with other objects impacts the overall photometric performance. This is especially true for point sources. Highly blended objects tend to have larger photometric uncertainties, systematically underestimated fluxes, and slightly biased colors. Secondly, >20% of stars at 22.5 21.5 mag.

  7. The MUSE Hubble Ultra Deep Field Survey. III. Testing photometric redshifts to 30th magnitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinchmann, J.; Inami, H.; Bacon, R.; Contini, T.; Maseda, M.; Chevallard, J.; Bouché, N.; Boogaard, L.; Carollo, M.; Charlot, S.; Kollatschny, W.; Marino, R. A.; Pello, R.; Richard, J.; Schaye, J.; Verhamme, A.; Wisotzki, L.

    2017-11-01

    We tested the performance of photometric redshifts for galaxies in the Hubble Ultra Deep field down to 30th magnitude. We compared photometric redshift estimates from three spectral fitting codes from the literature (EAZY, BPZ and BEAGLE) to high quality redshifts for 1227 galaxies from the MUSE integral field spectrograph. All these codes can return photometric redshifts with bias |(zMUSE-pz) / (1 + zMUSE)| 3 they are systematically biased high by up to (zMUSE-pz) / (1 + zMUSE) = 0.05, an offset that can in part be explained by adjusting the amount of intergalactic absorption applied. In agreement with previous studies we find little difference in the performance of the different codes, but in contrast to those we find that adding extensive ground-based and IRAC photometry actually can worsen photo-z performance for faint galaxies. We find an outlier fraction, defined through |(zMUSE-pz) / (1 + zMUSE)| > 0.15, of 8% for BPZ and 10% for EAZY and BEAGLE, and show explicitly that this is a strong function of magnitude. While this outlier fraction is high relative to numbers presented in the literature for brighter galaxies, they are very comparable to literature results when the depth of the data is taken into account. Finally, we demonstrate that while a redshift might be of high confidence, the association of a spectrum to the photometric object can be very uncertain and lead to a contamination of a few percent in spectroscopic training samples that do not show up as catastrophic outliers, a problem that must be tackled in order to have sufficiently accurate photometric redshifts for future cosmological surveys.

  8. Photometric Properties of Network and Faculae Derived from HMI Data Compensated for Scattered Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criscuoli, Serena; Norton, Aimee; Whitney, Taylor

    2017-10-01

    We report on the photometric properties of faculae and network, as observed in full-disk, scattered-light-corrected images from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager. We use a Lucy-Richardson deconvolution routine that corrects an image in less than one second. Faculae are distinguished from network through proximity to active regions. This is the first report that full-disk observations, including center-to-limb variations, reproduce the photometric properties of faculae and network observed previously only in sub-arcsecond-resolution; small field-of-view studies, I.e. that network, as defined by distance from active regions, exhibit higher photometric contrasts. Specifically, for magnetic flux values larger than approximately 300 G, the network is brighter than faculae and the contrast differences increase toward the limb, where the network contrast is about twice the facular one. For lower magnetic flux values, network appear darker than faculae. Contrary to reports from previous full-disk observations, we also found that network exhibits a higher center-to-limb variation. Our results are in agreement with reports from simulations that indicate magnetic flux alone is a poor proxy of the photometric properties of magnetic features. We estimate that the contribution of faculae and network to Total Solar Irradiance variability of the current Cycle 24 is overestimated by at least 11%, due to the photometric properties of network and faculae not being recognized as different. This estimate is specific to the method employed in this study to reconstruct irradiance variations, so caution should be paid when extending it to other techniques.

  9. Quantifying the Role of Groundwater for Drought Mitigation in Washington State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, A.; Barik, M. G.

    2016-12-01

    The 2015 drought in Washington State had a severe impact on the more than 300 crops grown in the state, including an initial estimated loss of $86.52 million on the iconic Washington apple industry alone [Washington State Department of Agriculture, Interim Report: 2015 Drought and Agriculture, 2015]. The full agricultural impact of the 2015 Washington drought has yet to be assessed. Groundwater plays an important role in drought mitigation in Washington's agricultural industry, just as it does in California's Central Valley. However, a key difference is Washington's requirement for permit applications to use emergency drought wells; a process that occurs only after an official drought declaration. The 2001, 2005, and 2015 droughts saw significant differences in the number of emergency drought permit applications that were reported back to the state, though the severity of drought in each year did not differ to the same extreme. Understanding the drivers to using groundwater during drought will help to better manage future groundwater use in the face of more frequent and severe droughts. The goal of this study is to identify the drivers and impacts to using groundwater for drought mitigation in Washington State, by both characterizing the differences in the 2001, 2005, and 2015 droughts and estimating groundwater use in the Columbia River Basin in Washington. Preliminary results show a mismatch between groundwater use estimated from permit applications compared to modeled groundwater demand for irrigation from the coupled hydrologic and cropping systems model, VIC-CropSyst. We explore drivers of this discrepancy and its relation to drought with observation wells, reported emergency well permits, models, and remote sensing. Ultimately, this work lays the foundation to assess the economic value of groundwater to mitigate crop losses in agricultural regions, especially into the future with changing regulatory structures and climate change.

  10. 3D-HST WFC3-SELECTED PHOTOMETRIC CATALOGS IN THE FIVE CANDELS/3D-HST FIELDS: PHOTOMETRY, PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, AND STELLAR MASSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skelton, Rosalind E. [South African Astronomical Observatory, PO Box 9, Observatory, Cape Town 7935 (South Africa); Whitaker, Katherine E. [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Bezanson, Rachel; Leja, Joel; Nelson, Erica J.; Oesch, Pascal [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, 260 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Brammer, Gabriel B. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Labbé, Ivo; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Leiden (Netherlands); Van der Wel, Arjen; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Maseda, Michael V. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA), Königstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Förster Schreiber, Natascha [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kriek, Mariska [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lundgren, Britt F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Magee, Daniel [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Marchesini, Danilo, E-mail: ros@saao.ac.za [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); and others

    2014-10-01

    The 3D-HST and CANDELS programs have provided WFC3 and ACS spectroscopy and photometry over ≈900 arcmin{sup 2} in five fields: AEGIS, COSMOS, GOODS-North, GOODS-South, and the UKIDSS UDS field. All these fields have a wealth of publicly available imaging data sets in addition to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data, which makes it possible to construct the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of objects over a wide wavelength range. In this paper we describe a photometric analysis of the CANDELS and 3D-HST HST imaging and the ancillary imaging data at wavelengths 0.3-8 μm. Objects were selected in the WFC3 near-IR bands, and their SEDs were determined by carefully taking the effects of the point-spread function in each observation into account. A total of 147 distinct imaging data sets were used in the analysis. The photometry is made available in the form of six catalogs: one for each field, as well as a master catalog containing all objects in the entire survey. We also provide derived data products: photometric redshifts, determined with the EAZY code, and stellar population parameters determined with the FAST code. We make all the imaging data that were used in the analysis available, including our reductions of the WFC3 imaging in all five fields. 3D-HST is a spectroscopic survey with the WFC3 and ACS grisms, and the photometric catalogs presented here constitute a necessary first step in the analysis of these grism data. All the data presented in this paper are available through the 3D-HST Web site (http://3dhst.research.yale.edu)

  11. Photometric study of the semidetached eclipsing binary UW Bootis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoori, Davood

    2015-05-01

    In this research the wide band (400-700 nm) along with BV light curves (LCs) analysis and spot modeling of the UW Boo system, were carried out using the PHOEBE (v 0.31a) program. Then absolute dimensions of the system were determined. In addition, times of minima data ("O-C curve") were analyzed. Apart from an almost parabolic variation in the general trend of O-C data, indicative of a secular decrease in the orbital period with rate -0.007 sec/yr, which was attributed to mass and angular momentum loss from the system, a sinusoidal variation with a period of 23±2 yr, modulating the orbital period, was found and attributed either to a third body circling around the system, or to a magnetic activity cycle operating in the system. The evolutionary status of the system was determined, using the results of LCs analysis. This shows that the primary is a typical Main Sequence (MS) star while the secondary is a bit evolved subgiant. It is notable that this is the first comprehensive study of the system.

  12. Modeling landslide recurrence in Seattle, Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salciarini, Diana; Godt, Jonathan W.; Savage, William Z.; Baum, Rex L.; Conversini, Pietro

    2008-01-01

    To manage the hazard associated with shallow landslides, decision makers need an understanding of where and when landslides may occur. A variety of approaches have been used to estimate the hazard from shallow, rainfall-triggered landslides, such as empirical rainfall threshold methods or probabilistic methods based on historical records. The wide availability of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and digital topographic data has led to the development of analytic methods for landslide hazard estimation that couple steady-state hydrological models with slope stability calculations. Because these methods typically neglect the transient effects of infiltration on slope stability, results cannot be linked with historical or forecasted rainfall sequences. Estimates of the frequency of conditions likely to cause landslides are critical for quantitative risk and hazard assessments. We present results to demonstrate how a transient infiltration model coupled with an infinite slope stability calculation may be used to assess shallow landslide frequency in the City of Seattle, Washington, USA. A module called CRF (Critical RainFall) for estimating deterministic rainfall thresholds has been integrated in the TRIGRS (Transient Rainfall Infiltration and Grid-based Slope-Stability) model that combines a transient, one-dimensional analytic solution for pore-pressure response to rainfall infiltration with an infinite slope stability calculation. Input data for the extended model include topographic slope, colluvial thickness, initial water-table depth, material properties, and rainfall durations. This approach is combined with a statistical treatment of rainfall using a GEV (General Extreme Value) probabilistic distribution to produce maps showing the shallow landslide recurrence induced, on a spatially distributed basis, as a function of rainfall duration and hillslope characteristics.

  13. Photometric techniques, performance and PSF characterization of GeMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turri, Paolo; McConnachie, Alan W.; Stetson, Peter B.; Andersen, David R.; Véran, Jean-Pierre; Fiorentino, Giuliana; Massari, Davide

    2016-01-01

    GeMS is the multi-conjugate adaptive optics instrument at the Gemini South telescope in Chile, the first facility-class MCAO system and the first to use laser guide stars. During its science verification period we have observed the Galactic globular cluster NGC 1851 and here we discuss the

  14. Photometric redshifts for Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program Data Release 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masayuki; Coupon, Jean; Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Mineo, Sogo; Nishizawa, Atsushi J.; Speagle, Joshua; Furusawa, Hisanori; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2018-01-01

    Photometric redshifts are a key component of many science objectives in the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP). In this paper, we describe and compare the codes used to compute photometric redshifts for HSC-SSP, how we calibrate them, and the typical accuracy we achieve with the HSC five-band photometry (grizy). We introduce a new point estimator based on an improved loss function and demonstrate that it works better than other commonly used estimators. We find that our photo-z's are most accurate at 0.2 ≲ zphot ≲ 1.5, where we can straddle the 4000 Å break. We achieve σ[Δzphot/(1 + zphot)] ˜ 0.05 and an outlier rate of about 15% for galaxies down to i = 25 within this redshift range. If we limit ourselves to a brighter sample of i https://hsc-release.mtk.nao.ac.jp/".

  15. Extracting cosmological information from the angular power spectrum of the 2MASS Photometric Redshift catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaguera-Antolínez, A.; Bilicki, M.; Branchini, E.; Postiglione, A.

    2018-02-01

    Using the almost all-sky 2MASS Photometric Redshift catalogue (2MPZ) we perform for the first time a tomographic analysis of galaxy angular clustering in the local Universe (z cosmological parameters, having fixed the others at their Planck values, namely the baryon fraction fb=0.14^{+0.09}_{-0.06}, the total matter density parameter Ωm = 0.30 ± 0.06, and the effective linear bias of 2MPZ galaxies beff, which grows from 1.1^{+0.3}_{-0.4} at ⟨z⟩ = 0.05 up to 2.1^{+0.3}_{-0.5} at ⟨z⟩ = 0.2, largely because of the flux-limited nature of the dataset. The results obtained here for the local Universe agree with those derived with the same methodology at higher redshifts, and confirm the importance of the tomographic technique for next-generation photometric surveys such as Euclid or LSST.

  16. Specularity and shadow detection for the multisource photometric reconstruction of a textured surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringier, Benjamin; Bony, Alexandre; Khoudeir, Majdi

    2012-01-01

    Textured surface analysis is essential for many applications. In this paper, we present a three-dimensional (3D) recovery approach for real textured surfaces based on photometric stereo. The aim is to be able to reconstruct the textured surfaces in 3D with a high degree of accuracy. For this, the proposed method uses a sequence of six images and a Lambertian bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) to recover the surface height map. A hierarchical selection of these images is employed to eliminate the effects of shadows and highlights for all surface facets. To evaluate the performances of our method, we compare it to other traditional photometric stereo methods on real textured surfaces using six or more images.

  17. Photometric redshift estimation based on data mining with PhotoRApToR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavuoti, S.; Brescia, M.; De Stefano, V.; Longo, G.

    2015-03-01

    Photometric redshifts (photo-z) are crucial to the scientific exploitation of modern panchromatic digital surveys. In this paper we present PhotoRApToR (Photometric Research Application To Redshift): a Java/C ++ based desktop application capable to solve non-linear regression and multi-variate classification problems, in particular specialized for photo-z estimation. It embeds a machine learning algorithm, namely a multi-layer neural network trained by the Quasi Newton learning rule, and special tools dedicated to pre- and post-processing data. PhotoRApToR has been successfully tested on several scientific cases. The application is available for free download from the DAME Program web site.

  18. Determination of stress concentration coefficients upon cyclic loading by photometric analysis of structure images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minina, N. A.; Emishkin, V. A.; Ovchinnikov, I. N.

    2017-01-01

    The development of an experimental method for the determination of stress concentration coefficient by the photometric analysis of surface reflectivity of material near stress concentrator and at a distance from it is considered in the paper. The experiments were performed with the AD-19 aluminum alloy samples under fatigue test conditions realized at a vibrating table with cantilevered sample. Notches 5 mm long and 0.4 mm wide spaced at constant intervals were applied by electrical discharge along one edge of the samples. The reflections of light from the fragments in the vicinity of the stress concentrator and from the opposite edge of the sample were compared with the help of photometric image analyzer. It is shown that such analysis can be used to determine the stress concentration coefficients.

  19. Drivers' use of marijuana in Washington state : traffic tech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    In July 2014, Washington State allowed legal sales of : recreational marijuana. Working with the Washington : Traffic Safety Commission, NHTSA assisted the State in : conducting a roadside study to examine the prevalence : of marijuana use before and...

  20. An assessment of interstate safety investment properties in Washington state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) commissioned the current study, targeting the entire interstate : mainline network in Washington State, to provide strategic direction to multi-biennial investment interstate locations that of...

  1. Trends and determinants of cycling in the Washington, DC region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    This report analyzes cycling trends, policies, and commuting in the Washington, DC area. The analysis is divided into two parts. : Part 1 focuses on cycling trends and policies in Washington (DC), Alexandria (VA), Arlington County (VA), Fairfax Count...

  2. A L1-TV Algorithm for Robust Perspective Photometric Stereo with Spatially-Varying Lightings

    OpenAIRE

    Quéau, Yvain; Lauze, François; Durou, Jean-Denis

    2015-01-01

    We tackle the problem of perspective 3D-reconstruction of Lambertian surfaces through photometric stereo, in the presence of outliers to Lambert’s law, depth discontinuities, and unknown spatially-varying lightings. To this purpose, we introduce a robust L1-TV variational formulation of the recovery problem where the shape itself is the main unknown, which naturally enforces integrability and permits to avoid integrating the normal field.

  3. Population mixtures and searches of lensed and extended quasars across photometric surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Peter; Agnello, Adriano; Treu, Tommaso

    2017-04-01

    Wide-field photometric surveys enable searches of rare yet interesting objects, such as strongly lensed quasars or quasars with a bright host galaxy. Past searches for lensed quasars based on their optical and near-infrared properties have relied on photometric cuts and spectroscopic preselection (as in the Sloan Quasar Lens Search), or neural networks applied to photometric samples. These methods rely on cuts in morphology and colours, with the risk of losing many interesting objects due to scatter in their population properties, restrictive training sets, systematic uncertainties in catalogue-based magnitudes and survey-to-survey photometric variations. Here, we explore the performance of a Gaussian mixture model to separate point-like quasars, quasars with an extended host and strongly lensed quasars using griz psf and model magnitudes and WISE W1, W2. The choice of optical magnitudes is due to their presence in all current and upcoming releases of wide-field surveys, whereas UV information is not always available. We then assess the contamination from blue galaxies and the role of additional features such as W3 magnitudes or psf-model terms as morphological information. As a demonstration, we conduct a search in a random 10 per cent of the SDSS footprint, and provide the catalogue of the 43 SDSS object with the highest 'lens' score in our selection that survive visual inspection, and are spectroscopically confirmed to host active nuclei. We inspect archival data and find images of 5/43 objects in the Hubble Legacy Archive, including two known lenses. The code and materials are available to facilitate follow-up.

  4. Study of organosulfurous compounds of oils by chromatographic method with help of flame-photometric detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yershov, V.A.; Nosova, V.S.; Shakirova, A.Kh.; Zhil' tsov, N.I.

    1979-01-01

    The possibility is indicated of determining in the gasoline fractions of oils of organosulfuric compounds by the method of gas-liquid chromatography with flame-photometric detector without their preliminary isolation. It was found that the organosulfuric compounds in gasoline fractions of the studied oils of West Siberia are missing and appear in petroleum products in the boiling point interval of 230-250/sup 0/C.

  5. Method for analysis of heavy sulphur compounds using gas chromatography with flame photometric detection

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, N.; Pinho, P. Guedes de; Vasconcelos, I

    2004-01-01

    A method for analysis of heavy sulphur compounds in wines, based on gas chromatography (GC) with flame photometric detection, is reported. Wine samples preparation includes a dichloromethane liquid–liquid extraction followed by concentration under a nitrogen atmosphere. The extracted fraction was also analysed by GC–mass spectrometry. The method enables high recovery of sulphur compounds in wine and satisfies the requirements of repeatability and sensitivity. Applications of the meth...

  6. GPZ: non-stationary sparse Gaussian processes for heteroscedastic uncertainty estimation in photometric redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almosallam, Ibrahim A.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Roberts, Stephen J.

    2016-10-01

    The next generation of cosmology experiments will be required to use photometric redshifts rather than spectroscopic redshifts. Obtaining accurate and well-characterized photometric redshift distributions is therefore critical for Euclid, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and the Square Kilometre Array. However, determining accurate variance predictions alongside single point estimates is crucial, as they can be used to optimize the sample of galaxies for the specific experiment (e.g. weak lensing, baryon acoustic oscillations, supernovae), trading off between completeness and reliability in the galaxy sample. The various sources of uncertainty in measurements of the photometry and redshifts put a lower bound on the accuracy that any model can hope to achieve. The intrinsic uncertainty associated with estimates is often non-uniform and input-dependent, commonly known in statistics as heteroscedastic noise. However, existing approaches are susceptible to outliers and do not take into account variance induced by non-uniform data density and in most cases require manual tuning of many parameters. In this paper, we present a Bayesian machine learning approach that jointly optimizes the model with respect to both the predictive mean and variance we refer to as Gaussian processes for photometric redshifts (GPZ). The predictive variance of the model takes into account both the variance due to data density and photometric noise. Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR12 data, we show that our approach substantially outperforms other machine learning methods for photo-z estimation and their associated variance, such as TPZ and ANNZ2. We provide a MATLAB and PYTHON implementations that are available to download at https://github.com/OxfordML/GPz.

  7. Spectroscopic Needs for Imaging Dark Energy Experiments: Photometric Redshift Training and Calibration

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, Jeffrey A.; Abate, Alexandra; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Allam, Sahar; Allen, Steven W.; Ansari, Réza; Bailey, Stephen; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Beers, Timothy C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Brodwin, Mark; Brownstein, Joel R.; Brunner, Robert J.; Carrasco Kind, Matias; Jorge L. Cervantes-Cota

    2013-01-01

    Large sets of objects with spectroscopic redshift measurements will be needed for imaging dark energy experiments to achieve their full potential, serving two goals:_training_, i.e., the use of objects with known redshift to develop and optimize photometric redshift algorithms; and_calibration_, i.e., the characterization of moments of redshift (or photo-z error) distributions. Better training makes cosmological constraints from a given experiment stronger, while highly-accurate calibration i...

  8. Timber resource statistics for eastern Washington, 1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil McKay; Patricia M. Bassett; Colin D. MacLean

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes a 1990-91 timber resource inventory of Washington east of the crest of the Cascade Range. The inventory was conducted on all private and public lands except National Forests. Timber resource statistics from National Forest inventories also are presented. Detailed tables provide estimates of forest area, timber volume, growth, mortality, and...

  9. Timber resource statistics for western Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffin D. MacLean; Patricia M. Bassett; Glenn. Yeary

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes a 1988-90 timber resource inventory of 19 counties in western Washington: Clallam, Clark, Cowlitz, Grays Harbor, Island, Jefferson, King, Kitsap, Lewis, Mason, Pacific, Pierce, San Juan, Skagit, Skamania, Snohomish, Thurston, Wahkiakum, and Whatcom. Detailed tables of forest area, timber volume, growth, mortality, and harvest are presented.

  10. South Africa's Subimperial Futures: Washington Consensus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa's Subimperial Futures: Washington Consensus, Bandung Consensus, or Peoples' Consensus? WG Martin. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/asr.v12i1.43533 · AJOL African Journals ...

  11. Recidivism of Supermax Prisoners in Washington State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, David; Johnson, L. Clark; Cain, Kevin C.

    2007-01-01

    This study of recidivism among Washington supermax prisoners used a retrospective matched control design, matching supermax prisoners one-to-one with nonsupermax prisoners on mental illness status and up to eight recidivism predictors. Supermax prisoners committed new felonies at a higher rate than nonsupermax controls, but the difference was not…

  12. 40 CFR 81.348 - Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Washington. 81.348 Section 81.348 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... along a meander line following the middle of the Lake and Roesiger Creek to Woods Creek; thence...

  13. Doctors of Osteopathy Licensed in Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senters, Jo

    Based on information gathered by the Health Manpower Project through a survey cosponsored with the Washington Osteopathic Medical Association, this report begins with a statement of philosophy of osteopathic medicine and proceeds to comment on where such professional education is available. Remarks on the type of educational background of the…

  14. Human Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense Infection in Washington State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billman, Zachary P.; Wallis, Carolyn K.; Abbott, April N.; Olson, John C.; Dhanireddy, Shireesha; Murphy, Sean C.

    2015-01-01

    A patient in Washington State harbored a fish tapeworm most likely acquired from eating raw salmon. Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense was identified by cox1 sequence analysis. Although this is the first documented human D. nihonkaiense infection in the United States, the parasite may have been present earlier but misidentified as Diphyllobothrium latum. PMID:25609724

  15. Laptop Circulation at Eastern Washington University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Doris; Malia, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    In 2001, Eastern Washington University's Libraries began a laptop circulation program with seventeen laptops. Today, there are 150 laptops in the circulation pool, as well as seventeen digital cameras, eleven digital handycams, and thirteen digital projectors. This article explains how the program has grown to its present size, the growing pains…

  16. Washington (Wash) C. Winn: In Memoriam

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-08

    Dr. Mike Miller and Dr. David Walker dicuss the career and life of noted clinical biologist, Dr. Washington C. Winn Jr.  Created: 3/8/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/12/2012.

  17. Photometric calibration of the COMBO-17 survey with the Softassign Procrustes Matching method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhbahaee, Z.; Nakajima, R.; Erben, T.; Schneider, P.; Hildebrandt, H.; Becker, A. C.

    2017-11-01

    Accurate photometric calibration of optical data is crucial for photometric redshift estimation. We present the Softassign Procrustes Matching (SPM) method to improve the colour calibration upon the commonly used Stellar Locus Regression (SLR) method for the COMBO-17 survey. Our colour calibration approach can be categorised as a point-set matching method, which is frequently used in medical imaging and pattern recognition. We attain a photometric redshift precision Δz/(1 + zs) of better than 2 per cent. Our method is based on aligning the stellar locus of the uncalibrated stars to that of a spectroscopic sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey standard stars. We achieve our goal by finding a correspondence matrix between the two point-sets and applying the matrix to estimate the appropriate translations in multidimensional colour space. The SPM method is able to find the translation between two point-sets, despite the existence of noise and incompleteness of the common structures in the sets, as long as there is a distinct structure in at least one of the colour-colour pairs. We demonstrate the precision of our colour calibration method with a mock catalogue. The SPM colour calibration code is publicly available at https://neuronphysics@bitbucket.org/neuronphysics/spm.git.

  18. GASDRA: Galaxy Spectrum Dynamic Range Analysis for Photometric Redshift Filter Partition Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente, J. de; Sanchez, E.; Sevilla, I.; Castilla, J.; Ponce, R.; Sanchez, F. J.

    2012-04-11

    The photometric redshift is an active area of research. It is becoming the preferred method for redshift measurement above spectroscopy one for large surveys. In these surveys, the requirement in redshift precision is relaxed in benefit of obtaining the measurements of large number of galaxies. One of the more relevant decisions to be taken in the design of a photometric redshift experiment is the number of filters since it affects deeply to the precision and survey time. Currently, there is not a clear method for evaluating the impact in both precision and exposure time of a determined filter partition set and usually it is determined by detailed simulations on the behavior of photo-z algorithms. In this note we describe GASDRA, a new method for extracting the minimal signal to noise requirement, depending on the number of filters needed for preserving the filtered spectrum shape, and hence to make feasible the spectrum identification. The application of this requirement guaranties a determined precision in the spectrum measurement. Although it cannot be translated directly to absolute photometric redshift error, it does provide a method for comparing the relative precision achieved in the spectrum representation by different sets of filters. We foresee that this relative precision is close related to photo-z error. In addition, we can evaluate the impact in the exposure time of any filter partition set with respect to other. (Author) 11 refs.

  19. Photometric redshifts for the next generation of deep radio continuum surveys - I. Template fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Kenneth J.; Brown, Michael J. I.; Williams, Wendy L.; Best, Philip N.; Buat, Veronique; Burgarella, Denis; Jarvis, Matt J.; Małek, Katarzyna; Oliver, S. J.; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; Smith, Daniel J. B.

    2018-01-01

    We present a study of photometric redshift performance for galaxies and active galactic nuclei detected in deep radio continuum surveys. Using two multiwavelength data sets, over the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey Boötes and COSMOS fields, we assess photometric redshift (photo-z) performance for a sample of ∼4500 radio continuum sources with spectroscopic redshifts relative to those of ∼63 000 non-radio-detected sources in the same fields. We investigate the performance of three photometric redshift template sets as a function of redshift, radio luminosity and infrared/X-ray properties. We find that no single template library is able to provide the best performance across all subsets of the radio-detected population, with variation in the optimum template set both between subsets and between fields. Through a hierarchical Bayesian combination of the photo-z estimates from all three template sets, we are able to produce a consensus photo-z estimate that equals or improves upon the performance of any individual template set.

  20. [Analysis of different health status based on characteristics of the facial spectrum photometric color].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiatuo; Wu, Hongjin; Lu, Luming; Tu, Liping; Zhang, Zhifeng; Chen, Xiao

    2012-12-01

    This paper is aimed to observe the difference of facial color of people with different health status by spectral photometric color measuring technique according to the theory of facial color diagnosis in Internal Classic. We gathered the facial color information about the health status of persons in healthy group (183), sub-healthy group (287) and disease group (370) respectively. The information included L, a, b, C values and reflection of different wavelengths in 400-700nm with CM-2600D spectral photometric color measuring instrument on 8 points. The results indicated that overall complexion color values of the people in the three groups were significantly different. The persons in the disease group looked deep dark in features. The people in the sub-healthy group looked pale in features. The loci L, a, b, C values were with varying degrees of significant differences (P color information at the same point of the people in the three groups, we obtained each group's diagnostic special point. There existed diagnostic values in distinguishing disease status and various status of health in some degree by spectral photometric color measuring technique. The present method provides a prosperous quantitative basis for Chinese medical inspection of the complexion diagnosis.

  1. MAPPING THE GALAXY COLOR–REDSHIFT RELATION: OPTIMAL PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT CALIBRATION STRATEGIES FOR COSMOLOGY SURVEYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masters, Daniel; Steinhardt, Charles; Faisst, Andreas [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Capak, Peter [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stern, Daniel; Rhodes, Jason [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Ilbert, Olivier [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire dAstrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France); Salvato, Mara [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schmidt, Samuel [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Longo, Giuseppe [Department of Physics, University Federico II, via Cinthia 6, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Paltani, Stephane; Coupon, Jean [Department of Astronomy, University of Geneva ch. dcogia 16, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Mobasher, Bahram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Hoekstra, Henk [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA, Leiden (Netherlands); Hildebrandt, Hendrik [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, Auf dem H’´ugel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Speagle, Josh [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, 60 Garden Street, MS 46, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kalinich, Adam [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Brodwin, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Brescia, Massimo; Cavuoti, Stefano [Astronomical Observatory of Capodimonte—INAF, via Moiariello 16, I-80131, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-11-01

    Calibrating the photometric redshifts of ≳10{sup 9} galaxies for upcoming weak lensing cosmology experiments is a major challenge for the astrophysics community. The path to obtaining the required spectroscopic redshifts for training and calibration is daunting, given the anticipated depths of the surveys and the difficulty in obtaining secure redshifts for some faint galaxy populations. Here we present an analysis of the problem based on the self-organizing map, a method of mapping the distribution of data in a high-dimensional space and projecting it onto a lower-dimensional representation. We apply this method to existing photometric data from the COSMOS survey selected to approximate the anticipated Euclid weak lensing sample, enabling us to robustly map the empirical distribution of galaxies in the multidimensional color space defined by the expected Euclid filters. Mapping this multicolor distribution lets us determine where—in galaxy color space—redshifts from current spectroscopic surveys exist and where they are systematically missing. Crucially, the method lets us determine whether a spectroscopic training sample is representative of the full photometric space occupied by the galaxies in a survey. We explore optimal sampling techniques and estimate the additional spectroscopy needed to map out the color–redshift relation, finding that sampling the galaxy distribution in color space in a systematic way can efficiently meet the calibration requirements. While the analysis presented here focuses on the Euclid survey, similar analysis can be applied to other surveys facing the same calibration challenge, such as DES, LSST, and WFIRST.

  2. Finding Galaxy Groups in Photometric-Redshift Space: The Probability Friends-of-Friends Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, I. H.; Yee, H. K. C.

    2008-03-01

    We present a structure-finding algorithm designed to identify galaxy groups in photometric-redshift data sets: the probability friends-of-friends (pFoF) algorithm. This algorithm is derived by combining the FoF algorithm in the transverse direction and the photometric-redshift probability densities in the radial dimension. The innovative characteristic of our group-finding algorithm is the improvement of redshift estimation via the constraints given by the transversely connected galaxies in a group, based on the assumption that all galaxies in a group have the same redshift. Tests using the Virgo Consortium Millennium Simulation mock catalogs allow us to show that the recovery rate of the pFoF algorithm is larger than 80% for mock groups of at least 2 × 1013 Msun, while the false detection rate is about 10% for pFoF groups containing around at least eight net members. Applying the algorithm to the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology Survey group catalogs gives results which are consistent with the mock catalog tests. From all these results, we conclude that our group-finding algorithm offers an effective yet simple way to identify galaxy groups in photometric-redshift catalogs.

  3. Photometric correction for VIRTIS-M data of comet 67P/CG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarniello, Mauro; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Filacchione, Gianrico; Erard, Stéphan; Leyrat, Cedric; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Raponi, Andrea; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Tosi, Federico; Capria, Maria Teresa; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Palomba, Ernesto; Longobardo, Andrea; Drossart, Pierre; Quirico, Eric; Beck, Pierre; Schmitt, Bernard

    2015-04-01

    VIRTIS, the Visible Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer onboard the Rosetta orbiter [1], has acquired so far millions of spectra of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko [2]. The instrument is composed of two subsystems: a high-resolution channel (VIRTIS-H) which is a punctual spectrometer (2.0-5-0 µm) and the mapper (VIRTIS-M) able to produce hyper-spectral images of the target (0.25-5.1 µm). The huge amount of data produced by VIRTIS has been acquired under different observation and illumination conditions. This induces photometric effects on the measured signal that need to be quantified and removed, in order to characterize the intrinsic spectral variability of the surface. To achieve this task we computed a photometric correction from VIRTIS-M data (Ciarniello et al, 2015), starting from August 2014, when the nucleus was largely resolved (MTP006-MT007 observation sequences) by means of a simplified Hapke model [3]. The global surface single particle phase function (SPPF) and the single scattering albedo (SSA) are determined as well as the effect of sub-pixel roughness is discussed. Comparisons with photometric properties of other comets are shown. This work is supported by the Italian Space Agency (ASI. We acknowledge funding from French and German space agency. References 1- Coradini et al, SSR, 2007 2- Capaccioni et al., Science, in Press, 2015 3- Hapke, Theory of reflectance and emittance spectroscopy. Cambridge University Press, 2012

  4. A joint analysis for cosmology and photometric redshift calibration using cross-correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Michael; Balan, Sreekumar T.; Abdalla, Filipe B.

    2017-04-01

    We present a method of calibrating the properties of photometric redshift bins as part of a larger nested sampling analysis for the inference of cosmological parameters. The redshift bins are characterized by their mean and variance, which are varied as free parameters and marginalized over when obtaining the cosmological parameters. We demonstrate that the likelihood function for cross-correlations in an angular power spectrum framework tightly constrains the properties of bins such that they may be well determined, reducing their influence on cosmological parameters and avoiding the bias from poorly estimated redshift distributions. We demonstrate that even with only three photometric and three spectroscopic bins, we can recover accurate estimates of the mean redshift of a bin to within Δμ ≈ 3-4 × 10-3 and the width of the bin to Δσ ≈ 1 × 10-3 for galaxies near z = 1. This indicates that we may be able to bring down the photometric redshift errors to a level which is in line with the requirements for the next generation of cosmological experiments.

  5. A cooperative approach among methods for photometric redshifts estimation: an application to KiDS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavuoti, S.; Tortora, C.; Brescia, M.; Longo, G.; Radovich, M.; Napolitano, N. R.; Amaro, V.; Vellucci, C.; La Barbera, F.; Getman, F.; Grado, A.

    2017-04-01

    Photometric redshifts (photo-z) are fundamental in galaxy surveys to address different topics, from gravitational lensing and dark matter distribution to galaxy evolution. The Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS), i.e. the European Southern Observatory (ESO) public survey on the VLT Survey Telescope (VST), provides the unprecedented opportunity to exploit a large galaxy data set with an exceptional image quality and depth in the optical wavebands. Using a KiDS subset of about 25000 galaxies with measured spectroscopic redshifts, we have derived photo-z using (i) three different empirical methods based on supervised machine learning; (ii) the Bayesian photometric redshift model (or BPZ); and (iii) a classical spectral energy distribution (SED) template fitting procedure (LE PHARE). We confirm that, in the regions of the photometric parameter space properly sampled by the spectroscopic templates, machine learning methods provide better redshift estimates, with a lower scatter and a smaller fraction of outliers. SED fitting techniques, however, provide useful information on the galaxy spectral type, which can be effectively used to constrain systematic errors and to better characterize potential catastrophic outliers. Such classification is then used to specialize the training of regression machine learning models, by demonstrating that a hybrid approach, involving SED fitting and machine learning in a single collaborative framework, can be effectively used to improve the accuracy of photo-z estimates.

  6. 78 FR 59955 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Correction AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington (Burke...

  7. Photo-z with CuBANz: An improved photometric redshift estimator using Clustering aided Back propagation Neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samui, Saumyadip; Samui Pal, Shanoli

    2017-02-01

    We present an improved photometric redshift estimator code, CuBANz, that is publicly available at https://goo.gl/fpk90V. It uses the back propagation neural network along with clustering of the training set, which makes it more efficient than existing neural network codes. In CuBANz, the training set is divided into several self learning clusters with galaxies having similar photometric properties and spectroscopic redshifts within a given span. The clustering algorithm uses the color information (i.e. u - g , g - r etc.) rather than the apparent magnitudes at various photometric bands as the photometric redshift is more sensitive to the flux differences between different bands rather than the actual values. Separate neural networks are trained for each cluster using all possible colors, magnitudes and uncertainties in the measurements. For a galaxy with unknown redshift, we identify the closest possible clusters having similar photometric properties and use those clusters to get the photometric redshifts using the particular networks that were trained using those cluster members. For galaxies that do not match with any training cluster, the photometric redshifts are obtained from a separate network that uses entire training set. This clustering method enables us to determine the redshifts more accurately. SDSS Stripe 82 catalog has been used here for the demonstration of the code. For the clustered sources with redshift range zspec < 0.7, the residual error (〈(zspec -zphot) 2 〉 1 / 2) in the training/testing phase is as low as 0.03 compared to the existing ANNz code that provides residual error on the same test data set of 0.05. Further, we provide a much better estimate of the uncertainty of the derived photometric redshift.

  8. Photometric Analysis of the Pi of the Sky Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Siudek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A database containing star measurements from the period 2006–2009 taken by the Pi of the Sky detector located in Las Campanas Observatory in Chile contains more than 2 billion measurements of almost 17 million objects. All measurements are available on the Pi of the Sky web site through a dedicated interface, which also allows users to download selected data. Accurate analysis of Pi of the Sky data is a real challenge, because of a number of factors that can influence the measurements. Possible sources of errors in our measurements include: reading the chip with the shutter open, strong and varying sky background, passing planets or planetoids, and clouds and hot pixels. In order tofacilitate the analysis of variable stars we have developed a system of dedicated filters to remove bad measurements or frames. The spectral sensitivity of the detector is taken into account by appropriate corrections based on the spectral type of reference stars. This process is illustrated by an analysis of the BG Ind system, where we have been able to reduce the systematic uncertainty to about 0.05 magnitudo.

  9. 1979-1980 Geothermal Resource Assessment Program in Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korosec, M.A.; Schuster, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for seven papers. Also included are a bibliography of geothermal resource information for the State of Washington, well temperature information and locations in the State of Washington, and a map of the geology of the White Pass-Tumac Mountain Area, Washington. (MHR)

  10. Evaluation of the Washington State Target Zero teams project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    As part of its Target Zero strategic highway safety plan that has the goal to reduce traffic fatalities in Washington to zero by the year 2030, the State of Washington established three detachments of Washington State Patrol (WSP) troopers to f...

  11. A Topographic Field Trip of Washington, D.C. - A Cartographic Multimedia Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has produced ?A Topographic Field Trip of Washington, D.C.,' a multimedia CD-ROM that uses topographic maps to tour Washington, D.C. Although designed for the middle school grade level, it can also be used to teach introductory topographic map reading skills to any level. Two versions of ?A Topographic Field Trip of Washington, D.C.,? are available. The first version, for Macintosh? systems only, was developed and produced as a prototype with educational resources funds and is available free of charge. The second version, for dual platforms, Macintosh?, and Windows? systems, is a sales item. The dual platform version contains improvements in content and navigational capabilities.

  12. Photometric Analysis of the Very Short Period Solar Type Binary, FY Bootis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samec, Ronald G.; Oliver, B.; Jaso, A.; Faulkner, D. R.; Hamme, W. V.

    2010-05-01

    We present a BVRcIc photometric analyses of the very short period eclipsing binary, FY Bootis. Our observations were taken with the 0.81-m Lowell Reflector on March 10-14 2009. A period study and a light curve solution is presented. The light curves were premodeled with Binary 3.0, then solved with the 2004 version Wilson code with intermediate integrations performed with PHOEBE. Our modeled light curves included 107 B, 109 V, 95 R and 98 I individual CCD observations taken with the 2K X 2K NASACAM. A hotter star modeling temperature of 4750 K was chosen after considering 2MASS J-H and H-K values and the Rucinski (1994) period color relation. These gave spectral types in the K0-K5V range. Six mean times of minimum light were determined, including HJDMin I= 2454901.9711 (±0.0022)d, 2454902.9350 (±0.0024)d, 2454904.8587 (±0.0002)d, 2454905.8304 (±0.0002)d and HJDMin II=2454904.9774 (±0.0007)d, 2454905.9491 (±0.0002)d. Some 30 minima from the literature were included with ours to reveal a sinusoidal ephemeris: HJD Min I =2454904.8646 (±0.0018)d + 0. 24116(±0.00158)*E +(0.0016±0.00004)sin [(0.00051±0.00006)*E-(0.4±0.6)]. The period of oscillation is 8±1 years with an amplitude of 0.2 AU in light travel time, assuming the orbital inclination of a third component is identical to the main binary orbit. The third body has 0.05 solar masses. Our Wilson Code analysis of FY Boo revealed it to be a W-type contact binary (the less massive component is the hotter) and a mass ratio of 2.5. The system parameters included a fill-out of 0.11, a component temperature difference of 200 K and an inclination of 82o. One large 68o magnetic region was modeled on the hotter companion with an average temperature of 0.96 times that of the photosphere. We wish to thank the American Astronomical Society for supporting this research through its small research grant program.

  13. A Photometric Study of Three Eclipsing Binary Stars (Poster abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, A.

    2016-12-01

    (Abstract only) As part of a program to study eclipsing binary stars that exhibit the O'Connell Effect (OCE) we are observing a selection of binary stars in a long term study. The OCE is a difference in maximum light across the ligthcurve possibly cause by starspots. We observed for 7 nights at McDonald Observatory using the 30-inch telescope in July 2015, and used the same telescope remotely for a total of 20 additional nights in August, October, December, and January. We will present lightcurves for three stars from this study, characterize the OCE for these stars, and present our model results for the physical parameters of the star making up each of these systems.

  14. PHOTOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF PI OF THE SKY DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Opiela

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pi of the Sky is a system of two wide field of view robotic telescopes, which search for short timescale astrophysical phenomena, especially for prompt optical GRB emissions. The system was designed for autonomous operation, monitoring a large fraction of the sky with 12m–13m range and time resolution of the order of 1–10 seconds. Two fully automatic Pi of the Sky detectors located in Spain (INTA — INTA El Arenosillo Test Centre in Mazagón, near Huelva. and Chile (SPDA — San Pedro de Atacama Observatory. have been observing the sky almost every night in search of rare optical phenomena. They also collect a lot of useful observations which include e.g. many kinds of variable stars. To be able to draw proper conclusions from the data received, adequate quality of the data is very important. Pi of the Sky data is subject to systematic errors caused by various factors, such as cloud cover, seen as significant fluctuations in the number of stars observed by the detector, problems with conducting mounting, a strong background of the moon or the passing of a bright object, e.g., a planet, near the observed star. Some of these adverse effects have already been detected during the cataloging of individual measurements, but the quality of our data was still not satisfactory for us. In order to improve the quality of our data, we have developed two new procedures based on two different approaches. In this article we will report on these procedures, give some examples, and we will show how these procedures improve the quality of our data.

  15. A new method to assign galaxy cluster membership using photometric redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castignani, G.; Benoist, C.

    2016-11-01

    We introduce a new effective strategy to assign group and cluster membership probabilities Pmem to galaxies using photometric redshift information. Large dynamical ranges both in halo mass and cosmic time are considered. The method takes into account the magnitude distribution of both cluster and field galaxies as well as the radial distribution of galaxies in clusters using a non-parametric formalism, and relies on Bayesian inference to take photometric redshift uncertainties into account. We successfully test the method against 1208 galaxy clusters within redshifts z = 0.05-2.58 and masses 1013.29-14.80M⊙ drawn from wide field simulated galaxy mock catalogs mainly developed for the forthcoming Euclid mission. Median purity and completeness values of and are reached for galaxies brighter than 0.25 L∗ within r200 of each simulated halo and for a statistical photometric redshift accuracy σ((zs-zp)/(1 + zs)) = 0.03. The mean values p̅=56% and c̅=93% are consistent with the median and have negligible sub-percent uncertainties. Accurate photometric redshifts (σ((zs-zp)/(1 + zs)) ≲ 0.05) and robust estimates for the cluster redshift and cluster center coordinates are required. The dependence of the assignments on photometric redshift accuracy, galaxy magnitude and distance from the halo center, and halo properties such as mass, richness, and redshift are investigated. Variations in the mean values of both purity and completeness are globally limited to a few percent. The largest departures from the mean values are found for galaxies associated with distant z ≳ 1.5 halos, faint ( 0.25 L∗) galaxies, and those at the outskirts of the halo (at cluster-centric projected distances r200) for which the purity is decreased, Δp ≃ 20% at most, with respect to the mean value. The proposed method is applied to derive accurate richness estimates. A statistical comparison between the true (Ntrue) vs. estimated richness (λ = ∑ Pmem) yields on average to unbiased

  16. Photometric performance of LGS MCAO with science-based metrics: first results from Gemini/GeMS observations of Galactic globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turri, Paolo; McConnachie, Alan W.; Stetson, Peter B.; Fiorentino, Giuliana; Andersen, David R.; Bono, Giuseppe; Véran, Jean-Pierre

    2014-08-01

    Multi-conjugate adaptive optics can achieve diffraction limited images over a field of arcminutes and is a central technology for the future ELTs: Gemini/GeMS is the first facility-class LGS MCAO system to operate. With it we have taken images in J and Ks bands of the globular cluster NGC 1851 for which we also have HST/ACS observations in the visible. In this paper we present the deepest to date near-infrared photometry of NGC 1851 providing a wide colour baseline CMD that reaches the lower main sequence to have a new insight into the stellar populations of this globular cluster. The use of the GGCs' lower main sequence knee to determine its age is one of the science drivers for the observation of GGCs with MCAO given its visibility in the infrared and because it requires high Strehl ratios to measure the faint stars' photometry. In addition to the stellar population analysis, these data allow to examine the photometric performance of the instrument using a large number of point sources distributed across the field. We analyze the photometric performance of the instrument and the field dependence of the PSF, a central part on the prediction and improvement of the performance of future LGS MCAO systems like NFIRAOS for the Thirty Meter Telescope.

  17. Photometric analysis of esthetically pleasant and unpleasant facial profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Nunes da Rocha Fortes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify which linear, angular and proportionality measures could influence a profile to be considered esthetically pleasant or unpleasant, and to assess sexual dimorphism. Methods: 150 standardized facial profile photographs of dental students of both sexes were obtained and printed on photographic paper. Ten plastic surgeons, ten orthodontists and ten layperson answered a questionnaire characterizing each profile as pleasant, acceptable or unpleasant. With the use of a score system, the 15 most pleasant and unpleasant profiles of each sex were selected. The photographs were scanned into AutoCAD computer software. Linear, angular and proportion measurements were obtained using the software tools. The average values between groups were compared by the Student's t-test and the Mann-Whitney test at 5%. Results: The linear measures LL-S, LL-H, LL-E, LL-B and Pn-H showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05. Statistical differences were also found in the angular measures G'.Pn.Pg', G'.Sn.Pg' and Sn.Me'.C and in the proportions G'-Sn:Sn-Me' and Sn-Gn':Gn'-C (p < 0.05. Differences between sexes were found for the linear measure Ala-Pn, angles G'-Pg'.N-Pn, Sn.Me'.C, and proportions Gn'-Sn:Sn-Me' and Ala-Pn:N'-Sn. (p < 0.05. Conclusion: The anteroposterior position of the lower lip, the amount of nose that influences the profile, facial convexity, total vertical proportion and lip-chin proportion appear to influence pleasantness of facial profile. Sexual dimorphism was identified in nasal length, nasofacial and lower third of the face angles, total vertical and nasal height/length proportions.

  18. Focus on: Washington Hospital Center, Biomedical Engineering Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, J D

    1995-01-01

    The Biomedical Engineering Department of the Washington Hospital Center provides clinical engineering services to an urban 907-bed, tertiary care teaching hospital and a variety of associated healthcare facilities. With an annual budget of over $3,000,000, the 24-person department provides cradle-to-grave support for a host of sophisticated medical devices and imaging systems such as lasers, CT scanners, and linear accelerators as well as traditional patient care instrumentation. Hallmarks of the department include its commitment to customer service and patient care, close collaboration with clinicians and quality assurance teams throughout the hospital system, proactive involvement in all phases of the technology management process, and shared leadership in safety standards with the hospital's risk management group. Through this interactive process, the department has assisted the Center not only in the acquisition of 11,000 active devices with a value of more than $64 million, but also in becoming one of the leading providers of high technology healthcare in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.

  19. Bibliography of the geology of the Columbia Basin and surrounding areas of Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, G.B.; Rigby, J.G.

    1979-07-01

    In the fall of 1977, the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geology and Earth Resources (WDGER), entered into a contract with the US Department of Energy, administered by Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) in Richland, Washington, as a principal contributor to a geologic study of feasibility of storing radioactive waste within Columbia River basalt. WDGER's responsibility was the production of this bibliography and a reconnaissance geologic map of the sediments overlying the Columbia River Basalt Group in the State of Washington. This bibliography is a compilation of all known published, unpublished, and open-file references dealing with geology and geophysics of the Columbia Basin of eastern Washington. The citations were obtained primarily from the WDGER and Washington State libraries; the Geo-Ref bibliographic system was also utilized. Because the WDGER portion of the study included preparation of a reconnaissance geologic map of surficial deposits in the Columbia Basin, available references dealing with this subject have been annotated. Many abstracts in the annotated section are quotations and have been copied directly from their respective publications.

  20. BVRI Photometric Study of the High Mass Ratio, Detached, Pre-contact W UMa Binary GQ Cancri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samec, R. G.; Olson, A.; Caton, D.; Faulkner, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    CCD BVRcIc light curves of GQ Cancri were observed in April 2013 using the SARA North 0.9-meter Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona in remote mode. It is a high-amplitude (V 0.9 magnitude) K0±V type eclipsing binary (T1 5250 K) with a photometrically-determined mass ratio of M2 / M1 = 0.80. Its spectral color type classifies it as a pre-contact W UMa Binary (PCWB). The Wilson-Devinney Mode 2 solutions show that the system has a detached binary configuration with fill-outs of 94% and 98% for the primary and secondary component, respectively. As expected, the light curve is asymmetric due to spot activity. Three times of minimum light were calculated, for two primary eclipses and one secondary eclipse, from our present observations. In total, some 26 times of minimum light covering nearly 20 years of observation were used to determine linear and quadratic ephemerides. It is noted that the light curve solution remained in a detached state for every iteration of the computer runs. The components are very similar with a computed temperature difference of only 4 K, and the flux of the primary component accounts for 53±55% of the system's light in B, V, Rc, and Ic. A 12-degree radius high latitude white spot (faculae) was iterated on the primary component.

  1. Low-temperature geothermal resources of Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, J.E. [Washington State Dept. of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA (United States). Div. of Geology and Earth Resources; Bloomquist, R.G. [Washington State Energy Office, Olympia, WA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    This report presents information on the location, physical characteristics, and water chemistry of low-temperature geothermal resources in Washington. The database includes 941 thermal (>20C or 68F) wells, 34 thermal springs, lakes, and fumaroles, and 238 chemical analyses. Most thermal springs occur in the Cascade Range, and many are associated with stratovolcanoes. In contrast, 97 percent of thermal wells are located in the Columbia Basin of southeastern Washington. Some 83.5 percent are located in Adams, Benton, Franklin, Grant, Walla Walla, and Yakima Counties. Yakima County, with 259 thermal wells, has the most. Thermal wells do not seem to owe their origin to local sources of heat, such as cooling magma in the Earth`s upper crust, but to moderate to deep circulation of ground water in extensive aquifers of the Columbia River Basalt Group and interflow sedimentary deposits, under the influence of a moderately elevated (41C/km) average geothermal gradient.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (Mason+ 2001-2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, B. D.; Wycoff, G. L.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Douglass, G. G.; Worley, C. E.

    2018-01-01

    The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (WDS) is the successor to the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0 (IDS; Jeffers and van den Bos, Publ. Lick Obs. 21). Three earlier double star catalogs in XXth century, those by Burnham (BDS, 1906, "General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), Innes (SDS, 1927, "Southern Double Star Catalogue -19 to -90 degrees", Union Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa), and Aitken (ADS, 1932 "New General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), each covered only a portion of the sky. Both the IDS and the WDS cover the entire sky, and the WDS is intended to contain all known visual double stars for which at least one differential measure has been published. The WDS is continually updated as published data become available. Prior to this, three major updates have been published (Worley and Douglass 1984, "Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, 1984.0", U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington; Worley and Douglass 1997A&AS..125..523W, Cat. I/237; Mason, Wycoff, Hartkopf, Douglass and Worley 2001AJ....122.3466M; and Mason et al. 2006.5). The Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) has seen numerous changes since the last major release of the catalog. The application of many techniques and considerable industry over the past few years has yielded significant gains in both the number of systems and the number of measures. Is is maintained by the US Naval Observatory, and represents the world's principal database of astrometric double and multiple star information. The WDS contains positions (J2000), discoverer designations, epochs, position angles, separations, magnitudes, spectral types, proper motions, and, when available, Durchmusterung numbers and notes for the components of the systems. (3 data files).

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (Mason+ 2001-2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, B. D.; Wycoff, G. L.; Hartkopf, W. I.; Douglass, G. G.; Worley, C. E.

    2017-10-01

    The Washington Visual Double Star Catalog (WDS) is the successor to the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0 (IDS; Jeffers and van den Bos, Publ. Lick Obs. 21). Three earlier double star catalogs in XXth century, those by Burnham (BDS, 1906, "General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), Innes (SDS, 1927, "Southern Double Star Catalogue -19 to -90 degrees", Union Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa), and Aitken (ADS, 1932 "New General Catalogue of Double Stars within 121 degrees of the North Pole", Carnegie Institution of Washington), each covered only a portion of the sky. Both the IDS and the WDS cover the entire sky, and the WDS is intended to contain all known visual double stars for which at least one differential measure has been published. The WDS is continually updated as published data become available. Prior to this, three major updates have been published (Worley and Douglass 1984, "Washington Visual Double Star Catalog, 1984.0", U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington; Worley and Douglass 1997A&AS..125..523W, Cat. I/237; Mason, Wycoff, Hartkopf, Douglass and Worley 2001AJ....122.3466M; and Mason et al. 2006.5). The Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) has seen numerous changes since the last major release of the catalog. The application of many techniques and considerable industry over the past few years has yielded significant gains in both the number of systems and the number of measures. Is is maintained by the US Naval Observatory, and represents the world's principal database of astrometric double and multiple star information. The WDS contains positions (J2000), discoverer designations, epochs, position angles, separations, magnitudes, spectral types, proper motions, and, when available, Durchmusterung numbers and notes for the components of the systems. (3 data files).

  4. Washington State Community Colleges: Impact on the Economy of the State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Sally; And Others

    Using a Virginia study as a model, this study assessed the effect on Washington state's economy of its 27 campus community college system. The study was based on a simple circular cash-flow model for the years 1969-1976 and measured economic impact in three areas: on the level of business volume done in-state, on employment, and on total state…

  5. Timber resource statistics for forest land in eastern Washington, January 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew N. Gray; Jeremy S. Fried; Glenn Christensen; Larry. Potts

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes timber resource statistics for the 20 counties in eastern Washington. The inventory sampled all private and public lands except those administered by the National Forest System in 2001, and those that were reserved from management for wood products. Area information for parks and other reserves was obtained directly from the organizations...

  6. The fifth International Geological Congress, Washington, 1891

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, C.M.

    2006-01-01

    The 5th International Geological Congress (IGC), the initial meeting in North America, was the first of the three IGCs that have been held in the United States of America (USA). Of the 538 registrants alive when the 5th IGC convened in Washington, 251 persons, representing fifteen countries, actually attended the meeting. These participants included 173 people from the USA, of whom forty-two represented the US Geological Survey (USGS). Fourteen of the US State geological surveys sent representatives to Washington. Eight participants came from other countries in the Western Hemisphere - Canada (3), Chile (1), Mexico (3), and Peru (1). The sixty-six European geologists and naturalists at the 5th IGC represented Austro-Hungary (3), Belgium (3), Britain (12), France (7), Germany (23), Norway (1), Romania (3), Russia (8), Sweden (4), and Switzerland (2). The USGS and the Columbian College (now the George Washington University) acted as the principal hosts. The American Association for the Advancement of Science and then the Geological Society of America (GSA) met in the Capital immediately before the Congress convened (26 August-1 September 1891). The 5th IGC's formal discussions treated the genetic classification of Pleistocene rocks, the chronological correlation of clastic rocks, and the international standardization of colors, symbols, and names used on geologic maps. The third of those topics continued key debates at the 1st through 4th IGCs. The GSA, the Korean Embassy, the Smithsonian Institution's US National Museum, the USGS, and one of the two Secretaries-General hosted evening receptions. Field excursions examined Paleozoic exposures in New York (18-25 August), Cretaceous-Pleistocene localities along the Potomac River south of Washington (30 August), and classic Precambrian-Pleistocene sequences and structures in the Great Plains, Yellowstone, Rocky Mountains, and Great Basin (2-26 September), with optional trips to the Grand Canyon (19-28 September) and Lake

  7. Nearshore Wave Predictions along the Oregon and Southwest Washington Coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Medina, G.; Özkan-Haller, H. T.; Ruggiero, P.

    2012-12-01

    The Pacific Northwest region of the United States of America is characterized as having one of the most severe wave climates in the northern hemisphere. In addition, an observed multi-decadal increase in wave heights and the potential of harvesting wave energy in the region is attracting local governments, the private sector and scientific communities to understand wave transformation across the shelf and expand the predictive capabilities. To satisfy these and other needs, a high-resolution wave forecasting model was recently implemented for the Oregon and Southwest Washington coasts. The modeling domain extends from Klamath, California (41.50o) to the south to Taholah, Washington (47.35o) to the north and to the shelf break at the offshore boundary. This implementation has been proven accurate with linear correlation coefficients in the excess of 0.83 and percent errors of ˜ 20% when comparing results from multiple hindcasts to ground truth data even at water depths as shallow as 13 m. This implementation is able to capture the alongshore variations in the wave field caused by the major bathymetric features in the region. The forecasting model is run daily producing 84 hour forecasts. The results are disseminated via the Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing System webpage (http://www.nanoos.org). Spectral and bulk parameter forecasts are being made available at 233 locations along the 25 meter contour. In addition spatial plots of swell wave height, peak wave period and direction are made available for each forecast hour.

  8. Energy Conservation Study on Darigold Fluid Milk Plant, Issaquah, Washington.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seton, Johnson & Odell, Inc.

    1985-01-15

    This report presents the findings of an energy study done at Darigold dairy products plant in Issaquah, Washington. The study includes all electrical energy using systems at the plant, but does not address specific modifications to process equipment or the gas boilers. The Issaquah Darigold plant receives milk and cream, which are stored in large, insulated silos. These raw products are then processed into butter, cottage cheese, buttermilk, yogurt, sour cream, and powdered milk. This plant produces the majority of the butter used in the state of Washington. The Issaquah plant purchases electricity from Puget Sound Power and Light Company. The plant is on Schedule 31, primary metering. The plant provides transformers to step down the voltage to 480, 240, and 120 volts as needed. Based on utility bills for the period from July 1983 through July 1984, the Issaquah Darigold plant consumed 7,134,300 kWh at a total cost of $218,703.78 and 1,600,633 therms at a total cost of $889,687.48. Energy use for this period is shown in Figures 1.1 to 1.5. Demand charges account for approximately 23% of the total electrical bill for this period, while reactive charges account for less than 0.5%. The electrical usage for the plant was divided into process energy uses, as summarized in Figure 1.2. This breakdown is based on a 311-day processing schedule, with Sunday clean-up and holidays composing the 54 days of downtime.

  9. The effect of unresolved contaminant stars on the cross-matching of photometric catalogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Tom J.; Naylor, Tim

    2017-07-01

    A fundamental process in astrophysics is the matching of two photometric catalogues. It is crucial that the correct objects be paired, and that their photometry does not suffer from any spurious additional flux. We compare the positions of sources in Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), INT Photometric H α Survey, Two Micron All Sky Survey and AAVSO Photometric All Sky Survey with Gaia Data Release 1 astrometric positions. We find that the separations are described by a combination of a Gaussian distribution, wider than naively assumed based on their quoted uncertainties, and a large wing, which some authors ascribe to proper motions. We show that this is caused by flux contamination from blended stars not treated separately. We provide linear fits between the quoted Gaussian uncertainty and the core fit to the separation distributions. We show that at least one in three of the stars in the faint half of a given catalogue will suffer from flux contamination above the 1 per cent level when the density of catalogue objects per point spread function area is above approximately 0.005. This has important implications for the creation of composite catalogues. It is important for any closest neighbour matches as there will be a given fraction of matches that are flux contaminated, while some matches will be missed due to significant astrometric perturbation by faint contaminants. In the case of probability-based matching, this contamination affects the probability density function of matches as a function of distance. This effect results in up to 50 per cent fewer counterparts being returned as matches, assuming Gaussian astrometric uncertainties for WISE-Gaia matching in crowded Galactic plane regions, compared with a closest neighbour match.

  10. Photometric transit search for planets around cool stars from the western Italian Alps: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacobbe, P.; Damasso, M.; Sozzetti, A.; Toso, G.; Perdoncin, M.; Calcidese, P.; Bernagozzi, A.; Bertolini, E.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Smart, R. L.

    2012-08-01

    We present the results of a year-long photometric monitoring campaign of a sample of 23 nearby (d red) noise in our data degrades the precision by a factor of ˜1.3 with respect to a pure white noise regime. Based on a detailed stellar variability analysis (i) we detected no transit-like events (an expected result, given the sample size); (ii) we determined photometric rotation periods of ˜0.47 and ˜0.22 d for LHS 3445 and GJ 1167A, respectively; (iii) these values agree with the large projected rotational velocities (˜25 and ˜33 km s-1, respectively) inferred for both stars based on the analysis of archival spectra; (iv) the estimated inclinations of the stellar rotation axes for LHS 3445 and GJ 1167A are consistent with those derived using a simple spot model; and (v) short-term, low-amplitude flaring events were recorded for LHS 3445 and LHS 2686. Finally, based on simulations of transit signals of given period and amplitude injected in the actual (nightly reduced) photometric data for our sample, we derive a relationship between transit detection probability and phase coverage. We find that, using the Box-fitting Least Squares search algorithm, even when the phase coverage approaches 100 per cent, there is a limit to the detection probability of ≈90 per cent. Around programme stars with phase coverage > 50 per cent, we would have had >80 per cent chances of detecting planets with P 0.5 per cent, corresponding to minimum detectable radii in the range ˜1.0-2.2 R⊕. These findings are illustrative of our high readiness level ahead of the main survey start.

  11. Optimizing Spectroscopic and Photometric Galaxy Surveys: Same-Sky Benefits for Dark Energy and Modified Gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Donnacha [University Coll. London; Lahav, Ofer [University Coll. London; Bridle, Sarah [Manchester U.; Jouvel, Stephanie [Barcelona, IEEC; Abdalla, Filipe B. [University Coll. London; Frieman, Joshua A. [Chicago U., KICP

    2015-08-21

    The combination of multiple cosmological probes can produce measurements of cosmological parameters much more stringent than those possible with any individual probe. We examine the combination of two highly correlated probes of late-time structure growth: (i) weak gravitational lensing from a survey with photometric redshifts and (ii) galaxy clustering and redshift space distortions from a survey with spectroscopic redshifts. We choose generic survey designs so that our results are applicable to a range of current and future photometric redshift (e.g. KiDS, DES, HSC, Euclid) and spectroscopic redshift (e.g. DESI, 4MOST, Sumire) surveys. Combining the surveys greatly improves their power to measure both dark energy and modified gravity. An independent, non-overlapping combination sees a dark energy figure of merit more than 4 times larger than that produced by either survey alone. The powerful synergies between the surveys are strongest for modified gravity, where their constraints are orthogonal, producing a non-overlapping joint figure of merit nearly 2 orders of magnitude larger than either alone. Our projected angular power spectrum formalism makes it easy to model the cross-correlation observable when the surveys overlap on the sky, producing a joint data vector and full covariance matrix. We calculate a same-sky improvement factor, from the inclusion of these cross-correlations, relative to non-overlapping surveys. We find nearly a factor of 4 for dark energy and more than a factor of 2 for modified gravity. The exact forecast figures of merit and same-sky benefits can be radically affected by a range of forecasts assumption, which we explore methodically in a sensitivity analysis. We show that that our fiducial assumptions produce robust results which give a good average picture of the science return from combining photometric and spectroscopic surveys.

  12. Inferring the photometric and size evolution of galaxies from image simulations. I. Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carassou, Sébastien; de Lapparent, Valérie; Bertin, Emmanuel; Le Borgne, Damien

    2017-09-01

    Context. Current constraints on models of galaxy evolution rely on morphometric catalogs extracted from multi-band photometric surveys. However, these catalogs are altered by selection effects that are difficult to model, that correlate in non trivial ways, and that can lead to contradictory predictions if not taken into account carefully. Aims: To address this issue, we have developed a new approach combining parametric Bayesian indirect likelihood (pBIL) techniques and empirical modeling with realistic image simulations that reproduce a large fraction of these selection effects. This allows us to perform a direct comparison between observed and simulated images and to infer robust constraints on model parameters. Methods: We use a semi-empirical forward model to generate a distribution of mock galaxies from a set of physical parameters. These galaxies are passed through an image simulator reproducing the instrumental characteristics of any survey and are then extracted in the same way as the observed data. The discrepancy between the simulated and observed data is quantified, and minimized with a custom sampling process based on adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. Results: Using synthetic data matching most of the properties of a Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey Deep field, we demonstrate the robustness and internal consistency of our approach by inferring the parameters governing the size and luminosity functions and their evolutions for different realistic populations of galaxies. We also compare the results of our approach with those obtained from the classical spectral energy distribution fitting and photometric redshift approach. Conclusions: Our pipeline infers efficiently the luminosity and size distribution and evolution parameters with a very limited number of observables (three photometric bands). When compared to SED fitting based on the same set of observables, our method yields results that are more accurate and free from

  13. Signal-to-noise ratios in IUE low-dispersion spectra. II - Photometrically corrected images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    1993-01-01

    Photometrically corrected images from the IUE's two intensified vidicon cameras are used to explore the character of detector noise, and a protocol for the derivation of realistic noise models is proposed on the basis of available collections of UV-Flood calibration images. The incomplete removal of the pixel-to-pixel sensitivity pattern can lead to a factor-of-2 enhancement in apparent noise; even with good suppression of pixel granularity, the remaining random noise can exhibit saturation behavior which causes S/N to cease improving with increasing exposure. When all relevant effects are considered, underlying, 'pristine' noise models show virtually no dependence on spatial position.

  14. A homogeneous photometric and spectroscopic survey of open clusters in the Perseus Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Amparo; Negueruela, Ignacio; Monguió, Maria

    2015-08-01

    We are carrying out a homogeneous photometric survey of all young (Isaac Newton Telescope in La Palma. We intend to derive relative ages and distances with typical accuracies of 5 Ma and 200 pc. Our data will allow us to test the predictions of different models for the main mechanism producing the spiral structure of the Milky Way. In addition, we will enormously improve our knowledge of stellar evolution for stars in the 6-15 Msolar range. Moreover, the huge dataset of homogeneous photometry for thousands of stars (including ~2000 B-type stars) will have an enormous legacy value

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ECDFS galaxies photometric redshifts & counterparts (Hsu+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, L.-T.; Salvato, M.; Nandra, K.; Brusa, M.; Bender, R.; Buchner, J.; Donley, J. L.; Kocevski, D. D.; Guo, Y.; Hathi, N. P.; Rangel, C.; Willner, S. P.; Brightman, M.; Georgakakis, A.; Budavari, T.; Szalay, A. S.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Barro, G.; Dahlen, T.; Faber, S. M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Galametz, A.; Grazian, A.; Grogin, N. A.; Huang, K.-H.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Lucas, R. A.; McGrath, E.; Mobasher, B.; Peth, M.; Rosario, D. J.; Trump, J. R.

    2017-04-01

    The main product of this work is photometric redshifts for all sources detected in the CANDELS/GOODS-S, CDFS, and ECDFS area, a total of 105150 sources. This work has improved upon prior catalogs by Guo+ (2013, J/ApJS/207/24), Cardamone+ (2010, J/ApJS/189/270), and Hsieh+ (2012ApJS..203...23H) by using the most up-to-date photometry and SED template libraries including separate libraries for X-ray sources of different characteristics. Probabilities of association between X-ray sources and optical/NIR/MIR sources are also provided. (5 data files).

  16. Photometric Study of the FU Orionis Object BBW 76 from the Bamberg Observatory Southern Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, A.; Tsvetkova, K. P.; Tsvetkov, M. K.

    2006-04-01

    The Bamberg Observatory Southern Sky Survey provided 93 photographic plates with the FU Orionis object BBW 76, clearly detectable in the time interval 1963-1976. We perform aperture photometry of BBW 76 from the 2 x 2 degrees area near target star scanned with the Epson Expression 1640 XL flatbed scanner. For each plate a transformation of plate magnitude to the GSC 2.2 magnitudes in B photographic band was found out for selected reference stars, and used for deriving B magnitudes of BBW 76. The analysis of the photometric behaviour of BBW 76 is presented.

  17. Modeling Visible/Near-Infrared Photometric Properties of Dustfall on a Known Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohl-Dickstein, J.; Johnson, J. R.; Grundy, W. M.; Guinness, E.; Graff, T.; Shepard, M. K.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bell, J. F., III; Christensen, P.; Morris, R.

    2005-01-01

    We present a comprehensive visible/near-infrared two-layer radiative transfer modeling study using laboratory spectra of variable dust thicknesses deposited on substrates with known photometric parameters. The masking effects of Martian airfall dust deposition on rocks, soils, and lander/rover components provides the incentive to improve two-layer models [1-3]. It is believed that the model presented will facilitate understanding of the spectral and compositional properties of both the dust layer and substrate material, and allow for better compensation for dust deposition.

  18. An Environmental Friendly Procedure for Photometric Determination of Hypochlorite in Tap Water Employing a Miniaturized Multicommuted Flow Analysis Setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Sivanildo S.; Reis, Boaventura F.

    2011-01-01

    A photometric procedure for the determination of ClO− in tap water employing a miniaturized multicommuted flow analysis setup and an LED-based photometer is described. The analytical procedure was implemented using leucocrystal violet (LCV; 4,4′,4′′-methylidynetris (N,N-dimethylaniline), C25H31N3) as a chromogenic reagent. Solenoid micropumps employed for solutions propelling were assembled together with the photometer in order to compose a compact unit of small dimensions. After control variables optimization, the system was applied for the determination of ClO− in samples of tap water, and aiming accuracy assessment samples were also analyzed using an independent method. Applying the paired t-test between results obtained using both methods, no significant difference at the 95% confidence level was observed. Other useful features include low reagent consumption, 2.4 μg of LCV per determination, a linear response ranging from 0.02 up to 2.0 mg L−1  ClO−, a relative standard deviation of 1.0% (n = 11) for samples containing 0.2 mg L−1  ClO−, a detection limit of 6.0 μg L−1  ClO−, a sampling throughput of 84 determinations per hour, and a waste generation of 432 μL per determination. PMID:21747732

  19. Photography - Determination of thiosulphate and other residual chemicals in processed photographic films, plates and papers - Methylene blue photometric method and silver sulphide densitometric method

    CERN Document Server

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    1977-01-01

    Photography - Determination of thiosulphate and other residual chemicals in processed photographic films, plates and papers - Methylene blue photometric method and silver sulphide densitometric method

  20. The Photometric Investigation of V921 Her Using the Lunar-Based Ultraviolet Telescope of Chang’e-3 Mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The light curve of V921 Her in ultraviolet band observed by the Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope (LUT is analyzed by the Wilson-Devinney code. Our solutions conclude that V921 Her is an early type marginal contact binary system with an additional close-in component. The binary system is under poor thermal contact with a temperature difference of nearly 700 K between the two components. The close-in component contributes about 19% of the total luminosity in the triple system. Combining the radial velocity study together with our photometric solutions, the mass of the primary star and secondary one is calculated to be M1=1.784  (±0.055M⊙, M2=0.403  (±0.012M⊙. The evolutionary scenario of V921 Her is discussed. All times of light minimum of V921 Her available in the bibliography are taken into account and the O-C curve is analyzed for the first time. The most probable fitting results are discussed in the paper, which also confirm the existence of a third component (P3=10.2 year around the binary system. The period of V921 Her is also undergoing a continuously rapid increase at a rate of dP/dt=+2.79×10-7  day·year-1, which may be due to mass transfer from the less massive component to the more massive one.

  1. THE MISSION ACCESSIBLE NEAR-EARTH OBJECTS SURVEY (MANOS): FIRST PHOTOMETRIC RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thirouin, A.; Moskovitz, N.; Burt, B. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W Mars Hill Rd, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Binzel, R. P.; DeMeo, F. E.; Person, M. J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Christensen, E. [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Polishook, D. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Weizmann Institute, Herzl St 234, Rehovot, 7610001 (Israel); Thomas, C. A. [Planetary Science Institute (PSI), 1700 E Fort Lowell Road 106, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Trilling, D.; Hinkle, M.; Avner, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, P.O. Box 6010, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff AZ 86001 (United States); Willman, M. [University of Hawaii, Pukalani, HI 96788 (United States); Aceituno, F. J., E-mail: thirouin@lowell.edu [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA-CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía, S/N, Granada, E-18008 (Spain)

    2016-12-01

    The Mission Accessible Near-Earth Objects Survey aims to physically characterize sub-km near-Earth objects (NEOs). We report the first photometric results from the survey that began in 2013 August. Photometric observations were performed using 1–4 m class telescopes around the world. We present rotational periods and light curve amplitudes for 86 sub-km NEOs, though in some cases only lower limits are provided. Our main goal is to obtain light curves for small NEOs (typically, sub-km objects) and estimate their rotational periods, light curve amplitudes, and shapes. These properties are used for a statistical study to constrain overall properties of the NEO population. A weak correlation seems to indicate that smaller objects are more spherical than larger ones. We also report seven NEOs that are fully characterized (light curve and visible spectra) as the most suitable candidates for a future human or robotic mission. Viable mission targets are objects fully characterized, with Δ v {sup NHATS} ≤ 12 km s{sup −1}, and a rotational period P  > 1 hr. Assuming a similar rate of object characterization as reported in this paper, approximately 1230 NEOs need to be characterized in order to find 100 viable mission targets.

  2. Deriving photometric redshifts using fuzzy archetypes and self-organizing maps - II. Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speagle, Joshua S.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2017-07-01

    With an eye towards the computational requirements of future large-scale surveys such as Euclid and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) that will require photometric redshifts (photo-z's) for ≳ 109 objects, we investigate a variety of ways that 'fuzzy archetypes' can be used to improve photometric redshifts and explore their respective statistical interpretations. We characterize their relative performance using an idealized LSST ugrizY and Euclid YJH mock catalogue of 10 000 objects spanning z = 0-6 at Y = 24 mag. We find most schemes are able to robustly identify redshift probability distribution functions that are multimodal and/or poorly constrained. Once these objects are flagged and removed, the results are generally in good agreement with the strict accuracy requirements necessary to meet Euclid weak lensing goals for most redshifts between 0.8 ≲ z ≲ 2. These results demonstrate the statistical robustness and flexibility that can be gained by combining template-fitting and machine-learning methods and provide useful insights into how astronomers can further exploit the colour-redshift relation.

  3. Appearance characterization of linear Lambertian objects, generalized photometric stereo, and illumination-invariant face recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shaohua Kevin; Aggarwal, Gaurav; Chellappa, Rama; Jacobs, David W

    2007-02-01

    Traditional photometric stereo algorithms employ a Lambertian reflectance model with a varying albedo field and involve the appearance of only one object. In this paper, we generalize photometric stereo algorithms to handle all appearances of all objects in a class, in particular the human face class, by making use of the linear Lambertian property. A linear Lambertian object is one which is linearly spanned by a set of basis objects and has a Lambertian surface. The linear property leads to a rank constraint and, consequently, a factorization of an observation matrix that consists of exemplar images of different objects (e.g., faces of different subjects) under different, unknown illuminations. Integrability and symmetry constraints are used to fully recover the subspace bases using a novel linearized algorithm that takes the varying albedo field into account. The effectiveness of the linear Lambertian property is further investigated by using it for the problem of illumination-invariant face recognition using just one image. Attached shadows are incorporated in the model by a careful treatment of the inherent nonlinearity in Lambert's law. This enables us to extend our algorithm to perform face recognition in the presence of multiple illumination sources. Experimental results using standard data sets are presented.

  4. Correcting geometric and photometric distortion of document images on a smartphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Christian; Williem; Park, In Kyu

    2015-01-01

    A set of document image processing algorithms for improving the optical character recognition (OCR) capability of smartphone applications is presented. The scope of the problem covers the geometric and photometric distortion correction of document images. The proposed framework was developed to satisfy industrial requirements. It is implemented on an off-the-shelf smartphone with limited resources in terms of speed and memory. Geometric distortions, i.e., skew and perspective distortion, are corrected by sending horizontal and vertical vanishing points toward infinity in a downsampled image. Photometric distortion includes image degradation from moiré pattern noise and specular highlights. Moiré pattern noise is removed using low-pass filters with different sizes independently applied to the background and text region. The contrast of the text in a specular highlighted area is enhanced by locally enlarging the intensity difference between the background and text while the noise is suppressed. Intensive experiments indicate that the proposed methods show a consistent and robust performance on a smartphone with a runtime of less than 1 s.

  5. LCDs are better: psychophysical and photometric estimates of the temporal characteristics of CRT and LCD monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagroix, Hayley E P; Yanko, Matthew R; Spalek, Thomas M

    2012-07-01

    Many cognitive and perceptual phenomena, such as iconic memory and temporal integration, require brief displays. A critical requirement is that the image not remain visible after its offset. It is commonly believed that liquid crystal displays (LCD) are unsuitable because of their poor temporal response characteristics relative to cathode-ray-tube (CRT) screens. Remarkably, no psychophysical estimates of visible persistence are available to verify this belief. A series of experiments in which white stimuli on a black background produced discernible persistence on CRT but not on LCD screens, during both dark- and light-adapted viewing, falsified this belief. Similar estimates using black stimuli on a white background produced no visible persistence on either screen. That said, photometric measurements are available that seem to confirm the poor temporal characteristics of LCD screens, but they were obtained before recent advances in LCD technology. Using current LCD screens, we obtained photometric estimates of rise time far shorter (1-6 ms) than earlier estimates (20-150 ms), and approaching those of CRTs (<1 ms). We conclude that LCDs are preferable to CRTs when visible persistence is a concern, except when black-on-white displays are used.

  6. Reconciling Space Object Observed and Solar Pressure Albedo-Areas Via Astrometric and Photometric Data Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jah, M.; Mallik, V.

    There are many Resident Space Objects (RSOs) in the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) regime, both operational and debris. The primary non-gravitational force acting on these RSOs is Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP), which is sensitive to the RSO’s area-to-mass ratio. Sparse observation data and mismodelling of non-gravitational forces has constrained the state of practice in tracking and characterizing RSOs. Accurate identification, characterization, tracking, and motion prediction of RSOs is a high priority research issue as it shall aid in assessing collision probabilities in the GEO regime, and orbital safety writ large. Previous work in characterizing RSOs has taken a preliminary step in exploiting fused astrometric and photometric data to estimate the RSO mass, shape, attitude, and size. This works, in theory, since angles data are sensitive to SRP albedo-area-to-mass ratio, and photometric data are sensitive to shape, attitude, and observed albedo-area. By fusing these two data types, mass and albedo-area both become observable parameters and can be estimated as independent quantities. However, previous work in mass and albedo-area estimation has not quantified and assessed the fundamental physical link between SRP albedo-area and observed albedo-area. The observed albedo-area is always a function of the SRP albedo-area along the line of sight of the observer. This is the physical relationship that this current research exploits.

  7. Photometric and Spectroscopic analysis of lensed re-ionising sources at the frontier of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporte, N.; Ellis, R.; Roberts-Borsani, G.; Infante, L.; Zheng, W.; Bauer, F. E.; Bina, D.; Chilingarian, I.; Kim, S.; Pelló, R.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Richard, J.; Troncoso-Iribarren, P.; Streblyanska, A.

    2016-12-01

    Our team is performing an automatic search for very distant sources using HST, VLT, Magellan, Gemini, Spitzer and ALMA dataset around Frontier Fields aiming to study the nature and properties of sources during the epoch of reionization. In this paper, we report on our photometric sample selection, the photometric properties of our z>6 candidates and the evolution of galaxy number densities during the first billion years from a statistical point of view. Thanks to the huge depth of HST FF data, we identified several z>7 candidates selected in previous HST surveys as mid-z interlopers that could bias our conclusions on the evolution of the first galaxies. We also briefly discuss several interesting objects that will benefit from the arrival of the JWST. The spectroscopic follow-up has just started, and our team is observing a sample of z>7 sources with ground-based spectrographs in order to confirm the redshift of these objects and add robust constraints on their physical properties.

  8. A spectroscopic and photometric investigation of the mercury-manganese star KIC 6128830

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hümmerich, Stefan; Niemczura, Ewa; Walczak, Przemysław; Paunzen, Ernst; Bernhard, Klaus; Murphy, Simon J.; Drobek, Dominik

    2018-02-01

    The advent of space-based photometry provides the opportunity for the first precise characterizations of variability in mercury-manganese (HgMn/CP3) stars, which might advance our understanding of their internal structure. We have carried out a spectroscopic and photometric investigation of the candidate CP3 star KIC 6128830. A detailed abundance analysis based on newly acquired high-resolution spectra was performed, which confirms that the star's abundance pattern is fully consistent with its proposed classification. Photometric variability was investigated using 4 yr of archival Kepler data. In agreement with results from the literature, we have identified a single significant and independent frequency f1 = 0.2065424 d-1 with a peak-to-peak amplitude of ˜3.4 mmag and harmonic frequencies up to 5f1. Drawing on the predictions of state-of-the-art pulsation models and information on evolutionary status, we discuss the origin of the observed light changes. Our calculations predict the occurrence of g-mode pulsations at the observed variability frequency. On the other hand, the strictly mono-periodic nature of the variability strongly suggests a rotational origin. While we prefer the rotational explanation, the present data leave some uncertainty.

  9. The Photometric Evolution of the Classical Nova V723 Cassiopeia from 2006 through 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton-Drager, Catrina M.; Lane, Ryan I.; Recine, Kristen A.; Ljungquist, Lindsey S.; Grant, Jacob A.; Shrader, Katherine; Frymark, Derek G.; Dornbush, Eric M.; Richey-Yowell, Tyler; Boyle, Robert J.; Schwarz, Greg J.; Page, Kim L.

    2018-02-01

    We present photometric data of the classical nova, V723 Cas (Nova Cas 1995), over a span of 10 years (2006 through 2016) taken with the 0.9 m telescope at Lowell Observatory, operated as the National Undergraduate Research Observatory (NURO) on Anderson Mesa near Flagstaff, Arizona. A photometric analysis of the data produced light curves in the optical bands (Bessel B, V, and R filters). The data analyzed here reveal an asymmetric light curve (steep rise to maximum, followed by a slow decline to minimum), the overall structure of which exhibits pronounced evolution including a decrease in magnitude from year to year, at the rate of ∼0.15 mag yr‑1. We model these data with an irradiated secondary and an accretion disk with a hot spot using the eclipsing binary modeling program Nightfall. We find that we can model reasonably well each season of observation by changing very few parameters. The longitude of the hot spot on the disk and the brightness of the irradiated spot on the companion are largely responsible for the majority of the observed changes in the light curve shape and amplitude until 2009. After that, a decrease in the temperature of the white dwarf is required to model the observed light curves. This is supported by Swift/X-Ray Telescope observations, which indicate that nuclear fusion has ceased, and that V723 Cas is no longer detectable in the X-ray.

  10. COSMOS2015 photometric redshifts probe the impact of filaments on galaxy properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laigle, C.; Pichon, C.; Arnouts, S.; McCracken, H. J.; Dubois, Y.; Devriendt, J.; Slyz, A.; Le Borgne, D.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Ilbert, O.; Kraljic, K.; Malavasi, N.; Park, Changbom; Vibert, D.

    2018-03-01

    The variation of galaxy stellar masses and colour types with the distance to projected cosmic filaments are quantified using the precise photometric redshifts of the COSMOS2015 catalogue extracted from Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field (2 deg2). Realistic mock catalogues are also extracted from the lightcone of the cosmological hydrodynamical simulation HORIZON-AGN. They show that the photometric redshift accuracy of the observed catalogue (σz 1010M⊙ and z galaxies are statistically closer to their neighbouring filament. At fixed stellar mass, passive galaxies are also found closer to their filament, while active star-forming galaxies statistically lie further away. The contributions of nodes and local density are removed from these gradients to highlight the specific role played by the geometry of the filaments. We find that the measured signal does persist after this removal, clearly demonstrating that proximity to a filament is not equivalent to proximity to an overdensity. These findings are in agreement with gradients measured in both 2D and 3D in the HORIZON-AGN simulation and those observed in the spectroscopic surveys VIPERS and GAMA (which both rely on the identification of 3D filaments). They are consistent with a picture in which the influence of the geometry of the large-scale environment drives anisotropic tides that impact the assembly history of galaxies, and hence their observed properties.

  11. Spectro-photometric determinations of Mn, Fe and Cu in aluminum master alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehan; Naveed, A.; Shan, A.; Afzal, M.; Saleem, J.; Noshad, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Highly reliable, fast and cost effective Spectro-photometric methods have been developed for the determination of Mn, Fe & Cu in aluminum master alloys, based on the development of calibration curves being prepared via laboratory standards. The calibration curves are designed so as to induce maximum sensitivity and minimum instrumental error (Mn 1mg/100ml-2mg/100ml, Fe 0.01mg/100ml-0.2mg/100ml and Cu 2mg/100ml-10mg/ 100ml). The developed Spectro-photometric methods produce accurate results while analyzing Mn, Fe and Cu in certified reference materials. Particularly, these methods are suitable for all types of Al-Mn, Al-Fe and Al-Cu master alloys (5%, 10%, 50% etc. master alloys).Moreover, the sampling practices suggested herein include a reasonable amount of analytical sample, which truly represent the whole lot of a particular master alloy. Successive dilution technique was utilized to meet the calibration curve range. Furthermore, the workout methods were also found suitable for the analysis of said elements in ordinary aluminum alloys. However, it was observed that Cush owed a considerable interference with Fe, the later one may not be accurately measured in the presence of Cu greater than 0.01 %.

  12. LED-based spectrally tunable source for radiometric, photometric, and colorimetric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryc, Irena; Brown, Steven W.; Eppeldauer, George P.; Ohno, Yoshihiro

    2005-11-01

    A spectrally tunable light source using a large number of LEDs and an integrating sphere has been designed and is being constructed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The source is designed to have a capability of producing any spectral distribution, mimicking various light sources in the visible region by feedback control of individual LEDs. The output spectral irradiance or radiance of the source will be calibrated by a reference instrument, and the source will be used as a spectroradiometric as well as a photometric and colorimetric standard. A series of simulations have been conducted to predict the performance of the designed tunable source when used for calibration of display colorimeters. The results indicate that the errors can be reduced by an order of magnitude when the tunable source is used to calibrate the colorimeters, compared with measurement errors when the colorimeters are calibrated against Illuminant A. The source can also approximate various CIE daylight illuminants and common lamp spectral distributions for other photometric and colorimetric applications.

  13. A spectrally tunable solid-state source for radiometric, photometric, and colorimetric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryc, Irena; Brown, Steven W.; Eppeldauer, George P.; Ohno, Yoshihiro

    2004-10-01

    A spectrally tunable light source using a large number of LEDs and an integrating sphere has been designed and being developed at NIST. The source is designed to have a capability of producing any spectral distributions mimicking various light sources in the visible region by feedback control of individual LEDs. The output spectral irradiance or radiance of the source will be calibrated by a reference instrument, and the source will be used as a spectroradiometric as well as photometric and colorimetric standard. The use of the tunable source mimicking spectra of display colors, for example, rather than a traditional incandescent standard lamp for calibration of colorimeters, can reduce the spectral mismatch errors of the colorimeter measuring displays significantly. A series of simulations have been conducted to predict the performance of the designed tunable source when used for calibration of colorimeters. The results indicate that the errors can be reduced by an order of magnitude compared with those when the colorimeters are calibrated against Illuminant A. Stray light errors of a spectroradiometer can also be effectively reduced by using the tunable source producing a blackbody spectrum at higher temperature (e.g., 9000 K). The source can also approximate various CIE daylight illuminants and common lamp spectral distributions for other photometric and colorimetric applications.

  14. Modeling and Monitoring South Atlantic Anomaly in Low Earth Orbit Using SSUSI Photometric Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, G.; Schaefer, R. K.; Paxton, L. J.; Wolven, B. C.; Romeo, O.

    2016-12-01

    High energy particles in space are a source of noise for photometric instruments. By careful treatment of this noise, we can extract a great deal of information about in situ particle fluxes (Casadio and Arino, 2011, Schaefer, et al., 2016). Here we consider the analysis of data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's (DMSP) Special Sensor Ultraviolet Spectrographic Imager (SSUSI) instrument to examine particle fluxes (Schaefer, et al., 2016). We demonstrate that the data from the SSUSI 427 nm nadir photometer can be used to effectively monitor particle fluxes from the South Atlantic Anomaly. An accurate extraction of particle information requires an understanding of both the signal (moonglow) and the noise (> 30 MeV protons). We show how this photometer can be used to monitor the shape and flux intensity of the SAA over a solar cycle. These data show the evolution of the SAA in time and space. We also describe how data from the SSUSI scanning imaging spectrograph can be used to isolate and remove particle noise in the images obtained from this spacecraft. Thus, in cases where Spacecraft Size Weight and Power (SWaP) are tightly constrained, photometric instruments can be enlisted for dual use, providing both optical imaging and particle detection. Noise counts in the SSUSI 427 nm nadir photometer binned into 2x2 square degree bins and averaged over the year 2004. Here we see the familiar intensity pattern of the South Atlantic Anomaly.

  15. Estimated Water Use in Washington, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    Water use in the State of Washington has evolved in the past century from meager domestic and stock water needs to the current complex requirements of domestic-water users, large irrigation projects, industrial plants, and numerous other uses such as fish habitat and recreational activities. Since 1950, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has, at 5-year intervals, compiled data on the amount of water used in homes, businesses, industries, and on farms throughout the State. This water-use data, combined with other related USGS information, has facilitated a unique understanding of the effects of human activity on the State's water resources. As water availability continues to emerge as an important issue in the 21st century, the need for consistent, long-term water-use data will increase to support wise use of this essential natural resource. This report presents state and county estimates of the amount of public- and self-supplied water used for domestic, irrigation, livestock, aquaculture, industrial, mining, and thermoelectric power purposes in the State of Washington during 2005. Offstream fresh-water use was estimated to be 5,780 million gallons per day (Mgal/d). Domestic water use was estimated to be 648 Mgal/d or 11 percent of the total. Irrigation water use was estimated to be 3,520 Mgal/d, or 61 percent of the total. Industrial fresh-water use was estimated to be 520 Mgal/d, or 9 percent of the total. These three categories accounted for about 81 percent (4,690 Mgal/d) of the total of the estimated offstream freshwater use in Washington during 2005.

  16. University of Washington Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The theme of the University of Washington based Center for Child Environmental Health Risks Research (CHC) is understanding the biochemical, molecular and exposure...

  17. Social Marketing and the "New" Technology: Proceedings of a Washington Roundtable (Washington, DC, March 25, 1998).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Academy for Educational Development, Washington, DC.

    This document examines some of the key issues raised during the second Washington Roundtable on Social Marketing, convened by the Academy for Educational Development (AED) in 1998. AED invited participants to examine whether the interactive technologies that are revolutionizing commercial marketing--personal computers, the Internet (especially the…

  18. A long-term UBVRI photometric study of the pre-main sequence star V350 Cep

    OpenAIRE

    Ibryamov, Sunay; Semkov, Evgeni; Peneva, Stoyanka

    2014-01-01

    Results from UBVRI optical photometric observations of the pre-main sequence star V350 Cep during the period 2004-2014 are presented. The star was discovered in 1977 due to its remarkable increase in brightness by more than 5 mag (R). In previous studies, V350 Cep was considered a to be a potential FUor or EXor eruptive variables. Our data suggest that during the period of observations the star maintains its maximum brightness with low amplitude photometric variations. Our conclusion is that ...

  19. Washington Double Star Catalog Cross Index (1950 position sort)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    A machine-readable version of the Washington Catalog of Visual Double Stars (WDS) was prepared in 1984 on the basis of a data file that was collected and maintained for more than a century by a succession of double-star observers. Although this catalog is being continually updated, a new copy for distribution is not expected to be available for a few years. The WDS contains DM numbers, but many of these are listed only in the notes, which makes it difficult to search for double-star information, except by position. Hence, a cross index that provides complete DM identifications is desirable, and it appears useful to add HD numbers for systems in that catalog. Aitken Double Star (ADS) numbers were retained from the WDS, but no attempt was made to correct these except for obvious errors.

  20. Natural phenomena hazards, Hanford Site, south central Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallman, A.M.

    1996-04-16

    This document presents the natural phenomena hazard (NPH) loads for use in implementing DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation, at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. The purpose of this document is twofold: (1) summarize the NPH that are important to the design and evaluation of structures, systems, and components at the Hanford Site; (2) develop the appropriate natural phenomena loads for use in the implementation of DOE Order 5480.28. The supporting standards, DOE-STD-1020-94, Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities (DOE 1994a); DOE-STD-1022-94, Natural Phenomena Hazards Site Characteristics Criteria (DOE 1994b); and DOE-STD-1023-95, Natural Phenomena Hazards Assessment Criteria (DOE 1995) are the basis for developing the NPH loads.

  1. Comparing Measures of Late HIV Diagnosis in Washington State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Saganic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As more US HIV surveillance programs routinely use late HIV diagnosis to monitor and characterize HIV testing patterns, there is an increasing need to standardize how late HIV diagnosis is measured. In this study, we compared two measures of late HIV diagnosis, one based on time between HIV and AIDS, the other based on initial CD4+ results. Using data from Washington's HIV/AIDS Reporting System, we used multivariate logistic regression to identify predictors of late HIV diagnosis. We also conducted tests for trend to determine whether the proportion of cases diagnosed late has changed over time. Both measures lead us to similar conclusions about late HIV diagnosis, suggesting that being male, older, foreign-born, or heterosexual increase the likelihood of late HIV diagnosis. Our findings reaffirm the validity of a time-based definition of late HIV diagnosis, while at the same time demonstrating the potential value of a lab-based measure.

  2. Greenhouse gas mitigation options for Washington State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, N.

    1996-04-01

    President Clinton, in 1993, established a goal for the United States to return emissions of greenhouse gases to 1990 levels by the year 2000. One effort established to help meet this goal was a three part Environmental Protection Agency state grant program. Washington State completed part one of this program with the release of the 1990 greenhouse gas emissions inventory and 2010 projected inventory. This document completes part two by detailing alternative greenhouse gas mitigation options. In part three of the program EPA, working in partnership with the States, may help fund innovative greenhouse gas reduction strategies. The greenhouse gas control options analyzed in this report have a wide range of greenhouse gas reductions, costs, and implementation requirements. In order to select and implement a prudent mix of control strategies, policy makers need to have some notion of the potential change in climate, the consequences of that change and the uncertainties contained therein. By understanding the risks of climate change, policy makers can better balance the use of scarce public resources for concerns that are immediate and present against those that affect future generations. Therefore, prior to analyzing alternative greenhouse gas control measures, this report briefly describes the phenomenon and uncertainties of global climate change, and then projects the likely consequences for Washington state.

  3. Group Finding in the Stellar Halo Using Photometric Surveys: Current Sensitivity and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjib; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Majewski, Steven R.; Bullock, James; Muñoz, Ricardo R.

    2011-02-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) provided the first deep and global photometric catalogs of stars in our halo and not only clearly mapped its structure but also demonstrated the ubiquity of substructure within it. Future surveys promise to push such catalogs to ever increasing depths and larger numbers of stars. This paper examines what can be learned from current and future photometric databases using group-finding techniques. We compare groups recovered from a sample of M-giants from 2MASS with those found in synthetic surveys of simulated ΛCDM stellar halos that were built entirely from satellite accretion events and demonstrate broad consistency between the properties of the two sets. We also find that these recovered groups are likely to represent the majority of high-luminosity (L > 5 × 106 L sun) satellites accreted within the last 10 Gyr and on orbits with apocenters within 100 kpc. However, the sensitivity of the M-giant survey to accretion events that were either ancient from low-luminosity objects or those on radial orbits is limited because of the low number of stars, bias toward high-metallicity stars, and the shallow depth (distance explored only out to 100 kpc from the Sun). We examine the extent to which these limitations are addressed by current and future surveys, in particular catalogs of main-sequence turnoff (MSTO) stars from SDSS and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and of RR Lyrae stars from LSST or PanSTARRS. The MSTO and RR Lyrae surveys are more sensitive to low-luminosity events (L ~ 105 L sun or less) than the 2MASS M-giant sample. Additionally, RR Lyrae surveys, with superior depth, are also good at detecting events on highly eccentric orbits whose debris tends to lie beyond 100 kpc. When combined we expect these photometric surveys to provide a comprehensive picture of the last 10 Gyr of Galactic accretion. Events older than this are too phase mixed to be discovered. Pushing

  4. Long-term Photometric Variations in the Candidate White-dwarf Pulsar AR Scorpii from K2 , CRTS, and ASAS-SN Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littlefield, Colin; Garnavich, Peter; Kennedy, Mark [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN (United States); Callanan, Paul [Department of Physics, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Shappee, Benjamin [Carnegie Observatories, Pasadena, CA (United States); Holoien, Thomas [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-08-10

    We analyze long-cadence Kepler K2 observations of AR Sco from 2014, along with survey photometry obtained between 2005 and 2016 by the Catalina Real-Time Sky Survey and the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae. The K2 data show the orbital modulation to have been fairly stable during the 78 days of observations, but we detect aperiodic deviations from the average waveform with an amplitude of ∼2% on a timescale of a few days. A comparison of the K2 data with the survey photometry reveals that the orbital waveform gradually changed between 2005 and 2010, with the orbital maximum shifting to earlier phases. We compare these photometric variations with proposed models of this unusual system.

  5. Crash Fatality Rates After Recreational Marijuana Legalization in Washington and Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydelotte, Jayson D; Brown, Lawrence H; Luftman, Kevin M; Mardock, Alexandra L; Teixeira, Pedro G R; Coopwood, Ben; Brown, Carlos V R

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate motor vehicle crash fatality rates in the first 2 states with recreational marijuana legalization and compare them with motor vehicle crash fatality rates in similar states without recreational marijuana legalization. We used the US Fatality Analysis Reporting System to determine the annual numbers of motor vehicle crash fatalities between 2009 and 2015 in Washington, Colorado, and 8 control states. We compared year-over-year changes in motor vehicle crash fatality rates (per billion vehicle miles traveled) before and after recreational marijuana legalization with a difference-in-differences approach that controlled for underlying time trends and state-specific population, economic, and traffic characteristics. Pre-recreational marijuana legalization annual changes in motor vehicle crash fatality rates for Washington and Colorado were similar to those for the control states. Post-recreational marijuana legalization changes in motor vehicle crash fatality rates for Washington and Colorado also did not significantly differ from those for the control states (adjusted difference-in-differences coefficient = +0.2 fatalities/billion vehicle miles traveled; 95% confidence interval = -0.4, +0.9). Three years after recreational marijuana legalization, changes in motor vehicle crash fatality rates for Washington and Colorado were not statistically different from those in similar states without recreational marijuana legalization. Future studies over a longer time remain warranted.

  6. Expanding Access and Opportunity: The Washington State Achievers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Jennifer; Gorgol, Laura

    2010-01-01

    In 2001, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation launched a 10-year, multi-million dollar initiative, the Washington State Achievers Program (WSA), to increase opportunities for low-income students to attend postsecondary institutions in Washington State. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation granted funds to the College Success Foundation…

  7. Expanding Access and Opportunity: The Washington State Achievers Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    In 2001, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation launched the multi-year, multi-million dollar Washington State Achievers Scholarship program. Concerned about disparities in college participation for low-income students in the state of Washington versus their wealthier peers, the Gates Foundation partnered with the College Success Foundation…

  8. Assessing the lumber manufacturing sector in western Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean M. Daniels

    2010-01-01

    The production structure of the lumber manufacturing sector in western Washington was investigated using a translog cost function with capital. labor, and sawlog inputs. Analyses were performed with a panel data set of biennial observations from 1972 to 2002 on a cross section of 16 western Washington counties. Production structure was examined using Allen and...

  9. Spectral and photometric study of the symbiotic nova RS ophiuchus in quiet phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratyeva, L.; Rspaev, F.; Krugov, M.; Serebryanskiy, A.

    2017-07-01

    The results of spectral and photometric study of the recurrent Nova RS Ophiuchus are presented and discussed. Observations were carried out in 2009-2016. During these eight years the fluxes of HI and FeII emission lines have slightly decreased by a factor of 3 - 4. Hα and Hβ exhibit double-peaked profiles with a central absorption. The ratio of the blue and red peaks intensities(V/R) varies from 0.3 to 1.0 for Hβ and from 0.4 to 0.7 for Hα. Possible correlations between changes of the ratio and other spectral parameters were investigated. Dependence of V/R on the radial velocity of absorbtion component is found out.

  10. Deviation correction method for close-range photometric stereo with nonuniform illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hao; Qi, Lin; Wang, Nan; Dong, Junyu; Chen, Yijun; Yu, Hui

    2017-10-01

    Classical photometric stereo requires uniform collimated light, but point light sources are usually employed in practical setups. This introduces errors to the recovered surface shape. We found that when the light sources are evenly placed around the object with the same slant angle, the main component of the errors is the low-frequency deformation, which can be approximately described by a quadratic function. We proposed a postprocessing method to correct the deviation caused by the nonuniform illumination. The method refines the surface shape with prior information from calibration using a flat plane or the object itself. And we further introduce an optimization scheme to improve the reconstruction accuracy when the three-dimensional information of some locations is available. Experiments were conducted using surfaces captured with our device and those from a public dataset. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  11. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and pH dependent photometric and electrochemical fate of Schiff bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf, Abdur; Shah, Afzal; Abbas, Saghir; Rana, Usman Ali; Khan, Salah Ud-Din; Ali, Saqib; Zia-Ur-Rehman; Qureshi, Rumana; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard; Belanger-Gariepy, Francine

    2015-03-05

    A new Schiff base, 1-((4-bromophenylimino) methyl) naphthalen-2-ol (BPIMN) was successfully synthesized and characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, FTIR and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results were compared with a structurally related Schiff base, 1-((4-chlorophenylimino) methyl) naphthalen-2-ol (CPIMN). The photometric and electrochemical fate of BPIMN and CPIMN was investigated in a wide pH range. The experimental findings were supported by quantum mechanical approach. The redox mechanistic pathways were proposed on the basis of results obtained electrochemical techniques. Moreover, pH dependent UV-Vis spectroscopy of BPIMN and CPIMN was carried out and the appearance of isosbestic points indicated the existence of these compounds in different tautomeric forms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Space-based detection of space debris by photometric and polarimetric characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Shuxia; Wang, Hu; Lu, Xiaoyun; Shen, Yang; Pan, Yue

    2017-10-01

    The number of space debris has been increasing dramatically in the last few years, and is expected to increase as much in the future. As the orbital debris population grows, the risk of collision between debris and other orbital objects also grows. Therefore, space debris detection is a particularly important task for space environment security, and then supports for space debris modeling, protection and mitigation. This paper aims to review space debris detection systematically and completely. Firstly, the research status of space debris detection at home and abroad is presented. Then, three kinds of optical observation methods of space debris are summarized. Finally, we propose a space-based detection scheme for space debris by photometric and polarimetric characteristics.

  13. An Improved Photometric Calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Imaging Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Schlegel, D.J.; Finkbeiner, D.P.; Barentine, J.C.; Blanton, M.R.; Brewington, H.J.; Gunn, J.E.; Harvanek, M.; Hogg, D.W.; Ivezic, Z.; Johnston, D.; /LBL, Berkeley /Princeton U. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Texas U., Astron. Dept. /Apache Point Observ. /New York U. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Caltech, JPL

    2007-03-01

    We present an algorithm to photometrically calibrate wide field optical imaging surveys, that simultaneously solves for the calibration parameters and relative stellar fluxes using overlapping observations. The algorithm decouples the problem of ''relative'' calibrations from that of ''absolute'' calibrations; the absolute calibration is reduced to determining a few numbers for the entire survey. We pay special attention to the spatial structure of the calibration errors, allowing one to isolate particular error modes in downstream analyses. Applying this to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data, we achieve {approx}1% relative calibration errors across 8500 deg{sup 2} in griz; the errors are {approx}2% for the u band. These errors are dominated by unmodeled atmospheric variations at Apache Point Observatory.

  14. An Improved Photometric Calibration of the Sloan Digital SkySurvey Imaging Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Schlegel, David J.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Barentine, J.C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Brewington, Howard J.; Gunn, JamesE.; Harvanek, Michael; Hogg, David W.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Johnston, David; Kent, Stephen M.; Kleinman, S.J.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Neilsen Jr., Eric H.; Nitta, Atsuko; Loomis, Craig; Lupton,Robert H.; Roweis, Sam; Snedden, Stephanie A.; Strauss, Michael A.; Tucker, Douglas L.

    2007-09-30

    We present an algorithm to photometrically calibrate widefield optical imaging surveys, that simultaneously solves for thecalibration parameters and relative stellar fluxes using overlappingobservations. The algorithm decouples the problem of "relative"calibrations from that of "absolute" calibrations; the absolutecalibration is reduced to determining a few numbers for the entiresurvey. We pay special attention to the spatial structure of thecalibration errors, allowing one to isolate particular error modes indownstream analyses. Applying this to the SloanDigital Sky Survey imagingdata, we achieve ~;1 percent relative calibration errors across 8500sq.deg/ in griz; the errors are ~;2 percent for the u band. These errorsare dominated by unmodelled atmospheric variations at Apache PointObservatory. These calibrations, dubbed ubercalibration, are now publicwith SDSS Data Release 6, and will be a part of subsequent SDSS datareleases.

  15. Photometric method for determination of acidity constants through integral spectra analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevatskiy, Yuriy Eduardovich; Ruzanov, Daniil Olegovich; Samoylov, Denis Vladimirovich

    2015-04-01

    An express method for determination of acidity constants of organic acids, based on the analysis of the integral transmittance vs. pH dependence is developed. The integral value is registered as a photocurrent of photometric device simultaneously with potentiometric titration. The proposed method allows to obtain pKa using only simple and low-cost instrumentation. The optical part of the experimental setup has been optimized through the exclusion of the monochromator device. Thus it only takes 10-15 min to obtain one pKa value with the absolute error of less than 0.15 pH units. Application limitations and reliability of the method have been tested for a series of organic acids of various nature.

  16. NLTE Effects in Globular Cluster Integrated Light Spectra and Photometric Colors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Mitchell; Short, C. Ian

    2017-01-01

    Our overall goal is to investigate the effect that modelling the atmospheres and spectra of Galactic globular cluster (GGCs) members in non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) has on the integrated light (IL) spectrum, and the derivation of GGC ages and metallicities ([Fe/H] values) from IL photometric color and spectrum fitting. We create synthetic GGC populations and associated colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) using the Kroupa initial mass function (Kroupa, P., 2001, MNRAS, 322, 231-246) and the Teramo isochrones (Pietrinferni, A. et al, 2004, ApJ, 612, 168-190) with ages ranging from 9 to 15 Gyr, and [Fe/H] = -1.49 to -0.66 with α = +0.4. We investigate the dependence of predicted LTE and NLTE colors on the method and resolution of CMD discretization, and on the definition of representative stellar parameters in a discretized CMD.

  17. A photometric determination of twists in three early-type galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, T. B.; Schwarzschild, M.

    1979-01-01

    Detailed photometric data have been obtained for three early-type galaxies by using the Cerro Tololo 1.5-m telescope and an SEC television camera. The aim of this photometry is to gain further accurate information on the occurrence of twists in such galaxies; i.e., on any variations with radius of the position angle of the major axes of the isophotes. The results of the photometry are: (1) the finding of no detectable twist within the bulge of the S0 galaxy NGC 5102; (2) confirmation of a substantial twist (about 10 deg) in the inner portion of the E3 galaxy IC 1459; and (3) determination of a moderate twist (about 5 deg) within the E4 galaxy NGC 4697, possibly too small to have been previously detected. If such moderate twists should turn out to be common in elliptical galaxies, the suspicion of triaxiality for most such galaxies would be enhanced.

  18. Orbital and Photometric Analysis of the Inner Uranian Satellites from Hubble Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Robert S.; Showalter, Mark R.; de Pater, Imke; Lissauer, Jack J.

    2017-10-01

    We continue our exploration of the dynamics of the thirteen densely-packed inner Uranian satellites. Using over 830 long-exposure images taken during 2003-2013 by the Hubble Space Telescope through broadband filters, we have obtained astrometry for twelve of the thirteen moons (excluding Cordelia) and derived Keplerian orbital elements including the influence of Uranus’s oblateness. Analysis of the libration caused by the Belinda:Perdita 44:43 mean-motion resonance implies that Belinda has roughly 26 times the mass of Perdita. We also see evidence of forced eccentricity in the orbits of several moons due to currently unknown perturbations. We will present our most recent findings on these topics as well as the photometrically-obtained rotational state of Perdita.

  19. The ESO-Max Planck photometric and spectroscopic survey in the south: EMPhaSSiS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibata R.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available EMPhaSSiS is a photometric and spectroscopic survey of the disk of the Milky Way. The survey covers 33 fields in the 3rd quadrant of the Milky Way and probes every ten degrees in Galactic Longitude between l = 180∘ - 280∘ and at Galactic Latitudes of b = −20∘, − 30∘ and − 40∘. Each field is observed in four filters, U, B, V and R, reaching depths of 21.5, 24.0, 23.5 and 23.5 respectively. Spectroscopic observations have been carried out in 11 of these fields and in so doing, main sequence turn-off stars are being traced into the outer disk. This survey will provide metallicities and distances to the stellar populations that reside in the very outer disk of the Milky Way and help trace its evolution with increasing Galactic radius.

  20. 77 FR 11582 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Central Washington University Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Central Washington University Department of... Washington University Department of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains and associated... human remains and associated funerary object may contact the Central Washington University Department of...

  1. 77 FR 15802 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Central Washington University Department of Anthropology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Central Washington University Department of... Washington University Department of Anthropology has completed an inventory of human remains in consultation... to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Central Washington University...

  2. A new method to search for high-redshift clusters using photometric redshifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castignani, G.; Celotti, A. [SISSA, Via Bonomea 265, I-34136 Trieste (Italy); Chiaberge, M.; Norman, C., E-mail: castigna@sissa.it [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    We describe a new method (Poisson probability method, PPM) to search for high-redshift galaxy clusters and groups by using photometric redshift information and galaxy number counts. The method relies on Poisson statistics and is primarily introduced to search for megaparsec-scale environments around a specific beacon. The PPM is tailored to both the properties of the FR I radio galaxies in the Chiaberge et al. sample, which are selected within the COSMOS survey, and to the specific data set used. We test the efficiency of our method of searching for cluster candidates against simulations. Two different approaches are adopted. (1) We use two z ∼ 1 X-ray detected cluster candidates found in the COSMOS survey and we shift them to higher redshift up to z = 2. We find that the PPM detects the cluster candidates up to z = 1.5, and it correctly estimates both the redshift and size of the two clusters. (2) We simulate spherically symmetric clusters of different size and richness, and we locate them at different redshifts (i.e., z = 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0) in the COSMOS field. We find that the PPM detects the simulated clusters within the considered redshift range with a statistical 1σ redshift accuracy of ∼0.05. The PPM is an efficient alternative method for high-redshift cluster searches that may also be applied to both present and future wide field surveys such as SDSS Stripe 82, LSST, and Euclid. Accurate photometric redshifts and a survey depth similar or better than that of COSMOS (e.g., I < 25) are required.

  3. Photometric Selection of a Massive Galaxy Catalog with z ≥ 0.55

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Carolina; Spergel, David N.; Ho, Shirley

    2017-02-01

    We present the development of a photometrically selected massive galaxy catalog, targeting Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) and massive blue galaxies at redshifts of z≥slant 0.55. Massive galaxy candidates are selected using infrared/optical color-color cuts, with optical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and infrared data from “unWISE” forced photometry derived from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The selection method is based on previously developed techniques to select LRGs with z> 0.5, and is optimized using receiver operating characteristic curves. The catalog contains 16,191,145 objects, selected over the full SDSS DR10 footprint. The redshift distribution of the resulting catalog is estimated using spectroscopic redshifts from the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey and photometric redshifts from COSMOS. Restframe U - B colors from DEEP2 are used to estimate LRG selection efficiency. Using DEEP2, the resulting catalog has an average redshift of z = 0.65, with a standard deviation of σ =2.0, and an average restframe of U-B=1.0, with a standard deviation of σ =0.27. Using COSMOS, the resulting catalog has an average redshift of z = 0.60, with a standard deviation of σ =1.8. We estimate 34 % of the catalog to be blue galaxies with z≥slant 0.55. An estimated 9.6 % of selected objects are blue sources with redshift z< 0.55. Stellar contamination is estimated to be 1.8%.

  4. Diffusion coefficients of oxygen and hemoglobin as obtained simultaneously from photometric determination of the oxygenation of layers of hemoglobin solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaan, J. A.; Kreuzer, F.; van Wely, F. K.

    1980-01-01

    The oxygenation of layers of deoxygenated hemoglobin solutions after a sudden exposure to a gas containing oxygen at a partial pressure P1 has been studied by a photometric method. Layer thicknesses varied between 50 and 250 micron, hemoglobin concentrations between 0.1 and 0.34kg/l, and oxygen

  5. CANDELS/GOODS-S, CDFS, and ECDFS: photometric redshifts for normal and X-ray-detected galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Li-Ting; Salvato, Mara; Nandra, Kirpal; Brusa, Marcella; Bender, Ralf; Buchner, Johannes; Brightman, Murray; Georgakakis, Antonis [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Donley, Jennifer L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kocevski, Dale D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Guo, Yicheng; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, Sandra M. [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Hathi, Nimish P. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Rangel, Cyprian [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Willner, S. P.; Ashby, Matthew L. N. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Budavári, Tamás; Szalay, Alexander S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Dahlen, Tomas [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States); and others

    2014-11-20

    We present photometric redshifts and associated probability distributions for all detected sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS). This work makes use of the most up-to-date data from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and the Taiwan ECDFS Near-Infrared Survey (TENIS) in addition to other data. We also revisit multi-wavelength counterparts for published X-ray sources from the 4 Ms CDFS and 250 ks ECDFS surveys, finding reliable counterparts for 1207 out of 1259 sources (∼96%). Data used for photometric redshifts include intermediate-band photometry deblended using the TFIT method, which is used for the first time in this work. Photometric redshifts for X-ray source counterparts are based on a new library of active galactic nuclei/galaxy hybrid templates appropriate for the faint X-ray population in the CDFS. Photometric redshift accuracy for normal galaxies is 0.010 and for X-ray sources is 0.014 and outlier fractions are 4% and 5.2%, respectively. The results within the CANDELS coverage area are even better, as demonstrated both by spectroscopic comparison and by galaxy-pair statistics. Intermediate-band photometry, even if shallow, is valuable when combined with deep broadband photometry. For best accuracy, templates must include emission lines.

  6. CANDELS/GOODS-S, CDFS, and ECDFS: Photometric Redshifts for Normal and X-Ray-Detected Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Ting; Salvato, Mara; Nandra, Kirpal; Brusa, Marcella; Bender, Ralf; Buchner, Johannes; Donley, Jennifer L.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Guo, Yicheng; Hathi, Nimish P.; Rangel, Cyprian; Willner, S. P.; Brightman, Murray; Georgakakis, Antonis; Budavári, Tamás; Szalay, Alexander S.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Barro, Guillermo; Dahlen, Tomas; Faber, Sandra M.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Galametz, Audrey; Grazian, Andrea; Grogin, Norman A.; Huang, Kuang-Han; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lucas, Ray A.; McGrath, Elizabeth; Mobasher, Bahram; Peth, Michael; Rosario, David J.; Trump, Jonathan R.

    2014-11-01

    We present photometric redshifts and associated probability distributions for all detected sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS). This work makes use of the most up-to-date data from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and the Taiwan ECDFS Near-Infrared Survey (TENIS) in addition to other data. We also revisit multi-wavelength counterparts for published X-ray sources from the 4 Ms CDFS and 250 ks ECDFS surveys, finding reliable counterparts for 1207 out of 1259 sources (~96%). Data used for photometric redshifts include intermediate-band photometry deblended using the TFIT method, which is used for the first time in this work. Photometric redshifts for X-ray source counterparts are based on a new library of active galactic nuclei/galaxy hybrid templates appropriate for the faint X-ray population in the CDFS. Photometric redshift accuracy for normal galaxies is 0.010 and for X-ray sources is 0.014 and outlier fractions are 4% and 5.2%, respectively. The results within the CANDELS coverage area are even better, as demonstrated both by spectroscopic comparison and by galaxy-pair statistics. Intermediate-band photometry, even if shallow, is valuable when combined with deep broadband photometry. For best accuracy, templates must include emission lines.

  7. Machine-learning-based photometric redshifts for galaxies of the ESO Kilo-Degree Survey data release 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavuoti, S.; Brescia, M.; Tortora, C.; Longo, G.; Napolitano, N. R.; Radovich, M.; Barbera, F. La; Capaccioli, M.; de Jong, J. T. A.; Getman, F.; Grado, A.; Paolillo, M.

    We have estimated photometric redshifts (zphot) for more than 1.1 million galaxies of the public European Southern Observatory (ESO) Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) data release 2. KiDS is an optical wide-field imaging survey carried out with the Very Large Telescope (VLT) Survey Telescope (VST) and the

  8. Open star clusters in the Milky Way. Comparison of photometric and trigonometric distance scales based on Gaia TGAS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, Dana A.; Piskunov, Anatoly E.; Kharchenko, Nina V.; Röser, Siegfried; Schilbach, Elena; Scholz, Ralf-Dieter; Reffert, Sabine; Yen, Steffi X.

    2017-10-01

    Context. The global survey of star clusters in the Milky Way (MWSC) is a comprehensive list of 3061 objects that provides, among other parameters, distances to clusters based on isochrone fitting. The Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS) catalogue, which is a part of Gaia data release 1 (Gaia DR1), delivers accurate trigonometric parallax measurements for more than 2 million stars, including those in star clusters. Aims: We compare the open cluster photometric distance scale with the measurements given by the trigonometric parallaxes from TGAS to evaluate the consistency between these values. Methods: The average parallaxes of probable cluster members available in TGAS provide the trigonometric distance scale of open clusters, while the photometric scale is given by the distances published in the MWSC. Sixty-four clusters are suited for comparison as they have more than 16 probable members with parallax measurements in TGAS. We computed the average parallaxes of the probable members and compared these to the photometric parallaxes derived within the MWSC. Results: We find a good agreement between the trigonometric TGAS-based and the photometric MWSC-based distance scales of open clusters, which for distances less than 2.3 kpc coincide at a level of about 0.1 mas with no dependence on the distance. If at all, there is a slight systematic offset along the Galactic equator between 30° and 160° galactic longitude.

  9. Interprofessional Initiatives at the University of Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Lynne; Murphy, Nanci; Belza, Basia; Brock, Doug; Gallagher, Thomas H.; Lindhorst, Taryn; Morton, Tom; Schaad, Doug; Mitchell, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Pharmacists must collaborate with other health professionals to promote the optimal use of medications, relying on coordinated, interprofessional communication and care to do so. In 2003, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended “all health professionals should be educated to deliver patient-centered care as members of an interdisciplinary team, emphasizing evidence-based practice, quality improvement approaches, and informatics.”2 At the University of Washington, the Center for Health Sciences Interprofessional Education (CHSIE) was established in 1997 to promote interprofessional curricular and clinical innovation in education, faculty development, and student activities, and to conduct evaluative research regarding the impact of interprofessional innovations. In this manuscript, we will describe the Center for Health Sciences Interprofessional Education, and highlight key projects that serve as examples of pharmacy involvement in interprofessional education, research, and service. PMID:19657496

  10. Business leaders bring their clout to Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, M

    1990-04-20

    Big business has always been opposed to government interference in its affairs. But now, besieged by the high cost--increasing at an annual rate of 20 to 30 percent--of health benefits for employees, their families, and retirees, a significant number of major corporate executives are seeking greater government involvement in finding a solution to the problem. Interest in health care policy decisions is so high that business leaders are participating in special health care commissions as members or by providing testimony. Some corporations even send company advocates to Washington, DC, to track and influence health care policymaking. What exactly do these corporate leaders want? They are not all in agreement about the degree of government involvement that is necessary or desirable. Nevertheless, they do have strong opinions about delivery of health care at the local level.

  11. Photometric and Colorimetric Assessment of LED Chip Scale Packages by Using a Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Test (SSADT) Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Cheng; Fan, Jiajie; Fang, Jiayi; Yu, Chaohua; Ren, Yi; Fan, Xuejun; Zhang, Guoqi

    2017-10-16

    By solving the problem of very long test time on reliability qualification for Light-emitting Diode (LED) products, the accelerated degradation test with a thermal overstress at a proper range is regarded as a promising and effective approach. For a comprehensive survey of the application of step-stress accelerated degradation test (SSADT) in LEDs, the thermal, photometric, and colorimetric properties of two types of LED chip scale packages (CSPs), i.e., 4000 °K and 5000 °K samples each of which was driven by two different levels of currents (i.e., 120 mA and 350 mA, respectively), were investigated under an increasing temperature from 55 °C to 150 °C and a systemic study of driving current effect on the SSADT results were also reported in this paper. During SSADT, junction temperatures of the test samples have a positive relationship with their driving currents. However, the temperature-voltage curve, which represents the thermal resistance property of the test samples, does not show significant variance as long as the driving current is no more than the sample's rated current. But when the test sample is tested under an overdrive current, its temperature-voltage curve is observed as obviously shifted to the left when compared to that before SSADT. Similar overdrive current affected the degradation scenario is also found in the attenuation of Spectral Power Distributions (SPDs) of the test samples. As used in the reliability qualification, SSADT provides explicit scenes on color shift and correlated color temperature (CCT) depreciation of the test samples, but not on lumen maintenance depreciation. It is also proved that the varying rates of the color shift and CCT depreciation failures can be effectively accelerated with an increase of the driving current, for instance, from 120 mA to 350 mA. For these reasons, SSADT is considered as a suitable accelerated test method for qualifying these two failure modes of LED CSPs.

  12. Distribution of Elevated Nitrate Concentrations in Ground Water in Washington State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frans, Lonna

    2008-01-01

    More than 60 percent of the population of Washington State uses ground water for their drinking and cooking needs. Nitrate concentrations in ground water are elevated in parts of the State as a result of various land-use practices, including fertilizer application, dairy operations and ranching, and septic-system use. Shallow wells generally are more vulnerable to nitrate contamination than deeper wells (Williamson and others, 1998; Ebbert and others, 2000). In order to protect public health, the Washington State Department of Health requires that public water systems regularly measure nitrate in their wells. Public water systems serving more than 25 people collect water samples at least annually; systems serving from 2 to 14 people collect water samples at least every 3 years. Private well owners serving one residence may be required to sample when the well is first drilled, but are unregulated after that. As a result, limited information is available to citizens and public health officials about potential exposure to elevated nitrate concentrations for people whose primary drinking-water sources are private wells. The U.S. Geological Survey and Washington State Department of Health collaborated to examine water-quality data from public water systems and develop models that calculate the probability of detecting elevated nitrate concentrations in ground water. Maps were then developed to estimate ground water vulnerability to nitrate in areas where limited data are available.

  13. A Search for Photometric Variability in the Young T3.5 Planetary-mass Companion GU Psc b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naud, Marie-Eve; Artigau, Étienne; Rowe, Jason F.; Doyon, René; Malo, Lison; Albert, Loïc; Gagné, Jonathan; Bouchard, Sandie

    2017-10-01

    We present a photometric J-band variability study of GU Psc b, a T3.5 co-moving planetary-mass companion (9-13 {M}{Jup}) to a young (˜150 Myr) M3 member of the AB Doradus Moving Group. The large separation between GU Psc b and its host star (42″) provides a rare opportunity to study the photometric variability of a planetary-mass companion. The study presented here is based on observations obtained from 2013 to 2014 over three nights with durations of 5-6 hr each with the WIRCam imager at Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Photometric variability with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 4 ± 1% at a timescale of ˜6 hr was marginally detected on 2014 October 11. No high-significance variability was detected on 2013 December 22 and 2014 October 10. The amplitude and timescale of the variability seen here, as well as its evolving nature, is comparable to what was observed for a variety of field T dwarfs and suggests that mechanisms invoked to explain brown dwarf variability may be applicable to low-gravity objects such as GU Psc b. Rotation-induced photometric variability due to the formation and dissipation of atmospheric features such as clouds is a plausible hypothesis for the tentative variation detected here. Additional photometric measurements, particularly on longer timescales, will be required to confirm and characterize the variability of GU Psc b, determine its periodicity and to potentially measure its rotation period.

  14. Estimating photometric redshifts for X-ray sources in the X-ATLAS field using machine-learning techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountrichas, G.; Corral, A.; Masoura, V. A.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Ruiz, A.; Georgakakis, A.; Carrera, F. J.; Fotopoulou, S.

    2017-12-01

    We present photometric redshifts for 1031 X-ray sources in the X-ATLAS field using the machine-learning technique TPZ. X-ATLAS covers 7.1 deg2 observed with XMM-Newton within the Science Demonstration Phase of the H-ATLAS field, making it one of the largest contiguous areas of the sky with both XMM-Newton and Herschel coverage. All of the sources have available SDSS photometry, while 810 additionally have mid-IR and/or near-IR photometry. A spectroscopic sample of 5157 sources primarily in the XMM/XXL field, but also from several X-ray surveys and the SDSS DR13 redshift catalogue, was used to train the algorithm. Our analysis reveals that the algorithm performs best when the sources are split, based on their optical morphology, into point-like and extended sources. Optical photometry alone is not enough to estimate accurate photometric redshifts, but the results greatly improve when at least mid-IR photometry is added in the training process. In particular, our measurements show that the estimated photometric redshifts for the X-ray sources of the training sample have a normalized absolute median deviation, nmad ≈ 0.06, and a percentage of outliers, η = 10-14%, depending upon whether the sources are extended or point like. Our final catalogue contains photometric redshifts for 933 out of the 1031 X-ray sources with a median redshift of 0.9. The table of the photometric redshifts is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/608/A39

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: New SDSS and Washington photometry in Segue 3 (Hughes+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, J.; Lacy, B.; Sakari, C.; Wallerstein, G.; Davis, C. E.; Schiefelbein, S.; Corrin, O.; Joudi, H.; Le, D.; Haynes, R. M.

    2017-10-01

    We used the Apache Point Observatory (APO) new Astrophysical Research Consortium Telescope Imaging Camera (ARCTIC) imager and the camera it replaced, Seaver Prototype Imaging camera (SPIcam) for our observations with the 3.5m telescope. The ARCTIC camera has a 4096*4096 STA chip giving 7.5'*7.5' as the FOV when the new 5-inch diameter circular filters are used. The older Washington filters are 3''*3'' and vigniette the FOV. SPIcam had a FOV of 4.8'*4.8'. We have several filter wheels that can handle up to ten 3*3 inch square filters (fewer in full-field mode), where binning 1*1 yields 0.11arcseconds/pixel. The fastest readout time in 2*2 binned mode is about 5s. The blue-UV sensitivity of ARCTIC is greater than that of SPIcam, which was a backside-illuminated SITe TK2048E 2048*2048 pixel CCD with 24 micron pixels, which we also binned (2*2), giving a plate scale of 0.28 arcsec per pixel. Where we combined the data sets, we binned ARCTIC 2*2 and slightly degraded its resolution. We found no irreducible color terms between frames taken with both imagers, internally. From 2013 to 2015, we had 11 half-nights total, and 102 frames had seeing better than 2'', many of which were under photometric conditions, and several nights had subarcsecond seeing. Some of the observations were repeated between SPIcam and ARCTIC, which served to test the new imager. We observed Seg 3 in the Washington filters (Canterna 1976AJ.....81..228C) C and T1 and SDSS ugri filters with both SPIcam and ARCTIC. The frames used are listed in Table1, the overlap between this paper and the Vr-data from Fadely et al. 2011 (Cat. J/AJ/142/88) (not the g and r mag values) and Ortolani et al. 2013 (Cat. J/MNRAS/433/1966) is detailed in Table2. Our photometry is presented in Table3 for all 218 objects detected in our field-of-view in CT1ugri-filters, where we required detections in all filters in order to produce spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We include the z-filter from SDSS DR13 and any 2MASS

  16. 77 FR 32631 - Public Utility District No. 1 of Klickitat County, Washington; Notice of Preliminary Permit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... located near Goldendale, Klickitat County, Washington, and Rufus, Sherman County, Oregon. The project... Avenue, Goldendale, Washington 98620; phone: (509) 773-5891. FERC Contact: Kelly Wolcott; phone: (202...

  17. The State-of-the-art HST Astro-photometric Analysis of the Core of ω Centauri. III. The Main Sequence's Multiple Populations Galore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, A.; Milone, A. P.; Anderson, J.; Marino, A. F.; Piotto, G.; van der Marel, R. P.; Bedin, L. R.; King, I. R.

    2017-08-01

    We take advantage of the exquisite quality of the Hubble Space Telescope 26-filter astro-photometric catalog of the core of ω Cen presented in the first paper of this series and the empirical differential-reddening correction presented in the second paper in order to distill the main sequence into its constituent populations. To this end, we restrict ourselves to the five most useful filters: the magic “trio” of F275W, F336W, and F438W, along with F606W and F814W. We develop a strategy for identifying color systems where different populations stand out most distinctly, then we isolate those populations and examine them in other filters where their subpopulations also come to light. In this way, we have identified at least 15 subpopulations, each of which has a distinctive fiducial curve through our five-dimensional photometric space. We confirm the MSa to be split into two subcomponents, and find that both the bMS and the rMS are split into three subcomponents. Moreover, we have discovered two additional MS groups: the MSd (which has three subcomponents) shares similar properties with the bMS, and the MSe (which has four subcomponents) has properties more similar to those of the rMS. We examine the fiducial curves together and use synthetic spectra to infer relative heavy-element, light-element, and helium abundances for the populations. Our findings show that the stellar populations and star formation history of ω Cen are even more complex than inferred previously. Finally, we provide as a supplement to the original catalog a list that identifies for each star which population it is most likely associated with. Based on archival observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  18. Geologic Assessment of Undiscovered Gas Resources of the Eastern Oregon and Washington Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey Eastern Oregon and Washington Province Assessment Team, (compiler)

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment is to develop geology-based hypotheses regarding the potential for additions to oil and gas reserves in priority areas of the United States, focusing on the distribution, quantity, and availability of oil and natural gas resources. The USGS has completed an assessment of the undiscovered oil and gas potential of the Eastern Oregon and Washington Province of Oregon and Washington (USGS Province 5005). The province is a priority Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) province for the National Assessment because of its potential for oil and gas resources. The assessment of this province is based on geologic principles and uses the total petroleum system concept. The geologic elements of a total petroleum system include hydrocarbon source rocks (source rock maturation, hydrocarbon generation and migration), reservoir rocks (stratigraphy, sedimentology, petrophysical properties), and hydrocarbon traps (trap formation and timing). In the Eastern Oregon and Washington Province, the USGS used this geologic framework to define one total petroleum system and two assessment units within the total petroleum system, and quantitatively estimated the undiscovered gas resources within each assessment unit.

  19. Digital data set of volcano hazards for active Cascade Volcanos, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Steve P.

    1996-01-01

    Scientists at the Cascade Volcano Observatory have completed hazard assessments for the five active volcanos in Washington. The five studies included Mount Adams (Scott and others, 1995), Mount Baker (Gardner and others, 1995), Glacier Peak (Waitt and others, 1995), Mount Rainier (Hoblitt and others, 1995) and Mount St. Helens (Wolfe and Pierson, 1995). Twenty Geographic Information System (GIS) data sets have been created that represent the hazard information from the assessments. The twenty data sets have individual Open File part numbers and titles

  20. Photometric Monitoring of Non-resolved Space Debris and Databases of Optical Light Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildknecht, Thomas; Koshkin, Nikolay; Korobeinikova, Elen; Melikiants, Seda; Shakun, Leonid; Strakhova, Svetlana; Linder, Esther; Silha, Jiri; Hager, Monika

    The population of space debris increased drastically during the last years. Collisions involving massive objects may produce large number of fragments leading to significantly growth of the space debris population. An effective remediation measure in order to stabilize the population in LEO, is therefore the removal of large, massive space debris. To remove these objects, not only precise orbits, but also more detailed information about their attitude states will be required. One important property of an object targeted for removal is its spin period and spin axis orientation. If we observe a rotating object, the observer sees different surface areas of the object which leads to changes in the measured intensity. Rotating objects will produce periodic brightness variations with frequencies which are related to the spin periods. Photometric monitoring is the real tool for remote diagnostics of the satellite rotation around its center of mass. This information is also useful, for example, in case of contingency. Moreover, it is also important to take into account the orientation of non-spherical body (e.g. space debris) in the numerical integration of its motion when a close approach with the another spacecraft is predicted. We introduce the two databases of light curves: the AIUB data base, which contains about a thousand light curves of LEO, MEO and high-altitude debris objects (including a few functional objects) obtained over more than seven years, and the data base of the Astronomical Observatory of Odessa University (Ukraine), which contains the results of more than 10 years of photometric monitoring of functioning satellites and large space debris objects in low Earth orbit. AIUB used its 1m ZIMLAT telescope for all light curves. For tracking low-orbit satellites, the Astronomical Observatory of Odessa used the KT-50 telescope, which has an alt-azimuth mount and allows tracking objects moving at a high angular velocity. The diameter of the KT-50 main mirror is

  1. [Photometric micro-titration model of DPPH radicals scavenging activity and its application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yun-tao; Wei, Wei; Ye, Li-qing; Li, Xiao-fen; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Hong-jiao; Yang, Lu; Yu, Jiao-jiao; Cha, Jia-wei

    2015-02-01

    In the present paper, the stoichiometric ratio (R) for the interreaction of DPPH radicals with the antoxidant was employed as a evaluation index for DPPH radicals scavenging activity of antioxidants. This evaluation index was related only with the stoichiometric relationship between DPPH radicals and the antioxidant, not the relationship with the initial DPPH amount and the volume of sample, which could offer a solution for the problem of poor comparability of EC50 under different conditions. A novel photometric micro-titration method was proposed for the determination of the stoichiometric ratio (R) for the interreaction of DPPH radicals with the antoxidant. The titration equation was established based on the absorbance difference (deltaA) of DPPH radicals in the titration process and the added amount of antoxidant. The stoichiometric ratio (R) for the reaction of DPPH radicals with the addition amount of antoxidant was determined by the titration equation obtained, while, the DPPH median elimination concentration (EC50) of antoxidant can be calculated by the stoichiometric ratio (R). The above photometric micro-titration model was verified using rutin as DPPH radicals scavenger. As experiment results, the stoichiometric ratio (R) of DPPH radicals to rutin was determined to be in the range of 1.817-1.846. The calculated value of EC50 was 1.196 x 10(-3), 2.392 x 10(-3), 4.819 x 10(-3) and 7.292 x 10(-3) mg x mL(-1) for 1.12 x 10(-7), 2.24 x 10(-7), 4.48 x 10(-7) and 6.72 x 10(-7) mol of the additon amount of DPPH radicals, respectively. The proposed method has better precision and reliability with smaller amount of sample than conventional method. While, the obtained stoichiometric ratio value (R) of rutin was employed to calculate the rutin median elimination concentration for DPPH EC50) according to the conditions as reported in the literatures, and the calculated results were consistent with that reported in the literatures.

  2. Photometric survey, modelling, and scaling of long-period and low-amplitude asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciniak, A.; Bartczak, P.; Müller, T.; Sanabria, J. J.; Alí-Lagoa, V.; Antonini, P.; Behrend, R.; Bernasconi, L.; Bronikowska, M.; Butkiewicz-Bąk, M.; Cikota, A.; Crippa, R.; Ditteon, R.; Dudziński, G.; Duffard, R.; Dziadura, K.; Fauvaud, S.; Geier, S.; Hirsch, R.; Horbowicz, J.; Hren, M.; Jerosimic, L.; Kamiński, K.; Kankiewicz, P.; Konstanciak, I.; Korlevic, P.; Kosturkiewicz, E.; Kudak, V.; Manzini, F.; Morales, N.; Murawiecka, M.; Ogłoza, W.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Pilcher, F.; Polakis, T.; Poncy, R.; Santana-Ros, T.; Siwak, M.; Skiff, B.; Sobkowiak, K.; Stoss, R.; Żejmo, M.; Żukowski, K.

    2018-02-01

    Context. The available set of spin and shape modelled asteroids is strongly biased against slowly rotating targets and those with low lightcurve amplitudes. This is due to the observing selection effects. As a consequence, the current picture of asteroid spin axis distribution, rotation rates, radiometric properties, or aspects related to the object's internal structure might be affected too. Aims: To counteract these selection effects, we are running a photometric campaign of a large sample of main belt asteroids omitted in most previous studies. Using least chi-squared fitting we determined synodic rotation periods and verified previous determinations. When a dataset for a given target was sufficiently large and varied, we performed spin and shape modelling with two different methods to compare their performance. Methods: We used the convex inversion method and the non-convex SAGE algorithm, applied on the same datasets of dense lightcurves. Both methods search for the lowest deviations between observed and modelled lightcurves, though using different approaches. Unlike convex inversion, the SAGE method allows for the existence of valleys and indentations on the shapes based only on lightcurves. Results: We obtain detailed spin and shape models for the first five targets of our sample: (159) Aemilia, (227) Philosophia, (329) Svea, (478) Tergeste, and (487) Venetia. When compared to stellar occultation chords, our models obtained an absolute size scale and major topographic features of the shape models were also confirmed. When applied to thermophysical modelling (TPM), they provided a very good fit to the infrared data and allowed their size, albedo, and thermal inertia to be determined. Conclusions: Convex and non-convex shape models provide comparable fits to lightcurves. However, some non-convex models fit notably better to stellar occultation chords and to infrared data in sophisticated thermophysical modelling (TPM). In some cases TPM showed strong

  3. ImpastoR: a realistic surface display system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferwerda, James A

    2015-01-01

    .... Our system, based on a desktop PC with GPU hardware, LCD display, light and position sensors, and custom graphics software, supports the photometrically accurate and visually realistic real-time...

  4. Department of the Air Force Environmental Statement. Construction and Operation of the West Coast OTH-B Radar System, Lake and Klamath Counties, Oregon; Modoc and Sacramento Counties, California; Pierce County, Washington; Elmore County, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    503) 092.4461 Practice Limited to Orthodontics May 10, 1983 Klamath County Chamber of Commerce 125 North 8th St. Klamath Falls, Oregon 97601 Dear Sirs...other facilities are articulated In various manuals and documents. An example of one of these is, "Systems Manual, Operation and Maintenance, Real

  5. Ephemeral seafloor sedimentation during dam removal: Elwha River, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Melissa M.; Warrick, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    The removal of the Elwha and Glines Canyon dams from the Elwha River in Washington, USA, resulted in the erosion and transport of over 10 million m3 of sediment from the former reservoirs and into the river during the first two years of the dam removal process. Approximately 90% of this sediment was transported through the Elwha River and to the coast at the Strait of Juan de Fuca. To evaluate the benthic dynamics of increased sediment loading to the nearshore, we deployed a tripod system in ten meters of water to the east of the Elwha River mouth that included a profiling current meter and a camera system. With these data, we were able to document the frequency and duration of sedimentation and turbidity events, and correlate these events to physical oceanographic and river conditions. We found that seafloor sedimentation occurred regularly during the heaviest sediment loading from the river, but that this sedimentation was ephemeral and exhibited regular cycles of deposition and erosion caused by the strong tidal currents in the region. Understanding the frequency and duration of short-term sediment disturbance events is instrumental to interpreting the ecosystem-wide changes that are occurring in the nearshore habitats around the Elwha River delta.

  6. Ephemeral seafloor sedimentation during dam removal: Elwha River, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Melissa M.; Warrick, Jonathan A.

    2017-11-01

    The removal of the Elwha and Glines Canyon dams from the Elwha River in Washington, USA, resulted in the erosion and transport of over 10 million m3 of sediment from the former reservoirs and into the river during the first two years of the dam removal process. Approximately 90% of this sediment was transported through the Elwha River and to the coast at the Strait of Juan de Fuca. To evaluate the benthic dynamics of increased sediment loading to the nearshore, we deployed a tripod system in ten meters of water to the east of the Elwha River mouth that included a profiling current meter and a camera system. With these data, we were able to document the frequency and duration of sedimentation and turbidity events, and correlate these events to physical oceanographic and river conditions. We found that seafloor sedimentation occurred regularly during the heaviest sediment loading from the river, but that this sedimentation was ephemeral and exhibited regular cycles of deposition and erosion caused by the strong tidal currents in the region. Understanding the frequency and duration of short-term sediment disturbance events is instrumental to interpreting the ecosystem-wide changes that are occurring in the nearshore habitats around the Elwha River delta.

  7. Performance of Former-ELL Students on Washington High Stakes Assessments: Research into Performance of Former-ELL Students on Washington's English-Only Assessments and Implications for Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington State Board of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This document reports on the academic performance of the two most rapidly growing subgroups in Washington: English Language Learners (ELLs) and Former ELLs, but the emphasis here is on the latter. These two student groups have some unique qualities that pose some serious challenges to accountability systems. This research was initiated by State…

  8. Toke Point, Washington Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Toke Point, Washington Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  9. Timber resource statistics for the Olympic Peninsula, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia M. Bassett; Daniel D. Oswald

    1961-01-01

    This report summarizes a 1978-79 timber resource inventory of five counties in the Olympic Peninsula of Washington: Clallam, Grays Harbor, Jefferson, Mason, and Thurston. Detailed tables of forest area, timber volume, growth, mortality, and harvest are presented.

  10. Port Angeles, Washington Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Port Angeles, Washington Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST)...

  11. Westport, Washington Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Westport, Washington Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  12. La Push, Washington Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The La Push, Washington Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  13. Washington Maritime NWRC: Initial Survey Instructions for Tufted Puffin Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This survey is key to assessing the status and trends of Tufted Puffins (Fratercula cirrhata) on their breeding colonies within Washington State and, with additional...

  14. Silviculture of mixed conifer forests in eastern Oregon and Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.W. Seidel; P.H. Cochran

    1981-01-01

    The silviculture of mixed conifer forests in eastern Oregon and Washington is described. Topics discussed include ecological setting, damaging agents, silviculture, and management. The relevant literature is presented, along with unpublished research, experience, and observations. Research needs are also proposed.

  15. Neah Bay, Washington Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Neah Bay, Washington Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  16. Southwestern Washington 1/3 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1/3-second Southwest Washington Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1/3-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  17. LiDAR (Terrain), THURSTON COUNTY, WASHINGTON, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Fugro EarthData Company furnished the collection, processing, and development of LiDAR for 825 square miles in Washington (805 square miles of Thurston County and 20...

  18. Endangered Species Case - Washington Toxics Coalition v. EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Web page provides information on the Washington Toxics Coalition v. EPA case, related to protection of Pacific salmon and steelhead, and links to the biological opinions issued by the NMFS and EPA’s responses.

  19. Monsanto Gives Washington U. $23.5 Million.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culliton, Barbara J.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews various provisions of a five-year, $23.5-million research agreement between Washington University and the Monsanto Company. The scientific focus of this venture will be on proteins and peptides which modify cellular behavior. (SK)

  20. 78 FR 64006 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington, Seattle, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum, University of Washington (Burke Museum), has completed an...